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Sample records for expression affect blood

  1. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid affects blood parameters, liver morphology and expression of selected hepatic genes in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Koronowicz, A A; Banks, P; Szymczyk, B; Leszczyńska, T; Master, A; Piasna, E; Szczepański, W; Domagała, D; Kopeć, A; Piątkowska, E; Laidler, P

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research were to investigate the effect of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched diet on Isa Brown laying hen health status and to provide a comprehensive analysis of changes in blood parameters, liver morphology and selected hepatic gene expression. Hens were allocated to the control and experimental group (diet enriched with 0.75% CLA) for a total period of 4 m. At the end of the experiment half of the hens from each group were slaughtered for analyses. The remaining hens were transferred to an organic farm for the next 5 m and fed on the diet without CLA supplementation. The CLA-enriched diet resulted in significant changes in blood and serum parameters; specifically, haematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and white blood cells (WBC) count were decreased compared to the control. The total cholesterol (TC) was not significantly affected while the triacylglycerol's (TG) concentration was elevated. The activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was significantly increased in the CLA-supplemented group, while aspartate aminotransferase (AST) showed an increasing tendency. Liver biopsies showed pathological changes classified as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Additionally, the expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acids synthesis (ME1, ACLY, ACC, FASN, SCD1), oxidation (CPT1α, PPARA), detoxification processes (Cytochrome P450, CYP, Flavin-containing monooxygenase, FMO3), oxidative stress (NOX4, XbP1) and inflammation (IL6, TNFα) were elevated. Cessation of CLA supplementation for 5 m of organic farming resulted in normalisation of blood and hepatic parameters to the levels observed in control hens. The results of this study indicate that dietary CLA triggers an integrated stress response in laying hens and activates mechanisms involved in liver detoxification.

  2. Alcohol: Does It Affect Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure (hypertension) Does drinking alcohol affect your blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure to unhealthy levels. Having more than three drinks ...

  3. MicroRNA-137 Inhibits EFNB2 Expression Affected by a Genetic Variant and Is Expressed Aberrantly in Peripheral Blood of Schizophrenia Patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Rui; Nie, Fayi; Wang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Congshan; Liu, Meng; Valenzuela, Robert K; Liu, Wanqing; Shi, Yongyong; Ma, Jie

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous and non-coding single-stranded RNAs of approximately 22 nucleotides, many of which are evolutionarily conserved. Genome-wide association studies have identified a robust statistical association between the MIR137 gene and schizophrenia in Europeans, which was replicated in the Han Chinese population in a case-control study. In the previous study, we provided evidence for a significant association between the EFNB2 gene and schizophrenia in Han Chinese subjects. In the current study, we utilized computational analysis, vector construction of point mutations, luciferase reporter assays and gene expression assays including RT-qPCR and western blotting methods to investigate miR-137 directly targeting EFNB2 gene and explore the reversal effect of a genetic variant of SNP rs550067317 in the putative seed-pair region of EFNB2 3'-UTR. We also found that miR-137 could be detected in the peripheral blood of a cohort of first-onset schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, and the area under curve was 0.795 (95% confidence interval 0.700-0.890), which is a middle diagnostic value for disease, suggesting that it might be valuable for diagnosing schizophrenia. In summary, this study would improve our understanding of the role of miR-137 in schizophrenia-associated signaling pathways and identify the genetic basis of rs550067317 for schizophrenia. Furthermore, we provided new evidence for the involvement of miR-137 in the etiology and diagnosis of schizophrenia, which might contribute to the discovery of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the disease.

  4. Decoding Children's Expressions of Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinman, Joel A.; Feldman, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    Mothers' ability to decode their children's nonverbal expressions of four affects (happiness, sadness, fear, and anger) was contrasted with the decoding ability of a matched group of nonmothers. Results indicate that mothers were accurately able to decode expressions of happiness but had relative difficulty with decoding expressions of sadness,…

  5. Does the method of expression of venous blood affect ischaemia/reperfusion damage in tourniquet use? An experimental study on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Iltar, Serkan; Kılınç, Cem Yalın; Alemdaroğlu, Kadir Bahadır; Ozcan, Selahattin; Aydoğan, Nevres Hürriyet; Sürer, Hatice; Kılınç, Aytün Şadan

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ischaemia and reperfusion phases of two tourniquet application models (Group 1: expressing the blood by a sterile rubber bandage and Group 2: elevation of the limb for several minutes) using an analysis of ischaemia/reperfusion parameters and blood pH. Sixteen New Zealand rabbits were used. Muscle samples were extracted from the triceps surae; at phase A (baseline: just before tourniquet application), phase B (ischaemia: 3h after tourniquet inflation) and phase C (2h after tourniquet deflation). Nitrite, nitrate, reduced glutathione, myeloperoxidase, malondyaldehyde were measured in the samples. Blood pH was also measured at each phase. Group 2 had significantly decreased nitrite (p=0.007) and nitrate (p=0.01) levels compared to Group 1 while passing from phase A to phase B. The pH decrease through the phases was significant within Group 1 (p=0.006) and was not significant within Group 2 (p=0.052). Lower levels of NO metabolites nitrate and nitrite, result from tourniquet use with incomplete venous blood expression by elevation. Also, with this technique severe acidosis is less likely to occur than when a tourniquet is used with expression of the venous blood by rubber bandage. These findings may help in the decision of which tourniquet technique is to be used for potentially long operations which may exceed 2h.

  6. Deficient and excess dietary selenium levels affect growth performance, blood cells apoptosis and liver HSP70 expression in juvenile yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Ru; Huang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Guo-Xia; Wu, Ying-Xia; Xian, Jian-An; Wang, An-Li; Cao, Jun-Ming

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effects of deficient and excess dietary selenium (Se) on growth, blood cells apoptosis and liver heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in juvenile yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco). After 8 weeks, yellow catfish (initial weight: 2.12 ± 0.01 g) fed isonitrogenous and isolipid diets containing <0.05 (deficient dietary Se) or 6.5 (excess dietary Se) mg Se/kg displayed a significantly lower weight gain ratio (WGR) than those fed a diet containing 0.23 (normal dietary Se) mg Se/kg. As dietary Se levels increased, liver Se concentration, glutathione peroxidase activity and the hepatosomatic index increased significantly. Plasma glucose concentration was highest in the normal treatment compared with the excess dietary Se treatment. Both deficient and excess dietary Se lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis ratio in blood cells, whereas only excess dietary Se increased their cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) (CF-Ca(2+)) concentration. Excess dietary Se also resulted in the highest level of HSP70 expression, thereby possibly providing a protective mechanism against oxidative stress. These results indicate that both deficient and excess dietary Se restrained the growth of juvenile yellow catfish and caused oxidative stress. The overproduction of ROS may act as a signal molecule mediate apoptosis when dietary Se deficiency. Both ROS and CF-Ca(2+) were recorded when dietary Se excess, suggesting that Ca(2+) may be activated by Se and play a major role during Se-induced oxidative stress and cell apoptosis.

  7. Periconceptional undernutrition affects in utero methyltransferase expression and steroid hormone concentrations in uterine flushings and blood plasma during the peri-implantation period in domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Franczak, A; Zglejc, K; Waszkiewicz, E; Wojciechowicz, B; Martyniak, M; Sobotka, W; Okrasa, S; Kotwica, G

    2016-08-18

    Female undernutrition during early pregnancy may affect the physiological pattern of genomic DNA methylation. We hypothesised that in utero DNA methylation may be impaired in females fed a restrictive diet in early pregnancy. In this study we evaluated whether poor maternal nutritional status, induced by applying a restricted diet during the peri-conceptional period, may influence: (1) the potential for in utero DNA methylation, expressed as changes in the mRNA expression and protein abundance of methyltransferases: DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNMT3a in the endometrium and the myometrium, (2) the intrauterine microenvironment, measured as oestradiol 17β (E2) and progesterone (P4) concentrations in uterine flushings and (3) plasma concentration of E2 and P4 during the peri-implantation period. Our results indicate that maternal peri-conceptional undernutrition affects maintenance and de novo DNA methylation in the endometrium, de novo methylation in the myometrium and a results in a decrease in intrauterine E2 concentration during the peri-implantation period. The intrauterine concentration of P4 and plasma concentrations of E2 and P4 did not change. These findings suggest that undernutrition during the earliest period of pregnancy, and perhaps the pre-pregnancy period, may create changes in epigenetic mechanisms in the uterus and intrauterine milieu of E2 during the peri-implantation period.

  8. Blood Pressure: Is It Affected by Cold Weather?

    MedlinePlus

    ... your narrowed veins and arteries. In addition to cold weather, blood pressure may also be affected by a sudden change in weather patterns, such as a weather front or a storm. Your body — and blood vessels — ...

  9. Does Schumann resonance affect our blood pressure?

    PubMed Central

    Mitsutake, G.; Otsuka, K.; Hayakawa, M.; Sekiguchi, M.; Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether Schumann resonance (SR) affects blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and depression and, if so, whether the putative BP reactivity to SR (BPR-SR) is associated with health-related lifestyle (HLS), disease-related illnesses (DRI), and depression. Methods A sample of 56 adults in Urausu, Hokkaido, Japan, wore an ambulatory BP monitor, except for the time in the shower, for seven consecutive days. They completed the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form and a health survey questionnaire on HLS and DRI. Group mean differences and within-individual differences in systolic (S) and diastolic (D) BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), double product (DP), and HR were, respectively, compared between normal and enhanced SR days, using Student’s t-test. Correlations between BPR-SR and other characteristics (i.e. age, gender, HLS, DRI, subjective health, and depression) were analyzed, using Pearson’s product moment correlation. Results and discussion Group mean SBP, DBP, MAP, and DP for enhanced SR days were lower than those for normal days (P = 0.005-0.036). DRI was negatively associated with BPR-SR in SBP, DBP, MAP, and DP (P = 0.003-0.024), suggesting a better health status for those who showed lower BP on enhanced SR days. HLS was negatively associated with BPR-SR in DBP and MAP (P = 0.016-0.029). Males showed higher BPR-SR in DBP and MAP than females (P = 0.0044-0.016). Neither subjective health nor depression was significantly associated with BPR-SR. Future studies based on larger sample sizes are planned to see whether possible health effects can be generalized. PMID:16275477

  10. Decoding Children's Expressions of Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinman, Joel A.; Feldman, Robert S.

    Mothers' ability to decode the emotional expressions of their male and female children was compared to the decoding ability of non-mothers. Happiness, sadness, fear and anger were induced in children in situations that varied in terms of spontaneous and role-played encoding modes. It was hypothesized that mothers would be more accurate decoders of…

  11. Audio-visual affective expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Thomas S.; Zeng, Zhihong

    2007-11-01

    Automatic affective expression recognition has attracted more and more attention of researchers from different disciplines, which will significantly contribute to a new paradigm for human computer interaction (affect-sensitive interfaces, socially intelligent environments) and advance the research in the affect-related fields including psychology, psychiatry, and education. Multimodal information integration is a process that enables human to assess affective states robustly and flexibly. In order to understand the richness and subtleness of human emotion behavior, the computer should be able to integrate information from multiple sensors. We introduce in this paper our efforts toward machine understanding of audio-visual affective behavior, based on both deliberate and spontaneous displays. Some promising methods are presented to integrate information from both audio and visual modalities. Our experiments show the advantage of audio-visual fusion in affective expression recognition over audio-only or visual-only approaches.

  12. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular.

  13. How Does Smoking Affect the Heart and Blood Vessels?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease, heart attack, and stroke . Smoking and Atherosclerosis The image shows how smoking can affect arteries ... a detailed view of a leg artery with atherosclerosis—plaque buildup that's partially blocking blood flow. Figure ...

  14. Affective Scaffolds, Expressive Arts, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Some theorists have argued that elements of the surrounding world play a crucial role in sustaining and amplifying both cognition and emotion. Such insights raise an interesting question about the relationship between cognitive and affective scaffolding: in addition to enabling the realization of specific affective states, can an affective niche also enable the realization of certain cognitive capacities? In order to gain a better understanding of this relationship between affective niches and cognition, I will examine the use of expressive arts in the context of psychotherapy and peacebuilding. In these settings, environmental resources and interpersonal scaffolds not only evoke emotion and encourage the adoption of particular bodily affective styles, but also support the development of capacities for self-awareness and interpersonal understanding. These affective scaffolds play a crucial role in therapy and peacebuilding, in fact, insofar as they facilitate the development of self-knowledge, enhance capacities associated with social cognition, and build positive rapport and trust among participants. I will argue that this is because affectivity is linked to the way that subjects frame and attend to their surroundings. Insofar as the regulation and modification of emotion goes hand in hand with opening up new interpretive frames and establishing new habits of mind, the creation of an affective niche can contribute significantly to various modes of cognition. PMID:27014164

  15. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension.

  16. High Salt Diet Affects Renal Sodium Excretion and ERRα Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys regulate the balance of water and sodium and therefore are related to blood pressure. It is unclear whether estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), an orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor highly expressed in kidneys, affects the reabsorption of water and sodium. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in the expressions of ERRα, Na+/K+-ATPase and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) proteins affected the reabsorption of water and sodium in kidneys of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats. SS.13BN rats, 98% homologous to the DS rats, were used as a normotensive control group. The 24 h urinary sodium excretion of the DS and SS.13BN rats increased after the 6-week high salt diet intervention, while sodium excretion was increased in DS rats with daidzein (agonist of ERRα) treatment. ERRα expression was decreased, while β- and γ-ENaC mRNA expressions were increased upon high sodium diet treatment in the DS rats. In the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay, positive PCR signals were obtained in samples treated with anti-ERRα antibody. The transcriptional activity of ERRα was decreased upon high salt diet intervention. ERRα reduced the expressions of β- and γ-ENaC by binding to the ENaC promoter, thereby increased Na+ reabsorption. Therefore, ERRα might be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:27043552

  17. Factors affecting Brucella spp. blood cultures positivity in children.

    PubMed

    Apa, Hurşit; Devrim, Ilker; Memur, Seyma; Günay, Ilker; Gülfidan, Gamze; Celegen, Mehmet; Bayram, Nuri; Karaarslan, Utku; Bağ, Ozlem; Işgüder, Rana; Oztürk, Aysel; Inan, Seyhan; Unal, Nurrettin

    2013-03-01

    Brucella infections have a wide spectrum of symptoms especially in children, making the diagnosis a complicated process. The gold standard for the final diagnosis for brucellosis is to identify the Brucella spp. isolated from blood or bone marrow cultures. The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the factors affecting the isolation of Brucella spp. from blood cultures. In our study, the ratio of fever, presence of hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly were found to be higher in the bacteremic group. In addition, C-reactive protein levels and liver function enzymes were found to be higher in the bacteremic group. In our opinion, while evaluating the febrile child with suspected Brucella infection, we highly recommend sampling blood cultures regardless of the history of previous antimicrobial therapy and duration of the symptoms.

  18. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  19. Diabetes Management: How Lifestyle, Daily Routine Affect Blood Sugar

    MedlinePlus

    ... management requires awareness. Know what makes your blood sugar level rise and fall — and how to control ... factors. By Mayo Clinic Staff Keeping your blood sugar levels within the range recommended by your doctor ...

  20. Dissecting gene expression at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Melanie A.; Bien-Ly, Nga; Daneman, Richard; Watts, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of genome-wide expression data for the blood-brain barrier is an invaluable resource that has recently enabled the discovery of several genes and pathways involved in the development and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier, particularly in rodent models. The broad distribution of published data sets represents a viable starting point for the molecular dissection of the blood-brain barrier and will further direct the discovery of novel mechanisms of blood-brain barrier formation and function. Technical advances in purifying brain endothelial cells, the key cell that forms the critical barrier, have allowed for greater specificity in gene expression comparisons with other central nervous system cell types, and more systematic characterizations of the molecular composition of the blood-brain barrier. Nevertheless, our understanding of how the blood-brain barrier changes during aging and disease is underrepresented. Blood-brain barrier data sets from a wider range of experimental paradigms and species, including invertebrates and primates, would be invaluable for investigating the function and evolution of the blood-brain barrier. Newer technologies in gene expression profiling, such as RNA-sequencing, now allow for finer resolution of transcriptomic changes, including isoform specificity and RNA-editing. As our field continues to utilize more advanced expression profiling in its ongoing efforts to elucidate the blood-brain barrier, including in disease and drug delivery, we will continue to see rapid advances in our understanding of the molecular mediators of barrier biology. We predict that the recently published data sets, combined with forthcoming genomic and proteomic blood-brain barrier data sets, will continue to fuel the molecular genetic revolution of blood-brain barrier biology. PMID:25414634

  1. Categorical Perception of Affective and Linguistic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Stephen; Emmorey, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated categorical perception (CP) effects for affective facial expressions and linguistic facial expressions from American Sign Language (ASL) for Deaf native signers and hearing non-signers. Facial expressions were presented in isolation (Experiment 1) or in an ASL verb context (Experiment 2). Participants performed ABX…

  2. Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation colour affect perceived human health.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Ian D; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice.

