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Sample records for expressing murine cd40

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi infection induces the expression of CD40 in murine cardiomyocytes favoring CD40 ligation-dependent production of cardiopathogenic IL-6.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Mariela Alejandra Moreno; Casasco, Agustina; González, Mariela; Postan, Miriam; Corral, Ricardo Santiago; Petray, Patricia Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    The inflammatory response in the myocardium is an important aspect of the pathogenesis of Chagas' heart disease raised by Trypanosoma cruzi. CD40, a transmembrane type I receptor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family, is expressed in a broad spectrum of cell types and is crucial in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Activation of CD40 through ligation to CD40L (CD154) induces multiple effects, including the secretion of proinflammatory molecules. In the present study, we examined the ability of T. cruzi to trigger the expression of CD40 in cardiac myocytes in vitro and in a murine model of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Our results indicate, for the first time, that T. cruzi is able to induce the expression of CD40 in HL-1 murine cardiomyocytes. Moreover, ligation of CD40 receptor upregulated interleukin-6 (IL-6), associated with inflammation. Furthermore, the induction of this costimulatory molecule was demonstrated in vivo in myocardium of mice infected with T. cruzi. This suggests that CD40-bearing cardiac muscle cells could interact with CD40L-expressing lymphocytes infiltrating the heart, thus contributing to inflammatory injury in chagasic cardiomyopathy.

  2. Separate cis-trans Pathways Post-transcriptionally Regulate Murine CD154 (CD40 Ligand) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B. JoNell; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Collins, Jane; Bloch, Donald; Bergeron, Alan; Henry, Brian; Terry, Benjamin M.; Zan, Moe; Mouland, Andrew J.; Rigby, William F. C.

    2008-01-01

    We report a role for CA repeats in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) in regulating CD154 expression. Human CD154 is encoded by an unstable mRNA; this instability is conferred in cis by a portion of its 3′-UTR that includes a polypyrimidine-rich region and CA dinucleotide repeat. We demonstrate similar instability activity with the murine CD154 3′-UTR. This instability element mapped solely to a conserved 100-base CU-rich region alone, which we call a CU-rich response element. Surprisingly, the CA dinucleotide-rich region also regulated reporter expression but at the level of translation. This activity was associated with poly(A) tail shortening and regulated by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L levels. We conclude that the CD154 3′-UTR contains dual cis-acting elements, one of which defines a novel function for exonic CA dinucleotide repeats. These findings suggest a mechanism for the association of 3′-UTR CA-rich response element polymorphisms with CD154 overexpression and the subsequent risk of autoimmune disease. PMID:18640985

  3. Anti-CD40 ligand monoclonal antibody delays the progression of murine autoimmune cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Yang, G-X; Iwakoshi, N; Knechtle, S J; Kawata, K; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Joh, T; Bowlus, C; Gershwin, M E

    2013-12-01

    While there have been significant advances in our understanding of the autoimmune responses and the molecular nature of the target autoantigens in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), unfortunately these data have yet to be translated into new therapeutic agents. We have taken advantage of a unique murine model of autoimmune cholangitis in which mice expressing a dominant negative form of transforming growth factor β receptor II (dnTGFβRII), under the control of the CD4 promoter, develop an intense autoimmune cholangitis associated with serological features similar to human PBC. CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a major receptor-ligand pair that provides key signals between cells of the adaptive immune system, prompting us to determine the therapeutic potential of treating autoimmune cholangitis with anti-CD40L antibody (anti-CD40L; MR-1). Four-week-old dnTGFβRII mice were injected intraperitoneally with either anti-CD40L or control immunoglobulin (Ig)G at days 0, 2, 4 and 7 and then weekly until 12 or 24 weeks of age and monitored for the progress of serological and histological features of PBC, including rigorous definition of liver cellular infiltrates and cytokine production. Administration of anti-CD40L reduced liver inflammation significantly to 12 weeks of age. In addition, anti-CD40L initially lowered the levels of anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA), but these reductions were not sustained. These data indicate that anti-CD40L delays autoimmune cholangitis, but the effect wanes over time. Further dissection of the mechanisms involved, and defining the events that lead to the reduction in therapeutic effectiveness will be critical to determining whether such efforts can be applied to PBC.

  4. Clinical disease upregulates expression of CD40 and CD40 ligand on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD40 and CD40L interactions have costimulatory effects that are part of a complex series of events in host cellular and humoral immune responses and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in expression of CD40 and CD40L on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolat...

  5. CD40 expressed on thymic epithelial cells provides costimulation for proliferation but not for apoptosis of human thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, G; Martinez Cáceres, E; Voordouw, A; Noteboom, E; Graf, D; Kroczek, R A; Spits, H

    1996-05-15

    Human thymic epithelial cells express CD40, so we examined the possible role of CD40 in activation of thymocytes. We observed that both CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ thymocytes proliferate after stimulation by anti-CD3 mAb in the presence of cultured thymic epithelial cells. Costimulation of CD4+ thymocytes by thymic epithelial cells is partly inhibited by an anti-CD40 mAb, but this mAb has no effect on costimulation of CD8+ thymocytes. The selective costimulatory ability of CD40 for CD4+ thymocytes was confirmed in experiments in which thymocytes were stimulated with anti-CD3 in the presence of murine P815 cells transfected with CD40 cDNA. The level of costimulation induced by P815-CD40 was comparable with that induced by P815 cells expressing CD80 (B7.1). Treatment of thymocytes with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and the phorbol ester PMA or with anti-CD3 mAb resulted in up-regulation of the CD40 ligand, suggesting that this molecule is involved in CD40-mediated costimulation of human thymocytes. Costimulation of thymocytes by CD80 strongly increased anti-CD3-induced death of fetal thymocytes. In contrast, costimulation by CD40 did not increase anti-CD3-mediated apoptosis of these thymocytes. To confirm that CD40 does not affect anti-CD3-induced cell death, we established a variant of the Jurkat T leukemic cell line that constitutively expresses CD40L and analyzed the sensitivity of this cell line for activation-induced apoptosis. In contrast to CD80, CD40 failed to increase anti-CD3-mediated apoptosis in CD40L+ Jurkat cells, whereas both CD40 and CD80 strongly increased IL-2 production induced by anti-CD3. These findings suggest that costimulation by CD40 is involved in clonal expansion of CD4+ thymocytes but not in activation-induced cell death.

  6. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  7. Critical role of microglial CD40 in the maintenance of mechanical hypersensitivity in a murine model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ling; Palmer, Christopher D.; Malon, Jennifer T.; De Leo, Joyce A.

    2010-01-01

    We recently demonstrated a contributing role of spinal cord infiltrating CD4+ T lymphocytes in the maintenance of mechanical hypersensitivity in a rodent model of neuropathic pain, spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx). It has been demonstrated that microglia play a role in the etiology of pain states. We hypothesized that infiltrating CD4+ T lymphocytes communicate with microglia via a CD40-CD154 interaction. Here, we investigated the role of CD40 in the development of mechanical hypersensitivity post-L5Tx. CD40 KO mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical sensitivity compared with WT mice starting from day 5 post-L5Tx. Using bone marrow chimeric mice, we further identified a pro-nociceptive role of CNS microglial CD40 rather than the peripheral leukocytic CD40. Flow cytometric analysis determined a significant increase of CD40+ microglia in the ipsilateral side of lumbar spinal cord post-L5Tx. Further, spinal cord proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α) profiling demonstrated an induction of IL-6 in both WT and CD40 KO mice post-L5Tx prior to the increase of microglial CD40 expression, indicating a CD40-independent induction of IL-6 following L5Tx. These data establish a novel role of microglial CD40 in the maintenance of nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity, a behavioral sign of neuropathic pain. PMID:19750482

  8. Expression of B7 (CD80) and CD40 antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease is independent of latent Epstein—Barr virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P G; Oates, J; Reynolds, G M; Crocker, J; Young, L S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To examine the expression of CD40 and B7 (CD80) antigens and the CD40 ligand in Hodgkin's disease. Methods—Antigen and ligand expression was studied in 17 cases of Hodgkin's disease using immunohistochemistry. The study included 11 cases of Hodgkin's disease in which latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection could be demonstrated within tumour cells by in situ hybridisation for the EBV encoded early RNAs (EBERs). Results—In all cases, irrespective of EBV status, Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants (HRS cells) showed strong expression of both B7 and CD40 antigens. CD40 ligand expression was not shown in HRS cells but was confined to a subset of small lymphocytes some of which were seen to be in intimate contact with HRS cells. Paraffin wax sections from a further 60 cases of Hodgkin's disease were examined for CD40 and EBER expression alone. The CD40 antigen was identified in HRS cells in all of these cases irrespective of EBER expression. Conclusions—As CD40 and B7 expression are features of professional antigen presenting cells, these results provide further evidence that HRS cells may have antigen presenting properties and that this may contribute to the characteristic recruitment and activation of non-malignant lymphocytes which is a feature of Hodgkin's disease. The ability of HRS cells to activate Th cells may in turn contribute to their own survival through the induction of the gp39/CD40 pathway. Images PMID:16695980

  9. Differential modulation by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9)-THC) of CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in activated mouse splenic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Crawford, Robert B; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2012-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids has been widely demonstrated in experimental animal models and in humans. CD40-CD40-ligand (L) interactions are among the most crucial initiators of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of ∆(9)-THC on CD40L expression in mouse splenic T cells after activation with various stimuli. Time course studies demonstrated that peak surface expression of CD40L by CD4(+) T cells after anti-CD3/CD28 or phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io) occurred 8 h post activation. Peak CD40L mRNA levels were observed at 2 h post PMA/Io treatment and at 4 h post anti-CD3/CD28 treatment. Pretreatment with ∆(9)-THC significantly impaired the upregulation of CD40L induced by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level. By contrast, ∆(9)-THC did not affect PMA/Io-induced surface CD40L expression on CD4(+) T cells. Additionally, ∆(9)-THC also attenuated anti-CD3/CD28-induced CD40L expression on CD4(+) T cells derived from CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. We investigated whether the mechanism by which ∆(9)-THC suppressed CD40L expression involved putative cannabinoid activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Although activation of GR resulted in suppression of CD40L induction by anti-CD3/CD28, no interaction between ∆(9)-THC and GR was observed by a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ∆(9)-THC targets proximal T cell receptor-associated signaling in a cannabinoid receptor- and glucocorticoid receptor-independent manner. These findings identify suppression of CD40L expression as a novel part of the mechanism by which ∆(9)-THC exerts anti-inflammatory activity.

  10. Enhancing Antitumor Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Through Constitutive CD40L Expression

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kevin J; Seinstra, Beatrijs A; Nikhamin, Yan; Yeh, Raymond; Usachenko, Yelena; van Leeuwen, Dayenne G; Purdon, Terence; Pegram, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with genetically modified T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a promising therapy for patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, CAR-modified T cells (CAR T cells) have mostly failed in patients with solid tumors or low-grade B-cell malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bulky lymph node involvement. Herein, we enhance the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells through the constitutive expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154). T cells genetically modified to constitutively express CD40L (CD40L-modified T cells) demonstrated increased proliferation and secretion of proinflammatory TH1 cytokines. Further, CD40L-modified T cells augmented the immunogenicity of CD40+ tumor cells by the upregulated surface expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), adhesion molecules (CD54, CD58, and CD70), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules (Class I and HLA-DR), and the Fas-death receptor (CD95). Additionally, CD40L-modified T cells induced maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 by monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Finally, tumor-targeted CD19-specific CAR/CD40L T cells exhibited increased cytotoxicity against CD40+ tumors and extended the survival of tumor-bearing mice in a xenotransplant model of CD19+ systemic lymphoma. This preclinical data supports the clinical application of CAR T cells additionally modified to constitutively express CD40L with anticipated enhanced antitumor efficacy. PMID:25582824

  11. The role of CD40 expression in dendritic cells in cancer biology; a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gui Han; Askari, Alan; Malietzis, George; Bernardo, David; Clark, Susan K; Knight, Stella C; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2014-01-01

    CD40 is a co-stimulatory molecule belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and is essential in activation of dendritic cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells capable of initiating cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response against cancer cells. However, there are few studies on the characterization of DCs in cancer, specifically their expression of CD40, despite its implication in cancer immunotherapy. We reviewed available data on the expression of CD40 on DCs in various cancers, and its implications for cancer immunotherapy. A systematic review on CD40 expression on DCs in cancer was performed with reference to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA). Studies that satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria were 21 out of 927. Variations in type and status of the cancers, source of DCs and methodology for detecting CD40 expression amongst the studies resulted in contrasting results. DCs generally expressed low CD40 in tumor infiltrating DCs (tiDCs), in DCs derived by in vitro culture from blood monocytes using cytokine stimulation (MoDCs) and in DCs exposed in vitro to tumor cells lines; the studies suggested that CD40 expression in DCs is impaired in cancer particularly in metastatic disease. However, DCs identified in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) expressed higher numbers of CD40 positive cells in some cancer patients, which could be due to tumor-derived factors leading to partially-stimulated DCs. The results provide evidence that some cancer patients may show partial systemic DC activation and expression of increased CD40 in response to the presence of tumor but that such activity may become abortive in the presence of factors produced by the tumor. This review has thus identified key papers on CD40 expression on DCs in various cancers and discusses the limitations and contrasting results of these studies in relation to variations in methodology. The results highlight the need

  12. Irradiation up-regulates CD80 expression through induction of tumour necrosis factor-α and CD40 ligand expression on B lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Fumio; Nakano, Hideki; Seo, Akira; Okada, Yayoi; Torihata, Hideko; Tanaka, Yuriko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Miyake, Hidekazu; Kakiuchi, Terutaka

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we reported that 100 Gy X-ray irradiation followed by 24 hr incubation up-regulates CD80 expression in murine B lymphoma cells, A20-2J. In the present study, we analysed the underlying mechanisms of such up-regulation using A20-HL cells derived from A20-2J cells. Irradiation of A20-HL cells with 100 Gy enhanced CD80 expression. Incubation of untreated A20-HL cells with those 100 Gy irradiated induced up-regulation of CD80 expression. Irradiation of A20-HL cells also up-regulated the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and CD40 ligand (CD40L), and the amount of immunoprecipitable TNF-α and CD40L in cell lysates. The addition of anti-TNF-α or anti-CD40L monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the incubation of irradiated A20-HL cells partially inhibited up-regulation of CD80 expression, and the addition of both antibodies together almost completely inhibited the up-regulation, suggesting that irradiation up-regulated the CD80 expression through the induction of TNF-α and CD40L expression. Irradiation also increased the accumulation of CD80, TNF-α and CD40L mRNA. n-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), a nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitor, markedly decreased irradiation-induced accumulation of CD80 mRNA and CD80 expression. FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, and nifedipine, a calcium channel inhibitor, inhibited not only the expression of TNF-α and CD40L, but also the up-regulation of CD80 on irradiated A20-HL cells. These results strongly suggested that irradiation induced TNF-α and CD40L expression, which then up-regulated CD80 mRNA and CD80 expression through activation of NF-κB transcription factor in A20-HL cells. PMID:12100723

  13. Cooperation of multiple signaling pathways in CD40-regulated gene expression in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dadgostar, Hajir; Zarnegar, Brian; Hoffmann, Alexander; Qin, Xiao-Feng; Truong, Uyen; Rao, Govinda; Baltimore, David; Cheng, Genhong

    2002-01-01

    CD40/CD40L interaction is essential for multiple biological events in T dependent humoral immune responses, including B cell survival and proliferation, germinal center and memory B cell formation, and antibody isotype switching and affinity maturation. By using high-density microarrays, we examined gene expression in primary mouse B lymphocytes after multiple time points of CD40L stimulation. In addition to genes involved in cell survival and growth, which are also induced by other mitogens such as lipopolysaccharide, CD40L specifically activated genes involved in germinal center formation and T cell costimulatory molecules that facilitate T dependent humoral immunity. Next, by examining the roles of individual CD40-activated signal transduction pathways, we dissected the overall CD40-mediated response into genes independently regulated by the individual pathways or collectively by all pathways. We also found that gene down-regulation is a significant part of the overall response and that the p38 pathway plays an important role in this process, whereas the NF-κB pathway is important for the up-regulation of primary response genes. Our finding of overlapping independent control of gene expression modules by different pathways suggests, in principle, that distinct biological behaviors that depend on distinct gene expression subsets can be manipulated by targeting specific signaling pathways. PMID:11830667

  14. INVOLVEMENT OF TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 4 AND MAPK PATHWAYS IN LPS-INDUCED CD40 EXPRESSION IN MONOCYTIC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CD40 is a co-stimulatory surface molecule actively expressed on mature dendritic cells (DC). Recent studies suggest that endotoxin (LPS) inhalation induces DC maturation in the airways of healthy volunteers. To characterize the effect of LPS on CD40 expression and underlying mech...

  15. A novel CD40LG deletion causes the hyper-IgM syndrome with normal CD40L expression in a 6-month-old child.

    PubMed

    López-Herrera, Gabriela; Maravillas-Montero, José Luis; Vargas-Hernández, Alexander; Berrón-Ruíz, Laura; Ramírez-Sánchez, Emmanuel; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco Javier; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2015-05-01

    The X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHIGM) is the most common form of HIGM. Patients are clinically diagnosed on the basis of recurrent sinopulmonary infections, accompanied with low levels of IgG and IgA, normal to elevated levels of IgM, and the presence of peripheral B cells. Here, we have reported a novel deletion of four nucleotides in CD40LG exon 3, c.375_378delCAAA, which led to a frameshift mutation with a premature stop codon, p.Asn101*126. The deletion resulted in a truncated protein, in which majority of the extracellular domain was lost. However, detection of surface CD40L was still possible as the intracellular, transmembrane, and part of the extracellular domains were not affected. This indicated that this mutation did not affect protein stability and that immunodetection of CD40L expression is not enough for the diagnosis of XHIGM. Our study strongly suggests that genetic diagnosis for XHIGM should always be performed when clinical data support this diagnosis and CD40L protein is present.

  16. Nanovesicle-targeted Kv1.3 knockdown in memory T cells suppresses CD40L expression and memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chimote, Ameet A; Hajdu, Peter; Kottyan, Leah C; Harley, John B; Yun, Yeoheung; Conforti, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Ca(2+) signaling controls activation and effector functions of T lymphocytes. Ca(2+) levels also regulate NFAT activation and CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in T cells. CD40L in activated memory T cells binds to its cognate receptor, CD40, on other cell types resulting in the production of antibodies and pro-inflammatory mediators. The CD40L/CD40 interaction is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and CD40L is widely recognized as a therapeutic target. Ca(2+) signaling in T cells is regulated by Kv1.3 channels. We have developed lipid nanoparticles that deliver Kv1.3 siRNAs (Kv1.3-NPs) selectively to CD45RO(+) memory T cells and reduce the activation-induced Ca(2+) influx. Herein we report that Kv1.3-NPs reduced NFAT activation and CD40L expression exclusively in CD45RO(+) T cells. Furthermore, Kv1.3-NPs suppressed cytokine release and induced a phenotype switch of T cells from predominantly memory to naïve. These findings indicate that Kv1.3-NPs operate as targeted immune suppressive agents with promising therapeutic potentials.

  17. Involvement of the cytoplasmic cysteine-238 of CD40 in its up-regulation of CD23 expression and its enhancement of TLR4-triggered responses.

    PubMed

    Nadiri, Amal; Jundi, Malek; El Akoum, Souhad; Hassan, Ghada S; Yacoub, Daniel; Mourad, Walid

    2015-11-01

    CD40, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, plays a key role in both adaptive and innate immunity. Engagement of CD40 with its natural trimeric ligand or with cross-linked antibodies results in disulfide-linked CD40 (dl-CD40) homodimer formation, a process mediated by the cysteine-238 residues of the cytoplasmic tail of CD40. The present study was designed to elucidate the biological relevance of cysteine-238-mediated dl-CD40 homodimers to the expression of CD23 on B cells and to investigate its possible involvement in the innate response. Our results indicate that cysteine-238-mediated dl-CD40 homodimerization is required for CD40-induced activation of PI3-kinase/Akt signaling and the subsequent CD23 expression, as inhibition of dl-CD40 homodimer formation through a point mutation-approach specifically impairs these responses. Interestingly, cysteine-238-mediated dl-CD40 homodimers are also shown to play a crucial role in Toll-like receptor 4-induced CD23 expression, further validating the importance of this system in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. This process also necessitates the activation of the PI3-kinase/Akt cascade. Thus, our results highlight new roles for CD40 and cysteine-238-mediated CD40 homodimers in cell biology and identify a potential new target for therapeutic strategies against CD40-associated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  18. A GM-CSF and CD40L bystander vaccine is effective in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hatem; Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Antonia, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in using cancer vaccines to treat breast cancer patients in the adjuvant setting to prevent recurrence in high risk situations or in combination with other immunomodulators in the advanced setting. Current peptide vaccines are limited by immunologic compatibility issues, and engineered autologous cellular vaccines are difficult to produce on a large scale. Using standardized bystander cell lines modified to secrete immune stimulating adjuvant substances can greatly enhance the ability to produce immunogenic cellular vaccines using unmodified autologous cells or allogeneic medical grade tumor cell lines as targets. We investigated the efficacy of a cellular vaccine using B78H1 bystander cell lines engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and CD40 ligand (BCG) in a murine model of breast cancer. Methods Five-week-old female BALB/c mice were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad with 4T1 tumor cells. Treatment consisted of irradiated 4T1 ± BCG cells given subcutaneously every 4 days and was repeated three times per mouse when tumors became palpable. Tumors were measured two to three times per week for 25 days. The vaccine’s activity was confirmed in a second experiment using Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells in C57BL/6 mice to exclude a model specific effect. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunospots (ELISPOTS) were performed on splenic lymphocytes incubated with 4T1 lysates along with immunohistochemistry for CD3 on tumor sections. Results Tumor growth was significantly inhibited in the 4T1-BCG and LLC-BCG treatment groups when compared to 4T1 and LLC treatment groups. There were higher levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ secreting T-cells on ELISPOT for BCG treated groups, and a trend for higher numbers of tumor infiltrating CD3+ lymphocytes. Some tumors in the 4T1-BCG demonstrated organized lymphoid structures within the tumor microenvironment as well. Conclusion

  19. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function.

    PubMed

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS.

  20. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS. PMID:26068105

  1. PU.1 Expression in T Follicular Helper Cells Limits CD40L-Dependent Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Awe, Olufolakemi; Hufford, Matthew M; Wu, Hao; Pham, Duy; Chang, Hua-Chen; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Dent, Alexander L; Kaplan, Mark H

    2015-10-15

    PU.1 is an ETS family transcription factor that is important for the development of multiple hematopoietic cell lineages. Previous work demonstrated a critical role for PU.1 in promoting Th9 development and in limiting Th2 cytokine production. Whether PU.1 has functions in other Th lineages is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of ectopic expression of PU.1 in CD4(+) T cells and observed decreased expression of genes involved with the function of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, including Il21 and Tnfsf5 (encoding CD40L). T cells from conditional mutant mice that lack expression of PU.1 in T cells (Sfpi1(lck-/-)) demonstrated increased production of CD40L and IL-21 in vitro. Following adjuvant-dependent or adjuvant-independent immunization, we observed that Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice had increased numbers of Tfh cells, increased germinal center B cells (GCB cells), and increased Ab production in vivo. This correlated with increased expression of IL-21 and CD40L in Tfh cells from Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice compared with control mice. Finally, although blockade of IL-21 did not affect GCB cells in Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice, anti-CD40L treatment of immunized Sfpi1(lck-/-) mice decreased GCB cell numbers and Ag-specific Ig concentrations. Together, these data indicate an inhibitory role for PU.1 in the function of Tfh cells, germinal centers, and Tfh-dependent humoral immunity.

  2. Introduction of a CD40L genomic fragment via a human artificial chromosome vector permits cell-type-specific gene expression and induces immunoglobulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Li, Yanze C; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Gene therapy using cDNA driven by an exogenous promoter is not suited for genetic disorders that require intrinsic expression of a transgene, such as hyperimmunoglobulin (Ig)M syndrome (HIGM), which is caused by mutations in the CD40L gene. The human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector has the potential to solve this problem, because it can be used to transfer large genomic fragments containing their own regulatory elements. In this study, we examined whether introduction of a genomic fragment of CD40L via the HAC vector permits intrinsic expression of the transgene and has an effect on immunoglobulin secretion. We constructed an HAC vector carrying the mouse CD40L genomic fragment (mCD40L-HAC) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and transferred the mCD40L-HAC vector into a human CD4-positive active T-cell line (Jurkat) and a human myeloid cell line (U937) via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). The mCD40L-HAC vector permits mCD40L expression in human active T cells but not in human myeloid cells. The mCD40L-HAC also functions to stimulate mouse B cells derived from CD40L(-/-) mice, inducing secretion of IgG. This study may be an initial step toward the therapeutic application of HAC vectors for intrinsic expression of genes, a potential new direction for genome-based gene therapy.

  3. Adenovirus co-expressing CD40 ligand and interleukin (IL)-2 contributes to maturation of dendritic cells and production of IL-12

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhi; Gao, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Lou, Jin-Xing; Yang, Kai; Liu, Xiao-Dong; He, Xue-Peng; Chen, Hui-Ren

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct a chimeric adenovirus (Ad)5/F35 co-expressing human CD4O ligand (CD4OL) and interleukin (IL)-2 (Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2). The infection efficiency to human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs), expression of genes, phenotype changes and IL-12 production of Mo-DC by Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2 were investigated. CD40L and IL-2 from total RNA extracted from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and used to construct Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2. The infection efficiency, expression of CD40L, and phenotype changes of Mo-DC infected with Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2 were analyzed using flow cytometry. The quantities of IL-2 and IL-12 in the supernatants of Mo-DC following infection of Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The CD40L and IL-2 genes were successfully cloned and the Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2 was constructed. Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2 efficiently infected Mo-DCs with an infection efficiency of >75%, and the infected Mo-DCs expressed CD40L and secreted IL-2. The expression levels of cluster of differentiation (CD)80, CD86, CD40, and human leukocyte antigen-antigen D related on Mo-DC were moderate; however, CD83 was low prior to infection of Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2. Those molecules, particularly CD83, were markedly upregulated 24 h after the infection. Increasing quantities of IL-12 in the supernatants were detected subsequent to infection at different time points in a time-dependent manner. Thus, Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2 efficiently infected human Mo-DCs and its products, CD40L and IL-2, were subsequently expressed. In addition, infection with Ad5/F35 CD40L-IL-2 stimulated the maturation of Mo-DC and high levels of IL-12 production. PMID:27882218

  4. Targeted gene editing restores regulated CD40L function in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Nicholas; Hagin, David; Sommer, Karen; Song, Yumei; Khan, Iram; Clough, Courtnee; Ochs, Hans D; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Torgerson, Troy R

    2016-05-26

    Loss of CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression or function results in X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig)M syndrome (X-HIGM), characterized by recurrent infections due to impaired immunoglobulin class-switching and somatic hypermutation. Previous attempts using retroviral gene transfer to correct murine CD40L expression restored immune function; however, treated mice developed lymphoproliferative disease, likely due to viral-promoter-dependent constitutive CD40L expression. These observations highlight the importance of preserving endogenous gene regulation in order to safely correct this disorder. Here, we report efficient, on-target, homology-directed repair (HDR) editing of the CD40LG locus in primary human T cells using a combination of a transcription activator-like effector nuclease-induced double-strand break and a donor template delivered by recombinant adeno-associated virus. HDR-mediated insertion of a coding sequence (green fluorescent protein or CD40L) upstream of the translation start site within exon 1 allowed transgene expression to be regulated by endogenous CD40LG promoter/enhancer elements. Additionally, inclusion of the CD40LG 3'-untranslated region in the transgene preserved posttranscriptional regulation. Expression kinetics of the transgene paralleled that of endogenous CD40L in unedited T cells, both at rest and in response to T-cell stimulation. The use of this method to edit X-HIGM patient T cells restored normal expression of CD40L and CD40-murine IgG Fc fusion protein (CD40-muIg) binding, and rescued IgG class switching of naive B cells in vitro. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineered nuclease-directed gene repair to restore endogenously regulated CD40L, and the potential for its use in T-cell therapy for X-HIGM syndrome.

  5. Constitutive CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminates germinal center response and leads to augmented plasma cell production in T cell areas.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Anna; Long, Eugene; Stapler, Dale; Cascalho, Marilia; Tsubata, Takeshi; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko

    2010-07-01

    CD40/CD40L engagement is essential to T cell-dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the precise role of CD40 signaling through cognate T-B interaction in the generation of germinal center and memory B cells is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, a B cell-specific CD40L transgene (CD40LBTg) was introduced into mice with B cell-restricted MHC class II deficiency. Using this mouse model, we show that constitutive CD40L expression on B cells alone could not induce germinal center differentiation of MHC class II-deficient B cells after immunization with T cell-dependent Ag. Thus, some other MHC class II-dependent T cell-derived signals are essential for the generation of germinal center B cells in response to T cell-dependent Ag. In fact, CD40LBTg mice generated a complex Ag-specific IgG1 response, which was greatly enhanced in early, but reduced in late, primary response compared with control mice. We also found that the frequency of Ag-specific germinal center B cells in CD40LBTg mice was abruptly reduced 1 wk after immunization. As a result, the numbers of Ag-specific IgG1 long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells were reduced. By histology, large numbers of Ag-specific plasma cells were found in T cell areas adjacent to Ag-specific germinal centers of CD40LBTg mice, temporarily during the second week of primary response. These results indicate that CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminated their ongoing germinal center response and produced plasma cells. Our results support the notion that CD40 signaling is an active termination signal for germinal center reaction.

  6. TNF-α promotes IFN-γ-induced CD40 expression and antigen process in Myb-transformed hematological cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyi; Chen, Jiezhong; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2012-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ and interleukin-4 are critical cytokines in regulating the immune responses against infections and tumours. In this study, we investigated the effects of three cytokines on CD40 expression in Myb-transformed hematological cells and their regulatory roles in promoting these cells into dendritic cells. We observed that both interleukin-4 and interferon-γ increased CD40 expression in these hematological cells in a dose-dependent manner, although the concentration required for interleukin-4 was significantly higher than that for interferon-γ. We found that tumour necrosis factor-α promoted CD40 expression induced by interferon-γ, but not by interleukin-4. Our data showed that tumour necrosis factor-α plus interferon-γ-treated Myb-transformed hematological cells had the greatest ability to take up and process the model antigen DQ-Ovalbumin. Tumour necrosis factor-α also increased the ability of interferon-γ to produce the mixed lymphocyte reaction to allogenic T cells. Furthermore, only cotreatment with tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ induced Myb-transformed hematological cells to express interleukin-6. These results suggest that tumour necrosis factor-α plays a key regulatory role in the development of dendritic cells from hematological progenitor cells induced by interferon-γ.

  7. Interleukin 21 Controls mRNA and MicroRNA Expression in CD40-Activated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Loris; Capaia, Matteo; Zupo, Simona; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Brizzolara, Antonella; Orengo, Anna Maria; Croce, Michela; Marchesi, Edoardo; Ferrarini, Manlio; Canevari, Silvana; Ferrini, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    Several factors support CLL cell survival in the microenvironment. Under different experimental conditions, IL21 can either induce apoptosis or promote CLL cell survival. To investigate mechanisms involved in the effects of IL21, we studied the ability of IL21 to modulate gene and miRNA expressions in CD40-activated CLL cells. IL21 was a major regulator of chemokine production in CLL cells and it modulated the expression of genes involved in cell movement, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. In particular, IL21 down-regulated the expression of the chemokine genes CCL4, CCL3, CCL3L1, CCL17, and CCL2, while it up-regulated the Th1-related CXCL9 and CXCL10. In addition, IL21 down-regulated the expression of genes encoding signaling molecules, such as CD40, DDR1 and PIK3CD. IL21 modulated a similar set of genes in CLL and normal B-cells (e.g. chemokine genes), whereas other genes, including MYC, TNF, E2F1, EGR2 and GAS-6, were regulated only in CLL cells. An integrated analysis of the miRNome and gene expression indicated that several miRNAs were under IL21 control and these could, in turn, influence the expression of potential target genes. We focused on hsa-miR-663b predicted to down-regulate several relevant genes. Transfection of hsa-miR-663b or its specific antagonist showed that this miRNA regulated CCL17, DDR1, PIK3CD and CD40 gene expression. Our data indicated that IL21 modulates the expression of genes mediating the crosstalk between CLL cells and their microenvironment and miRNAs may take part in this process.

  8. Interleukin 21 Controls mRNA and MicroRNA Expression in CD40-Activated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Cecco, Loris; Capaia, Matteo; Zupo, Simona; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Brizzolara, Antonella; Orengo, Anna Maria; Croce, Michela; Marchesi, Edoardo; Ferrarini, Manlio; Canevari, Silvana; Ferrini, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    Several factors support CLL cell survival in the microenvironment. Under different experimental conditions, IL21 can either induce apoptosis or promote CLL cell survival. To investigate mechanisms involved in the effects of IL21, we studied the ability of IL21 to modulate gene and miRNA expressions in CD40-activated CLL cells. IL21 was a major regulator of chemokine production in CLL cells and it modulated the expression of genes involved in cell movement, metabolism, survival and apoptosis. In particular, IL21 down-regulated the expression of the chemokine genes CCL4, CCL3, CCL3L1, CCL17, and CCL2, while it up-regulated the Th1-related CXCL9 and CXCL10. In addition, IL21 down-regulated the expression of genes encoding signaling molecules, such as CD40, DDR1 and PIK3CD. IL21 modulated a similar set of genes in CLL and normal B-cells (e.g. chemokine genes), whereas other genes, including MYC, TNF, E2F1, EGR2 and GAS-6, were regulated only in CLL cells. An integrated analysis of the miRNome and gene expression indicated that several miRNAs were under IL21 control and these could, in turn, influence the expression of potential target genes. We focused on hsa-miR-663b predicted to down-regulate several relevant genes. Transfection of hsa-miR-663b or its specific antagonist showed that this miRNA regulated CCL17, DDR1, PIK3CD and CD40 gene expression. Our data indicated that IL21 modulates the expression of genes mediating the crosstalk between CLL cells and their microenvironment and miRNAs may take part in this process. PMID:26305332

  9. Increased CD40 Expression Enhances Early STING-Mediated Type I Interferon Response and Host Survival in a Rodent Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiangyu; Wu, Jian; Lin, Meng; Sun, Wenxiang; He, Xiao; Gowda, Channe; Bolland, Silvia; Long, Carole A.; Wang, Rongfu; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Both type I interferon (IFN-I) and CD40 play a significant role in various infectious diseases, including malaria and autoimmune disorders. CD40 is mostly known to function in adaptive immunity, but previous observations of elevated CD40 levels early after malaria infection of mice led us to investigate its roles in innate IFN-I responses and disease control. Using a Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis N67 and C57BL/6 mouse model, we showed that infected CD40-/- mice had reduced STING and serum IFN-β levels day-2 post infection, higher day-4 parasitemia, and earlier deaths. CD40 could greatly enhance STING-stimulated luciferase signals driven by the IFN-β promoter in vitro, which was mediated by increased STING protein levels. The ability of CD40 to influence STING expression was confirmed in CD40-/- mice after malaria infection. Substitutions at CD40 TRAF binding domains significantly decreased the IFN-β signals and STING protein level, which was likely mediated by changes in STING ubiquitination and degradation. Increased levels of CD40, STING, and ISRE driven luciferase signal in RAW Lucia were observed after phagocytosis of N67-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), stimulation with parasite DNA/RNA, or with selected TLR ligands [LPS, poly(I:C), and Pam3CSK4]. The results suggest stimulation of CD40 expression by parasite materials through TLR signaling pathways, which was further confirmed in bone marrow derived dendritic cells/macrophages (BMDCs/BMDMs) and splenic DCs from CD40-/-, TLR3-/- TLR4-/-, TRIF-/-, and MyD88-/- mice after iRBC stimulation or parasite infection. Our data connect several signaling pathways consisting of phagocytosis of iRBCs, recognition of parasite DNA/RNA (possibly GPI) by TLRs, elevated levels of CD40 and STING proteins, increased IFN-I production, and longer host survival time. This study reveals previously unrecognized CD40 function in innate IFN-I responses and protective pathways in infections with malaria strains that induce a strong

  10. CD40-activated B cells express full lymph node homing triad and induce T-cell chemotaxis: potential as cellular adjuvants.

    PubMed

    von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Popov, Alexey; Klein-Gonzalez, Nela; Fiore, Francesca; Debey, Svenja; Draube, Andreas; Maecker, Britta; Menezes, Isaura; Nadler, Lee M; Schultze, Joachim L

    2006-04-01

    CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B cells) have previously been introduced as an alternative source of antigen-presenting cells for immunotherapy. CD40-B cells can prime naive and expand memory T cells, and they can be generated in large numbers from very small amounts of peripheral blood derived from healthy individuals or cancer patients alike. Administration of CD40-B cells as a cellular adjuvant would require these cells to migrate toward secondary lymphoid organs and attract T cells in situ, processes guided by specific chemokines and chemokine receptors. Here, we demonstrate that primary, human CD40-B cells express a pattern of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors necessary for homing to secondary lymphoid organs and have the capacity to migrate to cognate ligands. Furthermore, we show that CD40-B cells express important T-cell attractants and induce strong T-cell chemotaxis. These findings further support the use of CD40-B cells as cellular adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy.

  11. The expression and concentration of CD40 ligand in normal pregnancy, preeclampsia, and hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Hanan A G; Abousamra, Nashwa K; Goda, Hossam; El-Shouky, Reda; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia has been associated with increased platelet activation detected before disease onset. Inappropriate activation of platelets may be involved in pathogenesis in preeclampsia by promoting coagulation and thrombosis and also as a mediator of inflammation. The exaggerated platelet activation and inflammation leading to endothelial damage in preeclampsia can be explained by the CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) system. Expression of CD40L on platelets was determined by whole-blood flow cytometry, and serum levels of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 11 women with mild preeclampsia, 11 women with severe preeclampsia, and six women with hemolytic anemia, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome compared with 13 normotensive pregnant women as a control group. The platelet surface expression of CD40L was significantly higher in women with mild and severe preeclampsia and HELLP compared with normal pregnancy group (P = 0.001; P ≤ 0.001; P = 0.003, respectively), with no significant difference being found between women with mild preeclampsia compared with HELLP and severe preeclampsia compared with HELLP (P = 0.2; P = 0.8, respectively). The serum concentration of sCD40L was significantly higher in women with mild and severe preeclampsia and HELLP compared with the normal pregnancy group (P = 0.001; P ≤ 0.001; P = 0.022, respectively), with no significant difference being found between women with mild compared with severe preeclampsia or HELLP and severe preeclampsia compared with HELLP (P = 0.7; P = 0.6; P = 0.6, respectively). In conclusion, the higher expression and concentration of CD40L in women with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome compared with normal pregnant women may indicate an exaggerated activation of platelets and endothelial cells in the disorder.

  12. Cloning and high level expression of the biologically active extracellular domain of Macaca mulatta CD40 in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengyun; Wan, Lin; Yang, Hao; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-03-01

    The CD40-mediated immune response contributes to a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases. CD40 antagonists have potential as novel therapies for immune disorders. However, the CD40 pathway has not been well characterized in the rhesus monkey Macaca mulatta, which is a valuable animal model for human immune disease. An 834 bp transcript was cloned from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of rhesus monkey using specific primers designed according to the predicted sequence of M. mulatta CD40 (mmCD40) in GenBank. Sequence analysis demonstrated that mmCD40 is highly homologous to human CD40 (hCD40), with an amino acid sequence identity of 94%. Genes encoding the extracellular domain of mmCD40 and the Fc fragment of the hIgG1 were inserted into a pPIC9K plasmid to produce mmCD40Ig by Pichia pastoris. Approximately 15-20 mg of the mmCD40Ig protein with ∼90% purity could be recovered from 1 L of culture. The purified mmCD40Ig protein can form dimers and can specifically bind CD40L-positive cells. Additionally, the mmCD40Ig protein can bind hCD40L protein in phosphate buffered saline and form a stable combination in a size-exclusion chromatography assay using a Superdex 200 column. Moreover, mmCD40Ig is as efficient as M. mulatta CTLA4Ig (mmCTLA4Ig) to suppress Con A-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Additionally, mmCD40Ig only showed mild immunosuppressive activity in a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) system. These results suggest that mmCD40Ig secreted by P. pastoris was productive and functional, and it could be used as a tool for pathogenesis and therapies for chronic inflammatory diseases in a M. mulatta model.

  13. NF-κB Is Involved in Regulation of CD40 Ligand Expression on Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Activated Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia; Ayala, Hilda; Vázquez, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    Interaction between CD40L (CD154) on activated T cells and its receptor CD40 on antigen-presenting cells has been reported to be important in the resolution of infection by mycobacteria. However, the mechanism(s) by which Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) up-regulates membrane expression of CD40L molecules is poorly understood. This study was done to investigate the role of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in the regulation of CD40L expression in human CD4+ T cells stimulated with BCG. Specific pharmacologic inhibition of the NF-κB pathway revealed that this signaling cascade was required in the regulation of CD40L expression on the surface of BCG-activated CD4+ T cells. These results were further supported by the fact that treatment of BCG-activated CD4+ T cells with these pharmacological inhibitors significantly down-regulated CD40L mRNA. In this study, inhibitor κBα (IκBα) and IκBβ protein production was not affected by the chemical protease inhibitors and, more importantly, BCG led to the rapid but transient induction of NF-κB activity. Our results also indicated that CD40L expression on BCG-activated CD4+ T cells resulted from transcriptional up-regulation of the CD40L gene by a mechanism which is independent of de novo protein synthesis. Interestingly, BCG-induced activation of NF-κB and the increased CD40L cell surface expression were blocked by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors 1-[5-isoquinolinesulfonyl]-2-methylpiperazine and salicylate, both of which block phosphorylation of IκB. Moreover, rottlerin a Ca2+-independent PKC isoform inhibitor, significantly down-regulated CD40L mRNA in BCG-activated CD4+ T cells. These data strongly suggest that CD40L expression by BCG-activated CD4+ T cells is regulated via the PKC pathway and by NF-κB DNA binding activity. PMID:12738634

  14. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4(+) T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ(9)-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ(9)-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ(9)-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ(9)-THC suppresses human T cell function.

  15. CD40/CD40L contributes to hypercholesterolemia-induced microvascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Karen Y.; Calahan, LeShanna; Hamric, Candiss M.; Russell, Janice M.; Granger, D. Neil

    2009-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is associated with phenotypic changes in endothelial cell function that lead to a proinflammatory and prothrombogenic state in different segments of the microvasculature. CD40 ligand (CD40L) and its receptor CD40 are ubiquitously expressed and mediate inflammatory responses and platelet activation. The objective of this study was to determine whether CD40/CD40L, in particular T-cell CD40L, contributes to microvascular dysfunction induced by hypercholesterolemia. Intravital microscopy was used to quantify blood cell adhesion in cremasteric postcapillary venules, endothelium-dependent vasodilation responses in arterioles, and microvascular oxidative stress in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6, CD40-deficient (−/−), CD40L−/−, or severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice placed on a normal (ND) or high-cholesterol (HC) diet for 2 wk. WT-HC mice exhibited an exaggerated leukocyte and platelet recruitment in venules and impaired vasodilation responses in arterioles compared with ND counterparts. A deficiency of CD40, CD40L, or lymphocytes attenuated these responses to HC. The HC phenotype was rescued in CD40L−/− and SCID mice by a transfer of WT T cells. Bone marrow chimeras revealed roles for both vascular- and blood cell-derived CD40 and CD40L in the HC-induced vascular responses. Hypercholesterolemia induced an oxidative stress in both arterioles and venules of WT mice, which was abrogated by either CD40 or CD40L deficiency. The transfer of WT T cells into CD40L−/− mice restored the oxidative stress. These results implicate CD40/CD40L interactions between circulating cells and the vascular wall in both the arteriolar and venular dysfunction elicited by hypercholesterolemia and identify T-cell-associated CD40L as a key mediator of these responses. PMID:19112095

  16. TWEAK inhibits TRAF2-mediated CD40 signaling by destabilization of CD40 signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Steffen; Lang, Isabell; Rosenthal, Alevtina; Schäfer, Viktoria; Weisenberger, Daniela; Carmona Arana, José Antonio; Trebing, Johannes; Siegmund, Daniela; Neumann, Manfred; Wajant, Harald

    2013-09-01

    We found recently that TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and fibroblast growth factor-inducible-14 (Fn14) by virtue of their strong capability to reduce the freely available cytoplasmic pool of TNFR-associated factor (TRAF)2 and cellular inhibitors of apoptosis (cIAPs) antagonize the functions of these molecules in TNFR1 signaling, resulting in sensitization for apoptosis and inhibition of classical NF-κB signaling. In this study, we demonstrate that priming of cells with TWEAK also interferes with activation of the classical NF-κB pathway by CD40. Likewise, there was strong inhibition of CD40 ligand (CD40L)-induced activation of MAPKs in TWEAK-primed cells. FACS analysis and CD40L binding studies revealed unchanged CD40 expression and normal CD40L-CD40 interaction in TWEAK-primed cells. CD40L immunoprecipitates, however, showed severely reduced amounts of CD40 and CD40-associated proteins, indicating impaired formation or reduced stability of CD40L-CD40 signaling complexes. The previously described inhibitory effect of TWEAK on TNFR1 signaling has been traced back to reduced activity of the TNFR1-associated TRAF2-cIAP1/2 ubiquitinase complex and did not affect the stability of the immunoprecipitable TNFR1 receptor complex. Thus, the inhibitory effect of TWEAK on CD40 signaling must be based at least partly on other mechanisms. In line with this, signaling by the CD40-related TRAF2-interacting receptor TNFR2 was also attenuated but still immunoprecipitable in TWEAK-primed cells. Collectively, we show that Fn14 activation by soluble TWEAK impairs CD40L-CD40 signaling complex formation and inhibits CD40 signaling and thus identify the Fn14-TWEAK system as a potential novel regulator of CD40-related cellular functions.

  17. Defective expression of the CD40 ligand in X chromosome-linked immunoglobulin deficiency with normal or elevated IgM.

    PubMed Central

    Fuleihan, R; Ramesh, N; Loh, R; Jabara, H; Rosen, R S; Chatila, T; Fu, S M; Stamenkovic, I; Geha, R S

    1993-01-01

    B lymphocytes from patients with X chromosome-linked immunoglobulin deficiency with normal or elevated serum IgM are unable to switch from the synthesis of IgM/IgD to that of other immunoglobulin isotypes. Isotype switch recombination was evaluated in three affected males by examining interleukin 4-driven IgE synthesis. T-cell-dependent IgE synthesis was completely absent in the B lymphocytes of the patients. In contrast, CD40 mAb plus interleukin 4 induced the patients' B cells to synthesize IgE and to undergo deletional switch recombination. Because interaction between CD40 and its ligand on activated T cells is critical for T-cell-driven isotype switching, we examined CD40 ligand expression. In contrast to normal T cells, lymphocytes from the patients expressed no detectable CD40 ligand on their surface after stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin, although the mRNA of the ligand was expressed normally. These results suggest that defective expression of the CD40 ligand underlies the failure of isotype switching in this disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7681587

  18. PPARα agonist fenofibrate attenuates TNF-α-induced CD40 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via the SIRT1-dependent signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weirong; Lin, Qinqin; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Jiye; Ren, Feng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Ji, Meixi; Li, Yanxiang

    2013-06-10

    The ligand-activated transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) participates in the regulation of cellular inflammation. More recent studies indicated that sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylase, regulates the inflammatory response in adipocytes. However, whether the role of PPARα in inflammation is mediated by SIRT1 remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of PPARα agonist fenofibrate on the expressions of SIRT1 and pro-inflammatory cytokine CD40 and underlying mechanisms in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that fenofibrate inhibited CD40 expression and up-regulated SIRT1 expression in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated adipocytes, and these effects of fenofibrate were reversed by PPARα antagonist GW6471. Moreover, SIRT1 inhibitors sirtinol/nicotinamide (NAM) or knockdown of SIRT1 could attenuate the effect of fenofibrate on TNF-α-induced CD40 expression in adipocytes. Importantly, NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) augmented the effect of fenofibrate on CD40 expression in adipocytes. Further study found that fenofibrate decreased the expression of acetylated-NF-κB p65 (Ac-NF-κB p65) in TNF-α-stimulated adipocytes, and the effect of fenofibrate was abolished by SIRT1 inhibition. In addition, fenofibrate up-regulated SIRT1 expression through AMPK in TNF-α-stimulated adipocytes. Taken together, these findings indicate that PPARα agonist fenofibrate inhibits TNF-α-induced CD40 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via the SIRT1-dependent signaling pathway. -- Highlights: • Fenofibrate up-regulates SIRT1 expression in TNF-α-stimulated adipocytes. • Fenofibrate inhibits CD40 expression through SIRT1 in adipocytes. • The effects of fenofibrate on CD40 and SIRT1 expressions are dependent on PPARα. • Fenofibrate inhibits CD40 expression via SIRT1-dependent deacetylation of NF-κB. • Fenofibrate increases SIRT1 expression through PPARα and AMPK in adipocytes.

  19. Human epidermal Langerhans cells differ from monocyte-derived Langerhans cells in CD80 expression and in secretion of IL-12 after CD40 cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Peiser, Matthias; Wanner, Reinhard; Kolde, Gerhard

    2004-09-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) represent an immature population of myeloid dendritic cells (DCs). As a result of their unique Birbeck granules (BGs), langerin expression, and heterogeneous maturation process, they differ from other immature DCs. Monocyte-derived LCs (MoLCs) mimic epidermal LCs. MoLCs with characteristic BGs are generated by culturing blood-derived monocytes with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-4, and transforming growth factor-beta1. Here, we compare maturation-induced antigen expression and cytokine release of LCs with MoLCs. To achieve comparable cell populations, LCs and MoLCs were isolated by CD1c cell sorting, resulting in high purity. In unstimulated cells, CD40 was expressed at equal levels. After stimulation with CD40 ligand (CD40L), LCs and MoLCs acquired CD83 and increased CD86. High CD80 expression was exclusively detected in CD1c-sorted MoLCs. Human leukocyte antigen-DR and CD54 expression was found in all cell populations, however, at different intensities. CD40 triggering increased the potency of LCs and MoLCs to stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation. Activated MoLCs released IL-12p70 and simultaneously, anti-inflammatory IL-10. The application of the Toll-like receptor ligands peptidoglycan, flagellin, and in particular, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased the corelease of these cytokines. LCs secreted IL-10 at a comparable level with MoLCs but failed to produce high amounts of IL-12p70 after application of danger signals. These data indicate that MoLCs as well as LCs display no maturation arrest concerning CD83 and CD86 expression. In difference to MoLCs, LCs resisted activation by CD40L and LPS in terms of IL-12 production. This shows that natural and generated LCs share similar features but differ in relevant functions.

  20. Modulation of neuronal differentiation by CD40 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Huayu; Obregon, Demian; Lou, Deyan; Ehrhart, Jared; Fernandez, Frank; Silver, Archie; Tan Jun

    2008-05-02

    Neuron differentiation is a complex process involving various cell-cell interactions, and multiple signaling pathways. We showed previously that CD40 is expressed and functional on mouse and human neurons. In neurons, ligation of CD40 protects against serum withdrawal-induced injury and plays a role in survival and differentiation. CD40 deficient mice display neuron dysfunction, aberrant neuron morphologic changes, and associated gross brain abnormalities. Previous studies by Tone and colleagues suggested that five isoforms of CD40 exist with two predominant isoforms expressed in humans: signal-transducible CD40 type I and a C-terminal truncated, non-signal-transducible CD40 type II. We hypothesized that differential expression of CD40 isoform type I and type II in neurons may modulate neuron differentiation. Results show that adult wild-type, and CD40{sup -/-} deficient mice predominantly express CD40 type I and II isoforms. Whereas adult wild-type mice express mostly CD40 type I in cerebral tissues at relatively high levels, in age and gender-matched CD40{sup -/-} mice CD40 type I expression was almost completely absent; suggesting a predominance of the non-signal-transducible CD40 type II isoform. Younger, 1 day old wild-type mice displayed less CD40 type I, and more CD40 type II, as well as, greater expression of soluble CD40 (CD40L/CD40 signal inhibitor), compared with 1 month old mice. Neuron-like N2a cells express CD40 type I and type II isoforms while in an undifferentiated state, however once induced to differentiate, CD40 type I predominates. Further, differentiated N2a cells treated with CD40 ligand express high levels of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN); an effect reduced by anti-CD40 type I siRNA, but not by control (non-targeting) siRNA. Altogether these data suggest that CD40 isoforms may act in a temporal fashion to modulate neuron differentiation during brain development. Thus, modulation of neuronal CD40 isoforms and CD40 signaling may

  1. Retinoic acid promotes mouse splenic B cell surface IgG expression and maturation stimulated by CD40 and IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2008-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) increases antibody production in vivo but its role in B-cell activation is unclear. In a model of purified mouse splenic B cells stimulated by CD40 coreceptor (as a surrogate of T cell co-stimulation), IL-4, a principal Th-2 cytokine, and ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor, CD40 engagement or IL-4 alone induced B-cell activation indicated by increased Igγ1 germline transcripts, cell proliferation, and surface (s)IgG1 expression, while triple stimulation with the combination of anti-CD40/IL-4/anti-μ synergized to heighten B-cell activation. Although RA was growth inhibitory for anti-CD40-activated B cells, RA increased the proportion of B cells that had more differentiated phenotypes, such as expression of higher level of activation-induced deaminase, Blimp-1, CD138/syndecan-1 and sIgG1. Overall, RA can promote B-cell maturation at the population level by increasing the number of sIgG1 and CD138 expressing cells, which may be related to the potentiation of humoral immunity in vivo. PMID:18082674

  2. CD40 Ligand enhances immunogenicity of vector-based vaccines in immunocompetent and CD4+ T cell deficient individuals

    PubMed Central

    Auten, Matthew W.; Huang, Weitao; Dai, Guixiang; Ramsay, Alistair J.

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of host immunity, particularly CD4+ T cell deficiency, presents significant complications for vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. CD40 ligand (CD40L or CD154), a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF), is an important co-stimulatory molecule and, through interactions with its cognate receptor CD40, plays a pivotal role in the generation of host immune responses. Exploitation of CD40L and its receptor CD40 could provide a means to enhance and potentially restore protective immune responses in CD4+ T cell deficiency. To investigate the potential adjuvanticity of CD40L, we constructed recombinant plasmid DNA and adenoviral (Ad) vaccine vectors expressing murine CD40L and the mycobacterial protein antigen 85B (Ag85B). Co-immunization of mice with CD40L and Ag85B by intranasal or intramuscular prime-boosting led to route-dependent enhancement of the magnitude of vaccine-induced circulating and lung mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both normal (CD4-replete) and CD4+ T cell deficient animals, including polyfunctional T cell responses. The presence of CD40L alone was insufficient to enhance or restore CD4+ T cell responses in CD4-ablated animals; however, in partially-depleted animals, co-immunization with Ag85B and CD40L was capable of eliciting enhanced T cell responses, similar to those observed in normal animals, when compared to those given vaccine antigen alone. In summary, these findings show that CD40L has the capacity to enhance the magnitude of vaccine-induced polyfunctional T cell responses in CD4+ T cell deficient mice, and warrants further study as an adjuvant for immunization against opportunistic pathogens in individuals with CD4+ T cell deficiency. PMID:22349523

  3. A20 overexpression inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation, TRAF6 and CD40 expression in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xun-Liang; Pei, De-An; Yan, Ju-Zhen; Xu, Gang; Wu, Ping

    2014-04-17

    Zinc finger protein A20 is a key negative regulator of inflammation. However, whether A20 may affect inflammation during peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis is still unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of A20 overexpression on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells (RPMCs). Isolated and cultured RPMCs in vitro. Plasmid pGEM-T easy-A20 was transfected into RPMCs by Lipofectamine™2000. The protein expression of A20, phospho-IκBα, IκBα, TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 6 and CD40 were analyzed by Western blot. The mRNA expression of TRAF6, CD40, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by real time-PCR. NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in cells culture supernatant were determined by ELISA. Our results revealed that RPMCs overexpression of A20 lead to significant decrease of LPS-induced IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB DNA binding activity (all p<0.01). In addition, A20 also attenuated the expression of TRAF6, CD40, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in cells culture supernatant (all p<0.05). However, A20 only partly inhibited CD40 expression. Our study indicated that A20 overexpression may depress the inflammatory response induced by LPS in cultured RPMCs through negatively regulated the relevant function of adaptors in LPS signaling pathway.

  4. Agreement of skin test with IL-4 production and CD40L expression by T cells upon immunotherapy of subjects with systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings.

    PubMed

    Urra, José M; Cabrera, Carmen M; Alfaya, Teresa; Feo-Brito, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Venom immunotherapy is the only curative intervention for subjects with Hymenoptera venom allergy who suffering systemic reactions upon bee or wasp stings. Venom immunotherapy can restore normal immunity against venom allergens, as well as providing to allergic subjects a lifetime tolerance against venoms. Nevertheless, it is necessary using safety assays to monitoring the development of tolerance in the VIT protocols to avoid fatal anaphylactic reactions. The purpose of this study was to assess the modifications in several markers of tolerance induction in subjects with Hymenoptera venom allergy undergoing immunotherapy. The studies were performed at baseline time and after six month of VIT. Intradermal skin tests, basophil activation tests, specific IgE levels; and the T-cell markers (IL-4 and IFN-γ producing cells; and expression of the surface activation markers CD40L and CTLA-4) were assayed. At six month of immunotherapy all parameters studied had significant alterations. All decreased, except the IFN-γ producing cells. In addition, modifications in intradermal skin test showed a significant correlation with both, CD40L expression on CD4 T lymphocytes (p=0.043) and IL-4 producing T lymphocytes (p=0.012). Neither basophil activation test nor serum levels of sIgE demonstrated any correlation with the immunological parameters studied nor among them. These results suggest that both IL-4 production and CD40L expression could be two good indicators of the beneficial effects of venom immunotherapy which translate into skin tests.

  5. Analysis of the association between CD40 and CD40 ligand polymorphisms and systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of CD40 and CD40 ligand (CD40LG) genes in the susceptibility and phenotype expression of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods In total, 2,670 SSc patients and 3,245 healthy individuals from four European populations (Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, and Italy) were included in the study. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CD40 (rs1883832, rs4810485, rs1535045) and CD40LG (rs3092952, rs3092920) were genotyped by using a predesigned TaqMan allele-discrimination assay technology. Meta-analysis was assessed to determine whether an association exists between the genetic variants and SSc or its main clinical subtypes. Results No evidence of association between CD40 and CD40LG genes variants and susceptibility to SSc was observed. Similarly, no significant statistical differences were observed when SSc patients were stratified by the clinical subtypes, the serologic features, and pulmonary fibrosis. Conclusions Our results do not suggest an important role of CD40 and CD40LG gene polymorphisms in the susceptibility to or clinical expression of SSc. PMID:22731751

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Vpu Induces the Expression of CD40 in Endothelial Cells and Regulates HIV-Induced Adhesion of B-Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Winnie W.; Ruhl, Rebecca; Lewis, Paul; Bentley, Matthew; Nelson, Jay A.; Moses, Ashlee V.

    2004-01-01

    AIDS-related B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (AIDS-NHL) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). AIDS-NHL is clinically and histologically heterogeneous, but common features include an aggressive clinical course and frequent extranodal presentation. HIV-1 infection of nonimmune cells that interact with malignant B cells at extranodal sites may influence both the development and the clinical presentation of disease. Our previous studies have shown that coculture of B-lymphoma (BL) cells with HIV-1-infected endothelial cells (EC) leads to contact activation of EC and firm BL-cell adhesion. The key event promoting EC-BL-cell adhesion was HIV-1 upregulation of endothelial CD40, which allowed induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in a CD40-dependent manner. The present study was designed to identify the HIV-1 protein(s) that influence EC-BL-cell adhesion. When HIV-1 proteins were individually expressed in EC by using recombinant adenoviruses, cultured BL cells adhered exclusively to Vpu-transduced EC. As with HIV-infected EC, adhesive properties were linked to the capacity of Vpu to upregulate CD40, which in turn allowed efficient expression of VCAM-1. When EC were infected with an HIV-1 pseudotype lacking the Vpu gene, CD40 upregulation and BL-cell adhesive properties were lost, indicating an essential role for Vpu in EC-BL-cell interactions. Thus, these data reveal a novel function for HIV-1 Vpu and further suggest a role for Vpu in the development of AIDS-NHL at EC-rich extranodal sites. PMID:15078922

  7. The interleukin-2 receptor α chain (CD25) plays an important role in regulating monocyte-derived CD40 expression during anti-porcine cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z-G; Wang, Z; Zhu, L-M; Fang, Y-S; Yu, L-Z; Xu, H

    2012-05-01

    Long-term xenograft survival is limited by delayed xenograft rejection, and monocytes are thought to play an important role in this process. Although typically considered a T cell surface marker, interleukin 2 the receptor chain CD25 is also functional on monocytes. We hypothesized that CD25 expression on monocytes functions to augment monocyte activation in xeno-specific cellular responses. Xenogeneic mixed lymphocyte-endothelial cell reactions were used to study the role of CD25 in facilitating xenogeneic cell-mediated immune responses an in vitro. We also tested the effect of the anti-CD25 antibody daclizumab on monocyte-mediated T cell activation during xeno-specific cellular responses. Co-culture with porcine endothelial cells (PEC) elicited a pronounced proliferative response by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that was accompanied by upregulation of CD25 and CD40 on CD14(+) monocytes. CD4(+) cells proliferated in response to PEC-conditioned monocytes, while blockade of CD25 with daclizumab reduced CD4(+) cell proliferation in the presence of PEC-conditioned monocytes. In addition, daclizumab inhibited proliferation of PBMC in responses to PEC. Analysis of monocytes from PBMC-PEC cocultures by flow cytometry indicated that daclizumab inhibited CD40 upregulation on PEC-activated monocytes. These data demonstrate that CD25 blockade prevents xenogeneic cellular responses by directly blocking CD25 expression on both activated T cells and monocytes. CD25 blockade on T cells or monocytes may indirectly affect upregulation of CD40 on xenoreactive monocytes. Our data strengthen the rationale for incorporating CD25 directed therapy in discordant xenotransplantation.

  8. The CD40-CD40L system in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Pamukcu, Burak; Lip, Gregory Y H; Snezhitskiy, Viktor; Shantsila, Eduard

    2011-08-01

    The CD40-CD40L system is a pathway which is associated with both prothrombotic and proinflammatory effects. CD40 and its ligand were first discovered on the surface of activated T cells, but its presence on B cells, antigen-presenting cells, mast cells, and finally platelets, is evident. The soluble form of CD40L (sCD40L) is derived mainly from activated platelets and contributes to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. Indeed, sCD40L has autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine activities, and it enhances platelet activation, aggregation, and platelet-leucocyte conjugation that may lead to atherothrombosis. It has even been suggested that sCD40L may play a pathogenic role in triggering acute coronary syndromes. Conversely, blockade of this pathway with anti-CD40L antibodies may prevent or delay the progression of atherosclerosis. Concentrations of sCD40L also predict risk of future cardiovascular disease in healthy women and clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes. However, there are controversial and uncertain points over the application of this biomarker to clinical cardiology. In this review, we provide an overview of potential implications of CD40-CD40L signalling and sCD40L as a biomarker in patients with atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  9. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4{sup +} T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ{sup 9}-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4{sup +} T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ{sup 9}-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ{sup 9}-THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NFκB. • Δ{sup 9}-THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • Δ{sup 9}-THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β.

  10. Giving blood: a new role for CD40 in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Stephan; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2006-10-30

    CD40 was initially identified as a receptor expressed by B cells that is crucial for inducing an effective adaptive immune response. CD40 was subsequently shown to be expressed by endothelial cells and to promote angiogenesis. New data now show that in tumor-prone transgenic mice, CD40-mediated neovascularization is essential for early stage tumorigenicity. This suggests, at least in this mouse model, that CD40 has an important role in the angiogenic process that is coupled to carcinogenesis, a finding that could lead to novel therapeutic opportunities.