  3. Language and affective facial expression in children with perinatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Philip T.; Reilly, Judy S.

    2015-01-01

    Children with perinatal stroke (PS) provide a unique opportunity to understand developing brain-behavior relations. Previous research has noted distinctive differences in behavioral sequelae between children with PS and adults with acquired stroke: children fare better, presumably due to the plasticity of the developing brain for adaptive reorganization. Whereas we are beginning to understand language development, we know little about another communicative domain, emotional expression. The current study investigates the use and integration of language and facial expression during an interview. As anticipated, the language performance of the five and six year old PS group is comparable to their typically developing (TD) peers, however, their affective profiles are distinctive: those with right hemisphere injury are less expressive with respect to affective language and affective facial expression than either those with left hemisphere injury or TD group. The two distinctive profiles for language and emotional expression in these children suggest gradients of neuroplasticity in the developing brain. PMID:26117314

  4. Noncontact discrimination of animal and human blood with vacuum blood vessel and factors affect the discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linna; Zhang, Shengzhao; Sun, Meixiu; Li, Hongxiao; Li, Yingxin; Fu, Zhigang; Guan, Yang; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2017-03-01

    Discrimination of human and nonhuman blood is crucial for import-export ports and inspection and quarantine departments. Current methods are usually destructive, complicated and time-consuming. We had previously demonstrated that visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy combining PLS-DA method can successfully realize human blood discrimination. In that research, the spectra were measured with the fiber probe under the surface of blood samples. However, open sampling may pollute the blood samples. Virulence factors in blood samples can also endanger inspectors. In this paper, we explored the classification effect with the blood samples measured in the original containers-vacuum blood vessel. Furthermore, we studied the impact of different conditions of blood samples, such as coagulation and hemolysis, on the prediction ability of the discrimination model. The calibration model built with blood samples in different conditions displayed a satisfactory prediction result. This research demonstrated that visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method was potential for noncontact discrimination of human blood.

  5. Interferon-inducible gene expression signature in peripheral blood cells of patients with severe lupus.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Emily C; Batliwalla, Franak M; Karypis, George; Gaffney, Patrick M; Ortmann, Ward A; Espe, Karl J; Shark, Katherine B; Grande, William J; Hughes, Karis M; Kapur, Vivek; Gregersen, Peter K; Behrens, Timothy W

    2003-03-04

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex, inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects multiple organ systems. We used global gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify distinct patterns of gene expression that distinguish most SLE patients from healthy controls. Strikingly, about half of the patients studied showed dysregulated expression of genes in the IFN pathway. Furthermore, this IFN gene expression "signature" served as a marker for more severe disease involving the kidneys, hematopoetic cells, and/or the central nervous system. These results provide insights into the genetic pathways underlying SLE, and identify a subgroup of patients who may benefit from therapies targeting the IFN pathway.

  6. Disease-specific classification using deconvoluted whole blood gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Oh, William K.; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarker assays have an advantage in being minimally invasive. Diagnostic and prognostic models built on peripheral blood gene expression have been reported for various types of disease. However, most of these studies focused on only one disease type, and failed to address whether the identified gene expression signature is disease-specific or more widely applicable across diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of 46 whole blood gene expression datasets covering a wide range of diseases and physiological conditions. Our analysis uncovered a striking overlap of signature genes shared by multiple diseases, driven by an underlying common pattern of cell component change, specifically an increase in myeloid cells and decrease in lymphocytes. These observations reveal the necessity of building disease-specific classifiers that can distinguish different disease types as well as normal controls, and highlight the importance of cell component change in deriving blood gene expression based models. We developed a new strategy to develop blood-based disease-specific models by leveraging both cell component changes and cell molecular state changes, and demonstrate its superiority using independent datasets. PMID:27596246

  7. Assessment of Normal Variability in Peripheral Blood Gene Expression

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Catherine; Vernon, Suzanne D.; Karem, Kevin L.; ...

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral blood is representative of many systemic processes and is an ideal sample for expression profiling of diseases that have no known or accessible lesion. Peripheral blood is a complex mixture of cell types and some differences in peripheral blood gene expression may reflect the timing of sample collection rather than an underlying disease process. For this reason, it is important to assess study design factors that may cause variability in gene expression not related to what is being analyzed. Variation in the gene expression of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from three healthy volunteers sampled three times onemore » day each week for one month was examined for 1,176 genes printed on filter arrays. Less than 1% of the genes showed any variation in expression that was related to the time of collection, and none of the changes were noted in more than one individual. These results suggest that observed variation was due to experimental variability.« less

  8. Vasovagal syncope and blood donor return: examination of the role of experience and affective expectancies.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Etzel, Erin N; Ciesielski, Bethany G

    2010-03-01

    Vasovagal sensations (e.g., dizziness, nausea, and fainting) are one of the main reasons people find blood donation unpleasant. A better understanding of predictors of vasovagal sensations during blood donation could inform interventions designed to increase donor return rates. The present investigation examined the extent to which experience with blood donation and vasovagal sensations during blood donation uniquely predict the likelihood of donor return, even when controlling for affective expectancies. Participants presenting at community blood drives indicated how many times they have given blood and provided ratings of expected anxiety, pain, disgust, as well as fear of fainting before giving blood. After donating, participants completed a measure of vasovagal sensations experienced during blood donation. They also rated the pleasantness of the experience and willingness to donate blood in the future. The findings showed that experience with blood donation and vasovagal sensations during blood donation uniquely predicted willingness to donate blood in the future even when controlling for age and negative affective expectancies about giving blood. This finding suggests that vasovagal sensations and experience with blood donation have unique (and perhaps additive) effects on willingness to donate blood in the future, suggesting that behavior modification interventions that directly target these variables could potentially increase donor retention.

  9. Melatonin differentially affects vascular blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jonathan S; Sauder, Charity L; Ray, Chester A

    2011-02-01

    Melatonin is synthesized and released into the circulation by the pineal gland in a circadian rhythm. Melatonin has been demonstrated to differentially alter blood flow to assorted vascular beds by the activation of different melatonin receptors in animal models. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of melatonin on blood flow to various vascular beds in humans. Renal (Doppler ultrasound), forearm (venous occlusion plethysmography), and cerebral blood flow (transcranial Doppler), arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were measured in 10 healthy subjects (29±1 yr; 5 men and 5 women) in the supine position for 3 min. The protocol began 45 min after the ingestion of either melatonin (3 mg) or placebo (sucrose). Subjects returned at least 2 days later at the same time of day to repeat the trial after ingesting the other substance. Melatonin did not alter heart rate and mean arterial pressure. Renal blood flow velocity (RBFV) and renal vascular conductance (RVC) were lower during the melatonin trial compared with placebo (RBFV, 40.5±2.9 vs. 45.4±1.5 cm/s; and RVC, 0.47±0.02 vs. 0.54±0.01 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively). In contrast, forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) were greater with melatonin compared with placebo (FBF, 2.4±0.2 vs. 1.9±0.1 ml·100 ml(-1)·min(-1); and FVC, 0.029±0.003 vs. 0.023±0.002 arbitrary units, respectively). Melatonin did not alter cerebral blood flow measurements compared with placebo. Additionally, phentolamine (5-mg bolus) after melatonin reversed the decrease in RVC, suggesting that melatonin increases sympathetic outflow to the kidney to mediate renal vasoconstriction. In summary, exogenous melatonin differentially alters vascular blood flow in humans. These data suggest the complex nature of melatonin on the vasculature in humans.

  10. CHILDHOOD BLOOD LEAD LEVELS NOT AFFECTED BY HOUSING COMPLIANCE STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a secondary analysis of data from the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of Philadelphia (July 1, 1999 through September 1, 2004), the authors evaluated the effect of housing compliance status and time to achieve compliance on changes in children's blood lead levels. ...

  11. Expressive suppression and neural responsiveness to nonverbal affective cues

    PubMed Central

    Petrican, Raluca; Rosenbaum, R. Shayna; Grady, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Optimal social functioning occasionally requires concealment of one’s emotions in order to meet one’s immediate goals and environmental demands. However, because emotions serve an important communicative function, their habitual suppression disrupts the flow of social exchanges and, thus, incurs significant interpersonal costs. Evidence is accruing that the disruption in social interactions, linked to habitual expressive suppression use, stems not only from intrapersonal, but also from interpersonal causes, since the suppressors’ restricted affective displays reportedly inhibit their interlocutors’ emotionally expressive behaviors. However, expressive suppression use is not known to lead to clinically significant social impairments. One explanation may be that over the lifespan, individuals who habitually suppress their emotions come to compensate for their interlocutors’ restrained expressive behaviors by developing an increased sensitivity to nonverbal affective cues. To probe this issue, the present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to scan healthy older women while they viewed silent videos of a male social target displaying nonverbal emotional behavior, together with a brief verbal description of the accompanying context, and then judged the target’s affect. As predicted, perceivers who reported greater habitual use of expressive suppression showed increased neural processing of nonverbal affective cues. This effect appeared to be coordinated in a top-down manner via cognitive control. Greater neural processing of nonverbal cues among perceivers who habitually suppress their emotions was linked to increased ventral striatum activity, suggestive of increased reward value/personal relevance ascribed to emotionally expressive nonverbal behaviors. These findings thus provide neural evidence broadly consistent with the hypothesized link between habitual use of expressive suppression and compensatory development of increased

  12. Olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect glucose uptake and energy metabolism in human mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Stapel, Britta; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Scherr, Michaela; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge; Kahl, Kai G

    2017-05-01

    The use of antipsychotics carries the risk of metabolic side effects, such as weight gain and new onset type-2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms of the observed metabolic alterations are not fully understood. We compared the effects of two atypical antipsychotics, one known to favor weight gain (olanzapine), the other not (aripiprazole), on glucose metabolism. Primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and stimulated with olanzapine or aripiprazole for 72 h. Cellular glucose uptake was analyzed in vitro by 18F-FDG uptake. Further measurements comprised mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and 3, GLUT1 protein expression, DNA methylation of GLUT1 promoter region, and proteins involved in downstream glucometabolic processes. We observed a 2-fold increase in glucose uptake after stimulation with aripiprazole. In contrast, olanzapine stimulation decreased glucose uptake by 40%, accompanied by downregulation of the cellular energy sensor AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). GLUT1 protein expression increased, GLUT1 mRNA expression decreased, and GLUT1 promoter was hypermethylated with both antipsychotics. Pyruvat-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex activity decreased with olanzapine only. Our findings suggest that the atypical antipsychotics olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect energy metabolism in PBMC. The observed decrease in glucose uptake in olanzapine stimulated PBMC, accompanied by decreased PDH point to a worsening in cellular energy metabolism not compensated by AMKP upregulation. In contrast, aripiprazole stimulation lead to increased glucose uptake, while not affecting PDH complex expression. The observed differences may be involved in the different metabolic profiles observed in aripiprazole and olanzapine treated patients.

  13. Sweet future: fluctuating blood glucose levels affect future discounting.

    PubMed

    Wang, X T; Dvorak, Robert D

    2010-02-01

    This study explored metabolic mechanisms of future (delay) discounting, a choice phenomenon where people value present goods over future goods. Using fluctuating blood glucose as an index of body-energy budget, optimal discounting should regulate choice among rewards as a function of temporal caloric requirement. We identified this novel link between blood glucose levels measured in the lab and future-discounting rates of participants, who made choices between a "smaller and sooner" reward and a "larger but later" option, with possible actual monetary rewards. A group of participants who drank a soft drink that contained sugar showed a reduced rate of future discounting afterward, when we controlled for sex, age, body mass index, and the taste of the drink. In contrast, a group of participants who drank a soft drink that contained artificial sweetener showed an increased rate of future discounting. Blood glucose levels not only varied as a result of caloric intake but also regulated the rate of future discounting, according to participants' dynamic body-energy budget.

  14. Lead exposure increases blood pressure by increasing angiotensinogen expression.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiandong; Wang, Miaomiao; Wang, Yiqing; Sun, Na; Li, Chunping

    2016-01-01

    Lead exposure can induce increased blood pressure. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain lead-induced hypertension. Changes in angiotensinogen (AGT) expression levels or gene variants may also influence blood pressure. In this study, we hypothesized that AGT expression levels or gene variants contribute to lead-induced hypertension. A preliminary HEK293 cell model experiment was performed to analyze the association between AGT expression and lead exposure. In a population-based study, serum AGT level was measured in both lead-exposed and control populations. To further detect the influence of AGT gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in lead-induced hypertension, two SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) were genotyped in a case-control study including 219 lead-exposed subjects and 393 controls. Lead exposure caused an increase in AGT expression level in HEK 293 cell models (P < 0.001) compared to lead-free cells, and individuals exposed to lead had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001). Lead-exposed individuals had higher serum AGT levels compared to controls (P < 0.001). However, no association was found between AGT gene SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) and lead exposure. Nevertheless, the change in AGT expression level may play an important role in the development of lead-induced hypertension.

  15. Aging: a portrait from gene expression profile in blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabria, Elisa; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Dyar, Kenneth Allen; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bruseghini, Paolo; Morandi, Carlo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Schena, Federico; Capelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of reliable biomarkers of aging is important not only to monitor the effect of interventions and predict the timing of pathologies associated with aging but also to understand the mechanisms and devise appropriate countermeasures. Blood cells provide an easily available tissue and gene expression profiles from whole blood samples appear to mirror disease states and some aspects of the aging process itself. We report here a microarray analysis of whole blood samples from two cohorts of healthy adult and elderly subjects, aged 43±3 and 68±4 years, respectively, to monitor gene expression changes in the initial phase of the senescence process. A number of significant changes were found in the elderly compared to the adult group, including decreased levels of transcripts coding for components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which correlate with a parallel decline in the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), as monitored in the same subjects. In addition, blood cells show age-related changes in the expression of several markers of immunosenescence, inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings support the notion that the immune system has a major role in tissue homeostasis and repair, which appears to be impaired since early stages of the aging process. PMID:27545843

  16. Blood Gene Expression Profiling of Breast Cancer Survivors Experiencing Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Landmark-Hoyvik, Hege; Dumeaux, Vanessa; Reinertsen, Kristin V.; Edvardsen, Hege; Fossa, Sophie D.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To extend knowledge on the mechanisms and pathways involved in maintenance of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) by performing gene expression profiling of whole blood from breast cancer (BC) survivors with and without fibrosis 3-7 years after end of radiotherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles from blood were obtained for 254 BC survivors derived from a cohort of survivors, treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer 3-7 years earlier. Analyses of transcriptional differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with fibrosis (n = 31) and BC survivors without fibrosis (n = 223) were performed using R version 2.8.0 and tools from the Bioconductor project. Gene sets extracted through a literature search on fibrosis and breast cancer were subsequently used in gene set enrichment analysis. Results: Substantial differences in blood gene expression between BC survivors with and without fibrosis were observed, and 87 differentially expressed genes were identified through linear analysis. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 signaling was identified as the most significant gene set, showing a down-regulation of most of the core genes, together with up-regulation of a transcriptional activator of the inhibitor of fibrinolysis, Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 in the BC survivors with fibrosis. Conclusion: Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 signaling was found down-regulated during the maintenance phase of fibrosis as opposed to the up-regulation reported during the early, initiating phase of fibrosis. Hence, once the fibrotic tissue has developed, the maintenance phase might rather involve a deregulation of fibrinolysis and altered degradation of extracellular matrix components.