  11. IL-12-mediated STAT4 signaling and TCR signal strength cooperate in the induction of CD40L in human and mouse CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Stark, Regina; Hartung, Anett; Zehn, Dietmar; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    CD40L is one of the key molecules bridging the activation of specific T cells and the maturation of professional and nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells including B cells. CD4(+) T cells have been regarded as the major T-cell subset that expresses CD40L upon cognate activation; however, we demonstrate here that a putative CD8(+) helper T-cell subset expressing CD40L is induced in human and murine CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in mice immunized with antigen-pulsed dendritic cells. IL-12 and STAT4-mediated signaling was the major instructive cytokine signal boosting the ability of CD8(+) T cells to express CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, TCR signaling strength modulated CD40L expression in CD8(+) T cells after primary differentiation in vitro as well as in vivo. The induction of CD40L in CD8(+) T cells regulated by IL-12 and TCR signaling may enable CD8(+) T cells to respond autonomously of CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we propose that under proinflammatory conditions, a self-sustaining positive feedback loop could facilitate the efficient priming of T cells stimulated by high affinity peptide displaying APCs.

  12. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system.

  13. A Salmonella typhi OmpC fusion protein expressing the CD154 Trp140–Ser149 amino acid strand binds CD40 and activates a lymphoma B-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Mario I; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Luría-Perez, Rosendo; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Isibasi, Armado; González-Bonilla, Cesar R

    2003-01-01

    CD154 is a type II glycoprotein member of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family, which is expressed mainly on the surface of activated T lymphocytes. The interaction with its receptor CD40, plays a central role in the control of several functions of the immune system. Structural models based on the homology of CD154 with TNF and lymphotoxin indicate that binding to CD40 involves three regions surrounding amino acids K143, R203 and Q220, and that strands W140–S149 and S198–A210 are critical for such interactions. Also, it has been reported that two recombinant CD154 fragments, including amino acid residues Y45–L261 or E108–L261 are biologically active, whereas other polypeptides, including S149–L261, are not. Therefore, we decided to construct a fusion protein inserting the W140-S149 amino acid strand (WAEKGYYTMS) in an external loop of the outer membrane protein C (OmpC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and assess its ability to bind CD40 and activate B cells. The sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the chimeric OmpC–gp39 protein conserved its ability to form trimers. Binding to CD40 was established by three variants of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a direct binding assay by coating plates with a recombinant CD40–Fc protein and through two competition assays between OmpC–gp39 and recombinant CD154 or soluble CD40–Fc. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that OmpC–gp39 increased the expression levels of major histocompatibility complex II, CD23, and CD80, in Raji human B-cell lymphoma similarly to an antibody against CD40. These results further support that the CD154/CD40 interaction is similar to the TNF/TNF receptor. This is the first report of a bacterial fusion protein containing a small amino acid strand form a ligand that is able to activate its cognate receptor. PMID:14511234

  14. Platelet CD40L at the interface of adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Elzey, Bennett D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Sowa, Jennifer M.; Crist, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Initiated by the finding that platelets express functional CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154), many new roles for platelets have been discovered in unanticipated areas, including the immune response. When current literature is considered as a whole, the picture that is emerging begins to show that platelets are able to significantly affect, for better or worse, the overall health and condition of the mammalian host. Animal models have made significant contributions to our expanding knowledge of platelet function, much of which is anticipated to be clinically relevant. While still mostly circumstantial, the evidence supports a critical role for CD40L in many normal and disease processes. PMID:21075431

  15. Differential peptide binding to CD40 evokes counteractive responses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Srijit; Alonso-Sarduy, Livan; Alonso, Livan; Roduit, Charles; Bandyopadhyay, Syamdas; Singh, Shailza; Saha, Shipra; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Roy, Somenath; Dietler, Giovanni; Kasas, Sandor; Das, Pradeep; Krishnasastry, M V; Saha, Bhaskar

    2012-05-01

    The antigen-presenting cell–expressed CD40 is implied in the regulation of counteractive immune responses such as induction of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)–12 and IL-10, respectively. The mechanism of this duality in CD40 function remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether such duality depends on ligand binding. Based on CD40 binding, we identifed two dodecameric peptides, peptide-7 and peptide-19, from the phage peptide library. Peptide-7 induces IL-10 and increases Leishmania donovani infection in macrophages, whereas peptide-19 induces IL-12 and reduces L. donovani infection. CD40-peptide interaction analyses by surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy suggest that the functional differences are not associated with the studied interaction parameters. The molecular dynamic simulation of the CD40-peptides interaction suggests that these two peptides bind to two different places on CD40. Thus, we suggest for the first time that differential binding of the ligands imparts functional duality to CD40.

  16. AdCD40L--crossing the valley of death?

    PubMed

    Ullenhag, Gustav; Loskog, Angelica S I

    2012-08-01

    CD40-mediated cancer therapy has been under development since it became clear that CD40 plays a profound role in the stimulation of adaptive immune responses. Further, CD40 signaling on tumor cells may lead to growth arrest or even apoptosis that improves therapy outcome. The therapeutic window is appealing since the immune system is selective and normal cells do not apoptose upon CD40 signaling. AdCD40L is an adenoviral-based immunostimulatory gene therapy under evaluation for its efficacy to treat cancer. Because of its nature, the adenoviral backbone will stimulate TLRs while CD40L potentiates the shifts toward Th1 type of immunity. AdCD40L has shown efficacy in various murine models, and safety studies have been performed on dog patients and in human clinical trials. AdCD40L has been used for both ex vivo gene modification of tumor cell vaccines as well as for direct intratumoral injections. Lately, an oncolytic vector has been used to further increase the eradication of solid tumors that as a consequence further boosts the release of tumor antigens and creates danger signaling in the tumor micro milieu. This review discusses the currently unfolding mechanisms of action of AdCD40L gene therapy and its possibilities to reach clinical care.

  17. Are polymorphisms of the immunoregulatory factor CD40LG implicated in acute transfusion reactions?

    PubMed Central

    Aloui, Chaker; Sut, Caroline; Prigent, Antoine; Fagan, Jocelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Granados-Herbepin, Viviana; Touraine, Renaud; Pozzetto, Bruno; Aouni, Mahjoub; Fendri, Chedlia; Hassine, Mohsen; Chakroun, Tahar; Jemni-Yacoub, Saloua; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L/CD154), a member of TNF superfamily, is notably expressed on activated CD4+ T-cells and stimulated platelets. CD40L is linked to a variety of pathologies and to acute transfusion reactions (ATR). Mutations in this gene (CD40LG) lead to X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome. Some CD40LG polymorphisms are associated with variable protein expression. The rationale behind this study is that CD40L protein has been observed to be involved in ATR. We wondered whether genetic polymorphisms are implicated. We investigated genetic diversity in the CD40LG using DHPLC and capillary electrophoresis for screening and genotyping (n = 485 French and Tunisian blood donors). We identified significant difference in the CD40LG linkage pattern between the two populations. Variant minor alleles were significantly over-represented in Tunisian donors (P<0.0001 to 0.0270). We found higher heterogeneity in the Tunisian, including three novel low frequency variants. As there was not a particular pattern of CD40LG in single apheresis donors whose platelet components induced an ATR, we discuss how this information may be useful for future disease association studies on CD40LG. PMID:25430087

  18. CD40 controls CXCR5-induced recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells to gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yixin; Shen, Jin; Zhang, Guangbo; Chen, Xiaojuan; Wu, JiaMing; Chen, Weichang

    2015-11-17

    To explore the mechanisms of MDSC trafficking and accumulation during tumor progression. In this study, we report significant CD40 upregulation in tumor-infiltrating MDSC when compared with splenic MDSC. Microarray analyses comparing CD40(high) and CD40l(ow) MDSC revealed 1872 differentially expressed genes, including CD83, CXCR5, BTLA, CXCL9, TLR1, FLT3, NOD2 and CXCL10. In vivo experiments comparing wild-type (WT) and CD40 knockout (KO) mice demonstrated that CD40 critically regulates CXCR5 expression. Consistently, the transwell analysis confirmed the essential role of CXCR5-CXCL13 crosstalk in the migration of CD40+ MDSC toward gastric cancer. Furthermore, more MDSC accumulated in the gastric cancers of WT mice when compared with KO mice, and the WT tumors mostly contained CD40+ cells. Functionally, tumors grew faster in WT than KO mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that CD40 expression upregulates the chemokine receptor CXCR5 and promotes MDSC migration toward and accumulation within cancer. Therefore, this study provides preliminary evidence that CD40 may stimulate tumor growth by enabling immune evasion via MDSC recruitment and inhibition of T cell expansion.

  19. Regulatory T Cells and Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment Undergo Fas-Dependent Cell Death during IL-2/αCD40 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jonathan M.; Subleski, Jeff J.; Back, Tim; Chen, Xin; Watkins, Stephanie K.; Yagita, Hideo; Sayers, Thomas J.; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Fas ligand expression in certain tumors has been proposed to contribute to immunosuppression and poor prognosis. However, immunotherapeutic approaches may elicit the Fas-mediated elimination of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within tumors that represent major obstacles for cancer immunotherapy. Previously, we showed that IL-2 and agonistic CD40 Ab (αCD40) elicited synergistic antitumor responses coincident with the efficient removal of Tregs and MDSCs. We demonstrate in this study in two murine tumor models that Treg and MDSC loss within the tumor microenvironment after IL-2/αCD40 occurs through a Fas-dependent cell death pathway. Among tumor-infiltrating leukocytes, CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and immature myeloid cells expressed Fas ligand after treatment. Fas was expressed by tumor-associated Tregs and immature myeloid cells, including MDSCs. Tregs and MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment expressed active caspases after IL-2/αCD40 therapy and, in contrast with effector T cells, Tregs significantly downregulated Bcl-2 expression. In contrast, Tregs and MDSCs proliferated and expanded in the spleen after treatment. Adoptive transfer of Fas-deficient Tregs or MDSCs into wild-type, Treg-, or MDSC-depleted hosts resulted in the persistence of Tregs or MDSCs and the loss of antitumor efficacy in response to IL-2/αCD40. These results demonstrate the importance of Fas-mediated Treg/MDSC removal for successful antitumor immunotherapy. Our results suggest that immunotherapeutic strategies that include exploiting Treg and MDSC susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis hold promise for treatment of cancer. PMID:24808361

  20. CD40 regulates the processing of NF-κB2 p100 to p52

    PubMed Central

    Coope, H.J.; Atkinson, P.G.P.; Huhse, B.; Belich, M.; Janzen, J.; Holman, M.J.; Klaus, G.G.B.; Johnston, L.H.; Ley, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    The nf-kb2 gene encodes the cytoplasmic NF-κB inhibitory protein p100 from which the active p52 NF-κB subunit is derived by proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Ligands which stimulate p100 processing to p52 have not been defined. Here, ligation of CD40 on transfected 293 cells is shown to trigger p52 production by stimulating p100 ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-mediated proteolysis. CD40-mediated p52 accumulation is dependent on de novo protein synthesis and triggers p52 translocation into the nucleus to generate active NF-κB dimers. Endogenous CD40 ligation on primary murine splenic B cells also stimulates p100 processing, which results in the delayed nuclear translocation of p52–RelB dimers. In both 293 cells and primary splenic B cells, the ability of CD40 to trigger p100 processing requires functional NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK). In contrast, NIK activity is not required for CD40 to stimulate the degradation of IκBα in either cell type. The regulation of p100 processing by CD40 is likely to be important for the transcriptional regulation of CD40 target genes in adaptive immune responses. PMID:12374738

  1. Soluble CD40 Ligand in Aspirin-Treated Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Gremmel, Thomas; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is mainly generated by cleavage of CD40L from the surface of activated platelets, and therefore considered a platelet activation marker. Although the predictive value of sCD40L for ischemic events has been demonstrated in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), studies on the association of sCD40L with cardiovascular outcomes in lower risk populations yielded heterogeneous results. We therefore sought to investigate factors influencing sCD40L levels, and the predictive value of sCD40L for long-term ischemic events in unselected, aspirin-treated patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. sCD40L was determined by a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 682 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Two-year follow-up data were obtained from 562 patients. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel was associated with significantly lower levels of sCD40L and lower platelet surface expressions of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa compared to aspirin monotherapy (all p≤0.01). Hypertension was linked to lower plasma concentrations of sCD40L, whereas female sex, increasing high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hematocrit were associated with higher sCD40L concentrations (all p<0.05). sCD40L levels were similar in patients without and with the primary endpoint in the overall study population (p = 0.4). Likewise, sCD40L levels did not differ significantly between patients without and with the secondary endpoints (both p≥0.4). Similar results were obtained when only patients with angiographically-proven coronary artery disease (n = 459), stent implantation (n = 205) or ACS (n = 125) were analyzed. The adjustment for differences in patient characteristics by multivariate regression analyses did not change the results. ROC curve analyses did not reveal cut-off values for sCD40L for the prediction of the primary or secondary endpoints. In conclusion, plasma sCD40L levels are

  2. Thymic medullary epithelium and thymocyte self tolerance require cooperation between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy A.; Zhang, Jingjing; Jeon, Hyein; Nitta, Takeshi; Ohigashi, Izumi; Klug, David; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Choudhury, Baishakhi; Sharrow, Susan O.; Granger, Larry; Adams, Anthony; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Jenkinson, S. Rhiannon; Richie, Ellen R.; Gress, Ronald E.; Takahama, Yousuke; Hodes, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A critical process during thymic development of the T cell repertoire is the induction of self-tolerance. Tolerance in developing T cells is highly dependent on medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and mTEC development in turn requires signals from mature single positive (SP) thymocytes, a bidirectional relationship termed thymus crosstalk. We show that CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory interactions, which mediate negative selection and self-tolerance, upregulate expression of LTα, LTβ and RANK in the thymus and are necessary for medullary development. Combined absence of CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L results in profound deficiency in mTEC development comparable to that observed in the absence of SP thymocytes. This requirement for costimulatory signaling is maintained even in a TCR transgenic model of high affinity TCR-ligand interactions. CD4 thymocytes maturing in the altered thymic epithelial environment of CD40/CD80/86 KO mice are highly autoreactive in vitro and are lethal in congenic adoptive transfer in vivo, demonstrating a critical role for these costimulatory pathways in self-tolerance as well as thymic epithelial development. These findings demonstrate that cooperativity between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L pathways is required for normal medullary epithelium and for maintenance of self-tolerance in thymocyte development. PMID:24337745

  3. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL(-1) and 0.6-0.7 ng mL(-1), respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces.

  4. CD40 stimulation leads to effective therapy of CD40− tumors through induction of strong systemic cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunity

    PubMed Central

    van Mierlo, Geertje J. D.; den Boer, Annemieke Th.; Medema, Jan Paul; van der Voort, Ellen I. H.; Fransen, Marieke F.; Offringa, Rienk; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Toes, Rene E. M.

    2002-01-01

    Adequate spontaneous activation of tumor-specific T lymphocytes in tumor-bearing hosts is rare, despite the expression of tumor antigens that are potentially highly immunogenic. For example, failure of the immune system to raise competent responses against established tumors expressing the human adenovirus E1A-antigen allows this tumor to grow in immunocompetent mice. We show that systemic in vivo administration of agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies into tumor-bearing mice results in tumor eradication mediated by CD8+ T cells. Treatment resulted in a strong expansion and systemic accumulation of E1A-specific CTL and depended on CD40 expression on host cells, as the tumor was CD40−, and therapy failed in CD40-deficient mice. Local intratumoral administration of anti-CD40 mAb is equally effective in licensing strong, systemic CTL immunity, resulting in the clearance of distant tumor nodules. Our data indicate that the immune response after cancer–host interactions can be directed toward competence, leading to the cure of established tumors merely by delivery of a CD40-dependent “license to kill” signal. PMID:11929985

  5. Nasal mast cells in perennial allergic rhinitics exhibit increased expression of the Fc epsilonRI, CD40L, IL-4, and IL-13, and can induce IgE synthesis in B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pawankar, R; Okuda, M; Yssel, H; Okumura, K; Ra, C

    1997-01-01

    Cross-linking of allergen specific IgE bound to the high affinity IgE receptor (FC epsilonRI) on the surface of mast cells with multivalent allergens results in the release of both pre-formed and newly generated mediators, and in the manifestation of allergic symptoms. The expression of Fc epsilonRI, and the synthesis of IgE are therefore critical for the development of allergic diseases. In this study, we report that nasal mast cells (NMC) from patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR) expressed significantly greater levels of the Fc epsilonRI, CD40L, IL-4, and IL-13 as compared to NMC from patients with chronic infective rhinitis (CIR). The level of Fc epsilonRI expression in NMC of PAR patients strongly correlated with the levels of serum total (r = 0.8, P < 0.003) and specific IgE (r = 0.89, P < 0.0004) antibodies. In addition, stimulation of NMC with IL-4, upregulated the Fc epsilonRIalpha chain expression both at the protein and mRNA levels, as detected by flow cytometry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, NMC from PAR, but not CIR, patients induced IgE synthesis by purified B cells in the presence of Der fII (mite antigen). These results suggest novel and critical roles for mast cells in promoting the allergic reaction through the increased expression of Fc epsilonRI and by enhancing and amplifying the IgE production, within the local microenvironment. PMID:9119992

  6. Autocrine stimulation of IL-10 is critical to the enrichment of IL-10-producing CD40(hi)CD5(+) regulatory B cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jun Ho; Han, Hee Dong; Kim, A-Ram; Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, Min Bum; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kim, Young Mi; You, Ji Chang; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2015-01-01

    IL-10-producing B (Breg) cells regulate various immune responses. However, their phenotype remains unclear. CD40 expression was significantly increased in B cells by LPS, and the Breg cells were also enriched in CD40(hi)CD5(+) B cells. Furthermore, CD40 expression on Breg cells was increased by IL-10, CD40 ligand, and B cell-activating factor, suggesting that CD40(hi) is a common phenotype of Breg cells. LPS-induced CD40 expression was largely suppressed by an anti-IL-10 receptor antibody and in IL-10(-/-)CD5(+)CD19(+) B cells. The autocrine effect of IL-10 on the CD40 expression was largely suppressed by an inhibitor of JAK/STAT3. In vivo, the LPS treatment increased the population of CD40(hi)CD5(+) Breg cells in mice. However, the population of CD40(hi)CD5(+) B cells was minimal in IL-10(-/-) mice by LPS. Altogether, our findings show that Breg cells are largely enriched in CD40(hi)CD5(+) B cells and the autocrine effect of IL-10 is critical to the formation of CD40(hi)CD5(+) Breg cells.

  7. CD40 ligand, Bcl-2 and apoptosis in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Ola A; Omran, Alaa A; Elnaggar, Amina M; Fathy, Ayman

    2009-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a haematopoetic neoplasm caused primarily by defects in apoptosis mechanisms and complicated by progressive marrow failure, immunosupression and increased resistance to chemotherapy. The CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interaction has been shown to significantly increase antigen presentation in normal and malignant B-cells and it is a powerful regulator of cell survival. Bcl-2 expression is common in CLL and is associated with decreased overall survival. Our objective was to asses CD40 ligand (CD154) and Bcl-2 expressions and their correlation with clinical and laboratory features in CLL patients. This study was conducted on 40 subjects, including 10 healthy volunteers as the control group and 30 patients presented with de novo chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), all of them were subjected to thorough history taking, full clinical examinations, routine laboratory investigations and flowcytometric assessment of CD40L and Bcl-2 on lymphocytes. There was a highly significant increase in TLC, absolute lymphocytic count, serum LDH, B2-microglobulin and Bcl-2 expression (P<0.001); there was a significant increase in CD40L expression (P<0.05); whereas there was a highly significant decrease in hemoglobin concentration and platelets count between the study group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference as regard direct Coombs' test between both groups. There was no significant relation between CD154 expression and clinical findings, Rai staging system and other laboratory parameters. CD40L expression is increased with staging of Modified Rai staging system but not reaching the significant level. There was no significant correlation between CD154 expression and some of clinical and laboratory parameters, whereas there was only significantly negative correlation between Bcl-2 expression and both haemoglobin concentration and platelets count (P<0.001). Combination of Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs

  8. Cloning and expression analysis of the murine lymphotoxin beta gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pokholok, D K; Maroulakou, I G; Kuprash, D V; Alimzhanov, M B; Kozlov, S V; Novobrantseva, T I; Turetskaya, R L; Green, J E; Nedospasov, S A

    1995-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and soluble lymphotoxin (LT) (also called LT-alpha or TNF-beta) are cytokines with similar biological activities that are encoded by related and closely linked genes. TNF-alpha, a mediator of the inflammatory response, exists in soluble and transmembrane forms. LT-alpha can be secreted or retained at the cell surface by binding to a 33-kDa transmembrane subunit, LT-beta. The recently cloned human LT-beta gene encodes another TNF family member and is linked to the TNF/LT locus within the major histocompatibility complex locus. The cell surface LT is a heterotrimer consisting of LT-alpha and LT-beta, whose physiological function is not yet clearly defined. We now report the sequence analysis of the genomic region and cDNA of murine LT-beta gene, which is closely associated with the TNF-alpha and LT-alpha genes within the murine major histocompatibility complex locus. Unlike the TNF-alpha, LT-alpha, and human LT-beta genes, which contain four exons, the murine LT-beta contains three exons and encodes a 244-amino acid polypeptide with a 66-amino acid insert that is absent from the human homologue. In situ hybridization demonstrates constitutive expression of LT-beta in lymphoid and hematopoietic tissues. LT-beta transcription is maximal in the thymic medulla and in splenic white pulp. LT-beta mRNA is also detected in the skin and in specific regions of the brain. The LT-beta promoter region contains putative Ets-binding sites, suggesting that the expression of LT-beta may be regulated in part by Ets transcription factors whose pattern of lymphoid expression overlaps that of LT-beta. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7846035

  9. Effective genetic vaccination with a widely shared endogenous retroviral tumor antigen requires CD40 stimulation during tumor rejection phase.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Cingarlini, Sara; Apolloni, Elisa; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; De Santo, Carmela; Macino, Beatrice; Marin, Oriano; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-12-15

    Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) products are recognized by T lymphocytes in mice and humans. As these Ags are preferentially expressed by neoplastic tissues, they might represent an ideal target for active immunization by genetic vaccination. However, i.m. inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding mouse gp70 or p15E, two products of the env gene of an endogenous murine leukemia virus, elicited a weak Ag-specific T lymphocyte response and resulted in partial protection from challenge with mouse tumors possessing these Ags. Depletion experiments showed that CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T lymphocytes were crucial for the antitumor activity of the vaccines. Systemic administration of agonistic anti-CD40 mAb increased the therapeutic potential of genetic vaccination, but only when given during the tumor rejection phase and not at the time of immunization. This effect correlated with a dramatic increase in the number of ERV-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Adjuvant activity of CD40 agonists thus seems to be relevant to enhance the CD8(+) T cell-dependent response in tumor-bearing hosts, suggesting that sustaining tumor-specific T lymphocyte survival in subjects undergoing vaccination might be a key event in the successful vaccination with weak tumor Ags.

  10. Disruption of antigen-induced inflammatory responses in CD40 ligand knockout mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lei, X F; Ohkawara, Y; Stämpfli, M R; Mastruzzo, C; Marr, R A; Snider, D; Xing, Z; Jordana, M

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of the interaction between CD40 and its ligand (CD40L) to antigen-induced airways inflammatory responses. To this end, we used a model involving ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization followed by OVA aerosol challenge in CD40L knockout (KO) mice. OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 were detected in the serum of the sensitized control, but not in CD40L-KO mice. After antigen challenge, sensitized control mice developed airway inflammation that was primarily eosinophilic. This inflammatory response was dramatically reduced in CD40L-KO mice. In contrast, similar numbers of eosinophils were observed in both the bone marrow and the peripheral blood in the sensitized controls and mutant strains after antigen challenge. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these findings, we examined levels of the cytokines IL-5, IL-4, and TNFalpha in both bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum. Similar levels of IL-5 were detected in BAL and serum of control and CD40L-KO mice; however, negligible levels of IL-4 in BAL and serum and of TNFalpha in BAL were detected in CD40L-KO mice when compared with control mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that endothelial cell expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 in OVA-sensitized and -challenged CD40L-KO mice was, as detected by immunohistochemistry, markedly decreased compared with that observed in similarly treated control mice. In addition, we locally overexpressed IL-4 and TNFalpha by using an adenoviral (Ad)-mediated gene transfer approach. Intranasal administration of either Ad/TNFalpha or Ad/IL-4 into OVA-sensitized and -challenged CD40L-KO mice did not reconstitute airway eosinophilia. However, concurrent administration of Ad/TNFalpha and Ad/IL-4 upregulated endothelial expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and resulted in full reconstitution of the inflammatory response in the airways. Together, these findings demonstrate the importance of the CD40-CD40L costimulatory

  11. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in murine hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, J W; MacGregor, G R; Wager-Smith, K; Fletcher, F A; Moore, K A; Hawkins, D; Villalon, D; Chang, S M; Caskey, C T

    1988-01-01

    Multiple replication-defective retrovirus vectors were tested for their ability to transfer and express human adenosine deaminase in vitro and in vivo in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model. High-titer virus production was obtained from vectors by using both a retrovirus long terminal repeat promoter and internal transcriptional units with human c-fos and herpes virus thymidine kinase promoters. After infection of primary murine bone marrow with one of these vectors, human adenosine deaminase was detected in 60 to 85% of spleen colony-forming units and in the blood of 14 of 14 syngeneic marrow transplant recipients. This system offers the opportunity to assess methods for increasing efficiency of gene transfer, for regulation of expression of foreign genes in hematopoietic progenitors, and for long-term measurement of the stability of expression in these cells. Images PMID:3072474

  12. miRNA-145 inhibits VSMC proliferation by targeting CD40

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xin; Li, Dai; Chen, Min; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Bikui; Wu, Tian; Guo, Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated functions of miR-145 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) phenotypes and vascular diseases. In this study, we aim to determine whether CD40 is involved in miR-145 mediated switch of VSMC phenotypes. In cultured VSMCs, the effects of miR-145 and CD40 on TNF-α, TGF-β, and Homocysteine (Hcy) induced cell proliferation were evaluated by over-expression of miR-145 or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of CD40. We also used ultrasound imaging to explore the effect of miR-145 on carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) in atherosclerotic cerebral infarction (ACI) patients. The results showed 50 ng/mL TNF-α, 5 ng/mL TGF-β, and 500 μmol/L Hcy significantly increased the expression of CD40, both at mRNA and protein levels, and also induced the proliferation of VSMCs. We found that over-expression of miR-145 significantly inhibited the expression of CD40 and the differentiation of VSMCs, and over-expression of miR-145 decreased IL-6 levels in VSMC supernatants. In ACI patients, the lower expression of miR-145 was associated with thicker CIMT and higher levels of plasma IL-6. Our results suggest that the miR-145/CD40 pathway is involved in regulating VSMC phenotypes in TNF-α, TGF-β, and Hcy induced VSMCs proliferation model. Targeting miR-145/CD40 might be a useful strategy for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27731400

  13. Construction and immunological characterization of CD40L or GM-CSF incorporated Hantaan virus like particle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Truax, Agnieszka D.; Ma, Ruixue; Liu, Ziyu; Lei, Yingfeng; Zhang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Shang, Lei; Liu, Rongrong; Wang, Fang; Wu, Xingan

    2016-01-01

    Infection of Hantaan virus (HTNV) usually causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). China has the worst epidemic incidence of HFRS as well as high fatality. Inactivated whole virus has been used for HFRS vaccination, however there are still problems such as safety concerns. CD40 ligand (CD40L) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are well-known immune stimulating molecules that can enhance antigen presenting, lymphocytes activation and maturation, incorporation of CD40L and GM-CSF to the surface of virus like particles (VLPs) can greatly improve the vaccination effect. We constructed eukaryotic vectors expressing HTNV M segment and S segment, as well as vectors expressing HTNV M segment with CD40L or GM-CSF, our results showed successful production of CD40L or GM-CSF incorporated HTNV VLPs. In vitro stimulation with CD40L or GM-CSF anchored HTNV VLP showed enhanced activation of macrophages and DCs. CD40L/GM-CSF incorporated VLP can induce higher level of HTNV specific antibody and neutralizing antibody in mice. Immunized mice splenocytes showed higher ability of secreting IFN-γ and IL-2, as well as enhancing CTL activity. These results suggest CD40L/GM-CSF incorporated VLP can serve as prospective vaccine candidate. PMID:27542281

  14. CD40 Negatively Regulates ATP-TLR4-Activated Inflammasome in Microglia.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Sagar; Patel, Divyesh; Agrawal-Rajput, Reena

    2017-03-01

    During acute brain injury and/or sterile inflammation, release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activates pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Microglial toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 activated by DAMPs potentiates neuroinflammation through inflammasome-induced IL-1β and pathogenic Th17 polarization which critically influences brain injury. TLR4 activation accompanies increased CD40, a cognate costimulatory molecule, involved in microglia-mediated immune responses in the brain. During brain injury, excessive release of extracellular ATP (DAMPs) is involved in promoting the damage. However, the regulatory role of CD40 in microglia during ATP-TLR4-mediated inflammasome activation has never been explored. We report that CD40, in the absence of ATP, synergizes TLR4-induced proinflammatory cytokines but not IL-1β, suggesting that the response is independent of inflammasome. The presence of ATP during TLR4 activation leads to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and caspase-1-mediated IL-1β secretion which was inhibited during CD40 activation, accompanied with inhibition of ERK1/2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Experiments using selective inhibitors prove indispensability of ERK 1/2 and ROS for inflammasome activation. The ATP-TLR4-primed macrophages polarize the immune response toward pathogenic Th17 cells, whereas CD40 activation mediates Th1 response. Exogenous supplementation of IFN-γ (a Th1 cytokine and CD40 inducer) results in decreased IL-1β, suggesting possible feedback loop mechanism of inflammasome inhibition, whereby IFN-γ-mediated increase in CD40 expression and activation suppress neurotoxic inflammasome activation required for Th17 response. Collectively, the findings indicate that CD40 is a novel negative regulator of ATP-TLR4-mediated inflammasome activation in microglia, thus providing a checkpoint to regulate excessive inflammasome activation and Th17 response during DAMP-mediated brain injury.

  15. Oxygen-regulated gene expression in murine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kind, Karen L; Tam, Kimberley K Y; Banwell, Kelly M; Gauld, Ashley D; Russell, Darryl L; Macpherson, Anne M; Brown, Hannah M; Frank, Laura A; Peet, Daniel J; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important component of the environment of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC), both in vivo within the ovarian follicle and during in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM). Cumulus cells have a key role in supporting oocyte development, and cumulus cell function and gene expression are known to be altered when the environment of the COC is perturbed. Oxygen-regulated gene expression is mediated through the actions of the transcription factors, the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In the present study, the effect of oxygen on cumulus cell gene expression was examined following in vitro maturation of the murine COC at 2%, 5% or 20% oxygen. Increased expression of HIF-responsive genes, including glucose transporter-1, lactate dehydrogenase A and BCL2/adenovirus E1B interacting protein 3, was observed in cumulus cells matured at 2% or 5%, compared with 20% oxygen. Stabilisation of HIF1α protein in cumulus cells exposed to low oxygen was confirmed by western blot and HIF-mediated transcriptional activity was demonstrated using a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein under the control of a promoter containing hypoxia response elements. These results indicate that oxygen concentration influences cumulus cell gene expression and support a role for HIF1α in mediating the cumulus cell response to varying oxygen.

  16. T Cell Cancer Therapy Requires CD40-CD40L Activation of Tumor Necrosis Factor and Inducible Nitric-Oxide-Synthase-Producing Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Ilaria; Zilio, Serena; Desantis, Giacomo; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Agnellini, Andrielly H R; Ugel, Stefano; Sasso, Maria Stella; Qualls, Joseph E; Kratochvill, Franz; Zanovello, Paola; Molon, Barbara; Ries, Carola H; Runza, Valeria; Hoves, Sabine; Bilocq, Amélie M; Bindea, Gabriela; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Galon, Jérôme; Murray, Peter J; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-09-12

    Effective cancer immunotherapy requires overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments. We found that local nitric oxide (NO) production by tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells is important for adoptively transferred CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumors. These myeloid cells are phenotypically similar to inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2)- and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-producing dendritic cells (DC), or Tip-DCs. Depletion of immunosuppressive, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R)-dependent arginase 1(+) myeloid cells enhanced NO-dependent tumor killing. Tumor elimination via NOS2 required the CD40-CD40L pathway. We also uncovered a strong correlation between survival of colorectal cancer patients and NOS2, CD40, and TNF expression in their tumors. Our results identify a network of pro-tumor factors that can be targeted to boost cancer immunotherapies.

  17. The antileukemia activity of a human anti-CD40 antagonist antibody, HCD122, on human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Klabunde, Sha; Lin, Karen; Georgakis, Georgios V.; Cherukuri, Anu; Holash, Jocelyn; Goldbeck, Cheryl; Xu, Xiaomei; Kadel, Edward E.; Lee, Sang Hoon; Aukerman, Sharon Lea; Jallal, Bahija; Aziz, Natasha; Weng, Wen-Kai; Wierda, William; O'Brien, Susan; Younes, Anas

    2008-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the surface expression of CD20, CD5 antigens, as well as the receptor CD40. Activation of CD40 by its ligand (CD40L) induces proliferation and rescues the cells from spontaneous and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. CD40 activation also induces secretion of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IL-8, and GM-CSF, which are involved in tumor cell survival, migration, and interaction with cells in the tumor microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that in primary B-CLL tumor cells, the novel antagonist anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, HCD122, inhibits CD40L-induced activation of signaling pathways, proliferation and survival, and secretion of cytokines. Furthermore, HCD122 is also a potent mediator of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), lysing B-CLL cells more efficiently than rituximab in vitro, despite a significantly higher number of cell surface CD20 binding sites compared with CD40. Unlike rituximab, however, HCD122 (formerly CHIR-12.12) does not internalize upon binding to the cells. Our data suggest that HCD122 may inhibit B-CLL growth by blocking CD40 signaling and by ADCC-mediated cell lysis. PMID:18497318

  18. The antileukemia activity of a human anti-CD40 antagonist antibody, HCD122, on human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Luqman, Mohammad; Klabunde, Sha; Lin, Karen; Georgakis, Georgios V; Cherukuri, Anu; Holash, Jocelyn; Goldbeck, Cheryl; Xu, Xiaomei; Kadel, Edward E; Lee, Sang Hoon; Aukerman, Sharon Lea; Jallal, Bahija; Aziz, Natasha; Weng, Wen-Kai; Wierda, William; O'Brien, Susan; Younes, Anas

    2008-08-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the surface expression of CD20, CD5 antigens, as well as the receptor CD40. Activation of CD40 by its ligand (CD40L) induces proliferation and rescues the cells from spontaneous and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. CD40 activation also induces secretion of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, IL-8, and GM-CSF, which are involved in tumor cell survival, migration, and interaction with cells in the tumor microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that in primary B-CLL tumor cells, the novel antagonist anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, HCD122, inhibits CD40L-induced activation of signaling pathways, proliferation and survival, and secretion of cytokines. Furthermore, HCD122 is also a potent mediator of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), lysing B-CLL cells more efficiently than rituximab in vitro, despite a significantly higher number of cell surface CD20 binding sites compared with CD40. Unlike rituximab, however, HCD122 (formerly CHIR-12.12) does not internalize upon binding to the cells. Our data suggest that HCD122 may inhibit B-CLL growth by blocking CD40 signaling and by ADCC-mediated cell lysis.

  19. Dynamics of notch expression during murine prostate development and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shou, J; Ross, S; Koeppen, H; de Sauvage, F J; Gao, W Q

    2001-10-01

    Notch signaling has been widely demonstrated to be responsible for cell fate determination during normal development and implicated in human T-cell leukemia and mouse mammary carcinomas. Here we show that Notch signaling may be involved in prostatic development and cancer cell growth. In situ hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that Notch1 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells during normal development and in prostate cancer cells. Characterization of Notch1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, in which the expression of reporter green fluorescent protein is under the control of the Notch1 promoter, indicated that Notch1-expressing cells were associated with the basal epithelial cell population in the prostate. Examination of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate showed that expression of Notch1 was elevated in malignant prostatic epithelial cells of primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of Notch ligands, however, was low or undetectable in cultured prostate cancer cells or in malignant prostatic epithelial cells in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 inhibited the proliferation of various prostate cancer cells, including DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that Notch signaling may play a role in murine prostatic development and tumorigenesis.

  20. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  1. Analytical workflow profiling gene expression in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Scott E.; González-Peña, Dianelys; Lawson, Marcus A.; McCusker, Robert H.; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; O’Connor, Jason C.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive and simultaneous analysis of all genes in a biological sample is a capability of RNA-Seq technology. Analysis of the entire transcriptome benefits from summarization of genes at the functional level. As a cellular response of interest not previously explored with RNA-Seq, peritoneal macrophages from mice under two conditions (control and immunologically challenged) were analyzed for gene expression differences. Quantification of individual transcripts modeled RNA-Seq read distribution and uncertainty (using a Beta Negative Binomial distribution), then tested for differential transcript expression (False Discovery Rate-adjusted p-value < 0.05). Enrichment of functional categories utilized the list of differentially expressed genes. A total of 2079 differentially expressed transcripts representing 1884 genes were detected. Enrichment of 92 categories from Gene Ontology Biological Processes and Molecular Functions, and KEGG pathways were grouped into 6 clusters. Clusters included defense and inflammatory response (Enrichment Score = 11.24) and ribosomal activity (Enrichment Score = 17.89). Our work provides a context to the fine detail of individual gene expression differences in murine peritoneal macrophages during immunological challenge with high throughput RNA-Seq. PMID:25708305

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  3. Stromal endothelial cells establish a bidirectional crosstalk with chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells through the TNF-related factors BAFF, APRIL and CD40L

    PubMed Central

    Cols, Montserrat; Barra, Carolina M.; He, Bing; Puga, Irene; Xu, Weifeng; Chiu, April; Tam, Wayne; Knowles, Daniel M.; Dillon, Stacey R.; Leonard, John P.; Furman, Richard R.; Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a clonal B cell disorder of unknown origin. Accessory signals from the microenvironment are critical for the survival, expansion and progression of malignant B cells. We found that the CLL stroma included microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) expressing BAFF and APRIL, two TNF family members related to the T cell-associated B cell-stimulating molecule CD40 ligand (CD40L). Constitutive release of soluble BAFF and APRIL increased upon engagement of CD40 on MVECs by CD40L aberrantly expressed on CLL cells. In addition to enhancing MVEC expression of the CD40 receptor, leukemic CD40L induced cleavases that elicited intracellular processing of pro-BAFF and pro-APRIL proteins in MVECs. The resulting soluble BAFF and APRIL proteins delivered survival, proliferation, Ig gene-remodeling and differentiation signals by activating CLL cells through TACI, BAFF-R and BCMA receptors. BAFF and APRIL further amplified CLL cell survival by up-regulating the expression of leukemic CD40L. Inhibition of TACI, BCMA and BAFF-R expression on CLL cells, abrogation of CD40 expression in MVECs, or suppression of BAFF and APRIL cleavases in MVECs reduced the survival and diversification of malignant B cells. These data indicate that BAFF, APRIL and CD40L form a CLL-enhancing bidirectional signaling network linking neoplastic B cells with the microvascular stroma. PMID:22593611

  4. Melatonin modulates adiponectin expression on murine colitis with sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, Young Sook; Baik, Haing-Woon; Jun, Jin Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong; Choi, Jin Woo; Chung, Sook Hee; Gye, Myung Chan; Lim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jun Bong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine adiponectin expression in colonic tissue of murine colitis and systemic cytokine expression after melatonin treatments and sleep deprivation. METHODS The following five groups of C57BL/6 mice were used in this study: (1) group I, control; (2) group II, 2% DSS induced colitis for 7 d; (3) group III, 2% DSS induced colitis and melatonin treatment; (4) group IV, 2% DSS induced colitis with sleep deprivation (SD) using specially designed and modified multiple platform water baths; and (5) group V, 2% DSS induced colitis with SD and melatonin treatment. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) or saline was intraperitoneally injected daily to mice for 4 d. The body weight was monitored daily. The degree of colitis was evaluated histologically after sacrificing the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis was performed using anti-adiponectin antibody. After sampling by intracardiac punctures, levels of serum cytokines were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Sleep deprivation in water bath exacerbated DSS induced colitis and worsened weight loss. Melatonin injection not only alleviated the severity of mucosal injury, but also helped survival during stressful condition. The expression level of adiponectin in mucosa was decreased in colitis, with the lowest level observed in colitis combined with sleep deprivation. Melatonin injection significantly (P < 0.05) recovered the expression of adiponectin. The expression levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were increased in the serum of mice with DSS colitis but decreased after melatonin injection. CONCLUSION This study suggested that melatonin modulated adiponectin expression in colonic tissue and melatonin and adiponectin synergistically potentiated anti-inflammatory effects on colitis with sleep deprivation. PMID:27672276

  5. Expression of phospholipase C isozymes by murine B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hempel, W M; DeFranco, A L

    1991-06-01

    Cross-linking of membrane (m) Ig, the B cell receptor for Ag, activates protein tyrosine phosphorylation and hydrolysis of phosphotidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. The latter signal transduction pathway is an important mediator of antigen receptor engagement. The initial event in this pathway is the activation of phospholipase C (PLC). The identity of the isozyme of PLC used in B cells and the mechanism by which it becomes activated are currently unknown. The cDNA encoding five different isozymes have been cloned. As a first step in identifying the isozyme of PLC that is coupled to mIgM, murine cDNA fragments for the five cloned PLC isozymes were generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned, and used to screen a panel of B cell lines representing different stages of development for PLC mRNA expression. All the B cell lines tested expressed high levels of PLC alpha and PLC gamma 2 mRNA, whereas PLC beta and PLC delta mRNA expression were undetectable by both Northern blot and PCR analysis. PLC gamma 1 had a more complicated pattern of mRNA expression. PLC gamma 1 mRNA expression was lower than that observed for PLC alpha or PLC gamma 2 mRNA and varied widely among different cell lines. The pattern of PLC gamma 1 mRNA expression did not correlate with the developmental stage of the cell lines. The pattern of PLC gamma 1 protein expression in the panel of B cell lines correlated with the pattern of PLC gamma 1 mRNA expression. PLC gamma 1 expression was very low in several B cell lines, despite the fact that these cell lines show mIgM-stimulatable PLC activity. The variable and in some cases very low expression of PLC gamma 1 suggests that it may not be the form of PLC that is activated by mIgM. In contrast, PLC alpha and PLC gamma 2 were abundantly expressed in all B cell lines tested. This observation is consistent with the possibility that PLC alpha or PLC gamma 2 is activated by mIgM.

  6. Manipulation of pulmonary prostacyclin synthase expression prevents murine lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L; Miller, York E; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Moore, Mark D; Gesell, Tracy L; Gao, Bifeng; Malkinson, Alvin M; Golpon, Heiko A; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Geraci, Mark W

    2002-02-01

    Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity decreases eicosanoid production and prevents lung cancer in animal models. Prostaglandin (PG) I(2) (PGI(2), prostacyclin) is a PGH(2) metabolite with anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antimetastatic properties. The instability of PGI(2) has limited its evaluation in animal models of cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary overexpression of prostacyclin synthase may prevent the development of murine lung tumors. Transgenic mice with selective pulmonary prostacyclin synthase overexpression were exposed to two distinct carcinogenesis protocols: an initiation/promotion model and a simple carcinogen model. The transgenic mice exhibited significantly reduced lung tumor multiplicity (tumor number) in proportion to transgene expression, a dose-response effect. Moreover, the highest expressing mice demonstrated reduced tumor incidence. To investigate the mechanism for protection, we evaluated PG levels and inflammatory responses. At the time of sacrifice following one carcinogenesis model, the transgenics exhibited only an increase in 6-keto-PGF(1alpha), not a decrease in PGE(2). Thus, elevated PGI(2) levels and not decreased PGE(2) levels appear to be necessary for the chemopreventive effects. When exposed to a single dose of butylated hydroxytoluene, transgenic mice exhibited a survival advantage; however, reduction in alveolar inflammatory response was not observed. These studies demonstrate that manipulation of PG metabolism downstream from COX produces even more profound lung cancer reduction than COX inhibition alone and could be the basis for new approaches to understanding the pathogenesis and prevention of lung cancer.

  7. BMP and BMP receptor expression during murine organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, Shahab M.; Villasenor, Alethia; Chong, Diana; Soukup, Carrie; Cleaver, Ondine

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical for regulating embryonic organ growth and differentiation. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) molecules represents one class of such cell-cell signaling molecules that regulate the morphogenesis of several organs. Due to high redundancy between the myriad BMP ligands and receptors in certain tissues, it has been challenging to address the role of BMP signaling using targeting of single Bmp genes in mouse models. Here, we present a detailed study of the developmental expression profiles of three BMP ligands (Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp7) and three BMP receptors (Bmpr1a, Bmpr1b, and BmprII), as well as their molecular antagonist (noggin), in the early embryo during the initial steps of murine organogenesis. In particular, we focus on the expression of Bmp family members in the first organs and tissues that take shape during embryogenesis, such as the heart, vascular system, lungs, liver, stomach, nervous system, somites and limbs. Using in situ hybridization, we identify domains where ligand(s) and receptor(s) are either singly or co-expressed in specific tissues. In addition, we identify a previously unnoticed asymmetric expression of Bmp4 in the gut mesogastrium, which initiates just prior to gut turning and the establishment of organ asymmetry in the gastrointestinal tract. Our studies will aid in the future design and/or interpretation of targeted deletion of individual Bmp or Bmpr genes, since this study identifies organs and tissues where redundant BMP signaling pathways are likely to occur. PMID:19393343

  8. BMP and BMP receptor expression during murine organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Shahab M; Villasenor, Alethia; Chong, Diana; Soukup, Carrie; Cleaver, Ondine

    2009-06-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical for regulating embryonic organ growth and differentiation. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) molecules represents one class of such cell-cell signaling molecules that regulate the morphogenesis of several organs. Due to high redundancy between the myriad BMP ligands and receptors in certain tissues, it has been challenging to address the role of BMP signaling using targeting of single Bmp genes in mouse models. Here, we present a detailed study of the developmental expression profiles of three BMP ligands (Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp7) and three BMP receptors (Bmpr1a, Bmpr1b, and BmprII), as well as their molecular antagonist (noggin), in the early embryo during the initial steps of murine organogenesis. In particular, we focus on the expression of Bmp family members in the first organs and tissues that take shape during embryogenesis, such as the heart, vascular system, lungs, liver, stomach, nervous system, somites and limbs. Using in situ hybridization, we identify domains where ligand(s) and receptor(s) are either singly or co-expressed in specific tissues. In addition, we identify a previously unnoticed asymmetric expression of Bmp4 in the gut mesogastrium, which initiates just prior to gut turning and the establishment of organ asymmetry in the gastrointestinal tract. Our studies will aid in the future design and/or interpretation of targeted deletion of individual Bmp or Bmpr genes, since this study identifies organs and tissues where redundant BMP signaling pathways are likely to occur.

  9. Molecular analysis of fiber type-specific expression of murine myostatin promoter.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Mônica Senna; Thomas, Mark; Forbes, Davanea; Watson, Trevor; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2004-10-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of muscle growth, and absence of the functional myostatin protein leads to the heavy muscle phenotype in both mouse and cattle. Although the role of myostatin in controlling muscle mass is established, little is known of the mechanisms regulating the expression of the myostatin gene. In this study, we have characterized the murine myostatin promoter in vivo. Various constructs of the murine myostatin promoter were injected into the quadriceps muscle of mice, and the reporter luciferase activity was analyzed. The results indicate that of the seven E-boxes present in the 2.5-kb fragment of the murine myostatin promoter, the E5 E-box plays an important role in the regulation of promoter activity in vivo. Furthermore, the in vitro studies demonstrated that MyoD preferentially binds and upregulates the murine myostatin promoter activity. We also analyzed the activity of the bovine and murine promoters in murine skeletal muscle and showed that, despite displaying comparable levels of activity in murine myoblast cultures, bovine myostatin promoter activity is much weaker than murine myostatin promoter in mice. Finally, we demonstrate that in vivo, the 2.5-kb region of the murine myostatin promoter is sufficient to drive the activity of the reporter gene in a fiber type-specific manner.

  10. CD40 ligand exhibits a direct antiviral effect on Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 infection via a PI3K-dependent, autophagy-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vlahava, Virginia-Maria; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Sourvinos, George

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between CD40 and its ligand, CD40L/CD154, is crucial for the efficient initiation and regulation of immune responses against viruses. Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus capable of manipulating host responses and exploiting host proteins to establish productive infection. Herein we have examined the impact of CD40L-mediated CD40 activation on HSV-1 replication in U2OS cells stably expressing the CD40 receptor. Treatment of these cells with CD40L significantly reduced the HSV-1 progeny virus compared to non-treated cells. The activation of CD40 signaling did not affect the binding of HSV-1 virions on the cell surface but rather delayed the translocation of VP16 to the nucleus, affecting all stages of viral life cycle. Using pharmacological inhibitors and RNAi we show that inhibition of PI3 kinase but not autophagy reverses the effects of CD40L on HSV-1 replication. Collectively, these data demonstrate that CD40 activation exerts a direct inhibitory effect on HSV-1, initiating from the very early stages of the infection by exploiting PI3 kinase-dependent but autophagy-independent mechanisms.

  11. Organization of the human CD40L gene: Implications for molecular defects in X chromosome-linked hyper-IgM syndrome and prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, A.; Macchi, P.P.; Strina, D.; Frattini, A.; Lucchini, F.; Patrosso, C.M.; Vezzoni, P.; Notarangelo, L.D.; Giliani, S.; Mantuano, E.

    1994-03-15

    Recently, CD40L has been identified as the gene responsible for X chromosome-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM1). CD40L on activated T cells from HIGM1 patients fails to bind B-cell CD40 molecules, and subsequent analysis of CD40L transcripts by reverse transcription PCR demonstrated coding region mutations in these patients. This approach, however, is of limited use for prenatal diagnosis of HIGM1 in the early-gestation fetus. In this report, the authors have defined the genomic structure of the CD40L gene, which is composed of five exons and four intervening introns. With this information, the authors have defined at the genomic level the CD40L coding region. These different deletions arose from three distinct mechanisms, including (i) a splice donor mutation with exon skipping, (ii) a splice acceptor mutation with utilization of a cryptic splice site, and (iii) a deletion/insertion event with the creation of a new splice acceptor site. In addition, they have performed prenatal evaluation of an 11-week-old fetus at risk for HIGM1. CD40L genomic clones provide a starting point for further studies of the genetic elements that control CD40L expression. Knowledge of the CD40L gene structure will prove useful for the identification of additional mutations in HIGM1 and for performing genetic counseling about this disease. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes.

  13. Blue Light Modulates Murine Microglial Gene Expression in the Absence of Optogenetic Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kevin P.; Kiernan, Elizabeth A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.; Watters, Jyoti J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural optogenetic applications over the past decade have steadily increased; however the effects of commonly used blue light paradigms on surrounding, non-optogenetic protein-expressing CNS cells are rarely considered, despite their simultaneous exposure. Here we report that blue light (450 nm) repetitively delivered in both long-duration boluses and rapid optogenetic bursts gene-specifically altered basal expression of inflammatory and neurotrophic genes in immortalized and primary murine wild type microglial cultures. In addition, blue light reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression in microglia activated with lipopolysaccharide. These results demonstrate previously unreported, off-target effects of blue light in cells not expressing optogenetic constructs. The unexpected gene modulatory effects of blue light on wild type CNS resident immune cells have novel and important implications for the neuro-optogenetic field. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic utility of blue light modulation of the wild type CNS. PMID:26883795

  14. HIV-1 induction of CD40 on endothelial cells promotes the outgrowth of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Moses, A V; Williams, S E; Strussenberg, J G; Heneveld, M L; Ruhl, R A; Bakke, A C; Bagby, G C; Nelson, J A

    1997-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is associated with the development of aggressive extranodal B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Using microvascular endothelial cell (MVEC)-enriched bone marrow stromal cultures, HIV infection of stromal MVECs from lymphoma patients induced the outgrowth of malignant B cells. MVECs were the only HIV-infected cells in the stroma, and purified brain MVECs also induced a phenotype supportive of neoplastic B-cell attachment and proliferation. HIV infection of MVECs stimulated surface expression of CD40 and allowed preferential induction of the vascular cell adhesion molecule VCAM-1 after CD40 triggering. B-lymphoma cells expressed the CD40 ligand (CD40L), and blocking of CD40-CD40L interactions between HIV-infected MVECs and B-lymphoma cells inhibited B-cell attachment and proliferation. These observations suggest that HIV promotes B-lymphoma cell growth through facilitating attachment of lymphoma cells to HIV-infected MVECs and represent a novel mechanism through which viruses may induce malignancies.

  15. Vaccination with a Fusion Protein That Introduces HIV-1 Gag Antigen into a Multitrimer CD40L Construct Results in Enhanced CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protection from Viral Challenge by Vaccinia-Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Raffa, Francesca N.; Williams, Cindi-Ann; Kornbluth, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) is a membrane protein that is important for the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and DC-induced CD8+ T cell responses. To be active, CD40L must cluster CD40 receptors on responding cells. To produce a soluble form of CD40L that clusters CD40 receptors necessitates the use of a multitrimer construct. With this in mind, a tripartite fusion protein was made from surfactant protein D (SPD), HIV-1 Gag as a test antigen, and CD40L, where SPD serves as a scaffold for the multitrimer protein complex. This SPD-Gag-CD40L protein activated CD40-bearing cells and bone marrow-derived DCs in vitro. Compared to a plasmid for Gag antigen alone (pGag), DNA vaccination of mice with pSPD-Gag-CD40L induced an increased number of Gag-specific CD8+ T cells with increased avidity for major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted Gag peptide and improved vaccine-induced protection from challenge by vaccinia-Gag virus. The importance of the multitrimeric nature of the complex was shown using a plasmid lacking the N terminus of SPD that produced a single trimer fusion protein. This plasmid, pTrimer-Gag-CD40L, was only weakly active on CD40-bearing cells and did not elicit strong CD8+ T cell responses or improve protection from vaccinia-Gag challenge. An adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vaccine incorporating SPD-Gag-CD40L was much stronger than Ad5 expressing Gag alone (Ad5-Gag) and induced complete protection (i.e., sterilizing immunity) from vaccinia-Gag challenge. Overall, these results show the potential of a new vaccine design in which antigen is introduced into a construct that expresses a multitrimer soluble form of CD40L, leading to strongly protective CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:24227853

  16. Characterisation of the TNF superfamily members CD40L and BAFF in the small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula).

    PubMed

    Li, Ronggai; Redmond, Anthony K; Wang, Tiehui; Bird, Steve; Dooley, Helen; Secombes, Chris J

    2015-11-01

    The tumour necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) members CD40L and BAFF play critical roles in mammalian B cell survival, proliferation and maturation, however little is known about these key cytokines in the oldest jawed vertebrates, the cartilaginous fishes. Here we report the cloning of CD40L and BAFF orthologues (designated ScCD40L and ScBAFF) in the small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula). As predicted both proteins are type II membrane-bound proteins with a TNF homology domain in their extracellular region and both are highly expressed in shark immune tissues. ScCD40L transcript levels correlate with those of TCRα and transcription of both genes is modulated in peripheral blood leukocytes following in vitro stimulation. Although a putative CD40L orthologue was identified in the elephant shark genome the work herein is the first molecular characterisation and transcriptional analysis of CD40L in a cartilaginous fish. ScBAFF was also cloned and its transcription characterised in an attempt to resolve the discrepancies observed between spiny dogfish BAFF and bamboo shark BAFF in previously published studies.

  17. CD40 activation induces NREM sleep and modulates genes associated with sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gast, Heidemarie; Müller, Andreas; Lopez, Martin; Meier, Daniel; Huber, Reto; Dechent, Frieder; Prinz, Marco; Emmenegger, Yann; Franken, Paul; Birchler, Thomas; Fontana, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    The T-cell derived cytokine CD40 ligand is overexpressed in patients with autoimmune diseases. Through activation of its receptor, CD40 ligand leads to a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1) dependent impairment of locomotor activity in mice. Here we report that this effect is explained through a promotion of sleep, which was specific to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep while REM sleep was suppressed. The increase in NREM sleep was accompanied by a decrease in EEG delta power during NREM sleep and by a decrease in the expression of transcripts in the cerebral cortex known to be associated with homeostatic sleep drive, such as Homer1a, Early growth response 2, Neuronal pentraxin 2, and Fos-like antigen 2. The effect of CD40 activation was mimicked by peripheral TNF injection and prevented by the TNF blocker etanercept. Our study indicates that sleep-wake dysregulation in autoimmune diseases may result from CD40 induced TNF:TNFR1 mediated alterations of molecular pathways, which regulate sleep-wake behavior.

  18. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of an Eimeria vaccine candidate based on Eimeria tenella immune mapped protein 1 and chicken CD40 ligand.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangwen; Lin, Qian; Qiu, Jianhan; Qin, Mei; Tang, Xinming; Suo, Xun; Huang, Zhijian; Liu, Xianyong

    2015-05-30

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) has shown potential as a powerful immunological adjuvant in various studies. Here, the efficacy of a chimeric subunit vaccine, consisting of Eimeria tenella immune mapped protein 1 (EtIMP1) and chicken CD40L, was evaluated against E. tenella infection. The recombinant EtIMP1-CD40L was purified from E. coli over-expressing this protein. Chickens were vaccinated with EtIMP1-CD40L without adjuvant or EtIMP1 with Freund's adjuvant. Immunization of chickens with EtIMP1-CD40L fusion protein resulted in stronger IFN-γ secretion and IgA response than that with only recombinant EtIMP1 with Freund's adjuvant. The clinical effect (cecal lesions, body weights gain, and oocysts shedding) of the EtIMP1-CD40L without adjuvant was also better than that of the EtIMP1 with adjuvant, as evidenced by the difference between the two groups in the oocyst output of E. tenella-challenged chickens. The results suggest that the EtIMP1-CD40L fusion protein can be used as an effective immunogen in the development of subunit vaccines against Eimeria infection.

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and NF-kappa B/Rel are at the divergence of CD40-mediated proliferation and survival pathways.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, S; Hsia, C; Suzuki, H; Kadowaki, T; Koyasu, S; Liou, H C

    2000-10-01

    CD40 receptor ligation evokes several crucial outcomes for the fate of an activated B cell, including proliferation and survival. Although multiple signaling molecules in the CD40 pathways have been identified, their specific roles in regulating proliferation and maintaining cell viability are still obscure. In this report, we demonstrate that the activation of both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K) and NF-kappaB/Rel transcription factors is crucial for CD40-mediated proliferation. Furthermore, our data indicate that PI-3K is indispensable for CD40-mediated NF-kappaB/Rel activation. This is achieved via activation of AKT and the degradation of IkappaBalpha. Furthermore, we show that PI-3K activity is necessary for the degradation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip. Therefore, both of these events comprise the mechanism by which PI-3K controls cell proliferation. In contrast to the absolute requirement of PI-3K and NF-kappaB/Rel for proliferation, these signaling molecules are only partially responsible for CD40-mediated survival, as blocking of PI-3K activity did not lead to apoptosis of anti-CD40-treated cells. However, the PI-3K/NF-kappaB pathway is still required for CD40-induced Bcl-X gene expression. Taken together, our data indicate that multiple survival pathways are triggered via this receptor, whereas NF-kappaB/Rel and PI-3K are crucial for CD40-induced proliferation.

  20. Characterization of a Broadly Reactive Anti-CD40 Agonistic Monoclonal Antibody for Potential Use as an Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Waghela, Suryakant D.; Lokhandwala, Shehnaz; Ambrus, Andy; Bray, Jocelyn; Vuong, Christina; Vinodkumar, Vanitha; Dominowski, Paul J.; Rai, Sharath; Mwangi, Duncan; Foss, Dennis L.; Mwangi, Waithaka

    2017-01-01

    Lack of safe and effective adjuvants is a major hindrance to the development of efficacious vaccines. Signaling via CD40 pathway leads to enhanced antigen processing and presentation, nitric oxide expression, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by antigen presenting cells, and stimulation of B-cells to undergo somatic hypermutation, immunoglobulin class switching, and proliferation. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies have shown promising adjuvant qualities in human and mouse vaccine studies. An anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated 2E4E4, was identified and shown to have strong agonistic effects on primary cells from multiple livestock species. The mAb recognize swine, bovine, caprine, and ovine CD40, and evoked 25-fold or greater proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from these species relative to cells incubated with an isotype control (p<0.001). In addition, the mAb induced significant nitric oxide (p<0.0001) release by bovine macrophages. Furthermore, the mAb upregulated the expression of MHC-II by PBMCs, and stimulated significant (p<0.0001) IL-1α, IL6, IL-8, and TNF-α expression by PBMCs. These results suggest that the mAb 2E4E4 can target and stimulate cells from multiple livestock species and thus, it is a potential candidate for adjuvant development. This is the first study to report an anti-swine CD40 agonistic mAb that is also broadly reactive against multiple species. PMID:28107431

  1. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-12-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain.

  2. Dendritic cells induce Tc1 cell differentiation via the CD40/CD40L pathway in mice after exposure to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Liang-Jian; Deng, Ting-Ting; Wang, Qin; Qiu, Shi-Lin; Liang, Yi; He, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jian-Quan; Bai, Jing; Li, Mei-Hua; Deng, Jing-Min; Liu, Guang-Nan; Liu, Ji-Feng; Zhong, Xiao-Ning

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cells and CD8(+) T cells participate in the pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including emphysema, but little is known of the involvement of the CD40/CD40L pathway. We investigated the role of the CD40/CD40L pathway in Tc1 cell differentiation induced by dendritic cells in a mouse model of emphysema, and in vitro. C57BL/6J wild-type and CD40(-/-) mice were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) or not (control), for 24 wk. In vitro experiments involved wild-type and CD40(-/-) dendritic cells treated with CS extract (CSE) or not. Compared with the control groups, the CS mice (both wild type and CD40(-/-)) had a greater percentage of lung dendritic cells and higher levels of major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I molecules and costimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80. Relative to the CS CD40(-/-) mice, the CS wild type showed greater signs of lung damage and Tc1 cell differentiation. In vitro, the CSE-treated wild-type cells evidenced more cytokine release (IL-12/p70) and Tc1 cell differentiation than did the CSE-treated CD40(-/-) cells. Exposure to cigarette smoke increases the percentage of lung dendritic cells and promotes Tc1 cell differentiation via the CD40/CD40L pathway. Blocking the CD40/CD40L pathway may suppress development of emphysema in mice exposed to cigarette smoke.

  3. Tuning of CD40-CD154 interactions in human B-lymphocyte activation: a broad array of in vitro models for a complex in vivo situation.

    PubMed

    Néron, Sonia; Nadeau, Philippe J; Darveau, André; Leblanc, Jean-François

    2011-02-01

    Naive and memory B-lymphocyte populations can be activated through the binding of CD154 to CD40, a receptor that is constitutively expressed on the surface of these cells. Models based on the in vitro stimulation of human B lymphocytes through CD40 have greatly contributed to our understanding of the human immune response in healthy individuals and patients suffering from immune disorders. The nature of the engineered CD40 ligands is as diverse as the in vitro models used in studies of CD40-activated B lymphocytes. Monoclonal anti-CD40 antibodies, recombinant CD154 proteins, soluble CD154(+) membranes as well as CD154(+) cell lines have turned out to be very useful tools, and are still in use today. As for any receptor-ligand interaction, parameters such as duration and strength of contact, timing, affinity, and receptor density are major determinants of CD40 binding by CD154 or anti-CD40. Furthermore, variation in the intensity of CD40 stimulation has been shown to influence proliferation, differentiation and immunoglobulin secretion of human hybridomas, B-cell lines, tonsil and blood B lymphocytes. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the great diversity of CD40 agonists used in in vitro models of B-lymphocyte activation, with a particular emphasis on variations in the resulting strength of CD40 signaling generated by these models. A better understanding of these models could open up new avenues for the rational use of human B lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells in cellular therapies.