  17. Children's Expression of Negative Affect: Reasons and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeman, Janice; Shipman, Kimberly

    1996-01-01

    Examines the influence of socialization figures (parents, friends), emotion type (anger, sadness, physical pain), age, and gender on 66 second-grade and 71 fifth-grade children's reasons for and methods of affect expression. Found that girls reported using verbal means to communicate emotion, whereas boys cited mildly aggressive methods. (MDM)

  18. Quantitative expression of candidate genes affecting eggshell color.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chuanwei; Li, Zesheng; Yang, Ning; Ning, Zhonghua

    2014-05-01

    There are three pigments that affect the color of an eggshell: protoporphyrin, biliverdin and biliverdin-zinc chelate. Protoporphyrin is the main pigment in brown and light-brown eggshells, whereas very little protoporphyrin is found in white eggshells. Eggshell protoporphyrin is derived from the heme formation in birds. Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX) and ferrochelatase (FECH) represent rate-limiting enzymes for the heme-biosynthetic pathway. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), feline leukemia virus receptor (FLVCR), and heme-responsive gene-1 (HRG1) serve as primary transporters for both protoporphyrinogen and heme. Finally, four organic anion transporting polypeptide family members (including solute carrier organic anion transporter family, SLCO1C1, SLCO1A2, SLCO1B3 and LOC418189) may affect pigment transport within eggshells. Here we measured gene expression levels in key tissues of egg-producing hens. We analyzed three different types of hens that generated distinct eggshell colors: white, pink or brown. Our data revealed three ways in which eggshell color was genetically influenced. First, high-level expression of CPOX generated more protoporphyrinogen and a brown eggshell color. In contrast, high expression of FECH likely converted more protoporphyrinogen into heme, reduced protoporphyrinogen levels within the eggshell and generated a light color. Second, heme transporters also affected eggshell color. High-level expression of BCRP, HRG1 and FLVCR were associated with brown, white and generally lighter eggshell colors, respectively. Finally, protoporphyrin precipitation also affected eggshell color, as high expression of both SLCO1A2 and SLCO1C1 were associated with brown eggshell color. As such, we have identified seven genes in which expression levels in different tissues were associated with eggshell color.

  19. Differential gene expression associated with inflammation in peripheral blood cells of patients with pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-jun; Wang, Ping; Jiao, Jie; Han, Lin; Lu, Yu-min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study expression changes in inflammation-related genes in peripheral blood of patients with pneumoconiosis and to explore the possibility of these genes as pneumoconiosis biomarkers. Methods: Peripheral blood samples of patients with pneumoconiosis patients and controls were collected, and total RNA of the blood cells were extracted and reverse transcribed to cDNA. Screenings of deferentially expressed genes associated with inflammation between patients with pneumoconiosis and controls were performed using real-time quantitative PCR array and the expressions of the three most upregulated genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. Results: The expression of 11 genes was significantly altered in patients with pneumoconiosis compared with those of the control. Among these 11 genes, 8 genes were upregulated and 3 were downregulated. Preliminary results indicated that interleukin 6 (IL-6) mRNA expression in patients with pneumoconiosis was higher than that in controls (P=0.019). The level of IL6 mRNA expression in the patients was higher than that in non-smoking controls, but it was neither affected by type and stage of pneumoconiosis nor by time of contact with dust. Conclusions: IL6 was possibly involved in the development of pneumoconiosis. PMID:27265534

  20. HIV and chronic methamphetamine dependence affect cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Vaida, Florin; Cherner, Mariana; Yeh, Melinda J; Liang, Christine L; Gardner, Carly; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J; Buxton, Richard B

    2011-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and methamphetamine (METH) dependence are independently associated with neuronal dysfunction. The coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neuronal activity is the basis of many task-based functional neuroimaging techniques. We examined the interaction between HIV infection and a previous history of METH dependence on CBF within the lenticular nuclei (LN). Twenty-four HIV-/METH-, eight HIV-/METH+, 24 HIV+/METH-, and 15 HIV+/METH+ participants performed a finger tapping paradigm. A multiple regression analysis of covariance assessed associations and two-way interactions between CBF and HIV serostatus and/or previous history of METH dependence. HIV+ individuals had a trend towards a lower baseline CBF (-10%, p = 0.07) and greater CBF changes for the functional task (+32%, p = 0.01) than HIV- subjects. Individuals with a previous history of METH dependence had a lower baseline CBF (-16%, p = 0.007) and greater CBF changes for a functional task (+33%, p = 0.02). However, no interaction existed between HIV serostatus and previous history of METH dependence for either baseline CBF (p = 0.53) or CBF changes for a functional task (p = 0.10). In addition, CBF and volume in the LN were not correlated. A possible additive relationship could exist between HIV infection and a history of METH dependence on CBF with a previous history of METH dependence having a larger contribution. Abnormalities in CBF could serve as a surrogate measure for assessing the chronic effects of HIV and previous METH dependence on brain function.

  1. Determinants of ABH expression on human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Cooling, Laura L W; Kelly, Kathleen; Barton, James; Hwang, Debbie; Koerner, Theodore A W; Olson, John D

    2005-04-15

    Platelets express ABH antigens, which can adversely effect platelet transfusion recovery and survival in ABH-incompatible recipients. To date, there has been no large, comprehensive study comparing specific donor factors with ABH expression on platelet membranes and glycoconjugates. We studied ABH expression in 166 group A apheresis platelet donors by flow cytometry, Western blotting, and thin layer chromatography relative to donor age, sex, A1/A2 subgroup, and Lewis phenotype. Overall, A antigen on platelet membranes, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids was linked to an A1 red blood cell (RBC) phenotype. Among A1 donors, platelet ABH varied significantly between donors (0%-87%). Intradonor variability, however, was minimal, suggesting that platelet ABH expression is a stable, donor-specific characteristic, with 5% of A1 donors typing as either ABH high- or low-expressers. Group A2 donors, in contrast, possessed a Bombay-like phenotype, lacking both A and H antigens. Unlike RBCs, ABH expression on platelets may be determined primarily by H-glycosyltransferase (FUT1) activity. Identification of A2 and A1 low expressers may increase the availability and selection of crossmatched and HLA-matched platelets. Platelets from group A2 may also be a superior product for patients undergoing A/O major mismatch allogeneic progenitor cell transplantation.

  2. l-Ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takafumi; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Mari; Nakamura, Kaai; Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Ikeda, Yuko; Ishida, Yuko; Wang, Guanying; Shirakawa, Chise; Tanihata, Yoko; Ohara, Kazuaki; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral circadian clock is entrained by factors in the external environment such as scheduled feeding, exercise, and mental and physical stresses. In addition, recent studies in mice demonstrated that some food components have the potential to control the peripheral circadian clock during scheduled feeding, although information about these components remains limited. l-Ornithine is a type of non-protein amino acid that is present in foods and has been reported to have various physiological functions. In human trials, for example, l-ornithine intake improved a subjective index of sleep quality. Here we demonstrate, using an in vivo monitoring system, that repeated oral administration of l-ornithine at an early inactive period in mice induced a phase advance in the rhythm of PER2 expression. By contrast, l-ornithine administration to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not affect the expression of PER2, indicating that l-ornithine indirectly alters the phase of PER2. l-Ornithine also increased plasma levels of insulin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 alongside mPer2 expression, suggesting that it exerts its effects probably via insulin secretion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that l-ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression and may expand the possibilities of L-ornithine as a health food. PMID:27703199

  3. l-Ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takafumi; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Mari; Nakamura, Kaai; Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Ikeda, Yuko; Ishida, Yuko; Wang, Guanying; Shirakawa, Chise; Tanihata, Yoko; Ohara, Kazuaki; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-10-05

    The peripheral circadian clock is entrained by factors in the external environment such as scheduled feeding, exercise, and mental and physical stresses. In addition, recent studies in mice demonstrated that some food components have the potential to control the peripheral circadian clock during scheduled feeding, although information about these components remains limited. l-Ornithine is a type of non-protein amino acid that is present in foods and has been reported to have various physiological functions. In human trials, for example, l-ornithine intake improved a subjective index of sleep quality. Here we demonstrate, using an in vivo monitoring system, that repeated oral administration of l-ornithine at an early inactive period in mice induced a phase advance in the rhythm of PER2 expression. By contrast, l-ornithine administration to mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not affect the expression of PER2, indicating that l-ornithine indirectly alters the phase of PER2. l-Ornithine also increased plasma levels of insulin, glucose and glucagon-like peptide-1 alongside mPer2 expression, suggesting that it exerts its effects probably via insulin secretion. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that l-ornithine affects peripheral clock gene expression and may expand the possibilities of L-ornithine as a health food.

  4. Structural features affecting variant surface glycoprotein expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Böhme, Ulrike; Cross, George A M

    2003-05-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of Trypanosoma brucei is the most abundant GPI-anchored protein expressed on any cell, and is an essential virulence factor. To determine what structural features affect efficient expression of VSG, we made a series of mutations in two VSGs. Inserting 18 amino acids, between the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, reduced the expression of VSG 221 to about 3% of the wild-type level. When this insertion was combined with deletion of the single carboxy-terminal subdomain, expression was reduced a further three-fold. In VSG 117, which contains two carboxy-terminal subdomains, point mutation of the intervening N-glycosylation site reduced expression about 15-fold. Deleting the most carboxy-terminal subdomain and intervening region, including the N-glycosylation site, reduced expression to 15-20% of wild type VSG, and deletion of both subdomains reduced expression to <1%. Despite their low abundance, all VSG mutants were GPI anchored on the cell surface. Our results suggest that, for a protein to be efficiently displayed on the surface of bloodstream-form T. brucei, it is essential that it contains the conserved structural motifs of a T. brucei VSG. Serum resistance-associated protein (SRA), which confers human infectivity on T. brucei, strongly resembles a VSG deletion mutant. Expression of three epitope-tagged versions of SRA in T. brucei conferred total resistance to human serum. SRA possesses a canonical GPI signal sequence, but we were unable to obtain unequivocal evidence for the presence of a GPI anchor. SRA was not released during osmotic lysis, indicating that it is not GPI anchored on the cell surface.

  5. Blood-informative transcripts define nine common axes of peripheral blood gene expression.

    PubMed

    Preininger, Marcela; Arafat, Dalia; Kim, Jinhee; Nath, Artika P; Idaghdour, Youssef; Brigham, Kenneth L; Gibson, Greg

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to capturing the covariance structure of peripheral blood gene expression that relies on the identification of highly conserved Axes of variation. Starting with a comparison of microarray transcriptome profiles for a new dataset of 189 healthy adult participants in the Emory-Georgia Tech Center for Health Discovery and Well-Being (CHDWB) cohort, with a previously published study of 208 adult Moroccans, we identify nine Axes each with between 99 and 1,028 strongly co-regulated transcripts in common. Each axis is enriched for gene ontology categories related to sub-classes of blood and immune function, including T-cell and B-cell physiology and innate, adaptive, and anti-viral responses. Conservation of the Axes is demonstrated in each of five additional population-based gene expression profiling studies, one of which is robustly associated with Body Mass Index in the CHDWB as well as Finnish and Australian cohorts. Furthermore, ten tightly co-regulated genes can be used to define each Axis as "Blood Informative Transcripts" (BITs), generating scores that define an individual with respect to the represented immune activity and blood physiology. We show that environmental factors, including lifestyle differences in Morocco and infection leading to active or latent tuberculosis, significantly impact specific axes, but that there is also significant heritability for the Axis scores. In the context of personalized medicine, reanalysis of the longitudinal profile of one individual during and after infection with two respiratory viruses demonstrates that specific axes also characterize clinical incidents. This mode of analysis suggests the view that, rather than unique subsets of genes marking each class of disease, differential expression reflects movement along the major normal Axes in response to environmental and genetic stimuli.

  6. Blood-Informative Transcripts Define Nine Common Axes of Peripheral Blood Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Preininger, Marcela; Arafat, Dalia; Kim, Jinhee; Nath, Artika P.; Idaghdour, Youssef; Brigham, Kenneth L.; Gibson, Greg

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to capturing the covariance structure of peripheral blood gene expression that relies on the identification of highly conserved Axes of variation. Starting with a comparison of microarray transcriptome profiles for a new dataset of 189 healthy adult participants in the Emory-Georgia Tech Center for Health Discovery and Well-Being (CHDWB) cohort, with a previously published study of 208 adult Moroccans, we identify nine Axes each with between 99 and 1,028 strongly co-regulated transcripts in common. Each axis is enriched for gene ontology categories related to sub-classes of blood and immune function, including T-cell and B-cell physiology and innate, adaptive, and anti-viral responses. Conservation of the Axes is demonstrated in each of five additional population-based gene expression profiling studies, one of which is robustly associated with Body Mass Index in the CHDWB as well as Finnish and Australian cohorts. Furthermore, ten tightly co-regulated genes can be used to define each Axis as “Blood Informative Transcripts” (BITs), generating scores that define an individual with respect to the represented immune activity and blood physiology. We show that environmental factors, including lifestyle differences in Morocco and infection leading to active or latent tuberculosis, significantly impact specific axes, but that there is also significant heritability for the Axis scores. In the context of personalized medicine, reanalysis of the longitudinal profile of one individual during and after infection with two respiratory viruses demonstrates that specific axes also characterize clinical incidents. This mode of analysis suggests the view that, rather than unique subsets of genes marking each class of disease, differential expression reflects movement along the major normal Axes in response to environmental and genetic stimuli. PMID:23516379

  7. Level of Mercury Manometer With Respect to Heart: Does it Affect Blood Pressure Measurement?

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Raj; Roy, V K; Manna, S; Bhattacharjee, M

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of blood pressure is an integral part of clinical examination. Over the years various types of instruments have been used to measure blood pressure but till date the mercury sphygmomanometer is regarded as the gold standard. However, there is a myth prevalent among health professionals regarding the level of the manometer in relation to heart at the time of measuring of blood pressure. Many professionals insist that it has to be placed at the level of the heart. We argue that the limb from which pressure is measured must be at the heart level rather than the manometer. We conducted a study in which we measured the blood pressure in adults by placing the manometer at three different levels with respect to the heart. The values of blood pressure obtained at all levels were similar and did not show any statistically significant difference. We therefore conclude that the level of sphygmomanometer per se does not affect blood pressure measurement.

  8. Identifying a gene expression signature of cluster headache in blood

    PubMed Central

    Eising, Else; Pelzer, Nadine; Vijfhuizen, Lisanne S.; Vries, Boukje de; Ferrari, Michel D.; ‘t Hoen, Peter A. C.; Terwindt, Gisela M.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Cluster headache is a relatively rare headache disorder, typically characterized by multiple daily, short-lasting attacks of excruciating, unilateral (peri-)orbital or temporal pain associated with autonomic symptoms and restlessness. To better understand the pathophysiology of cluster headache, we used RNA sequencing to identify differentially expressed genes and pathways in whole blood of patients with episodic (n = 19) or chronic (n = 20) cluster headache in comparison with headache-free controls (n = 20). Gene expression data were analysed by gene and by module of co-expressed genes with particular attention to previously implicated disease pathways including hypocretin dysregulation. Only moderate gene expression differences were identified and no associations were found with previously reported pathogenic mechanisms. At the level of functional gene sets, associations were observed for genes involved in several brain-related mechanisms such as GABA receptor function and voltage-gated channels. In addition, genes and modules of co-expressed genes showed a role for intracellular signalling cascades, mitochondria and inflammation. Although larger study samples may be required to identify the full range of involved pathways, these results indicate a role for mitochondria, intracellular signalling and inflammation in cluster headache. PMID:28074859

  9. Whole Blood Donation Affects the Interpretation of Hemoglobin A1c

    PubMed Central

    Lenters-Westra, Erna; de Kort, Wim; Bokhorst, Arlinke G.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Slingerland, Robbert J.; Vos, Michel J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several factors, including changed dynamics of erythrocyte formation and degradation, can influence the degree of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) formation thereby affecting its use in monitoring diabetes. This study determines the influence of whole blood donation on HbA1c in both non-diabetic blood donors and blood donors with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this observational study, 23 non-diabetic blood donors and 21 blood donors with type 2 diabetes donated 475 mL whole blood and were followed prospectively for nine weeks. Each week blood samples were collected and analyzed for changes in HbA1c using three secondary reference measurement procedures. Results Twelve non-diabetic blood donors (52.2%) and 10 (58.8%) blood donors with type 2 diabetes had a significant reduction in HbA1c following blood donation (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). All non-diabetic blood donors with a normal ferritin concentration predonation had a significant reduction in HbA1c. In the non-diabetic group the maximum reduction was -11.9%, in the type 2 diabetes group -12.0%. When eligible to donate again, 52.2% of the non-diabetic blood donors and 41.2% of the blood donors with type 2 diabetes had HbA1c concentrations significantly lower compared to their predonation concentration (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). Conclusion Patients with type 2 diabetes contributing to whole blood donation programs can be at risk of falsely lowered HbA1c. This could lead to a wrong interpretation of their glycemic control by their general practitioner or internist. PMID:28118412

  10. Paternal MHC expression on mouse trophoblast affects uterine vascularization and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Madeja, Zofia; Yadi, Hakim; Apps, Richard; Boulenouar, Selma; Roper, Stephen J; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Colucci, Francesco; Hemberger, Myriam

    2011-03-08

    The mammalian fetus represents a semiallograft within the maternal uterus yet is not rejected. This situation is particularly pronounced in species with a hemochorial type of placentation, such as humans and rodents, where maternal tissues and blood are in direct contact with fetal trophoblast and thus potentially with paternal antigens. The main polymorphic antigens responsible for graft rejection are MHC antigens. In humans the trophoblast cells invading into the decidua have a unique pattern of MHC class I expression characterized by both classical (HLA-C) and nonclassical (HLA-G and HLA-E) molecules. Whether such an unusual MHC repertoire on the surface of trophoblast is a conserved feature between species with hemochorial placentation has not been resolved. Here we demonstrate, using a range of methods, that C57BL/6 mouse trophoblast predominantly expresses only one MHC class I antigen, H2-K, at the cell surface of giant cells but lacks expression of nonclassical MHC molecules. Antigenic disparity between parental MHCs affects trophoblast-induced transformation of the uterine vasculature and, consequently, placental and fetal gowth. Maternal uterine blood vessels were more dilated, allowing for increased blood supply, in certain combinations of maternal and paternal MHC haplotypes, and these allogeneic fetuses and placentas were heavier at term compared with syngeneic controls. Thus, maternal-fetal immune interactions are instrumental to optimize reproductive success. This cross-talk has important implications for human disorders of pregnancy, such as preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction.