  4. Effect of CD40/CD40L signaling on IL-10-producing regulatory B cells in Chinese children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baohui; Tan, Xiongjun; Xiong, Xiao; Wu, Daoqi; Zhang, Gaofu; Wang, Mo; Dong, Shifang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Haiping; Li, Qiu

    2016-11-11

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role and mechanism of interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B cells (B10 cells) in the pathogenesis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN). We examined the percentage of B10 cells, CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells, CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD27(+) B cells, Th17 cells, and T regulatory (Treg) cells within the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) population in healthy subjects and HSP/HSPN patients. The percentage of B10 cells and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells was reduced in HSPN patients and that of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD27(+) B cells was decreased only in HSPN patients with hematuria and proteinuria or massive proteinuria. The expression of IL-10 by B10 cells and their subsets was decreased in HSPN patients and returned to normal levels in HSP/HSPN patients in remission. B10 cells and their subsets negatively correlated with the Th17/Treg ratio. There was no difference in B10pro + B10 cells, Th17 cells, Treg cells, and the Th17/Treg ratio between children with HSP/HSPN and healthy controls after CD40L stimulation. On the other hand, the level of IL-10 expressed by CD19(+)CD40(+) B cells was decreased in HSPN, and the percentage of B10pro + B10 cells and Treg cells was reduced and that of Th17 cell was increased in the presence of anti-CD40L monoclonal antibody (mAb). Thus, decreased B10 cells and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells may function as an early marker of renal impairment in HSPN. The dysfunction of B10 cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of HSPN by regulating the Th17/Treg balance. Moreover, the CD40/CD40L signaling pathway may play a role in B10 cell differentiation and functional maturation.

  5. Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in murine small intestine during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryo; Yajima, Takaji; Tsukahara, Takamitsu

    2017-02-01

    The important role played by the gut microbiota in host immunity is mediated, in part, through toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated the postnatal changes in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine and assessed how expression is influenced by gut microbiota. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine was highly dynamic during development. The changes were especially profound during the suckling period, with the maximal mRNA levels detected in the mid-suckling period. Immunohistochemical and flow-cytometric analyses indicated that the changes in TLR2 and TLR4 expression involve primarily epithelial cells. The germ-free mice showed minor changes in TLR2/TLR4 mRNA and TLR2 protein during the suckling period. This study demonstrated that the postnatal expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in small intestinal epithelial cells is dynamic and depends on the presence of commensal intestinal microbiota.

  6. Kinetics of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Gene Expression following Infection of Murine Cells in Culture and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rochford, Rosemary; Lutzke, Mary L.; Alfinito, Rosiane S.; Clavo, Anaira; Cardin, Rhonda D.

    2001-01-01

    A model system to study the pathogenesis of gammaherpesvirus infections is the infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). To define the kinetics of infection, we developed an RNase protection assay to quantitate gene expression from lytic (K3, Rta, M8, DNA polymerase [DNA pol], and gB) and candidate latency (M2, M3, M9, M11, ORF73, and ORF74) genes. All candidate latency genes were expressed during lytic infection of 3T3 cells. Four kinetic classes of transcripts were observed following infection of 3T3 cells: immediate-early (K3, Rta, M8, and ORF73), early (DNA pol), early-late (M3, M11, and ORF74), and late (M2, M9, and gB). To assess the kinetics of viral gene expression in vivo, lungs, spleens, and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) were harvested from MHV-68-infected mice. All transcripts were expressed between 3 and 6 days postinfection (dpi) in the lungs. In the spleen, K3, M3, M8, and M9 transcripts were expressed between 10 and 16 dpi when latency is established. The K3, M3, M8, M9, and M11 transcripts were detected in the MLN from 2 through 16 dpi. This is the first demonstration of MHV-68 gene expression in the MLN. Importantly, our data showed that MHV-68 has different kinetics of gene expression at different sites of infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that K3, a gene recently shown to encode a protein that downregulates major histocompatibility complex class I on the surface of cells, is expressed during latency, which argues for a role of K3 in immune evasion during latent infection. PMID:11333874

  7. Kinetics of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 gene expression following infection of murine cells in culture and in mice.

    PubMed

    Rochford, R; Lutzke, M L; Alfinito, R S; Clavo, A; Cardin, R D

    2001-06-01

    A model system to study the pathogenesis of gammaherpesvirus infections is the infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). To define the kinetics of infection, we developed an RNase protection assay to quantitate gene expression from lytic (K3, Rta, M8, DNA polymerase [DNA pol], and gB) and candidate latency (M2, M3, M9, M11, ORF73, and ORF74) genes. All candidate latency genes were expressed during lytic infection of 3T3 cells. Four kinetic classes of transcripts were observed following infection of 3T3 cells: immediate-early (K3, Rta, M8, and ORF73), early (DNA pol), early-late (M3, M11, and ORF74), and late (M2, M9, and gB). To assess the kinetics of viral gene expression in vivo, lungs, spleens, and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) were harvested from MHV-68-infected mice. All transcripts were expressed between 3 and 6 days postinfection (dpi) in the lungs. In the spleen, K3, M3, M8, and M9 transcripts were expressed between 10 and 16 dpi when latency is established. The K3, M3, M8, M9, and M11 transcripts were detected in the MLN from 2 through 16 dpi. This is the first demonstration of MHV-68 gene expression in the MLN. Importantly, our data showed that MHV-68 has different kinetics of gene expression at different sites of infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that K3, a gene recently shown to encode a protein that downregulates major histocompatibility complex class I on the surface of cells, is expressed during latency, which argues for a role of K3 in immune evasion during latent infection.

  8. Expression and function of the murine B7 antigen, the major costimulatory molecule expressed by peritoneal exudate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Razi-Wolf, Z; Freeman, G J; Galvin, F; Benacerraf, B; Nadler, L; Reiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The murine B7 (mB7) protein is a potent costimulatory molecule for the T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of murine CD4+ T cells. We have previously shown that stable mB7-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells but not vector-transfected controls synergize with either anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody-induced or concanavalin A-induced T-cell activation, resulting ultimately in lymphokine production and proliferation. We now have generated a hamster anti-mB7 monoclonal antibody. This reagent recognizes a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50-60 kDa. The mB7 antigen is expressed on activated B cells and on peritoneal exudate cells (PECs). Antibody blocking experiments demonstrate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule expressed by PECs for the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. This suggests an important role for mB7 during immune-cell interactions. We have also surveyed a panel of murine cell lines capable of providing costimulatory activity. Our results indicate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule on some but not all cell lines and that there may be additional molecules besides mB7 that can costimulate the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. Images PMID:1373896

  9. Dendritic cell based PSMA immunotherapy for prostate cancer using a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector.

    PubMed

    Williams, Briana Jill; Bhatia, Shilpa; Adams, Lisa K; Boling, Susan; Carroll, Jennifer L; Li, Xiao-Lin; Rogers, Donna L; Korokhov, Nikolay; Kovesdi, Imre; Pereboev, Alexander V; Curiel, David T; Mathis, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human prostate tumor vaccine and gene therapy trials using ex vivo methods to prime dendritic cells (DCs) with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been somewhat successful, but to date the lengthy ex vivo manipulation of DCs has limited the widespread clinical utility of this approach. Our goal was to improve upon cancer vaccination with tumor antigens by delivering PSMA via a CD40-targeted adenovirus vector directly to DCs as an efficient means for activation and antigen presentation to T-cells. To test this approach, we developed a mouse model of prostate cancer by generating clonal derivatives of the mouse RM-1 prostate cancer cell line expressing human PSMA (RM-1-PSMA cells). To maximize antigen presentation in target cells, both MHC class I and TAP protein expression was induced in RM-1 cells by transduction with an Ad vector expressing interferon-gamma (Ad5-IFNγ). Administering DCs infected ex vivo with CD40-targeted Ad5-huPSMA, as well as direct intraperitoneal injection of the vector, resulted in high levels of tumor-specific CTL responses against RM-1-PSMA cells pretreated with Ad5-IFNγ as target cells. CD40 targeting significantly improved the therapeutic antitumor efficacy of Ad5-huPSMA encoding PSMA when combined with Ad5-IFNγ in the RM-1-PSMA model. These results suggest that a CD-targeted adenovirus delivering PSMA may be effective clinically for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  10. CD40L is not involved in acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Aree; Awla, Darbaz; Jeppsson, Bengt; Regnér, Sara; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2011-05-20

    Recent data suggest that platelets not only control thrombosis and hemostasis but may also regulate inflammatory processes such as acute pancreatitis. However, the specific role of platelet-derived mediators in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis is not known. Herein, we examined the role of CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) in different models of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by repetitive caerulein administration (50μg/kg, i.p.) or infusion of sodium taurocholate (5%-10μl) into the pancreatic duct in wild-type C57BL/6 and CD40L-deficient mice. Neutrophil infiltration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) levels, acinar cell necrosis, edema and hemorrhage in the pancreas as well as serum amylase activity and lung levels of MPO were quantified 24h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Caerulein and taurocholate challenge caused a clear-cut pancreatic damage characterized by increased acinar cell necrosis, neutrophil infiltration, focal hemorrhage, edema formation as well as increased levels of serum amylase and MIP-2 in the pancreas and lung MPO and histological damage. Notably, CD40L gene-deficient animals exhibited a similar phenotype as wild-type mice after challenge with caerulein and taurocholate. Similarly, administration of an antibody directed against CD40L had no effect against acute pancreatitis. Our data suggest that CD40L does not play a functional role in experimental acute pancreatitis. Thus, other candidates than CD40L needs to be explored in order to identify platelet-derived mediators in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis.

  11. Increased CD40 ligation and reduced BCR signalling leads to higher IL-10 production in B-cells from tolerant kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nova-Lamperti, Estefania; Chana, Prabhjoat; Mobillo, Paula; Runglall, Manohursingh; Kamra, Yogesh; McGregor, Reuben; Lord, Graham M.; Lechler, Robert I.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Background An increased percentage of peripheral transitional B-cells producing IL-10 has been observed in patients tolerant to kidney allografts. In healthy volunteers, the balance between the CD40 and B-cell receptor (BCR) signalling modulated IL-10 production by B-cells, with stimulation via the BCR decreasing CD40-mediated-IL-10 production. In this study, we evaluate whether in tolerant kidney transplant patients the increased IL-10 production by B-cells was due to an altered CD40 and/or BCR signalling. Methods B-cells obtained from a new cohort of tolerant renal transplant recipients and those from age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers, were activated via CD40 and BCR, either alone or in combination. Results In tolerant patients we observed higher percentages of B-cells producing IL-10 after CD40 ligation and higher expression of CD40L on activated T-cells, compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, B-cells from tolerant recipients had reduced ERK signalling following BCR-mediated activation compared to healthy controls. In keeping with this, combining BCR signalling with CD40 ligation did not reduce IL-10 secretion as was observed in healthy control transitional B-cells. Conclusion Altogether our data suggests that the altered response of B-cells in tolerant recipients may contribute to long-term stable graft acceptance. PMID:27472092

  12. Immune stimulatory receptor CD40 is required for T-cell suppression and T regulatory cell activation mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Ma, Ge; Weber, Kaare J; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Wang, George; Yin, Bingjiao; Divino, Celia M; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2010-01-01

    Immune tolerance to tumors is often associated with accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and an increase in the number of T-regulatory cells (Treg). In tumor-bearing mice, MDSCs can themselves facilitate the generation of tumor-specific Tregs. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of the immune stimulatory receptor CD40 on MDSCs is required to induce T-cell tolerance and Treg accumulation. In an immune reconstitution model, adoptive transfer of Gr-1+CD115+ monocytic MDSCs derived from CD40-deficient mice failed to recapitulate the ability of wild-type MDSCs to induce tolerance and Treg development in vivo. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies phenocopied the effect of CD40 deficiency and also improved the therapeutic efficacy of IL-12 and 4-1BB immunotherapy in the treatment of advanced tumors. Our findings suggest that CD40 is essential not only for MDSC-mediated immune suppression but also for tumor-specific Treg expansion. Blockade of CD40-CD40L interaction between MDSC and Treg may provide a new strategy to ablate tumoral immune suppression and thereby heighten responses to immunotherapy.

  13. Synergy between CD40 and MyD88 Does Not Influence Host Survival to Salmonella Infection.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Ulf Alexander; Fernandez-Santoscoy, Maria; Tam, Miguel A; Tegtmeyer, Pia; Wick, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using purified toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands plus agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies showed that TLRs and CD40 can act synergistically on dendritic cells (DCs) to optimize T cell activation and Th1 differentiation. However, a synergistic effect of TLRs and CD40 during bacterial infection is not known. Here, we show that mice lacking the TLR adaptor MyD88 alone, or lacking both MyD88 and CD40 [double knockout (DKO) mice], are compromised in survival to Salmonella infection but have intact recruitment of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as well as unaltered abundance of DC subsets and DC activation in infected tissues. In contrast to infected wildtype and CD40(-/-) mice, both MyD88(-/-) mice and DKO mice lack detectable serum IFN-γ and have elevated IL-10. A synergistic effect of TLRs and CD40 was revealed in co-culture experiments where OT-II T cell proliferation was compromised when DKO DCs were pulsed with OVA protein and OVA323-339 peptide, but not with heat-killed Salmonella expressing OVA (HKSOVA), relative to MyD88(-/-) DCs. By contrast, MyD88(-/-) or DKO DCs pulsed with any of the antigens had a similar ability to induce IFN-γ that was lower than WT or CD40(-/-) DCs. DKO DCs pulsed with HKSOVA, but not with OVA or OVA323-339, had increased IL-10 relative to MyD88(-/-) DCs. Finally, HKSOVA-pulsed MyD88(-/-) and DKO DCs had similar and low induction of NFκB-dependent and -independent genes upon co-culture with OT-II cells. Overall, our data revealed that synergistic effects of CD40 and MyD88 do not influence host survival to Salmonella infection or serum levels of IFN-γ or IL-10. However, synergistic effects of MyD88 and CD40 may be apparent on some (IL-10 production) but not all (OT-II proliferation and IFN-γ production) DC functions and depend on the complexity of the antigen. Indeed, synergistic effects observed using purified ligands and well-defined antigens may not necessarily apply when complex antigens, such as live bacteria

  14. CD40-targeted adenoviral cancer vaccines: the long and winding road to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hangalapura, Basav N.; Timares, Laura; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Scheper, Rik J.; Curiel, David T.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ability of Dendritic Cells (DC) to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses has been exploited to develop potent anti-cancer immunotherapies. Recent clinical trials exploring the efficacy of ex vivo modified autologous DC-based vaccines have reported some promising results. However, in vitro generation of autologous DC for clinical administration, their loading with tumor associated antigens (TAA) and their activation, is laborious and expensive, and, due to interindividual variability in the personalized vaccines, poorly standardized. An attractive alternative approach is to load resident DC in vivo by targeted delivery of TAA , using viral vectors and activating them simultaneously. To this end we have constructed genetically modified Adenoviral (Ad) vectors and bispecific adaptor molecules to retarget Ad vectors encoding TAA to the CD40 receptor on DC. Preclinical human and murine studies conducted so far have clearly demonstrated the suitability of a “two-component”, i.e. Ad and adaptor molecule, configuration for targeted modification of DC in vivo for cancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes recent progress in the development of CD40-targeted Ad-based cancer vaccines and highlights pre-clinical issues in clinical translation of this approach. PMID:22228547

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α/CD40 Ligand-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Greatly Enhanced the Antitumor Immune Response and Lifespan in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmandi, Saeed; Menaa, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The interaction between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dendritic cells (DCs) affects T cell development and function. Further, the chemotactic capacity of MSCs, their interaction with the tumor microenvironment, and the intervention of immune-stimulatory molecules suggest possible exploitation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and CD40 ligand (CD40L) to genetically modify MSCs for enhanced cancer therapy. Both DCs and MSCs were isolated from BALB/c mice. DCs were then cocultured with MSCs transduced with TNF-α and/or CD40L [(TNF-α/CD40L)-MSCs]. Major DCs' maturation markers, DC and T cell cytokines such as interleukin-4, -6, -10, -12, TNF-α, tumor growth factor-β, as well as T cell proliferation, were assessed. Meantime, a BALB/c mouse breast tumor model was inducted by injecting 4T1 cells subcutaneously. Mice (n=10) in each well-defined test groups (n=13) were cotreated with DCs and/or (TNF-α/CD40L)-MSCs. The controls included untreated, empty vector-MSC, DC-lipopolysaccharide, and immature DC mouse groups. Eventually, cytokine levels from murine splenocytes, as well as tumor volume and survival of mice, were assessed. Compared with the corresponding controls, both in vitro and in vivo analyses showed induction of T helper 1 (Th1) as well as suppression of Th2 and Treg responses in test groups, which led to a valuable antitumor immune response. Further, the longest mouse survival was observed in mouse groups that were administered with DCs plus (TNF-α/CD40L)-MSCs. In our experimental setting, the present pioneered study demonstrates that concomitant genetic modification of MSCs with TNF-α and CD40L optimized the antitumor immunity response in the presence of DCs, meantime increasing the mouse lifespan. PMID:24372569

  16. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  17. Ligation of CD40 in Human Müller Cells Induces P2X7 Receptor–Dependent Death of Retinal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Jose-Andres C.; Lopez Corcino, Yalitza; Dubyak, George R.; Kern, Timothy S.; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Subauste, Carlos S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40) is required for retinal capillary degeneration in diabetic mice, a process mediated by the retinal endothelial cells (REC) death. However, CD40 activates prosurvival signals in endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to identify a mechanism by which CD40 triggers programmed cell death (PCD) of RECs and address this paradox. Methods Human RECs and Müller cells were incubated with CD154 and L-N6-(1-Iminoethyl)lysine (L-Nil, nitric oxide synthase 2 inhibitor), α-lipoic acid (inhibitor of oxidative stress), anti-Fas ligand antibody, or A-438079 (P2X7 adenosine triphosphate [ATP] receptor inhibitor). Programmed cell death was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) or Hoechst/propidium iodide staining. Release of ATP was measured using a luciferase-based assay. Mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin. Expression of P2X7 was assessed by FACS, quantitative PCR, or immunohistochemistry. Results Ligation of CD40 in primary RECs did not induce PCD. In contrast, in the presence of primary CD40+ Müller cells, CD40 stimulation caused PCD of RECs that was not impaired by L-Nil, α-lipoic acid, or anti-Fas ligand antibody. We found CD40 did not trigger TNF-α or IL-1β secretion. Primary Müller cells released extracellular ATP in response to CD40 ligation. Inhibition of P2X7 (A-438079) impaired PCD of RECs; CD40 upregulated P2X7 in RECs, making them susceptible to ATP/P2X7–mediated PCD. Diabetic mice upregulated P2X7 in the retina and RECs in a CD40-dependent manner. Conclusions Cluster of differentiation 40 induces PCD of RECs through a dual mechanism: ATP release by Müller cells and P2X7 upregulation in RECs. These findings are likely of in vivo relevance since CD40 upregulates P2X7 in RECs in diabetic mice and CD40 is known to be required for retinal capillary degeneration. PMID:27893093

  18. CD40 ligand-mediated activation of the de novo RelB NF-kappaB synthesis pathway in transformed B cells promotes rescue from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mineva, Nora D; Rothstein, Thomas L; Meyers, John A; Lerner, Adam; Sonenshein, Gail E

    2007-06-15

    CD40, a tumor necrosis factor receptor family member, is expressed on B lymphocytes. Interaction between CD40 and its ligand (CD40L), expressed on activated T lymphocytes, is critical for B cell survival. Here, we demonstrate that CD40 signals B cell survival in part via transcriptional activation of the RelB NF-kappaB subunit. CD40L treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells induced levels of relB mRNA. Similarly, CD40L-mediated rescue of WEHI 231 B lymphoma cells from apoptosis induced upon B cell receptor (surface IgM) engagement led to increased relB mRNA levels. Recently, we characterized a new de novo synthesis pathway for the RelB NF-kappaB subunit, induced by the cytomegalovirus IE1 protein, in which binding of p50/p65 NF-kappaB and c-Jun/Fra-2 AP-1 complexes to the relB promoter works in synergy to potently activate transcription (Wang, X., and Sonenshein, G. E. (2005) J. Virol. 79, 95-105). CD40L treatment of WEHI 231 cells caused induction of AP-1 family members Fra-2, c-Jun, JunD, and JunB. Cotransfection of Fra-2 with the Jun AP-1 subunits and p50/c-Rel NF-kappaB led to synergistic activation of the relB promoter. Ectopic expression of relB or RelB knockdown using small interfering RNA demonstrated the important role of this subunit in control of WEHI 231 cell survival and implicated activation of the anti-apoptotic factors Survivin and manganese superoxide dismutase. Thus, CD40 engagement of transformed B cells activates relB gene transcription via a process we have termed the de novo RelB synthesis pathway, which protects these cells from apoptosis.

  19. Intraepithelial lymphocytes express junctional molecules in murine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko . E-mail: INAGAKI@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Sawaguchi, Akira; Suganuma, Tatsuo; Matsuzaki, Goro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2005-06-17

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) that reside at basolateral site regulate the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells (EC) for providing a first line of host defense in intestine. However, it remains unknown how IEL interact and communicate with EC. Here, we show that IEL express junctional molecules like EC. We identified mRNA expression of the junctional molecules in IEL such as zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) (tight junction), {beta}-catenin and E-cadherin (adherens junction), and connexin26 (gap junction). IEL constitutively expressed occludin and E-cadherin at protein level, while other T cells in the thymus, spleen, liver, mesenteric lymph node, and Peyer's patches did not. {gamma}{delta} IEL showed higher level of these expressions than {alpha}{beta} IEL. The expression of occludin was augmented by anti-CD3 Ab stimulation. These results suggest the possibility of a novel role of IEL concerning epithelial barrier and communication between IEL and EC.

  20. Eukaryotic expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of murine Manic Fringe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinek, Martin; Conti, Elena

    2006-08-01

    The catalytic domain of the murine glycosyltransferase Manic Fringe was expressed in insect cells. Removal by site-directed mutagenesis of two N-glycosylation sites present in the protein was essential to obtain crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Fringe proteins are Golgi-resident β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that regulate development in metazoa through glycosylation of the Notch receptor and its ligands. The catalytic domain of murine Manic Fringe was expressed in the baculovirus/insect-cell system as a secreted protein. Mass-spectrometric analysis of the purified protein indicated the presence of two N-linked glycans. Abolishing the glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis was necessary in order to obtain orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. For phasing, a highly redundant data set was collected using a crystal soaked with halide salts.

  1. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in a murine model of Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Hu, Li-Ting; Che, Cheng-Ye; Li, Cui; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To observe the presence and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) during the corneal immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) in the murine models. METHODS The murine model of fungal keratitis was established by smearing with colonies of A. fumigatus after scraping central epithelium of cornea and covering with contact lenses in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were randomly divided into control group, sham group and A. fumigatus keratitis group. The cornea was monitored daily using a slit lamp and recorded disease score after infection. Corneal lesion was detected by immunofluorescence staining. IDO mRNA and protein were also detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS The disease score and slit lamp photography indicated that disease severity was consistent with corneal inflammation in the murine models, and the disease scores in A. fumigatus keratitis group were obviously higher than those in the sham group. By immunofluorescence staining, IDO was mainly localized in corneal epithelium and stroma in the murine corneal tissues with A. fumigatus keratitis. Compared with the sham group, IDO mRNA expression was significantly enhanced in corneal epithelium infected by A. fumigatus. Furthermore, IDO protein expression detected by Western blot was in accord with transcript levels of IDO mRNA measured by qRT-PCR. IDO protein expression was enhanced after A. fumigatus infection compared with the sham group. CONCLUSION IDO is detected in corneal epithelium and stroma locally, which indicates IDO takes part in the pathogenesis of A. fumigatus keratitis and plays a key role in immune regulation at the early stage. PMID:27162718

  2. Pim-1 kinase expression during murine mammary development

    SciTech Connect

    Gapter, Leslie A.; Magnuson, Nancy S.; Ng, Ka-yun; Hosick, Howard L. . E-mail: hosick@wsu.edu

    2006-07-07

    Pim-1 kinase phosphorylates substrates whose activities are linked to proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although pim-1 is induced by hormones and cytokines, the hormonal control and contribution of Pim-1 to mammary gland development have not been evaluated. We examined Pim-1 expression in mammary cell lines, investigated whether Pim-1 levels could be altered in breast epithelia by mammogenic hormones, and evaluated Pim-1 expression during mammary development. We found that Pim-1 was elevated in most mammary carcinoma cell lines and progesterone increased Pim-1 protein to some extent in non-tumorigenic mammary epithelia. Pim-1 expression in situ was consistent with the documented profile of progesterone activity in mouse mammary glands. Pim-1 nuclear localization correlated with cytoplasmic distribution for its substrate, p21{sup CIP/Waf1}, and we found that Pim-1 and p21 associate in vitro. Our results suggest that Pim-1 expression may be regulated by progesterone during mammary development and Pim-1 associates with p21 in mammary epithelial cells.

  3. Differential expression of murine adult hemoglobins in early ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzyniak, C.J.; Lewis, S.E.; Popp, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A hemoglobin mutation is described that permits study of the expression of the two adult ..beta..-globin genes throughout fetal and postnatal development. Mice with a mutation at the Hbb/sup s/, ..beta..-globin locus, were used to study the relative levels of ..beta..-s2major and ..beta..-sminor globins specified by the mutant Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype during development. At 11.5 days of gestation ..beta..-sminor comprised over 80% and ..beta..-s2major under 20% of the adult beta-globin. The relative level of ..beta..-sminor decreased through fetal development; at birth ..beta..-sminor represented 33.7% of the ..beta..-globin. The adult values of 71.0% ..beta..-s2major and 29.0% ..beta..-sminor globin are expressed in mice six days after birth. Because the two ..beta..-globin genes are expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup 2s/ haplotype, both the ..beta..-smajor and ..beta..-sminor genes must be expressed in mice of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype. Expression of the ..beta..-sminor gene is elevated to 35.6% in Hbb/sup s2/ mice that have been bled repeatedly. Thus, the 5' ..beta..-s2major and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype and, presumably the 5' ..beta..-smajor and 3' ..beta..-sminor genes of the Hbb/sup s/ haplotype, are regulated independently and are homologous to the 5' ..beta..-dmajor and 3' ..beta..-dminor genes of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotype. Mice of the Hbb/sup s2/ haplotype are better than mice of the Hbb/sup d/ haplotytpe for studying the mechanisms of hemoglobin switching because the Hbb/sup s2/ each of the three embryonic and two adult hemoglobins can be separated by electrophoresis. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Murine Hepatic miRNAs Expression and Regulation of Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Jiyun; Kim, Suna; Kwon, Dae Young; Ha, Tae Youl

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression primarily by translational repression or by messenger RNA degradation. MicroRNAs play crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little is known regarding their role in obesity. We investigated differences of microRNA (miRNA) expression in liver tissue from diet-induced obese mice and potential effects of them on gene and protein expression. We used a miRNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR to determine miRNA expression in murine liver tissue. Gene and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Effects of miRNA by knock-down using RNAi or overexpression on putative target genes and/or proteins in a murine hepatic cell line were also investigated. MicroRNA array and qRT-PCR analsysis revealed that > 50 miRNAs were down- or upregulated more than 2-fold in the liver of diet-induced obese mice. While changes in expression of many genes were observed at the mRNA level, some were only altered at the protein level. Overexpression or knock-down of miR-107 in murine hepatic cells revealed that the expression of its putative target, fatty acid synthase, was dramatically decreased or increased, respectively. In conclusion, more than 50 hepatic miRNAs were dysregulated in diet-induced obese mice. Some of them regulate protein expression at translation level and others regulate mRNA expression at transcriptional level. MiR-107 is downregulated while FASN, a putative target of miR-107, was increased in diet-induced obese mice. These findings provide the evidence of the correlation of miRNAs and their targets in diet-induced obese mice. PMID:21120623

  5. A multi-trimeric fusion of CD40L and gp100 tumor antigen activates dendritic cells and enhances survival in a B16-F10 melanoma DNA vaccine model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M; Rivas, Yaelis; Otero, Miguel; Raffa, Francesca N; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad; Stone, Geoffrey W

    2015-09-11

    Vaccination with tumor-associated antigens can induce cancer-specific CD8+ T cells. A recent improvement has been the targeting of antigen to dendritic cells (DC) using antibodies that bind DC surface molecules. This study explored the use of multi-trimers of CD40L to target the gp100 melanoma tumor antigen to DC. The spontaneously-multimerizing gene Surfactant Protein D (SPD) was used to fuse gp100 tumor antigen and CD40L, creating the recombinant protein SPD-gp100-CD40L. This "third generation" DC-targeting vaccine was designed to both target antigen to DC and optimally activate dendritic cells by aggregating CD40 trimers on the DC membrane surface. SPD-gp100-CD40L expressed as a 110kDa protein. Analytical light scattering analysis gave elution data corresponding to 4-trimer and multi-trimer SPD-gp100-CD40L oligomers. The protein was biologically active on dendritic cells and induced CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. DNA vaccination with SPD-gp100-CD40L plasmid, together with plasmids encoding IL-12p70 and GM-CSF, significantly enhanced survival and inhibited tumor growth in a B16-F10 melanoma model. Expression of gp100 and SPD-CD40L as separate molecules did not enhance survival, highlighting the requirement to encode gp100 within SPD-CD40L for optimal vaccine activity. These data support a model where DNA vaccination with SPD-gp100-CD40L targets gp100 to DC in situ, induces activation of these DC, and generates a protective anti-tumor response when given in combination with IL-12p70 and GM-CSF plasmids.

  6. Murine heart gene expression during acute Chagasic myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F.; Parra-Henao, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is transmitted by the parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Acute infection is characterized by acute myocarditis, although it is largely asymptomatic. Initial cardiac insult could be a determinant to the posterior development of chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy, usually after 10 years in only approximately 30% of chronically infected patients. Herein, we characterized the acute gene expression profiling in heart tissue of two strains of mice infected with T. cruzi (tulahuen strain) at 4 weeks and their respective controls. Gene sequence data are available at NCBI under GEO accession number: GSE63847. The output of the genes expression suggests differences in involvement of protein kinase B (AKT), NCAM1, HLA-DRA, and ubiquitin C genes networks. These gene activation differences may correlate with myocardial contractility during the acute infection. PMID:26484182

  7. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-12-15

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7-8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of µ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of µ-opioid receptors.

  8. Changing expression and subcellular distribution of karyopherins during murine oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mihalas, Bettina P; Western, Patrick S; Loveland, Kate L; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Holt, Janet E

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian oocyte growth and development is driven by a strict program of gene expression that relies on the timely presence of transcriptional regulators via nuclear pores. By targeting specific cargos for nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, karyopherin (KPN) proteins are key to the relocation of essential transcription factors and chromatin-remodelling factors into and out of the nucleus. Using multiple complementary techniques, here we establish that KPNA genes and proteins are dynamically expressed and relocalised throughout mouse oogenesis and folliculogenesis. Of the KPNAs examined (Kpna1, Kpna2, Kpna3, Kpna4, Kpna6, Kpna7, Kpnb1, Ipo5 and Xpo1), all were expressed in the embryonic ovary with up-regulation of protein levels concomitant with meiotic entry for KPNA2, accompanied by the redistribution of the cellular localisation of KPNA2 and XPO1. In contrast, postnatal folliculogenesis revealed significant up-regulation of Kpna1, Kpna2, Kpna4, Kpna6 and Ipo5 and down-regulation of Kpnb1, Kpna7 and Xpo1 at the primordial to primary follicle transition. KPNAs exhibited different localisation patterns in both oocytes and granulosa cells during folliculogenesis, with three KPNAs--KPNA1, KPNA2 and IPO5--displaying marked enrichment in the nucleus by antral follicle stage. Remarkably, varied subcellular expression profiles were also identified in isolated pre-ovulatory oocytes with KPNAs KPNA2, KPNB1 and IPO5 detected in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear rim and XPO1 in cytoplasmic aggregates. Intriguingly, meiotic spindle staining was also observed for KPNB1 and XPO1 in meiosis II eggs, implying roles for KPNAs outside of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Thus, we propose that KPNAs, by targeting specific cargoes, are likely to be key regulators of oocyte development.

  9. 1.8 Astroms Structure of Murine GITR Ligand Dimer Expressed in Drosophila Melanogaster S2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, K.; Ramagopal, U; Nathenson, S; Almo, S

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique 'strand-exchanged' dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical 'strand-exchanged' dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL.

  10. Integrating Murine Gene Expression Studies to Understand Obstructive Lung Disease Due to Chronic Inhaled Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Hofmann, Oliver; Baron, Rebecca M.; Cernadas, Manuela; Meng, Quanxin Ryan; Bresler, Herbert S.; Brass, David M.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Christiani, David C.; Hide, Winston

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Endotoxin is a near ubiquitous environmental exposure that that has been associated with both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These obstructive lung diseases have a complex pathophysiology, making them difficult to study comprehensively in the context of endotoxin. Genome-wide gene expression studies have been used to identify a molecular snapshot of the response to environmental exposures. Identification of differentially expressed genes shared across all published murine models of chronic inhaled endotoxin will provide insight into the biology underlying endotoxin-associated lung disease. Methods We identified three published murine models with gene expression profiling after repeated low-dose inhaled endotoxin. All array data from these experiments were re-analyzed, annotated consistently, and tested for shared genes found to be differentially expressed. Additional functional comparison was conducted by testing for significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes in known pathways. The importance of this gene signature in smoking-related lung disease was assessed using hierarchical clustering in an independent experiment where mice were exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and endotoxin plus smoke. Results A 101-gene signature was detected in three murine models, more than expected by chance. The three model systems exhibit additional similarity beyond shared genes when compared at the pathway level, with increasing enrichment of inflammatory pathways associated with longer duration of endotoxin exposure. Genes and pathways important in both asthma and COPD were shared across all endotoxin models. Mice exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and smoke plus endotoxin were accurately classified with the endotoxin gene signature. Conclusions Despite the differences in laboratory, duration of exposure, and strain of mouse used in three experimental models of chronic inhaled endotoxin, surprising similarities in gene expression were observed

  11. Microarray Based Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Brown and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue: Significance with Human

    PubMed Central

    Boparai, Ravneet K.; Kondepudi, Kanthi Kiran; Mantri, Shrikant; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Background Two types of adipose tissues, white (WAT) and brown (BAT) are found in mammals. Increasingly novel strategies are being proposed for the treatment of obesity and its associated complications by altering amount and/or activity of BAT using mouse models. Methodology/Principle Findings The present study was designed to: (a) investigate the differential expression of genes in LACA mice subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and BAT using mouse DNA microarray, (b) to compare mouse differential gene expression with previously published human data; to understand any inter- species differences between the two and (c) to make a comparative assessment with C57BL/6 mouse strain. In mouse microarray studies, over 7003, 1176 and 401 probe sets showed more than two-fold, five-fold and ten-fold change respectively in differential expression between murine BAT and WAT. Microarray data was validated using quantitative RT-PCR of key genes showing high expression in BAT (Fabp3, Ucp1, Slc27a1) and sWAT (Ms4a1, H2-Ob, Bank1) or showing relatively low expression in BAT (Pgk1, Cox6b1) and sWAT (Slc20a1, Cd74). Multi-omic pathway analysis was employed to understand possible links between the organisms. When murine two fold data was compared with published human BAT and sWAT data, 90 genes showed parallel differential expression in both mouse and human. Out of these 90 genes, 46 showed same pattern of differential expression whereas the pattern was opposite for the remaining 44 genes. Based on our microarray results and its comparison with human data, we were able to identify genes (targets) (a) which can be studied in mouse model systems to extrapolate results to human (b) where caution should be exercised before extrapolation of murine data to human. Conclusion Our study provides evidence for inter species (mouse vs human) differences in differential gene expression between sWAT and BAT. Critical understanding of this data may help in development of novel ways to engineer one form of adipose

  12. An autologous in situ tumor vaccination approach for hepatocellular carcinoma. 2. Tumor-specific immunity and cure after radio-inducible suicide gene therapy and systemic CD40-ligand and Flt3-ligand gene therapy in an orthotopic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, Yujo; Deb, Niloy J; Garg, Madhur K; Kabarriti, Rafi; Fan, Zuoheng; Alfieri, Alan A; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Guha, Chandan

    2014-08-01

    Diffuse hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal disease that radiation therapy (RT) currently has a limited role in treating because of the potential for developing fatal radiation-induced liver disease. However, recently diffuse HCC, "radio-inducible suicide gene therapy" has been shown to enhance local tumor control and residual microscopic disease within the liver for diffuse HCC, by using a combination of chemoactivation and molecular radiosensitization. We have demonstrated that the addition of recombinant adenovirus-expressing human Flt3 ligand (Adeno-Flt3L) after radio-inducible suicide gene therapy induced a Th1-biased, immune response and enhanced tumor control in an ectopic model of HCC. We hypothesized that sequential administration of recombinant adenovirus-expressing CD40L (Adeno-CD40L) could further potentiate the efficacy of our trimodal therapy with RT + HSV-TK + Adeno-Flt3L. We examined our hypothesis in an orthotopic model of diffuse HCC using BNL1ME A.7R.1 (BNL) cells in Balb/c mice. BNL murine hepatoma cells (5 × 10(4)) transfected with an expression vector of HSV-TK under the control of a radiation-inducible promoter were injected intraportally into BALB/cJ mice. Fourteen days after the HCC injection, mice were treated with a 25 Gy dose of radiation to the whole liver, followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment and systemic adenoviral cytokine gene therapy (Flt3L or CD40L or both). Untreated mice died in 27 ± 4 days. Radiation therapy alone had a marginal effect on survival (median = 35 ± 7 days) and the addition of HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy improved the median survival to 47 ± 6 days. However, the addition of Adeno-Flt3L to radiation therapy and HSV-TK/GCV therapy significantly (P = 0.0005) increased survival to a median of 63 ± 20 days with 44% (7/16) of the animals still alive 116 days after tumor implantation. The curative effect of Flt3L was completely abolished when using immunodeficient nude mice or mice depleted for CD4, CD8 and

  13. Murine Brca2: Sequence, map position, and expression pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Sharan, S.K.; Bradley, A.

    1997-03-01

    Mutations in the human BRCA2 gene are responsible for about 45% of hereditary early onset breast cancer. Recently, the human BRCA2 gene was cloned, and several germline mutations were identified. Here we describe the cloning of the mouse homologue of BRCA2. The mouse cDNA sequence predicts a 3328-amino-acid Brca2 protein, 90 amino acids shorter than the human protein. The overall identity between the mouse and the human proteins is 59%, while the similarity is 72%. At the nucleotide level the homology is 74%. By comparing the amino acid sequences of the two homologues we have identified five highly conserved novel domains that may be functionally significant. Brca2 has been mapped to the distal end of mouse chromosome 5, a region of the mouse genome that contains other genes that also map to human chromosome 13q12-q13, confirming the conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Expression of Brca2 was detected in midgestation embryos and adult testis, thymus, and ovary. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Identical expression profiling of human and murine TIPE3 protein reveals links to its functions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Hao, Chunyan; Zhang, Wenqian; Shao, Jie; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Guizhong; Liu, Suxia

    2015-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 like-3 (TNFAIP8L3, TIPE3) is a newly discovered member of TNFAIP8 family and regarded as a lipid second messenger transfer protein that promotes cancer. Yet the nature of the cells and tissues that express TIPE3 protein has not been determined. In this study, we examined TIPE3 expression in various murine and human tissues by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. We found that TIPE3 expression was almost identical in most organs from human and mice. TIPE3 is a cytoplasmic protein expressed preferentially in epithelial-derived cells with secretory functions. Furthermore, TIPE3 protein is highly expressed in most human carcinoma cell lines. These results suggest that TIPE3 may play important roles in carcinogenesis and cell secretion.

  15. Identical Expression Profiling of Human and Murine TIPE3 Protein Reveals Links to Its Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Hao, Chunyan; Zhang, Wenqian; Shao, Jie; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Guizhong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 like-3 (TNFAIP8L3, TIPE3) is a newly discovered member of TNFAIP8 family and regarded as a lipid second messenger transfer protein that promotes cancer. Yet the nature of the cells and tissues that express TIPE3 protein has not been determined. In this study, we examined TIPE3 expression in various murine and human tissues by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. We found that TIPE3 expression was almost identical in most organs from human and mice. TIPE3 is a cytoplasmic protein expressed preferentially in epithelial-derived cells with secretory functions. Furthermore, TIPE3 protein is highly expressed in most human carcinoma cell lines. These results suggest that TIPE3 may play important roles in carcinogenesis and cell secretion. PMID:25479791

  16. Structure and expression of the murine calcyon gene.

    PubMed

    Dai, Rujuan; Bergson, Clare

    2003-06-05

    Calcyon was recently identified as a D1 dopamine receptor (DR1) interacting protein. Previous studies show that calcyon can potentiate DR1 mediated intracellular Ca(2+) release in transfected HEK293 cells, and may play an important role in DR1 Ca(2+) signaling in brain. We report that similar to the genomic structure of the human gene, the mouse calcyon gene contains six relatively short exons, with a large intron (about 8.4 kb) between exons one and two. The mouse and human calcyon genes exhibit a high level of sequence homology (77.5% at the nucleotide level) within coding regions. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses reveal that mouse calcyon transcripts are most abundant in brain, but also present in testis and ovary, as well as in kidney and heart at much lower levels. The most distal of the transcript initiation sites identified by 5' RACE is located 159 nucleotides upstream of the putative start of translation. BLAST search of the NCBI mouse EST database and RT-PCR analysis uncovered two differentially spliced transcripts, "mcal-A" and "mcal-B." The two transcripts are identical, except that mcal-B contains a longer 3' untranslated region due to retention of a short intron (I5) between exons five and six. However, mcal-A represents the predominant calcyon transcript in mouse tissue. Further, the presence of I5 produced no detectable differences in the biosynthesis of calcyon polypeptide when expressed in HEK293, MDCK and Neuro2a cells.

  17. Expression and regulation of RB1CC1 in developing murine and human tissues.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Noriko; Chano, Tokuhiro; Taga, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeru; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2004-10-01

    RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1) is a novel molecule implicated in the regulation of RB1 (retinoblastoma 1) expression. However, information about the RB1CC1 gene is limited and its function remains somewhat obscure. The present study analyzes the expression and promoter activities of RB1CC1 in developing murine and human tissues. Rb1cc1 was abundantly expressed from an early stage of the mouse embryo throughout development. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that Rb1cc1 was ubiquitous in the mouse, rather than in the human embryo, especially in the musculoskeletal system, heart and neural tissues. Promoter activity was highest in a region located about 300 bp immediately upstream of exon 1 in both the mouse and human RB1CC1 genes, suggesting that this region is a core promoter. The promoter activity of RB1CC1 was generally higher in mice than in humans, and suppressive with intron 1, especially in humans. These results suggested that more Rb1cc1 is expressed throughout developing murine than in human tissues, and that RB1CC1 expression is controlled more stringently by modification at intron 1 in humans than in mice.

  18. Resveratrol inhibits mucus overproduction and MUC5AC expression in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhen-Hua; Tang, Ji-Hong; Chen, Guo; Lai, Yi-Min; Chen, Qing-Ge; Li, Zao; Yang, Wei; Luo, Xu-Min; Wang, Xiong-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that resveratrol is able to significantly inhibit the upregulation of mucin 5AC (MUC5AC), a major component of mucus; thus indicating that resveratrol may have potential in regulating mucus overproduction. However, there have been few studies regarding the resveratrol‑mediated prevention of MUC5AC overproduction in vivo, and the mechanisms by which resveratrol regulates MUC5AC expression have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, an ovalbumin (OVA)‑challenged murine model of asthma was used to assess the effects of resveratrol treatment on mucus production in vivo. The results demonstrated that resveratrol significantly inhibited OVA‑induced airway inflammation and mucus production. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of MUC5AC were increased in the OVA‑challenged mice, whereas treatment with resveratrol significantly inhibited this effect. The expression levels of murine calcium‑activated chloride channel (mCLCA)3, an important key mediator of MUC5AC production, were also reduced following resveratrol treatment. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrated that resveratrol significantly inhibited human (h)CLCA1 and MUC5AC expression in a dose‑dependent manner. These results indicated that resveratrol was effective in preventing mucus overproduction and MUC5AC expression in vivo, and its underlying mechanism may be associated with regulation of the mCLCA3/hCLCA1 signaling pathway.

  19. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hachem, Ahmed; Yacoub, Daniel; Zaid, Younes; Mourad, Walid; Merhi, Yahye

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  20. Lipid rafts regulate cellular CD40 receptor localization in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Min; Wang Qing; Zhu Huilian; Ma Jing; Hou Mengjun; Tang Zhihong; Li Juanjuan; Ling Wenhua

    2007-09-28

    Cholesterol enriched lipid rafts are considered to function as platforms involved in the regulation of membrane receptor signaling complex through the clustering of signaling molecules. In this study, we tested whether these specialized membrane microdomains affect CD40 localization in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that upon CD40 ligand stimulation, endogenous and exogenous CD40 receptor is rapidly mobilized into lipid rafts compared with unstimulated HAECs. Efficient binding between CD40L and CD40 receptor also increases amounts of CD40 protein levels in lipid rafts. Deficiency of intracellular conserved C terminus of the CD40 cytoplasmic tail impairs CD40 partitioning in raft. Raft disorganization after methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin treatment diminishes CD40 localization into rafts. In vivo studies show that elevation of circulating cholesterol in high-cholesterol fed rabbits increases the cholesterol content and CD40 receptor localization in lipid rafts. These findings identify a physiological role for membrane lipid rafts as a critical regulator of CD40-mediated signal transduction and raise the possibility that certain pathologic conditions may be treated by altering CD40 signaling with drugs affecting its raft localization.

  1. CD40 activation: lessons for HIV immunotherapy from malignancies?

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Gribben, John

    2005-09-01

    In HIV, the immune defects seen are due not only to a decrease in T-cell numbers, but also to qualitative impairment in T-cell function as well as decreased antigen-presenting cell (APC) function. These defects in cell-mediated immunity lead to increased level of infection, contributing to inability to clear the HIV virus, and an increased incidence of tumours. One of the major defects in HIV appears to be the failure of CD4 T cells to provide CD 154 (CD40 ligand)-mediated help, which is required for APC function. In lymphomas, activation through CD40 leads to increased APC activity and induction of immune responses against tumours. Such an effect may also be useful in HIV to increase response against the virus and improve immune surveillance of tumours.

  2. Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) limits murine gammaherpesvirus-68 induced monokine expression.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Daniel A; Nirmaier, Jamie L; Singh, Sam J; Tolbert, Melanie D; Bost, Kenneth L

    2008-08-01

    While Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA) has been shown to modulate immune responses, no studies have addressed drug-induced alterations to viral infection. In this study, bone marrow-derived macrophages were exposed to MDMA, then infected with murine gammaherpesvirus-68, and the expression of monokines assessed. MDMA-induced reductions in virus-stimulated monokine mRNA expression were observed in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, IL-6 mRNA expression and secretion was significantly decreased in gammaherpesvirus-infected macrophages exposed to MDMA. Concentrations of MDMA capable of reducing monokine production did not induce significant cell death and allowed normal viral gene expression. These studies represent the first to demonstrate the ability of this drug of abuse to alter a viral-induced macrophage response.

  3. TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population in murine epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Ting; Qiao, Liangjun; Du, Jia; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Hengguang; Wang, Fangfang; Huang, Qiaorong; Meng, Wentong; Zhu, Hongyan; Bu, Hong; Li, Hui; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Normal interfollicular epidermis (IFE) homeostasis is maintained throughout the entire life by its own stem cells that self-renew and generate progeny that undergo terminal differentiation. However, the fine markers of the stem cells in interfollicular epidermis are not well defined yet. Here we found that TLR7 identified the existence of progenitors and interfollicular epidermal stem cells in murine skin. In vitro, TLR7-expressing cells comprised of two subpopulations that were competent to proliferate and exhibited distinct differentiation potentials. Three-dimensional (3D) organotypic culture and skin reconstitution assays showed that TLR7-expressing cells were able to reconstruct the interfollicular epidermis. Finally, TLR7-expressing cells maintained the intact interfollicular epidermal structures revealed in serial transplantation assays in vivo in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that TLR7-expressing cells comprise an interfollicular epidermal stem cell population. PMID:25060222

  4. Desipramine decreases expression of human and murine indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alexandra K; Janda, Tiffany M; Lawson, Marcus A; Rytych, Jennifer L; Smith, Robin A; Ocampo-Solis, Cecilia; McCusker, Robert H

    2017-05-01

    Abundant evidence connects depression symptomology with immune system activation, stress and subsequently elevated levels of kynurenine. Anti-depressants, such as the tricyclic norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor desipramine (Desip), were developed under the premise that increasing extracellular neurotransmitter level was the sole mechanism by which they alleviate depressive symptomologies. However, evidence suggests that anti-depressants have additional actions that contribute to their therapeutic potential. The Kynurenine Pathway produces tryptophan metabolites that modulate neurotransmitter activity. This recognition identified another putative pathway for anti-depressant targeting. Considering a recognized role of the Kynurenine Pathway in depression, we investigated the potential for Desip to alter expression of rate-limiting enzymes of this pathway: indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenases (Ido1 and Ido2). Mice were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) with Desip to determine if Desip alters indoleamine-dioxygenase (DO) expression in vivo following a modeled immune and stress response. This work was followed by treating murine and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and Desip. In vivo: Desip blocked LPS-induced Ido1 expression in hippocampi, astrocytes, microglia and PBMCs and Ido2 expression by PBMCs. Ex vivo: Desip decreased IFNγ-induced Ido1 and Ido2 expression in murine PBMCs. This effect was directly translatable to the human system as Desip decreased IDO1 and IDO2 expression by human PBMCs. These data demonstrate for the first time that an anti-depressant alters expression of Ido1 and Ido2, identifying a possible new mechanism behind anti-depressant activity. Furthermore, we propose the assessment of PBMCs for anti-depressant responsiveness using IDO expression as a biomarker.

  5. Influence of pre-analytical and analytical factors on soluble CD40L measurements.

    PubMed

    Varo, Nerea; Nuzzo, Rebecca; Natal, Cristina; Libby, Peter; Schönbeck, Uwe

    2006-11-01

    The soluble form of CD40L (CD40 ligand), a pro-atherogenic mediator, has emerged as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for cardiovascular events. However, as platelets can shed CD40L upon activation, accurate measurement has proved challenging. The present study addresses the controversy regarding the appropriate specimen and preparation for laboratory evaluation of blood sCD40L (soluble CD40L). Serum and plasma (collected in EDTA, citrate or heparin) were collected from healthy volunteers (n=20), and sCD40L was analysed by ELISA immediately or after one to three freeze-thaw cycles and at different centrifugation speeds. Urine sCD40L levels were measured in subjects with low- and high-plasma sCD40L levels. Serum sCD40L levels (5.45+/-4.55 ng/ml; P<0.001) were higher than in citrate, EDTA or heparin plasma (1.03+/-1.07, 1.43+/-1.03 or 1.80+/-1.25 ng/ml respectively), with no significant differences between plasma preparations. Increasing g values (200-13000 g), which gradually deplete plasma of platelets, yielded lower sCD40L levels. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles significantly (P<0.05) increased sCD40L concentrations in platelet-rich, but not platelet-depleted, plasma (up to 2.4-fold). Bilirubin and haemoglobin interfered positively, and triacylglycerols (triglycerides) and cholesterol quenched CD40L signalling. No sCD40L was detected in urine samples. In conclusion, serum yields higher sCD40L concentrations than plasma; accurate measurements of sCD40L require exclusion of platelets and avoiding their post-hoc activation. Samples with high concentrations of bilirubin, haemoglobin and/or triacylglycerols should be excluded, as these substances interfere with the assay.

  6. Expression of transcripts for cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) in the murine lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Haendler, B; Toda, I; Sullivan, D A; Schleuning, W D

    1999-03-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) represent a family of evolutionarily conserved proteins which may play a role in the innate immune system and are transcriptionally regulated by androgens in several tissues. Transcripts for all three members of the CRISP family have now been identified in the murine lacrimal gland. RT-PCR using primers able to discriminate between the related CRISP forms allowed the amplification of fragments with the expected length. DNA sequencing revealed a complete identity with the hitherto characterized epididymal CRISP-1, testicular CRISP-2, and salivary gland CRISP-3. An analysis of several mouse strains indicated that all expressed the three CRISP forms, but in differing amounts. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from acinar cells of lacrimal glands revealed that they expressed CRISP-1 and CRISP-2. Semiquantitative and quantitative analyses furthermore showed higher CRISP-1 and CRISP-3 mRNA levels in the lacrimal glands of male BALB/c and NOD mice when compared to females. Testosterone treatment of C3H/HeJ female mice was followed by an upregulation of the steady-state CRISP-1 but not CRISP-2 transcript levels. A comparable stimulation was observed for the mRNAs coding for parotid secretory protein (PSP), a factor previously shown to exhibit sexual dimorphism in the murine lacrimal gland. The expression of CRISP transcripts in the lacrimal gland is consistent with a function in the innate immune system.

  7. The expression of TIPE1 in murine tissues and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhang, Guizhong; Hao, Chunyan; Wang, Yan; Lou, Yunwei; Zhang, Wenqian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Suxia

    2011-07-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) family play important roles in immune homeostasis and cancer. TIPE1 (TNFAIP8-like 1) is a new member of the TIPE family that may regulate cell death. However, due to the lack of a suitable antibody, the nature of cells and tissues that express TIPE1 protein has not been determined. In this study, we generated a highly specific antibody to TIPE1 and examined TIPE1 expression in various murine tissues and human cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription real-time PCR, and Western blot. We found that TIPE1 protein was detected in a wide variety of tissues in C57BL/6 mice, such as neurons in brain, hepatocytes, germ cells of female and male reproductive organs, muscular tissues, and a variety of cells of the epithelial origin, particularly those with secretory functions. TIPE1 protein was not expressed in mature T or B lymphocytes, but detectable in human B lymphoblast cell line HMy2.CIR and murine T cell line EL4. Furthermore, high levels of TIPE1 mRNA were detected in most human carcinoma cell lines, especially in cells transformed with viral genomes. These results indicate that TIPE1 may perform functions in cell secretion and carcinogenesis, but not in immunity.

  8. Tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells exacerbate immune-mediated hepatitis in mice in a CD40-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Manns, Michael P; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-04-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing (TB) mice. We studied hepatic MDSCs in two murine models of immune-mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of TB mice with Concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide resulted in increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum levels in comparison to tumor-free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSCs into naïve mice exacerbated Con A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells revealed a polarized proinflammatory gene signature after Con A treatment. An IFN-γ-dependent upregulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells along with an upregulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Con A treatment was observed. Con A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) MDSCs as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSCs led to increased arginase activity upon Con A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40(-/-) tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased ROS production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSCs act as proinflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner.

  9. 1.8 Å structure of murine GITR ligand dimer expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Nathenson, Stanley G.; Almo, Steven C.

    2009-05-01

    1.8 Å X-ray crystal structure of mouse GITRL expressed in D. melanogaster S2 cells shows an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric assembly similar to that observed previously for the E. coli-expressed protein. Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 Å resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical ‘strand-exchanged’ dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL.

  10. T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes infiltrating murine tumors are not induced to express foxp3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are enriched within a broad range of murine and human solid tumors. The ontogeny of these Foxp3 Tregs - selective accumulation or proliferation of natural thymus-derived Treg (nTreg) or induced Treg (iTreg) converted in the periphery from naïve T cells - is not known. We used several strains of mice in which Foxp3 and EGFP are coordinately expressed to address this issue. We confirmed that Foxp3-positive CD4 T cells are enriched among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and splenocytes (SPL) in B16 murine melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 Foxp3EGFP mice. OT-II Foxp3EGFP mice are essentially devoid of nTreg, having transgenic CD4 T cells that recognize a class II-restricted epitope derived from ovalbumin; Foxp3 expression could not be detected in TIL or SPL in these mice when implanted with ovalbumin-transfected B16 tumor (B16-OVA). Likewise, TIL isolated from B16 tumors implanted in Pmel-1 Foxp3EGFP mice, whose CD8 T cells recognize a class I-restricted gp100 epitope, were not induced to express Foxp3. All of these T cell populations - wild-type CD4, pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 - could be induced in vitro to express Foxp3 by engagement of their T cell receptor (TCR) and exposure to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). B16 melanoma produces TGFβ and both pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 express TCR that should be engaged within B16 and B16-OVA respectively. Thus, CD8 and CD4 transgenic T cells in these animal models failed to undergo peripheral induction of Foxp3 in a tumor microenvironment. PMID:22112546

  11. CD40 Ligand Deficient C57BL/6 Mouse Is a Potential Surrogate Model of Human X-Linked Hyper IgM (X-HIGM) Syndrome for Characterizing Immune Responses against Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Saucedo, Catalina; Bernal-Reynaga, Rodolfo; Zayas-Jahuey, Jesus; Galindo-Gomez, Silvia; Shibayama, Mineko; Garcia-Galvez, Carlos; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with X-HIGM syndrome fail to express functional CD40 ligand; consequently they cannot mount effective protective antibody responses against pathogenic bacteria. We evaluated, compared, and characterized the humoral immune response of wild type (WT) and C57-CD40L deficient (C57-CD40L−/−) mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium. Basal serum isotype levels were similar for IgM and IgG3 among mice, while total IgG and IgG2b concentrations were significantly lower in C57-CD40L−/− mice compared with WT. Essentially IgG1 and IgG2c levels were detectable only in WT mice. C57-CD40L−/− animals, orally inoculated with 2 × 109 CFU, presented several clinical manifestations since the second week of infection and eventually died. In contrast at this time point no clinical manifestations were observed among C57-CD40L−/− mice infected with 1 × 107 CFU. Infection was subclinical in WT mice inoculated with either bacterial dose. The serum samples from infected mice (1 × 107 CFU), collected at day 14 after infection, had similar C. rodentium-specific IgM titres. Although C57-CD40L−/− animals had lower IgG and IgG2b titres than WT mice, C57-CD40L−/− mice sera displayed complement-mediated bactericidal activity against C. rodentium. C. rodentium-infected C57-CD40L−/− mice are capable of producing antibodies that are protective. C57-CD40L−/− mouse is a useful surrogate model of X-HIGM syndrome for studying immune responses elicited against pathogens. PMID:26064940

  12. BCL11B expression in intramembranous osteogenesis during murine craniofacial suture development.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Greg; van Bakel, Harm; Zhou, Xueyan; Losic, Bojan; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Sutures, where neighboring craniofacial bones are separated by undifferentiated mesenchyme, are major growth sites during craniofacial development. Pathologic fusion of bones within sutures occurs in a wide variety of craniosynostosis conditions and can result in dysmorphic craniofacial growth and secondary neurologic deficits. Our knowledge of the genes involved in suture formation is poor. Here we describe the novel expression pattern of the BCL11B transcription factor protein during murine embryonic craniofacial bone formation. We examined BCL11B protein expression at E14.5, E16.5, and E18.5 in 14 major craniofacial sutures of C57BL/6J mice. We found BCL11B expression to be associated with all intramembranous craniofacial bones examined. The most striking aspects of BCL11B expression were its high levels in suture mesenchyme and increasingly complementary expression with RUNX2 in differentiating osteoblasts during development. BCL11B was also expressed in mesenchyme at the non-sutural edges of intramembranous bones. No expression was seen in osteoblasts involved in endochondral ossification of the cartilaginous cranial base. BCL11B is expressed to potentially regulate the transition of mesenchymal differentiation and suture formation within craniofacial intramembranous bone.

  13. BCL11B expression in intramembranous osteogenesis during murine craniofacial suture development

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Greg; van Bakel, Harm; Zhou, Xueyan; Losic, Bojan; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Sutures, where neighboring craniofacial bones are separated by undifferentiated mesenchyme, are major growth sites during craniofacial development. Pathologic fusion of bones within sutures occurs in a wide variety of craniosynostosis conditions and can result in dysmorphic craniofacial growth and secondary neurologic deficits. Our knowledge of the genes involved in suture formation is poor. Here we describe the novel expression pattern of the BCL11B transcription factor protein during murine embryonic craniofacial bone formation. We examined BCL11B protein expression at E14.5, E16.5, and E18.5 in 14 major craniofacial sutures of C57BL/6J mice. We found BCL11B expression to be associated with all intramembranous craniofacial bones examined. The most striking aspects of BCL11B expression were its high levels in suture mesenchyme and increasingly complementary expression with RUNX2 in differentiating osteoblasts during development. BCL11B was also expressed in mesenchyme at the non-sutural edges of intramembranous bones. No expression was seen in osteoblasts involved in endochondral ossification of the cartilaginous cranial base. BCL11B is expressed to potentially regulate the transition of mesenchymal differentiation and suture formation within craniofacial intramembranous bone. PMID:25511173

  14. Developmentally regulated availability of RANKL and CD40 ligand reveals distinct mechanisms of fetal and adult cross-talk in the thymus medulla.

    PubMed

    Desanti, Guillaume E; Cowan, Jennifer E; Baik, Song; Parnell, Sonia M; White, Andrea J; Penninger, Josef M; Lane, Peter J L; Jenkinson, Eric J; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2012-12-15

    T cell tolerance in the thymus is a key step in shaping the developing T cell repertoire. Thymic medullary epithelial cells play multiple roles in this process, including negative selection of autoreactive thymocytes, influencing thymic dendritic cell positioning, and the generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Previous studies show that medullary thymic epithelial cell (mTEC) development involves hemopoietic cross-talk, and numerous TNFR superfamily members have been implicated in this process. Whereas CD40 and RANK represent key examples, interplay between these receptors, and the individual cell types providing their ligands at both fetal and adult stages of thymus development, remain unclear. In this study, by analysis of the cellular sources of receptor activator for NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and CD40L during fetal and adult cross-talk in the mouse, we show that the innate immune cell system drives initial fetal mTEC development via expression of RANKL, but not CD40L. In contrast, cross-talk involving the adaptive immune system involves both RANKL and CD40L, with analysis of distinct subsets of intrathymic CD4(+) T cells revealing a differential contribution of CD40L by conventional, but not Foxp3(+) regulatory, T cells. We also provide evidence for a stepwise involvement of TNFRs in mTEC development, with CD40 upregulation induced by initial RANK signaling subsequently controlling proliferation within the mTEC compartment. Collectively, our findings show how multiple hemopoietic cell types regulate mTEC development through differential provision of RANKL/CD40L during ontogeny, revealing molecular differences in fetal and adult hemopoietic cross-talk. They also suggest a stepwise process of mTEC development, in which RANK is a master player in controlling the availability of other TNFR family members.

  15. Dynamic expression of the Slit-Robo GTPase activating protein genes during development of the murine nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Claire; Endris, Volker; Rappold, Gudrun

    2009-03-10

    We investigated the expression of the three known Slit-Robo GTPase activating protein (srGAP) genes in the developing murine nervous system using in situ hybridization. The three genes are expressed during embryonic and early postnatal development in the murine nervous system, showing a distinct pattern of expression in the olfactory system, the eye, forebrain and midbrain structures, the cerebellum, the spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia, which we discuss in relation to Slit-Robo expression patterns and signaling pathways. We also report srGAP2 expression in zones of neuronal differentiation and srGAP3 in ventricular zones of neurogenesis in many different tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). Compared to srGAP2 and srGAP3, the onset of srGAP1 expression is later in most CNS tissues. We propose that these differences in expression point to functional differences between these three genes in the development of neural tissues.