  11. Marker gene tethering by nucleoporins affects gene expression in plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah; Galinha, Carla; Desset, Sophie; Tolmie, Frances; Evans, David; Tatout, Christophe; Graumann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In non-plant systems, chromatin association with the nuclear periphery affects gene expression, where interactions with nuclear envelope proteins can repress and interactions with nucleoporins can enhance transcription. In plants, both hetero- and euchromatin can localize at the nuclear periphery, but the effect of proximity to the nuclear periphery on gene expression remains largely unknown. This study explores the putative function of Seh1 and Nup50a nucleoporins on gene expression by using the Lac Operator / Lac Repressor (LacI-LacO) system adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana. We used LacO fused to the luciferase reporter gene (LacO:Luc) to investigate whether binding of the LacO:Luc transgene to nucleoporin:LacI protein fusions alters luciferase expression. Two separate nucleoporin-LacI-YFP fusions were introduced into single insert, homozygous LacO:Luc Arabidopsis plants. Homozygous plants carrying LacO:Luc and a single insert of either Seh1-LacI-YFP or Nup50a-LacI-YFP were tested for luciferase activity and compared to plants containing LacO:Luc only. Seh1-LacI-YFP increased, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP decreased luciferase activity. Seh1-LacI-YFP accumulated at the nuclear periphery as expected, while Nup50a-LacI-YFP was nucleoplasmic and was not selected for further study. Protein and RNA levels of luciferase were quantified by western blotting and RT-qPCR, respectively. Increased luciferase activity in LacO:Luc+Seh1-LacI-YFP plants was correlated with increased luciferase protein and RNA levels. This change of luciferase expression was abolished by disruption of LacI-LacO binding by treating with IPTG in young seedlings, rosette leaves and inflorescences. This study suggests that association with the nuclear periphery is involved in the regulation of gene expression in plants.

  12. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions.

  13. Diazepam affects the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor density and their expression levels in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Bolaris, Stamatis; Valcana, Theony; Margarity, Marigoula

    2005-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are involved in the occurrence of anxiety and affective disorders; however, the effects following an anxiolytic benzodiazepine treatment, such as diazepam administration, on the mechanism of action of thyroid hormones has not yet been investigated. The effect of diazepam on the in vitro nuclear T3 binding, on the relative expression of the TH receptors (TRs) and on the synaptosomal TH availability were examined in adult rat cerebral hemispheres 24 h after a single intraperitoneal dose (5 mg/kg BW) of this tranquillizer. Although, diazepam did not affect the availability of TH either in blood circulation or in the synaptosomal fraction, it decreased (33%) the nuclear T3 maximal binding density (B(max)). No differences were observed in the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)). The TRalpha2 variant (non-T3-binding) mRNA levels were increased by 33%, whereas no changes in the relative expression of the T3-binding isoforms of TRs (TRalpha1, TRbeta1) were observed. This study shows that a single intraperitoneal injection of diazepam affects within 24 h, the density of the nuclear TRs and their expression pattern. The latest effect occurs in an isoform-specific manner involving specifically the TRalpha2 mRNA levels in adult rat brain.

  14. Oxalomalate affects the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Irace, Carlo; Esposito, Giuseppe; Maffettone, Carmen; Rossi, Antonietta; Festa, Michela; Iuvone, Teresa; Santamaria, Rita; Sautebin, Lidia; Carnuccio, Rosa; Colonna, Alfredo

    2007-03-13

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is an homodimeric enzyme which produces large amounts of nitric oxide (NO) in response to inflammatory stimuli. Several factors affect the synthesis and catalytic activity of iNOS. Particularly, dimerization of NOS monomers is promoted by heme, whereas an intracellular depletion of heme and/or L-arginine considerably decreases NOS resistance to proteolysis. In this study, we found that oxalomalate (OMA, oxalomalic acid, alpha-hydroxy-beta-oxalosuccinic acid), an inhibitor of both aconitase and NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, inhibited nitrite production and iNOS protein expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated J774 macrophages, without affecting iNOS mRNA content. Furthermore, injection of OMA precursors to LPS-stimulated rats also decreased nitrite production and iNOS expression in isolated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, alpha-ketoglutarate or succinyl-CoA administration reversed OMA effect on NO production, thus correlating NO biosynthesis with the anabolic capacity of Krebs cycle. When protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide in LPS-activated J774 cells treated with OMA, iNOS protein levels, evaluated by Western blot analysis and (35)S-metabolic labelling, were decreased, suggesting that OMA reduces iNOS biosynthesis and induces an increase in the degradation rate of iNOS protein. Moreover, we showed that OMA inhibits the activity of the iNOS from lung of LPS-treated rats by enzymatic assay. Our results, demonstrating that OMA acts regulating synthesis, catalytic activity and degradation of iNOS, suggest that this compound might have a potential role in reducing the NO overproduction occurring in some pathological conditions.

  15. Manipulation of hemoglobin expression affects Arabidopsis shoot organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Elhiti, Mohamed; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Hill, Robert D; Stasolla, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Over the past few years non-symbiotic plant hemoglobins have been described in a variety of plant species where they fulfill several functions ranging from detoxification processes to basic aspects of plant growth and post-embryonic development. To date no information is available on the role of hemoglobins during in vitro morphogenesis. Shoot organogenesis was induced in Arabidopsis lines constitutively expressing class 1, 2 and 3 hemoglobins (GLB1, 2 and 3) and lines in which the respective genes were either downregulated by RNAi (GLB1) or knocked out (GLB2 and GLB3). The process was executed by culturing root explants on an initial auxin-rich callus induction medium (CIM) followed by a transfer onto a cytokinin-containing shoot induction medium (SIM). While the repression of GLB2 inhibited organogenesis the over-expression of GLB1 or GLB2 enhanced the number of shoots produced in culture, and altered the transcript levels of genes participating in cytokinin perception and signalling. The up-regulation of GLB1 or GLB2 activated CKI1 and AHK3, genes encoding cytokinin receptors and affected the transcript levels of cytokinin responsive regulators (ARRs). The expression of Type-A ARRs (ARR4, 5, 7, 15, and 16), feed-back repressors of the cytokinin pathway, was repressed in both hemoglobin over-expressors whereas that of several Type-B ARRs (ARR2, 12, and 13), transcription activators of cytokinin-responsive genes, was induced. Such changes enhanced the sensitivity of the root explants to cytokinin allowing the 35S::GLB1 and 35S::GLB2 lines to produce shoots at low cytokinin concentrations which did not promote organogenesis in the WT line. These results show that manipulation of hemoglobin can modify shoot organogenesis in Arabidopsis and possibly in those systems partially or completely unresponsive to applications of exogenous cytokinins.

  16. Blood pressure and expression of microRNAs in whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhou; Kresovich, Jacob K.; Zheng, Yinan; Zhong, Jia; Patel, Ruchi; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Dou, Chang; McCracken, John P.; Díaz, Anaité; Motta, Valeria; Sanchez-Guerra, Marco; Bian, Shurui; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) is a complex, multifactorial clinical outcome driven by genetic susceptibility, behavioral choices, and environmental factors. Many molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the pathophysiology of high BP even as its prevalence continues to grow worldwide, increasing morbidity and marking it as a major public health concern. To address this, we evaluated miRNA profiling in blood leukocytes as potential biomarkers of BP and BP-related risk factors. Methods The Beijing Truck Driver Air Pollution Study included 60 truck drivers and 60 office workers examined in 2008. On two days separated by 1–2 weeks, we examined three BP measures: systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure measured at both pre- and post-work exams for blood NanoString nCounter miRNA profiles. We used covariate-adjusted linear mixed-effect models to examine associations between BP and increased miRNA expression in both pooled and risk factor-stratified analyses. Results Overall 43 miRNAs were associated with pre-work BP (FDR<0.05). In stratified analyses different but overlapping groups of miRNAs were associated with pre-work BP in truck drivers, high-BMI participants, and usual alcohol drinkers (FDR<0.05). Only four miRNAs were associated with post-work BP (FDR<0.05), in ever smokers. Conclusion Our results suggest that many miRNAs were significantly associated with BP in subgroups exposed to known hypertension risk factors. These findings shed light on the underlying molecular mechanisms of BP, and may assist with the development of a miRNA panel for early detection of hypertension. PMID:28278198

  17. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wingo, Aliza P.; Gibson, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD. PMID:25300922

  18. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wingo, Aliza P; Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD.

  19. Expression of the human blood coagulation protein factor XIIIa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: dependence of the expression levels from host-vector systems and medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Bröker, M; Bäuml, O; Göttig, A; Ochs, J; Bodenbenner, M; Amann, E

    1991-03-01

    The human blood coagulation protein Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae employing Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle vectors based on a 2-mu plasmid. Several factors affecting high production yield of recombinant FXIIIa were analysed. The use of the regulatable GAL-CYC1 hybrid promoter resulted in higher FXIIIa expression when compared with the constitutive ADCI promoter. Screening for suitable yeast strains for expression of FXIIIa under the transcriptional control of the GAL-CYC1 hybrid promoter revealed a broad spectrum of productivity. No obvious correlation between the expression rate and the genetic markers of the strains could be identified. The medium composition markedly influenced the FXIIIa expression rates. The expression of FXIIIa was strictly regulated by the carbon source. Glucose as the only sugar and energy source repressed the synthesis of FXIIIa, whereas addition of galactose induced FXIIIa expression. Special feeding schemes resulted in a productivity of up to 100 mg FXIIIa/l in shake flasks.

  20. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Ariadna; Wang, Yongjun; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kameneka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression. PMID:26963516

  1. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased red blood cell destruction can affect teens: G6PD deficiency. G6PD is an enzyme that helps to protect ... can cause red cells to hemolyze, or burst. G6PD deficiency is a common hereditary disease among people of ...

  2. A Meta-analysis of Gene Expression Signatures of Blood Pressure and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian H.; Liu, Chunyu; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Yao, Chen; Ying, Sai-xia; Courchesne, Paul; Milani, Lili; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; Reinmaa, Eva; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Singleton, Andrew; Melzer, David; Metspalu, Andres; Carstensen, Maren; Grallert, Harald; Herder, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Waldenberger, Melanie; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B.; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Munson, Peter J.; Yang, Xia; Prokisch, Holger; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have uncovered numerous genetic variants (SNPs) that are associated with blood pressure (BP). Genetic variants may lead to BP changes by acting on intermediate molecular phenotypes such as coded protein sequence or gene expression, which in turn affect BP variability. Therefore, characterizing genes whose expression is associated with BP may reveal cellular processes involved in BP regulation and uncover how transcripts mediate genetic and environmental effects on BP variability. A meta-analysis of results from six studies of global gene expression profiles of BP and hypertension in whole blood was performed in 7017 individuals who were not receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. We identified 34 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to BP (Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05). Among these genes, FOS and PTGS2 have been previously reported to be involved in BP-related processes; the others are novel. The top BP signature genes in aggregate explain 5%–9% of inter-individual variance in BP. Of note, rs3184504 in SH2B3, which was also reported in GWAS to be associated with BP, was found to be a trans regulator of the expression of 6 of the transcripts we found to be associated with BP (FOS, MYADM, PP1R15A, TAGAP, S100A10, and FGBP2). Gene set enrichment analysis suggested that the BP-related global gene expression changes include genes involved in inflammatory response and apoptosis pathways. Our study provides new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, and suggests novel transcriptomic markers for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. PMID:25785607

  3. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Therapeutic Response at Six Months in Patients With Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kaiyu; Sawle, Ashley D; Frank, M Barton; Chen, Yanmin; Wallace, Carol A; Jarvis, James N

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether gene expression profiles identified in peripheral whole blood samples could be used to determine therapeutic outcome in a cohort of children with newly diagnosed polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Whole blood samples from the Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy (TREAT) in JIA patients were analyzed on Illumina microarrays, and differential gene expression was compared to expression in healthy controls. Microarray results were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in an independent cohort of samples. Pathway analysis software was used to characterize gene expression profiles. Support vector machines were used to develop predictive models for different patient classes. Results Differential gene expression profiles for rheumatoid factor (RF)–positive and RF-negative patients were remarkably similar. Pathway analysis revealed a broad range of affected pathways, consistent with current mechanistic theories. Modeling showed that the prognosis at 6 months was strongly linked to gene expression at presentation, irrespective of treatment. Conclusion Gene expression is linked to therapeutic outcome, and gene expression in the peripheral blood may be a suitable target for a prognostic test. PMID:24782192

  4. Energized by love: thinking about romantic relationships increases positive affect and blood glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Sarah C E; Campbell, Lorne; Loving, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the impact of thinking of a current romantic partner on acute blood glucose responses and positive affect over a short period of time. Participants in romantic relationships were randomly assigned to reflect on their partner, an opposite-sex friend, or their morning routine. Blood glucose levels were assessed prior to reflection, as well as at 10 and 25 min postreflection. Results revealed that individuals in the routine and friend conditions exhibited a decline in glucose over time, whereas individuals in the partner condition did not exhibit this decline (rather, a slight increase) in glucose over time. Reported positive affect following reflection was positively associated with increases in glucose, but only for individuals who reflected on their partner, suggesting this physiological response reflects eustress. These findings add to the literature on eustress in relationships and have implications for relationship processes.

  5. Expression of Toll-like Receptor 9 in nose, peripheral blood and bone marrow during symptomatic allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Fransson, Mattias; Benson, Mikael; Erjefält, Jonas S; Jansson, Lennart; Uddman, Rolf; Björnsson, Sven; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Adner, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disease of the upper airway mucosa that also affects leukocytes in bone marrow and peripheral blood. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is a receptor for unmethylated CpG dinucleotides found in bacterial and viral DNA. The present study was designed to examine the expression of TLR9 in the nasal mucosa and in leukocytes derived from different cellular compartments during symptomatic allergic rhinitis. Methods The study was based on 32 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and 18 healthy subjects, serving as controls. Nasal biopsies were obtained before and after allergen challenge. Bone marrow, peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid were sampled outside and during pollen season. The expression of TLR9 in tissues and cells was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, respectively. Results TLR9 was found in several cell types in the nasal mucosa and in different leukocyte subpopulations derived from bone marrow, peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid. The leukocyte expression was generally higher in bone marrow than in peripheral blood, and not affected by symptomatic allergic rhinitis. Conclusion The widespread expression of TLR9 in the nasal mucosa along with its rich representation in leukocytes in different compartments, demonstrate the possibility for cells involved in allergic airway inflammation to directly interact with bacterial and viral DNA. PMID:17328813

  6. Key Immune Cell Cytokines Affects the Telomere Activity of Cord Blood Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazvan, Balal; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Mohammadi, Seyede Momeneh; Montazer Saheb, Soheila; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Schmied, Laurent; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Darabi, Masoud; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Telomere is a nucleoprotein complex at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes and its length is regulated by telomerase. The number of DNA repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n is reduced with each cell division in differentiated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SCF (Stem Cell Factor), Flt3 (Fms- Like tyrosine kinase-3), Interleukin-2, 7 and 15 on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in mononuclear and umbilical cord blood stem cells (CD34+ cells) during development to lymphoid cells. Methods: The mononuclear cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood by Ficoll-Paque density gradient. Then cells were cultured for 21 days in the presence of different cytokines. Telomere length and hTERT gene expression were evaluated in freshly isolated cells, 7, 14 and 21 days of culture by real-time PCR. The same condition had been done for CD34+ cells but telomere length and hTERT gene expression were measured at initial and day 21 of the experiment. Results: Highest hTERT gene expression and maximum telomere length were measured at day14 of MNCs in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15. Also, there was a significant correlation between telomere length and telomerase gene expression in MNCs at 14 days in a combination of IL-7 and IL-15 (r = 0.998, p =0.04). In contrast, IL-2 showed no distinct effect on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in cells. Conclusion: Taken together, IL-7 and IL-15 increased telomere length and hTERT gene expression at 14 day of the experiment. In conclusion, it seems likely that cells maintain naïve phenotype due to prolonged exposure of IL-7 and IL-15. PMID:27478776

  7. Hindlimb-unloading suppresses B cell population in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation associated with OPN expression in circulating blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ezura, Yoichi; Nagata, Junji; Nagao, Masashi; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Rittling, Susan; Denhardt, David T; Noda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Rodent hindlimb unloading (HU) by tail-suspension is a model to investigate disuse-induced bone loss in vivo. Previously, we have shown that osteopontin (OPN, also known as Spp1) is required for unloading-induced bone loss. However, how unloading affects OPN expression in the body is not fully understood. Here, we examined OPN expression in peripheral blood of mice subjected to HU. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that OPN expression is increased in circulating peripheral blood cells. This HU-induced increase in OPN mRNA expression was specific in circulating peripheral blood cells, as OPN was not increased in the blood cells in bone marrow. HU-induced enhancement in OPN expression in peripheral blood cells was associated with an increase in the fraction of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells in the peripheral blood. In contrast, HU decreased the fraction size of B-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. We further examined if B-lymphogenesis is affected in the mice deficient for osteopontin subjected to HU. In bone marrow, HU decreased the population of the B-lymphocyte lineage cells significantly, whereas it did not alter the population of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. HU also increased the cells in T-lymphocyte lineage in bone marrow. Interestingly, these changes were observed similarly both in OPN-deficient and wild-type mice. These results indicate for the first time that HU increases OPN expression in circulating cells and suppresses bone marrow B-lymphogenesis.