  16. Regulation of endothelial VCAM-1 expression in murine cardiac grafts. Roles for TNF and IL4.

    PubMed Central

    Bergese, S.; Pelletier, R.; Vallera, D.; Widmer, M.; Orosz, C.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo mechanisms of vascular endothelial activation and VCAM-1 expression were studied in murine heterotopic cardiac grafts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that cardiac allograft endothelia develop reactivity with MECA-32 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and M/K-2 (anti-VCAM-1) MAb within 3 days of transplantation, whereas cardiac isografts develop MECA-32 reactivity but no M/K-2 reactivity. Additional studies demonstrated that a single treatment of cardiac isograft recipients with the anti-CD3 MAb 145-2C11 induces VCAM-1 expression on isograft microvascular endothelia within 24 hours. We have used this experimental system to identify the cytokines responsible for expression of VCAM-1 and MECA-32 MAb reactivity on graft vascular endothelia. We report that the expression of VCAM-1 on isograft endothelia that was induced with anti-CD3 MAb was blocked by simultaneous treatment with either pentoxifylline, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor (TNFR-Fc), anti-IL4 MAb, or soluble IL4R, but not by anti-IFN-gamma MAb. Alternatively, a similar pattern of isograft endothelial VCAM-1 expression was stimulated in the absence of anti-CD3 MAbs with a single injection of human recombinant TNF-alpha, or with recombinant murine IL4 provided as IL4/anti-IL4 MAb complexes. In addition, the IL4-induced VCAM-1 expression was completely blocked by a single intravenous treatment of the isograft recipients with TNFR:Fc. This suggests that high concentrations of TNF-alpha can stimulate endothelial VCAM-1 expression, but these concentrations are apparently not achieved in cardiac isografts. In the absence of an inducing agent such as anti-CD3 MAb, the stimulation of VCAM-1 expression with exogenous IL4 may reflect functional interaction between endogenous TNF and exogenous IL4, as suggested by the blocking experiments with TNFR:Fc. Although cardiac isograft endothelia normally develop reactivity with MECA-32 MAb within 3 days of transplantation, treatment of cardiac isograft

  17. Effect of Red Wine Polyphenols on the Expression of Transthyretin in Murine Choroid Plexus.

    PubMed

    Tenore, Gian C; Morisco, Filomena; Lembo, Vincenzo; Ritieni, Alberto

    Plasmatic transthyretin may be regarded as a suitable candidate biomarker for the onset, severity, and progression of Alzheimer disease. The aim of the present experimental work was to evaluate the effect of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) on the expression of transthyretin in murine choroid plexus. In contrast to what generally reported in literature for polyphenols, our experimental results indicated a correlation between RWPs assumption and a decrease of transthyretin expression, with a non-dose dependent trend. The present study would point out the attention on the possible pro-oxidant effects of red wine polyphenols at certain doses, although further in vitro, in vivo, and clinical experiments must be performed in order to clarify the mechanisms of action at the base of observed results.

  18. Expression of Ia antigens by murine kidney epithelium after exposure to streptozotocin.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, A. G.; Mannschreck, J. W.; Anderson, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    In the normal murine kidney, Ia antigens are expressed by dendritic cells located within the interstitial connective tissue and scattered cells within the glomerulus. After receiving multiple low doses of streptozotocin, a nitrosourea derivative of glucose, kidney epithelium labeled intensely with anti-Ia antibodies. Ultrastructural immunohistochemistry indicated that the epithelial cells of the proximal convoluted tubules expressed Ia antigens on their basolateral surfaces while remaining Ia- on their luminal surfaces. This response to streptozotocin does not appear to be related to the diabetogenic potential of the drug, because BALB/cJ mice, which remain normoglycemic after treatment with streptozotocin, also exhibited strongly Ia+ tubular epithelium after treatment with streptozotocin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2950766

  19. Increased TLR4 expression in murine placentas after oral infection with periodontal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Arce, R.M.; Barros, S.P.; Wacker, B.; Peters, B.; Moss, K.; Offenbacher, S.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal periodontitis has emerged as a putative risk factor for preterm births in humans. The periodontitis-associated dental biofilm is thought to serve as an important source of oral bacteria and related virulence factors that hematogenously disseminate and affect the fetoplacental unit; however the underlying biological mechanisms are yet to be fully elucidated. This study hypothesized that an oral infection with the human periodontal pathogens Campylobacter rectus and Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to induce fetal growth restriction, placental inflammation and enhance Toll-like receptors type 4 (TLR4) expression in a murine pregnancy model. Female Balb/C mice (n=40) were orally infected with C. rectus and/or P. gingivalis over a 16-week period and mated once per week. Pregnant mice were sacrificed at embryonic day (E) 16.5 and placentas were collected and analyzed for TLR4 mRNA levels and qualitative protein expression by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. TLR4 mRNA expression was found to be increased in C. rectus-infected group (1.98±0.886 fold difference, P<0.01, ANOVA) compared to controls. Microscopic analysis of murine placentas showed enhanced immunofluorescence of TLR4 in trophoblasts, mainly in the placental labyrinth layer. Also, combined oral infection with C. rectus and P. gingivalis significantly reduced the overall fecundity compared to controls (16.7% vs. 75%, infected vs. non-infected mice respectively, P=0.03, Kaplan-Meier). The results supported an enhanced placental TLR4 expression after oral infection with periodontal pathogens. The TLR4 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of preterm births; therefore the abnormal regulation of placental TLR4 may give new insights into how maternal periodontitis and periodontal pathogens might be linked to placental inflammation and preterm birth pathogenesis. PMID:19101032

  20. Retrovirally transduced murine T lymphocytes expressing FasL mediate effective killing of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Symes, JC; Siatskas, C; Fowler, DH; Medin, JA

    2010-01-01

    Adoptively transferred T cells possess anticancer activities partially mediated by T-cell FasL engagement of Fas tumor targets. However, antigen-induced T-cell activation and clonal expansion, which stimulates FasL activity, is often inefficient in tumors. As a gene therapy approach to overcome this obstacle, we have created oncoretroviral vectors to overexpress FasL or non-cleavable FasL (ncFasL) on murine T cells of a diverse T-cell receptor repertoire. Expression of c-FLIP was also engineered to prevent apoptosis of transduced cells. Retroviral transduction of murine T lymphocytes has historically been problematic, and we describe optimized T-cell transduction protocols involving CD3/CD28 co-stimulation of T cells, transduction on ice using concentrated oncoretrovirus, and culture with IL-15. Genetically modified T cells home to established prostate cancer tumors in vivo. Co-stimulated T cells expressing FasL, ncFasL and ncFasL/c-FLIP each mediated cytotoxicity in vitro against RM-1 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To evaluate the compatibility of this approach with current prostate cancer therapies, we exposed RM-1, LNCaP, and TRAMP-C1 cells to radiation, mitoxantrone, or docetaxel. Fas and H-2b expression were upregulated by these methods. We have developed a novel FasL-based immuno-gene therapy for prostate cancer that warrants further investigation given the apparent constitutive and inducible Fas pathway expression in this malignancy. PMID:19096446

  1. Retinal expression of small non-coding RNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Wang, Zhongxiao; Sun, Ye; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization is a leading cause of blindness in proliferative retinopathy. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play critical roles in both vascular and neuronal development of the retina through post-transcriptional regulation of target gene expression. To identify the function and therapeutic potential of sncRNAs in retinopathy, we assessed the expression profile of retinal sncRNAs in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) with pathologic proliferation of neovessels. Approximately 2% of all analyzed sncRNAs were significantly altered in OIR retinas compared with normoxic controls. Twenty three microRNAs with substantial up- or down-regulation were identified, including miR-351, -762, -210, 145, -155, -129-5p, -150, -203, and -375, which were further analyzed for their potential target genes in angiogenic, hypoxic, and immune response-related pathways. In addition, nineteen small nucleolar RNAs also revealed differential expression in OIR retinas compared with control retinas. A decrease of overall microRNA expression in OIR retinas was consistent with reduced microRNA processing enzyme Dicer, and increased expression of Alu element in OIR. Together, our findings elucidated a group of differentially expressed sncRNAs in a murine model of proliferative retinopathy. These sncRNAs may exert critical post-transcriptional regulatory roles in regulating pathological neovascularization in eye diseases. PMID:27653551

  2. Blocking CD40-TRAF6 signaling is a therapeutic target in obesity-associated insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Seijkens, Tom; Zarzycka, Barbara; Engel, David; Poggi, Marjorie; van den Berg, Susan; van den Berg, Sjoerd; Soehnlein, Oliver; Winkels, Holger; Beckers, Linda; Lievens, Dirk; Driessen, Ann; Kusters, Pascal; Biessen, Erik; Garcia-Martin, Ruben; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Gijbels, Marion; Noelle, Randolph; Boon, Louis; Hackeng, Tilman; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Xu, Aimin; Vriend, Gert; Nabuurs, Sander; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Gerdes, Norbert; de Winther, Menno; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Weber, Christian; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Nicolaes, Gerry; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Lutgens, Esther

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays an instrumental role in obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we unravel the role of the costimulatory molecule CD40 and its signaling intermediates, TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs), in diet-induced obesity (DIO). Although not exhibiting increased weight gain, male CD40−/− mice in DIO displayed worsened insulin resistance, compared with wild-type mice. This worsening was associated with excessive inflammation of adipose tissue (AT), characterized by increased accumulation of CD8+ T cells and M1 macrophages, and enhanced hepatosteatosis. Mice with deficient CD40-TRAF2/3/5 signaling in MHCII+ cells exhibited a similar phenotype in DIO as CD40−/− mice. In contrast, mice with deficient CD40-TRAF6 signaling in MHCII+ cells displayed no insulin resistance and showed a reduction in both AT inflammation and hepatosteatosis in DIO. To prove the therapeutic potential of inhibition of CD40-TRAF6 in obesity, DIO mice were treated with a small-molecule inhibitor that we designed to specifically block CD40-TRAF6 interactions; this compound improved insulin sensitivity, reduced AT inflammation, and decreased hepatosteatosis. Our study reveals that the CD40-TRAF2/3/5 signaling pathway in MHCII+ cells protects against AT inflammation and metabolic complications associated with obesity whereas CD40-TRAF6 interactions in MHCII+ cells aggravate these complications. Inhibition of CD40-TRAF6 signaling by our compound may provide a therapeutic option in obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24492375

  3. Sunitinib enhances the antitumor responses of agonistic CD40-antibody by reducing MDSCs and synergistically improving endothelial activation and T-cell recruitment

    PubMed Central

    van Hooren, Luuk; Georganaki, Maria; Huang, Hua; Mangsbo, Sara M.; Dimberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    CD40-activating immunotherapy has potent antitumor effects due to its ability to activate dendritic cells and induce cytotoxic T-cell responses. However, its efficacy is limited by immunosuppressive cells in the tumor and by endothelial anergy inhibiting recruitment of T-cells. Here, we show that combining agonistic CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy with vascular targeting using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib decreased tumor growth and improved survival in B16.F10 melanoma and T241 fibrosarcoma. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with anti-CD40 mAb led to increased activation of CD11c+ dendritic cells in the tumor draining lymph node, while sunitinib treatment reduced vessel density and decreased accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells. The expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules was up-regulated on tumor endothelial cells only when anti-CD40 mAb treatment was combined with sunitinib. This was associated with enhanced intratumoral infiltration of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. Our results show that combining CD40-stimulating immunotherapy with sunitinib treatment exerts potent complementary antitumor effects mediated by dendritic cell activation, a reduction in myeloid derived suppressor cells and increased endothelial activation, resulting in enhanced recruitment of cytotoxic T-cells. PMID:27385210

  4. Myocarditis induced by targeted expression of the MCP-1 gene in murine cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kolattukudy, P. E.; Quach, T.; Bergese, S.; Breckenridge, S.; Hensley, J.; Altschuld, R.; Gordillo, G.; Klenotic, S.; Orosz, C.; Parker-Thornburg, J.

    1998-01-01

    To explore the possible role of monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1) in inflammatory diseases of the heart, we expressed the murine MCP-1(JE) gene under the control of the alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain promoter to attempt to target MCP-1 expression to the adult heart muscle. The five lines of transgenic mice thus produced showed targeted expression of MCP-1 transcripts and protein in the adult heart muscle and pulmonary vein but not in skeletal muscle. MCP-1 level in the transgenic hearts increased up to 30 to 45 days of age, and leukocyte infiltration into interstitium between cardiomyocytes increased up to 60 to 75 days. The infiltrate was mainly macrophages but not T cells. The presence of MCP-1 in the transgenic hearts did not induce cytokine production indicative of leukocyte activation. Echocardiographic analysis of 1-year-old mice that express MCP-1 in the myocardium and of age-matched controls revealed cardiac hypertrophy and dilation, increases in left ventricular (LV) mass, and systolic and diastolic left ventricular internal diameters. A significant decline in M-mode shortening fraction showed depressed contractile function. Transgenic hearts were 65% heavier, and histological analysis showed moderate myocarditis, edema, and some fibrosis. Thus, MCP-1 expression in the heart muscle may provide a model to investigate myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9422528

  5. Interleukin 4 induces membrane Thy-1 expression on normal murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Snapper, C M; Hornbeck, P V; Atasoy, U; Pereira, G M; Paul, W E

    1988-01-01

    Thy-1, a cell-surface glycoprotein of undetermined function, is expressed in relatively large amounts on mouse thymocytes, peripheral T cells, and neurons. It is widely used as a marker to distinguish peripheral T cells from B cells in mice. We show here that, in five distinct mouse strains, recombinant interleukin 4 (IL-4/B-cell stimulatory factor 1) strikingly induces membrane expression of Thy-1 on the vast majority of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated normal murine B cells. Thy-1+ B cells are precursors for immunoglobulin-secreting cells. RNA blot analysis indicates that B cells express a Thy-1 mRNA of 1.8 kilobases, the same size as that found in T cells. Cell mixing experiments show that only cells derived from Thy-1.2+ donors express Thy-1.2, indicating that B cells expressing Thy-1 have not passively absorbed the glycoprotein from another cell source. Recombinant interferon-gamma inhibits Thy-1 induction by B cells stimulated with LPS and IL-4. Thy-1 is also induced on B cells that have been stimulated as a result of the specific activation of an IL-4-producing T-helper clone. Anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibody inhibits the induction of B-cell Thy-1 in this T-cell-B-cell interaction. Images PMID:2901096

  6. Temperature-sensitive viral RNA expression in Moloney murine sarcoma virus ts110-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamelin, R; Brizzard, B L; Nash, M A; Murphy, E C; Arlinghaus, R B

    1985-01-01

    We examined the mos-specific intracellular RNA species in 6m2 cells, an NRK cell line nonproductively infected with the ts110 mutant of Moloney murine sarcoma virus. These cells present a normal phenotype at 39 degrees C and a transformed phenotype at 28 or 33 degrees C, expressing two viral proteins, termed P85gag-mos and P58gag, at 28 to 33 degrees C, whereas only P58gag is expressed at 39 degrees C. It has been previously shown that 6m2 cells contain two virus-specific RNA species, a 4.0-kilobase (kb) RNA coding for P58gag and a 3.5-kb RNA coding for P85gag-mos. Using both Northern blot and S1 nuclease analyses, we show here that the 3.5-kb RNA is the predominant viral RNA species in 6m2 cells grown at 28 degrees C, whereas only the 4.0-kb RNA is detected at 39 degrees C. During temperature shift experiments, the 3.5-kb RNA species disappears after a shift from 28 to 39 degrees C and is detected again after a shift back from 39 to 28 degrees C. By Southern blot analysis, we have detected only one ts110 proviral DNA in the 6m2 genome. This observation, as well as previously published heteroduplex and S1 nuclease analyses which showed that the 3.5-kb RNA species lacks about 430 bases found at the gag gene-mos gene junction in the 4.0-kb RNA, suggests that the 3.5-kb RNA is a splicing product of the 4.0-kb RNA. The absence of the 3.5-kb RNA when 6m2 cells are grown at 39 degrees C indicates that the splicing reaction is thermosensitive. The splicing defect of the ts110 Moloney murine sarcoma virus viral RNA in 6m2 cells cannot be complemented by acute Moloney murine leukemia virus superinfection, since no 3.5-kb ts110 RNA was detected in acutely superinfected 6m2 cells maintained at 39 degrees C. The spliced Moloney murine leukemia virus env mRNA, however, is found in acutely infected cells maintained at 39 degrees C, suggesting that the lack of ts110 viral RNA splicing at 39 degrees C is not due to an obvious host defect. In sharp contrast, however, 6m2 cells

  7. Expression of murine interleukin 7 in a murine glioma cell line results in reduced tumorigenicity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T; Tashiro, K; Miyatake, S; Kinashi, T; Nakano, T; Oda, Y; Kikuchi, H; Honjo, T

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the immunoregulatory effect of local and continuous secretion of interleukin 7 (IL-7) from murine glioma cells (203-glioma) engineered by murine IL-7 gene transfection. Secretion of IL-7 from glioma cells did not result in morphology or growth rate changes but did reduce tumorigenicity in vivo in proportion to the amount of IL-7 produced. This reduction in tumorigenicity could be reversed in a dose-dependent fashion by injection of anti-IL-7 neutralizing monoclonal antibody at the tumor site. Mice immunized with IL-7-producing glioma cells showed a specific immune response to 203-glioma but not to two other syngeneic cell lines (B-16, a melanoma, and YM-12, a fibrosarcoma). IL-7-producing glioma cells were not rejected in mice depleted of CD8+ cells but were rejected in mice depleted of CD4+ or NK1.1+ cells. These results suggest that CD8+ T cells may play an important role in tumor rejection. Images PMID:1570303

  8. MicroRNA expression profiling of the developing murine upper lip.

    PubMed

    Warner, Dennis R; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Brock, Guy; Webb, Cindy L; Michele Pisano, M; Greene, Robert M

    2014-08-01

    Clefts of the lip and palate are thought to be caused by genetic and environmental insults but the role of epigenetic mechanisms underlying this common birth defect are unknown. We analyzed the expression of over 600 microRNAs in the murine medial nasal and maxillary processes isolated on GD10.0-GD11.5 to identify those expressed during development of the upper lip and analyzed spatial expression of a subset. A total of 142 microRNAs were differentially expressed across gestation days 10.0-11.5 in the medial nasal processes, and 66 in the maxillary processes of the first branchial arch with 45 common to both. Of the microRNAs exhibiting the largest percent increase in both facial processes were five members of the Let-7 family. Among those with the greatest decrease in expression from GD10.0 to GD11.5 were members of the microRNA-302/367 family that have been implicated in cellular reprogramming. The distribution of expression of microRNA-199a-3p and Let-7i was determined by in situ hybridization and revealed widespread expression in both medial nasal and maxillary facial process, while that for microRNA-203 was much more limited. MicroRNAs are dynamically expressed in the tissues that form the upper lip and several were identified that target mRNAs known to be important for its development, including those that regulate the two main isoforms of p63 (microRNA-203 and microRNA-302/367 family). Integration of these data with corresponding proteomic datasets will lead to a greater appreciation of epigenetic regulation of lip development and provide a better understanding of potential causes of cleft lip.

  9. Expression of the Murine Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene in Muscle and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Pearlman, Joel A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Ranier, Joel E.; Reeves, Alice A.; Caskey, C. Thomas

    1988-03-01

    Complementary DNA clones were isolated that represent the 5' terminal 2.5 kilobases of the murine Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Dmd) messenger RNA (mRNA). Mouse Dmd mRNA was detectable in skeletal and cardiac muscle and at a level approximately 90 percent lower in brain. Dmd mRNA is also present, but at much lower than normal levels, in both the muscle and brain of three different strains of dystrophic mdx mice. The identification of Dmd mRNA in brain raises the possibility of a relation between human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene expression and the mental retardation found in some DMD males. These results also provide evidence that the mdx mutations are allelic variants of mouse Dmd gene mutations.

  10. Expressing anti-HIV VRC01 antibody using the murine IgG1 secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Aw, Rochelle; McKay, Paul F; Shattock, Robin J; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-12-01

    The use of the recombinant expression platform Pichia pastoris to produce pharmaceutically important proteins has been investigated over the past 30 years. Compared to mammalian cultures, expression in P. pastoris is cheaper and faster, potentially leading to decreased costs and process development times. Product yields depend on a number of factors including the secretion signal chosen for expression, which can influence the host cell response to recombinant protein production. VRC01, a broadly neutralising anti-HIV antibody, was expressed in P. pastoris, using the methanol inducible AOX1 promoter for both the heavy and light chains. Titre reached up to 3.05 μg mL(-1) in small scale expression. VRC01 was expressed using both the α-mating factor signal peptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the murine IgG1 signal peptide. Surprisingly, using the murine IgG1 signal peptide resulted in higher yield of antibody capable of binding gp140 antigen. Furthermore, we evaluated levels of secretory stress compared to the untransformed wild-type strain and show a reduced level of secretory stress in the murine IgG1 signal peptide strains versus those containing the α-MF signal peptide. As bottlenecks in the secretory pathway are often the limiting factor in protein secretion, reduced levels of secretory stress and the higher yield of functional antibody suggest the murine IgG1 signal peptide may lead to better protein folding and secretion. This work indicates the possibilities for utilising the murine IgG1 signal peptide for a range of antibodies, resulting in high yields and reduced cellular stress.

  11. ICAM-1-expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R; Hordijk, Peter L; Hogg, Nancy; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-02-18

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1-deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1-mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense.

  12. Acrolein increases 5-lipoxygenase expression in murine macrophages through activation of ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chae E.; Lee, Seung J.; Seo, Kyo W.; Park, Hye M.; Yun, Jung W.; Bae, Jin U.; Bae, Sun S.; Kim, Chi D.

    2010-05-15

    Episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants has been linked to acute myocardial infarction, and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is involved in the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which destabilizes atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, the present study determined the effect of acrolein on 5-LO/leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}) production in murine macrophages. Stimulation of J774A.1 cells with acrolein led to increased LTB{sub 4} production in association with increased 5-LO expression. Acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway, but not by inhibitors for JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. In line with these results, acrolein exclusively increased the phosphorylation of ERK among these MAPK, suggesting a role for the ERK pathway in acrolein-induced 5-LO expression with subsequent production of LTB{sub 4}. Among the receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), acrolein-evoked ERK phosphorylation was attenuated by AG1478, an EGFR inhibitor, but not by AG1295, a PDGFR inhibitor. In addition, acrolein-evoked 5-LO expression was also inhibited by inhibition of EGFR pathway, but not by inhibition of PDGFR pathway. These observations suggest that acrolein has a profound effect on the 5-LO pathway via an EGFR-mediated activation of ERK pathway, leading to acute ischemic syndromes through the generation of LTB{sub 4}, subsequent MMP-9 production and plaque rupture.

  13. Heterogeneity of Functional Properties of Clone 66 Murine Breast Cancer Cells Expressing Various Stem Cell Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Farrell, Tracy; Sharma, Gayatri; McGuire, Timothy R.; O’Kane, Barbara; Sharp, J. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer grows, metastasizes and relapses from rare, therapy resistant cells with a stem cell phenotype (cancer stem cells/CSCs). However, there is a lack of studies comparing the functions of CSCs isolated using different phenotypes in order to determine if CSCs are homogeneous or heterogeneous. Methods Cells with various stem cell phenotypes were isolated by sorting from Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that grow orthotopically in immune intact syngeneic mice. These populations were compared by in vitro functional assays for proliferation, growth, sphere and colony formation; and in vivo limiting dilution analysis of tumorigenesis. Results The proportion of cells expressing CD44highCD24low/neg, side population (SP) cells, ALDH1+, CD49fhigh, CD133high, and CD34high differed, suggesting heterogeneity. Differences in frequency and size of tumor spheres from these populations were observed. Higher rates of proliferation of non-SP, ALDH1+, CD34low, and CD49fhigh suggested properties of transit amplifying cells. Colony formation was higher from ALDH1− and non-SP cells than ALDH1+ and SP cells suggesting a progenitor phenotype. The frequency of clonal colonies that grew in agar varied and was differentially altered by the presence of Matrigel™. In vivo, fewer cells with a stem cell phenotype were needed for tumor formation than “non-stem” cells. Fewer SP cells were needed to form tumors than ALDH1+ cells suggesting further heterogeneities of cells with stem phenotypes. Different levels of cytokines/chemokines were produced by Clone 66 with RANTES being the highest. Whether the heterogeneity reflects soluble factor production remains to be determined. Conclusions These data demonstrate that Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that express stem cell phenotypes are heterogeneous and exhibit different functional properties, and this may also be the case for human breast cancer stem cells. PMID:24265713

  14. Methamphetamine and HIV-Tat Alter Murine Cardiac DNA Methylation and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koczor, Christopher A.; Fields, Earl; Jedrzejczak, Mark J.; Jiao, Zhe; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Shang, Joan; Torres, Rebecca A.; Lewis, William

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the individual and combined effects of HIV-1 and methamphetamine (N-methyl-1-phenylpropan-2-amine, METH) on cardiac dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of HIV/AIDS. METH is abused epidemically and is frequently associated with acquisition of HIV-1 infection or AIDS. We employed microarrays to identify mRNA differences in cardiac left ventricle (LV) gene expression following METH administration (10d, 3mg/kg/d, subcutaneously) in C57Bl/6 wild-type littermates (WT) and Tat-expressing transgenic (TG) mice. Arrays identified 880 differentially expressed genes (expression fold change>1.5, p<0.05) following METH exposure, Tat expression, or both. Using pathway enrichment analysis, mRNAs encoding polypeptides for calcium signaling and contractility were altered in the LV samples. Correlative DNA methylation analysis revealed significant LV DNA methylation changes following METH exposure and Tat expression. By combining these data sets, 38 gene promoters (27 related to METH, 11 related to Tat) exhibited differences by both methods of analysis. Among those, only the promoter for CACNA1C that encodes L-type calcium channel Cav1.2 displayed DNA methylation changes concordant with its gene expression change. Quantitative PCR verified that Cav1.2 LV mRNA abundance doubled following METH. Correlative immunoblots specific for Cav1.2 revealed a 3.5-fold increase in protein abundance in METH LVs. Data implicate Cav1.2 in calcium dysregulation and hypercontractility in the murine LV exposed to METH. They suggest a pathogenetic role for METH exposure to promote LV dysfunction that outweighs Tat-induced effects. PMID:26307267

  15. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Is Expressed in Germ Cells throughout the Murine Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Natsumi; Davy, Philip M C; Gardner, Lauren H; Mathews, Juanita; Yamazaki, Yuki; Allsopp, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells of the early embryo, and germ line cells, are essential to ensure uncompromised development to adulthood as well as species propagation, respectively. Recently, the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) has been shown to have important roles in embryonic stem cells; in particular, regulation of conversion to glycolytic metabolism and, as we have shown, maintenance of functional levels of telomerase. In the present study, we sought to assess whether Hif1α was also expressed in the primitive cells of the murine embryo. We observed expression of Hif1α in pre-implantation embryos, specifically the 2-cell stage, morula, and blastocyst. Robust Hif1α expression was also observed in male and female primordial germ cells. We subsequently assessed whether Hif1α was expressed in adult male and female germ cells. In the testis, Hif1α was robustly expressed in spermatogonial cells, in both juvenile (6-week old) and adult (3-month old) males. In the ovaries, Hif1α was expressed in mature oocytes from adult females, as assessed both in situ and in individual oocytes flushed from super-ovulated females. Analysis of Hif1α transcript levels indicates a mechanism of regulation during early development that involves stockpiling of Hif1α protein in mature oocytes, presumably to provide protection from hypoxic stress until the gene is re-activated at the blastocyst stage. Together, these observations show that Hif1α is expressed throughout the life-cycle, including both the male and female germ line, and point to an important role for Hif1α in early progenitor cells.

  16. Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Is Expressed in Germ Cells throughout the Murine Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Lauren H.; Mathews, Juanita; Yamazaki, Yuki; Allsopp, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells of the early embryo, and germ line cells, are essential to ensure uncompromised development to adulthood as well as species propagation, respectively. Recently, the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) has been shown to have important roles in embryonic stem cells; in particular, regulation of conversion to glycolytic metabolism and, as we have shown, maintenance of functional levels of telomerase. In the present study, we sought to assess whether Hif1α was also expressed in the primitive cells of the murine embryo. We observed expression of Hif1α in pre-implantation embryos, specifically the 2-cell stage, morula, and blastocyst. Robust Hif1α expression was also observed in male and female primordial germ cells. We subsequently assessed whether Hif1α was expressed in adult male and female germ cells. In the testis, Hif1α was robustly expressed in spermatogonial cells, in both juvenile (6-week old) and adult (3-month old) males. In the ovaries, Hif1α was expressed in mature oocytes from adult females, as assessed both in situ and in individual oocytes flushed from super-ovulated females. Analysis of Hif1α transcript levels indicates a mechanism of regulation during early development that involves stockpiling of Hif1α protein in mature oocytes, presumably to provide protection from hypoxic stress until the gene is re-activated at the blastocyst stage. Together, these observations show that Hif1α is expressed throughout the life-cycle, including both the male and female germ line, and point to an important role for Hif1α in early progenitor cells. PMID:27148974

  17. Molecular variants of KCNQ channels expressed in murine portal vein myocytes: a role in delayed rectifier current.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Susumu; Sergeant, Gerard P; Greenwood, Iain A; Horowitz, Burton

    2003-05-16

    We have analyzed the expression of KCNQ genes in murine portal vein myocytes and determined that of the 5 known KCNQ channels, only KCNQ1 was expressed. In addition to the full-length KCNQ1 transcript, a novel spliced form (termed KCNQ1b) was detected that had a 63 amino acid truncation at the C-terminus. KCNQ1b was not detected in heart or brain but represented approximately half the KCNQ1 transcripts expressed in PV. Antibodies specific for KCNQ1a stained cell membranes from portal vein myocytes and HEK cells expressing the channel. However, because the antibodies were generated against an epitope in the deleted, C-terminal portion of the protein, these antibodies did not stain HEK cells expressing KCNQ1b. In murine portal vein myocytes, in the presence of 5 mmol/L 4-aminopyridine, an outwardly rectifying K+ current was recorded that was sensitive to linopirdine, a specific blocker of KCNQ channels. Currents produced by the heterologous expression of KCNQ1a or KCNQ1b were inhibited by similar concentrations of linopirdine, and linopirdine prolonged the time-course of the action potential in isolated portal vein myocytes. Our data suggest that these two KCNQ1 splice forms are expressed in murine portal vein and contribute to the delayed rectifier current in these myocytes.

  18. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  19. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Mejia, Martha Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Porchia, Leonardo M; Salgado, Hilda Rosas; Totolhua, José-Luis; Ortega, Arturo; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa Clara Regina; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO), has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs) are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf), infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME), non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels. PMID:24676665

  20. Expression pattern and mapping of the murine versican gene (Cspg2) to chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, M.F.; Morgan, J.L.; Buchberg, A.M.

    1995-09-01

    Versican is a modular proteoglycan harboring a hyaluronan-binding domain at its amino-terminal end and a selectin-like domain at its carboxyl-terminal end, separated by a large intervening region containing the attachment sites for the glycosaminoglycan side chains. By virtue of its modular nature, versican may play a role in cellular attachment, migration, and proliferation by interacting with cell surfaces and extracellular matrix molecules. To discern the function of versican through the analysis of spontaneous and targeted genetic mutations, we have isolated a mouse versican cDNA encoding part of the hyaluronan-binding region, analyzed its mRNA expression in various adult mouse tissues and embryos, and determined the chromosomal location of the gene. Murine versican was 89% identical to human versican at the amino acid level and was highly expressed in mouse embryos at Days 13, 14, and 18. Expression was also detected in adult mouse brain, heart, lung, spleen, skeletal muscle, skin, tail, kidney, and testis. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we assigned the versican gene (Cspg2) to mouse chromosome 13, in a region that is syntenic with the long arm of human chromosome 5 where the human CSPG2 gene is located. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Differential gene expression in human, murine, and cell line-derived macrophages upon polarization.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Kara L; Wrona, Emily A; Romero-Torres, Saly; Pallotta, Isabella; Graney, Pamela L; Witherel, Claire E; Panicker, Leelamma M; Feldman, Ricardo A; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Santambrogio, Laura; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freytes, Donald O

    2016-09-10

    The mechanisms by which macrophages control the inflammatory response, wound healing, biomaterial-interactions, and tissue regeneration appear to be related to their activation/differentiation states. Studies of macrophage behavior in vitro can be useful for elucidating their mechanisms of action, but it is not clear to what extent the source of macrophages affects their apparent behavior, potentially affecting interpretation of results. Although comparative studies of macrophage behavior with respect to cell source have been conducted, there has been no direct comparison of the three most commonly used cell sources: murine bone marrow, human monocytes from peripheral blood (PB), and the human leukemic monocytic cell line THP-1, across multiple macrophage phenotypes. In this study, we used multivariate discriminant analysis to compare the in vitro expression of genes commonly chosen to assess macrophage phenotype across all three sources of macrophages, as well as those derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), that were polarized towards four distinct phenotypes using the same differentiation protocols: M(LPS,IFN) (aka M1), M(IL4,IL13) (aka M2a), M(IL10) (aka M2c), and M(-) (aka M0) used as control. Several differences in gene expression trends were found among the sources of macrophages, especially between murine bone marrow-derived and human blood-derived M(LPS,IFN) and M(IL4,IL13) macrophages with respect to commonly used phenotype markers like CCR7 and genes associated with angiogenesis and tissue regeneration like FGF2 and MMP9. We found that the genes with the most similar patterns of expression among all sources were CXCL-10 and CXCL-11 for M(LPS,IFN) and CCL17 and CCL22 for M(IL4,IL13). Human PB-derived macrophages and human iPSC-derived macrophages showed similar gene expression patterns among the groups and genes studied here, suggesting that iPSC-derived monocytes have the potential to be used as a reliable cell source of human macrophages

  2. The selective expression of distinct fucosylated glycoproteins on murine T and B lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Salam, Fatma; Mansour, Mohamed H; Al-Shemary, Tahany

    2005-01-01

    The putative expression of distinct terminally fucosylated glycoconjugates among murine lymphocyte subpopulations was sought using Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA), each with a distinctive primary binding preference to type II and type I blood group H oligosaccharide determinants, respectively. In newly born and adult mice, direct labeling of isolated lymphocyte subsets in suspension, as well as immunohistochemical assays were indicative of the age-regulated co-expression of the UEA-I-reactive ligand among thymic epithelial cells and a subset of the mature (PNA-), medullary thymocytes. In the spleen, UEA-I-ligand expression was selectively confined to a subset of the CD4+ T lymphocytes scattered around red pulp sinuses in newly born mice, but distinctively localized within the T cell-dependent periarteriolar lymphoid sheath compartment in adult mice. Among thymocytes of adult mice, two-dimensional Western blots demonstrated the expression of the UEA-I-reactive ligand among multiple isoforms of three major 50, 114 and 180kDa acidic glycoproteins, of which, heterogeneous weight and charge variants of the 114kDa component were also evident among splenocytes. The expression of the AAA-reactive ligand was, on the other hand, restricted to a single major 120 kDa acidic glycoprotein, in addition to a minor molecular weight variant of 115kDa, associated with a subset of immature IgM+ B lymphocytes localized within the red pulp, in both newly born and adult mice. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to mechanisms that govern lymphocyte maturation, selection and migration.

  3. Gene expression profile of androgen modulated genes in the murine fetal developing lung

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidences suggest that sex affects lung development. Indeed, a higher incidence of respiratory distress syndrome is observed in male compared to female preterm neonates at comparable developmental stage and experimental studies demonstrated an androgen-related delay in male lung maturation. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these deleterious effects of androgens in lung maturation are only partially understood. Methods To build up a better understanding of the effect of androgens on lung development, we analyzed by microarrays the expression of genes showing a sexual difference and those modulated by androgens. Lungs of murine fetuses resulting from a timely mating window of 1 hour were studied at gestational day 17 (GD17) and GD18, corresponding to the period of surge of surfactant production. Using injections of the antiandrogen flutamide to pregnant mice, we hunted for genes in fetal lungs which are transcriptionally modulated by androgens. Results Results revealed that 1844 genes were expressed with a sexual difference at GD17 and 833 at GD18. Many genes were significantly modulated by flutamide: 1597 at GD17 and 1775 at GD18. Datasets were analyzed by using in silico tools for reconstruction of cellular pathways. Between GD17 and GD18, male lungs showed an intensive transcriptional activity of proliferative pathways along with the onset of lung differentiation. Among the genes showing a sex difference or an antiandrogen modulation of their expression, we specifically identified androgen receptor interacting genes, surfactant related genes in particularly those involved in the pathway leading to phospholipid synthesis, and several genes of lung development regulator pathways. Among these latter, some genes related to Shh, FGF, TGF-beta, BMP, and Wnt signaling are modulated by sex and/or antiandrogen treatment. Conclusion Our results show clearly that there is a real delay in lung maturation between male and female in this period

  4. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE ALTERS GENE EXPRESSION IN THE DEVELOPING MURINE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horn, Kristin H.; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of passive smoke exposures on the developing brain. Objective The purpose of the current study was to identify changes in gene expression in the murine hippocampus as a consequence of in utero exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke (an experimental equivalent of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS)) at exposure levels that do not result in fetal growth inhibition. Methods A whole body smoke inhalation exposure system was utilized to deliver ETS to pregnant C57BL/6J mice for six hours/day from gestational days 6–17 (gd 6–17) [for microarray] or gd 6–18.5 [for fetal phenotyping]. Results There were no significant effects of ETS exposure on fetal phenotype. However, 61 “expressed” genes in the gd 18.5 fetal hippocampus were differentially regulated (up- or down-regulated by 1.5 fold or greater) by maternal exposure to ETS. Of these 61 genes, 25 genes were upregulated while 36 genes were downregulated. A systems biology approach, including computational methodologies, identified cellular response pathways, and biological themes, underlying altered fetal programming of the embryonic hippocampus by in utero cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusions Results from the present study suggest that even in the absence of effects on fetal growth, prenatal smoke exposure can alter gene expression during the “early” period of hippocampal growth and may result in abnormal hippocampal morphology, connectivity, and function. PMID:19969065

  5. Murine muscle-specific enolase: cDNA cloning, sequence, and developmental expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lamandé, N; Mazo, A M; Lucas, M; Montarras, D; Pinset, C; Gros, F; Legault-Demare, L; Lazar, M

    1989-01-01

    In vertebrates, the glycolytic enzyme enolase (EC 4.2.1.11) is present as homodimers and heterodimers formed from three distinct subunits of identical molecular weight, alpha, beta, and gamma. We report the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the beta subunit of murine muscle-specific enolase. The corresponding amino acid sequence shows greater than 80% homology with the beta subunit from chicken obtained by protein sequencing and with alpha and gamma subunits from rat and mouse deduced from cloned cDNAs. In contrast, there is no homology between the 3' untranslated regions of mouse alpha, beta, and gamma enolase mRNAs, which also differ greatly in length. The short 3' untranslated region of beta enolase mRNA accounts for its distinct length, 1600 bases. It is known that a progressive transition from alpha alpha to beta beta enolase occurs in developing skeletal muscle. We show that this transition mainly results from a differential regulation of alpha and beta mRNA levels. Analysis of myogenic cell lines shows that beta enolase gene is expressed at the myoblast stage. Moreover, transfection of premyogenic C3H10T1/2 cells with MyoD1 cDNA shows that the initial expression of beta transcripts occurs during the very first steps of the myogenic pathway, suggesting that it could be a marker event of myogenic lineage determination. Images PMID:2734297

  6. Murine Cytomegalovirus Abortively Infects Human Dendritic Cells, Leading to Expression and Presentation of Virally Vectored Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuqing; Messerle, Martin; Sapinoro, Ramil; Santos, Kathlyn; Hocknell, Peter K.; Jin, Xia; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen-presenting cells that play a crucial role in antigen-specific immune responses. Thus, the targeting of exogenous antigens to DC has become a popular approach for cancer immunotherapy and vaccine development. In this report, we studied the interplay between murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and human monocyte-derived DC. The results showed that an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-encoding, replication-competent MCMV vector underwent abortive infection in human DC; this was accompanied by the efficient expression of EGFP. Infection of human DC by this vector resulted in a modest increase in the expression of cell surface proteins associated with DC maturation and has no significant effect on the immunostimulatory function of the cells, as reflected by their ability to support T-cell proliferation in a mixed-lymphocyte reaction. Finally, an MCMV vector encoding the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope glycoprotein was constructed and used to infect cultured human DC. The infected DC were shown to be capable of stimulating the expansion of autologous, gp120-specific, class I-restricted T lymphocytes from an HIV-1-negative donor, as determined by tetramer staining and enzyme-linked immunospot analysis. Taken together, these results suggest that MCMV may have potential utility as a vector for human vaccine development. PMID:12805417

  7. Kick-starting the cancer-immunity cycle by targeting CD40

    PubMed Central

    Ellmark, P; Mangsbo, S M; Furebring, C; Tötterman, T H; Norlén, P

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of CD40 on dendritic cells to expand and activate tumor-specific T cells and generate anticancer immunity is an attractive therapeutic approach. Since CD40 agonists exert their effects upstream of checkpoint inhibitors, including PD-1 or PD-L1 antagonists, they are ideal candidates for combination regimens. PMID:26140231

  8. Loss of caveolin-1 alters extracellular matrix protein expression and ductal architecture in murine mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher; Hielscher, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is abnormal in breast tumors and has been reported to contribute to breast tumor progression. One factor, which may drive ongoing matrix synthesis in breast tumors, is the loss of stromal caveolin-1 (cav-1), a scaffolding protein of caveolae, which has been linked to breast tumor aggressiveness. To determine whether loss of cav-1 results in the abnormal expression of matrix proteins, mammary glands from cav- 1-/- and cav- 1 +/+ mice were investigated for differences in expression of several ECM proteins. In addition, the presence of myofibroblasts, changes in the vessel density, and differences in duct number and size were assessed in the mammary glands of both animal models. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of fibronectin, tenascin-C, collagens and αSMA were significantly increased in the mammary glands of cav-1-/- mice. Second harmonic generation revealed more organized collagen fibers in cav-1 -/- glands and supported immunohistochemical analyses of increased collagen abundance in the glands of cav-1 -/- mice. Analysis of the ductal structure demonstrated a significant increase in the number of proliferating ducts in addition to significant increases in the duct circumference and area in cav-1 -/- glands compared to cav- 1 +/+ glands. Differences in microvessel density weren’t apparent between the animal models. In summary, we found that the loss of cav-1 resulted in increased ECM and α-SMA protein expression in murine mammary glands. Furthermore, we found that an abnormal ductal architecture accompanied the loss of cav-1. These data support a role for cav-1 in maintaining mammary gland structure. PMID:28187162

  9. Loss of caveolin-1 alters extracellular matrix protein expression and ductal architecture in murine mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher; Rahim, Sahar; Arnold, Jeremiah; Hielscher, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is abnormal in breast tumors and has been reported to contribute to breast tumor progression. One factor, which may drive ongoing matrix synthesis in breast tumors, is the loss of stromal caveolin-1 (cav-1), a scaffolding protein of caveolae, which has been linked to breast tumor aggressiveness. To determine whether loss of cav-1 results in the abnormal expression of matrix proteins, mammary glands from cav- 1-/- and cav- 1 +/+ mice were investigated for differences in expression of several ECM proteins. In addition, the presence of myofibroblasts, changes in the vessel density, and differences in duct number and size were assessed in the mammary glands of both animal models. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of fibronectin, tenascin-C, collagens and αSMA were significantly increased in the mammary glands of cav-1-/- mice. Second harmonic generation revealed more organized collagen fibers in cav-1 -/- glands and supported immunohistochemical analyses of increased collagen abundance in the glands of cav-1 -/- mice. Analysis of the ductal structure demonstrated a significant increase in the number of proliferating ducts in addition to significant increases in the duct circumference and area in cav-1 -/- glands compared to cav- 1 +/+ glands. Differences in microvessel density weren't apparent between the animal models. In summary, we found that the loss of cav-1 resulted in increased ECM and α-SMA protein expression in murine mammary glands. Furthermore, we found that an abnormal ductal architecture accompanied the loss of cav-1. These data support a role for cav-1 in maintaining mammary gland structure.

  10. A comparison of two distinct murine macrophage gene expression profiles in response to Leishmania amazonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The experimental murine model of leishmaniasis has been widely used to characterize the immune response against Leishmania. CBA mice develop severe lesions, while C57BL/6 present small chronic lesions under L. amazonensis infection. Employing a transcriptomic approach combined with biological network analysis, the gene expression profiles of C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after L. amazonensis infection in vitro, were compared. These strains were selected due to their different degrees of susceptibility to this parasite. Results The genes expressed by C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after infection, differ greatly, both with respect to absolute number as well as cell function. Uninfected C57BL/6 macrophages express genes involved in the deactivation pathway of macrophages at lower levels, while genes related to the activation of the host immune inflammatory response, including apoptosis and phagocytosis, have elevated expression levels. Several genes that participate in the apoptosis process were also observed to be up-regulated in C57BL/6 macrophages infected with L. amazonensis, which is very likely related to the capacity of these cells to control parasite infection. By contrast, genes involved in lipid metabolism were found to be up-regulated in CBA macrophages in response to infection, which supports the notion that L. amazonensis probably modulates parasitophorous vacuoles in order to survive and multiply in host cells. Conclusion The transcriptomic profiles of C57BL/6 macrophages, before and after infection, were shown to be involved in the macrophage pathway of activation, which may aid in the control of L. amazonensis infection, in contrast to the profiles of CBA cells. PMID:22321871

  11. Differential expression of the Slc4 bicarbonate transporter family in murine corneal endothelium and cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Shei, William; Liu, Jun; Htoon, Hla M.; Aung, Tin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the relative expression levels of all the solute carrier 4 (Slc4) transporter family members (Slc4a1–Slc4a11) in murine corneal endothelium using real-time quantitative (qPCR), to identify further important members besides Slc4a11 and Slc4a4, and to explore how close to the baseline levels the gene expressions remain after cells have been subjected to expansion and culture. Methods Descemet’s membrane-endothelial layers of 8–10-week-old C57BL6 mice were stripped from corneas and used for both primary cell culture and direct RNA extraction. Total RNA (from uncultured cells as well as cultured cells at passages 2 and 7) was reverse transcribed, and the cDNA was used for real time qPCR using specific primers for all the Slc4 family members. The geNorm method was applied to determine the most stable housekeeping genes and normalization factor, which was calculated from multiple housekeeping genes for more accurate and robust quantification. Results qPCR analyses revealed that all Slc4 bicarbonate transporter family members were expressed in mouse corneal endothelium. Slc4a11 showed the highest expression, which was approximately three times higher than that of Slc4a4 (3.4±0.3; p=0.004). All Slc4 genes were also expressed in cultured cells, and interestingly, the expression of Slc4a11 in cultured cells was significantly reduced by approximately 20-fold (0.05±0.001; p=0.000001) in early passage and by approximately sevenfold (0.14±0.002; p=0.000002) in late passage cells. Conclusions Given the known involvement of SLC4A4 and SLC4A11 in corneal dystrophies, we speculate that the other two highly expressed genes in the uncultured corneal endothelium, SLC4A2 and SLC4A7, are worthy of being considered as potential candidate genes for corneal endothelial diseases. Moreover, as cell culture can affect expression levels of Slc4 genes, caution and careful design of experiments are necessary when undertaking studies of Slc4-mediated ion transport

  12. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  13. Downregulation of Orai1 expression in the airway alleviates murine allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lin, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Orai1 is the key subunit of the Ca2+-release-activated Ca2+ channel. Our previous report has demonstrated that Orai1 expression in the airway was upregulated in the ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis (AR) mouse models. To observe whether inhibition of Orai1 expression in the airway could suppress symptoms in a murine model of AR and to assess the impacts of this inhibition on the responses of local and systemic immunocytes, we administered recombinant lentivirus vectors that encoded shRNA against ORAI1 (lenti-ORAI1) into the nostrils of OVA-sensitized mice before the challenges, and analyzed its effect on allergic responses, as compared with the unsensitized mice and untreated AR mice. Administration of lenti-ORAI1 into the nasal cavity successfully infected cells in the epithelial layer of the nasal mucosa, and significantly decreased the frequencies of sneezing and nasal rubbing of the mice. Protein levels of leukotriene C4, OVA-specific IgE, and IL-4 in the nasal lavage fluid and serum and eosinophil cation protein in the serum were also significantly reduced by lenti-ORAI1, as were the mRNA levels of these factors in the nasal mucosa and spleen. These data suggested that administration of lenti-ORAI1 into the nasal cavity effectively decreased Orai1 expression in the nasal mucosa, alleviated AR symptoms, and partially inhibited the hyperresponsiveness of the local and systemic immune cells including T cells, B cells, mast cells and eosinophils that are involved in the pathogenesis of AR. PMID:22170034

  14. An Anacardiaceae preparation reduces the expression of inflammation-related genes in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leiro, J; García, D; Arranz, J A; Delgado, R; Sanmartín, M L; Orallo, F

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of an aqueous extract of the stem bark of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae; Vimang), which contains a defined mixture of components including polyphenols (principally mangiferin, MA), triterpenes, phytosteroids, fatty acids and microelements, on expression of inflammation mediators in inflammatory murine macrophages after stimulation in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). In vitro treatment with Vimang at 4 microg/ml reduced levels of NOS-2 mRNA and NOS-2, while treatment at 40 microg/ml also reduced levels of COX-2 mRNA, COX-2, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Results suggested that MA is involved in these effects. In vitro treatment with Vimang at 40 microg/ml also inhibited mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but did not affect mRNA levels of IL-6 or tumor growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Extracellular release of TNF-alpha by inflammatory macrophages was inhibited by in vitro treatment with Vimang at the same concentrations that showed inhibition of TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The inhibition of TNF-alpha production appears to be at least partially attributable to MA. Vimang at 4 microg/ml decreased mRNA levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) but did not affect expression of the NF-kappaB inhibitor (IkappaB). These data indicate that the potent anti-inflammatory effects of Vimang are due to selective modulation of the expression of inflammation-related genes, leading to attenuation of macrophage activation.

  15. Global microRNA expression is essential for murine mast cell development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun Young; Brandal, Stephanie; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Zhou; Takemoto, Clifford M

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that have been shown to play a critical role in normal physiology and disease, such as hematopoietic development and cancer. However, their role in mast-cell function and development is poorly understood. The major objective of this study was to determine how global miRNA expression affects mast-cell physiology. The RNase III endonuclease, Dicer, is required for the processing of pre-miRNAs into mature miRNAs. To investigate the effect of global miRNA depletion on mast cells in vivo, we generated a mast-cell-specific knock out of Dicer in mice. Transgenic mice (Mcpt5-Cre) that express Cre selectively in connective tissue mast cells were crossed with mice carrying the floxed conditional Dicer allele (Dicer fl/fl). Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer fl/fl mice with homozygous Dicer gene deletion in mast cells were found to have a profound mast-cell deficiency with near complete loss of peritoneal, gastrointestinal, and skin mast cells. We examined the in vivo functional consequence of mast-cell-specific Dicer deletion using an immunoglobulin-E-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis murine model. Immunoglobulin-E-sensitized wild type Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer +/+ and heterozygous Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer fl/+ mice show marked hypothermia with antigen; however, homozygous Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer fl/fl mice were completely unresponsive to antigen challenge. These studies suggest a critical role for Dicer and miRNA expression for establishment of tissue compartments of functional mast cells in vivo.

  16. Targeting reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator to murine mammary epithelial cells that express the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Atish; Soyal, Selma M; Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2007-10-01

    Through an established gene-targeting strategy, reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator (rtTA) was targeted downstream of the murine progesterone receptor (PR) promoter. Mice were generated in which one (PR(+/rtTA)) or both (PR(rtTA/rtTA)) PR alleles harbor the rtTA insertion. The PR(+/rtTA) and PR(rtTA/rtTA) knockins exhibit phenotypes identical to the normal and the progesterone receptor knockout mouse, respectively. Crossed with the TZA reporter, which carries the TetO-LacZ responder transgene, the PR(+/rtTA)/TZA and PR(rtTA/rtTA)/TZA bigenics exhibit doxycycline-induced beta-galactosidase activity specifically in progesterone responsive target tissues such as the mammary gland, uterus, ovary, and pituitary gland. In the case of the PR(+/rtTA)/TZA mammary epithelium, dual immunofluorescence demonstrated that PR expression and doxycycline-induced beta-galactosidase activity colocalized; beta-galactosidase was not detected in the absence of doxycycline. Although both the PR(+/rtTA) and PR(rtTA/rtTA) knockins represent innovative animal models with which to further query progesterone's mechanism of action in vivo, the PR(rtTA/rtTA) mouse in particular promises to provide unique insight into the paracrine mechanism of action, which underpins progesterone's involvement in mammary morphogenesis with obvious implications for extending our understanding of this steroid's role in breast cancer progression.

  17. STAT3 and SOCS3 Expression Patterns During Murine Placenta Development

    PubMed Central

    San Martin, S.; Fitzgerald, J.S.; Weber, M.; Párraga, M.; Sáez, T.; Zorn, T.M.; Markert, U.R.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been identified as an important signal transducer in the invasive phenotype of the trophoblasts cells in in vitro studies. However, the in situ distribution and patterns of expression of this molecule in trophoblast cells during the development of the placenta are still under-elucidated. Mice uteri of gestational ages between 7 and 14 days of pregnancy (dop) were fixed in methacarn and processed with immunoperoxidase techniques for detection of STAT3 and its phosphorylation at serine (p-ser727) residues, as well as the suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) expression. STAT3 was observed at 7 through 9 dop in both the antimesometrial and mesometrial deciduas, while continued immunoreactivity between 10 and 13 dop was seen only in the mesometrial decidua. In the placenta, STAT3 was detected in the cytotrophoblast cells of labyrinth and giant trophoblast cells between 10 and 14 dop. Immunoreactivity for STAT3 was also seen in trophoblast cells surrounding the maternal blood vessels. On days 10 and 11 of pregnancy, p-ser727 was detectable in the mesometrial decidua and in giant trophoblasts, while during 12-14 dop in the spongiotrophoblast region. In addition, SOCS3 was immunodetected in maternal and placental tissues, principally in the giant trophoblast cells during the whole period of the study. The present in situ study shows the distribution of STAT3, its serine activation and SOCS3 in different maternal and fetal compartments during murine placental development, thus further supporting the idea that they play a role during physiological placentation in mice. PMID:23807298

  18. IgE and IgA produced by OX40-OX40L or CD40-CD40L interaction in B cells-mast cells re-activate FcεRI or FcαRI on mast cells in mouse allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gwan Ui; Lim, Ji Yeun; Kim, Nam Goo; Shin, Joo-Ho; Ro, Jai Youl

    2015-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of allergic diseases related to IgE. This study was undertaken to determine whether IgE or IgA, produced by CD40-CD40L or OX40-OX40L interactions between B cells and mast cells, re-activate FcεRI or FcαRI on mast cell surface. C57BL mice were sensitized and subjected to OVA challenge to induce asthma. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and primary B cells were co-cultured. Mast cell recruitment into airways was stained by May-Grünwald Giemsa, the expression of markers or signaling molecules were determined by immunohistochemistry or Western blotting, and co-localization of B cells and mast cells by immunofluorescence. Anti-CD40 plus anti-OX40L Abs synergistically reduced IgE and IgA production, and mediators (histamine, LTs and cytokines) released in mast cells, and additively reduced other responses, such as, numbers of mast cells, the expression of markers (tryptase, mMCP5, B220 and CD19), surface molecules (CD40, CD40L, OX40 and OX40L), FcεRI or FcαRI and the co-localization of BMMCs and B cells, and IgE- or IgA-producing cells, as compared with individual blocking Ab treatment which reducedresponses in BAL cells or lung tissues of OVA-challenged mice or in co-culture of B and mast cells. The data suggest that IgE and IgA, produced by OX40-OX40L or CD40-CD40L interaction between B cells and mast cells, may re-activate receptors of FCεRI and FcαRI on mast cell surfaces, followed by more mediator release, and furthermore, that treatment with anti-CD40 plus anti-OX40L Abs offers a potential treatment for allergic asthma.

  19. Differences of cell surface marker expression between bone marrow- and kidney-derived murine mesenchymal stromal cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cakiroglu, F; Osbahr, J W; Kramer, J; Rohwedel, J

    2016-10-31

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are undifferentiated, multipotent adult cells with regenerative properties. They are particularly relevant for therapeutic approaches due to the simplicity of their isolation and cultivation. Since MSC show an expression pattern of cell surface marker, which is almost identical to fibroblasts, many attempts have been made to address the similarities and differences between MSC and fibroblasts. In this study we aimed to isolate murine MSC from bone marrow (BM) and kidney to characterize them in comparison to fibroblasts. Cells were isolated from murine kidney, BM and abdominal skin by plastic adherence and subsequently characterized by analysing their capability to build colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-F), their morphology, their proliferation, expression of telomerase activity and cell surface antigens as well as their differentiation capacity. Plastic adherent cells from the 3 mouse tissues showed similar morphology, proliferation profiles and CFU-F building capacities. However, while MSC from BM and kidney differentiated into the adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic direction, fibroblasts were not able to do so efficiently. In addition, a tendency for lower expression of telomerase was found in the fibroblast population. Proliferating cells from kidney and BM expressed the MSC-specific cell surface markers CD105 and Sca-1 on a significantly higher and CD117 on a significantly lower level compared to fibroblasts and were thereby distinguishable from fibroblasts. Furthermore, we found that certain CD markers were specifically expressed on a higher level, either in BM-derived cells or fibroblasts. This study demonstrates that murine MSC isolated from different organs express certain specific markers, which enable their discrimination.

  20. Cellular RNA homologous to the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene: expression and relationship to the viral sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J Y; Baltimore, D

    1983-01-01

    To examine the expression of the cellular homolog of the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene (the v-abl sequence), a DNA probe representing the v-abl sequence was prepared. The probe detected two cytoplasmic polyadenylic acid-containing c-abl RNAs of about 6.5 and 5.5 kilobases in a variety of rodent cells, and slightly larger RNAs were detected in human cells. These two RNA species were found in all normal tissues or cell lines examined, but at differing concentrations: liver cells had the least, fibroblastic cell lines had the most. By using a probe able to detect the cellular but not the viral gene, the two RNAs were shown to be present in Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed cells at levels found either in their untransformed counterparts or in similar cell types transformed by other means. The target cells of the virus have a somewhat elevated level of the two RNAs although expression of the c-abl gene is not restricted to these cells. The v-abl sequence lacks 0.35 and 0.85 kilobases of the c-abl RNA on the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. Thus, the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene is an internal fragment of the transcript of a normal cellular gene. Images PMID:6306446

  1. Osteogenic gene expression of murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells under cyclic tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, C. T.; Chen, C. C.; Cheong, U.-I.; Liu, S. L.; Huang, T. H.

    2014-08-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can promote cell proliferation. The remodeling ability of the tension side of orthodontic teeth affects post-orthodontic stability. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the osteogenic effects of LLLT on osteoblast-like cells treated with a simulated tension system that provides a mechanical tension regimen. Murine osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cells were cultured in a Flexcell strain unit with programmed loads of 12% elongation at a frequency of 0.5 Hz for 24 and 48 h. The cultured cells were treated with a low-level diode laser using powers of 5 J and 10 J. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The expression of osteogenic genes (type I collagen (Col-1), osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), bone morphologic protein (BMP-2), and bone morphologic protein (BMP-4)) in MC3T3-E1 cells was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The proliferation rate of tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells under 5 J and 10 J LLLT increased compared with that of the control group (p < 0.05). Prominent mineralization of the MC3T3-E1 cells was visible using a von Kossa stain in the 5 J LLLT group. Osteogenic genes (Col-1, OC, OPG and BMP-2) were significantly expressed in the MC3T3-E1 cells treated with 5 J and 10 J LLLT (p < 0.05). LLLT in tension-cultured MC3T3-E1 cells showed synergistic osteogenic effects, including increases in cell proliferation and Col-1, OPN, OC, OPG and BMP-2 gene expression. LLLT might be beneficial for bone remodeling on the tension side of orthodontics.

  2. Antibodies to CD40 prevent Epstein-Barr virus-mediated human B-cell lymphomagenesis in severe combined immune deficient mice given human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, W J; Funakoshi, S; Beckwith, M; Rushing, S E; Conley, D K; Armitage, R J; Fanslow, W C; Rager, H C; Taub, D D; Ruscetti, F W

    1995-09-01

    CD40 is expressed on both normal and neoplastic B lymphocytes. Signal transduction through CD40 in vitro has been shown to exert stimulatory effects on normal B cells and inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced B-cell lymphoma lines and some other cell lines derived from patients with aggressive histology lymphoma. The transfer of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) from EBV-seropositive donors into severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice has been previously shown to result in the generation of human B-cell lymphomas. These tumors are similar to the highly aggressive EBV-induced lymphomas that can arise clinically after transplantation or in the setting of immunodeficiency. Treatment of huPBL-SCID chimeric mice with anti-CD40 or anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) significantly delayed the development of EBV-induced B-cell lymphoma. However, the effects of the two MoAb were mechanistically distinct. Anti-CD40 treatment prevented lymphoma generation, while still allowing for functional human B-cell engraftment in the huPBL-SCID mice compared with mice receiving no treatment, all of which succumbed to lymphoma. By contrast, treatment with anti-CD20 significantly inhibited total human B-cell engraftment in the SCID recipients, which accounted for the absence of lymphomas. In vitro assays examining the transformation of human B cells by EBV also indicated that anti-CD40 could directly inhibit EBV-transformation, whereas anti-CD20 antibodies had no effect. Thus, anti-CD40 exerts selective effects to allow for the engraftment of normal human B cells and prevent the emergence of EBV lymphomas. Stimulation of CD40 by antibodies or its physiologic ligand may, therefore, be of significant clinical use in the prevention of EBV-induced B lymphomas that may arise when EBV-seropositive individuals receive immunosuppressive regimens after transplantation or in immune deficiency states, such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  3. HCELL Expression on Murine MSC Licenses Pancreatotropism and Confers Durable Reversal of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Reza; Moore, Robert; Sakai, Shinobu; Donnelly, Conor B.; Mounayar, Marwan; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease resulting in destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties, garnering increasing attention as cellular therapy for T1D and other immunologic diseases. However, MSCs generally lack homing molecules, hindering their colonization at inflammatory sites following intravenous (IV) administration. Here we analyzed whether enforced E-selectin ligand expression on murine MSCs could impact their effect in reversing hyperglycemia in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Though murine MSCs natively do not express the E-selectin binding determinant sialyl Lewisx (sLex), we found that fucosyltransferase-mediated α(1,3)-exofucosylation of murine MSCs resulted in sLex display uniquely on cell surface CD44 thereby creating HCELL, the E-selectin-binding glycoform of CD44. Following IV infusion into diabetic NOD mice, allogeneic HCELL+ MSCs showed 3-fold greater peri-islet infiltrates compared to buffer-treated (i.e., HCELL−) MSCs, with distribution in proximity to E-selectin-expressing microvessels. Exofucosylation had no effect on MSC immunosuppressive capacity in in vitro assays, however, though engraftment was temporary for both HCELL+ and HCELL− MSCs, administration of HCELL+ MSCs resulted in durable reversal of hyperglycemia, whereas only transient reversal was observed following administration of HCELL− MSCs. Notably, exofucosylation of MSCs generated from CD44−/− mice induced prominent membrane expression of sLex, but IV administration of these MSCs into hyperglycemic NOD mice showed no enhanced pancreatotropism or reversal of hyperglycemia. These findings provide evidence that glycan engineering to enforce HCELL expression boosts trafficking of infused MSCs to pancreatic islets of NOD mice and substantially improves their efficacy in reversing autoimmune diabetes. PMID:25641589

  4. HCELL Expression on Murine MSC Licenses Pancreatotropism and Confers Durable Reversal of Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Reza; Moore, Robert; Sakai, Shinobu; Donnelly, Conor B; Mounayar, Marwan; Sackstein, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an immune-mediated disease resulting in destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess potent immunomodulatory properties, garnering increasing attention as cellular therapy for T1D and other immunologic diseases. However, MSCs generally lack homing molecules, hindering their colonization at inflammatory sites following intravenous (IV) administration. Here, we analyzed whether enforced E-selectin ligand expression on murine MSCs could impact their effect in reversing hyperglycemia in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Although murine MSCs natively do not express the E-selectin-binding determinant sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x) ), we found that fucosyltransferase-mediated α(1,3)-exofucosylation of murine MSCs resulted in sLe(x) display uniquely on cell surface CD44 thereby creating hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), the E-selectin-binding glycoform of CD44. Following IV infusion into diabetic NOD mice, allogeneic HCELL(+) MSCs showed threefold greater peri-islet infiltrates compared to buffer-treated (i.e., HCELL(-) ) MSCs, with distribution in proximity to E-selectin-expressing microvessels. Exofucosylation had no effect on MSC immunosuppressive capacity in in vitro assays; however, although engraftment was temporary for both HCELL(+) and HCELL(-) MSCs, administration of HCELL(+) MSCs resulted in durable reversal of hyperglycemia, whereas only transient reversal was observed following administration of HCELL(-) MSCs. Notably, exofucosylation of MSCs generated from CD44(-/-) mice induced prominent membrane expression of sLe(x) , but IV administration of these MSCs into hyperglycemic NOD mice showed no enhanced pancreatotropism or reversal of hyperglycemia. These findings provide evidence that glycan engineering to enforce HCELL expression boosts trafficking of infused MSCs to pancreatic islets of NOD mice and substantially improves their efficacy in reversing autoimmune diabetes. Stem Cells

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of murine vascular endothelial-cadherin in early stage development of cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Breier, G; Breviario, F; Caveda, L; Berthier, R; Schnürch, H; Gotsch, U; Vestweber, D; Risau, W; Dejana, E

    1996-01-15

    An early step in the formation of the extraembryonic and intraembryonic vasculature is endothelial cell differentiation and organization in blood islands and vascular structures. This involves the expression and function of specific adhesive molecules at cell-to-cell junctions. Previous work showed that endothelial cells express a cell-specific cadherin (vascular endothelial [VE]-cadherin, or 7B4/cadherin-5) that is organized at cell-to-cell contacts in cultured cells and is able to promote intercellular adhesion. In this study, we investigated whether VE-cadherin could be involved in early cardiovascular development in the mouse embryo. We first cloned and sequenced the mouse VE-cadherin cDNA. At the protein level, murine VE-cadherin presented 75% identity (90%, considering conservative amino acid substitutions) with the human homologue. Transfection of murine VE-cadherin cDNA in L cells induced Ca(++)-dependent cell-to-cell aggregation and reduced cell detachment from monolayers. In situ hybridization of adult tissues showed that the murine molecule is specifically expressed by endothelial cells. In mouse embryos, VE-cadherin transcripts were detected at the very earliest stages of vascular development (E7.5) in mesodermal cells of the yolk sac mesenchyme. At E9.5, expression of VE-cadherin was restricted to the peripheral cell layer of blood islands that gives rise to endothelial cells. Hematopoietic cells in the center of blood islands were not labeled. At later embryonic stages, VE-cadherin transcripts were detected in vascular structures of all organs examined, eg, in the ventricle of the heart, the inner cell lining of the atrium and the dorsal aorta, in intersomitic vessels, and in the capillaries of the developing brain. A comparison with flk-1 expression during brain angiogenesis revealed that brain capillaries expressed relatively low amounts of VE-cadherin. In the adult brain, the level of VE-cadherin transcript was further reduced. By

  6. p62 regulates CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages through interaction with TRAF6

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, Kristina; Ehrenschwender, Martin

    2015-08-14

    CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family. Activation-induced recruitment of adapter proteins, so-called TNF-receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) to the cytoplasmic tail of CD40 triggers signaling cascades important in the immune system, but has also been associated with excessive inflammation in diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Especially, pro-inflammatory nuclear factor κB (NFκB) signaling emanating from CD40-associated TRAF6 appears to be a key pathogenic driving force. Consequently, targeting the CD40-TRAF6 interaction is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy, but the underlying molecular machinery of this signaling axis is to date poorly understood. Here, we identified the multifunctional adaptor protein p62 as a critical regulator in CD40-mediated NFκB signaling via TRAF6. CD40 activation triggered formation of a TRAF6-p62 complex. Disturbing this interaction tremendously reduced CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages, while TRAF6-independent signaling pathways remained unaffected. This highlights p62 as a potential target in hyper-inflammatory, CD40-associated pathologies. - Highlights: • CD40 activation triggers interaction of the adapter protein TRAF6 with p62. • TRAF6-p62 interaction regulates CD40-mediated NFκB signaling in macrophages. • Defective TRAF6-p62 interaction reduces CD40-mediated NFκB activation in macrophages.

  7. Evaluation of murine lymphocyte membrane potential, intracellular free calcium, and interleukin-2 receptor expression upon exposure to 1,1-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Frazier, D E; Tarr, M J; Olsen, R G

    1992-06-01

    The effects of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) on several early events associated with lymphocyte activation were examined. The concentration of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) and membrane potential of murine lymphocytes were found to be altered upon exposure to UDMH; [Ca2+]i was increased in murine thymocytes, while splenocytes exhibited membrane hyperpolarization. In addition, interleukin-2 receptor expression induced by in-vitro concanavalin A stimulation of murine splenocytes at 24 and 48 h in the presence of UDMH was not affected. UDMH may interfere with the ability of these two distinct lymphocyte populations to regulate normal ionic fluctuations, thus contributing to altered immune responsiveness.

  8. Synergy of anti-CD40, CpG and MPL in activation of mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongyu; Felder, Mildred A R; Sondel, Paul M; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2015-08-01

    Activation of macrophages is a prerequisite for their antitumor effects. Several reagents, including agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), can stimulate activation of macrophages. Our previous studies showed synergy between anti-CD40 and CpG and between anti-CD40 and MPL in macrophage activation and antitumor efficacy in mice. In the present study, we asked whether there was synergy among these three reagents. The activation of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) obtained from mice injected with anti-CD40 and then treated with CpG and/or MPL in vitro was determined by their ability to suppress proliferation of tumor cells and to produce various cytokines and chemokines in vitro. Cell sorting and histology followed by functional testing showed that macrophages were the main cell population in PEC activated by CD40 ligation in vivo. A combination of anti-CD40, CpG or MPL activated PEC to suppress proliferation of B16 cells and produce nitric oxide far greater than the single reagents or any of the double combinations of these reagents. In addition, the combination of all three reagents activated PEC to secrete IL-12, IFN-γ and MCP-1 to a greater degree than any single reagent or any two combined reagents. These results demonstrate that macrophages can be synergistically activated by anti-CD40, CpG and MPL, suggesting that this novel combined approach might be further investigated as potential cancer therapy.

  9. Effects of representative glucocorticoids on TNFα- and CD40L-induced NF-κB activation in sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Cechin, Sirlene R; Buchwald, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Glucocorticoids are an important class of anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive drugs. A crucial part of their anti-inflammatory action results from their ability to repress proinflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) upon binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Accordingly, sensor cells quantifying their effect on inflammatory signal-induced NF-κB activation can provide useful information regarding their potencies as well as their transrepression abilities. Here, we report results obtained on their effect in suppressing both the TNFα- and the CD40L-induced activation of NF-κB in sensor cells that contain an NF-κB-inducible SEAP construct. In these cells, we confirmed concentration-dependent NF-κB activation for both TNFα and CD40L at low nanomolar concentrations (EC50). Glucocorticoids tested included hydrocortisone, prednisolone, dexamethasone, loteprednol etabonate, triamcinolone acetonide, beclomethasone dipropionate, and clobetasol propionate. They all caused significant, but only partial inhibition of these activations in concentration-dependent manners that could be well described by sigmoid response-functions. Despite the limitations of only partial maximum inhibitions, this cell-based assay could be used to quantitate the suppressing ability of glucocorticoids (transrepression potency) on the expression of proinflammatory transcription factors caused by two different cytokines in parallel both in a detailed, full dose-response format as well as in a simpler single-dose format. Whereas inhibitory potencies obtained in the TNF assay correlated well with consensus glucocorticoid potencies (receptor-binding affinities, Kd, RBA, at the GR) for all compounds, the non-halogenated steroids (hydrocortisone, prednisolone, and loteprednol etabonate) were about an order of magnitude more potent than expected in the CD40 assay in this system.

  10. Expression, localization, and functional model of cholesterol transporters in lactating and nonlactating mammary tissues of murine, bovine, and human origin.

    PubMed

    Mani, Orlando; Körner, Meike; Sorensen, Martin T; Sejrsen, Kristen; Wotzkow, Carlos; Ontsouka, Corneille E; Friis, Robert R; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Albrecht, Christiane

    2010-08-01

    Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a pivotal role in cellular lipid efflux. To identify candidate cholesterol transporters implicated in lipid homeostasis and mammary gland (MG) physiology, we compared expression and localization of ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 and their regulatory genes in mammary tissues of different species during the pregnancy-lactation cycle. Murine and bovine mammary glands (MGs) were investigated during different functional stages. The abundance of mRNAs was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, transporter proteins were localized in murine, bovine, and human MGs by immunohistochemistry. In the murine MG, ABCA1 mRNA abundance was elevated during nonlactating compared with lactating stages, whereas ABCA7 and ABCA1 mRNA profiles were not altered. In the bovine MG, ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 mRNAs abundances were increased during nonlactating stages compared with lactation. Furthermore, associations between mRNA levels of transporters and their regulatory genes LXRalpha, PPARgamma, and SREBPs were found. ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 proteins were localized in glandular MG epithelial cells (MEC) during lactation, whereas during nonlactating stages, depending on species, the proteins showed distinct localization patterns in MEC and adipocytes. Our results demonstrate that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCA7 are differentially expressed between lactation and nonlactating stages and in association with regulatory genes. Combined expression and localization data suggest that the selected cholesterol transporters are universal MG transporters involved in transport and storage of cholesterol and in lipid homeostasis of MEC. Because of the species-specific expression patterns of transporters in mammary tissue, mechanisms of cholesterol homeostasis seem to be differentially regulated between species.

  11. The ryanodine receptor/calcium channel genes are widely and differentially expressed in murine brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular calcium release channels that participate in controlling cytosolic calcium levels. At variance with the probably ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-operated calcium channels (1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors), RyRs have been mainly regarded as the calcium release channels controlling skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. Increasing evidence has recently suggested that RyRs may be more widely expressed, but this has never been extensively examined. Therefore, we cloned three cDNAs corresponding to murine RyR homologues to carry a comprehensive analysis of their expression in murine tissues. Here, we report that the three genes are expressed in almost all tissues analyzed, where tissue-specific patterns of expression were observed. In the uterus and vas deferens, expression of RyR3 was localized to the smooth muscle component of these organs. In the testis, expression of RyR1 and RyR3 was detected in germ cells. RyR mRNAs were also detected in in vitro-cultured cell lines. RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3 mRNA were detected in the cerebrum and in the cerebellum. In situ analysis revealed a cell type-specific pattern of expression in the different regions of the central nervous system. The differential expression of the three ryanodine receptor genes in the central nervous system was also confirmed using specific antibodies against the respective proteins. This widespread pattern of expression suggests that RyRs may participate in the regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis in a range of cells wider than previously recognized. PMID:7876312

  12. Elevated soluble CD40 ligand in diabetic patients with painless myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Qiu, Jianping; Zhang, Denghai; Qiu, Geng

    2011-01-01

    Because a useful biomarker for painless myocardial infarction (MI) has yet to be identified, the aim of this study was to identify a biomarker for diabetic patients with painless MI. A case-control design was used to compare inflammatory cytokine levels among 111 patients with diabetes mellitus, including 31 patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), 30 patients with painful MI, 20 patients with painless MI, and 30 age- and sex-matched patients without CHD (control group). In addition to baseline parameters, cytokine levels, including plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein (HsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) levels, were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). No differences in baseline characteristics were observed for patients with painless MI as compared to the other patient groups. Significantly higher sCD40L, HsCRP, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were detected in patients with MI, and markedly elevated sCD40L and IL-6 levels were observed in patients with painless MI as compared to those with painful MI. sCD40L may be a useful biomarker for painless MI in diabetic patients, which could reduce misdiagnosis and expedite treatment. Further studies are required to validate the diagnostic utility of this putative biomarker as well as investigate the mechanism by which sCD40L is elevated in these patients.

  13. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  14. RelB regulates Bcl-xl expression and the irradiation-induced apoptosis of murine prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, LIANG; ZHU, BIN; YANG, LUOYAN; ZHAO, XIAOKUN; JIANG, HONHYI; MA, FANG

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis in prostate cancer (PCa) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) is believed to play a critical role in radioresistance. Bcl-xl, an important member of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family, has critical roles in tumor progression and development. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of Bcl-xl expression and radiosensitivity from murine PCa RM-1 cells. An adenovirus-mediated RNA interference technique was employed to inhibit the expression of the RelB gene. RelB proteins were detected upon irradiation following transfection with small interfering (si)RelB, as shown by western blot analysis. The radiosensitivity of the RM-1 cells was determined by clonogenic assays. The apoptosis of the RM-1 cells were detected by flow cytometry assay, then quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to determine the expression level of Bcl-xl mRNA in the RM-1 cells. Radiation treatment increased the RelB protein levels from the cytosol and nucleus in the RM-1 cells. The protein expression levels of RelB in the pLentilox-sh-RelB-transfected RM-1 cells were significantly lower than in the negative interference group following radiation treatment. The percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis in the siRelB-RM-1 group was significantly higher than that in the control group following radiation treatment. Finally, a positive link between Bcl-xl expression and RelB activity was established in the RM-1 cells. Inhibition of RelB correlates with a decrease in expression of Bcl-xl. In conclusion, adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting RelB inhibits Bcl-xl expression, enhances radiosensitivity and regulates the irradiation-induced apoptosis of the murine PCa RM-1 cell line. PMID:24839547

  15. Cloning, embryonic expression, and alternative splicing of a murine kidney-specific Na-K-Cl cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, P; Vanden Heuvel, G B; Payne, J A; Forbush, B

    1995-09-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the murine renal Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) was cloned using library screening and anchored polymerase chain reaction. The deduced protein sequence contained 1,095 amino acids and was 93.5% identical to rabbit NKCC2 and 97.6% identical to rat BSC1. Two potential sites of phosphorylation by adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinase and seven potential sites of phosphorylation by protein kinase C, which were previously identified in the rabbit and rat sequences, were phylogenetically conserved in the mouse. The expression of NKCC2 in the mouse was examined with Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Expression of NKCC2 was kidney specific in both adult and embryonic mice. In the developing metanephros, NKCC2 was induced at 14.5 days post coitus and was expressed in distal limbs of immature loops of Henle but was absent from the ureteric bud, S-shaped bodies, and earlier nephrogenic structures. Similar to the rabbit, isoforms of NKCC2 that differed in the sequence of a 96-bp segment were identified in the mouse. In situ hybridization revealed that the isoforms exhibited different patterns of expression in the mature thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle as follows: isoform F was most highly expressed in the inner stripe of outer medulla, isoform A was most highly expressed in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, and isoform B was most highly expressed in the cortical thick ascending limb. To verify that the isoforms were generated by alternative splicing of mutually exclusive cassette exons, genomic clones encoding murine NKCC2 were characterized. Cassette exons were identified that corresponded to each of the three isoforms and were flanked by consensus splice donor and acceptor sequences.

  16. The murine decorin. Complete cDNA cloning, genomic organization, chromosomal assignment, and expression during organogenesis and tissue differentiation.

    PubMed

    Scholzen, T; Solursh, M; Suzuki, S; Reiter, R; Morgan, J L; Buchberg, A M; Siracusa, L D; Iozzo, R V

    1994-11-11

    Decorin, a proteoglycan known to interact with collagen and growth factors, may play key roles during ontogenesis, tissue remodeling, and cancer. We have deciphered the complete protein sequence of the murine decorin by cDNA cloning, elucidated its gene structure and chromosomal location, and investigated its expression in the developing embryo. The decorin protein and the gene were highly conserved vis à vis the human counterpart; however, the murine gene lacked a leader exon, exon Ib, which was found only in the human. Using interspecific backcrossing, we assigned the gene to chromosome 10 just proximally to the Steel gene locus. In situ hybridization studies of developing mouse embryos showed a distinct pattern of expression with a progressive increase of decorin mRNA during ontogenesis. At early stages (day 11 postconception), decorin was detectable only in the floor plate region. Subsequently (days 13-16 postconception), decorin expression was especially prominent in the meninges and mesothelial linings of pericardium, pleura, and coelomic cavity, as well as in the dermis and subepithelial layers of the intestine and urinary bladder. In contrast, the major parenchymal organs were only weakly positive for decorin mRNA. These findings suggest that decorin may play a role in epithelial/mesenchymal interactions during organ development and shaping.

  17. CD40 agonist converting CTL exhaustion via the activation of the mTORC1 pathway enhances PD-1 antagonist action in rescuing exhausted CTLs in chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Aizhang; Wang, Rong; Freywald, Andrew; Stewart, Kristoffor; Tikoo, Suresh; Xu, Jianqing; Zheng, Changyu; Xiang, Jim

    2017-03-11

    Expansion of PD-1-expressing CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and associated CTL exhaustion are chief issues for ineffective virus-elimination in chronic infectious diseases. PD-1 blockade using antagonistic anti-PD-L1 antibodies results in a moderate conversion of CTL exhaustion. We previously demonstrated that CD40L signaling of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific vaccine, OVA-Texo, converts CTL exhaustion via the activation of the mTORC1 pathway in OVA-expressing adenovirus (AdVova)-infected B6 mice showing CTL inflation and exhaustion. Here, we developed AdVova-infected B6 and transgenic CD11c-DTR (termed AdVova-B6 and AdVova-CD11c-DTR) mice with chronic infection, and assessed a potential effect of CD40 agonist on the conversion of CTL exhaustion and on a potential enhancement of PD-1 antagonist action in rescuing exhausted CTLs in our chronic infection models. We demonstrate that a single dose of anti-CD40 alone can effectively convert CTL exhaustion by activating the mTORC1 pathway, leading to CTL proliferation, up-regulation of an effector-cytokine IFN-γ and the cytolytic effect in AdVova-B6 mice. Using anti-CD4 antibody and diphtheria toxin (DT) to deplete CD4(+) T-cells and dendritic cells (DCs), we discovered that the CD40 agonist-induced conversion in AdVova-B6 and AdVova-CD11c-DTR mice is dependent upon host CD4(+) T-cell and DC involvements. Moreover, CD40 agonist significantly enhances PD-1 antagonist effectiveness in rescuing exhausted CTLs in chronic infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of CD40 signaling in the conversion of CTL exhaustion and its ability to enhance PD-1 antagonist action in rescuing exhausted CTLs in chronic infection. Therefore, our findings may positively impact the design of new therapeutic strategies for chronic infectious diseases.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  19. MiR-145-5p regulates hypoxia-induced inflammatory response and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes by targeting CD40.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Zhang, Liwei; You, Fei; Zhou, Jingyu; Ma, Yongjiang; Yang, Feifei; Tao, Ling

    2017-03-09

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that inflammation and apoptosis are involved in the development of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In this study, we sought to investigate the specific role and the underlying regulatory mechanism of miR-145-5p in myocardial ischemic injury. H9c2 cardiac cells were exposed to hypoxia to establish a model of myocardial hypoxic/ischemic injury. We found that miR-145-5p was notably down-regulated, while CD40 expression was highly elevated in H9c2 cells following exposure to acute hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia markedly enhanced the inflammatory response, as reflected by an increase in the secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6, whereas the introduction of miR-145-5p effectively suppressed inflammatory factor production triggered by hypoxia. Furthermore, we observed hypoxia stimulation significantly augmented apoptosis accompanied by a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and an increase in the expression of Bax, Caspase-3, and Caspase-9. However, augmentation of miR-145-5p led to a dramatic prevention of hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Importantly, we identified CD40 as a direct target of miR-145-5p. Interestingly, the depletion of CD40 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) apparently repressed the production of inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in the setting of acute hypoxic treated. Taken together, these data demonstrated that miR-145-5p may function as a cardiac-protective molecule in myocardial ischemic injury by ameliorating inflammation and apoptosis via negative regulation of CD40. The study gives evidence that miR-145-5p provides an interesting strategy for protecting cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced inflammatory response and apoptosis.

  20. Human and murine pituitary expression of leukemia inhibitory factor. Novel intrapituitary regulation of adrenocorticotropin hormone synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Akita, S; Webster, J; Ren, S G; Takino, H; Said, J; Zand, O; Melmed, S

    1995-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene expression was detected in human fetal pituitary tissue by expression of LIF mRNA transcripts, protein immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Fetal LIF immunoreactivity colocalized with 30% of ACTH-expressing cells, approximately 20% of somatotrophs, and approximately 15% of non-hormone-expressing cells. LIF was also strongly expressed in normal adult pituitary and in four growth hormone-producing and two ACTH-producing adenomas, but not in eight nonfunctioning pituitary tumors. Culture of fetal cells expressing surface LIF-binding sites demonstrated predominance of in vitro ACTH secretion as compared with other pituitary hormones. In AtT-20 murine cells, LIF (ED50 10 pM) stimulated basal proopiomelanocortin mRNA levels by 40% and corticotropin-releasing hormone-induced ACTH secretion (two- to threefold), as did oncostatin M (ED50 30 pM), a related peptide. ACTH responses were not further enhanced by both cytokines together, which is consistent with their shared receptor. Anti-LIF antiserum neutralized basal and LIF-induced ACTH secretion, suggesting autocrine regulation of ACTH by LIF. The results show that human pituitary cells express the LIF gene and LIF-binding sites, predominantly in corticotrophs. Pituitary LIF expression and LIF regulation of proopiomelanocortin and ACTH reflect an intrapituitary role for LIF in modulating early embryonic determination of specific human pituitary cells and as a paracrine or autocrine regulator of mature ACTH. Images PMID:7883977

  1. ACAT1 deletion in murine macrophages associated with cytotoxicity and decreased expression of collagen type 3A1

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Annabelle . E-mail: arodrig5@jhmi.edu; Ashen, M. Dominique; Chen, Edward S.

    2005-05-27

    In contrast to some published studies of murine macrophages, we previously showed that ACAT inhibitors appeared to be anti-atherogenic in primary human macrophages in that they decreased foam cell formation without inducing cytotoxicity. Herein, we examined foam cell formation and cytotoxicity in murine ACAT1 knockout (KO) macrophages in an attempt to resolve the discrepancies. Elicited peritoneal macrophages from normal C57BL6 and ACAT1 KO mice were incubated with DMEM containing acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 {mu}g protein/ml) for 48 h. Cells became cholesterol enriched and there were no differences in the total cholesterol mass. Esterified cholesterol mass was lower in ACAT1 KO foam cells compared to normal macrophages (p < 0.04). Cytotoxicity, as measured by the cellular release of [{sup 14}C]adenine from macrophages, was approximately 2-fold greater in ACAT1 KO macrophages as compared to normal macrophages (p < 0.0001), and this was independent of cholesterol enrichment. cDNA microarray analysis showed that ACAT1 KO macrophages expressed substantially less collagen type 3A1 (26-fold), which was confirmed by RT-PCR. Total collagen content was also significantly reduced (57%) in lung homogenates isolated from ACAT1 KO mice (p < 0.02). Thus, ACAT1 KO macrophages show biochemical changes consistent with increased cytotoxicity and also a novel association with decreased expression of collagen type 3A1.

  2. [Mesenchymal stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase inhibit growth of murine melanoma B16F10 in vivo].

    PubMed

    Krasikova, L S; Karshieva, S S; Cheglakov, I B; Belyavsky, A V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell-based suicide gene therapy in mice bearing murine melanoma B16F10. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were transfected with plasmid constructs expressing cytosine deaminase fused with uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDA/UPRT) or CDA/UPRT fused with HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 (CDA/UPRT/VP22). In this study, we demonstrate that direct intratumoral transplantation of MSCs expressing CDA/UPRT or CDA/UPRT/VP22 followed by systemic administration of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) results in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. There was a 53% reduction in tumor volume in mice treated with CDA/UPRT-MSCs and 58% reduction in tumor volume in mice treated with CDA/UPRT/VP22-MSCs as compared with control animals transplanted with B16F10 melanoma alone. Injection of CDA/UPRT-MSC and CDA/UPRT/VP22-MSC prolonged the life span of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma by 15 and 26%, respectively. The data indicate that in murine B16F10 melanoma model, MSCs encoding CDA/UPRT suicide gene have a significant antitumor effect.

  3. Generation of murine tumor cell lines deficient in MHC molecule surface expression using the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Lenkl, Clarissa; Goyal, Ashish; Diederichs, Sven; Dickes, Elke; Osen, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to establish murine tumor cell lines, devoid of MHC I or MHC II surface expression, respectively. The melanoma cell line B16F10 and the murine breast cancer cell line EO-771, the latter stably expressing the tumor antigen NY-BR-1 (EO-NY), were transfected with an expression plasmid encoding a β2m-specific single guide (sg)RNA and Cas9. The resulting MHC I negative cells were sorted by flow cytometry to obtain single cell clones, and loss of susceptibility of peptide pulsed MHC I negative clones to peptide-specific CTL recognition was determined by IFNγ ELISpot assay. The β2m knockout (KO) clones did not give rise to tumors in syngeneic mice (C57BL/6N), unless NK cells were depleted, suggesting that outgrowth of the β2m KO cell lines was controlled by NK cells. Using sgRNAs targeting the β-chain encoding locus of the IAb molecule we also generated several B16F10 MHC II KO clones. Peptide loaded B16F10 MHC II KO cells were insusceptible to recognition by OT-II cells and tumor growth was unaltered compared to parental B16F10 cells. Thus, in our hands the CRISPR/Cas9 system has proven to be an efficient straight forward strategy for the generation of MHC knockout cell lines. Such cell lines could serve as parental cells for co-transfection of compatible HLA alleles together with human tumor antigens of interest, thereby facilitating the generation of HLA matched transplantable tumor models, e.g. in HLAtg mouse strains of the newer generation, lacking cell surface expression of endogenous H2 molecules. In addition, our tumor cell lines established might offer a useful tool to investigate tumor reactive T cell responses that function independently from MHC molecule surface expression by the tumor. PMID:28301575

  4. APE/Ref-1 makes fine-tuning of CD40-induced B cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Merluzzi, Sonia; Gri, Giorgia; Gattei, Valter; Pagano, Michele; Pucillo, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/Redox factor-1, a multifunctional DNA base excision repair and redox regulation enzyme, plays an important role in oxidative signalling, transcription factor regulation, and cell cycle control. Recently, we have demonstrated that following the triggering of CD40 on B cells, APE/Ref-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and regulates the activity of B cell-specific transcription factors. In the present paper we investigate whether APE/Ref-1 plays a role in controlling CD40-mediated B cell proliferation too. We demonstrate a concurrent increase in proliferation and decrease in apoptosis of primary mouse B cells activated by CD40 cross-linking and transfected with functional APE/Ref-1 antisense oligonucleotide. Moreover, we provide evidence that a redox-mediated signalling mechanism is involved in this process and we propose that APE/Ref-1, controlling the intracellular redox state, may also affect the cell cycle by inducing nucleus-cytoplasm redistribution of p21. Together, these findings suggest that APE/Ref-1 could act as a negative regulator in an adaptive response to elevated ROS levels following CD40 cross-linking. Considering the important role of ROS and APE/Ref-1 in CD40-mediated B cell proliferation, our data will contribute to understand the mechanisms of tumor escape and suggest APE/Ref-1 as a novel target for tumor therapeutic approaches. PMID:18617267

  5. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of mouse macrophages stimulates early expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and SOCS3

    PubMed Central

    Alston, Christine I.; Dix, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a species-specific β-herpesvirus that infects for life up to 80% of the world’s population and causes severe morbidity in at-risk immunocompromised populations. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and SOCS3 are host proteins that act as inducible negative feedback regulators of cytokine signaling and have been implicated in several ocular diseases and viral infections. We recently found in our mouse model of experimental cytomegalovirus retinitis that subretinally-injected murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) stimulates ocular SOCS1 and SOCS3 during retrovirus-induced immune suppression of murine AIDS (MAIDS), and that infiltrating macrophages are prominent cellular sources of retinal SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression. Herein we investigate possible virologic mechanisms whereby MCMV infection may stimulate SOCS1 and/or SOCS3 expression in cell culture. We report that infection of IC-21 mouse macrophages with MCMV propagated through the salivary glands of BALB/c mice, but not from tissue culture in C57BL/6 fibroblasts, transiently stimulates SOCS1 and SOCS3 mRNA transcripts, but not SOCS5 mRNA. Viral tegument proteins are insufficient for this stimulation, as replication-deficient UV-inactivated MCMV fails to stimulate SOCS1 or SOCS3 in IC-21 macrophages. By contrast, infection of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with either productive MCMV or UV-inactivated MCMV significantly stimulates SOCS1 and SOCS3 mRNA expression early after infection. Treatment of MCMV-infected IC-21 mouse macrophages with the antiviral drug ganciclovir significantly decreases MCMV-stimulated SOCS3 expression at 3 days post-infection. These data suggest cell type-specific, different roles for viral immediate early or early gene expression and/or viral tegument proteins in the early stimulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3 during MCMV infection. Furthermore, putative biphasic stimulation of SOCS3 during late MCMV infection of IC-21 mouse macrophages may occur by divergent

  6. Effect of stress on eotaxin and expression of adhesion molecules in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Ricarda A; Sagach, Viktoriya; Quarcoo, David; Dinh, Q Thai; Arck, Petra C; Klapp, Burghard F

    2007-01-01

    Recently we have shown that sound stress enhances allergic airway inflammation in a combined murine model. In the current study we investigated mediating factors and early kinetics of stress exacerbated allergic airway inflammation. Stress significantly increased allergen induced airway inflammation as identified by leukocyte numbers in BAL fluids. Eotaxin levels from stressed mice were significantly higher 24 h after stress. No differences were found for vascular or cellular adhesion molecule expression or cytokine levels. Our data indicate that the effect of stress on allergic airway inflammation might be mediated by the chemoattractant eotaxin, while Th2 cytokines and expression of adhesion molecules seem not to be differently regulated in stressed and non-stressed mice.

  7. GLUT4, GLUT1, and GLUT8 are the dominant GLUT transcripts expressed in the murine left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The heart derives energy from a wide variety of substrates including fatty acids, carbohydrates, ketones, and amino acids. The healthy heart generates up to 30% of its ATP from glucose. Under conditions of cardiac injury or stress, the heart relies even more heavily on glucose as a source of fuel. Glucose is transported into the heart by members of the family of facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs). While research examining the transport of glucose into the heart has primarily focused on the roles of the classical glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, little is known about the functions of more newly identified GLUT isoforms in the myocardium. Methods In this study the presence and relative RNA message abundance of each of the known GLUT isoforms was determined in left ventricular tissue from two commonly used inbred laboratory mouse strains (C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ) by quantitative real time PCR. Relative message abundance was also determined in GLUT4 null mice and in murine models of dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Results GLUT4, GLUT1, and GLUT8 were found to be the most abundant GLUT transcripts in the normal heart, while GLUT3, GLUT10, and GLUT12 are present at relatively lower levels. Assessment of relative GLUT expression in left ventricular myocardium from mice with dilated cardiomyopathy revealed increased expression of GLUT1 with reduced levels of GLUT4, GLUT8, and GLUT12. Compensatory increase in the expression of GLUT12 was observed in genetically altered mice lacking GLUT4. Conclusions Glucose transporter expression varies significantly among murine models of cardiac dysfunction and involves several of the class III GLUT isoforms. Understanding how these more newly identified GLUT isoforms contribute to regulating myocardial glucose transport will enhance our comprehension of the normal physiology and pathophysiology of the heart. PMID:22681646

  8. Correlation of cellular expression with function of NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase in the murine lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Lies, Barbara; Groneberg, Dieter; Friebe, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The action of nitric oxide (NO) to stimulate NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC), followed by production of cGMP, and eventually to cause smooth muscle relaxation is well known. In the lower urinary tract (LUT), in contrast to the cardiovascular system and the gastrointestinal tract, specific localization in combination with function of NO-GC has not been investigated to date. Consequently, little is known about the mechanisms regulating relaxation of the lower urinary tract in general and the role of NO-GC-expressing cells in particular. To study the distribution and function of NO-GC in the murine lower urinary tract, we used internal urethral sphincter and bladder detrusor from global (GCKO) and smooth muscle cell-specific (SM-GCKO) NO-GC knock-out mice for immunohistochemical analyses and organ bath experiments. In urethral sphincter, NO-GC-positive immunofluorescence was confined to smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Deletion of NO-GC in SMCs abolished NO-induced relaxation. In bladder detrusor, exposure to NO did not cause relaxation although immunohistochemistry uncovered the existence of NO-GC in the tissue. In contrast to the urethral sphincter, expression of NO-GC in bladder detrusor was limited to platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα)-positive interstitial cells. In conclusion, NO-GC found in SMCs of the urethral sphincter mediates NO-induced relaxation; bladder detrusor is unique as NO-GC is not expressed in SMCs and, thus, NO does not induce relaxation. Nevertheless, NO-GC expression was found in PDGFRα-positive interstitial cells of the murine bladder with an as yet unknown function. Further investigation is needed to clarify the role of NO-GC in the detrusor.

  9. Nasal administration of interleukin-33 induces airways angiogenesis and expression of multiple angiogenic factors in a murine asthma surrogate.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shan; Li, Yan; Wang, Jingjing; Lv, Zhe; Yi, Dawei; Huang, Qiong; Corrigan, Chris J; Wang, Wei; Quangeng, Zhang; Ying, Sun

    2016-05-01

    The T-helper cell type 2-promoting cytokine interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been implicated in asthma pathogenesis. Angiogenesis is a feature of airways remodelling in asthma. We hypothesized that IL-33 induces airways angiogenesis and expression of angiogenic factors in an established murine surrogate of asthma. In the present study, BALB/c mice were subjected to serial intranasal challenge with IL-33 alone for up to 70 days. In parallel, ovalbumin (OVA) -sensitized mice were subjected to serial intranasal challenge with OVA or normal saline to serve as positive and negative controls, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis of expression of von Willebrand factor and erythroblast transformation-specific-related gene, both blood vessel markers, and angiogenic factors angiogenin, insulin-like growth factor-1, endothelin-1, epidermal growth factor and amphiregulin was performed in lung sections ex vivo. An established in-house assay was used to test whether IL-33 was able to induce microvessel formation by human vascular endothelial cells. Results showed that serial intranasal challenge of mice with IL-33 or OVA resulted in proliferation of peribronchial von Willebrand factor-positive blood vessels to a degree closely related to the total expression of the angiogenic factors amphiregulin, angiogenin, endothelin-1, epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-1. IL-33 also induced microvessel formation by human endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent fashion in vitro. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that IL-33 has the capacity to induce angiogenesis at least partly by increasing local expression of multiple angiogenic factors in an allergen-independent murine asthma surrogate, and consequently that IL-33 or its receptor is a potential novel molecular target for asthma therapy.

  10. Patterns of gene expression in the murine brain revealed by in situ hybridization of brain-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Branks, P L; Wilson, M C

    1986-07-01

    Biochemical differences between neuronal cell populations of the mammalian brain, including selection of neurotransmitters and distinct neural antigens, suggest that the regulation of gene expression plays an important role in defining brain function. Here we describe the use of in situ hybridization to identify cDNA clones of highly regulated mRNA species and to define directly their pattern of gene expression in brain at both gross morphological and cellular levels. One of the selected cDNA clones, pMuBr2, detected a single 3.0 kb mRNA species, which from in situ hybridization appears specific to oligodendroglia cells. Three other cDNA clones, pMuBr3, 8 and 85, identified polyadenylated mRNA transcripts expressed by neuronal cells of the murine brain. Viewed at the gross morphological level, the mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNA sequences exhibit different patterns of abundance distinguishing such brain structures as pons, anterior thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and anterior lobe of the neuroendocrine pituitary gland. At the cellular level, in situ hybridization revealed that these mRNAs are differentially expressed by morphologically and functionally distinct neurons of the cerebellum and hippocampal formation. When examined in the context of known brain function, however, the regulated expression of the neuron-specific mRNAs does not correlate simply with known cellular morphology or previously demonstrated neuronal relationships suggesting novel patterns of gene expression which may contribute to brain function.

  11. Differential expression of extracellular matrix remodeling genes in a murine model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Swiderski, R. E.; Dencoff, J. E.; Floerchinger, C. S.; Shapiro, S. D.; Hunninghake, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to the chemotherapeutic drug bleomycin leads to pulmonary fibrosis in humans and has been widely used in animal models of the disease. Using C57BL/6 bleomycin-sensitive mice, pulmonary fibrosis was induced by multiple intraperitoneal injections of the drug. An increase in the relative amounts of steady-state alpha1(I) procollagen, alpha1(III) procollagen, and fibronectin mRNA as well as histopathological evidence of fibrosis was observed. The effect of bleomycin on the expression of the enzymes responsible for extracellular matrix degradation, the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and their inhibitors (TIMPs), was selective and showed temporal differences during the development of fibrosis. Of the MMPs tested, bleomycin treatment resulted in the up-regulation of gelatinase A and macrophage metalloelastase gene expression in whole-lung homogenates, whereas gelatinase B, stromelysin-1, and interstitial collagenase gene expression was not significantly changed. Timp2 and Timp3, the murine homologues of the respective TIMP genes, were constitutively expressed, whereas Timp1 was markedly up-regulated during fibrosis. The strong correlation between enhanced extracellular matrix gene expression, differential MMP and TIMP gene expression, and histopathological evidence of fibrosis suggest that dysregulated matrix remodeling is likely to contribute to the pathology of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9502424

  12. CD40-mediated NFκB activation in B cells is increased in multiple sclerosis and modulated by therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ding; Ireland, Sara J.; Remington, Gina; Alvarez, Enrique; Racke, Michael K.; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M.; Monson, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    CD40 interacts with CD40 ligand and plays an essential role in immune regulation and homeostasis. Recent research findings, however, support a pathogenic role of CD40 in a number of autoimmune diseases. We previously showed that memory B cells from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients exhibited enhanced proliferation with CD40 stimulation compared to healthy donors. In this study, we used a multi-parameter phosflow approach to analyze the phosphorylation status of NFκB and three major MAP kinases (P38, ERK and JNK), the essential components of signaling pathways downstream of CD40 engagement in B cells from MS patients. We found that memory and naïve B cells from RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients exhibited a significantly elevated level of phosphorylated NFκB (p-P65) following CD40 stimulation compared to healthy donor controls. Combination therapy with interferon beta-1a (Avonex) and mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) modulated the hyper-phosphorylation of P65 in B cells of RRMS patients at levels similar to healthy donor controls. Lower disease activity after the combination therapy correlated with the reduced phosphorylation of P65 following CD40 stimulation in treated patients. In addition, glatiramer acetate (GA) treatment also significantly reduced CD40-mediated P65 phosphorylation in RRMS patients, suggesting that reducing CD40-mediated p-P65 induction may be a general mechanism by which some current therapies modulate MS disease. PMID:27798157

  13. Small Molecule Inhibition of the TNF Family Cytokine CD40 Ligand Through a Subunit Fracture Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    L Silvian; J Friedman; K Strauch; T Cachero; E Day; F Qian; B Cunningham; A Fung; L Sun; et al.

    2011-12-31

    BIO8898 is one of several synthetic organic molecules that have recently been reported to inhibit receptor binding and function of the constitutively trimeric tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family cytokine CD40 ligand (CD40L, aka CD154). Small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interfaces are relatively rare, and their discovery is often very challenging. Therefore, to understand how BIO8898 achieves this feat, we characterized its mechanism of action using biochemical assays and X-ray crystallography. BIO8898 inhibited soluble CD40L binding to CD40-Ig with a potency of IC{sub 50} = 25 {mu}M and inhibited CD40L-dependent apoptosis in a cellular assay. A co-crystal structure of BIO8898 with CD40L revealed that one inhibitor molecule binds per protein trimer. Surprisingly, the compound binds not at the surface of the protein but by intercalating deeply between two subunits of the homotrimeric cytokine, disrupting a constitutive protein-protein interface and breaking the protein's 3-fold symmetry. The compound forms several hydrogen bonds with the protein, within an otherwise hydrophobic binding pocket. In addition to the translational splitting of the trimer, binding of BIO8898 was accompanied by additional local and longer-range conformational perturbations of the protein, both in the core and in a surface loop. Binding of BIO8898 is reversible, and the resulting complex is stable and does not lead to detectable dissociation of the protein trimer. Our results suggest that a set of core aromatic residues that are conserved across a subset of TNF family cytokines might represent a generic hot-spot for the induced-fit binding of trimer-disrupting small molecules.

  14. IgG subclass co-expression brings harmony to the quartet model of murine IgG function.

    PubMed

    Collins, Andrew M

    2016-11-01

    A model of murine IgG function is presented in which the co-expression of the IgG subclasses is a central feature, class switching occurs before the commencement of somatic hypermutation, and there is little switching between subclasses. It is named the quartet model to emphasize the harmony that comes from the simultaneous presence of the four subclasses. In this model, IgG3 and IgG2b antibodies are particularly important early in the response, when T-cell help may be limiting. IgG3 initiates inflammation through complement fixation, whereas IgG2b provides early FcγR-mediated effector functions. As T-cell help strengthens, IgG2a antibodies increase the power of the response, whereas IgG1 production helps limit the inflammatory drive and limits immunopathology. The model highlights the fact that murine IgG subclasses function quite differently to human IgG subclasses. This allows them to serve the special immunological needs of a species that is vulnerable because of its small size.

  15. A novel Krueppel related factor consisting of only a KRAB domain is expressed in the murine trigeminal ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Nikulina, Karina; Bodeker, MacDara; Warren, John; Matthews, Philip; Margolis, Todd P. . E-mail: todd.margolis@ucsf.edu

    2006-09-29

    The largest family of zinc-finger (ZnF) transcription factors is that containing the Krueppel-associated box, or KRAB domain. The amino-terminal KRAB domain of these proteins functions as a transcriptional repressor with the downstream ZnF motifs providing DNA-binding specificity. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel murine Krueppel-related factor (KLF), MIF1, which contains a KRAB domain but lacks a ZnF motif. Western blot analysis identified MIF1-like proteins in the murine trigeminal ganglion (TG) and immunostaining localized these proteins primarily to the cytoplasm of TG neuronal cell bodies. In situ hybridization for Mif1 transcripts confirms the selective expression of Mif1 in TG neurons. Consistent with the non-nuclear localization of MIF1 we could detect no transcriptional repressor activity of the MIF1 protein. However MIF1 appears to be capable of interacting with the co-repressor TIF1{beta} and exhibits transcription repressor activity when fused to yeast GAL4 binding domain protein. Genomic analysis of Mif1 sequence suggests that the Mif1 transcript may result from splicing of a longer KRAB-ZnF containing transcript.

  16. Phase IA/II, multicentre, open-label study of the CD40 antagonistic monoclonal antibody lucatumumab in adult patients with advanced non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Michelle; Assouline, Sarit; Kuruvilla, John; Solal-Céligny, Philippe; Heo, Dae S; Verhoef, Gregor; Corradini, Paolo; Abramson, Jeremy S; Offner, Fritz; Engert, Andreas; Dyer, Martin J S; Carreon, Daniel; Ewald, Brett; Baeck, Johan; Younes, Anas; Freedman, Arnold S

    2014-01-01

    Despite advancements in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), patients continue to relapse and thus a need for new targeted therapies remains. The CD40 receptor is highly expressed on neoplastic B cells and activation leads to enhanced proliferation and survival. Lucatumumab (HCD122) is a fully human antagonistic CD40 monoclonal antibody. A phase IA/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and activity of lucatumumab in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma. Determination of the MTD was the primary objective of the phase IA dose escalation portion and clinical response was the primary objective of the phase II dose expansion portion. Patients received escalating doses of lucatumumab administered intravenously once weekly for 4 weeks of an 8-week cycle. MTD was determined at 4 mg/kg of lucatumumab. A total of 111 patients with NHL (n = 74) and HL (n = 37) were enrolled. Responses were observed across various lymphoma subtypes. The overall response rate by computed tomography among patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) and marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue (MZL/MALT) was 33·3% and 42·9%, respectively. Lucatumumab demonstrates modest activity in relapsed/refractory patients with advanced lymphoma, suggesting that targeting of CD40 warrants further investigation.

  17. Simultaneous activation of viral antigen-specific memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells using mRNA-electroporated CD40-activated autologous B-cells.

    PubMed

    Van den Bosch, Glenn A; Van Gulck, Ellen; Ponsaerts, Peter; Nijs, Griet; Lenjou, Marc; Apers, Ludwig; Kint, Ilse; Heyndrickx, Leo; Vanham, Guido; Van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has become obvious that not only CD8 T-cells, but also CD4 T-helper cells are required for the induction of an effective, long-lasting cellular immune response. In view of the clinical importance of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we developed 2 strategies to simultaneously reactivate viral antigen-specific memory CD4 and CD8 T-cells of CMV-seropositive and HIV-seropositive subjects using mRNA-electroporated autologous CD40-activated B cells. In the setting of HIV, we provide evidence that CD40-activated B cells can be cultured from HAART-naive HIV-1 seropositive patients. These cells not only express and secrete the HIV p24 antigen after electroporation with codon-optimized HIV-1 gag mRNA, but can also be used to in vitro reactivate Gag antigen-specific interferon-gamma-producing CD4 and CD8 autologous T-cells. For the CMV-specific approach, we applied mRNA coding for the pp65 protein coupled to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 to transfect CD40-activated B cells to induce CMV antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells. More detailed analysis of the activated interferon-gamma-producing CMV pp65 tetramer positive CD8 T-cells revealed an effector memory phenotype with the capacity to produce interleukin-2. Our findings clearly show that the concomitant activation of both CD4 and CD8 (memory) T-cells using mRNA-electroporated CD40-B cells is feasible in CMV and HIV-1-seropositive persons, which indicates the potential value of this approach for application in cellular immunotherapy of infectious diseases.

  18. P53 and Murine Double Mimute 2 (MDM2) Expression Changes and Significance in Different Types of Endometrial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhongyong; Xu, Wanqing; Dan, Gang; Liu, Yuan; Xiong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometrial lesions are common in obstetrics and gynecology, including endometrial polyps, uterine adenomyosis, and malignant endometrial adenocarcinoma. Endometrial lesions seriously affect women’s health, fertility, quality of life, and life safety. As a pro-apoptosis gene, p53 is considered to be closely related with human tumors. Murine double mimute 2 (MDM2) is an oncogene that can promote tumor occurrence and development. P53 and MDM2 expression and significance in different types of endometrial lesions have not been fully elucidated. Material/Methods Normal endometrium, endometrial polyps, uterine adenomyosis, and endometrial adenocarcinoma tissue samples were collected. Real-time PCR was used to detect p53 and MDM2 mRNA expression. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis were applied to test p53 and MDM2 protein expression. Their correlation with clinical staging of endometrial adenocarcinoma was analyzed. Results P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein expression were significantly elevated in the endometrial polyps group and the endometrial adenocarcinoma group compared with the normal control group (P<0.05). Their levels increased more obviously in endometrial adenocarcinoma compared with endometrial polyps (P<0.05). P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein expression were slightly enhanced in uterine adenomyosis compared with normal controls, but this difference lacked statistical significance (P>0.05). P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein level showed a positive correlation. Significantly higher expression of p53 or MDM2 was observed in patients with stage III compared to those in patients with stage II. Higher expression was also observed in patients with stage II than in patients with stage I. Conclusions P53 and MDM2 mRNA and protein were elevated in endometrial polyps and endometrial adenocarcinoma and their expressions were correlated with clinical staging of endometrial adenocarcinoma. They can promote cancer occurrence and development, and can

  19. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Mai, Yun; Gao, Guangxia

    2010-12-29

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1) enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  20. Genomic organisation of the mouse gene encoding endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) and mRNA expression of ECE-1 isoforms in murine tissues.

    PubMed

    Lindenau, Steffi; von Langsdorff, Christian; Saxena, Amit; Paul, Martin; Orzechowski, Hans-Dieter

    2006-05-24

    Mouse knockout-models have previously revealed important biological functions of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) in normal cardiac and craniofacial development. Since human ECE-1 is expressed in various isoforms, termed a, b, c, and d, expression of which is controlled by alternative promoters, we postulated that corresponding isoforms may also be transcribed from the murine Ece1 gene. By comparative sequence analysis using exon-specific sequences of human and rat ECE-1 we have resolved the complete exon-intron structure of the murine Ece1 locus on chromosome 4. The murine Ece1 gene comprises 23 exons distributed over 100 kb of genomic DNA and was found to be structurally highly conserved when compared to the human ECE1 gene. As with the human gene, the exons containing isoform-specific sequences were localised in the 5' terminal region of the murine Ece1 gene. Using specific sense primers, isoform-specific expression of murine ECE-1 mRNA in various mouse tissues was confirmed by RT-PCR. Using real-time PCR we demonstrated that ECE-1c was the most abundantly expressed isoform in most tissues, except for heart and aorta displaying a more even isoform distribution. We detected an additional isoform-specific exon, designated c2, which was apparently constitutively spliced and expressed only as minor fraction of ECE-1c transcripts. Our results provide evidence of structural conservation of mammalian genes encoding ECE-1 and will facilitate a more refined analysis of ECE-1 mRNA expression in the mouse model organism.

  1. Apigenin: Selective CK2 inhibitor increases Ikaros expression and improves T cell homeostasis and function in murine pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Nadine; Szekeres, Karoly; Iclozan, Cristina; Rivera, Ivannie Ortiz; McGill, Andrew; Johnson, Gbemisola; Nwogu, Onyekachi

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) evades immune destruction by favoring the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that inhibit effector T cells. The transcription factor Ikaros is critical for lymphocyte development, especially T cells. We have previously shown that downregulation of Ikaros occurs as a result of its protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in our Panc02 tumor-bearing (TB) mouse model. Mechanistically, we observed a deregulation in the balance between Casein Kinase II (CK2) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), which suggested that increased CK2 activity is responsible for regulating Ikaros’ stability in our model. We also showed that this loss of Ikaros expression is associated with a significant decrease in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell percentages but increased CD4+CD25+ Tregs in TB mice. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the dietary flavonoid apigenin (API), on Ikaros expression and T cell immune responses. Treatment of splenocytes from naïve mice with (API) stabilized Ikaros expression and prevented Ikaros downregulation in the presence of murine Panc02 cells in vitro, similar to the proteasome inhibitor MG132. In vivo treatment of TB mice with apigenin (TB-API) improved survival, reduced tumor weights and prevented splenomegaly. API treatment also restored protein expression of some Ikaros isoforms, which may be attributed to its moderate inhibition of CK2 activity from splenocytes of TB-API mice. This partial restoration of Ikaros expression was accompanied by a significant increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell percentages and a reduction in Treg percentages in TB-API mice. In addition, CD8+ T cells from TB-API mice produced more IFN-γ and their splenocytes were better able to prime allogeneic CD8+ T cell responses compared to TB mice. These results provide further evidence that Ikaros is regulated by CK2 in our pancreatic cancer model. More importantly, our findings suggest that API may be a possible therapeutic agent for stabilizing Ikaros

  2. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  3. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Dina A.; Scarff, Jennifer M.; Garcia, Preston P.; Cassidy, Sara K. B.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine. PMID:26148026

  4. A Murine Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Receptor Expressed in CHO Cells is Activated by Basic FGF and Kaposi FGF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansukhani, Alka; Moscatelli, David; Talarico, Daniela; Levytska, Vera; Basilico, Claudio

    1990-06-01

    We have cloned a murine cDNA encoding a tyrosine kinase receptor with about 90% similarity to the chicken fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor and the human fms-like gene (FLG) tyrosine kinase. This mouse receptor lacks 88 amino acids in the extracellular portion, leaving only two immunoglobulin-like domains compared to three in the chicken FGF receptor. The cDNA was cloned into an expression vector and transfected into receptor-negative CHO cells. We show that cells expressing the receptor can bind both basic FGF and Kaposi FGF. Although the receptor binds basic FGF with a 15- to 20-fold higher affinity, Kaposi FGF is able to induce down-regulation of the receptor to the same extent as basic FGF. The receptor is phosphorylated upon stimulation with both FGFs, DNA synthesis is stimulated, and a proliferative response is produced in cells expressing the receptor, whereas cells expressing the cDNA in the antisense orientation show none of these responses to basic FGF or Kaposi FGF. Thus this receptor can functionally interact with two growth factors of the FGF family.

  5. Slit-Robo GTPase-activating proteins are differentially expressed in murine dorsal root ganglia: modulation by peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Zhao, Jiu-Hong; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Dan; Zheng, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Xian-Fang; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Yi, Xi-Nan

    2012-04-01

    The Slit-Robo GTPase-activating proteins (srGAPs) play an important role in neurite outgrowth and axon guidance; however, little is known about its role in nerve regeneration after injury. Here, we studied the expression of srGAPs in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following sciatic nerve transection (SNT) using morphometric and immunohistochemical techniques. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis indicated that srGAP1 and srGAP3, but not srGAP2, were expressed in normal adult DRG. Following unilateral SNT, elevated mRNA and protein levels of srGAP1 and srGAP3 were detected in the ipsilateral relative to contralateral L(3-4) DRGs from day 3 to day 14. Immunohistochemical results showed that srGAP1 and srGAP3 were largely expressed in subpopulations of DRG neurons in naïve DRGs. However, after SNT, srGAP3 in neurons was significantly increased in the ipsilateral relative to contralateral DRGs, which peaked at day 7 to day 14. Interestingly, DRG neurons with strong srGAP3 labeling also coexpressed Robo2 after peripheral nerve injury. These results suggest that srGAPs are differentially expressed in murine DRG and srGAP3 are the predominant form. Moreover, srGAP3 may participate in Slit-Robo signaling in response to peripheral nerve injury or the course of nerve regeneration.

  6. Murine Coronavirus Delays Expression of a Subset of Interferon-Stimulated Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kristine M.; Elliott, Ruth; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Weiss, Susan R.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of the type I interferon (IFN-I) system in limiting coronavirus replication and dissemination has been unequivocally demonstrated by rapid lethality following infection of mice lacking the alpha/beta IFN (IFN-α/β) receptor with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Interestingly, MHV has a cell-type-dependent ability to resist the antiviral effects of IFN-α/β. In primary bone-marrow-derived macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, MHV replication was significantly reduced by the IFN-α/β-induced antiviral state, whereas IFN treatment of cell lines (L2 and 293T) has only minor effects on replication (K. M. Rose and S. R. Weiss, Viruses 1:689-712, 2009). Replication of other RNA viruses, including Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), Sindbis virus, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and Sendai virus (SeV), was significantly inhibited in L2 cells treated with IFN-α/β, and MHV had the ability to rescue only SeV replication. We present evidence that MHV infection can delay interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) induction mediated by both SeV and IFN-β but only when MHV infection precedes SeV or IFN-β exposure. Curiously, we observed no block in the well-defined IFN-β signaling pathway that leads to STAT1-STAT2 phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus in cultures infected with MHV. This observation suggests that MHV must inhibit an alternative IFN-induced pathway that is essential for early induction of ISGs. The ability of MHV to delay SeV-mediated ISG production may partially involve limiting the ability of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) to function as a transcription factor. Transcription from an IRF-3-responsive promoter was partially inhibited by MHV; however, IRF-3 was transported to the nucleus and bound DNA in MHV-infected cells superinfected with SeV. PMID:20357099

  7. Murine coronavirus delays expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kristine M; Elliott, Ruth; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Weiss, Susan R

    2010-06-01

    The importance of the type I interferon (IFN-I) system in limiting coronavirus replication and dissemination has been unequivocally demonstrated by rapid lethality following infection of mice lacking the alpha/beta IFN (IFN-alpha/beta) receptor with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Interestingly, MHV has a cell-type-dependent ability to resist the antiviral effects of IFN-alpha/beta. In primary bone-marrow-derived macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, MHV replication was significantly reduced by the IFN-alpha/beta-induced antiviral state, whereas IFN treatment of cell lines (L2 and 293T) has only minor effects on replication (K. M. Rose and S. R. Weiss, Viruses 1:689-712, 2009). Replication of other RNA viruses, including Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), Sindbis virus, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and Sendai virus (SeV), was significantly inhibited in L2 cells treated with IFN-alpha/beta, and MHV had the ability to rescue only SeV replication. We present evidence that MHV infection can delay interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) induction mediated by both SeV and IFN-beta but only when MHV infection precedes SeV or IFN-beta exposure. Curiously, we observed no block in the well-defined IFN-beta signaling pathway that leads to STAT1-STAT2 phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus in cultures infected with MHV. This observation suggests that MHV must inhibit an alternative IFN-induced pathway that is essential for early induction of ISGs. The ability of MHV to delay SeV-mediated ISG production may partially involve limiting the ability of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) to function as a transcription factor. Transcription from an IRF-3-responsive promoter was partially inhibited by MHV; however, IRF-3 was transported to the nucleus and bound DNA in MHV-infected cells superinfected with SeV.

  8. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  9. Analysis of cellular phenotype during in vitro immunization of murine splenocytes for generating antigen-specific immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Takashi; Yoshimi, Tatsunari; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2013-03-01

    Although various in vitro immunization methods to generate antigen-specific antibodies have been described, a highly effective method that can generate high-affinity immunoglobulins has not yet been reported. Herein, we analyzed a cellular phenotype during in vitro immunization of murine splenocytes for generating antigen-specific immunoglobulins. We identified a combination of T cell-dependent stimuli (IL-4, IL-5, anti-CD38 and anti-CD40 antibodies) plus lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that stimulates antigen-exposed splenocytes in vitro, followed by induction of the cells phenotypically equivalent to germinal center B cells. We also observed that LPS induced high expression levels of mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We stimulated antigen-exposed splenocytes, followed by the accumulation of mutations in immunoglobulin genes. From the immunized splenocytes, hybridoma clones secreting antigen-specific immunoglobulins were obtained.

  10. Sonicated Protein Fractions of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Induce Inflammatory Responses and Differential Gene Expression in a Murine Alveolar Macrophage Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Damte, Dereje; Lee, Seung-Jin; Birhanu, Biruk Tesfaye; Suh, Joo-Won; Park, Seung-Chun

    2015-12-28

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is known to cause porcine enzootic pneumonia (EP), an important disease in swine production. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of sonicated protein fractions of M. hyopneumoniae on inflammatory response and gene expression in the murine alveolar macrophage MH-S cell line. The effects of sonicated protein fractions and intact M. hyopneumoniae on the gene expression of cytokines and iNOS were assessed using RT-PCR. The Annealing Control Primer (ACP)-based PCR method was used to screen differentially expressed genes. Increased transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA was observed after exposure to the supernatant (SPT), precipitant (PPT), and intact M. hyopneumoniae protein. A time-dependent analysis of the mRNA expression revealed an upregulation after 4 h for IL-6 and iNOS and after 12 h for IL-1β and TNF-α, for both SPT and PPT; the fold change in COX-2 expression was less. A dose- and time-dependent correlation was observed in nitrite (NO) production for both protein fractions; however, there was no significant difference between the effects of the two protein fractions. In a differential gene analysis, PCR revealed differential expression for nine gene bands after 3 h of stimulation - only one gene was downregulated, while the remaining eight were upregulated. The results of this study provide insights that help improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of and macrophage defenses against M. hyopneumoniae assault, and suggest targets for future studies on therapeutic interventions for M. hyopneumoniae infections.

  11. Renal Dnase1 Enzyme Activity and Protein Expression Is Selectively Shut Down in Murine and Human Membranoproliferative Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2010-01-01

    Background Deposition of chromatin-IgG complexes within glomerular membranes is a key event in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. We recently reported an acquired loss of renal Dnase1 expression linked to transformation from mild to severe membranoproliferative lupus nephritis in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. As this may represent a basic mechanism in the progression of lupus nephritis, several aspects of Dnase1 expression in lupus nephritis were analyzed. Methodology/Principal Findings Total nuclease activity and Dnase1 expression and activity was evaluated using in situ and in vitro analyses of kidneys and sera from (NZBxNZW)F1 mice of different ages, and from age-matched healthy controls. Immunofluorescence staining for Dnase1 was performed on kidney biopsies from (NZBxNZW)F1 mice as well as from human SLE patients and controls. Reduced serum Dnase1 activity was observed in both mesangial and end-stage lupus nephritis. A selective reduction in renal Dnase1 activity was seen in mice with massive deposition of chromatin-containing immune complexes in glomerular capillary walls. Mice with mild mesangial nephritis showed normal renal Dnase1 activity. Similar differences were seen when comparing human kidneys with severe and mild lupus nephritis. Dnase1 was diffusely expressed within the kidney in normal and mildly affected kidneys, whereas upon progression towards end-stage renal disease, Dnase1 was down-regulated in all renal compartments. This demonstrates that the changes associated with development of severe nephritis in the murine model are also relevant to human lupus nephritis. Conclusions/Significance Reduction in renal Dnase1 expression and activity is limited to mice and SLE patients with signs of membranoproliferative nephritis, and may be a critical event in the development of severe forms of lupus nephritis. Reduced Dnase1 activity reflects loss in the expression of the protein and not inhibition of enzyme activity. PMID:20856893

  12. Analysis of the pattern of expression of the Fanconi anemia group C (Facc) gene during murine development

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshtein, F.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a variety of congenital and skeletal malformations, progressive pancytopanenia and predisposition to malignancies. FA cells display chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Both the human and the corresponding murine cDNAs have been cloned in our lab. Here we describe the expression of Facc during mouse development, using mRNA in situ hybridization. Our aim is to obtain clues on the possible function of the Facc gene product during development that may help elucidate basic defect(s) in FA. In addition, knowledge of the exact pattern of Facc expression will assist in interpreting the phenotypes of mutant mice, currently being developed. In embryos the gene is diffusely expressed over the entire embryo, with higher hybridization levels in the mesenchyme and in both upper and lower extremities. Specific expression of Facc is seen in the perichondrium and marrow of long bones of hind limbs/hip; long bones of front limbs/shoulder region; developing digits of front and hind paws; and ribs. The signal is also detected in the following regions: cranial/frontal; facial/periorbital and maxillary/mandibular, hair follicles, diaphragm and lung. In addition, generalized Facc expression is seen during these embryonic stages. The pattern of Facc expression is consistent with the known skeletal abnormalities in FA patients, which include radial ray deformities, metacarpal hypoplasia, and abnormalities of lower limbs, ribs, head and face. The signal in the lung is consistent with the lung lobe absence and abnormal pulmonary drainage that have been detected in some FA patients. The sloped forehead and microcephaly in FA patients may have some association with the signal seen in the frontal region of the mouse cranium. Taken together, our results suggest that Facc is directly involved in the development of various embryonic tissues, particularly bone.

  13. Clinical response to persistent, low-level beta-glucuronidase expression in the murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type VII.

    PubMed

    Donsante, A; Levy, B; Vogler, C; Sands, M S

    2007-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) deficiency. This disease exhibits a broad spectrum of clinical signs including skeletal dysplasia, retinal degeneration, cognitive deficits and hearing impairment. Sustained, high-level expression of GUSB significantly improves the clinical course of the disease in the murine model of MPS VII. Low levels of enzyme expression (1-5% of normal) can significantly reduce the biochemical and histopathological manifestations of MPS VII. However, it has not been clear from previous studies whether persistent, low levels of circulating GUSB lead to significant improvements in the clinical presentation of this disease. We generated a rAAV2 vector that mediates persistent, low-level GUSB expression in the liver. Liver and serum levels of GUSB were maintained at approximately 5% and approximately 2.5% of normal, respectively, while other tissue ranged from background levels to 0.9%. This level of activity significantly reduced the secondary elevations of alpha-galactosidase and the levels of glycosaminoglycans in multiple tissues. Interestingly, this level of GUSB was also sufficient to reduce lysosomal storage in neurons in the brain. Although there were small but statistically significant improvements in retinal function, auditory function, skeletal dysplasia, and reproduction in rAAV-treated MPS VII mice, the clinical deficits were still profound and there was no improvement in lifespan. These data suggest that circulating levels of GUSB greater than 2.5% will be required to achieve substantial clinical improvements in MPS VII.

  14. Tetracycline-regulated intratumoral expression of interleukin-3 enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy for murine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C-H; Hong, J-H; Hsieh, K-F; Hsiao, H-W; Chuang, W-L; Lee, C-C; McBride, W H; Chiang, C-S

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate means of increasing the efficiency with which cancer cell death following local radiation therapy (RT) is translated into the generation of tumor immunity since, if this were to be achieved, it would be expected to enhance the rates of disease-free recurrence and survival. Our investigations centered around the use of interleukin-3 (IL-3), expressed intratumorally using an inducible adenoviral vector, to alter the immunogenicity of established murine TRAMP-C1 prostate cancer receiving a course of fractionated local RT (7 Gy per fraction per day for 5 days). Because high systemic levels of IL-3 can be associated with toxicity, a tetracycline-regulated gene delivery system was employed. The results show that while intratumoral IL-3 expression or RT alone caused a modest delay in TRAMP-C1 tumor growth, the combination was synergistic with 50% of mice being cured and developing a long-term, tumor-specific state of immunity. Immunological analyses performed on splenic lymphocytes demonstrated that, compared to RT or IL-3 alone, combined treatment significantly increased the number of tumor-specific IFN-gamma-secreting and cytotoxic T cells. The study demonstrates that tetracycline-regulated IL-3 gene expression within tumors can enhance the immune response to prostate cancer and this can augment the efficacy of a course of RT without additional side effects.