  8. Jugular venous pooling during lowering of the head affects blood pressure of the anesthetized giraffe.

    PubMed

    Brøndum, E; Hasenkam, J M; Secher, N H; Bertelsen, M F; Grøndahl, C; Petersen, K K; Buhl, R; Aalkjaer, C; Baandrup, U; Nygaard, H; Smerup, M; Stegmann, F; Sloth, E; Ostergaard, K H; Nissen, P; Runge, M; Pitsillides, K; Wang, T

    2009-10-01

    How blood flow and pressure to the giraffe's brain are regulated when drinking remains debated. We measured simultaneous blood flow, pressure, and cross-sectional area in the carotid artery and jugular vein of five anesthetized and spontaneously breathing giraffes. The giraffes were suspended in the upright position so that we could lower the head. In the upright position, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 193 +/- 11 mmHg (mean +/- SE), carotid flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and carotid cross-sectional area was 0.85 +/- 0.04 cm(2). Central venous pressure (CVP) was 4 +/- 2 mmHg, jugular flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and jugular cross-sectional area was 0.14 +/- 0.04 cm(2) (n = 4). Carotid arterial and jugular venous pressures at head level were 118 +/- 9 and -7 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively. When the head was lowered, MAP decreased to 131 +/- 13 mmHg, while carotid cross-sectional area and flow remained unchanged. Cardiac output was reduced by 30%, CVP decreased to -1 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.01), and jugular flow ceased as the jugular cross-sectional area increased to 3.2 +/- 0.6 cm(2) (P < 0.01), corresponding to accumulation of approximately 1.2 l of blood in the veins. When the head was raised, the jugular veins collapsed and blood was returned to the central circulation, and CVP and cardiac output were restored. The results demonstrate that in the upright-positioned, anesthetized giraffe cerebral blood flow is governed by arterial pressure without support of a siphon mechanism and that when the head is lowered, blood accumulates in the vein, affecting MAP.

  9. Fasting and sampling time affect liver gene expression of high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y

    2010-05-01

    Several physiological and biological variables are known to affect peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α-dependent signaling pathway and plasma biochemical profiles. However, less is known about the effect of these variables on high-fat diet-fed mice. In a 5-week study, C57BL/6 mice were divided into control (C) and high-fat diet-fed (H) groups, whereby before dissection, each group was subdivided into non-fasted (nC and nH) and a 15-h fasted mice (fC and fH) killed in the early light cycle, and a 15-h fasted mice (eC and eH) killed in the late phase of the light cycle. Liver and blood from the vena cava were collected. Non-fasted nC and nH mice have a marginal difference in their body weight gain, whereas significant differences were found for fasted mice. In nH mice, PPAR-α, acyl-CoA oxidase and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein expressions were significantly elevated, in contrast to fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl CoA-desaturase (SCD)-1, and elongase (ELOVL)-6 expressions. Fasn was profoundly induced in fH mice, while decreased sterol regulatory-binding protein-1 and SCD-1 were found only in eH mice. Different from the gene expression profiles, plasma total cholesterol level of the eH mice was higher than controls, whereas nH mice have increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids. Only glucose level of the fH mice was higher than that observed for controls. Results showed that fasting and sampling time have significantly affected liver gene expression and plasma biochemical indices of the high-fat diet-treated mice. An overlook in these aspects can cause serious discrepancies in the experimental data and their interpretations.

  10. rhG-CSF does not affect the phenotype of adult donor peripheral blood NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lassailly, F; Sielleur, I; Blaise, D; Chabannon, C

    2005-01-01

    Considerable evidence in preclinical models as well as in human transplantation now suggests that donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells can contribute to alloimmune recognition of recipient residual tumour cells. This makes the NK cell population an attractive target for in vitro or in vivo manipulations, in order to improve the antitumour effect of allogeneic transplantation. However, conditions in which allogeneic donor cells are collected vary; several reports have emphasised the different phenotypic and functional properties of T cells derived from marrow, cord blood or mobilised peripheral blood grafts; others have demonstrated different clinical outcomes following blood or marrow transplantation after myeloablative conditioning regimens. NK cells have been examined in this setting; the availability of new tools to study the expression of a variety of surface antigens that are involved in the control of NK cell activity offered us an opportunity to extensively characterise the phenotypic properties of NK cells from donors, before and after administration of pharmacological doses of rhG-CSF used for haematopoietic progenitor mobilisation. Our study suggests that rhG-CSF does not reproducibly alter blood NK cell phenotype in normal individuals, and thus that donor-derived cells are fully equipped to exert their potential antitumour effect.

  11. Seasonal tracking of histo-blood group antigen expression and norovirus binding in oyster gastrointestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Engelbrektson, Anna L; Mandrell, Robert E

    2008-08-01

    Noroviruses (NORs) are the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks. Outbreaks are often associated with the consumption of contaminated oysters and generally occur between the months of November and March, when oysters produce the highest levels of glycogen. Oyster glycogen has been proposed as playing a role in NOR accumulation. Recent research indicates that histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) function as viral receptors on human gastrointestinal cells. In this study, oyster glycogen was tested to determine whether it contains HBGA-like molecules and whether it plays a role in NOR binding. The correlation between the amount of HBGA expression and NOR binding also was measured. We also tested whether seasonal changes affected HBGA expression and binding of recombinant NORs. The results indicate that recombinant NOR binding is highly correlated with HBGA expression in Virginica (Crassostrea virginica), Pacific (Crassostrea gigas), and Kumamato (Crassostrea sikamea) oysters, but the association does not have a seasonal pattern. No obvious trend in either HBGA expression or recombinant NOR binding by month was noted. A significant increase in recombinant NOR binding was observed in Virginica and Pacific oysters in a season not generally associated with NOR gastroenteritis outbreaks. A significant increase in HBGA expression also was observed for Pacific and Virginica oysters in the same season. Paradoxically, HBGA expression and NOR binding both were higher in oysters produced in the non-NOR gastroenteritis season (April through October) than in those produced in the NOR gastroenteritis season (November through March), suggesting that seasonal NOR gastroenteritis outbreaks are not associated with high levels of HBGA expression or NOR binding.

  12. Risk factors affecting blood PCDDs and PCDFs in residents living near an industrial incinerator in Korea.

    PubMed

    Leem, J H; Lee, D S; Kim, J

    2006-10-01

    The contamination sources of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), such as industrial incinerators, can potentially change the blood levels and isomer patterns of PCDD/DFs in residents living near the incinerators. In this study, we estimated whether the blood levels and isomer patterns of PCDD/DFs in residents living near an incinerator were affected by its presence and investigated factors that characterize the risk of high exposure to PCDD/DFs in the area. We estimated the blood levels and homologue patterns of PCDD/DFs in a group of 40 residents living within 5 km of an industrial incinerator and in a group of 20 residents living 20 km away from an incinerator. We cannot assert that the operation of incinerator facilities was only cause of increased PCDD/DFs in these residents; however, the operation of incinerator facilities in agricultural areas increased PCDD/DF exposure to individuals. The group living next to the industrial incinerator especially represented the typical isomer pattern in which the proportions of OCDDs were lower and those of PCDFs higher than those in the other groups. The high-risk population with increased blood levels of PCDD/DFs included those who had lived longer in the contaminated area as well as those who frequently ate contaminated foods.

  13. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices--How numerical implementation affects the results.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed.

  14. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices - How numerical implementation affects the results

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed. PMID:26679833

  15. Sex and storage affect cholinesterase activity in blood plasma of Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Freezing at -25?C had confounding effects on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in blood plasma from breeding female quail, but did not affect ChE activity in plasma from males. Plasma ChE activity of control females increased consistently during 28 days of storage while both carbamate- and cidrotophos-inhibited ChE decreased. Refrigeration of plasma at 4?C for 2 days had little effect of ChE activity. Plasma ChE activity was averaged about 34% higher in breeding males than in females. Extreme caution should be exercised in use of blood plasma for evaluation of anti ChE exposure in free-living birds.

  16. Perceptual, Categorical, and Affective Processing of Ambiguous Smiling Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Manuel G.; Fernandez-Martin, Andres; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Why is a face with a smile but non-happy eyes likely to be interpreted as happy? We used blended expressions in which a smiling mouth was incongruent with the eyes (e.g., angry eyes), as well as genuine expressions with congruent eyes and mouth (e.g., both happy or angry). Tasks involved detection of a smiling mouth (perceptual), categorization of…

  17. DNA Methylation of Lipid-Related Genes Affects Blood Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Liliane; Wahl, Simone; Pilling, Luke C.; Reischl, Eva; Sandling, Johanna K.; Kunze, Sonja; Holdt, Lesca M.; Kretschmer, Anja; Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Hedman, Åsa K.; Roden, Michael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Teupser, Daniel; Meisinger, Christa; Spector, Timothy D.; Kronenberg, Florian; Prokisch, Holger; Melzer, David; Peters, Annette; Deloukas, Panos; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waldenberger, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Epigenetic mechanisms might be involved in the regulation of interindividual lipid level variability and thus may contribute to the cardiovascular risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between genome-wide DNA methylation and blood lipid levels high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Observed DNA methylation changes were also further analyzed to examine their relationship with previous hospitalized myocardial infarction. Methods and Results Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were determined in whole blood samples of 1776 subjects of the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 cohort using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumina). Ten novel lipid-related CpG sites annotated to various genes including ABCG1, MIR33B/SREBF1, and TNIP1 were identified. CpG cg06500161, located in ABCG1, was associated in opposite directions with both high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β coefficient=−0.049; P=8.26E-17) and triglyceride levels (β=0.070; P=1.21E-27). Eight associations were confirmed by replication in the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F3 study (n=499) and in the Invecchiare in Chianti, Aging in the Chianti Area study (n=472). Associations between triglyceride levels and SREBF1 and ABCG1 were also found in adipose tissue of the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource cohort (n=634). Expression analysis revealed an association between ABCG1 methylation and lipid levels that might be partly mediated by ABCG1 expression. DNA methylation of ABCG1 might also play a role in previous hospitalized myocardial infarction (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval=1.06–1.25). Conclusions Epigenetic modifications of the newly identified loci might regulate disturbed blood lipid levels and thus contribute to the development of complex lipid-related diseases. PMID:25583993

  18. Altered expression of KLC3 may affect semen parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kargar- Dastjerdy, Pegah; Tavalaee, Marziyeh; Salehi, Mansoor; Falahati, Mojtaba; Izadi, Tayebeh; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: KLC3 protein as a member of the kinesin light-chain protein family plays an important role in spermatogenesis, during formation of mitochondrial sheath in the mid piece of the sperm tail. Objective: This study for the first time aims to compare the expression of the KLC3 gene between fertile and infertile individuals. Materials and Methods: Semen samples were collected from 19 fertile individuals who were selected from embryo-donor volunteers and 57 infertile individuals who had abnormal sperm parameters according to world health organization criteria. Sperm parameters using computer assisted sperm analysis and the quantitative KLC3-gene expression using the real-time PCR method were measured. Results: Our results revealed a significant correlations between sperm concentration with relative expression of KLC3 only in infertile groups (r=0.45, p=0.00). A significant correlation was not found between KLC3 expression and sperm motility; however, the relative expression of KLC3 was significantly higher in asthenozoospermic compared to non-asthenozoospermic individuals. Conclusion: Low expression of KLC3 may result in improper function of midpiece, which has important function in sperm motility. The results of this study show that aberrant expression of KLC3 might be associated with phenomena like oligozoospermia and asthenozoospermia. This article is extracted from student’s thesis. PMID:27141544

  19. The Enfacement Illusion Is Not Affected by Negative Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Brianna; Cardini, Flavia; Làdavas, Elisabetta; Bertini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Enfacement is an illusion wherein synchronous visual and tactile inputs update the mental representation of one’s own face to assimilate another person’s face. Emotional facial expressions, serving as communicative signals, may influence enfacement by increasing the observer’s motivation to understand the mental state of the expresser. Fearful expressions, in particular, might increase enfacement because they are valuable for adaptive behavior and more strongly represented in somatosensory cortex than other emotions. In the present study, a face was seen being touched at the same time as the participant’s own face. This face was either neutral, fearful, or angry. Anger was chosen as an emotional control condition for fear because it is similarly negative but induces less somatosensory resonance, and requires additional knowledge (i.e., contextual information and social contingencies) to effectively guide behavior. We hypothesized that seeing a fearful face (but not an angry one) would increase enfacement because of greater somatosensory resonance. Surprisingly, neither fearful nor angry expressions modulated the degree of enfacement relative to neutral expressions. Synchronous interpersonal visuo-tactile stimulation led to assimilation of the other’s face, but this assimilation was not modulated by facial expression processing. This finding suggests that dynamic, multisensory processes of self-face identification operate independently of facial expression processing. PMID:26291532

  20. The Enfacement Illusion Is Not Affected by Negative Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Beck, Brianna; Cardini, Flavia; Làdavas, Elisabetta; Bertini, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Enfacement is an illusion wherein synchronous visual and tactile inputs update the mental representation of one's own face to assimilate another person's face. Emotional facial expressions, serving as communicative signals, may influence enfacement by increasing the observer's motivation to understand the mental state of the expresser. Fearful expressions, in particular, might increase enfacement because they are valuable for adaptive behavior and more strongly represented in somatosensory cortex than other emotions. In the present study, a face was seen being touched at the same time as the participant's own face. This face was either neutral, fearful, or angry. Anger was chosen as an emotional control condition for fear because it is similarly negative but induces less somatosensory resonance, and requires additional knowledge (i.e., contextual information and social contingencies) to effectively guide behavior. We hypothesized that seeing a fearful face (but not an angry one) would increase enfacement because of greater somatosensory resonance. Surprisingly, neither fearful nor angry expressions modulated the degree of enfacement relative to neutral expressions. Synchronous interpersonal visuo-tactile stimulation led to assimilation of the other's face, but this assimilation was not modulated by facial expression processing. This finding suggests that dynamic, multisensory processes of self-face identification operate independently of facial expression processing.