  15. Expression and localization of laminin 5, laminin 10, type IV collagen, and amelotin in adult murine gingiva.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takashi; Yamazaki, Takaki; Shibayama, Kazuko; Kumazawa, Kaido; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro

    2014-06-01

    The biochemical composition of the internal and external basal laminae in the junctional epithelium differs significantly, and the precise cellular origin of their respective molecules remains to be determined. In the present study, the expression and localization of three basement membrane-specific molecules-laminin 5 (γ2 chain), type IV collagen (α1 chain), and laminin 10 (α5 chain)-and one tooth-specific molecule, amelotin, was analyzed in adult murine gingiva by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the outermost cells in junctional epithelium facing the tooth enamel strongly expressed laminin 5 mRNA, supporting the immunohistochemical staining data. This suggests that laminin 5 is actively synthesized in junctional epithelial cells and that the products are incorporated into the internal basal lamina to maintain firm epithelial adhesion to the tooth enamel throughout life. Conversely, no amelotin mRNA signals were detected in the junctional epithelial cells, suggesting that the molecules localized on the internal basal lamina are mainly derived from maturation-stage ameloblasts. Weak and sporadic expression of type IV collagen in addition to laminin 10 in the gingiva indicates that these molecules undergo turnover less frequently in adult animals.

  16. Urocortin-1 Mediated Cardioprotection Involves XIAP and CD40-Ligand Recovery: Role of EPAC2 and ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Ordóñez, Antonio; Smani, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Aims Urocortin-1 (Ucn-1) is an endogenous peptide that protects heart from ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injuries. Ucn-1 is known to prevent cardiac cell death, but its role in the transcription of specific genes related to survival signaling pathway has not been fully defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular signaling implicated in the improvement of cardiac myocytes survival induced by Ucn-1. Methods and Results Ucn-1 administration before ischemia and at the onset of reperfusion, in rat hearts perfused in Langendorff system, fully recovered heart contractility and other hemodynamic parameters. Ucn-1 enhanced cell viability and decreased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in adult cardiac myocytes subjected to simulated I/R. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining indicated that Ucn-1 promoted cell survival and decreased cell necrosis through Epac2 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) and ERK1/2 (extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1/2) activation. We determined that Ucn-1 shifted cell death from necrosis to apoptosis and activated caspases 9 and 3/7. Furthermore, mini-array, RT-qPCR and protein analyses of apoptotic genes showed that Ucn-1 upregulated the expression of CD40lg, Xiap and BAD in cells undergoing I/R, involving Epac2 and ERK1/2 activation. Conclusions Our data indicate that Ucn-1 efficiently protected hearts from I/R damage by increasing the cell survival and stimulated apoptotic genes, CD40lg, Xiap and BAD, overexpression through the activation of Epac2 and ERK1/2. PMID:26840743

  17. Identification of Signaling Pathways by Which CD40 Stimulates Autophagy and Antimicrobial Activity against Toxoplasma gondii in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Elizabeth; Lopez Corcino, Yalitza; Portillo, Jose-Andres C.; Miao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    CD40 is an important stimulator of autophagy and autophagic killing of Toxoplasma gondii in host cells. In contrast to autophagy induced by nutrient deprivation or pattern recognition receptors, less is known about the effects of cell-mediated immunity on Beclin 1 and ULK1, key regulators of autophagy. Here we studied the molecular mechanisms by which CD40 stimulates autophagy in macrophages. CD40 ligation caused biphasic Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. The second phase of JNK phosphorylation was dependent on autocrine production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α and JNK signaling were required for the CD40-induced increase in autophagy. JNK signaling downstream of CD40 caused Ser-87 phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and dissociation between Bcl-2 and Beclin 1, an event known to stimulate the autophagic function of Beclin 1. However, TNF-α alone was unable to stimulate autophagy. CD40 also stimulated autophagy via a pathway that included calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and ULK1. CD40 caused AMPK phosphorylation at its activating site, Thr-172. This effect was mediated by CaMKKβ and was not impaired by neutralization of TNF-α. CD40 triggered AMPK-dependent Ser-555 phosphorylation of ULK1. CaMKKβ, AMPK, and ULK1 were required for CD40-induced increase in autophagy. CD40-mediated autophagic killing of Toxoplasma gondii is known to require TNF-α. Knockdown of JNK, CaMKKβ, AMPK, or ULK1 prevented T. gondii killing in CD40-activated macrophages. The second phase of JNK phosphorylation—Bcl-2 phosphorylation—Bcl-2–Beclin 1 dissociation and AMPK phosphorylation-ULK1 phosphorylation occurred simultaneously at ∼4 h post-CD40 stimulation. Thus, CaMKKβ and TNF-α are upstream molecules by which CD40 acts on ULK1 and Beclin 1 to stimulate autophagy and killing of T. gondii. PMID:27354443

  18. Determination of thromboxane formation, soluble CD40L release and thrombopoietin clearance in apheresis platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Folker; Baertl, Anja; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Zimmermann, Norbert; Weber, Artur Aron; Lorenz, Horst; Giers, Günther

    2012-01-01

    All deleterious changes in platelet morphology, structure and function that occur in platelet concentrates (PC) during storage are titled as the 'platelet storage lesion'. No single in vitro test currently available is sufficient in assessing these changes of platelet quality. The release of soluble CD40 Ligand (sCD40L), the formation of thromboxane (TXB2) and the thrombopoietin (TPO) clearance reflect different aspects of platelet metabolism and activitiy, and were used to examine platelet quality in apheresis platelet products. At days 1, 3 and 5, in single-donor apheresis platelet products (n = 10) under routine storage conditions, sCD40L (measured by ELISA) and TXB2 (measured by RIA) were determined after platelet stimulation (recalcification and clot formation). TPO (measured by ELISA) was determined after an incubation time of 5 h at 37°C with platelet-rich plasma (adjusted initial TPO concentration of about 500 pg/mL). Results were related to a therapeutic unit (TU = 2 × 10(11) platelets). Immediately after platelet preparation, sCD40L release was 41 ± 7.6 ng/TU, TXB2 formation 1688 ± 374 ng/TU and TPO clearance 1.22 ± 0.32 ng/h/TU. At days 1, 3 and 5, sCD40L was reduced to 89 ± 7%, 71 ± 12% and 57 ± 9%, TXB2 release to 91 ± 6%, 74 ± 12% and 58 ± 9% and TPO clearance to 90 ± 15%, 84 ± 5% and 79 ± 10% of the respective control values. In conclusion, in single-donor apheresis PC, sCD40L release and TXB2 formation as well as TPO clearance by the platelets were dependent on storage duration and reduced to about 60% to 80% of the respective control values after a storage period for 5 days. These findings are in line with literature data, indicating that a loss of platelet functionality of about 30% will occur after 5 days of storage.

  19. Developmental and tissue-specific expression of prosaposin mRNA in murine tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.; Witte, D. P.; Grabowski, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Prosaposin is a multifunctional locus in humans and mice that encodes in tandem and in the same reading frame four glycoprotein activators, or saposins, of lysosomal hydrolases. These ubiquitously expressed glycoproteins and the precursor, prosaposin, have been proposed to function in glycosphingolipid catabolic pathways and glycolipid transport. To characterize the temporal and spatial expression of the prosaposin locus, prenatal and postnatal mouse tissues were screened by in situ hybridization with a mouse antisense riboprobe for prosaposin. Prenatally, prosaposin mRNA was expressed differentially in the placenta and prominently in the decidua basalis and capsularis where expression was gestational age dependent. No other region of high-level expression was detectable in the prenatal mouse. In comparison, high-level differential expression of prosaposin was clearly evident postnatally in a variety of organs, including secretory epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, ependymal lining, upper trachea, esophagus, cortical tubules of the kidney, sertoli cells of the testes and epididymis. Discrete localization of prosaposin mRNA expression was also found in neurons of the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, and lateral columns of the spinal cord as well as in hepatocytes of the mature liver. Very high levels of expression were found in specialized tissues including the Harderian glands and macrophages of lymph nodes, lungs, splenic tissue, and thymus. These studies indicate that the expression of the prosaposin locus, a presumed "housekeeping" gene, is under tissue- and cell-specific differential control. The spatial organization of expression suggests a role for this locus in the expression of glycosphingolipid-storage diseases. Images Figure 2 PMID:7992842

  20. Epoc-1: a POU-domain gene expressed in murine epidermal basal cells and thymic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, K; Yasui, T; Yamamoto, A; Shiku, H; Kishimoto, T; Kikutani, H

    1993-11-15

    POU-domain transcription factors are known as developmental regulators which control organ development and cell phenotypes. In order to clarify the roles of POU-domain transcription factors in cell differentiation, we cloned a novel POU family gene, Epoc-1, from a murine thymus cDNA library. The amino acid (aa) sequence of the POU-specific domain of Epoc-1 is almost identical to those of Oct-1 and Oct-2. However, within the POU-homeodomain, 13 out of 60 aa differ between Epoc-1 and Oct-2. Recombinant Epoc-1 products were found to bind specifically to the octamer sequence. Epoc-1 was found to be expressed in skin, thymus, stomach and testis. In situ hybridization experiments and RNase protection assays indicated that Epoc-1 is expressed in the epidermal basal cells of the skin, which contain stem cells unipotent for keratinocyte differentiation and in thymic stromal elements. These results suggest that Epoc-1 might be one of the developmental regulators which controls epidermal development and thymic organogenesis.

  1. A subdose of fluconazole alters the virulence of Cryptococcus gattii during murine cryptococcosis and modulates type I interferon expression.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Bretas Oliveira, Danilo; Santos, Juliana Ribeiro Alves; Carneiro, Hellem Cristina Silva; Ribeiro, Noelly de Queiroz; Oliveira, Lorena Vívien Neves de; Barcellos, Vanessa Abreu; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2017-02-01

    Cryptococcosis is an invasive infection caused by yeast-like fungus of the genera Cryptococcus spp. The antifungal therapy for this disease provides some toxicity and the incidence of infections caused by resistant strains increased. Thus, we aimed to assess the consequences of fluconazole subdoses during the treatment of cryptococcosis in the murine inflammatory response and in the virulence factors of Cryptococcus gattii. Mice infected with Cryptococcus gattii were treated with subdoses of fluconazole. We determined the behavior of mice and type 1 interferon expression during the treatment; we also studied the virulence factors and susceptibility to fluconazole for the colonies recovered from the animals. A subdose of fluconazole prolonged the survival of mice, but the morbidity of cryptococcosis was higher in treated animals. These data were linked to the increase in: (i) fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration, (ii) capsule size and (iii) melanization of C. gattii, which probably led to the increased expression of type I interferons in the brains of mice but not in the lungs. In conclusion, a subdose of fluconazole altered fungal virulence factors and susceptibility to this azole, leading to an altered inflammatory host response and increased morbidity.

  2. PPAR-γ/IL-10 axis inhibits MyD88 expression and ameliorates murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Elisa; Sisti, Flavia; Sônego, Fabiane; Wang, Suojuan; Filgueiras, Luciano Ribeiro; Brandt, Stephanie; Serezani, Ana Paula Moreira; Du, Hong; Cunha, Fernando Q; Alves-Filho, Jose Carlos; Serezani, Carlos Henrique

    2014-03-01

    Polymicrobial sepsis induces organ failure and is accompanied by overwhelming inflammatory response and impairment of microbial killing. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is a nuclear receptor with pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism, inflammation, and cell proliferation. The insulin-sensitizing drugs thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are specific PPAR-γ agonists. TZDs exert anti-inflammatory actions in different disease models, including polymicrobial sepsis. The TZD pioglitazone, which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, improves sepsis outcome; however, the molecular programs that mediate its effect have not been determined. In a murine model of sepsis, we now show that pioglitazone treatment improves microbial clearance and enhances neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. We also observed reduced proinflammatory cytokine production and high IL-10 levels in pioglitazone-treated mice. These effects were associated with a decrease in STAT-1-dependent expression of MyD88 in vivo and in vitro. IL-10R blockage abolished PPAR-γ-mediated inhibition of MyD88 expression. These data demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which pioglitazone protects against polymicrobial sepsis is through the impairment of MyD88 responses. This appears to represent a novel regulatory program. In this regard, pioglitazone provides advantages as a therapeutic tool, because it improves different aspects of host defense during sepsis, ultimately enhancing survival.

  3. Life-spanning murine gene expression profiles in relation to chronological and pathological aging in multiple organs

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Raoul V; van der Hoeven, Tessa V; Wackers, P.F.K.; Robinson, Joke; van der Horst, Gijsbertus TJ; Dollé, Martijn ET; Vijg, Jan; Breit, Timo M; Hoeijmakers, Jan HJ; van Steeg, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aging and age-related pathology is a result of a still incompletely-understood intricate web of molecular and cellular processes. We present a C57BL/6J female mice in vivo aging study of five organs (liver, kidney, spleen, lung and brain), in which we compare genome-wide gene expression profiles during chronological aging with pathological changes throughout the entire murine lifespan (13, 26, 52, 78, 104 and 130 weeks). Relating gene expression changes to chronological aging revealed many differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and altered gene-sets (AGSs) were found in most organs, indicative of intra-organ generic aging processes. However, only ≤ 1% of these DEGs are found in all organs. For each organ, at least one of 18 tested pathological parameters showed a good age-predictive value, albeit with much inter- and intra-individual (organ) variation. Relating gene expression changes to pathology-related aging revealed correlated genes and gene-sets, which made it possible to characterize the difference between biological and chronological aging. In liver, kidney and brain, a limited number of overlapping pathology-related AGSs were found. Immune responses appeared to be common, yet the changes were specific in most organs. Furthermore, changes were observed in energy homeostasis, reactive oxygen species, cell cycle, cell motility and DNA damage. Comparison of chronological and pathology-related AGSs revealed substantial overlap and interesting differences. For example, the presence of immune processes in liver pathology-related AGSs which were not detected in chronological aging. The many cellular processes that are only found employing aging–related pathology could provide important new insights into the progress of aging. PMID:23795901

  4. Immunodominant liver-specific expression suppresses transgene-directed immune responses in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R; Clay, Timothy M; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2012-05-01

    Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression might best

  5. Immunodominant Liver-Specific Expression Suppresses Transgene-Directed Immune Responses in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Sun, Baodong; Osada, Takuya; Rodriguiz, Ramona; Yang, Xiao Yi; Luo, Xiaoyan; Kemper, Alex R.; Clay, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression

  6. Autocrine TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation is a determinant for evasion of CD40-induced cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Daoxia; Zhong, Yingjia; Zhou, Yuqiong; Sun, Hong; Zheng, Xuelian; Zhao, Chen; Yan, Youyi; Lin, Yong; Liao, Linchuan; Wang, Xia

    2013-07-05

    Activation of CD40 by CD40L results in diverse effects on different malignant cells, causing either promotion of survival, growth and resistance to chemotherapy, or induction of cytostasis and apoptosis. The molecular mechanisms underlying CD40-mediated growth regulation and apoptosis induction in cancer cell are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of NF-κB activation in CD40-mediated cytotoxicity in cancer cells. The results show that activation of CD40 by recombinant soluble CD40 ligand (rsCD40L) readily induced NF-κB activation and blocking NF-κB significantly enhanced rsCD40L-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Importantly, autocrine of TNF-α induced by rsCD40L was indispensable for both NF-κB activation and cytotoxicity induction, establishing a dual role of autocrine TNF-α that constitutes both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic arms of CD40 signaling. Our results indicate that autocrine TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation is a determinant for cancer cells' evasion of CD40L-induced cytotoxicity and blocking NF-κB may have potential for improve the value of CD40 as an anticancer agent.

  7. TGF-β1 Upregulates the Expression of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 in Murine Lungs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Liang; Chen, Rui-Qi; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Ran, Wen-Zhuo; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-07

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) increases the expression of TGF-β family genes, which are known as profibrogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we determined whether TGF-β1 regulated the expression of TREM-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. The expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1 was increased on day 7, 14, and 21 after single intratracheal injection of bleomycin (BLM). And there was positive correlation between the expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1. TGF-β1 increased expression of TREM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. The expression of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) was increased in lung tissues from mouse after BLM injection and in mouse macrophages after TGF-β1 treatment, respectively. TGF-β1 significantly increased the relative activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with plasmid contenting wild type-promoter of TREM-1. But TGF-β1 had no effect on the activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with a mutant-TREM1 plasmid carrying mutations in the AP-1 promoter binding site. In conclusion, we found the expression of TREM-1 was increased in lung tissues from mice with pulmonary fibrosis. TGF-β1 increased the expression of TREM-1 in mouse macrophages partly via the transcription factor AP-1.

  8. Update on CD40 and CD154 blockade in transplant models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianshu; Pierson, Richard N; Azimzadeh, Agnes M

    2015-01-01

    Generation of an effective immune response against foreign antigens requires two distinct molecular signals: a primary signal provided by the binding of antigen-specific T-cell receptor to peptide-MHC on antigen-presenting cells and a secondary signal delivered via the engagement of costimulatory molecules. Among various costimulatory signaling pathways, the interactions between CD40 and its ligand CD154 have been extensively investigated given their essential roles in the modulation of adaptive immunity. Here, we review current understanding of the role CD40/CD154 costimulation pathway has in alloimmunity, and summarize recent mechanistic and preclinical advances in the evaluation of candidate therapeutic approaches to target this receptor-ligand pair in transplantation. PMID:26268734

  9. Inhibition of c-myc expression induces apoptosis of WEHI 231 murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M; Arsura, M; Bellas, R E; FitzGerald, M J; Lee, H; Schauer, S L; Sherr, D H; Sonenshein, G E

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of WEHI 231 immature B-lymphoma cells with an antibody against their surface immunoglobulin (anti-Ig) induces apoptosis and has been studied extensively as a model of B-cell tolerance. Anti-Ig treatment of exponentially growing WEHI 231 cells results in an early transient increase in c-myc expression that is followed by a decline to below basal levels; this decrease in c-myc expression immediately precedes the induction of cell death. Here we have modulated NF-kappaB/Rel factor activity, which regulates the rate of c-myc gene transcription, to determine whether the increase or decrease in c-Myc-levels mediates apoptosis in WEHI 231 cells. Addition of the serine/threonine protease inhibitor N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), which blocks the normally rapid turnover of the specific inhibitor of NF-kappaB/Rel IkappaBalpha in these cells, caused a drop in Rel-related factor binding. TPCK treatment resulted in decreased c-myc expression, preventing the usual increase seen following anti-Ig treatment. Whereas inhibition of the induction of c-myc expression mediated by anti-Ig failed to block apoptosis, reduction of c-myc expression in exponentially growing WEHI 231 cells induced apoptosis even in the absence of anti-Ig treatment. In WEHI 231 clones ectopically expressing c-Myc, apoptosis induced by treatment with TPCK or anti-Ig was significantly diminished and cells continued to proliferate. Furthermore, apoptosis of WEHI 231 cells ensued following enhanced expression of Mad1, which has been found to reduce functional c-Myc levels. These results indicate that the decline in c-myc expression resulting from the drop in NF-kappaB/Rel binding leads to activation of apoptosis of WEHI 231 B cells. PMID:8756660

  10. Localization of PPARdelta in murine central nervous system: expression in oligodendrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Woods, John W; Tanen, Michael; Figueroa, David J; Biswas, Chhabi; Zycband, Emanuel; Moller, David E; Austin, Christopher P; Berger, Joel P

    2003-06-13

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), PPARdelta, PPARgamma and PPARalpha, comprise a subclass of the supergene family of nuclear receptors. As such they are ligand-regulated transcription factors whose major effects are mediated by altering expression of target genes. PPARdelta has been shown to be ubiquitously expressed in mammals. However, its primary biological role(s) has yet to be defined. Several recent studies have demonstrated that PPARdelta is the most highly expressed PPAR isoform in the central nervous system, but ambiguity still exists as to the specific brain sub-regions and cells in which it is expressed. Here, utilizing novel, isoform-selective PPARdelta riboprobes and an anti-peptide antibody, we performed a series of in situ hybridization and immunolocalization studies to determine the distribution of PPARdelta in the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. We found that PPARdelta mRNA and protein is expressed throughout the brain, with particularly high levels in the entorhinal cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus, and lower levels in the corpus callosum and caudate putamen. At the cellular level, PPARdelta mRNA and protein were found to be expressed in oligodendrocytes and neurons but not astrocytes. Such results suggest a role for PPARdelta in both myelination and neuronal functioning within the CNS.

  11. Functional up-regulation of KCNA gene family expression in murine mesenteric resistance artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, S J; Cheong, A; Flemming, R; Mair, L; Sivaprasadarao, A; Beech, D J

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on the hypothesis that KCNA genes (which encode KVα1 voltage-gated K+ channels) have enhanced functional expression in smooth muscle cells of a primary determinant of peripheral resistance – the small mesenteric artery. Real-time PCR methodology was developed to measure cell type-specific in situ gene expression. Profiles were determined for arterial myocyte expression of RNA species encoding KVα1 subunits as well as KVβ1, KVα2.1, KVγ9.3, BKCaα1 and BKCaβ1. The seven major KCNA genes were expressed and more readily detected in endothelium-denuded mesenteric resistance artery compared with thoracic aorta; quantification revealed dramatic differential expression of one to two orders of magnitude. There was also four times more RNA encoding KVα2.1 but less or similar amounts encoding KVβ1, KVγ9.3, BKCaα1 and BKCaβ1. Patch-clamp recordings from freshly isolated smooth muscle cells revealed dominant KVα1 K+ current and current density twice as large in mesenteric cells. Therefore, we suggest the increased RNA production of the resistance artery impacts on physiological function, although there is quantitatively less K+ current than might be expected. The mechanism conferring up-regulated expression of KCNA genes may be common to all the gene family and play a functional role in the physiological control of blood pressure. PMID:14742730

  12. Pluripotency Factors and Polycomb Group Proteins Repress Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Expression in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Chia-I; Wang, Qin; Fan, Yunxia; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development. PMID:24316986

  13. Stimulation through CD40 and TLR-4 Is an Effective Host Directed Therapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Pahari, Susanta; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Aqdas, Mohammad; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among all infectious diseases. Failure of Bacillus Calmette Guerin as a vaccine and serious side-effects and toxicity due to long-term TB drug regime are the major hurdles associated with TB control. The problem is further compounded by the emergence of drug-resistance strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Consequently, it demands a serious attempt to explore safer and superior treatment approaches. Recently, an improved understanding of host–pathogen interaction has opened up new avenues for immunotherapy for treating TB. Although, dendritic cells (DCs) show a profound role in generating immunity against Mtb, their immunotherapeutic potential needs to be precisely investigated in controlling TB. Here, we have devised an approach of bolstering DCs efficacy against Mtb by delivering signals through CD40 and TLR-4 molecules. We found that DCs triggered through CD40 and TLR-4 showed increased secretion of IL-12, IL-6, and TNF-α. It also augmented autophagy. Interestingly, CD40 and TLR-4 stimulation along with the suboptimal dose of anti-TB drugs significantly fortified their efficacy to kill Mtb. Importantly, animals treated with the agonists of CD40 and TLR-4 boosted Th1 and Th17 immunity. Furthermore, it amplified the pool of memory CD4 T cells as well as CD8 T cells. Furthermore, substantial reduction in the bacterial burden in the lungs was observed. Notably, this adjunct therapy employing immunomodulators and chemotherapy can reinvigorate host immunity suppressed due to drugs and Mtb. Moreover, it would strengthen the potency of drugs in curing TB. PMID:27729911

  14. Fibrillar organization of fibronectin is expressed coordinately with cell surface gangliosides in a variant murine fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    NCTC 2071A cells, a line of transformed murine fibroblasts, grow in serum-free medium, are deficient in gangliosides, synthesize fibronectin, but do not retain and organize it on the cell surface. When the cells are exposed to exogenous gangliosides, fibrillar strands of fibronectin become attached to the cell surface. A morphologically distinct variant of NCTC 2071A cells was observed to both retain cell surface fibronectin and organize it into a fibrillar network when the cells were stained with anti-fibronectin antibodies and a fluorescent second antibody. A revertant cell type appeared to resemble the parental NCTC 2071A cells in terms of morphology and fibronectin organization. All three cell types were subjected to mild NaIO4 oxidation and reduction with KB3H4 of very high specific radioactivity in order to label the sialic acid residues of surface gangliosides. The variant had much more surface gangliosides than the parental, particularly more complex gangliosides corresponding to GM1 and GD1a. The surface gangliosides of the revertant were intermediate between the parental and the variant. By using sialidase, which hydrolyzes GD1a to GM1, and 125I-labeled cholera toxin, which binds specifically to GM1, the identity and levels of these gangliosides were confirmed in the three cell types. When variant cells were exposed to sialidase for 2 d, there appeared to be little change in fibronectin organization. Concomitant treatment of the cells with the B subunit of cholera toxin, which bound to all the surface GM1 including that generated by the sialidase, however, eliminated the fibrillar network of fibronectin. In addition, exposure of the variant cells to a 70,000-mol-wt fragment of fibronectin, which lacks the cell attachment domain but contains a matrix assembly domain, inhibited the formation of fibers. Finally, all three cell types were assayed for their ability to attach to and spread on fibronectin-coated surfaces; no significant differences were found

  15. Coxsackievirus Expression of the Murine Secretory Protein Interleukin-4 Induces Increased Synthesis of Immunoglobulin G1 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Nora M.; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Tracy, Steven; Jackson, John; Höfling, Katja; Leser, J. Smith; Malone, James; Kolbeck, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We cloned the sequence encoding murine interleukin-4 (mIL-4), including the secretory signal, into the genome of CVB3/0, an artificially attenuated strain of coxsackievirus B3, at the junction of the capsid protein 1D and the viral protease 2Apro. Two strains of chimeric CVB3 were constructed using, in one case, identical sequences to encode 2Apro cleavage sites (CVB3/0-mIL4/47) on either side of the inserted coding sequence and, in the other case, nonidentical sequences that varied at the nucleotide level without changing the amino acid sequences (CVB3-PL2-mIL4/46). Transfection of HeLa cells yielded progeny viruses that replicated with rates similar to that of the parental CVB3/0 strain, although yields of mIL-4-expressing strains were approximately 10-fold lower than those of the parental virus. Western blot analysis of viral proteins isolated from HeLa cells inoculated with either strain of chimeric virus demonstrated that the chimeric viruses synthesized capsid protein 1D at approximately twofold-higher levels than the parental virus. mIL-4 protein was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in HeLa cells inoculated with either strain of chimeric virus. Lysates of HeLa cells inoculated with either chimeric virus induced the proliferation of the mIL-4-requiring murine MC-9 cell line, demonstrating biological activity of the CVB3-expressed mIL-4. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis of viral RNA derived from sequential passaging of CVB3/0-mIL4/47 in HeLa cells demonstrated deletion of the mIL-4 coding sequence occurring by the fourth passage, while similar analysis of CVB3-PL2-mIL4/46 RNA demonstrated detection of the mIL-4 coding sequence in the virus population through 10 generations in HeLa cells. mIL-4 protein levels determined by ELISA were consistent with the stability and loss data determined by RT-PCR analysis of the passaged viral genomes. Studies of insert stability of CVB3-PL2-mIL4/46 during replication in mice showed the presence of

  16. Alterations in Gene Expression and DNA Methylation during Murine and Human Lung Alveolar Septation

    PubMed Central

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K.; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  17. In Vitro Immune Toxicity of Depleted Uranium: Effects on Murine Macrophages, CD4+ T Cells, and Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bin; Fleming, James T.; Schultz, Terry W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a by-product of the uranium enrichment process and shares chemical properties with natural and enriched uranium. To investigate the toxic effects of environmental DU exposure on the immune system, we examined the influences of DU (in the form of uranyl nitrate) on viability and immune function as well as cytokine gene expression in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenic CD4+ T cells. Macrophages and CD4+ T cells were exposed to various concentrations of DU, and cell death via apoptosis and necrosis was analyzed using annexin-V/propidium iodide assay. DU cytotoxicity in both cell types was concentration dependent, with macrophage apoptosis and necrosis occurring within 24 hr at 100 μM DU exposure, whereas CD4+ T cells underwent cell death at 500 μM DU exposure. Noncytotoxic concentrations for macrophages and CD4+ T cells were determined as 50 and 100 μM, respectively. Lymphoproliferation analysis indicated that macrophage accessory cell function was altered with 200 μM DU after exposure times as short as 2 hr. Microarray and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that DU alters gene expression patterns in both cell types. The most differentially expressed genes were related to signal transduction, such as c-jun, NF-κ Bp65, neurotrophic factors (e.g., Mdk), chemokine and chemokine receptors (e.g., TECK/CCL25), and interleukins such as IL-10 and IL-5, indicating a possible involvement of DU in cancer development, autoimmune diseases, and T helper 2 polarization of T cells. The results are a first step in identifying molecular targets for the toxicity of DU and the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the immune modulation ability of DU. PMID:16393663

  18. Dissociation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible gene expression in murine macrophages pretreated with smooth LPS versus monophosphoryl lipid A.

    PubMed Central

    Henricson, B E; Manthey, C L; Perera, P Y; Hamilton, T A; Vogel, S N

    1993-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the nontoxic derivative of lipid A, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), were employed to assess the relationship between expression of LPS-inducible inflammatory genes and the induction of tolerance to LPS in murine macrophages. Both LPS and MPL induced expression (as assessed by increased steady-state mRNA levels) of a panel of seven "early" inflammatory genes including the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta, type 2 TNF receptor (TNFR-2), IP-10, D3, D8, and D2 genes (the last four represent LPS-inducible early genes whose functions remain unknown). In addition, LPS and MPL were both capable of inducing tolerance to LPS. The two stimuli differed in the relative concentration required to induce various outcome measures, with LPS being 100- to 1,000-fold more potent on a mass concentration basis. Characterization of the tolerant state identified three distinct categories of responsiveness. Two genes (IP-10 and D8) exhibited strong desensitization in macrophages pretreated with tolerance-inducing concentrations of either LPS or MPL. In macrophages rendered tolerant by pretreatment with LPS or MPL, a second group of inducible mRNAs (TNF-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and D3) showed moderate suppression of response to secondary stimulation by LPS. The third category of inducible genes (TNFR-2 and D2) showed increased expression in macrophages pretreated with tolerance-inducing concentrations of either LPS or MPL. All of the LPS-inducible genes examined exhibited modest superinduction with less than tolerance-inducing concentrations of either stimulus, suggesting a priming effect of these adjuvants at low concentration. The differential behavior of the members of this panel of endotoxin-responsive genes thus offers insight into molecular events associated with acquisition of transient tolerance to LPS. PMID:8388859

  19. The alternative sigma factor B modulates virulence gene expression in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model but does not influence kidney gene expression pattern of the host.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Burian, Marc; Schäfer, Tina; Bröker, Barbara M; Ohlsen, Knut; Völker, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and are an increasing threat not only in hospital settings. The expression of the staphylococcal virulence factor repertoire is known to be affected by the alternative sigma factor B (SigB). However, its impact during infection still is a matter of debate. Kidney tissues of controls or mice infected with S. aureus HG001 or its isogenic sigB mutant were analyzed by transcriptome profiling to monitor the host response, and additionally expression of selected S. aureus genes was monitored by RT-qPCR. Direct transcript analysis by RT-qPCR revealed significant SigB activity in all mice infected with the wild-type strain, but not in its isogenic sigB mutant (p<0.0001). Despite a clear-cut difference in the SigB-dependent transcription pattern of virulence genes (clfA, aur, and hla), the host reaction to infection (either wild type or sigB mutant) was almost identical. Despite its significant activity in vivo, loss of SigB did neither have an effect on the outcome of infection nor on murine kidney gene expression pattern. Thus, these data support the role of SigB as virulence modulator rather than being a virulence determinant by itself.

  20. Expression of human. alpha. -globin and mouse/human hybrid. beta. -globin genes in murine hemopoietic stem cells transduced by recombinant retroviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.L.; Dwarki, V.J.; Verma, I.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Murine cell lines releasing helper-free recombinant retroviruses containing human {alpha}-globin and mouse/human hybrid {beta}-globin genes were generated. The expression of the hybrid {beta}-globin gene but not the human {alpha}-globin gene was regulated appropriately in infected mouse erythroid leukemia (MEL) cells. Murine bone marrow cells were infected by coculture with virus-producing cells and transplanted into lethally irradiated syngeneic recipients. Greater than 90% of the spleen colonies (12-15 days), which are derived from hemopoietic multipotential stem cells, showed proviral integration. Various levels of expression of the transduced globin genes were detected in all of the provirus-positive spleen colonies. Proviral sequences and transcripts from the transduced globin genes could also be detected in a few long-term reconstituted recipients in an observation period of 10 months after transplantation.

  1. Domain structure of the Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase: mutational analysis and separate expression of the DNA polymerase and RNase H activities.

    PubMed Central

    Tanese, N; Goff, S P

    1988-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase of Moloney murine leukemia virus, like that of all retroviruses, exhibits a DNA polymerase activity capable of synthesis on RNA or DNA templates and an RNase H activity with specificity for RNA in the form of an RNA.DNA hybrid. We have generated a library of linker insertion mutants of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enzyme expressed in bacteria and assayed these mutants for both enzymatic activities. Those mutations affecting the DNA polymerase activity were clustered in the 5'-proximal two-thirds of the gene, and those affecting RNase H were in the remaining 3' one-third. Based on these maps, plasmids were made that expressed each one of the domains separately; assays of the proteins encoded by these plasmids showed that each domain exhibited only the expected activity. Images PMID:2450347

  2. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression is upregulated in autoimmune murine lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Wuthrich, R. P.; Jevnikar, A. M.; Takei, F.; Glimcher, L. H.; Kelley, V. E.

    1990-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a cell-surface protein regulating interactions among immune cells. To determine whether altered expression of ICAM-1 occurs in autoimmune lupus nephritis, we studied ICAM-1 expression in kidneys of normal and autoimmune MRL-lpr and (NZBX NZW)F1 (NZB/W) mice. By immunoperoxidase staining, ICAM-1 is constitutively expressed at low levels in proximal tubules (PT), endothelium and interstitial cells in normal C3H/FeJ mice. In nephritic MRL-lpr and NZB/W kidneys, staining for ICAM-1 is increased in the PT, particularly in the brush border, and is prominent in the glomerular mesangium and the endothelium of large vessels. By Western blot analysis, ICAM-1 is not detected in the urine of normal BALB/c and C3H/FeJ or autoimmune MRL-lpr. By Northern blot analysis, nephritic MRL-lpr and NZB/W have a two- to fivefold increase in steady state levels of ICAM-1 transcripts in the kidney as compared with normal or prenephritic mice. This is paralleled by an increase in MHC class II transcripts. In cultured PT cells, ICAM-1 is expressed at basal levels in PT and is increased by the cytokines interferon-gamma, IL-1 alpha, and TNF-alpha. Thus cytokine-mediated upregulation of ICAM-1 in lupus nephritis may promote interaction of immune cells with renal tissue. The predominant apical expression of ICAM-1 opposite to the basolateral Ia expression suggests a novel role for this adhesion molecule in PT. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1968316

  3. Estradiol antagonism of glucocorticoid-induced GILZ expression in human uterine epithelial cells and murine uterus.

    PubMed

    Whirledge, Shannon; Cidlowski, John A

    2013-01-01

    Sex hormone signaling regulates a variety of functions in the uterine endometrium essential for embryo implantation and immunity. Epithelial cells of the uterine endometrium are the target of the coordinated actions of estradiol (E(2)) and progesterone. However, little information exists regarding the interplay of estrogens with glucocorticoids in this tissue. Using the human uterine epithelial cell line ECC1, E(2) was found to antagonize induction of the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) gene expression, which is associated with several of the immune-related functions of glucocorticoids. Interestingly, E(2) antagonizes glucocorticoid regulated nascent RNA GILZ expression within 1 h of hormone treatment. Repression of glucocorticoid-induced GILZ expression requires the estrogen receptor (ER), because both treatment with the ER-antagonist ICI 182,780 and small interfering RNA knockdown of ERα block E(2)'s ability to repress GILZ gene expression. Antagonism of glucocorticoid-induced GILZ expression may not be unique to ERα, as the ERβ agonist Liquiritigenin is also able to antagonize glucocorticoid signaling. Transcriptional regulation appears to be at the level of promoter binding. Both the glucocorticoid receptor and ERα are recruited to regions of the GILZ promoter containing glucocorticoid response elements and the transcriptional start site. Glucocorticoid receptor binding to these regions in the presence of dexamethasone decreases with E(2) treatment. GILZ gene expression was also found to be repressed in the whole mouse uterus treated with a combination of dexamethasone and E(2). Regulation of the antiinflammatory gene GILZ by glucocorticoids and E(2) suggests cross talk between the immune modulating functions of glucocorticoids and the reproductive actions of estradiol signaling.

  4. Pax8, a murine paired box gene expressed in the developing excretory system and thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Plachov, D; Chowdhury, K; Walther, C; Simon, D; Guenet, J L; Gruss, P

    1990-10-01

    Several mouse genes designated 'Pax genes' contain a highly conserved DNA sequence homologous to the paired box of Drosophila. Here we describe the isolation of Pax8, a novel paired box containing clone from an 8.5 day p.c. mouse embryo cDNA library. An open reading frame of 457 amino acids (aa) contains the 128 aa paired domain near the amino terminus. Another conserved region present in some other paired box genes, the octapeptide Tyr-Ser-Ile-Asn-Gly-Leu-Leu-Gly, is located 43 aa C-terminal to the paired domain. Using an interspecies backcross system, we have mapped the Pax8 gene within the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 2 in a close linkage to the surf locus. Several developmental mutations are located in this region. In situ hybridization was used to determine the pattern of Pax8 expression during mouse embryogenesis. Pax8 is expressed transiently between 11.5 and 12.5 days of gestation along the rostrocaudal axis extending from the myelencephalon throughout the length of the neural tube, predominantly in two parallel regions on either side of the basal plate. We also detected Pax8 expression in the developing thyroid gland beginning at 10.5 days of gestation, during the thyroid evagination. In the mesonephros and metanephros the expression of Pax8 was localized to the mesenchymal condensations, which are induced by the nephric duct and ureter, respectively. These condensations develop to functional units, the nephrons, of the kidney. These data are consistent with a role for Pax8 in the induction of kidney epithelium. The embryonic expression pattern of Pax8 is compared with that of Pax2, another recently described paired box gene expressed in the developing excretory system.

  5. Analysis of Human TAAR8 and Murine Taar8b Mediated Signaling Pathways and Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Mühlhaus, Jessica; Dinter, Juliane; Nürnberg, Daniela; Rehders, Maren; Depke, Maren; Golchert, Janine; Homuth, Georg; Yi, Chun-Xia; Morin, Silke; Köhrle, Josef; Brix, Klaudia; Tschöp, Matthias; Kleinau, Gunnar; Biebermann, Heike

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid hormone derivative 3-iodothyronamine (3-T1AM) exerts metabolic effects in vivo that contradict known effects of thyroid hormones. 3-T1AM acts as a trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) agonist and activates Gs signaling in vitro. Interestingly, 3-T1AM-meditated in vivo effects persist in Taar1 knockout-mice indicating that further targets of 3-T1AM might exist. Here, we investigated another member of the TAAR family, the only scarcely studied mouse and human trace-amine-associated receptor 8 (Taar8b, TAAR8). By RT-qPCR and locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) in situ hybridization, Taar8b expression in different mouse tissues was analyzed. Functionally, we characterized TAAR8 and Taar8b with regard to cell surface expression and signaling via different G-protein-mediated pathways. Cell surface expression was verified by ELISA, and cAMP accumulation was quantified by AlphaScreen for detection of Gs and/or Gi/o signaling. Activation of G-proteins Gq/11 and G12/13 was analyzed by reporter gene assays. Expression analyses revealed at most marginal Taar8b expression and no gender differences for almost all analyzed tissues. In heart, LNA-in situ hybridization demonstrated the absence of Taar8b expression. We could not identify 3-T1AM as a ligand for TAAR8 and Taar8b, but both receptors were characterized by a basal Gi/o signaling activity, a so far unknown signaling pathway for TAARs. PMID:25391046

  6. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy.

    PubMed

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-12-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression.

  7. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression. PMID:17222216

  8. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Murine Gene Expression in Skin and Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Alwood, Joshua; Tahimic, Candice; Sowa, Marianne B.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2017-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight causes a negative calcium balance and reduces bone density in astronauts. The potential for exposure to space radiation to contribute to lasting decrements in bone mass is not yet understood. Sustained changes to bone mass have a relatively long latency for development, however skin is a radiation sensitive organ and changes in skin gene expression may serve as an early radiation biomarker of exposures and may correlate with adverse effects on skeletal tissue. Previous studies have shown that FGF18 gene expression levels of hair follicles collected from astronauts on the ISS rose over time. In the hair follicle, FGF18 signaling mediates radioresistance in the telogen by arresting the cell cycle, and FGF18 has the potential to function as a radioprotector. In bone, FGF18 appears to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation positively during osteogenesis and negatively during chondrogenesis. Cellular defense responses to radiation are shared by a variety of organs, hence in this study, we examined whether radiation induced gene expression changes in skin may be predictive of the responses of skeletal tissue to radiation exposure. We have examined oxidative stress and growth arrest pathways in mouse skin and long bones by measuring gene expression levels via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) after exposure to total body irradiation (TBI). To investigate the effects of irradiation on gene expression, we used skin and femora (cortical shaft) from the following treatment groups: control (normally loaded, sham-irradiated), and TBI (0.5 Gy Fe-56 600 MeV/n and 0.5 Gy H-1 150 MeV/n). Animals were euthanized one and 11 days post-IR. Statistical analysis was performed via a Student's ttest. In skin samples one day after IR, skin expression of FGF18 was significantly greater (3.8X) than sham-irradiated controls (3.8X), but did not differ 11 days post TBI. Expression levels of other radiation related genes (Nfe2l2, Trp53, Cdkn1a, FoxO3

  9. HNF4alpha and NF-E2 are key transcriptional regulators of the murine Abcc6 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Douet, Vanessa; VanWart, Christopher M; Heller, Matthew B; Reinhard, Sabrina; Le Saux, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in an ABC transporter gene called ABCC6 are responsible for pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a rare heritable disease characterized by elastic fiber calcification in skin, ocular and vascular tissues. The presumed function of this ABC transporter is to export metabolites from polarized cells. However, the endogenous substrate(s) are unknown and the exact relationship with elastic fibers is unclear. As ABCC6 is only expressed at high level in liver and kidneys, tissues seemingly unrelated to the PXE phenotype, we explored the transcriptional regulation of the murine Abcc6 gene to define the transcriptional signal conferring tissue specificity and to gather clues on its possible biological function. We cloned 2.9 kb of the mAbcc6 5'-flanking region and several deletion constructs linked to a luciferase reporter gene. We delineated a proximal promoter and a liver-specific enhancer region. We also demonstrated that the proximal region is a TATA-less promoter requiring an intact CCAAT-box and Sp1 binding for its basal activity. By using reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitations, we showed that HNF4alpha and surprisingly, NF-E2, enhanced the mAbcc6 promoter activity. The involvement of both HNF4alpha and NF-E2 in the mAbcc6 gene regulation suggests that Abcc6 might be involved in a detoxification processes related to hemoglobin or heme.

  10. ALDH Enzyme Expression Is Independent of the Spermatogenic Cycle, and Their Inhibition Causes Misregulation of Murine Spermatogenic Processes1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Travis; Arnold, Samuel L.; Fasnacht, Rachael; Rowsey, Ross; Mitchell, Debra; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Isoherranen, Nina; Griswold, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations in the vitamin A metabolism pathway could be a significant cause of male infertility, as well as a target toward the development of a male contraceptive, necessitating the need for a better understanding of how testicular retinoic acid (RA) concentrations are regulated. Quantitative analyses have recently demonstrated that RA is present in a pulsatile manner along testis tubules. However, it is unclear if the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes, which are responsible for RA synthesis, contribute to the regulation of these RA concentration gradients. Previous studies have alluded to fluctuations in ALDH enzymes across the spermatogenic cycle, but these inferences have been based primarily on qualitative transcript localization experiments. Here, we show via various quantitative methods that the three well-known ALDH enzymes (ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3), and an ALDH enzyme previously unreported in the murine testis (ALDH8A1), are not expressed in a stage-specific manner in the adult testis, but do fluctuate throughout juvenile development in perfect agreement with the first appearance of each advancing germ cell type. We also show, via treatments with a known ALDH inhibitor, that lowered testicular RA levels result in an increase in blood-testis barrier permeability, meiotic recombination, and meiotic defects. Taken together, these data further our understanding of the complex regulatory actions of RA on various spermatogenic events and, in contrast with previous studies, also suggest that the ALDH enzymes are not responsible for regulating the recently measured RA pulse. PMID:26632609

  11. Expression of TCR-Vβ peptides by murine bone marrow cells does not identify T-cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Janice L; Karsunky, Holger; Serwold, Thomas; Papathanasiou, Peter; Weissman, Irving L; O'Neill, Helen C

    2015-08-01

    Germline transcription has been described for both immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, raising questions of their functional significance during haematopoiesis. Previously, an immature murine T-cell line was shown to bind antibody to TCR-Vβ8.2 in absence of anti-Cβ antibody binding, and an equivalent cell subset was also identified in the mesenteric lymph node. Here, we investigate whether germline transcription and cell surface Vβ8.2 expression could therefore represent a potential marker of T-cell progenitors. Cells with the TCR phenotype of Vβ8.2(+) Cβ(-) are found in several lymphoid sites, and among the lineage-negative (Lin(-)) fraction of hematopoietic progenitors in bone marrow (BM). Cell surface marker analysis of these cells identified subsets reflecting common lymphoid progenitors, common myeloid progenitors and multipotential progenitors. To assess whether the Lin(-) Vβ8.2(+) Cβ(-) BM subset contains hematopoietic progenitors, cells were sorted and adoptively transferred into sub-lethally irradiated recipients. No T-cell or myeloid progeny were detected following introduction of cells via the intrathymic or intravenous routes. However, B-cell development was detected in spleen. This pattern of restricted in vivo reconstitution disputes Lin(-) Vβ8.2(+) Cβ(-) BM cells as committed T-cell progenitors, but raises the possibility of progenitors with potential for B-cell development.

  12. Transgenic tomato expressing interleukin-12 has a therapeutic effect in a murine model of progressive pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Elías-López, A L; Marquina, B; Gutiérrez-Ortega, A; Aguilar, D; Gomez-Lim, M; Hernández-Pando, R

    2008-10-01

    Host control of mycobacterial infection, in both human and mouse models, has been shown to be associated with the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma by CD4(+) T cells. Interleukin (IL)-12 is known to be a crucial cytokine in the differentiation of IFN-gamma-producing T helper 1 (Th1) cells. To determine whether continuous administration of IL-12 expressed in transgenic tomato (TT-IL-12) has therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary tuberculosis, BALB/c mice were infected with either Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain or a multi-drug-resistant clinical isolate (MDR) and treated with a daily oral dose of TT-IL12 crude fruit extracts. For the early H37Rv infection, TT-IL-12 administration was started 1 day before infection and continued for 60 days. In the H37Rv or MDR late infection, treatment was started 60 days after infection and continued for another 60 days. In both phases of infection, TT-IL-12 administration resulted in a reduction of bacterial loads and tissue damage compared with wild-type tomato (non-TT). The Th1 response was increased and the Th2 response was reduced. In the late infection, a long-term treatment with TT-IL-12 was necessary. We demonstrate that TT-IL-12 increases resistance to infection and reduces lung tissue damage during early and late drug-sensitive and drug-resistant mycobacterial infection.

  13. Structure of murine enterokinase (enteropeptidase) and expression in small intestine during development.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Zheng, X; Lu, D; Rubin, D C; Pung, C Y; Sadler, J E

    1998-02-01

    Enterokinase (enteropeptidase) is expressed only in proximal small intestine, where it initiates digestive enzyme activation by converting trypsinogen into trypsin. To investigate this restricted expression pattern, mouse enterokinase cDNA was cloned, and the distribution of enterokinase mRNA and enzymatic activity were determined in adult mice and during gestation. Analysis of enterokinase sequences showed that a mucinlike domain near the NH2 terminus is composed of repeated approximately 15-amino acid Ser/Thr-rich motifs. By Northern blotting and trypsinogen activation assays, enterokinase mRNA and enzymatic activity were undetectable in stomach, abundant in duodenum, and decreased distally until they were undetectable in midjejunum, ileum, and colon. By in situ mRNA hybridization, enterokinase mRNA was localized to the enterocytes throughout the villus. Expression was not observed in goblet cells, Paneth cells, or Brunner's glands. Enterokinase mRNA and enzymatic activity were not detected in the duodenum of fetal mice but were easily detected in the duodenum on postnatal days 2-6. Both enterokinase mRNA and enzymatic activity decreased to very low levels after day 7 but increased after weaning and reached a high level characteristic of adult life by day 60. Therefore, in mice, duodenal enterocytes are the major type of cells expressing enterokinase, which appears to be regulated at the level of mRNA abundance.

  14. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Cultured Murine Muscle Cells Reproduces Gene Expression Changes of Trained Mouse Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Nathalie; Arnold, Anne-Sophie; Item, Flurin; Summermatter, Serge; Brochmann Santana Santos, Gesa; Christe, Martine; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco; Handschin, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Adequate levels of physical activity are at the center of a healthy lifestyle. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate the beneficial effects of exercise remain enigmatic. This gap in knowledge is caused by the lack of an amenable experimental model system. Therefore, we optimized electric pulse stimulation of muscle cells to closely recapitulate the plastic changes in gene expression observed in a trained skeletal muscle. The exact experimental conditions were established using the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) as a marker for an endurance-trained muscle fiber. We subsequently compared the changes in the relative expression of metabolic and myofibrillar genes in the muscle cell system with those observed in mouse muscle in vivo following either an acute or repeated bouts of treadmill exercise. Importantly, in electrically stimulated C2C12 mouse muscle cells, the qualitative transcriptional adaptations were almost identical to those in trained muscle, but differ from the acute effects of exercise on muscle gene expression. In addition, significant alterations in the expression of myofibrillar proteins indicate that this stimulation could be used to modulate the fiber-type of muscle cells in culture. Our data thus describe an experimental cell culture model for the study of at least some of the transcriptional aspects of skeletal muscle adaptation to physical activity. This system will be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms that regulate exercise adaptation in muscle. PMID:20532042

  15. s-SHIP expression identifies a subset of murine basal prostate cells as neonatal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Chmelar, Renee S.; Bauderlique-Le Roy, Hélène; Deruy, Emeric; Tian, Lu; Vessella, Robert L.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Bourette, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of prostate stem cells (PSCs) is crucial for understanding their biology during normal development and tumorigenesis. In this aim, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing GFP from the stem cell-specific s-SHIP promoter to mark putative stem cells during postnatal prostate development. Here we show that cells identified by GFP expression are present transiently during early prostate development and localize to the basal cell layer of the epithelium. These prostate GFP+ cells are a subpopulation of the Lin− CD24+ Sca-1+ CD49f+ cells and are capable of self-renewal together with enhanced growth potential in sphere-forming assay in vitro, a phenotype consistent with that of a PSC population. Transplantation assays of prostate GFP+ cells demonstrate reconstitution of prostate ducts containing both basal and luminal cells in renal grafts. Altogether, these results demonstrate that s-SHIP promoter expression is a new marker for neonatal basal prostate cells exhibiting stem cell properties that enables PSCs in situ identification and isolation via a single consistent parameter. Transcriptional profiling of these GFP+ neonatal stem cells showed an increased expression of several components of the Wnt signaling pathway. It also identified stem cell regulators with potential applications for further analyses of normal and cancer stem cells. PMID:27081082

  16. The effects of lifelong blindness on murine neuroanatomy and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Charles W.; Kozanian, Olga O.; Huffman, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian neocortical development is regulated by neural patterning mechanisms, with distinct sensory and motor areas arising through the process of arealization. This development occurs alongside developing central or peripheral sensory systems. Specifically, the parcellation of neocortex into specific areas of distinct cytoarchitecture, connectivity and function during development is reliant upon both cortically intrinsic mechanisms, such as gene expression, and extrinsic processes, such as input from the sensory receptors. This developmental program shifts from patterning to maintenance as the animal ages and is believed to be active throughout life, where the brain’s organization is stable yet plastic. In this study, we characterize the long-term effects of early removal of visual input via bilateral enucleation at birth. To understand the long-term effects of early blindness we conducted anatomical and molecular assays 18 months after enucleation, near the end of lifespan in the mouse. Bilateral enucleation early in life leads to long-term, stable size reductions of the thalamic lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and the primary visual cortex (V1) alongside a increase in individual whisker barrel size. Neocortical gene expression in the aging brain has not been previously identified; we document cortical expression of multiple regionalization genes. Expression patterns of Ephrin A5, COUP-TFI, and RZRβ and patterns of intraneocortical connectivity (INC) are altered in the neocortices of aging blind mice. Sensory inputs from different modalities during development likely play a major role in the development of cortical areal and thalamic nuclear boundaries. We suggest that early patterning by prenatal retinal activity combined with persistent gene expression within the thalamus and cortex is sufficient to establish and preserve a small but present LGN and V1 into late adulthood. PMID:26257648

  17. Antibody formation and mannose-6-phosphate receptor expression impact the efficacy of muscle-specific transgene expression in murine Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yi, Haiqing; Kemper, Alex; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lysosomal storage disorders such as Pompe disease can be more effectively treated, if immune tolerance to enzyme or gene replacement therapy can be achieved. Alternatively, immune responses against acid α-glucosidase (GAA) might be evaded in Pompe disease through muscle-specific expression of GAA with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. METHODS An AAV vector containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette to drive muscle-specific GAA expression was administered to GAA knockout (KO) mice, immune tolerant GAA-KO mice, and mannose-6-phosphate deficient GAA-KO mice. GAA activity and glycogen content were analyzed in striated muscle to determine biochemical efficacy. RESULTS The biochemical efficacy from GAA expression was slightly reduced in GAA-KO mice, as demonstrated by higher residual glycogen content in skeletal muscles. Next immune tolerance to GAA was induced in GAA-KO mice by co-administration of a second AAV vector encoding liver-specific GAA along with the AAV vector encoding muscle-specific GAA. Antibody formation was prevented by liver-specific GAA, and the biochemical efficacy of GAA expression was improved in absence of antibodies as evidenced by significantly reduced glycogen content in the diaphragm. Efficacy was reduced in old GAA-KO mice despite the absence of antibodies. The greatest impact upon gene therapy was observed in GAA-KO mice lacking the mannose-6-phosphate receptor in muscle. The clearance of stored glycogen was markedly impaired despite high GAA expression in receptor-deficient Pompe disease mice. CONCLUSIONS Overall, antibody formation had a subtle effect upon efficacy, while the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors markedly impaired muscle-targeted gene therapy in murine Pompe disease. PMID:20967919

  18. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) expression in murine retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Arul K.; Mysona, Barbara A.; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Tawfik, Amany; Sanders, A.; Markand, Shanu; Zorrilla, Eric; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Bollinger, Kathryn E.; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sigma receptor 1 (σR1) and 2 (σR2) are thought to be two distinct proteins which share the ability to bind multiple ligands, several of which are common to both receptors. Whether σR1 and σR2 share overlapping biological functions is unknown. Recently, progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) was shown to contain the putative σR2 binding site. PGRMC1 has not been studied in retina. We hypothesize that biological interactions between σR1 and PGRMC1 will be evidenced by compensatory upregulation of PGRMC1 in σR1−/− mice. Methods Immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, and immunoblotting methods were used to analyze expression of PGRMC1 in wild type mouse retina. Tissues from σR1−/− mice were used to investigate whether a biological interaction exists between σR1 and PGRMC1. Results In the eye, PGRMC1 is expressed in corneal epithelium, lens, ciliary body epithelium, and retina. In retina, PGRMC1 is present in Müller cells and retinal pigment epithelium. This expression pattern is similar, but not identical to σR1. PGRMC1 protein levels in neural retina and eye cup from σR1−/− mice did not differ from wild type mice. Nonocular tissues, lung, heart, and kidney showed similar Pgrmc1 gene expression in wild type and σR1−/− mice. In contrast, liver, brain and intestine showed increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in σR1−/− mice. Conclusion Despite potential biological overlap, deletion of σR1 did not result in a compensatory change in PGRMC1 protein levels in σR1−/− mouse retina. Increased Pgrmc1 gene expression in organs with high lipid content such as liver, brain, and intestine indicate a possible tissue specific interaction between σR1 and PGRMC1. The current studies establish the presence of PGRMC1 in retina and lay the foundation for analysis of its biological function. PMID:26642738

  19. Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 channel subunit expression in murine spinal dorsal horn GABAergic interneurones.

    PubMed

    Nowak, A; Mathieson, H R; Chapman, R J; Janzsó, G; Yanagawa, Y; Obata, K; Szabo, G; King, A E

    2011-09-01

    GABAergic interneurones, including those within spinal dorsal horn, contain one of the two isoforms of the synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), either GAD65 or GAD67. The physiological significance of these two GABAergic phenotypes is unknown but a more detailed anatomical and functional characterization may help resolve this issue. In this study, two transgenic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) knock-in murine lines, namely GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP (Δneo) mice, were used to profile expression of Shaw-related Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 K(+)-channel subunits in dorsal horn interneurones. Neuronal expression of these subunits confers specific biophysical characteristic referred to as 'fast-spiking'. Immuno-labelling for Kv3.1b or Kv3.3 revealed the presence of both of these subunits across the dorsal horn, most abundantly in laminae I-III. Co-localization studies in transgenic mice indicated that Kv3.1b but not Kv3.3 was associated with GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP immunopositive neurones. For comparison the distributions of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 K(+)-channel subunits which are linked to an excitatory neuronal phenotype were characterized. No co-localization was found between GAD-GFP +ve neurones and Kv4.2 or Kv4.3. In functional studies to evaluate whether either GABAergic population is activated by noxious stimulation, hindpaw intradermal injection of capsaicin followed by c-fos quantification in dorsal horn revealed co-expression c-fos and GAD65-GFP (quantified as 20-30% of GFP +ve population). Co-expression was also detected for GAD67-GFP +ve neurones and capsaicin-induced c-fos but at a much reduced level of 4-5%. These data suggest that whilst both GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP +ve neurones express Kv3.1b and therefore may share certain biophysical traits, their responses to peripheral noxious stimulation are distinct.

  20. Gene expression profiles of murine fatty liver induced by the administration of valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho; Hong, Il; Kim, Mingoo; Lee, Byung Hoon; Kim, Ju-Han; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-Il; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu; Lee, Mi-Ock . E-mail: molee@snu.ac.kr

    2007-04-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has been used as anticonvulsants, however, it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis and necrosis in the liver. To explore the mechanisms of VPA-induced steatosis, we profiled the gene expression patterns of the mouse liver that were altered by treatment with VPA using microarray analysis. VPA was orally administered as a single dose of 100 mg/kg (low-dose) or 1000 mg/kg (high-dose) to ICR mice and the animals were killed at 6, 24, or 72 h after treatment. Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were not significantly altered in the experimental animals. However, symptoms of steatosis were observed at 72 h with low-dose and at 24 h and 72 h with high-dose. After microarray data analysis, 1910 genes were selected by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) as VPA-responsive genes. Hierarchical clustering revealed that gene expression changes depended on the time rather than the dose of VPA treatment. Gene profiling data showed striking changes in the expression of genes associated with lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, oncogenesis, signal transduction, and development. Functional categorization of 1156 characteristically up- and down-regulated genes (cutoff > 1.5-fold) revealed that 60 genes were involved in lipid metabolism that was interconnected with biological pathways for biosynthesis of triglyceride and cholesterol, catabolism of fatty acid, and lipid transport. This gene expression profile may be associated with the known steatogenic hepatotoxicity of VPA and it may provide useful information for prediction of hepatotoxicity of unknown chemicals or new drug candidates through pattern recognition.

  1. Potential predictive role of chemotherapy-induced changes of soluble CD40 ligand in untreated advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, Amalia; Brunetti, Oronzo; Porcelli, Letizia; Graziano, Giusi; Iacobazzi, Rosa Maria; Signorile, Michele; Scarpa, Aldo; Lorusso, Vito; Silvestris, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma lacks predictive biomarkers. CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. CD40–sCD40L interaction is considered to contribute to the promotion of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serum sCD40L as a predictor in metastatic pancreatic cancer. We evaluated 27 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients treated with FOLFIRINOX (21 patients) or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination (six patients). The sCD40L level was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, at first evaluation (all patients), and at time to progression (18 patients). The radiological response was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, Version 1.1. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare pre–post treatment sCD40L levels with respect to clinical response, while Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between sCD40L and CA19.9 pre- and post-treatment. The Kruskal–Wallis test was also conducted for further comparisons. We observed a statistically significant reduction in the sCD40L level after 3 months of treatment in patients with partial response (11,718.05±7,097.13 pg/mL vs 4,689.42±5,409.96 pg/mL; P<0.01). Conversely, in patients with progressive disease, the biomarker statistically increased in the same time (9,351.51±7,356.91 pg/mL vs 22,282.92±11,629.35 pg/mL; P<0.01). This trend of sCD40L was confirmed in 18 patients at time to progression after the first evaluation. No differences were recorded within the stable disease group. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the sCD40L and CA19.9 pre–post treatment variation percentage (Pearson’s correlation coefficient =0.52; P<0.05). Our data suggest a possible predictive role of sCD40L in pancreatic cancer patients, similar to CA19.9. PMID:27555786

  2. Extracellular ATP induces cytokine expression and apoptosis through P2X7 receptor in murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Orinska, Zane; Hein, Martina; Petersen, Frank; Thon, Lutz; Adam, Dieter; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-04-01

    Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides act through specific cell surface receptors and regulate a wide variety of cellular responses in many cell types and tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that murine mast cells express several P2Y and P2X receptor subtypes including P2X(7), and describe functional responses of these cells to extracellular ATP. Stimulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC), as well as MC/9 and P815 mast cell lines with millimolar concentrations of ATP, resulted in Ca(2+) influx across the cellular membrane and cell permeabilization. Moreover, brief exposures to ATP were sufficient to induce apoptosis in BMMCs, MC/9, and P815 cells which involved activation of caspase-3 and -8. However, in the time period between commitment to apoptosis and actual cell death, ATP triggered rapid but transient phosphorylation of multiple signaling molecules in BMMCs and MC/9 cells, including ERK, Jak2, and STAT6. In addition, ATP stimulation enhanced the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-13, and TNF-alpha. The effects of ATP were mimicked by submillimolar concentrations of 3-O-(4'-benzoyl)-benzoyl-benzoyl-ATP, and were inhibited by pretreatment of mast cells with a selective blocker of human and mouse P2X(7) receptor, 1[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine, as well as oxidized ATP. The nucleotide selectivity and pharmacological profile data support the role for P2X(7) receptor as the mediator of the ATP-induced responses. Given the importance of mast cells in diverse pathological conditions, the ability of extracellular ATP to induce the P2X(7)-mediated apoptosis in these cells may facilitate the development of new strategies to modulate mast cell activities.