  1. CXCR4 expression affects overall survival of HCC patients whereas CXCR7 expression does not.

    PubMed

    Neve Polimeno, Maria; Ierano, Caterina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Simona Losito, Nunzia; Napolitano, Maria; Portella, Luigi; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Maria Trotta, Anna; Curley, Steven; Costantini, Susan; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Izzo, Francesco; Scala, Stefania

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a heterogeneous disease with a poor prognosis and limited markers for predicting patient survival. Because chemokines and chemokine receptors play numerous and integral roles in HCC disease progression, the CXCR4-CXCL12-CXCR7 axis was studied in HCC patients. CXCR4 and CXCR7 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 86 HCC patients (training cohort) and validated in 42 unrelated HCC patients (validation cohort). CXCR4 levels were low in 22.1% of patients, intermediate in 30.2%, and high in 47.7%, whereas CXCR7 levels were low in 9.3% of patients, intermediate in 44.2% and high in 46.5% of the patients in the training cohort. When correlated to patient outcome, only CXCR4 affected overall survival (P=0.03). CXCR4-CXCL12-CXCR7 mRNA levels were examined in 33/86 patients. Interestingly, the common CXCR4-CXCR7 ligand CXCL12 was expressed at significantly lower levels in tumor tissues compared to adjacent normal liver (P=0.032). The expression and function of CXCR4 and CXCR7 was also analyzed in several human HCC cell lines. CXCR4 was expressed in Huh7, Hep3B, SNU398, SNU449 and SNU475 cells, whereas CXCR7 was expressed in HepG2, Huh7, SNU449 and SNU475 cells. Huh7, SNU449 and SNU475 cells migrated toward CXCL12, and this migration was inhibited by AMD3100/anti-CXCR4 and by CCX771/anti-CXCR7. Moreover, SNU449 and Huh7 cells exhibited matrix invasion in the presence of CXCL12 and CXCL11, a ligand exclusive to CXCR7. In conclusion, CXCR4 affects the prognosis of HCC patients but CXCR7 does not. Therefore, the CXCR4-CXCL12-CXCR7 axis plays a role in the interaction of HCC with the surrounding normal tissue and represents a suitable therapeutic target.

  2. 25OHD analogues and vacuum blood collection tubes dramatically affect the accuracy of automated immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Cheng, Xinqi; Fang, Huiling; Zhang, Ruiping; Han, Jianhua; Qin, Xuzhen; Cheng, Qian; Su, Wei; Hou, Li’an; Xia, Liangyu; Qiu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Variations in vitamin D quantification methods are large, and influences of vitamin D analogues and blood collection methods have not been systematically examined. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D analogues 25OHD2 and 3-epi 25OHD3 and blood collection methods on vitamin D measurement, using five immunoassay systems and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Serum samples (332) were selected from routine vitamin D assay requests, including samples with or without 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, and analysed using various immunoassay systems. In samples with no 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3, all immunoassays correlated well with LC-MS/MS. However, the Siemens system produced a large positive mean bias of 12.5 ng/mL and a poor Kappa value when using tubes with clot activator and gel separator. When 25OHD2 or 3-epi 25OHD3 was present, correlations and clinical agreement decreased for all immunoassays. Serum 25OHD in VACUETTE tubes with gel and clot activator, as measured by the Siemens system, produced significantly higher values than did samples collected in VACUETTE tubes with no additives. Bias decreased and clinical agreement improved significantly when using tubes with no additives. In conclusion, most automated immunoassays showed acceptable correlation and agreement with LC-MS/MS; however, 25OHD analogues and blood collection tubes dramatically affected accuracy. PMID:26420221

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  5. Rapid gene expression changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes upon practice of a comprehensive yoga program.

    PubMed

    Qu, Su; Olafsrud, Solveig Mjelstad; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common integrative medicine (IM) modalities is yoga and related practices. Previous work has shown that yoga may improve wellness in healthy people and have benefits for patients. However, the mechanisms of how yoga may positively affect the mind-body system are largely unknown. Here we have assessed possible rapid changes in global gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in healthy people that practiced either a comprehensive yoga program or a control regimen. The experimental sessions included gentle yoga postures, breathing exercises, and meditation (Sudarshan Kriya and Related Practices--SK&P) compared with a control regimen of a nature walk and listening to relaxing music. We show that the SK&P program has a rapid and significantly greater effect on gene expression in PBMCs compared with the control regimen. These data suggest that yoga and related practices result in rapid gene expression alterations which may be the basis for their longer term cell biological and higher level health effects.

  6. Rapid Gene Expression Changes in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes upon Practice of a Comprehensive Yoga Program

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Su; Olafsrud, Solveig Mjelstad; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A.; Saatcioglu, Fahri

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common integrative medicine (IM) modalities is yoga and related practices. Previous work has shown that yoga may improve wellness in healthy people and have benefits for patients. However, the mechanisms of how yoga may positively affect the mind-body system are largely unknown. Here we have assessed possible rapid changes in global gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in healthy people that practiced either a comprehensive yoga program or a control regimen. The experimental sessions included gentle yoga postures, breathing exercises, and meditation (Sudarshan Kriya and Related Practices – SK&P) compared with a control regimen of a nature walk and listening to relaxing music. We show that the SK&P program has a rapid and significantly greater effect on gene expression in PBMCs compared with the control regimen. These data suggest that yoga and related practices result in rapid gene expression alterations which may be the basis for their longer term cell biological and higher level health effects. PMID:23613970

  7. Factors affecting initial training success of blood glucose testing in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Reamer, Lisa A; Haller, Rachel L; Thiele, Erica J; Freeman, Hani D; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes can be a problem for captive chimpanzees. Accurate blood glucose (BG) readings are necessary to monitor and treat this disease. Thus, obtaining voluntary samples from primates through positive reinforcement training (PRT) is critical. The current study assessed the voluntary participation of 123 chimpanzees in BG sampling and investigated factors that may contribute to individual success. All subjects participate in regular PRT sessions as part of a comprehensive behavioral management program. Basic steps involved in obtaining BG values include: voluntarily presenting a finger/toe; allowing digit disinfection; holding for the lancet device; and allowing blood collection onto a glucometer test strip for analysis. We recorded the level of participation (none, partial, or complete) when each chimpanzee was first asked to perform the testing procedure. Nearly 30% of subjects allowed the entire procedure in one session, without any prior specific training for the target behavior. Factors that affected this initial successful BG testing included sex, personality (chimpanzees rated higher on the factor "openness" were more likely to participate with BG testing), and past training performance for "present-for-injection" (chimpanzees that presented for their most recent anesthetic injection were more likely to participate). Neither age, rearing history, time since most recent anesthetic event nor social group size significantly affected initial training success. These results have important implications for captive management and training program success, underlining individual differences in training aptitude and the need for developing individual management plans in order to provide optimal care and treatment for diabetic chimpanzees in captivity.

  8. Systemic blood loss affects NF-kappa B regulatory mechanisms in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Moine, P; Shenkar, R; Kaneko, D; Le Tulzo, Y; Abraham, E

    1997-07-01

    The nuclear regulatory factor (NF)-kappa B is activated in the lungs of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In experimental models of acute lung injury, activation of NF-kappa B contributes to the increased expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators in the lungs. Because of the important role that NF-kappa B activation appears to play in the development of acute lung injury, we examined cytoplasmic and nuclear NF-kappa B counterregulatory mechanisms in lung mononuclear cells, using a murine model in which inflammatory lung injury develops after blood loss. Sustained activation of NF-kappa B was present in lung mononuclear cells over the 4-h period after blood loss. The activation of NF-kappa B after hemorrhage was accompanied by alterations in levels of the NF-kappa B regulatory proteins I kappa B alpha and Bcl-3. Cytoplasmic and nuclear I kappa B alpha were increased and nuclear Bcl-3 was decreased during the first hour after blood loss, but, by 4 h posthemorrhage, cytoplasmic and nuclear I kappa B alpha levels were decreased and nuclear levels of Bcl-3 were increased. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity in otherwise unmanipulated unhemorrhaged mice resulted in increased levels of I kappa B alpha and decreased amounts of Bcl-3 in nuclear extracts from lung mononuclear cells. No changes in the levels of nuclear I kappa B alpha or Bcl-3 occurred after hemorrhage when xanthine oxidase activity was inhibited. These results demonstrate that blood loss, at least partly through xanthine oxidase-dependent mechanisms, produces alterations in the levels of both I kappa B alpha and Bcl-3 in lung mononuclear cell populations. The effects of hemorrhage on proteins that regulate activation of NF-kappa B may contribute to the frequent development of inflammatory lung injury in this setting.

  9. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1500 ml; group B, 1500 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1700 ml; group C, 1700 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 2000 ml. Then, coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P < 0.001). Fibrinogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets strikingly decreased, whereas prothrombin time and APTT values significantly increased with bleeding amounts in both quick and slow-bleeding groups. Interestingly, compared with slow-bleeding patients, coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.

  10. Finger stick blood collection for gene expression profiling and storage of tempus blood RNA tubes

    PubMed Central

    Rinchai, Darawan; Anguiano, Esperanza; Nguyen, Phuong; Chaussabel, Damien

    2017-01-01

    With this report we aim to make available a standard operating procedure (SOP) developed for RNA stabilization of small blood volumes collected via a finger stick. The anticipation that this procedure may be improved through peer-review and/or readers public comments is another element motivating the publication of this SOP. Procuring blood samples from human subjects can, among other uses, enable assessment of the immune status of an individual subject via the profiling of RNA abundance using technologies such as real time PCR, NanoString, microarrays or RNA-sequencing. It is often desirable to minimize blood volumes and employ methods that are the least invasive and can be practically implemented outside of clinical settings. Finger stick blood samples are increasingly used for measurement of levels of pharmacological drugs and biological analytes. It is a simple and convenient procedure amenable for instance to field use or self-collection at home using a blood sample collection kit. Such methodologies should also enable the procurement of blood samples at high frequency for health or disease monitoring applications. PMID:28357036

  11. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  12. Blood Lactate Response to the CF Express Step Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-18

    hypertension and migraine headaches. Beta - blockers cause a moderate decrease in blood pressure, a pro- nounced reduction in heart rate, and a slight...antihypertensive therapy with beta - blockers : submaximal exercise capa- city and metabolic effects during exercise. Int. J. Sport. Med. 8:342-347. 26

  13. Cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells alter their gene expression when challenged with endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wens, B; De Boever, P; Verbeke, M; Hollanders, K; Schoeters, G

    2013-01-07

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to interfere with the hormonal system and may negatively influence human health. Microarray analysis was used in this study to investigate differential gene expression in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) after in vitro exposure to EDCs. PBMCs, isolated from blood samples of four male and four female healthy individuals, were exposed in vitro for 18h to either a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB126, 1μM), a non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB153, 10μM), a brominated flame retardant (BDE47, 10μM), a perfluorinated alkyl acid (PFOA, 10μM) or bisphenol (BPA, 10μM). ANOVA analysis revealed a significant change in the expression of 862 genes as a result of EDC exposure. The gender of the donors did not affect gene expression. Hierarchical cluster analysis created three groups and clustered: (1) PCB126-exposed samples, (2) PCB153 and BDE47, (3) PFOA and BPA. The number of differentially expressed genes varied per compound and ranged from 60 to 192 when using fold change and multiplicity corrected p-value as filtering criteria. Exposure to PCB126 induced the AhR signaling pathway. BDE47 and PCB153 are known to disrupt thyroid metabolism and exposure influenced the expression of the nuclear receptors PPARγ and ESR2, respectively. BPA and PFOA did not induce significant changes in the expression of known nuclear receptors. Overall, each compound produced a unique gene expression signature affecting pathways and GO processes linked to metabolism and inflammation. Twenty-nine genes were significantly altered in expression under all experimental conditions. Six of these genes (HSD11B2, MMP11, ADIPOQ, CEL, DUSP9 and TUB) could be associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, microarray analysis identified that PBMCs altered their gene expression response in vitro when challenged with EDCs. Our screening approach has identified a number of gene candidates that warrant further

  14. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles linked to monoamine metabolite levels in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Luykx, J J; Olde Loohuis, L M; Neeleman, M; Strengman, E; Bakker, S C; Lentjes, E; Borgdorff, P; van Dongen, E P A; Bruins, P; Kahn, R S; Horvath, S; de Jong, S; Ophoff, R A

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier separates circulating blood from the central nervous system (CNS). The scope of this barrier is not fully understood which limits our ability to relate biological measurements from peripheral to central phenotypes. For example, it is unknown to what extent gene expression levels in peripheral blood are reflective of CNS metabolism. In this study, we examine links between central monoamine metabolite levels and whole-blood gene expression to better understand the connection between peripheral systems and the CNS. To that end, we correlated the prime monoamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with whole-genome gene expression microarray data from blood (N=240 human subjects). We additionally applied gene-enrichment analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) to identify modules of co-expressed genes in blood that may be involved with monoamine metabolite levels in CSF. Transcript levels of two genes were significantly associated with CSF serotonin metabolite levels after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing: THAP7 (P=2.8 × 10−8, β=0.08) and DDX6 (P=2.9 × 10−7, β=0.07). Differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for genes expressed in the brain tissue (P=6.0 × 10−52). WGCNA revealed significant correlations between serotonin metabolism and hub genes with known functions in serotonin metabolism, for example, HTR2A and COMT. We conclude that gene expression levels in whole blood are associated with monoamine metabolite levels in the human CSF. Our results, including the strong enrichment of brain-expressed genes, illustrate that gene expression profiles in peripheral blood can be relevant for quantitative metabolic phenotypes in the CNS. PMID:27959337

  15. Haemopexin affects iron distribution and ferritin expression in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Noemi; Tonoli, Elisabetta; Logrand, Federica; Fiorito, Veronica; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Vercelli, Alessandro; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Haemopexin (Hx) is an acute phase plasma glycoprotein, mainly produced by the liver and released into plasma where it binds heme with high affinity and delivers it to the liver. This system provides protection against free heme-mediated oxidative stress, limits access by pathogens to heme and contributes to iron homeostasis by recycling heme iron. Hx protein has been found in the sciatic nerve, skeletal muscle, retina, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, a comparative proteomic analysis has shown an increase of Hx in CSF from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, thus suggesting its involvement in heme detoxification in brain. Here, we report that Hx is synthesised in brain by the ventricular ependymal cells. To verify whether Hx is involved in heme scavenging in brain, and consequently, in the control of iron level, iron deposits and ferritin expression were analysed in cerebral regions known for iron accumulation. We show a twofold increase in the number of iron-loaded oligodendrocytes in the basal ganglia and thalamus of Hx-null mice compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, there was no increase in H- and L-ferritin expression in these regions. This condition is common to several human neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in which iron loading is not associated with an adequate increase in ferritin expression. However, a strong reduction in the number of ferritin-positive cells was observed in the cerebral cortex of Hx-null animals. Consistent with increased iron deposits and inadequate ferritin expression, malondialdehyde level and Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase-1 expression were higher in the brain of Hx-null mice than in that of wild-type controls. These data demonstrate that Hx plays an important role in controlling iron distribution within brain, thus suggesting its involvement in iron-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19120692

  16. Data-driven asthma endotypes defined from blood biomarker and gene expression data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma is complicated by its mechanistically distinct subtypes (endotypes) driven by genetic susceptibility and modulating environmental factors. Clinical biomarkers and blood gene expression were collected from a stratified, cross-section...

  17. Early high-sodium solid diet does not affect sodium intake, sodium preference, blood volume and blood pressure in adult Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ufnal, Marcin; Drapala, Adrian; Sikora, Mariusz; Zera, Tymoteusz

    2011-07-01

    A high-Na diet may lead to the development of hypertension in both humans and rats; however, the causes of Na intake in amounts greater than physiologically needed as well as the mechanisms whereby high-Na food elevates blood pressure are not clear. Therefore, we decided to test the hypothesis that a high-Na diet introduced after suckling affects Na intake, food preference, resting blood pressure and blood volume in adult rats. Male Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, 4 weeks old, were divided into three groups and placed on either a high-Na (3.28%), a medium-Na (0.82%) or a regular diet (0.22%) with the same energy content for 8 weeks. Subsequently, food preference, resting arterial blood pressure, blood volume, plasma osmolality and Na blood level were evaluated. When offered a choice of diets, all the groups preferred the regular chow, and there was no significant difference in total Na intake between the groups. When the rats experienced the change from their initial chow to a new one with different Na content, they continued to eat the same amount of food. Body weight, resting arterial blood pressure, blood volume, plasma osmolality and Na blood level were comparable between the groups. In conclusion, the results show that a high-Na diet introduced immediately after suckling does not affect Na preference and Na intake in adult WKY rats. Furthermore, the findings provide evidence that both blood volume and arterial blood pressure are highly protected in normotensive rats on a high-Na diet.

  18. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  19. Encoding Conditions Affect Recognition of Vocally Expressed Emotions Across Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Jürgens, Rebecca; Drolet, Matthis; Pirow, Ralph; Scheiner, Elisabeth; Fischer, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Although the expression of emotions in humans is considered to be largely universal, cultural effects contribute to both emotion expression and recognition. To disentangle the interplay between these factors, play-acted and authentic (non-instructed) vocal expressions of emotions were used, on the assumption that cultural effects may contribute differentially to the recognition of staged and spontaneous emotions. Speech tokens depicting four emotions (anger, sadness, joy, fear) were obtained from German radio archives and re-enacted by professional actors, and presented to 120 participants from Germany, Romania, and Indonesia. Participants in all three countries were poor at distinguishing between play-acted and spontaneous emotional utterances (58.73% correct on average with only marginal cultural differences). Nevertheless, authenticity influenced emotion recognition: across cultures, anger was recognized more accurately when play-acted (z = 15.06, p < 0.001) and sadness when authentic (z = 6.63, p < 0.001), replicating previous findings from German populations. German subjects revealed a slight advantage in recognizing emotions, indicating a moderate in-group advantage. There was no difference between Romanian and Indonesian subjects in the overall emotion recognition. Differential cultural effects became particularly apparent in terms of differential biases in emotion attribution. While all participants labeled play-acted expressions as anger more frequently than expected, German participants exhibited a further bias toward choosing anger for spontaneous stimuli. In contrast to the German sample, Romanian and Indonesian participants were biased toward choosing sadness. These results support the view that emotion recognition rests on a complex interaction of human universals and cultural specificities. Whether and in which way the observed biases are linked to cultural differences in self-construal remains an issue for further investigation. PMID

  20. Warming-Up Affects Performance and Lactate Distribution between Plasma and Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Patrick; Zinner, Christoph; Yue, Zengyuan; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Warming-up (WU) is a widely used preparation for training and competition. However, little is known about the potential mechanisms of WU on performance and on the lactate distribution in the blood compartment. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether different WU procedures affect performance and lactate distribution between plasma and red blood cells (RBCs) after maximal exercise. At three different occasions eleven subjects performed one 30 s maximal effort exercise on a cycle ergometer. Before each exercise, subjects warmed up at different intensities: 1. no WU (NWU); 2. extensive WU (EWU); 3. intensive WU (IWU). Blood samples were taken under resting conditions, after WU, and in 1 minute intervals during recovery to determine lactate concentrations [LA] in whole blood ([LA]WB), plasma ([LA]plasma) and erythrocytes ([LA]RBC). Mean power output was +58 Watt (EWU) and +60 Watt (IWU) higher compared to NWU. For each WU condition [LA]plasma and [LA]RBC differed significantly at any time point, showing greater [LA]plasma compared to [LA]RBC. The maximal effort exercise caused a rapid decrease of the [LA]RBC/[LA]plasma ratio. [LA]RBC reached the peak 3-5 minutes later than [LA]plasma depending on the WU condition. The initial increments in [LA]RBC were 10-16% lower after IWU compared to NWU and EWU. The lower increment of [LA]RBC after IWU might be due to a “higher preloading” with lactate before exercise, causing a smaller initial [LA] gradient between plasma and RBCs. It seems that the influx decreases with increasing intracellular [LA]. Another possibility one could speculate about is, that the extracellular increase in [LA] inhibits the outflux of lactate produced by the RBC itself. This inhibited export of lactate from RBCs may lead to an intracellular lactate accumulation. But the relatively fast increase in [LA]RBC and other investigations partly contradicts this possibility. Key points Warm-up significantly improves performance during 30

  1. Caesium-affected gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sahr, Tobias; Voigt, Gabriele; Paretzke, Herwig G; Schramel, Peter; Ernst, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    * Excessive caesium can be toxic to plants. Here we investigated Cs uptake and caesium-induced gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. * Accumulation was measured in plants grown for 5 wk on agar supplemented with nontoxic and up to toxic levels of Cs. Caesium-induced gene expression was studied by suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH) and RT-PCR. * Caesium accumulated in leaf rosettes dependent upon the external concentration in the growth media, whereas the potassium concentration decreased in rosettes. At a concentration of 850 microM, Cs plants showed reduced development, and withered with an increase in concentration to 1 mM Cs. SSH resulted in the isolation of 73 clones that were differentially expressed at a Cs concentration of 150 microM. Most of the genes identified belong to groups of genes encoding proteins in stress defence, detoxification, transport, homeostasis and general metabolism, and proteins controlling transcription and translation. * The present study identified a number of marker genes for Cs in Arabidopsis grown under nontoxic Cs concentrations, indicating that Cs acts as an abiotic stress factor.

  2. The Induced Affect Response: 10-Week-Old Infants' Responses to Three Emotion Expressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Jeannette M.; Lelwica, Mary

    1987-01-01

    When mothers of 12 infants 10 weeks of age displayed noncontingent, practiced facial and vocal expressions of joy, anger, and sadness, infants responded differently to each expression. Infants' matching responses to maternal affects were only part of complex but predictable behavioral patterns that indicate meaningful affect states and possibly…

  3. Experimenter Affective Expression and Gaze Following in 7-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flom, Ross; Pick, Anne D.

    2005-01-01

    The study of gaze following in infants younger than 12 months of age has emphasized the effects of gesture, type of target, and its position or placement. This experiment extends this literature by examining the effects of adults' affective expression on 7-month-olds' gaze following. The effects of 3 affective expressions--happy, sad, and…

  4. Launch Conditions Might Affect the Formation of Blood Vessel in the Quail Chorioallantoic Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, M. K.; Unsworth, B. R.; Sychev, B. R.; Guryeva, T. S.; Dadasheva, O. A.; Piert, S. J.; Lagel, K. E.; Dubrovin, L. C.; Jahns, G. C.; Boda, K.; Sabo, V.; Samet, M. M.; Lelkes, P. I.

    1998-01-01

    AS 2 part of the first joint USA-Russian MIR/Shuttle program, fertilized quail eggs were flown on the MIR 18 mission. Post-flight examination indicated impaired survival of both the embryos in space and also of control embryos exposed to vibrational and g-forces simulating the conditions experienced during the launch of Progress 227. We hypothesized that excess mechanical forces and/or other conditions during the launch might cause abnormal development of the blood supply in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) leading to the impaired survival of the embryos. The CAM, a highly vascularized extraembryonic organ, provides for the oxygen exchange across the egg shell and is thus pivotal for proper embryonic development. To test our hypothesis, we compared angiogenesis In CAMS of eggs which were either exposed to the vibration and g-force profile simulating the conditions at launch of Progress 227 (synchronous controls), or kept under routine conditions in a laboratory Incubator (laboratory controls). At various time points during Incubation, the eggs were fixed in paraformaldehyde for subsequent dissection. At the time of dissection, the CAM was carefully lifted from the egg shell and examined as whole mounts by bright-field and fluorescent microscopy. The development or the vasculature (angiogenesis) was assessed from the density of blood vessels per viewing field and evaluated by computer aided image analysis. We observed a significant decrease In blood-vessel density in the synchronous controls versus "normal" laboratory controls beginning from day 10 of Incubation. The decrease in vascular density was restricted to the smallest vessels only, suggesting that conditions during the launch and/or during the subsequent Incubation of the eggs may affect the normal progress of angiogenesis in the CAM. Abnormal angiogenesis In the CAM might contribute to the impaired survival of the embryos observed in synchronous controls as well as in space.

  5. Classification accuracy of algorithms for blood chemistry data for three aquaculture-affected marine fish species.

    PubMed

    Coz-Rakovac, R; Topic Popovic, N; Smuc, T; Strunjak-Perovic, I; Jadan, M

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was determination and discrimination of biochemical data among three aquaculture-affected marine fish species (sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax; sea bream, Sparus aurata L., and mullet, Mugil spp.) based on machine-learning methods. The approach relying on machine-learning methods gives more usable classification solutions and provides better insight into the collected data. So far, these new methods have been applied to the problem of discrimination of blood chemistry data with respect to season and feed of a single species. This is the first time these classification algorithms have been used as a framework for rapid differentiation among three fish species. Among the machine-learning methods used, decision trees provided the clearest model, which correctly classified 210 samples or 85.71%, and incorrectly classified 35 samples or 14.29% and clearly identified three investigated species from their biochemical traits.

  6. Mutations Affecting Expression of the rosy Locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong Sung; Curtis, Daniel; McCarron, Margaret; Love, Carol; Gray, Mark; Bender, Welcome; Chovnick, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a "control element" near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. We have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry+10 underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. We induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study (T. P. Keith et al. 1987), the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH. PMID:3036645

  7. Mutations affecting expression of the rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Curtis, D.; McCarron, M.; Love, C.; Gray, M.; Bender, W.; Chovnick, A.

    1987-05-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a control element near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. The authors have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry/sup +10/ underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. They induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study, the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH.

  8. Influence of testosterone and a novel SARM on gene expression in whole blood of Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Riedmaier, Irmgard; Tichopad, Ales; Reiter, Martina; Pfaffl, Michael W; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2009-04-01

    Anabolic hormones, including testosterone, have been suggested as a therapy for aging-related conditions, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. These therapies are sometimes associated with severe androgenic side effects. A promising alternative to testosterone replacement therapy are selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). SARMs have the potential to mimic the desirable central and peripheral androgenic anabolic effects of testosterone without having its side effects. In this study we evaluated the effects of LGD2941, in comparison to testosterone, on mRNA expression of selected target genes in whole blood in an non-human model. The regulated genes can act as potential blood biomarker candidates in future studies with AR ligands. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were treated either with testosterone or LGD2941 for 90 days in order to compare their effects on mRNA expression in blood. Blood samples were taken before SARM application, on day 16 and on day 90 of treatment. Gene expression of 37 candidate genes was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) technology. Our study shows that both testosterone and LGD2941 influence mRNA expression of 6 selected genes out of 37 in whole blood. The apoptosis regulators CD30L, Fas, TNFR1 and TNFR2 and the interleukins IL-12B and IL-15 showed significant changes in gene expression between control and the treatment groups and represent potential biomarkers for androgen receptor ligands in whole blood.

  9. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields do not affect DNA damage and gene expression profiles of yeast and human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Luceri, Cristina; De Filippo, Carlotta; Giovannelli, Lisa; Blangiardo, Marta; Cavalieri, Duccio; Aglietti, Filippo; Pampaloni, Monica; Andreuccetti, Daniele; Pieri, Lapo; Bambi, Franco; Biggeri, Annibale; Dolara, Piero

    2005-09-01

    We studied the effects of extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on peripheral human blood lymphocytes and DBY747 Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Graded exposure to 50 Hz magnetic flux density was obtained with a Helmholtz coil system set at 1, 10 or 100 microT for 18 h. The effects of EMFs on DNA damage were studied with the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) in lymphocytes. Gene expression profiles of EMF-exposed human and yeast cells were evaluated with DNA microarrays containing 13,971 and 6,212 oligonucleotides, respectively. After exposure to the EMF, we did not observe an increase in the amount of strand breaks or oxidated DNA bases relative to controls or a variation in gene expression profiles. The results suggest that extremely low-frequency EMFs do not induce DNA damage or affect gene expression in these two different eukaryotic cell systems.

  10. Sleep deprivation affects inflammatory marker expression in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has been shown to increase inflammatory markers in rat sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Inflammation is a condition associated with pathologies such as obesity, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated changes in the pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in different depots of white adipose tissue in rats. We also assessed lipid profiles and serum levels of corticosterone, leptin, and adiponectin after 96 hours of sleep deprivation. Methods The study consisted of two groups: a control (C) group and a paradoxical sleep deprivation by 96 h (PSD) group. Ten rats were randomly assigned to either the control group (C) or the PSD. Mesenteric (MEAT) and retroperitoneal (RPAT) adipose tissue, liver and serum were collected following completion of the PSD protocol. Levels of interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-10 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were analysed in MEAT and RPAT, and leptin, adiponectin, glucose, corticosterone and lipid profile levels were analysed in serum. Results IL-6 levels were elevated in RPAT but remained unchanged in MEAT after PSD. IL-10 protein concentration was not altered in either depot, and TNF-α levels decreased in MEAT. Glucose, triglycerides (TG), VLDL and leptin decreased in serum after 96 hours of PSD; adiponectin was not altered and corticosterone was increased. Conclusion PSD decreased fat mass and may modulate the cytokine content in different depots of adipose tissue. The inflammatory response was diminished in both depots of adipose tissue, with increased IL-6 levels in RPAT and decreased TNF-α protein concentrations in MEAT and increased levels of corticosterone in serum. PMID:21034496

  11. Expression of blood group antigens on red cell microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, R T; Dumaswala, U J; Greenwalt, T J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether epitopes of the A, B, D, Fya, M, N, S, s, and K blood group antigens are present on microvesicle membranes shed by red cells during storage. Vesicles were isolated from outdated units of blood having and lacking the specified antigens. Diluted antisera were absorbed with fixed quantities of vesicles from red cells with the test antigen and red cells lacking that antigen (controls). The adsorbed and unadsorbed antisera were titrated and scored by using panel cells from persons known to be heterozygous for all the non-AB antigens. The mean titration scores following adsorption with the vesicles from A, B, D, M+N-, M-N+, S+s-, S-s+, and Fy(a+b-) units were appreciably lower than the control scores (0, 0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 4, and 4 vs. 19, 23, 34, 13, 12, 16, 18, and 29, respectively), which indicated the presence of these epitopes on the membrane of shed vesicles. The results following adsorption with K:1,2 vesicles were equivocal.

  12. SMIM1 variants rs1175550 and rs143702418 independently modulate Vel blood group antigen expression

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Mikael K.; Jöud, Magnus; Ajore, Ram; Vege, Sunitha; Ljungdahl, Klara W.; Westhoff, Connie M.; Olsson, Martin L.; Storry, Jill R.; Nilsson, Björn

    2017-01-01

    The Vel blood group antigen is expressed on the red blood cells of most individuals. Recently, we described that homozygosity for inactivating mutations in SMIM1 defines the rare Vel-negative phenotype. Still, Vel-positive individuals show great variability in Vel antigen expression, creating a risk for Vel blood typing errors and transfusion reactions. We fine-mapped the regulatory region located in SMIM1 intron 2 in Swedish blood donors, and observed a strong correlation between expression and rs1175550 as well as with a previously unreported tri-nucleotide insertion (rs143702418; C > CGCA). While the two variants are tightly linked in Caucasians, we separated their effects in African Americans, and found that rs1175550G and to a lesser extent rs143702418C independently increase SMIM1 and Vel antigen expression. Gel shift and luciferase assays indicate that both variants are transcriptionally active, and we identified binding of the transcription factor TAL1 as a potential mediator of the increased expression associated with rs1175550G. Our results provide insight into the regulatory logic of Vel antigen expression, and extend the set of markers for genetic Vel blood group typing. PMID:28084402

  13. Modulation of GLO1 Expression Affects Malignant Properties of Cells.

    PubMed

    Hutschenreuther, Antje; Bigl, Marina; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Debebe, Tewodros; Gaunitz, Frank; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-12-18

    The energy metabolism of most tumor cells relies on aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) characterized by an increased glycolytic flux that is accompanied by the increased formation of the cytotoxic metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Consequently, the rate of detoxification of this reactive glycolytic byproduct needs to be increased in order to prevent deleterious effects to the cells. This is brought about by an increased expression of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) that is the rate-limiting enzyme of the MGO-detoxifying glyoxalase system. Here, we overexpressed GLO1 in HEK 293 cells and silenced it in MCF-7 cells using shRNA. Tumor-related properties of wild type and transformed cells were compared and key glycolytic enzyme activities assessed. Furthermore, the cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions to analyze the impact on cell proliferation and enzyme activities. Our results demonstrate that knockdown of GLO1 in the cancer cells significantly reduced tumor-associated properties such as migration and proliferation, whereas no functional alterations where found by overexpression of GLO1 in HEK 293 cells. In contrast, hypoxia caused inhibition of cell growth of all cells except of those overexpressing GLO1. Altogether, we conclude that GLO1 on one hand is crucial to maintaining tumor characteristics of malignant cells, and, on the other hand, supports malignant transformation of cells in a hypoxic environment when overexpressed.

  14. Modulation of GLO1 Expression Affects Malignant Properties of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hutschenreuther, Antje; Bigl, Marina; Hemdan, Nasr Y. A.; Debebe, Tewodros; Gaunitz, Frank; Birkenmeier, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of most tumor cells relies on aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) characterized by an increased glycolytic flux that is accompanied by the increased formation of the cytotoxic metabolite methylglyoxal (MGO). Consequently, the rate of detoxification of this reactive glycolytic byproduct needs to be increased in order to prevent deleterious effects to the cells. This is brought about by an increased expression of glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) that is the rate-limiting enzyme of the MGO-detoxifying glyoxalase system. Here, we overexpressed GLO1 in HEK 293 cells and silenced it in MCF-7 cells using shRNA. Tumor-related properties of wild type and transformed cells were compared and key glycolytic enzyme activities assessed. Furthermore, the cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions to analyze the impact on cell proliferation and enzyme activities. Our results demonstrate that knockdown of GLO1 in the cancer cells significantly reduced tumor-associated properties such as migration and proliferation, whereas no functional alterations where found by overexpression of GLO1 in HEK 293 cells. In contrast, hypoxia caused inhibition of cell growth of all cells except of those overexpressing GLO1. Altogether, we conclude that GLO1 on one hand is crucial to maintaining tumor characteristics of malignant cells, and, on the other hand, supports malignant transformation of cells in a hypoxic environment when overexpressed. PMID:27999356

  15. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... that die or are lost from the body. White Blood Cells White blood cells (WBCs, and also ... of severe pain. previous continue Diseases of the White Blood Cells Neutropenia (pronounced: new-truh-PEE-nee- ...