  3. Characterization of the growth of murine fibroblasts that express human insulin receptors. II. Interaction of insulin with other growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, P.A.; Jarett, L. )

    1990-09-01

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and insulin on DNA synthesis were studied in murine fibroblasts transfected with an expression vector containing human insulin receptor cDNA (NIH 3T3/HIR) and the parental NIH 3T3 cells. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, individual growth factors in serum-free medium stimulated DNA synthesis with the following relative efficacies: insulin greater than or equal to 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than IGF-1 much greater than EGF. In comparison, the relative efficacies of these factors in stimulating DNA synthesis by NIH 3T3 cells were 10% fetal calf serum greater than PDGF greater than EGF much greater than IGF-1 = insulin. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, EGF was synergistic with 1-10 ng/ml insulin but not with 100 ng/ml insulin or more. Synergy of PDGF or IGF-1 with insulin was not detected. In the parental NIH 3T3 cells, insulin and IGF-1 were found to be synergistic with EGF (1 ng/ml), PDGF (100 ng/ml), and PDGF plus EGF. In NIH 3T3/HIR cells, the lack of interaction of insulin with other growth factors was also observed when the percentage of cells synthesizing DNA was examined. Despite insulin's inducing only 60% of NIH 3T3/HIR cells to incorporate thymidine, addition of PDGF, EGF, or PDGF plus EGF had no further effect. In contrast, combinations of growth factors resulted in 95% of the parental NIH 3T3 cells synthesizing DNA. The independence of insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis from other mitogens in the NIH 3T3/HIR cells is atypical for progression factor-stimulated DNA synthesis and is thought to be partly the result of insulin receptor expression in an inappropriate context or quantity.

  4. Ectopic expression of murine diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase 1 attenuates signaling through the ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chu, Caryn; Alapat, Daisy; Wen, Xiaping; Timo, Kimberly; Burstein, David; Lisanti, Michael; Shears, Stephen; Kohtz, D Stave

    2004-09-01

    Signals from several receptor tyrosine kinases are transduced by activation of the Ras family of GTP-binding proteins. Activation of Ras initiates a kinase cascade that culminates in activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The MAPKs include the c-jun NH(2)-terminal protein kinases (JNKs) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), both of which phosphorylate Elk-1/TCF, a factor that activates transcription of the c-fos gene. In this report, we identify a novel 19 kDa gene product as a negative regulator of signaling through the ERK1/2 pathway. While these studies were in progress, the human homologue of this gene was characterized as diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase (DIPP1) [EMBO J. 17 (1998) 6599], a phosphohydrolase that converts diphosphate groups on diphosphoinositol polyphosphates to monophosphates. Ectopic expression of murine DIPP1 (muDIPP1) blocked activation of the c-fos promoter by the ERK1/2 pathway. Inhibition of signal transduction through the ERK1/2 pathway by muDIPP1 occurs at or downstream from activation of MEK. In vitro kinase studies suggest that muDIPP1 is not a direct inhibitor of MEK or ERK activity, although, ectopic expression at near physiological levels results in attenuation of ERK phosphorylation in vivo. Interestingly, a site mutant of muDIPP1 lacking phosphohydrolase activity blocked signaling through the ERK1/2 pathway with greater efficiency than wild-type muDIPP1. This result suggests that inhibition of signaling through the ERK1/2 pathway is a distinct function of muDIPP1 that is not dependent on, but may be regulated by, its activity as a phosphohydrolase.

  5. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  6. Immediate effects of retinoic acid on gene expression in primary murine osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yorgan, Timur A; Heckt, Timo; Rendenbach, Carsten; Helmis, Christina; Seitz, Sebastian; Streichert, Thomas; Amling, Michael; Schinke, Thorsten

    2016-03-01

    Consistent with clinical observations demonstrating that hypervitaminosis A is associated with increased skeletal fracture risk, we have previously found that dietary retinol deprivation partially corrects the bone mineralization defects in a mouse model of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. That retinol-dependent signaling pathways impact the skeleton is further supported by various findings demonstrating a negative influence of retinoic acid (RA) on bone-forming osteoblasts. We hypothesized that RA would directly regulate the expression of specific target genes in osteoblasts, and we aimed to identify these by genome-wide expression analyses. Here we show that high dietary retinol intake in mice causes low bone mass associated with increased osteoclastogenesis and decreased osteoblastogenesis, but intact bone matrix mineralization. We additionally found that short-term treatment of primary osteoblasts with RA causes a rapid induction of specific genes involved in either retinol-dependent signaling (i.e. Rara, Crabp2) or skeletal remodeling (i.e. Twist2, Tnfsf11). In contrast, neither expression of established osteoblast differentiation markers nor the proliferation rate was immediately affected by RA administration. Collectively, our data suggest that the negative effects of vitamin A on skeletal integrity are explainable by an immediate influence of RA signaling on specific genes in osteoblasts that in turn influence bone remodeling.

  7. Schlafen 4–expressing myeloid-derived suppressor cells are induced during murine gastric metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; Hayes, Michael M.; Photenhauer, Amanda; Eaton, Kathryn A.; Li, Qian; Ocadiz-Ruiz, Ramon; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection triggers neoplastic transformation of the gastric mucosa in a small subset of patients, but the risk factors that induce progression to gastric metaplasia have not been identified. Prior to cancer development, the oxyntic gastric glands atrophy and are replaced by metaplastic cells in response to chronic gastritis. Previously, we identified schlafen 4 (Slfn4) as a GLI1 target gene and myeloid differentiation factor that correlates with spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that migration of SLFN4-expressing cells from the bone marrow to peripheral organs predicts preneoplastic changes in the gastric microenvironment. Lineage tracing in Helicobacter-infected Slfn4 reporter mice revealed that SLFN4+ cells migrated to the stomach, where they exhibited myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) markers and acquired the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. SLFN4+ MDSCs were not observed in infected GLI1-deficient mice. Overexpression of sonic hedgehog ligand (SHH) in infected WT mice accelerated the appearance of SLFN4+ MDSCs in the gastric corpus. Similarly, in the stomachs of H. pylori–infected patients, the human SLFN4 ortholog SLFN12L colocalized to cells that expressed MDSC surface markers CD15+CD33+HLA-DRlo. Together, these results indicate that SLFN4 marks a GLI1-dependent population of MDSCs that predict a shift in the gastric mucosa to a metaplastic phenotype. PMID:27427984

  8. Effects of neonatal stress and morphine on murine hippocampal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sandra E; Beyer, Richard P; Bammler, Theo K; Farin, Federico M; Gleason, Christine A

    2011-04-01

    Critically ill preterm infants experience multiple stressors while hospitalized. Morphine is commonly prescribed to ameliorate their pain and stress. We hypothesized that neonatal stress will have a dose-dependent effect on hippocampal gene expression, and these effects will be altered by morphine treatment. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to five treatment conditions between postnatal d 5 and 9: 1) control, 2) mild stress + saline, 3) mild stress + morphine, 4) severe stress + saline, and 5) severe stress + morphine. Hippocampal RNA was extracted and analyzed using Affymetrix Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Single gene analysis and gene set analysis were used to compare groups with validation by qPCR. Stress resulted in enrichment of gene sets related to fear response, oxygen carrying capacity, and NMDA receptor synthesis. Morphine down-regulated gene sets related to immune function. Stress + morphine resulted in enrichment of mitochondrial electron transport gene sets and down-regulation of gene sets related to brain development and growth. We conclude that neonatal stress alone influences hippocampal gene expression, and morphine alters a subset of stress-related changes in gene expression and influences other gene sets. Stress + morphine show interaction effects not present with either stimulus alone. These changes may alter neurodevelopment.

  9. Innovative immunohistochemistry identifies MMP-9 expressing macrophages at the invasive front of murine HCC

    PubMed Central

    Roderfeld, Martin; Rath, Timo; Lammert, Frank; Dierkes, Christian; Graf, Jürgen; Roeb, Elke

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proteolytic contribution of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) in tumor invasion, we analyzed whether TAM at the invasive front of small HCC in Abcb4-/--mice show an enhanced expression of MMP-9. METHODS: Liver cryosections of the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) invasive front from 12 mo old Abcb4-/--mice were stained for collagen type I and MMP-9 using Alexa488 and Alexa568 labeled secondary antibodies. Afterwards, the Alexa568 dye was bleached and the macrophage marker F4/80 was visualized using Alexa568 labeled secondary antibodies. Finally, photographs of the invasive tumor front were digitally overlaid and analyzed. RESULTS: After complete bleaching of the primary dye, specific fluorescence staining of a third antigen, here F4/80, was successfully performed on the same histological section. With this method, we were able to identify conglomerates of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9) expressing macrophages within the tumor capsule of HCC. CONCLUSION: MMP-9 expressing macrophages are involved in matrix remodelling at the invasive tumor front of HCC. The described staining protocol provides a simple yet powerful extension of conventional immuno-histochemistry, facilitating visualization of at least three different antigens plus nuclei in one single histological section. PMID:21160992

  10. Expression profiling reveals heightened apoptosis and supports fiber size economy in the murine muscles of mastication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Marianna; Morine, Kevin; Kulkarni, Cyelee; Barton, Elisabeth R

    2008-09-17

    Distinctions between craniofacial and axial muscles exist from the onset of development and throughout adulthood. The masticatory muscles are a specialized group of craniofacial muscles that retain embryonic fiber properties in the adult, suggesting that the developmental origin of these muscles may govern a pattern of expression that differs from limb muscles. To determine the extent of these differences, expression profiling of total RNA isolated from the masseter and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of adult female mice was performed, which identified transcriptional changes in unanticipated functional classes of genes in addition to those attributable to fiber type. In particular, the masseters displayed a reduction of transcripts associated with contractile and cytoskeletal load-sensing and anabolic processes, and heightened expression of genes associated with stress. Associated with these observations was a significantly smaller fiber cross-sectional area in masseters, significantly elevated load-sensing signaling (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase), and increased apoptotic index in masseters compared with TA muscles. Based on these results, we hypothesize that masticatory muscles may have a fundamentally different strategy for muscle design, compared with axial muscles. Specifically there are small diameter fibers that have an attenuated ability to hypertrophy, but an increased propensity to undergo apoptosis. These results may provide insight into the molecular basis for specific muscle-related pathologies associated with masticatory muscles.

  11. Characterization of G-protein alpha subunits in the Gq class: expression in murine tissues and in stromal and hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, T M; Scherle, P A; Strathmann, M P; Slepak, V Z; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    Murine G alpha 14 and G alpha 15 cDNAs encode distinct alpha subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). These alpha subunits are related to members of the Gq class and share certain sequence characteristics with G alpha q, G alpha 11, and G alpha 16, such as the absence of a pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylation site. G alpha 11 and G alpha q are ubiquitously expressed among murine tissues but G alpha 14 is predominantly expressed in spleen, lung, kidney, and testis whereas G alpha 15 is primarily restricted to hematopoietic lineages. Among hematopoietic cell lines, G alpha 11 mRNA is found in all cell lines tested, G alpha q is expressed widely but is not found in most T-cell lines, G alpha 15 is predominantly expressed in myeloid and B-cell lineages, and G alpha 14 is expressed in bone marrow adherent (stromal) cells, certain early myeloid cells, and progenitor B cells. Polyclonal antisera produced from synthetic peptides that correspond to two regions of G alpha 15 react with a protein of 42 kDa expressed in B-cell membranes and in Escherichia coli transformed with G alpha 15 cDNA. The expression patterns that were observed in mouse tissues and cell lines indicate that each of the alpha subunits in the Gq class may be involved in pertussis toxin-insensitive signal-transduction pathways that are fundamental to hematopoietic cell differentiation and function. Images PMID:1946421

  12. Activation of myeloid and endothelial cells by CD40L gene therapy supports T-cell expansion and migration into the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Moreno, R; Milenova, I; Liljenfeldt, L; Dieterich, L C; Christiansson, L; Karlsson, H; Ullenhag, G; Mangsbo, S M; Dimberg, A; Alemany, R; Loskog, A

    2017-02-01

    CD40 is an interesting target in cancer immunotherapy due to its ability to stimulate T-helper 1 immunity via maturation of dendritic cells and to drive M2 to M1 macrophage differentiation. Pancreatic cancer has a high M2 content that has shown responsive to anti-CD40 agonist therapy and CD40 may thus be a suitable target for immune activation in these patients. In this study, a novel oncolytic adenovirus armed with a trimerized membrane-bound extracellular CD40L (TMZ-CD40L) was evaluated as a treatment of pancreatic cancer. Further, the CD40L mechanisms of action were elucidated in cancer models. The results demonstrated that the virus transferring TMZ-CD40L had oncolytic capacity in pancreatic cancer cells and could control tumor progression. TMZ-CD40L was a potent stimulator of human myeloid cells and T-cell responses. Further, CD40L-mediated stimulation increased tumor-infiltrating T cells in vivo, which may be due to a direct activation of endothelial cells to upregulate receptors for lymphocyte attachment and transmigration. In conclusion, CD40L-mediated gene therapy is an interesting concept for the treatment of tumors with high levels of M2 macrophages, such as pancreatic cancer, and an oncolytic virus as carrier of CD40L may further boost tumor killing and immune activation.

  13. A Genetically Engineered Adenovirus Vector Targeted to CD40 Mediates Transduction of Canine Dendritic Cells and Promotes Antigen-Specific Immune Responses In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Erin E.; Nakayama, Masaharu; Smith, Bruce F.; Bird, R. Curtis; Muminova, Zhanat; Strong, Theresa; Timares, Laura; Korokhov, Nikolay; O'Neill, Ann Marie; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Glasgow, Joel N.; Tani, Kenzaburo; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting viral vectors encoding tumor-associated antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo is likely to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapeutic cancer vaccines. We have previously shown that genetic modification of adenovirus (Ad) 5 to incorporate CD40 ligand (CD40L) rather than native fiber allows selective transduction and activation of DCs in vitro. Here, we examine the capacity of this targeted vector to induce immune responses to the tumor antigen CEA in a stringent in vivo canine model. CD40-targeted Ad5 transduced canine DCs via the CD40-CD40L pathway in vitro, and following vaccination of healthy dogs, CD40-targeted Ad5 induced strong anti-CEA cellular and humoral responses. These data validate the canine model for future translational studies and suggest targeting of Ad5 vectors to CD40 for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs is a feasible approach for successful cancer therapy. PMID:19786146

  14. Abnormal costimulatory phenotype and function of dendritic cells before and after the onset of severe murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Dinnall, Joudy-Ann; Shivers, Debra K; Frisoni, Lorenza; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the activation and function of dendritic cells (DCs) in the spleens of diseased, lupus-prone NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice and age-matched BALB/c and C57BL/6 control mice. Lupus DCs showed an altered ex vivo costimulatory profile, with a significant increase in the expression of CD40, decreased expression of CD80 and CD54, and normal expression of CD86. DCs from young lupus-prone NZM2410 mice, before the development of the disease, expressed normal levels of CD80 and CD86 but already overexpressed CD40. The increase in CD40-positive cells was specific for DCs and involved the subset of myeloid and CD8alpha+ DCs before disease onset, with a small involvement of plasmacytoid DCs in diseased mice. In vitro data from bone marrow-derived DCs and splenic myeloid DCs suggest that the overexpression of CD40 is not due to a primary alteration of CD40 regulation in DCs but rather to an extrinsic stimulus. Our analyses suggest that the defect of CD80 in NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice, which closely resembles the costimulatory defect found in DCs from humans with systemic lupus erythematosus, is linked to the autoimmune disease. The increase in CD40 may instead participate in disease pathogenesis, being present months before any sign of autoimmunity, and its downregulation should be explored as an alternative to treatment with anti-CD40 ligand in lupus.

  15. Molecular genetic mechanisms of allelic specific regulation of murine Comt expression

    PubMed Central

    Segall, Samantha K.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Meloto, Carolina B.; Wen, Xia; Cunningham, Danielle; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Wiltshire, Tim; Gauthier, Josée; Tohyama, Sarasa; Martin, Loren J.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A functional allele of the mouse catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt) gene is defined by the insertion of a B2 short interspersed repeat element in its 3′-untranslated region (UTR). This allele has been associated with a number of phenotypes, such as pain and anxiety. In comparison with mice carrying the ancestral allele (Comt+), ComtB2i mice show higher Comt mRNA and enzymatic activity levels. Here, we investigated the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying this allelic specific regulation of Comt expression. Insertion of the B2 element introduces an early polyadenylation signal generating a shorter Comt transcript, in addition to the longer ancestral mRNA. Comparative analysis and in silico prediction of Comt mRNA potential targets within the transcript 3′ to the B2 element was performed and allowed choosing microRNA (miRNA) candidates for experimental screening: mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667. Cell transfection with each miRNA downregulated the expression of the ancestral transcript and COMT enzymatic activity. Our in vivo experiments showed that mmu-miR-667-3p is strongly correlated with decreasing amounts of Comt mRNA in the brain, and lentiviral injections of mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667 increase hypersensitivity in the mouse formalin model, consistent with reduced COMT activity. In summary, our data demonstrate that the Comt+ transcript contains regulatory miRNA signals in its 3′-untranslated region leading to mRNA degradation; these signals, however, are absent in the shorter transcript, resulting in higher mRNA expression and activity levels. PMID:26067582

  16. The effects of deoxynivalenol on gene expression in the murine thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Kol, Sandra W.M. van; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2011-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species and is often detected in grains. Because of its high abundance, there has been a large interest in the effects of DON in animals and humans. DON is known to be immunosuppressive at high concentrations and immunostimulatory at low concentrations. The present study aimed to acquire insight into the modes of action of DON. For this, C57Bl6 mice were orally exposed to 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg bw DON for 3, 6, or 24 h and thymuses were subjected to genome-wide expression microarray analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) demonstrated that DON downregulated genes involved in proliferation, mitochondria, protein synthesis, and ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, GSEA showed a selective downregulation of genes highly expressed at the early precursor thymocytes stage. This indicates that early precursor thymocytes, particularly at the double-positive CD4+CD8+ stage, are more vulnerable to DON than very early or late precursor thymocytes. There was a large overlap of genes upregulated by DON with genes previously reported to be either upregulated during T cell activation or upregulated during negative selection of thymocytes that recognize 'self-antigens'. This indicates that DON induces cellular events that also occur after activation of the T cell receptor, for example, release of calcium from the endoplasmatic reticulum. This T cell activation in the thymus then evokes negative selection and depletion of thymocytes, which provides a plausible explanation for the high sensitivity of the thymus for DON exposure. The expression patterns of four genes indicative for some of the processes that were affected after DON treatment were confirmed using real-time PCR. Immunocytological experiments with primary mouse thymocytes demonstrated the translocation of NFAT from the cytoplasm into the nucleus upon exposure top DON, thus providing further evidence for the involvement of T cell activation.

  17. Intraosseous delivery of lentiviral vectors targeting factor VIII expression in platelets corrects murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency.

  18. CD40-targeted dendritic cell delivery of PLGA-nanoparticle vaccines induce potent anti-tumor responses.

    PubMed

    Rosalia, Rodney A; Cruz, Luis J; van Duikeren, Suzanne; Tromp, Angelino T; Silva, Ana L; Jiskoot, Wim; de Gruijl, Tanja; Löwik, Clemens; Oostendorp, Jaap; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Ossendorp, Ferry

    2015-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a prominent role in the priming of CD8(+) T cells. Vaccination is a promising treatment to boost tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells which is crucially dependent on adequate delivery of the vaccine to DC. Upon subcutaneous (s.c.) injection, only a small fraction of the vaccine is delivered to DC whereas the majority is cleared by the body or engulfed by other immune cells. To overcome this, we studied vaccine delivery to DC via CD40-targeting using a multi-compound particulate vaccine with the aim to induce potent CD8(+) T cell responses. To this end, biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NP) were formulated encapsulating a protein Ag, Pam3CSK4 and Poly(I:C) and coated with an agonistic αCD40-mAb (NP-CD40). Targeting NP to CD40 led to very efficient and selective delivery to DC in vivo upon s.c. injection and improved priming of CD8(+) T cells against two independent tumor associated Ag. Therapeutic application of NP-CD40 enhanced tumor control and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. We conclude that CD40-mediated delivery to DC of NP-vaccines, co-encapsulating Ag and adjuvants, efficiently drives specific T cell responses, and therefore, is an attractive method to improve the efficacy of protein based cancer vaccines undergoing clinical testing in the clinic.

  19. 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase expression in a murine virus-induced myeloproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marcovistz, R; Le Bousse-Kerdiles, M C; Maillere, B; Smadja-Joffe, F; Poirrier, V; Jasmin, C

    1991-11-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV) infection in DBA/2 mice leads to important quantitative and qualitative changes in their hemopoiesis. These findings suggest a disturbance in the production and action of a certain hemopoietic factor similar to IL3. Here, we show that the level of the 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20 alpha-SDH) expression, which can be induced by IL3, is dramatically increased in spleen and thymus of MPSV-infected mice. Our results suggest that quantification of 20 alpha-SDH activity can be used to indicate abnormal production of a growth factor similar to IL3 in hemopoietic system diseases.

  20. Regulation of Intracellular Signaling Leading to Gene Expression in Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Murine Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-20

    oxide N02- - nitrite NP-40 - Nonidet P-40 p40 - inducible chain of Interleukin-l2 PAGE - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis PKC - Protein kinase...treated as indicated with 150 nM okadaic acid, and/or 100 ng/ml LPS Figure 26. RT-PCR analysis of lFN-P, IL-6, !L-10, p40 and GAPDH gene 114 expression...major cellular source of IL-1P, lL-6, lL-10, lL-12 (the inducible chain, p40 ), and TNF-a mRNA produced in the liver (Salkowski et al., 1995

  1. Creb1-Mecp2-mCpG Complex Transactivates Postnatal Murine Neuronal Glucose Transporter Isoform 3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongjun; Shin, Bo-Chul; Thamotharan, Shanthie

    2013-01-01

    The murine neuronal facilitative glucose transporter isoform 3 (Glut3) is developmentally regulated, peaking in expression at postnatal day (PN)14. In the present study, we characterized a canonical CpG island spanning the 5′-flanking region of the glut3 gene. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing identified methylation of this CpG (mCpG) island of the glut3 gene, frequency of methylation increasing 2.5-fold with a 1.6-fold increase in DNA methyl transferase 3a concentrations noted with advancing postnatal age (PN14 vs PN3). 5′-flanking region of glut3-luciferase reporter transient transfection in HT22 hippocampal neurons demonstrated that mCpGs inhibit glut3 transcription. Contrary to this biological function, glut3 expression rises synchronously with mCpGs in PN14 vs PN3 neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (IP) revealed that methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2) bound the glut3-mCpGs. Depending on association with specific coregulators, Mecp2, a dual regulator of gene transcription, may repress or activate a downstream gene. Sequential chromatin IP uncovered the glut3-mCpGs to bind Mecp2 exponentially upon recruitment of Creb1 rather than histone deacetylase 1. Co-IP and coimmunolocalization confirmed that Creb1 associated with Mecp2 and cotransfection with glut3-mCpG in HT22 cells enhanced glut3 transcription. Separate 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine pretreatment or in combination with trichostatin A reduced mCpG and specific small interference RNAs targeting Mecp2 and Creb1 separately or together depleting Mecp2 and/or Creb1 binding of glut3-mCpGs reduced glut3 expression in HT22 cells. We conclude that Glut3 is a methylation-sensitive neuronal gene that recruits Mecp2. Recruitment of Creb1-Mecp2 by glut3-mCpG contributes towards transactivation, formulating an escape from mCpG-induced gene suppression, and thereby promoting developmental neuronal glut3 gene transcription and expression. PMID:23493374

  2. Murine bone cell lines as models for spaceflight induced effects on differentiation and gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, P.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Reitz, G.

    Critical health factors for space crews especially on long-term missions are radiation exposure and the absence of gravity DNA double strand breaks DSB are presumed to be the most deleterious DNA lesions after radiation as they disrupt both DNA strands in close proximity Besides radiation risk the absence of gravity influences the complex skeletal apparatus concerning muscle and especially bone remodelling which results from mechanical forces exerting on the body Bone is a dynamic tissue which is life-long remodelled by cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineage Any imbalance of this system leads to pathological conditions such as osteoporosis or osteopetrosis Osteoblastic cells play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis and differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes Premature terminal differentiation has been reported to be induced by a number of DNA damaging or cell stress inducing agents including ionising and ultraviolet radiation as well as treatment with mitomycin C In the present study we compare the effects of sequential differentiation by adding osteoinductive substances ss -glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid Radiation-induced premature differentiation was investigated regarding the biosynthesis of specific osteogenic marker molecules and the differentiation dependent expression of marker genes The bone cell model established in our laboratory consists of the osteocyte cell line MLO-Y4 the osteoblast cell line OCT-1 and the subclones 4 and 24 of the osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1 expressing several

  3. Expression of Cadherin-17 Promotes Metastasis in a Highly Bone Marrow Metastatic Murine Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2017-01-01

    We previously established 4T1E/M3 highly bone marrow metastatic mouse breast cancer cells through in vivo selection of 4T1 cells. But while the incidence of bone marrow metastasis of 4T1E/M3 cells was high (~80%) when injected intravenously to mice, it was rather low (~20%) when injected subcutaneously. Therefore, using 4T1E/M3 cells, we carried out further in vitro and in vivo selection steps to establish FP10SC2 cells, which show a very high incidence of metastasis to lungs (100%) and spines (85%) after subcutaneous injection into mice. qRT-PCR and western bolt analysis revealed that cadherin-17 gene and protein expression were higher in FP10SC2 cells than in parental 4T1E/M3 cells. In addition, immunostaining revealed the presence of cadherin-17 at sites of bone marrow and lung metastasis after subcutaneous injection of FP10SC2 cells into mice. Suppressing cadherin-17 expression in FP10SC2 cells using RNAi dramatically decreased the cells' anchorage-independent growth and migration in vitro and their metastasis to lung and bone marrow in vivo. These findings suggest that cadherin-17 plays a crucial role in mediating breast cancer metastasis to bone marrow. PMID:28197418

  4. Ethanol-related alterations in gene expression patterns in the developing murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chanchal; Park, Kyoung Sun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Chai, Young Gyu

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that consuming alcohol prior to and during pregnancy can cause harm to the developing fetus. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a term commonly used to describe a range of disabilities that may arise from prenatal alcohol exposure such as fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders, and alcohol-related birth defects. Here, we report that maternal binge alcohol consumption alters several important genes that are involved in nervous system development in the mouse hippocampus at embryonic day 18. Microarray analysis revealed that Nova1, Ntng1, Gal, Neurog2, Neurod2, and Fezf2 gene expressions are altered in the fetal hippocampus. Pathway analysis also revealed the association of the calcium signaling pathway in addition to other pathways with the differentially expressed genes during early brain development. Alteration of such important genes and dynamics of the signaling pathways may cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Our findings offer insight into the molecular mechanism involved in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with alcohol-related defects.

  5. Expression of bioactive single-chain murine IL-12 in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyun; Dolan, Maureen C; Reidy, Michael; Cramer, Carole L

    2008-06-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12), an important immunomodulator for cell-mediated immunity, shows significant potential as a vaccine adjuvant and anticancer therapeutic. However, its clinical application is limited in part by lack of an effective bioproduction system for this complex heterodimeric glycoprotein. Transgenic plants show promise as scalable bioproduction platforms for challenging biopharmaceutical proteins. To test the potential of plants to effectively produce bioactive IL-12, we developed transgenic tobacco plant lines and derived root cultures yielding high levels of mouse IL-12 (MuIL-12). Functional IL-12 is a heterodimer consisting of two disulfide-linked subunits, p35 and p40. To ensure the stoichiometric expression and assembly of p35 and p40, we expressed a single-chain version of MuIL-12. Plant-derived single-chain MuIL-12 was characterized and purified for in vitro bioactivity assays. Our results demonstrated precise cleavage of the endogenous mouse p40 signal peptide in plants as well as addition of N-linked glycans. Plant-derived MuIL-12 triggered induction of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion from mouse splenocytes and stimulated splenocyte proliferation with comparable activities to those observed for commercially available animal cell-derived MuIL-12. These studies indicate that plants produce fully functional MuIL-12 at levels compatible with commercial production and may serve as an effective bioproduction platform for bioactive IL-12s from other species for human or veterinary vaccine and therapeutic applications.

  6. The murine ufo receptor: molecular cloning, chromosomal localization and in situ expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Faust, M; Ebensperger, C; Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Hameister, H; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1992-07-01

    We have cloned the mouse homologue of the ufo oncogene. It encodes a novel tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by a unique extracellular domain containing two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats. Comparison of the predicted ufo amino acid sequences of mouse and man revealed an overall identity of 87.6%. The ufo locus maps to mouse chromosome 7A3-B1 and thereby extends the known conserved linkage group between mouse chromosome 7 and human chromosome 19. RNA in situ hybridization analysis established the onset of specific ufo expression in the late embryogenesis at day 12.5 post coitum (p.c.) and localized ufo transcription to distinct substructures of a broad spectrum of developing tissues (e.g. subepidermal cells of the skin, mesenchymal cells of the periosteum). In adult animals ufo is expressed in cells forming organ capsules as well as in connective tissue structures. ufo may function as a signal transducer between specific cell types of mesodermal origin.

  7. Influence of helper T cells on the expression of a murine intrastrain crossreactive idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, K S; Gurish, M F; Nisonoff, A; Conger, J D; Hodes, R J

    1986-01-01

    The requirement for idiotype-specific helper T (Th) cells in the generation of a major intrastrain crossreactive idiotype was investigated. This idiotype, designated CRIA, is associated with a large proportion of anti-p-azobenzenearsonate (anti-Ar) antibodies in A/J mice. Secondary in vitro responses were studied. Using carrier-primed heterogeneous Th-cell populations, it was found that CRIA expression is determined by the mouse strain that provides the responding B cells and is independent of the strain of the Th cells functioning in vitro. Thus, A/J or A.BY (Ighe) B-plus-accessory-cell populations, primed in vivo to keyhole limpet hemocyanin-Ar (KLH-Ar), generated CRIA-dominant responses in vitro in the presence of KLH-Ar regardless of whether the KLH-primed Th cells were derived from CRIA+ strains (A/J or A.BY, Ighe) or CRIA- strains (B10.A or C57BL/10, Ighb). Further, when major histocompatibility complex-restricted, KLH-specific Th-cell clones were used, the CRIA dominance of the Ar-specific responses was again determined by the strain providing B plus accessory cells. Similar levels of expression of CRIA in Ar-specific antibodies were generated in the presence of heterogeneous or cloned Th cells. The results suggest that there is no absolute requirement for idiotype-specific Th cells in generating an Ar-specific secondary antibody response in vitro. PMID:2934739

  8. Antenatal dexamethasone treatment leads to changes in gene expression in a murine late placenta

    PubMed Central

    Baisden, Beth; Sonne, Srinivas; Joshi, Ratan Mani; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Shekhawat, Prem S

    2007-01-01

    Antenatal steroids like dexamethasone (DEX) are used to augment foetal lung maturity and there is a major concern that they impair foetal growth. If delivery is delayed after using antenatal DEX, placental function and hence foetal growth may be compromised even further. To investigate the effects of DEX on placental function, we treated 9 pregnant C57/BL6 mice with DEX and 9 pregnant mice were injected with saline to serve as controls. Placental gene expression was studied using microarrays in 3 pairs and other 6 pairs were used to confirm microarray results by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, western blot analysis and Oligo ApopTaq assay. DEX-treated placentas were hydropic, friable, pale, and weighed less (80.0±15.1 mg compared to 85.6.8±7.6 mg, p=0.05) (n=62 placentas). Foetal weight was significantly reduced after DEX use (940±32 mg compared to 1162±79 mg, p=0.001) (n=62 foetuses). There was > 99% similarity within and between the three gene chip data sets. DEX led to down-regulation of 1212 genes and up-regulation of 1382 genes. RT-PCR studies showed that DEX caused a decrease in expression of genes involved in cell division such as cyclins A2, B1, D2, cdk 2, cdk 4 and M-phase protein kinase along with growth-promoting genes such as EGF-R, BMP4 and IGFBP3. Oligo ApopTaq assay and western blot studies showed that DEX-treatment increased apoptosis of trophoblast cells. DEX-treatment led to up-regulation of aquaporin 5 and tryptophan hydroxylase genes as confirmed by real-time PCR, and in situ hybridization studies. Thus antenatal DEX treatment led to a reduction in placental and foetal weight, and this effect was associated with a decreased expression of several growth-promoting genes and increased apoptosis of trophoblast cells. PMID:17559929

  9. Impact of murine intestinal apolipoprotein A-IV expression on regional lipid absorption, gene expression, and growth

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Trang; Cook, Victoria R.; Rao, Anuradha; Weinberg, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is synthesized by intestinal enterocytes during lipid absorption and secreted into lymph on the surface of nascent chylomicrons. A compelling body of evidence supports a central role of apoA-IV in facilitating intestinal lipid absorption and in regulating satiety, yet a longstanding conundrum is that no abnormalities in fat absorption, feeding behavior, or weight gain were observed in chow-fed apoA-IV knockout (A4KO) mice. Herein we reevaluated the impact of apoA-IV expression in C57BL6 and A4KO mice fed a high-fat diet. Fat balance and lymph cannulation studies found no effect of intestinal apoA-IV gene expression on the efficiency of fatty acid absorption, but gut sac transport studies revealed that apoA-IV differentially modulates lipid transport and the number and size of secreted triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in different anatomic regions of the small bowel. ApoA-IV gene deletion increased expression of other genes involved in chylomicron assembly, impaired the ability of A4KO mice to gain weight and increase adipose tissue mass, and increased the distal gut hormone response to a high-fat diet. Together these findings suggest that apoA-IV may play a unique role in integrating feeding behavior, intestinal lipid absorption, and energy storage. PMID:21840868

  10. Structural characterization, tissue distribution, and functional expression of murine aminoacylase III.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Alexander; Carpenito, Gerardo; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Tsuprun, Vladimir; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Motemoturu, Srilakshmi; Sassani, Pakan; Solovieva, Nadezhda; Dukkipati, Ramnath; Kurtz, Ira

    2004-04-01

    Many xenobiotics are detoxified through the mercapturate metabolic pathway. The final product of the pathway, mercapturic acids (N-acetylcysteine S-conjugates), are secreted predominantly by renal proximal tubules. Mercapturic acids may undergo a transformation mediated by aminoacylases and cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases that leads to nephrotoxic reactive thiol formation. The deacetylation of cysteine S-conjugates of N-acyl aromatic amino acids is thought to be mediated by an aminoacylase whose molecular identity has not been determined. In the present study, we cloned aminoacylase III, which likely mediates this process in vivo, and characterized its function and structure. The enzyme consists of 318 amino acids and has a molecular mass (determined by SDS-PAGE) of approximately 35 kDa. Under nondenaturing conditions, the molecular mass of the enzyme is approximately 140 kDa as determined by size-exclusion chromatography, which suggests that it is a tetramer. In agreement with this hypothesis, transmission electron microscopy and image analysis of aminoacylase III showed that the monomers of the enzyme are arranged with a fourfold rotational symmetry. Northern analysis demonstrated an approximately 1.4-kb transcript that was expressed predominantly in kidney and showed less expression in liver, heart, small intestine, brain, lung, testis, and stomach. In kidney, aminoacylase III was immunolocalized predominantly to the apical domain of S1 proximal tubules and the cytoplasm of S2 and S3 proximal tubules. The data suggest that in kidney proximal tubules, aminoacylase III plays an important role in deacetylating mercapturic acids. The predominant cytoplasmic localization of aminoacylase III may explain the greater sensitivity of the proximal straight tubule to the nephrotoxicity of mercapturic acids.

  11. Altered ATP7A expression and other compensatory responses in a murine model of Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Niciu, Mark J; Ma, Xin-Ming; El Meskini, Rajaâ; Pachter, Joel S; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in the copper-transporter ATP7A lead to severe neurodegeneration in the mottled brindled hemizygous male (MoBr/y) mouse and human patients with Menkes disease. Our earlier studies demonstrated cell-type- and -stage-specific changes in ATP7A protein expression during postnatal neurodevelopment. Here we examined copper and cuproenzyme levels in MoBr/y mice to search for compensatory responses. While all MoBr/y neocortical subcellular fractions had decreased copper levels, the greatest decrease (8-fold) was observed in cytosol. Immunostaining for ATP7A revealed decreased levels in MoBr/y hippocampal pyramidal and cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In contrast, an upregulation of ATP7A protein occurred in MoBr/y endothelial cells, perhaps to compensate for a lack of copper in the neuropil. MoBr/y astrocytes and microglia increased their physical association with the blood-brain barrier. No alterations in ATP7A levels were observed in ependymal cells, arguing for specificity in the alteration observed at the blood-brain barrier. The decreased expression of ATP7A protein in MoBr/y Purkinje cells was associated with impaired synaptogenesis and dramatic cytoskeletal dysfunction. Immunoblotting failed to reveal any compensatory increase in levels of ATP7B. While total levels of several cuproenzymes (peptide-amidating monooxygenase, SOD1, and SOD3) were unaltered in the MoBr/y brain, levels of amidated cholecystokinin (CCK8) and amidated pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) were reduced in a tissue-specific fashion. The compensatory changes observed in the neurovascular unit provide insight into the success of copper injections within a defined neurodevelopmental period.

  12. Does Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) photocoagulation really induce less VEGF expression in murine retina than conventional laser treatment?

    PubMed

    Konac, Ece; Sonmez, Kenan; Bahcelioglu, Meltem; Kaplanoglu, Gulnur Take; Varol, Nuray; Sarac, Gulce Naz; Ozcan, P Yasin

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the differences in the mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in murine retina between mice subjected to conventional laser (AG) and those subjected to Pattern Scan Laser (PASCAL) system. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Group 1 (G1) receiving retinal scatter laser photocoagulation using with AG photocoagulator (n=16), Group 2 (G2) receiving retinal scatter laser photocoagulation using with PASCAL (n=16) and Group 3 (G3) served as an untreated control group (n=6). Molecular and morphological analyses of VEGF were performed on days 1, 2 and 5 by ELISA, real-time PCR and immuno-histochemical analysis. In samples which underwent AG (G1), when compared with the control group (G3), VEGF mRNA level increased 2.4 folds on day 2, whereas it decreased on day 5 (p□0.001). In samples which underwent PASCAL (G2), on the other hand, VEGF mRNA level increased 1.8 folds on day 1 and 2.2 folds on day 5 when compared with the control group (G3). In samples which underwent AG (G1), when compared with the control group (G3), VEGF protein level increased significantly on day 2, whereas it decreased on day 5 (p□0.001). In group G2, the VEGF levels in the sensory retina significantly increased as compared to control groups at both 2 and 5 days after laser photocoagulation using PASCAL laser (p=0.012, both time points). The peak expressions of VEGF protein in samples which underwent PASCAL and conventional laser were found on day 5 and day 2 respectively. In retinas of PASCAL-treated mice, VEGF immunoreactivity gradually increased during the 5-day follow-up. However, in argon laser group, the strongest VEGF immunoreactivity was detected on day 2, then started to decrease on day 5. In summary, the expression of VEGF protein and mRNA gradually increase during a 5-day follow-up period in PASCAL-treated mouse eyes, whereas in AG group they reach their peak levels on the second day of follow-up and

  13. Expression of serum albumin and of alphafetoprotein in murine normal and neoplastic primitive embryonic structures.

    PubMed

    Trojan, J; Naval, X; Johnson, T; Lafarge-Frayssinet, C; Hajeri-Germond, M; Farges, O; Pan, Y; Uriel, J; Abramasky, O; Ilan, J

    1995-12-01

    Alphafetoprotein (AFP), a major serum protein synthesized during the embryo-fetal and postnatal period (in the yolk sac, then in the liver), is also an oncoprotein. The intracellular presence of AFP and of serum albumin (SA) in normal and neoplastic neural crest and neural tube derivatives was previously demonstrated. In this work we have studied the comparative expression of AFP and SA in primitive neuroectoblastic structures of mouse embryos (6 and 7 days "post coitum") and mouse teratocarcinomas (derived from the PCC4 cell line). Using immunofluorescence technique, antibodies to SA gave a positive reaction in embryos of 7 days, while AFP was not detected during this period. By mRNA in situ hybridization, SA mRNA gave a strong signal in both 6 and 7 day embryos, whereas AFP mRNA gave a weak signal only in 7-day embryos. The distribution of SA and AFP and their mRNAs was investigated in primitive neuroectoblastic structures of the teratocarcinomas by in situ hybridization and immunostaining. Only SA protein was detectable by immunostaining. SA mRNA gave a strong signal in differentiating structures as well as in undifferentiated cell clusters. AFP mRNA was observed only in differentiating structure. Dot-blot hybridization indicated that the level of SA transcripts was at least 6-fold higher than that of AFP transcripts in the teratocarcinomas investigated. In teratocarcinoma-bearing mice injected intraperitoneally with 125I-radiolabeled SA and AFP, significant accumulations of both SA and AFP were demonstrated in the tumors, SA being about 3-fold higher than that of AFP after normalization to quantity of uptake in liver. External in vivo photoscanning confirmed this relationship of accumulated radiolabeled proteins. The last observation could be useful in vivo for diagnosis of teratocarcinoma. We conclude that the expression of SA relative to AFP and the external cellular uptake of SA relative to AFP are similar in normal embryonic developing tissues and in the

  14. Hypoxia increases Sca-1/CD44 co-expression in murine mesenchymal stem cells and enhances their adipogenic differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Valorani, M G; Germani, A; Otto, W R; Harper, L; Biddle, A; Khoo, C P; Lin, W R; Hawa, M I; Tropel, P; Patrizi, M P; Pozzilli, P; Alison, M R

    2010-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are usually cultured under normoxic conditions (21% oxygen). However, in vivo, the physiological "niches" for MSCs have a much lower oxygen tension. Because of their plasticity, stem cells are particularly sensitive to their environments, and oxygen tension is one developmentally important stimulus in stem cell biology and plays a role in the intricate balance between cellular proliferation and commitment towards differentiation. Therefore, we investigated here the effect of hypoxia (2% oxygen) on murine adipose tissue (AT) MSC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation. AT cells were obtained from the omental fat and AT-MSCs were selected for their ability to attach to the plastic dishes, and were grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Prior exposure of MSCs to hypoxia led to a significant reduction of ex vivo expansion time, with significantly increased numbers of Sca-1(+) as well as Sca-1(+)/CD44(+)double-positive cells. Under low oxygen culture conditions, the AT-MSC number markedly increased and their adipogenic differentiation potential was reduced. Notably, the hypoxia-mediated inhibition of adipogenic differentiation was reversible: AT-MSCs pre-exposed to hypoxia when switched to normoxic conditions exhibited significantly higher adipogenic differentiation capacity compared to their pre-exposed normoxic-cultured counterparts. Accordingly, the expression of adipocyte-specific genes, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (Ppargamma), lipoprotein lipase (Lpl) and fatty acid binding protein 4 (Fabp4) were significantly enhanced in hypoxia pre-exposed AT-MSCs. In conclusion, pre-culturing MSCs under hypoxic culture conditions may represent a strategy to enhance MSC production, enrichment and adipogenic differentiation.

  15. Chimeric human/murine monoclonal IgM antibodies to HIV-1 Nef antigen expressed on chronically infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Masahiro; He, Lianying; Kawamura, Takeshi; Omoto, Shinya; Fujii, Yoichi R; Okada, Noriko

    2003-01-01

    Human IgM antibody (Ab) to gangliosides induced cytolysis of HIV-1-infected cells by homologous human complement. We expected that any human IgM Ab reactive with HIV-1 infected cells could cause complement-mediated cytolysis. The trans-chromosome mouse (TC mouse) contains human chromosomes harboring genes responsible for immunoglobulin production. Spleen cells from TC mice immunized with recombinant Nef were fused with mouse myeloma cells to generate hybridomas, and we selected those that produced human mu-chain-positive Abs reactive with Nef fixed on an ELISA plate. However, the L-chain of the monoclonal Abs (mAbs) were murine lambda in type and were chimeric, and we could not succeed in obtaining mAb with human mu- and human kappa-chains. The chimeric mAbs reacted with the HIV-1 infected cells as seen with flow cytometric analysis, and the surface expression of Nef was also detectable on chronically infected OM10.1 cells which had no detectable gp120. However, although the reaction of the chimeric IgM mAb with HIV-1-infected MOLT4 cells induced C3 deposition on cell surfaces on incubation with fresh human serum, the cells remained unlysed, as determined by 51Cr release assay. The amount of Nef antigen on the cells might not have been high enough to overcome the function of HRF20 (CD59) that restricts formation of membrane attack complexes of homologous complement. However, combination of anti-Nef IgM mAb with other IgM mAbs reactive with the surface of HIV-1-infected cells may induce a synergistic effect in complement mediated cytolysis.

  16. Osteopontin Modulates Inflammation, Mucin Production, and Gene Expression Signatures After Inhalation of Asbestos in a Murine Model of Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Ramos-Nino, Maria E.; Eugenia-Ariza, Maria; MacPherson, Maximilian B.; Butnor, Kelly J.; Vacek, Pamela C.; McGee, Sean P.; Clark, Jessica C.; Steele, Chad; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and lung remodeling are hallmarks of asbestos-induced fibrosis, but the molecular mechanisms that control these events are unclear. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM) of distal bronchioles in a murine asbestos inhalation model, we show that osteopontin (OPN) is up-regulated by bronchiolar epithelial cells after chrysotile asbestos exposures. In contrast to OPN wild-type mice (OPN+/+) inhaling asbestos, OPN null mice (OPN−/−) exposed to asbestos showed less eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, diminished lung inflammation, and decreased mucin production. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12 subunit p40, MIP1α, MIP1β, and eotaxin) also were significantly less in asbestos-exposed OPN−/− mice. Microarrays performed on lung tissues from asbestos-exposed OPN+/+ and OPN−/− mice showed that OPN modulated the expression of a number of genes (Col1a2, Timp1, Tnc, Eln, and Col3a1) linked to fibrosis via initiation and cross talk between IL-1β and epidermal growth factor receptor-related signaling pathways. Novel targets of OPN identified include genes involved in cell signaling, immune system/defense, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cell cycle regulation. Although it is unclear whether the present findings are specific to chrysotile asbestos or would be observed after inhalation of other fibers in general, these results highlight new potential mechanisms and therapeutic targets for asbestosis and other diseases (asthma, smoking-related interstitial lung diseases) linked to OPN overexpression. PMID:21514415

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells engineered to express selectin ligands and IL-10 exert enhanced therapeutic efficacy in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wenbin; Pham, Victor; Liu, Linan; Riazifar, Milad; Pone, Egest J; Zhang, Shirley Xian; Ma, Fengxia; Lu, Mengrou; Walsh, Craig M.; Zhao, Weian

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) affords the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in both preclinical and clinical studies. However, the efficacy of MSC-based therapy for MS likely depends on the number of cells that home to inflamed tissues and on the controlled production of paracrine and immunomodulatory factors. Previously, we reported that engineered MSCs expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and Sialyl-Lewisx (SLeX) via mRNA transfection facilitated the targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) to inflamed ear. Here, we evaluated whether targeted delivery of MSCs with triple PSGL1/SLeX/IL-10 engineering improves therapeutic outcomes in mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model for human MS. We found PSGL-1/SLeX mRNA transfection significantly enhanced MSC homing to the inflamed spinal cord. This is consistent with results from in vitro flow chamber assays in which PSGL-1/SleX mRNA transfection significantly increased the percentage of rolling and adherent cells on activated brain microvascular endothelial cells, which mimic the inflamed endothelium of blood brain/spinal cord barrier in EAE. In addition, IL-10-transfected MSCs show significant inhibitory activity on the proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes from EAE mice. In vivo treatment with MSCs engineered with PSGL-1/SLeX/IL-10 in EAE mice exhibited a superior therapeutic function over native (unmodified) MSCs, evidenced by significantly improved myelination and decreased lymphocytes infiltration into the white matter of the spinal cord. Our strategy of targeted delivery of performance-enhanced MSCs could potentially be utilized to increase the effectiveness of MSC-based therapy for MS and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. PMID:26584349

  18. Expression of Nocardia brasiliensis superoxide dismutase during the early infection of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Revol, Agnès; Espinoza-Ruiz, Marisol; Medina-Villanueva, Igor; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar

    2006-12-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is the main agent of actinomycetoma in Mexico, but little is known about its virulence and molecular pathogenic pathways. These facultative intracellular bacteria are able to survive and divide within the host phagocytic cells, in part by neutralizing the reactive oxygen intermediates. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) participates in the intracellular survival of several bacterial species and, in particular, constitutes one of Nocardia asteroides virulence factors. To clarify SOD participation in the N. brasiliensis early infective process, we report its isolation and the consequent comparison of its transcript level. A 630 bp polymerase chain reaction fragment that included most of the coding sequence of N. brasiliensis sodA was cloned. A competitive assay was developed, allowing comparison of bacterial sod expression in exponential culture and 1 h after infecting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice. At that time, there were viable bacteria in the macrophages. The intracellular bacteria presented a clear decrease in their sod transcript amount, although their 16S rRNA (used as an internal control) and hsp levels were maintained or slightly increased, respectively. These results indicate that sodA transcription is not maintained within the SOS bacterial response induced by phagosomal conditions. Further kinetics will be necessary to precisely define sod transcriptional regulation during N. brasiliensis intra-macrophage growth.

  19. Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide induces ABCA1 expression by LXRα activation in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Wakabayashi, Hideyuki; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Yajima, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Aruto

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The major circulating quercetin metabolite (Q3GA) activated LXRα. •Q3GA induced ABCA1 via LXRα activation in macrophages. •Nelumbo nucifera leaf extracts contained quercetin glycosides. •N. nucifera leaf extract feeding elevated HDLC in mice. -- Abstract: Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) removes excess cholesterol from macrophages to prevent atherosclerosis. ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1) is a crucial cholesterol transporter involved in RCT to produce high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC), and is transcriptionally regulated by liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), a nuclear receptor. Quercetin is a widely distributed flavonoid in edible plants which prevented atherosclerosis in an animal model. We found that quercetin-3-O-glucuronide (Q3GA), a major quercetin metabolite after absorption from the digestive tract, enhanced ABCA1 expression, in vitro, via LXRα in macrophages. In addition, leaf extracts of a traditional Asian edible plant, Nelumbo nucifera (NNE), which contained abundant amounts of quercetin glycosides, significantly elevated plasma HDLC in mice. We are the first to present experimental evidence that Q3GA induced ABCA1 in macrophages, and to provide an alternative explanation to previous studies on arteriosclerosis prevention by quercetin.

  20. FUS affects circular RNA expression in murine embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Errichelli, Lorenzo; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Laneve, Pietro; Colantoni, Alessio; Legnini, Ivano; Capauto, Davide; Rosa, Alessandro; De Santis, Riccardo; Scarfò, Rebecca; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Lu, Lei; Caffarelli, Elisa; Shneider, Neil A.; Morlando, Mariangela; Bozzoni, Irene

    2017-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein FUS participates in several RNA biosynthetic processes and has been linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report that FUS controls back-splicing reactions leading to circular RNA (circRNA) production. We identified circRNAs expressed in in vitro-derived mouse motor neurons (MNs) and determined that the production of a considerable number of these circRNAs is regulated by FUS. Using RNAi and overexpression of wild-type and ALS-associated FUS mutants, we directly correlate the modulation of circRNA biogenesis with alteration of FUS nuclear levels and with putative toxic gain of function activities. We also demonstrate that FUS regulates circRNA biogenesis by binding the introns flanking the back-splicing junctions and that this control can be reproduced with artificial constructs. Most circRNAs are conserved in humans and specific ones are deregulated in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MNs carrying the FUSP525L mutation associated with ALS. PMID:28358055

  1. Impact of Enriched Environment on Murine T Cell Differentiation and Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Rattazzi, Lorenza; Piras, Giuseppa; Brod, Samuel; Smith, Koval; Ono, Masahiro; D’Acquisto, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    T cells are known to be plastic and to change their phenotype according to the cellular and biochemical milieu they are embedded in. In this study, we transposed this concept at a macroscopic level assessing whether changes in the environmental housing conditions of C57/BL6 mice would influence the phenotype and function of T cells. Our study shows that exposure to 2 weeks in an enriched environment (EE) does not impact the T cell repertoire in vivo and causes no changes in the early TCR-driven activation events of these cells. Surprisingly, however, T cells from enriched mice showed a unique T helper effector cell phenotype upon differentiation in vitro. This was featured by a significant reduction in their ability to produce IFN-γ and by an increased release of IL-10 and IL-17. Microarray analysis of these cells also revealed a unique gene fingerprint with key signaling pathways involved in autoimmunity being modulated. Together, our results provide first evidence for a specific effect of EE on T cell differentiation and its associated changes in gene expression profile. In addition, our study sheds new light on the possible mechanisms by which changes in environmental factors can significantly influence the immune response of the host and favor the resolution of the inflammatory response. PMID:27746779

  2. FUS affects circular RNA expression in murine embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Errichelli, Lorenzo; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Laneve, Pietro; Colantoni, Alessio; Legnini, Ivano; Capauto, Davide; Rosa, Alessandro; De Santis, Riccardo; Scarfò, Rebecca; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Lu, Lei; Caffarelli, Elisa; Shneider, Neil A; Morlando, Mariangela; Bozzoni, Irene

    2017-03-30

    The RNA-binding protein FUS participates in several RNA biosynthetic processes and has been linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report that FUS controls back-splicing reactions leading to circular RNA (circRNA) production. We identified circRNAs expressed in in vitro-derived mouse motor neurons (MNs) and determined that the production of a considerable number of these circRNAs is regulated by FUS. Using RNAi and overexpression of wild-type and ALS-associated FUS mutants, we directly correlate the modulation of circRNA biogenesis with alteration of FUS nuclear levels and with putative toxic gain of function activities. We also demonstrate that FUS regulates circRNA biogenesis by binding the introns flanking the back-splicing junctions and that this control can be reproduced with artificial constructs. Most circRNAs are conserved in humans and specific ones are deregulated in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MNs carrying the FUS(P525L) mutation associated with ALS.

  3. Two gene members of the murine HOX-5 complex show regional and cell-type specific expression in developing limbs and gonads.

    PubMed Central

    Dollé, P; Duboule, D

    1989-01-01

    This study reports the expression domains of two murine HOX gene members of the HOX-5 complex (Hox-5.2, Hox-5.3). These two genes have very similar homeodomain sequences, as well as temporal and spatial specificities of expression. They are both expressed at very posterior levels in the central nervous system, in sclerotome derivatives and in a few internal organs. In addition to these expression domains which are shared with other HOX genes, transcripts from both Hox-5.2 and Hox-5.3 are present at high levels in developing limbs. After an early homogeneous expression in mesodermal limb bud cells, transcription becomes restricted to cartilage-differentiating cells. In addition, Hox-5.2 is a marker for gonadal development. The possible involvement of such genes during inductive processes or organogenesis is discussed. Images PMID:2569970

  4. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Speck, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4). Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA) resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  5. Expression of functional GABAA receptors in cholecystokinin-secreting gut neuroendocrine murine STC-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Glassmeier, G; Herzig, K-H; Höpfner, M; Lemmer, K; Jansen, A; Scherübl, H

    1998-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine (NE) cells synthesize, store and secrete γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Recently, an autocrine-paracrine function of GABA has been proposed for secretion from NE cells.To search for functional GABAA receptors in NE gut cells, we performed whole-cell and perforated-patch-clamp studies in the intestinal cholecystokinin (CCK)-secreting NE cell line STC-1.Application of GABA evoked currents in STC-1 cells. These effects were mimicked by muscimol, an agonist of GABAA receptors, and blocked by picrotoxin or bicuculline, antagonists of GABAA receptors. The GABA- or muscimol-activated currents reversed near 0 mV, which under the recording conditions used was consistent with the activation of the GABAA receptor-Cl− channel complex.In contrast to the effect on most neurons, GABA as well as muscimol led to a (reversible) depolarization of the membrane potential of STC-1 cells. Membrane depolarization in turn activated voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in STC-1 cells.In accordance with the observed membrane depolarization and activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, both GABA and muscimol stimulated Ca2+-dependent CCK release. In contrast, bicuculline inhibited the GABA-induced secretion of CCK.Using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), mRNA of the GABAA receptor subunits α2, α3, α5, β1, β3 and δ could be detected in STC-1 cells.In summary, we have shown that the CCK-secreting gut NE cell line STC-1 expresses functional GABAA receptors and that GABA stimulates CCK release. Thus, GABA is involved in the fine tuning of CCK secretion from the gut NE cell line STC-1. PMID:9660895

  6. Lipopolysaccharide of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 via similar but distinct signaling pathways in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Ok-Jin; Cho, Min-Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a Gram-negative bacterium frequently isolated from lesions of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates innate immune cells via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to initiate inflammatory responses. In this study, we purified LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans (AaLPS) and investigated its ability to induce the expression of chemokines, which play an important role in recruitment of leukocytes to the infection site. AaLPS induced the expression of chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 in murine macrophages, leading to the infiltration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a transwell system. Although TLR4 was essential for the induction of all these chemokines by AaLPS, MCP-1 and MIP-1α expressions were MyD88-dependent, but IP-10 expression was MyD88-independent, as determined using macrophages from mice deficient in TLR4 or MyD88. Furthermore, the activation of ERK and JNK were necessary for the expression of MCP-1 and MIP-1α, whereas p38 MAP kinase and JNK activations were required for IP-10 expression. In addition, IFN-β/STAT1 signaling was exclusively involved in IP-10 expression but not in MCP-1 or MIP-1α expression. AaLPS also activated the transcription factors, NF-κB, AP-1, NF-IL6, and ISRE, all of which are involved in chemokine gene expression. These results suggest that AaLPS induces the expression of chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α, and IP-10 through TLR4 in murine macrophages. Further, the induction of MCP-1 and MIP-1α requires MyD88, ERK, and JNK, whereas the induction of IP-10 requires JNK, p38 MAP kinase, and IFN-β/STAT1.

  7. Dendritic cell secretion of IL-15 is induced by recombinant huCD40LT and augments the stimulation of antigen-specific cytolytic T cells.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, J S; Kuniyoshi, C J; Lim, A M; Wang, F Y; Bade, E R; Lau, R; Thomas, E K; Weber, J S

    1999-04-10

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells which stimulate strong proliferative and cytolytic T cell responses. Stimulation of CD40 on dendritic cells by its ligands and anti-CD40 antibodies induces maturation and enhances DC stimulatory ability. In order to understand the mechanism by which ligand:CD40 interactions augment DC function, we assessed the role of T cell stimulatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-15 in the function of DC stimulated with soluble trimeric CD40L, a recombinant fusion protein incorporating three covalently linked extracellular CD40L domains (huCD40LT). Peripheral blood derived DC treated with huCD40LT and/or IFN-gamma were used to stimulate T cell responses in vitro to specific antigens. DC treated with huCD40LT or IFN-gamma/huCD40LT stimulated enhanced T cell proliferation to CASTA, a soluble protein from C. albicans, induced T cells with augmented antigen-specific lysis, and increased the yield of antigen-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells. IL-15 production by DC was enhanced in cultures treated with huCD40LT and correlated with expansion of antigen-specific cytolytic T cells. Addition of a neutralizing anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody inhibited the expansion of viral and tumor antigen-specific T cells stimulated by IFN-gamma and huCD40LT-treated DC. In contrast, this enhanced stimulatory ability of DC did not appear to depend on synthesis of IL-12 since huCD40LT treatment stimulated the generation of antigen-specific cytokine producing and cytolytic T cells without increased IL-12 production. Addition of anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibody did not inhibit expansion of these cells. These data suggest that production of IL-15 but not IL-12 is an important factor in the enhanced immunostimulatory ability of huCD40LT-treated DC.

  8. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Donna C; Hirschman, Michael P; Sun, Anita; Singh, Meera V; Kasischke, Karl; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L) are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1) positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  9. Excess Soluble CD40L Contributes to Blood Brain Barrier Permeability In Vivo: Implications for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Donna C.; Hirschman, Michael P.; Sun, Anita; Singh, Meera V.; Kasischke, Karl; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L) are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1) positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking. PMID:23251626

  10. Biological rational for sequential targeting of Bruton tyrosine kinase and Bcl-2 to overcome CD40-induced ABT-199 resistance in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiron, David; Touzeau, Cyrille; Maïga, Sophie; Moreau, Philippe; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Le Gouill, Steven; Amiot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    The aggressive biological behavior of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and its short response to current treatment highlight a great need for better rational therapy. Herein, we investigate the ability of ABT-199, the Bcl-2-selective BH3 mimetic, to kill MCL cells. Among MCL cell lines tested (n = 8), only three were sensitive (LD50 < 200 nM). In contrast, all primary MCL samples tested (n = 11) were highly sensitive to ABT-199 (LD50 < 10 nM). Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL both confer resistance to ABT-199-specific killing and BCL2/(BCLXL + MCL1) mRNA ratio is a strong predictor of sensitivity. By mimicking the microenvironment through CD40 stimulation, we show that ABT-199 sensitivity is impaired through activation of NF-kB pathway and Bcl-xL up-regulation. We further demonstrate that resistance is rapidly lost when MCL cells detach from CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. It has been reported that ibrutinib induces lymphocytosis in vivo holding off malignant cells from their protective microenvironment. We show here for two patients undergoing ibrutinib therapy that mobilized MCL cells are highly sensitive to ABT-199. These results provide evidence that in situ ABT-199 resistance can be overcome when MCL cells escape from the lymph nodes. Altogether, our data support the clinical application of ABT-199 therapy both as a single agent and in sequential combination with BTK inhibitors. PMID:25797245

  11. Expression of a calpastatin transgene slows muscle wasting and obviates changes in myosin isoform expression during murine muscle disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, James G.; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    Muscle wasting is a prominent feature of several systemic diseases, neurological damage and muscle disuse. The contribution of calpain proteases to muscle wasting in any instance of muscle injury or disease has remained unknown because of the inability to specifically perturb calpain activity in vivo. We have generated a transgenic mouse with muscle-specific overexpression of calpastatin, which is the endogenous inhibitor of calpains, and induced muscle atrophy by unloading hindlimb musculature for 10 days. Expression of the transgene resulted in increases in calpastatin concentration in muscle by 30- to 50-fold, and eliminated all calpain activity that was detectable on zymograms. Muscle fibres in ambulatory, transgenic mice were smaller in diameter, but more numerous, so that muscle mass did not differ between transgenic and non-transgenic mice. This is consistent with the role of the calpain-calpastatin system in muscle cell fusion that has been observed in vitro. Overexpression of calpastatin reduced muscle atrophy by 30 % during the 10 day unloading period. In addition, calpastatin overexpression completely prevented the shift in myofibrillar myosin content from slow to fast isoforms, which normally occurs in muscle unloading. These findings indicate that therapeutics directed toward regulating the calpain-calpastatin system may be beneficial in preventing muscle mass loss in muscle injury and disease.

  12. CNTO 530 increases expression of HbA and HbF in murine models of β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Makropoulos, Dorie A; Achuthanandam, Ram; Avery, Justin; Wilson, Krista; Brosnan, Kerry; Miller, Andrew; Nesspor, Thomas; Chroscinski, Denise; Walker, Mindi; Egenolf, Devon; Huang, ChiChi; Bugelski, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    CNTO 530 is an erythropoietin receptor agonist MIMETIBODYTM construct. CNTO 530 has been shown to be active in a number of rodent models of acquired anemia (e.g. renal insufficiency and chemotherapy induced anemia). We investigated the efficacy of CNTO 530 in murine models of β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (Berkeley mice). β- thalassemic mice are deficient in expression of α-globin chain and heterozygous mice are characterized by a clinical syndrome similar to the human β-thalassemia intermedia. Berkeley mice are knocked out for murine alpha and beta globin and are transgenic for human alpha, beta (sickle) and gamma globin genes. Berkeley mice thus express human sickle hemoglobin A (HbS) and can also express human fetal hemoglobin. These mice express a severe compensated hypochromic microcytic anemia and display the sickle cell phenotype. To test the effectiveness of CNTO 530, mice from both genotypes received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) dose of CNTO 530 or darbepoetin-α (as a comparator) at 10,000 U/kg, a dose shown to cause a similar increase in reticulocytes and hemoglobin in normal mice. Hematologic parameters were evaluated over time. CNTO 530, but not darbepoetin-α, increased reticulocytes, red blood cells and total hemoglobin in β- thalassemic mice. In Berkeley mice CNTO 530 showed an increase in reticulocytes, red blood cells, F-cells, total hemoglobin and fetal hemoglobin. In conclusion, CNTO 530 is effective in murine models of β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. These data suggest that CNTO 530 may have beneficial effects in patients with genetically mediated hemoglobinopathies.

  13. Targeting of interleukin (IL)-17A inhibits PDL1 expression in tumor cells and induces anticancer immunity in an estrogen receptor-negative murine model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Feng; Chen, Chen; Li, Dongqing; Liu, Min; Lv, Zhuang-Wei; Ji, Yanhong; Xu, Jiru

    2017-01-31

    The expression of IL-17A and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1) is increased in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer. IL-17A promotes tumor cell survival and invasiveness and inhibits the antitumor immune response. The PDL1-PD1 (programmed death protein 1) signaling pathway promotes escape from immune surveillance in tumor cells. The pro-tumor properties of IL-17A and PDL1 in various cancers have been previously examined; however, the relationship and roles of IL-17A and PDL1 in ER-negative breast cancer have not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed whether IL-17A promotes PDL1 expression in tumor cells and whether targeting of IL-17A could inhibit ER-negative breast cancer progression in a murine model. Our study revealed that IL-17A promoted PDL1 expression in human and mouse cells. In the murine cancer model, targeting of IL-17A inhibited PDL1 expression in the tumor microenvironment, decreased the percentage of Treg cells in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and promoted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to secrete interferon gamma. More importantly, treatment with combined anti-IL-17A and anti-PDL1 antibodies enhanced antitumor effects in favor of tumor eradication. Thus, our study established a pro-tumor role of IL-17A in promoting tumor immune escape and supports the development of a novel cytokine immunotherapy against breast cancer.

  14. The regulatory elements of araBAD operon, contrary to lac-based expression systems, afford hypersynthesis of murine, and human interferons in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Alessandra; Alfarano, Pietro; Merulla, Davide; Mattana, Paolo; Rolli, Eleonora; Mangino, Pierluigi; Masotti, Lanfranco; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The overexpression of four different interferons, i.e., murine interferon alpha1 and human interferons alpha1, alpha 8, and alpha 21 was challenged in Escherichia coli. Synthetic genes coding for these interferons were designed, assembled, and cloned into the vector pET9a (using the NdeI and BamHI sites), placing interferon expression under the control of phage T7 promoter. Despite an intensive screening for optimal culture conditions, no interferon synthesis was observed using overexpression systems based on the regulatory elements of lac operon (e.g., in E. coli BL21DE3). On the contrary, high levels of interferon expression were detected in E. coli BL21AI, which chromosome contains the gene coding for phage T7 RNA polymerase under the control of the araBAD promoter. To analyze the reasons of this striking difference, the molecular events associated with the lack of interferon expression in E. coli BL21DE3 were studied, and murine interferon alpha1 was chosen as a model system. Surprisingly, it was observed that this interferon represses the synthesis of T7 RNA polymerase in E. coli BL21DE3 and, in particular, the expression of lac operon. In fact, by determining beta-galactosidase activity in E. coli BL21AI, a significantly lower LacZ activity was observed in cells induced to interferon synthesis.

  15. CD40-signalling abrogates induction of RORγt+ Treg cells by intestinal CD103+ DCs and causes fatal colitis

    PubMed Central

    Barthels, Christian; Ogrinc, Ana; Steyer, Verena; Meier, Stefanie; Simon, Ferdinand; Wimmer, Maria; Blutke, Andreas; Straub, Tobias; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Lutgens, Esther; Marconi, Peggy; Ohnmacht, Caspar; Garzetti, Debora; Stecher, Bärbel; Brocker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in intestinal tissues depends on the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) acquire microbiota-derived material from the gut lumen for transport to draining lymph nodes and generation of receptor-related orphan γt+ (RORγt+) Helios−-induced Treg (iTreg) cells. Here we show CD40-signalling as a microbe-independent signal that can induce migration of CD103+ DCs from the lamina propria (LP) to the mesenteric lymph nodes. Transgenic mice with constitutive CD11c-specific CD40-signalling have reduced numbers of CD103+ DCs in LP and a low frequency of RORγt+Helios− iTreg cells, exacerbated inflammatory Th1/Th17 responses, high titres of microbiota-specific immunoglobulins, dysbiosis and fatal colitis, but no pathology is detected in other tissues. Our data demonstrate a CD40-dependent mechanism capable of abrogating iTreg cell induction by DCs, and suggest that the CD40L/CD40-signalling axis might be able to intervene in the generation of new iTreg cells in order to counter-regulate immune suppression to enhance immunity. PMID:28276457

  16. Immunosuppression With CD40 Costimulatory Blockade Plus Rapamycin for Simultaneous Islet-Kidney Transplantation in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Oura, T; Hotta, K; Lei, J; Markmann, J; Rosales, I; Dehnadi, A; Kawai, K; Ndishabandi, D; Smith, R-N; Cosimi, A B; Kawai, T

    2017-03-01

    The lack of a reliable immunosuppressive regimen that effectively suppresses both renal and islet allograft rejection without islet toxicity hampers a wider clinical application of simultaneous islet-kidney transplantation (SIK). Seven MHC-mismatched SIKs were performed in diabetic cynomolgus monkeys. Two recipients received rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction followed by daily tacrolimus and rapamycin (ATG/Tac/Rapa), and five recipients were treated with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and rapamycin (aCD40/Rapa). Anti-inflammatory therapy, including anti-interleukin-6 receptor mAb and anti-tumor necrosis factor-α mAb, was given in both groups. The ATG/Tac/Rapa recipients failed to achieve long-term islet allograft survival (19 and 26 days) due to poor islet engraftment and cytomegalovirus pneumonia. In contrast, the aCD40/Rapa regimen provided long-term islet and kidney allograft survival (90, 94, >120, >120, and >120 days), with only one recipient developing evidence of allograft rejection. The aCD40/Rapa regimen was also tested in four kidney-alone transplant recipients. All four recipients achieved long-term renal allograft survival (100% at day 120), which was superior to renal allograft survival (62.9% at day 120) with triple immunosuppressive regimen (tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids). The combination of anti-CD40 mAb and rapamycin is an effective and nontoxic immunosuppressive regimen that uses only clinically available agents for kidney and islet recipients.

  17. MURINE PULMONARY MACROPHAGE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION OF TNFA AND MIP-2 AFTER EXPOSURE TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES (DEP) AND EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEP constitute an important fraction of particulate air pollution and have been shown to cause inflammation of the airways. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory cytokine response of alveolar macrophages exposed to DEP and DEP-extracts. A murine alveolar macr...

  18. Murine myeloid cell lines derived by in vitro infection with recombinant c-myb retroviruses express myb from rearranged vector proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, T J; Ramsay, R G; Johnson, G R

    1989-01-01

    To date, cellular transformation in vitro by the myb oncogene has been described for avian haemopoietic cells only. In order to exploit the well-characterized murine haemopoietic system to study transformation by myb, we have infected fetal liver cells with retroviral vectors carrying cDNAs that encode either complete or carboxy-terminally truncated c-myb proteins. We describe four cell lines which, despite our ability to efficiently infect haemopoietic target cells, were generated at low frequency. This was due, as least in part, to the requirement for a rearrangement within the vector that allowed expression of myb sequences. Three of the lines express a truncated myb protein while the fourth apparently expresses a normal c-myb protein, and thus constitutes an exception to the general association of truncation with transformation by myb. All four cell lines resemble immature cells of the myelomonocytic lineage and are dependent on colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) for their growth in vitro. One representative line could be converted to CSF-independence by infection with either Abelson murine leukaemia virus or a recombinant granulocyte-macrophage-CSF-encoding retrovirus; unlike the parental line, the resultant sublines were highly tumorigenic when injected into syngeneic mice. Images PMID:2670561

  19. The Relationship between the Antitumor Effect of the IL-12 Gene Therapy and the Expression of Th1 Cytokines in an HPV16-Positive Murine Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    García Paz, Flor; Madrid Marina, Vicente; Morales Ortega, Ausencio; Santander González, Abimelec; Peralta Zaragoza, Oscar; Burguete García, Ana; Torres Poveda, Kirvis; Moreno, José; Alcocer González, Juan; Hernandez Marquez, Eva; Bermúdez Morales, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of IL-12 expressed in plasmid on the Th1 cytokine profile in an experimental HPV16-positive murine tumor model and the association with the IL-12's antitumor effect. Methods. Mice were injected with BMK-16/myc cells to establish HPV16-positive tumor and then pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid; pcDNA3 plasmid or PBS was injected directly into tumor site. The antitumor effect of the treatment was evaluated and the cytokines expression profile in each tumor tissue was analyzed. Results. Treatment with pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid had a significant antitumor effect, and a Th2-Th3-type cytokines prolife was detected in the murine tumor model with expression of the cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. However, after the tumor was treated with three intratumoral injections of plasmid containing IL-12 cDNA, it showed a cytokine profile associated with Th1 with expression of IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ cytokines and reduced expression of IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. Conclusions. The treatment with the IL-12 gene in the experimental HPV16-positive tumor model promoted the activation of the cellular immune response via expression of a Th1-type cytokine profile and was associated with the inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, IL-12 treatment represents a novel approach for gene therapy against cervical cancer. PMID:24808638

  20. Expression of the EWS/FLI-1 oncogene in murine primary bone-derived cells Results in EWS/FLI-1-dependent, ewing sarcoma-like tumors.

    PubMed

    Castillero-Trejo, Yeny; Eliazer, Susan; Xiang, Lilin; Richardson, James A; Ilaria, Robert L

    2005-10-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common malignant pediatric bone tumor. Over 80% of Ewing sarcoma contain the oncogene EWS/FLI-1, which encodes the EWS/FLI-1 oncoprotein, a hybrid transcription factor comprised of NH2-terminal sequences from the RNA-binding protein EWS and the DNA-binding and COOH-terminal regions of the Ets transcription factor FLI-1. Although numerous genes are dysregulated by EWS/FLI-1, advances in Ewing sarcoma cancer biology have been hindered by the lack of an animal model because of EWS/FLI-1-mediated cytotoxicity. In this study, we have developed conditions for the isolation and propagation of murine primary bone-derived cells (mPBDC) that stably express EWS/FLI-1. Early-passage EWS/FLI-1 mPBDCs were immortalized in culture but inefficient at tumor induction, whereas later-passage cells formed sarcomatous tumors in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors contained morphologically primitive cells that lacked definitive lineage markers. Molecular characterization of murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors revealed that some but not all had acquired a novel, clonal in-frame p53 mutation associated with a constitutive loss of p21 expression. Despite indications that secondary events facilitated EWS/FLI-1 mPBDC tumorigenesis, cells remained highly dependent on EWS/FLI-1 for efficient transformation in clonogenic assays. This Ewing sarcoma animal model will be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular pathogenesis of Ewing sarcoma and provides rationale for the broader use of organ-specific progenitor cell populations for the study of human sarcoma.

  1. Association Study of Exon Variants in the NF-κB and TGFβ Pathways Identifies CD40 as a Modifier of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bello, Luca; Flanigan, Kevin M; Weiss, Robert B; Spitali, Pietro; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Muntoni, Francesco; Zaharieva, Irina; Ferlini, Alessandra; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie; Claustres, Mireille; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Barp, Andrea; Vianello, Sara; Pegoraro, Elena; Punetha, Jaya; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Giri, Mamta; McDonald, Craig M; Hoffman, Eric P

    2016-11-03

    The expressivity of Mendelian diseases can be influenced by factors independent from the pathogenic mutation: in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), for instance, age at loss of ambulation (LoA) varies between individuals whose DMD mutations all abolish dystrophin expression. This suggests the existence of trans-acting variants in modifier genes. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes (SPP1, encoding osteopontin, and LTBP4, encoding latent transforming growth factor β [TGFβ]-binding protein 4) have been established as DMD modifiers. We performed a genome-wide association study of age at LoA in a sub-cohort of European or European American ancestry (n = 109) from the Cooperative International Research Group Duchenne Natural History Study (CINRG-DNHS). We focused on protein-altering variants (Exome Chip) and included glucocorticoid treatment as a covariate. As expected, due to the small population size, no SNPs displayed an exome-wide significant p value (< 1.8 × 10(-6)). Subsequently, we prioritized 438 SNPs in the vicinities of 384 genes implicated in DMD-related pathways, i.e., the nuclear-factor-κB and TGFβ pathways. The minor allele at rs1883832, in the 5'-untranslated region of CD40, was associated with earlier LoA (p = 3.5 × 10(-5)). This allele diminishes the expression of CD40, a co-stimulatory molecule for T cell polarization. We validated this association in multiple independent DMD cohorts (United Dystrophinopathy Project, Bio-NMD, and Padova, total n = 660), establishing this locus as a DMD modifier. This finding points to cell-mediated immunity as a relevant pathogenetic mechanism and potential therapeutic target in DMD.

  2. Classification of dendritic cell phenotypes from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The selection of relevant genes for sample classification is a common task in many gene expression studies. Although a number of tools have been developed to identify optimal gene expression signatures, they often generate gene lists that are too long to be exploited clinically. Consequently, researchers in the field try to identify the smallest set of genes that provide good sample classification. We investigated the genome-wide expression of the inflammatory phenotype in dendritic cells. Dendritic cells are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Therefore, the prediction of the inflammatory phenotype in these cells may help with the selection of immune-modulating compounds. Results A data mining protocol was applied to microarray data for murine cell lines treated with various inflammatory stimuli. The learning and validation data sets consisted of 155 and 49 samples, respectively. The data mining protocol reduced the number of probe sets from 5,802 to 10, then from 10 to 6 and finally from 6 to 3. The performances of a set of supervised classification models were compared. The best accuracy, when using the six following genes --Il12b, Cd40, Socs3, Irgm1, Plin2 and Lgals3bp-- was obtained by Tree Augmented Naïve Bayes and Nearest Neighbour (91.8%). Using the smallest set of three genes --Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3-- the performance remained satisfactory and the best accuracy was with Support Vector Machine (95.9%). These data mining models, using data for the genes Il12b, Cd40 and Socs3, were validated with a human data set consisting of 27 samples. Support Vector Machines (71.4%) and Nearest Neighbour (92.6%) gave the worst performances, but the remaining models correctly classified all the 27 samples. Conclusions The genes selected by the data mining protocol proposed were shown to be informative for discriminating between inflammatory and steady-state phenotypes in dendritic cells. The robustness of the data mining

  3. Immunization of chickens with an agonistic monoclonal anti-chicken CD40 antibody-hapten complex: rapid and robust IgG response induced by a single subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Chou, Wen-Ko; Farnell, Morgan B; Mwangi, Waithaka; Berghman, Luc R

    2012-04-30

    Producing diagnostic antibodies in chicken egg yolk represents an alternate animal system that offers many advantages including high productivity at low cost. Despite being an excellent counterpart to mammalian antibodies, chicken IgG from yolk still represents an underused resource. The potential of agonistic monoclonal anti-CD40 antibodies (mAb) as a powerful immunological adjuvant has been demonstrated in mammals, but not in chickens. We recently reported an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 mAb (designated mAb 2C5) and showed that it may have potential as an immunological adjuvant. In this study, we examined the efficacy of targeting a short peptide to chicken CD40 [expressed by the antigen-presenting cells (APCs)] in enhancing an effective IgG response in chickens. For this purpose, an immune complex consisting of one streptavidin molecule, two directionally biotinylated mAb 2C5 molecules, and two biotinylated peptide molecules was produced. Chickens were immunized subcutaneously with doses of this complex ranging from 10 to 90 μg per injection once, and relative quantification of the peptide-specific IgG response showed that the mAb 2C5-based complex was able to elicit a strong IgG response as early as four days post-immunization. This demonstrates that CD40-targeting antigen to chicken APCs can significantly enhance antibody responses and induce immunoglobulin isotype-switching. This immunization strategy holds promise for rapid production of hapten-specific IgG in chickens.

  4. Replacing the Promoter of the Murine Gene Encoding P-selectin with the Human Promoter Confers Human-like Basal and Inducible Expression in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Nan; Shao, Bojing; Panicker, Sumith R.; Fu, Jianxin; McEver, Rodger P.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and mice, megakaryocytes/platelets and endothelial cells constitutively synthesize P-selectin and mobilize it to the plasma membrane to mediate leukocyte rolling during inflammation. TNF-α, interleukin 1β, and LPS markedly increase P-selectin mRNA in mice but decrease P-selectin mRNA in humans. Transgenic mice bearing the entire human SELP gene recapitulate basal and inducible expression of human P-selectin and reveal human-specific differences in P-selectin function. Differences in the human SELP and murine Selp promoters account for divergent expression in vitro, but their significance in vivo is not known. Here we generated knockin mice that replace the 1.4-kb proximal Selp promoter with the corresponding SELP sequence (SelpKI). SelpKI/KI mice constitutively expressed more P-selectin on platelets and more P-selectin mRNA in tissues but only slightly increased P-selectin mRNA after injection of TNF-α or LPS. Consistent with higher basal expression, leukocytes rolled more slowly on P-selectin in trauma-stimulated venules of SelpKI/KI mice. However, TNF-α did not further reduce P-selectin-dependent rolling velocities. Blunted up-regulation of P-selectin mRNA during contact hypersensitivity reduced P-selectin-dependent inflammation in SelpKI/− mice. Higher basal P-selectin in SelpKI/KI mice compensated for this defect. Therefore, divergent sequences in a short promoter mediate most of the functionally significant differences in expression of human and murine P-selectin in vivo. PMID:26631722

  5. Epstein-Barr virus IL-10 gene expression by a recombinant murine gammaherpesvirus in vivo enhances acute pathogenicity but does not affect latency or reactivation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many viral genes affect cytokine function within infected hosts, with interleukin 10 (IL-10) as a commonly targeted mediator. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes an IL-10 homologue (vIL-10) expressed during productive (lytic) infection and induces expression of cellular IL-10 (cIL-10) during latency. This study explored the role of vIL-10 in a murine gammaherpesvirus (MHV) model of viral infection. Methods The EBV vIL-10 gene was inserted into MHV-76, a strain which lacks the ability to induce cIL-10, by recombination in transfected mouse cells. Mice were infected intranasally with the recombinant, vIL-10-containing MHV-76 or control virus strains and assayed at various days post infection for lung virus titer, spleen cell number, percentage of latently infected spleen cells and ability to reactivate virus from spleen cells. Results Recombinant murine gammaherpesvirus expressing EBV vIL-10 rose to significantly higher titers in lungs and promoted an increase in spleen cell number in infected mice in comparison to MHV strains lacking the vIL-10 gene. However, vIL-10 expression did not alter the quantity of latent virus in the spleen or its ability to reactivate. Conclusions In this mouse model of gammaherpesvirus infection, EBV vIL-10 appears to influence acute-phase pathogenicity. Given that EBV and MHV wild-type strains contain other genes that induce cIL-10 expression in latency (e.g. LMP-1 and M2, respectively), vIL-10 may have evolved to serve the specific role in acute infection of enlarging the permissive host cell population, perhaps to facilitate initial survival and dissemination of viral-infected cells. PMID:25324959

  6. Chemokine gene expression in the murine renal cell carcinoma, RENCA, following treatment in vivo with interferon-alpha and interleukin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Sonouchi, K.; Hamilton, T. A.; Tannenbaum, C. S.; Tubbs, R. R.; Bukowski, R.; Finke, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The expression of three chemoattractant cytokine (chemokine) messenger (m)RNAs in the murine renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) from mice treated with a combination of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and interleukin-2 was examined and related to tumor infiltration by inflammatory leukocytes. Using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay, mRNAs encoding the KC, JE, and IP-10 genes were all elevated in tumor tissue from mice treated systemically with IFN-alpha/interleukin-2 for 4 days. Similarly, the mRNA for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was also increased in tumors from treated as compared to control animals. The same tumors showed a significant increase in Mac-1+ leukocytes, which correlated well with the increase in chemokine and TNF-alpha gene expression. The renal cell carcinoma tumor itself may be responsible for the expression of chemokine genes in the tumor bed following cytokine therapy. Cultures of freshly explanted RENCA cells expressed significant levels of chemokine mRNAs when stimulated in vitro with IFN alpha, IFN gamma, and/or interleukin-2, demonstrating that this tumor cell has potential for expression of these genes in vivo. In contrast, TNF-alpha expression was not detected in cultured tumor cells. Thus TNF-alpha may be expressed by infiltrating monocytes following exposure to recombinant cytokine therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8160774

  7. Selective IAP inhibition results in sensitization of unstimulated but not CD40-stimulated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jianguo; Laing, Naomi; Oates, Melanie; Lin, Ke; Johnson, Gillian; Pettitt, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in therapy, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) remains incurable and new treatment strategies are therefore urgently required. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are over-expressed in CLL, suggesting both a role in disease pathogenesis and the potential for therapeutic targeting. To explore these questions, we evaluated the effects on primary CLL cells of AZD5582, a novel potent and selective inhibitor of IAPs. AZD5582 at nanomolar concentrations induced extensive degradation of cIAP-1 and cIAP-2, but minimally of X chromosome-linked IAP (XIAP). However, these effects of AZD5582 produced little or no direct cytotoxicity, nor did they sensitize CLL cells to p53-dependent killing by fludarabine or p53-independent killing by dexamethasone. In contrast, AZD5582 significantly enhanced apoptosis induced by the death receptor (DR) agonist tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Importantly, killing by TRAIL plus AZD5582 was independent of adverse prognostic features including TP53 deletion which is strongly associated with chemoresistance in CLL. Coculture experiments involving transfected mouse fibroblasts expressing human CD40L (CD154) to mimic the effect of T cells at sites of tissue involvement showed that CD40 stimulation almost completely prevented the killing of CLL cells by TRAIL plus AZD5582 despite up-regulating TRAIL receptors 1 and 2. In conclusion, our findings confirm the rate-limiting, upstream involvement of IAPs in the extrinsic but not intrinsic apoptotic pathway of CLL cells and suggest that drug combinations that simultaneously activate DRs and inhibit IAPs may have therapeutic potential in patients with CLL who have failed T-cell-depleting chemotherapy. PMID:25505620

  8. Analysis of telomerase target gene expression effects from murine models in patient cohorts by homology translation and random survival forest modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Bruedigam, Claudia; Lane, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and rapidly fatal blood cancer that affects patients of any age group. Despite an initial response to standard chemotherapy, most patients relapse and this relapse is mediated by leukemia stem cell (LSC) populations. We identified a functional requirement for telomerase in sustaining LSC populations in murine models of AML and validated this requirement using an inhibitor of telomerase in human AML. Here, we describe in detail the contents, quality control and methods of the gene expression analysis used in the published study (Gene Expression Omnibus GSE63242). Additionally, we provide annotated gene lists of telomerase regulated genes in AML and R code snippets to access and analyze the data used in the original manuscript. PMID:26981425

  9. Role of platelet CD40 ligand for endothelial cell-monocyte interaction in the presence of flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Andreas H.; Schwarz, Manuel; König, Gerd; Hecker, Markus

    2014-11-01

    CD40 ligand (CD154)-induced ultra-large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimer-mediated endothelial cell-platelet-monocyte interaction may play an important role in adaptive and maladaptive vascular remodeling processes. Here we analyzed the impact of and conditions favouring the deposition of these multimers on the endothelial cell (EC) surface by way of CD40-CD154 co-stimulation in settings mimicking different forms of blood flow. Upon exposure to low oscillatory shear stress and sCD154, a release of vWF multimers comparable to histamine stimulation was monitored on the EC surface in a string-like fashion. Moreover, ex vivo perfused carotid arteries of wild type mice at low laminar shear stress rates showed a luminal release of vWF as ultra-large vWF multimers (ULVWF) upon stimulation with sCD154 which was absent in blood vessels of CD40 knockout mice. The observed CD40- and flow-dependent vWF release from intact endothelial cells and subsequent vWF multimer formation may facilitate adhesion and subsequent activation of circulating platelets at atherosclerotic predilection sites, which are characterized by disturbed flow patterns. This in turn may amplify endothelial cell-monocyte interaction, thus possibly initiating or promoting early atherosclerotic lesion formation.

  10. TLR7 and CD40 cooperate in IL-6 production via enhanced JNK and AP-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bush, Tony J; Bishop, Gail A

    2008-02-01

    During vaccination or infection, adaptive and innate immune receptors of B cells are engaged by microbial antigens/ligands. A better understanding of how innate and adaptive signaling pathways interact could enlighten B lymphocyte biology as well as aid immunotherapy strategies and vaccine design. To address this goal, we examined the effects of TLR stimulation on BCR and CD40-induced B cell activation. Synergistic production of IL-6 was observed in both human and mouse primary B cells stimulated through B cell antigen receptors, CD40 and TLR7, and these two receptors also cooperated independently of BCR signals. The enhanced IL-6 production was dependent upon the activity of c-Jun kinase (JNK) and cFos. Dual stimulation through CD40 and TLR7 markedly enhanced JNK activity. The increased level of active JNK in dual-stimulated cells was accompanied by an increase in the level of active AP-1 monomers cJun and cFos. The stimulation of B cells through both CD40 and TLR7 therefore enhanced the production of cytokines through increased JNK signaling and AP-1 activity. In addition, the dual stimulation increased cFos/AP-1 species in stimulated cells, effectively expanding the repertoire of AP-1 dimers as compared to singly stimulated B cells.

  11. Incorporation of GM-CSF or CD40L Enhances the Immunogenicity of Hantaan Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lin-Feng; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Liang; Yu, Lan; Ye, Wei; Liu, Zi-Yu; Ying, Qi-Kang; Wu, Xing-An; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Zhang, Fang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    A safe and effective Hantaan virus (HTNV) vaccine is highly desirable because HTNV causes an acute and often fatal disease (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, HFRS). Since the immunity of the inactivated vaccine is weak and the safety is poor, HTNV virus-like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive and safe alternative. These particles lack the viral genome but are perceived by the immune system as virus particles. We hypothesized that adding immunostimulatory signals to VLPs would enhance their efficacy. To accomplish this enhancement, we generated chimeric HTNV VLPs containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or CD40 ligand (CD40L) and investigated their biological activity in vitro. The immunization of mice with chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L induced stronger humoral immune responses and cellular immune responses compared to the HTNV VLPs and Chinese commercial inactivated hantavirus vaccine. Chimeric HTNV VLPs containing GM-CSF or CD40L also protected mice from an HTNV challenge. Altogether, our results suggest that anchoring immunostimulatory molecules into HTNV VLPs can be a potential approach for the control and prevention of HFRS. PMID:28066721

  12. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X- linked hyper IgM syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiying; Upadhyaya, Bhaskar; Wu, Liming; Koh, Christopher; Santín-Durán, Mónica; Pittaluga, Stefania; Uzel, Gulbu; Kleiner, David; Williams, Ester; Ma, Chi A.; Bodansky, Aaron; Oliveira, Joao B.; Edmonds, Pamela; Hornung, Ronald; Wong, Duane W.; Fayer, Ronald; Fleisher, Tom; Heller, Theo; Prussin, Calman; Jain, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restoring class switch recombination in XHM B cells and inducing cytokine secretion by monocytes. CP-870,893 infusions were well tolerated and showed significant activity in vivo, decreasing leukocyte concentration in peripheral blood. Although specific antibody responses were lacking, frequent dosing in one subject primed T cells to secrete IFN-g and suppressed oocyst shedding in the stool. Nevertheless, relapse occurred after discontinuation of therapy. The CD40 receptor was rapidly internalized following binding with CP-870,893, potentially explaining the limited capacity of CP-870,893 to mediate immune reconstitution. This study demonstrates that CP-870,893 suppressed oocysts shedding in XHM patients with biliary cryptosporidiosis. The continued study of CD40 agonists in XHM is warranted. PMID:22459705

  13. Macrophages and Fc-receptor interactions contribute to the antitumour activities of the anti-CD40 antibody SGN-40.

    PubMed

    Oflazoglu, E; Stone, I J; Brown, L; Gordon, K A; van Rooijen, N; Jonas, M; Law, C-L; Grewal, I S; Gerber, H-P

    2009-01-13

    SGN-40 is a therapeutic antibody targeting CD40, which induces potent anti-lymphoma activities via direct apoptotic signalling cells and by cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Here we show antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by macrophages to contribute significantly to the therapeutic activities and that the antitumour effects of SGN-40 depend on Fc interactions.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85B and ESAT-6 expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis elicits cell-mediated immune response in a murine vaccination model.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Anthony G; Nagy, Judit; Leiva, Sergio; Kishore, Uday; Rosenkrands, Ida; Robertson, Brian D

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential molecular and immunological differences of a recombinant fusion protein (Hybrid-1), comprising of the immunodominant antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, derived from two different expression systems, namely Mycobacterium smegmatis and Escherichia coli. The fusion protein was successfully expressed and purified from both bacterial hosts and analyzed for any host-dependent post-translational modifications that might affect the immunogenicity of the protein. We investigated the immunogenicity of Hybrid-1 expressed in the two host species in a murine vaccination model, together with a reference standard Hybrid-1 (expressed in E. coli) from the Statens Serum Institut. No evidence of any post-translation modification was found in the M. smegmatis-derived Hybrid-1 fusion protein, nor were there any significant differences in the T-cell responses obtained to the three antigens analyzed. In conclusion, the Hybrid-1 fusion protein was successfully expressed in a homologous expression system using M. smegmatis and this system is worth considering as a primary source for vaccination trials, as it provided protein of excellent yield, stability and free from lipopolysaccharide.

  15. Expression of trkB and trkC receptors and their ligands brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 in the murine amygdala.

    PubMed

    Krause, S; Schindowski, K; Zechel, S; von Bohlen und Halbach, O

    2008-02-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and their cognate receptors, trkB and trkC, have a variety of physiological brain functions, ranging from cell survival to mechanisms involved in learning and memory and long-term potentiation (LTP). LTP can be induced in the cortex and hippocampus, as well as within the amygdala. However, the role of neurotrophins in amygdalar LTP is largely unknown. Expression patterns of BDNF and NT-3 and their cognate receptors in the adult mouse amygdala have not been analyzed in detail. We have therefore examined the expression of trkB, trkC, BDNF, and NT-3 mRNA and protein in different amygdalar nuclei as well as in the hippocampal areas CA1-CA3 and the dentate gyrus. The distribution pattern of trkB, trkC, BDNF, and NT-3 mRNA in the murine hippocampus is comparable to that seen in rats. Within most amygdalar nuclei, a moderate BDNF mRNA expression was found; however, BDNF mRNA was virtually absent from the central nucleus. No expression of NT-3 mRNA was found within the amygdala, but trkC mRNA-expressing cells were widely distributed within this brain region. trkB mRNA was strongly expressed in the amygdala. Because trkB is expressed in a full-length and a truncated form (the latter form is also expressed by nonneuronal cells), we also investigated the distribution of full-length trkB mRNA-expressing cells and could demonstrate that this version of trkB receptors is also widely expressed in the amygdala. These results can serve as a basis for studies elucidating the physiological roles of these receptors in the amygdala.

  16. CD40 Gene Silencing Reduces the Progression of Experimental Lupus Nephritis Modulating Local Milieu and Systemic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Èlia; Merino, Ana; Goma, Montse; Aran, Josep M.; Bolaños, Nuria; de Ramon, Laura; Herrero-Fresneda, Immaculada; Bestard, Oriol; Cruzado, Josep M.; Grinyó, Josep M.; Torras, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is an autoimmune disorder in which co-stimulatory signals have been involved. Here we tested a cholesterol-conjugated-anti-CD40-siRNA in dendritic cells (DC) in vitro and in a model of LPS to check its potency and tissue distribution. Then, we report the effects of Chol-siRNA in an experimental model of mice with established lupus nephritis. Our in vitro studies in DC show a 100%intracellular delivery of Chol-siRNA, with a significant reduction in CD40 after LPS stimuli. In vivo in ICR mice, the CD40-mRNA suppressive effects of our Chol-siRNA on renal tissue were remarkably sustained over a 5 days after a single preliminary dose of Chol-siRNA. The intra-peritoneal administration of Chol-siRNA to NZB/WF1 mice resulted in a reduction of anti-DNA antibody titers, and histopathological renal scores as compared to untreated animals. The higher dose of Chol-siRNA prevented the progression of proteinuria as effectively as cyclophosphamide, whereas the lower dose was as effective as CTLA4. Chol-siRNA markedly reduced insterstitialCD3+ and plasma cell infiltrates as well as glomerular deposits of IgG and C3. Circulating soluble CD40 and activated splenic lymphocyte subsets were also strikingly reduced by Chol-siRNA. Our data show the potency of our compound for the therapeutic use of anti-CD40-siRNA in human LN and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:23799000

  17. Loss of hemolysin expression in Staphylococcus aureus agr mutants correlates with selective survival during mixed infections in murine abscesses and wounds.

    PubMed

    Schwan, William R; Langhorne, Michael H; Ritchie, Heather D; Stover, C Kendall

    2003-08-18

    During the screening of a Staphylococcus aureus signature-tagged mutagenesis library, it was noted that nonhemolytic bacteria became more abundant as time passed in murine abscess and wound models, but not within organ tissues associated with systemic infections. To examine this further, a mixed population of hyperhemolytic, hemolytic, and nonhemolytic S. aureus strain RN6390 cells were inoculated into mice using abscess, wound, and systemic models of infection. After 7 days in the abscess, the hyperhemolytic group markedly declined, whereas the nonhemolytic population increased significantly. A similar phenomenon occurred in murine wounds, but not during the systemic infection. Sequencing of several of the signature-tagged mutants indicated mutations in the agrC gene or within the agrA-agrC intergenic region. Both alpha-hemolysin and delta-hemolysin activity was curtailed in these mutants, but beta-hemolysin activity was unaffected. Single strain comparisons between wild-type strain 8325-4 and strain DU1090 (hla-) as well as between strain RN6911 (agr) and wild-type strain RN6390 were performed using the same three animal models of infection. The agr mutant strain and the hla mutant strain showed no difference in bacterial counts in murine wounds compared to their respective parent strains. The same held true in murine abscesses at day 4, but strain RN6911 counts then declined at day 7. Considerable clearing of the hla mutant strain and the agr mutant strain occurred in the systemic model of infection. Mixed infections with the DU1090 and 8325-4 strains in the abscess model showed a slight advantage given to the DU1090 population, but a distinct selection for the parental 8325-4 strain in the liver. These results suggest that agr mutations cause reductions in the expression of several secreted proteins, including alpha- and delta-hemolysin, which in turn contribute to a growth advantage of this agr mutant group within a mixed population of S. aureus cells residing

  18. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for murine hepcidin-1: correlation with hepatic mRNA expression in established and novel models of dysregulated iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gutschow, Patrick; Schmidt, Paul J; Han, Huiling; Ostland, Vaughn; Bartnikas, Thomas B; Pettiglio, Michael A; Herrera, Carolina; Butler, James S; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; Fleming, Mark D; Westerman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Mice have been essential for distinguishing the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Currently, investigators monitor levels of murine hepatic hepcidin-1 mRNA as a surrogate marker for the bioactive hepcidin protein itself. Here, we describe and validate a competitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that quantifies hepcidin-1 in mouse serum and urine. The assay exhibits a biologically relevant lower limit of detection, high precision, and excellent linearity and recovery. We also demonstrate correlation between serum and urine hepcidin-1 values and validate the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by analyzing plasma hepcidin response of mice to physiological challenges, including iron deficiency, iron overload, acute blood loss, and inflammation. Furthermore, we analyze multiple murine genetic models of iron dysregulation, including β-thalassemia intermedia (Hbb(th3/+)), hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe(-/-), Hjv(-/-), and Tfr2(Y245X/Y245X)), hypotransferrinemia (Trf(hpx/hpx)), heterozygous transferrin receptor 1 deficiency (Tfrc(+/-)) and iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (Tmprss6(-/-) and Tmprss6(hem8/hem8)). Novel compound iron metabolism mutants were also phenotypically characterized here for the first time. We demonstrate that serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with liver hepcidin mRNA expression, transferrin saturation and non-heme liver iron. In some circumstances, serum hepcidin-1 more accurately predicts iron parameters than hepcidin mRNA, and distinguishes smaller, statistically significant differences between experimental groups.

  19. Differences in the effects of four TRPV1 channel antagonists on lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production and COX-2 expression in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yuki; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-03-11

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome triggered by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of gram-negative bacteria, and cytokine production via LPS-induced macrophage activation is deeply involved in its pathogenesis. Effective therapy of sepsis has not yet been established. However, it was reported that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel antagonist capsazepine (CPZ; a capsaicin analogue) attenuates sepsis in a murine model [Ang et al., PLoS ONE 6(9) (2011) e24535; J. Immunol. 187 (2011) 4778-4787]. Here, we profiled the effects of four TRPV1 channel antagonists, AMG9810, SB366791, BCTC and CPZ, on the release of IL-6, IL-1β and IL-18, and on expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in LPS-activated macrophages. Treatment of murine macrophage J774.1 cells or BALB/c mouse-derived intraperitoneal immune cells with LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production and COX-2 expression. Pretreatment with AMG9810 or CPZ significantly suppressed the release of IL-6, IL-1β and IL-18, and COX-2 expression, whereas SB366791 and BCTC were less effective. These results support a role of TRPV1 channel in macrophage activation, but also indicate that only a subset of TRPV1 channel antagonists may be effective in suppressing inflammatory responses. These results suggest that at least some TRPV1 channel antagonists, such as AMG9810 and CPZ, may be candidate anti-inflammatory agents for treatment of sepsis.

  20. AB283. SPR-10 Down-regulation of ryanodine receptor gene expression in murine urinary bladder smooth muscle following partial bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Javed, Elham; Addya, Shankar; Fortina, Paolo; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan; Chacko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) displays spontaneous action potentials and this potential is related to the phasic nature of spontaneous contractions in this tissue. The amplitude of a phasic contraction depends on the increase in Ca2+ entry caused by membrane depolarization. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in UBSM decreases the force production by decreasing the frequency of phasic contractions through interactions with large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Microarray and network analysis were employed to determine the changes in mRNA in 14-day obstructed murine bladders. We found that obstruction significantly down-regulated the RyRs in bladder smooth muscle (BSM). Methods Male C57Bl/6 mice were surgically obstructed and kept for 14 days. Sham-operated mice served as a control. Bladders were excised; urothelium scraped off with a scalpel, and the serosa was removed. BSM obtained from PBOO and sham control animals were used for microarray and western blotting Results Pathway-based analysis of these gene signatures showed significant number of under-expressed genes in obstructed bladder and they were mapped to proteins involved in calcium signaling. We focused our work on RyR protein expression in BSM. There was a four-fold reduction of RyR3 in BSM in 14-day obstructed groups as shown by microarray and immunoblotting compared to that of sham-operated animals. Conclusions These results confirm that the RyR gene expression is down-regulated in obstructed murine bladder smooth muscle. Funding Source(s) None

  1. Abnormalities induced by the mutant gene, lpr. Patterns of disease and expression of murine leukemia viruses in SJL/J mice homozygous and heterozygous for lpr.

    PubMed

    Morse, H C; Roths, J B; Davidson, W F; Langdon, W Y; Fredrickson, T N; Hartley, J W

    1985-03-01

    SJL/J mice heterozygous or homozygous for the lpr mutation were compared with SJL/J-+/+ mice for longevity, histopathology, antigenic characteristics of lymphocytes and expression of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV). In comparison to +/+ mice, lpr homozygotes had a markedly shortened life span, died with infiltrative pulmonary disease, but little or no renal disease, and expressed high levels of infectious ecotropic MuLV in lymphoid tissues. SJL-lpr/+ mice had a life span intermediate between SJL-+/+ and -lpr/lpr mice, died with lymphomas that histologically resembled the neoplasms of +/+ mice, and sometimes expressed high levels of ecotropic MuLV. The lymphomas of lpr/+ could be transplanted to +/+ recipients in 78% of cases, and continuous in vitro lines were established from some of them. Similar effects on virus expression or lymphoma development were not observed in other strains homozygous or heterozygous for the lpr mutation. These results indicate that the diseases expressed by mice homozygous for the lpr mutation are highly strain-dependent, and that this gene can have an effect in the heterozygous state in SJL mice.

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1-Expressing Dendritic Cells Promote Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Induce Less Severe Airway Inflammation in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Gau, Rung-Jiun; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Suen, Jau-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for instructing immune responses toward inflammatory or anti-inflammatory status. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is known for its cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress and inflammation, suggesting its immune regulatory role in allergic lung inflammation. HO-1 has been implicated in affecting DC maturation; however, its role in DC-mediated T-cell differentiation is unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that HO-1-expressing bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) displayed tolerogenic phenotypes, including their resistance to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced maturation, high level expression of IL-10, and low T-cell stimulatory activity. In addition, HO-1-expressing DCs were able to induce antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Also, HO-1-expressing DCs modulated the severity of lung inflammatory responses in two murine models of airway inflammation. This study provided evidence supporting the role of HO-1-expressing DCs in tolerance induction and as a potential therapeutic target for allergic asthma as well as other inflammatory diseases. PMID:28033400

  3. In vivo Antitumor Effect of an HPV-specific Promoter driving IL-12 Expression in an HPV 16-positive Murine Model of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Fierros-Zarate, Geny; García-Meléndrez, Celina; Alcocer-Gonzalez, Juan Manuel; Morales-Ortega, Ausencio; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Burguete-García, Ana Isabel; Hernández-Márquez, Eva; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a DNA virus that infects epithelial cells and has been implicated in the development of cervical cancer. Few therapeutic strategies have been designed for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor of cervical cancer. In these early stages, the HPV E2 protein is the most important viral factor involved in viral gene expression and plays crucial roles during the vegetative viral cycle in epithelial cells. Papillomavirus E2 binds specifically to palindromic ACCN6GGT sequences, referred to as the E2 binding sites (E2BS), which are concentrated within the viral long control region, and which are responsible for regulation of the HPV protein's expression. Here, we consider E2BS as a candidate sequence to induce the expression of antiviral therapeutic genes selectively in HPV-infected cells expressing the E2 protein. This study focuses on the use of an HPV-specific promoter comprised of four E2BS to drive the expression of IL-12, leading to an antitumor effect in an HPV-positive murine tumor model. The therapeutic strategy was implemented via viral gene therapy using adenoviral vectors with recombinant E2 and IL-12 genes and E2BS-IL-12. We demonstrate that the HPV-specific promoter E2BS is functional in vitro and in vivo through transactivation of HPV E2 transcription factor. PMID:27877210

  4. Effects of Fetal and Neonatal Murine Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Infusion on MicroRNA-145 Expression in Renal Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in MRL/lpr Mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, C; Liu, X Y; Wan, W Q; Yi, Z W

    2015-10-01

    For patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus, current medications are insufficient to control their condition, and new treatments are necessary. We aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of fetal and neonatal murine peripheral blood (FNPB) mononuclear cells and their impact on microRNA-145 (miR-145) in renal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice. MRL/lpr mice aged 20 weeks were randomized to 3 groups of 15 (control group, radiation group, infusion group). The renal tissues were subjected to pathological examination. In situ hybridization assay was applied to measure miR-145 expression in renal vessels of MRL/lpr mice. The infusion group had significantly better results for pathological renal tissue lesions than either the control or radiation group. In MRL/lpr mice, there was positive expression of miR-145 in renal VSMCs, although the expression of miR-145 was not discernible in renal vascular intima and adventitia. The miR-145 expression in renal VSMCs in the infusion group was significantly higher than in the control or radiation group, and higher in the radiation group than in the control group; however, the difference was not statistically significant. The increased expression of miR-145 in renal VSMCs might be one of the mechanisms supporting FNPB as a therapy for lupus nephritis; it also suggests that the miR-145 in renal vessels might be a new target for treatment of lupus nephritis.

  5. Th40 cells (CD4+CD40+ Tcells) drive a more severe form of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than conventional CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaitaitis, Gisela M.; Yussman, Martin G.; Waid, Dan M.; Wagner, David H.

    2017-01-01

    CD40-CD154 interaction is critically involved in autoimmune diseases, and CD4 T cells play a dominant role in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). CD4 T cells expressing CD40 (Th40) are pathogenic in type I diabetes but have not been evaluated in EAE. We demonstrate here that Th40 cells drive a rapid, more severe EAE disease course than conventional CD4 T cells. Adoptively transferred Th40 cells are present in lesions in the CNS and are associated with wide spread demyelination. Primary Th40 cells from EAE-induced donors adoptively transfer EAE without further in-vitro expansion and without requiring the administration of the EAE induction regimen to the recipient animals. This has not been accomplished with primary, non-TCR-transgenic donor cells previously. If co-injection of Th40 donor cells with Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in the recipient animals is done, the disease course is more severe. The CFA component of the EAE induction regimen causes generalized inflammation, promoting expansion of Th40 cells and infiltration of the CNS, while MOG-antigen shapes the antigen-specific TCR repertoire. Those events are both necessary to precipitate disease. In MS, viral infections or trauma may induce generalized inflammation in susceptible individuals with subsequent disease onset. It will be important to further understand the events leading up to disease onset and to elucidate the contributions of the Th40 T cell subset. Also, evaluating Th40 levels as predictors of disease onset would be highly useful because if either the generalized inflammation event or the TCR-honing can be interrupted, disease onset may be prevented. PMID:28192476

  6. Coordinate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (flt-1) and its ligand suggests a paracrine regulation of murine vascular development.

    PubMed

    Breier, G; Clauss, M; Risau, W

    1995-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a candidate regulator of blood vessel growth during embryonic development and in tumors. To evaluate the role of VEGF receptor-1/flt-1 (VEGFR1/flt-1) in the development of the vascular system, we have characterized the murine homolog of the human flt-1 gene and have analyzed its expression pattern during mouse embryogenesis. Receptor binding studies using transfected COS cells revealed that the murine flt-1 gene encodes a high affinity receptor for VEGF. The apparent Kd for VEGF binding, as determined by Scatchard analysis, was 114 pM, demonstrating that VEGFR1/flt-1 has a higher affinity to VEGF than VEGF receptor-2/flk-1 (VEGFR2/flk-1). By in situ hybridization, VEGFR1/flt-1 was detected in the yolk sac mesoderm already at the early stages of vascular development, while the receptor ligand was expressed in the entire endoderm of 7.5-day mouse embryos. A comparison with VEGFR2/flk-1 showed that the two receptors shared a common expression domain in the yolk sac mesoderm, but were expressed at different sites in the ectoplacental cone. The differential expression of the two VEGF receptors persisted in the developing placenta, where VEGFR1/flt-1 mRNA was detected in the spongiotrophoblast layer, whereas VEGFR2/flk-1 transcripts were present in the labyrinthine layer which is the site of VEGF expression. In the embryo proper, VEGFR1/flt-1 mRNA was specifically localized in blood vessels and capillaries of the developing organs, closely resembling the pattern of VEGFR2/flk-1 transcript distribution. In the developing brain, the expression of VEGF receptors in the perineural capillary plexus and in capillary sprouts which have invaded the neuro-ectoderm correlated with endothelial cell proliferation and brain angiogenesis. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that VEGF and its receptors have an important function both in the differentiation of the endothelial lineage and in the neovascularization of developing organs

  7. Key Role of MicroRNA in the Regulation of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor Expression in Murine Alveolar Epithelial Cells during Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anne; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Baker, Jessica; Rowley, Jesse; Paine, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GM-CSF is an endogenous pulmonary cytokine produced by normal alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) that is a key defender of the alveolar space. AEC GM-CSF expression is suppressed by oxidative stress through alternations in mRNA turnover, an effect that is reversed by treatment with recombinant GM-CSF. We hypothesized that specific microRNA (miRNA) would play a key role in AEC GM-CSF regulation. A genome-wide miRNA microarray identified 19 candidate miRNA altered in primary AEC during oxidative stress with reversal by treatment with GM-CSF. Three of these miRNA (miR 133a, miR 133a*, and miR 133b) are also predicted to bind the GM-CSF 3′-untranslated region (UTR). PCR for the mature miRNA confirmed induction during oxidative stress that was reversed by treatment with GM-CSF. Experiments using a GM-CSF 3′-UTR reporter construct demonstrated that miR133a and miR133b effects on GM-CSF expression are through interactions with the GM-CSF 3′-UTR. Using lentiviral transduction of specific mimics and inhibitors in primary murine AEC, we determined that miR133a and miR133b suppress GM-CSF expression and that their inhibition both reverses oxidant-induced suppression of GM-CSF expression and increases basal expression of GM-CSF in cells in normoxia. In contrast, these miRNAs are not active in regulation of GM-CSF expression in murine EL4 T cells. Thus, members of the miR133 family play key roles in regulation of GM-CSF expression through effects on mRNA turnover in AEC during oxidative stress. Increased understanding of GM-CSF gene regulation may provide novel miRNA-based interventions to augment pulmonary innate immune defense in lung injury. PMID:24371146

  8. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  9. Modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine dendritic cells (DCs) by purified Achyranthes bidentata polysaccharide (ABP).

    PubMed

    Zou, Yaxuan; Meng, Jingjuan; Chen, Wenna; Liu, Jingling; Li, Xuan; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2011-08-01

    There are a large number of interactions at molecular and cellular levels between the plant polysaccharides and immune system. Plant polysaccharides present an interesting effects as immunomodulators, particularly in the induction of the cells both in innate and adaptive immune systems. Activation of DCs could improve antitumoral responses usually diminished in cancer patients, and natural adjuvants provide a possibility of inducing this activation. ABP is a purified polysaccharide isolated from Achyranthes bidentata, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The aim of this study is to investigate modulation of phenotypic and functional maturation of murine DCs by ABP. Both phenotypic and functional activities were assessed with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) for the morphology of the DC, transmitted electron microscopy (TEM) for intracellular lysosomes inside the DC, cellular immunohistochemistry for phagocytosis by the DCs, flow cytometry (FCM) for the changes in key surface molecules, bio-assay for the activity of acidic phosphatases (ACP), and ELISA for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12. In fact, we found that purified ABP induced phenotypic maturation revealed by increased expression of CD86, CD40, and MHC II. Functional experiments showed the down-regulation of ACP inside DCs (which occurs when phagocytosis of DCs is decreased, and antigen presentation increased with maturation). Finally, ABP increased the production of IL-12. These data reveal that ABP promotes effective activation of murine DCs. This adjuvant-like activity may have therapeutic applications in clinical settings where immune responses need boosting. It is therefore concluded that ABP can exert positive modulation to murine DCs.

  10. Maturation of murine bone marrow dendritic cells induced by acidic Ginseng polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuozhou; Meng, Jingjuan; Xia, Yanjie; Meng, Yiming; Du, Lin; Zhang, Zhenjie; Wang, Enhua; Shan, Fengping

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we report that a acidic polysaccharide (AGP) isolated from a Chinese medicinal herb, named Ginseng (Panax giseng C.A. Meyer), induces maturation of bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) via concrete changes both inside and outside BMDCs. The impacts of AGP on BMDCs were assessed with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) for morphology, flow cytometry (FCM) for key surface molecules, cytochemistry assay, FITC-dextran, bio-assay for phagocytosis and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for production of cytokines. Our results elucidated that PPS promoted maturation of BMDCs via changes as reflected by the down-regulation of acid phosphatase (ACP) activity inside the BMDCs, which occurs when phagocytosis of BMDCs to antigen decreased, while antigen presentation increased upon maturation, higher expression of key surface molecules of MHC II, CD80, CD86, CD83, and CD40, and releasing higher level of cytokines IL-12 and low level of TNF-α. Our study suggest that AGP play marked immunostimulating role on the maturation of murine BMDCs through precise regulation of phagocytosis and enzyme activities inside the BMDCs.

  11. Differing effects of clarithromycin and azithromycin on cytokine production by murine dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, K; Shirai, R; Mukae, H; Ishimoto, H; Nagata, T; Sakamoto, N; Ishii, H; Nakayama, S; Yanagihara, K; Mizuta, Y; Kohno, S

    2007-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotics are now well known to have anti-inflammatory effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate immune responses, we examined the in vitro effects of clarithromycin (CAM), azithromycin (AZM) and midecamycin (MDM) on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and production of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-12p40, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] of murine bone marrow-derived DCs by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. A 15-membered macrolide, AZM, and a 14-membered macrolide, CAM, significantly enhanced the intensity of a co-stimulatory molecule, CD80, on DCs but not CD86 and CD40. AZM significantly increased the production of IL-10 and CAM significantly inhibited the production of IL-6 by DCs. However, a 16-membered macrolide, MDM, did not have any significant effect on these surface markers and cytokine productions. Moreover, AZM increased IL-10 and CAM decreased IL-2 productions significantly, when naive T cells derived from spleen were co-cultured with DCs treated in advance with LPS and these macrolides. These findings suggest that 14-membered and 15-membered, but not 16-membered macrolides play as anti-inflammatory agents, at least in part, through modulating the functions of DCs. However, each macrolide affects them in different ways. PMID:17302905

  12. Expression and survival significance of B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Mingkui; Song, Yang; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges in lung cancer research is identifying patients at high risk of progression and metastasis following surgical resection. In the present study, the prognostic significance of B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was evaluated. BMI1 and MMP9 expression in tumors from 132 surgical NSCLC patients [squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), n=79; and adenocarcinoma (AD), n=53] was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The clinical significance was determined using multivariate Cox regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. High BMI1 expression was more frequent in SCC compared with that in AD (P=0.015). Comparisons between the expression of BMI1 and that of other known biological markers revealed that the expression of BMI1 was correlated with that of MMP9 (χ2=4.241, P=0.039) in SCC. Although an association was not identified between high BMI1 expression and overall survival (OS) in NSCLC or AD, high BMI1 expression was an unfavorable predictor of survival in SCC according to the survival curves (P=0.038). In addition, combined high BMI1 and MMP9 expression levels were significantly correlated with SCC nodal/distant metastasis (χ2=6.392, P=0.014). Multivariate Cox proportional model analysis demonstrated that this combined marker was an independent prognostic indicator of OS in SCC (P=0.025; hazard ratio = 12.963; 95% confidence interval: 1.142–7.637). Therefore, this study demonstrated that combined BMI1 and MMP9 expression may be used as a marker for the progression and metastasis of SCC. These results may aid in the elucidation of the potential mechanism underlying the involvement of BMI1 and MMP9 in tissue-specific SCC progression. PMID:27900059

  13. Lunar soil simulant uptake produces a concentration-dependent increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anuran; Wang, Angela; Lera, Matthew; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2010-01-01

    One of NASA's long-term objectives is to be able to stay on the moon for extended periods, and to provide a stepping-stone for future Mars explorations. The lunar soil simulant JSC-1 has been developed by NASA from volcanic ash found in Arizona to facilitate testing of toxicity and system requirements for lunar exploration. A concentration-response study of JSC-1 was undertaken on the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Results demonstrated concentrations of 50-2000 microg/ml JSC-1 induced enhanced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Data suggest that extraterrestrial regolith has the potential to induce an inflammatory response, and that future development of anti-inflammatory mitigative strategies may be necessary to counteract lunar dust-associated cellular toxicity.

  14. Soluble M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 expressed in Escherichia coli: analysis of chemokine-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Matúšková, R; Pančík, P; Štibrániová, I; Belvončíková, P; Režuchová, I; Kúdelová, M

    2015-12-01

    M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was identified as a viral chemokine-binding protein 3 (vCKBP-3) capable to bind a broad spectrum of chemokines and their receptors. During both acute and latent infection MHV-68 M3 protein provides a selective advantage for the virus by inhibiting the antiviral and inflammatory response. A unique mutation Asp307Gly was identified in the M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 72 (MHV-72), localized near chemokine-binding domain. Study on chemokine-binding properties of MHV-72 M3 protein purified from medium of infected cells implied reduced binding to some chemokines when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. It was suggested that the mutation in the M3 protein might be involved in the attenuation of immune response to infection with MHV-72. Recently, Escherichia coli cells were used to prepare native recombinant M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 (Pančík et al., 2013). In this study, we assessed the chemokine-binding properties of three M3 proteins prepared in E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 (DE3) cells, the full length M3 protein of both MHV-68 and MHV-72 and MHV-68 M3 protein truncated in the signal sequence (the first 24 aa). They all displayed binding activity to human chemokines CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL8 (IL-8), and CCL3 (MIP-1α). The truncated MHV-68 M3 protein had more than twenty times reduced binding activity to CCL5, but only about five and three times reduced binding to CXCL8 and CCL3 when compared to its full length counterpart. Binding of the full length MHV-72 M3 protein to all chemokines was reduced when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. Its binding to CCL5 and CCL3 was reduced over ten and seven times. However, its binding to CXCL8 was only slightly reduced (64.8 vs 91.8%). These data implied the significance of the signal sequence and also of a single mutation (at aa 307) for efficient M3 protein binding to some chemokines.

  15. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  16. Expression of the murine retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10) gene correlates with many sites of retinoid signalling during embryogenesis and organ differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cammas, Laura; Romand, Raymond; Fraulob, Valérie; Mura, Carole; Dollé, Pascal

    2007-10-01

    Retinoic acid acts as a signalling molecule regulating many developmental events in vertebrates. As this molecule directly influences gene expression by activating nuclear receptors, its patterns of synthesis have to be tightly regulated, and it is well established that at least three retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDHs) are involved in such tissue-specific synthesis. Whereas embryos from oviparous species can obtain retinaldehyde by metabolizing carotenoids stored in the yolk, placental embryos rely on retinol transferred from the maternal circulation. Here, we show that the gene encoding one of the murine retinol dehydrogenases, Rdh10, is expressed according to complex profiles both during early embryogenesis and organ differentiation. Many of its expression sites correlate with regions of active retinoid signalling and Raldh gene expression, especially with Raldh2 in the early presomitic and somitic mesoderm, retrocardiac and posterior branchial arch region, or later in the pleural mesothelium and kidney cortical region. Rdh10 also shows cell-type and/or regional specificity during development of the palate, teeth, and olfactory system. During limb bud development, it may participate in retinoic acid production in proximal/posterior cells, and eventually in interdigital mesenchyme. These data implicate the retinol to retinaldehyde conversion as the first step in the tissue-specific regulation of retinoic acid synthesis, at least in mammalian embryos.

  17. cDNA cloning of the murine PEX gene implicated in X-linked hypophosphatemia and evidence for expression in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Du, L.; Desbarats, M.; Viel, J.

    1996-08-15

    The recently identified human PEX g ene apparently encodes for a neutral endopeptidase that is mutated in patients with X-linked hypophosphatemia. The 3{prime} and 5{prime} ends of the coding region of PEX have not been cloned, nor has the tissue expression of the gene been identified. Here we report the isolation and characterization of the complete open reading frame of the mouse Pex gene and the demonstration of its expression in bone. Mouse Pex cDNA is predicted to encode a protein of 749 amino acids with 95% identity to the available human PEX sequence and significant homology to members of the membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase family. Northern blot analysis revealed a 6.6-kb transcript in bone and in cultured osteoblasts from normal mice that was not detectable in samples from the Hyp mouse, the murine homolog of human X-linked hypophosphatemia. Pex transcripts were, however, detectable in Hyp bone by RT-PCR amplification. Of particular interest, a cDNA clone from rat incisor shows 93% sequence identity to the 5{prime} end of Pex cDNA, suggesting that Pex may be expressed in another calcified tissue, the tooth. The association of impaired mineralization of bone and teeth and disturbed renal phosphate reabsorption with altered expression of Pex suggests that the Pex gene product may play a critical role in these processes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Expression of a phosphorylated substrate domain of p130Cas promotes PyMT-induced c-Src-dependent murine breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingshe; Kumbrink, Joerg; Lin, Bor-Tyh; Bouton, Amy H; Yang, Shi; Toselli, Paul A; Kirsch, Kathrin H

    2013-12-01

    Elevated expression of p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate)/BCAR1 (breast cancer antiestrogen resistance 1) in human breast tumors is a marker of poor prognosis and poor overall survival. p130Cas is a downstream target of the tyrosine kinase c-Src. Signaling mediated by p130Cas through its phosphorylated substrate domain (SD) and interaction with effector molecules directly promotes tumor progression. We previously developed a constitutively phosphorylated p130Cas SD molecule, Src*/SD (formerly referred to as Src*/CasSD), which acts as decoy molecule and attenuates the transformed phenotype in v-crk-transformed murine fibroblasts and human breast cancer cells. To test the function of this molecule in vivo, we established mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-long terminal repeat-Src*/SD transgenic mice in which mammary gland development and tumor formation were analyzed. Transgenic expression of the Src*/SD molecule under the MMTV-long terminal repeat promoter did not interfere with normal mammary gland development or induce tumors in mice observed for up to 11 months. To evaluate the effects of the Src*/SD molecule on tumor development in vivo, we utilized the MMTV-polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT) murine breast cancer model that depends on c-Src. PyMT mice crossed with Src*/SD mice displayed accelerated tumor formation. The earlier onset of tumors can be explained by the interaction of the Src* domain with PyMT and targeting the fused phosphorylated SD to the membrane. At membrane compartments, it might integrate membrane-associated active signaling complexes leading to increased proliferation measured by phospho-Histone H3 staining. Although these results were unexpected, they emphasize the importance of preventing the membrane association of Src*/SD when employed as decoy molecule.

  19. Expression of a phosphorylated substrate domain of p130Cas promotes PyMT-induced c-Src-dependent murine breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingshe; Kumbrink, Joerg; Kirsch, Kathrin H.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated expression of p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate)/BCAR1 (breast cancer antiestrogen resistance 1) in human breast tumors is a marker of poor prognosis and poor overall survival. p130Cas is a downstream target of the tyrosine kinase c-Src. Signaling mediated by p130Cas through its phosphorylated substrate domain (SD) and interaction with effector molecules directly promotes tumor progression. We previously developed a constitutively phosphorylated p130Cas SD molecule, Src*/SD (formerly referred to as Src*/CasSD), which acts as decoy molecule and attenuates the transformed phenotype in v-crk-transformed murine fibroblasts and human breast cancer cells. To test the function of this molecule in vivo, we established mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-long terminal repeat-Src*/SD transgenic mice in which mammary gland development and tumor formation were analyzed. Transgenic expression of the Src*/SD molecule under the MMTV-long terminal repeat promoter did not interfere with normal mammary gland development or induce tumors in mice observed for up to 11 months. To evaluate the effects of the Src*/SD molecule on tumor development in vivo, we utilized the MMTV-polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT) murine breast cancer model that depends on c-Src. PyMT mice crossed with Src*/SD mice displayed accelerated tumor formation. The earlier onset of tumors can be explained by the interaction of the Src* domain with PyMT and targeting the fused phosphorylated SD to the membrane. At membrane compartments, it might integrate membrane-associated active signaling complexes leading to increased proliferation measured by phospho-Histone H3 staining. Although these results were unexpected, they emphasize the importance of preventing the membrane association of Src*/SD when employed as decoy molecule. PMID:23825155

  20. A High Level of Soluble CD40L Is Associated with P. aeruginosa Infection in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Cordero-Pérez, Paula; Galindo-Rodríguez, Gabriela; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Villarreal-Villarreal, César Daniel; Mercado-Longoria, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the concentration of sCD40L, a product of platelet activation, correlates with the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the airway of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to determine its possible clinical association. Methods Sixty patients with CF, ranging in age from 2 months to 36 years, were studied. The demographics, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genotype, spirometry measurements, radiographic and tomographic scans, platelet count in peripheral blood, sCD40L, IL-6, TNF-α and ICAM1 data were collected. Infection-colonization of the airway was evaluated using sputum and throat swab cultures; the levels of anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibodies (Anti-PaAb) were evaluated. Results Patients with CF and chronic colonization had anti-PaAb values of 11.6 ± 2.1 ELISA units (EU) and sCD40L in plasma of 1530.9 ±1162.3 pg/mL; those with intermittent infection had 5.7 ± 2.7 EU and 2243.6 ± 1475.9 pg/mL; and those who were never infected had 3.46 ± 1.8 EU (p≤0.001) and 1008.1 ± 746.8 pg/mL (p≤0.01), respectively. The cutoff value of sCD40L of 1255 pg/mL was associated with an area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.97), reflecting P. aeruginosa infection with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 89%. Lung damage was determined using the Brasfield Score, the Bhalla Score, and spirometry (FVC%, FEV1%) and found to be significantly different among the groups (p≤0.001). Conclusion Circulating sCD40L levels are increased in patients with cystic fibrosis and P. aeruginosa infection. Soluble CD40L appears to reflect infection and provides a tool for monitoring the evolution of lung deterioration. PMID:28030642