  16. Genome-wide expression analysis of peripheral blood identifies candidate biomarkers for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Medved, Vesna; Terzic, Janos; Krainc, Dimitri

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression in blood of patients with newly-diagnosed schizophrenia during their first psychotic episode and subsequent remission. Whole blood samples were obtained from 32 untreated patients presenting with their first psychotic episode suggestive of schizophrenia and 32 age- and gender-matched controls. Using Affymetrix micoarrays, we identified significantly altered expression of 180 gene probes in psychotic patients compared to controls. A subset of four significantly changed genes was further confirmed with QRT-PCR. The following genes were significantly altered in patients: glucose transporter, SLC2A3 (p<0.001) and actin assembly factor DAAM2 (p<0.001) were increased, whereas translation, zinc metallopeptidase, neurolysin 1 and myosin C were significantly decreased (p<0.05). Expression of these candidate markers was also analyzed in a longitudinal study (12-24 months) in 12 patients who achieved full remission. Interestingly, expression of DAAM2 returned to control levels in patients who were in remission after their first psychotic episode, suggesting that its expression correlates with diseases progression and/or response to treatment. In summary, we identified changes of gene expression from peripheral blood which might help discriminate patients with schizophrenia from controls. While these results are promising, especially for DAAM2 whose polymorphic variants have been found significantly associated with schizophrenia, it will be important to analyze larger cohorts of patients in order to firmly establish changes in gene expression as blood markers of schizophrenia.

  17. Blood group antigen expression is involved in C. albicans interaction with buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Everest-Dass, Arun V; Kolarich, Daniel; Pascovici, Dana; Packer, Nicolle H

    2017-02-01

    Human blood group polymorphisms are known to be determined by the expression of A, B or H antigens and the Lewis antigens. Protection against microbial infections has been associated with inheritance of polymorphisms in genes encoding and regulating the expression of ABH and Lewis antigens in bodily secretions and epithelial tissue surfaces, subsequently resulting in the presentation of different glycosylated terminal antigens on the cell surface. We investigated the role of blood group antigens in diversifying the glycosylation of buccal epithelial cells (BEC) that line the oral cavity. Specifically, we characterized and statistically evaluated the expression of histo-blood group (A, B, O) antigens on N-and O-linked glycans from BEC membrane proteins of various individuals that represented different blood group type and secretor status using a porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PGC-LC-ESI-MS) based glycomics approach. From these BEC membrane proteins a total of 77 N-glycan and 96 O-glycan structures were structurally characterized from 19 individuals and relatively quantitated. The N-glycans from the secretor individuals did not express any A/B blood group determinants, but contained several terminal H-antigens. Apart from the non-secretors, the N-glycan profiles of BEC from all blood groups displayed similar glycan types, while varying in their relative intensities between individuals. However, multivariate analysis of the O-glycans from individuals displayed segregation patterns clearly associated with their blood group type and secretor status. In adhesion assays the oral pathogen Candida albicans showed a significantly higher interaction to blood group O type BECs relative to other blood groups.

  18. GAD1 Gene Expression in Blood of Patients with First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Jie Yin; Nurjono, Milawaty; Teo, Stephanie Ruth; Lee, Tih-Shih; Lee, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, has often been studied in relation to its role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. GABA is synthesized from glutamate by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), derived from two genes, GAD1 and GAD2. GAD1 is expressed as both GAD67 and GAD25 mRNA transcripts with the former reported to have a lower expression level in schizophrenia compared to healthy controls and latter was reported to be predominantly expressed fetally, suggesting a role in developmental process. In this study, GAD67 and GAD25 mRNA levels were measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in peripheral blood of subjects with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and from healthy controls. We observed low GAD25 and GAD67 gene expression levels in human peripheral blood. There was no difference in GAD25 and GAD67 gene expression level, and GAD25/GAD67 ratio between patients with FEP and healthy controls. PANSS negative symptoms were associated with levels of GAD25 mRNA transcripts in patients with FEP. While the current study provides information on GAD25 and GAD67 mRNA transcript levels in whole blood of FEP patients, further correlation and validation work between brain regions, cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood expression profiling are required to provide a better understanding of GAD25 and GAD67. PMID:28122016

  19. DDE and PCB 153 independently induce aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Ramírez, Octavio; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Salgado-Bustamante, Mariana; González-Amaro, Roberto; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Pérez-Maldonado, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that compounds inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines enhance AhR expression. The aim of this study was 2-fold: (1) to determine if two pro-inflammatory compounds, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-chlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), independently affect AhR gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); and (2) if affected, to determine whether the mechanism involved was due to AhR activation or to a pro-inflammatory effect of the chemicals. PBMC isolated from healthy individuals were incubated in the presence of DDE (10 µg/ml) and PCB 153 (20 ng/ml) over time and AhR and CYP1A1 expression was assessed with a real-time PCR technique. The results indicated there was over-expression of the AhR mRNA in PBMC when the cells were treated with DDE and PCB 153. No changes in expression levels of CYP1A1 mRNA were found. Importantly, when the cells were exposed to DDE and PCB 153 in the presence of an antagonist of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, the over-expression of AhR was abolished; as expected, the expression of CYP1A1 was unaffected. In conclusion, these studies demonstrated for the first time an increment of AhR expression "in vitro" in PBMC treated with two pro-inflammatory environmental pollutants, DDE and PCB153. Moreover, the over-expression of AhR was dependent of TNFα induced by DDE and PCB 153 and was independent of AhR activation.

  20. The relation of expression recognition and affective experience in facial expression processing: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangheng; Lu, Shenglan

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship of expression recognition and affective experience during facial expression processing by event-related potentials (ERP). Facial expressions used in the present study can be divided into three categories: positive (happy), neutral (neutral), and negative (angry). Participants were asked to finish two kinds of facial recognition tasks: one was easy, and the other was difficult. In the easy task, significant main effects were found for different valence conditions, meaning that emotions were evoked effectively when participants recognized the expressions in facial expression processing. However, no difference was found in the difficult task, meaning that even if participants had identified the expressions correctly, no relevant emotion was evoked during the process. The findings suggest that emotional experience was not simultaneous with expression identification in facial expression processing, and the affective experience process could be suppressed in challenging cognitive tasks. The results indicate that we should pay attention to the level of cognitive load when using facial expressions as emotion-eliciting materials in emotion studies; otherwise, the emotion may not be evoked effectively. PMID:22110330

  1. Gene expression alterations related to mania and psychosis in peripheral blood of patients with a first episode of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Gouvea, E S; Ota, V K; Noto, C; Santoro, M L; Spindola, L M; Moretti, P N; Carvalho, C M; Xavier, G; Rios, A C; Sato, J R; Hayashi, M A F; Brietzke, E; Gadelha, A; Bressan, R A; Cordeiro, Q; Belangero, S I

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic disorders affect ~3% of the general population and are among the most severe forms of mental diseases. In early stages of psychosis, clinical aspects may be difficult to distinguish from one another. Undifferentiated psychopathology at the first-episode of psychosis (FEP) highlights the need for biomarkers that can improve and refine differential diagnosis. We investigated gene expression differences between patients with FEP–schizophrenia spectrum (SCZ; N=53) or FEP–Mania (BD; N=16) and healthy controls (N=73). We also verified whether gene expression was correlated to severity of psychotic, manic, depressive symptoms and/or functional impairment. All participants were antipsychotic-naive. After the psychiatric interview, blood samples were collected and the expression of 12 psychotic-disorder-related genes was evaluated by quantitative PCR. AKT1 and DICER1 expression levels were higher in BD patients compared with that in SCZ patients and healthy controls, suggesting that expression of these genes is associated more specifically to manic features. Furthermore, MBP and NDEL1 expression levels were higher in SCZ and BD patients than in healthy controls, indicating that these genes are psychosis related (independent of diagnosis). No correlation was found between gene expression and severity of symptoms or functional impairment. Our findings suggest that genes related to neurodevelopment are altered in psychotic disorders, and some might support the differential diagnosis between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with a potential impact on the treatment of these disorders. PMID:27701407

  2. Acute arginine supplementation fails to improve muscle endurance or affect blood pressure responses to resistance training.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau K; Jones, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    Dietary supplement companies claim that arginine supplements acutely enhance skeletal muscular endurance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute arginine α-ketoglutarate supplementation (AAKG) will affect local muscle endurance of the arm and shoulder girdle or the blood pressure (BP) response to anaerobic exercise. Twelve trained college-aged men (22.6 ± 3.8 years) performed 2 trials of exercise separated by at least 1 week. At 4 hours before, and 30 minutes before exercise, a serving of an AAKG supplement (3,700 mg arginine alpha-ketoglutarate per serving) or placebo was administered. Resting BP was assessed pre-exercise after 16 minutes of seated rest, and 5 and 10 minutes postexercise. Three sets each of chin-ups, reverse chin-ups, and push-ups were performed to exhaustion with 3 minutes of rest between each set. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests. The AAKG supplementation did not improve muscle endurance or significantly affect the BP response to anaerobic work. Subjects performed fewer total chin-ups (23.75 ± 6.38 vs. 25.58 ± 7.18) and total trial repetitions (137.92 ± 28.18 vs. 141.08 ± 28.57) in the supplement trial (p ≤ 0.05). Subjects executed fewer reverse chin-ups (5.83 ± 1.85 vs. 6.75 ± 2.09) during set 2 after receiving the supplement as compared to the placebo (p < 0.05). Because AAKG supplementation may hinder muscular endurance, the use of these supplements before resistance training should be questioned.

  3. Effect of tissue fixatives on the immunohistochemical expression of ABH blood group isoantigens.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Sumita; Ololade, Omiyosoye; Adegboyega, Patrick A

    2002-09-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of ABH blood group isoantigens has been shown to be a useful ancillary technique for resolving problems associated with specimen mix-ups in the daily practice of surgical pathology. However, the effects of different fixatives on the expression of these antigens in paraffin-embedded tissues are not known. Therefore, the effects of seven different fixatives on the immunohistochemical expression of ABH blood group isoantigens were studied in tissues from several organs. The following fixatives were used: acetone, 70% ethanol, B5, Bouin, Carnoy, methanol, and 10% formalin. After fixation for 6, 12, and 72 hours, the tissue blocks were embedded in paraffin, and immunohistochemistry was performed on 4 microm-thick tissue sections using monoclonal antibodies to blood group isoantigens (A, B, and H) and the avidin-biotin detection method. Also, immunostaining was performed on step tissue sections with and without antigen retrieval using citrate buffer at pH 6.0. The expression of the blood group isoantigens was concordant with the blood group of the patient in all the cases studied, irrespective of the fixative and time of fixation. However, in the absence of antigen retrieval, the intensity of the staining reaction was diminished. These results showed that irrespective of the fixative used, immunohistochemical staining of paraffin-embedded tissue sections with ABH blood group antibodies is a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective method for sorting out interpretative problems of tissue contaminants (floaters) and specimen mix-ups in surgical pathology.

  4. Cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone affect the response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to mycobacterial antigens during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, C; Bay, M L; Farroni, M A; Bozza, V; Del Rey, A; Besedovsky, H; Bottasso, O A

    2004-12-01

    The effect of cortisol and/or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the immune response to antigens obtained from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was studied in vitro by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients at various stages of lung tuberculosis (TB) and from healthy control people (HCo). The results obtained show for the first time that addition of cortisol within concentrations of physiological range can inhibit the mycobacterial antigen-driven proliferation of cells from HCo and TB patients and the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), indicating that endogenous levels of cortisol may contribute to the decreased lymphoid cell response to mycobacterium antigens observed in TB patients. DHEA did not affect lymphoid cell proliferation, IFN-gamma production and the cortisol-mediated inhibitory effects. Interestingly, we found that DHEA, but not cortisol, suppressed the in vitro transforming growth factor-beta production by lymphoid cells from TB patients with an advanced disease, which is indicative of a selective direct effect of this hormone.

  5. Altered gene expression in blood and sputum in COPD frequent exacerbators in the ECLIPSE cohort.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dave; Fox, Steven M; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Bates, Stewart; Riley, John H; Celli, Bartolome

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are defined as frequent exacerbators suffer with 2 or more exacerbations every year. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenotype are poorly understood. We investigated gene expression profile patterns associated with frequent exacerbations in sputum and blood cells in a well-characterised cohort. Samples from subjects from the ECLIPSE COPD cohort were used; sputum and blood samples from 138 subjects were used for microarray gene expression analysis, while blood samples from 438 subjects were used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing. Using microarray, 150 genes were differentially expressed in blood (>±1.5 fold change, p≤0.01) between frequent compared to non-exacerbators. In sputum cells, only 6 genes were differentially expressed. The differentially regulated genes in blood included downregulation of those involved in lymphocyte signalling and upregulation of pro-apoptotic signalling genes. Multivariate analysis of the microarray data followed by confirmatory PCR analysis identified 3 genes that predicted frequent exacerbations; B3GNT, LAF4 and ARHGEF10. The sensitivity and specificity of these 3 genes to predict the frequent exacerbator phenotype was 88% and 33% respectively. There are alterations in systemic immune function associated with frequent exacerbations; down-regulation of lymphocyte function and a shift towards pro-apoptosis mechanisms are apparent in patients with frequent exacerbations.

  6. The effects of exposure to dynamic expressions of affect on 5-month-olds' memory.

    PubMed

    Flom, Ross; Janis, Rebecca B; Garcia, Darren J; Kirwan, C Brock

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the behavioral effects of adults' communicated affect on 5-month-olds' visual recognition memory. Five-month-olds were exposed to a dynamic and bimodal happy, angry, or neutral affective (face-voice) expression while familiarized to a novel geometric image. After familiarization to the geometric image and exposure to the affective expression, 5-month-olds received either a 5-min or 1-day retention interval. Following the 5-min retention interval, infants exposed to the happy affective expressions showed a reliable preference for a novel geometric image compared to the recently familiarized image. Infants exposed to the neutral or angry affective expression failed to show a reliable preference following a 5-min delay. Following the 1-day retention interval, however, infants exposed to the neutral expression showed a reliable preference for the novel geometric image. These results are the first to demonstrate that 5-month-olds' visual recognition memory is affected by the presentation of affective information at the time of encoding.

  7. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems.

  8. The Change of Expression Configuration Affects Identity-Dependent Expression Aftereffect but Not Identity-Independent Expression Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Song, Miao; Shinomori, Keizo; Qian, Qian; Yin, Jun; Zeng, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of expression configuration on cross-identity expression aftereffect. The expression configuration refers to the spatial arrangement of facial features in a face for conveying an emotion, e.g., an open-mouth smile vs. a closed-mouth smile. In the first of two experiments, the expression aftereffect is measured using a cross-identity/cross-expression configuration factorial design. The facial identities of test faces were the same or different from the adaptor, while orthogonally, the expression configurations of those facial identities were also the same or different. The results show that the change of expression configuration impaired the expression aftereffect when the facial identities of adaptor and tests were the same; however, the impairment effect disappears when facial identities were different, indicating the identity-independent expression representation is more robust to the change of the expression configuration in comparison with the identity-dependent expression representation. In the second experiment, we used schematic line faces as adaptors and real faces as tests to minimize the similarity between the adaptor and tests, which is expected to exclude the contribution from the identity-dependent expression representation to expression aftereffect. The second experiment yields a similar result as the identity-independent expression aftereffect observed in Experiment 1. The findings indicate the different neural sensitivities to expression configuration for identity-dependent and identity-independent expression systems. PMID:26733922

  9. Host-Based Peripheral Blood Gene Expression Analysis for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Zachary E; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Woods, Christopher W; McClain, Micah T

    2017-02-01

    Emerging pandemic infectious threats, inappropriate antibacterial use contributing to multidrug resistance, and increased morbidity and mortality from diagnostic delays all contribute to a need for improved diagnostics in the field of infectious diseases. Historically, diagnosis of infectious diseases has relied on pathogen detection; however, a novel concept to improve diagnostics in infectious diseases relies instead on the detection of changes in patterns of gene expression in circulating white blood cells in response to infection. Alterations in peripheral blood gene expression in the infected state are robust and reproducible, yielding diagnostic and prognostic information to help facilitate patient treatment decisions.

  10. Perceiving emotions in neutral faces: expression processing is biased by affective person knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Rabovsky, Milena; Abdel Rahman, Rasha

    2015-01-01

    According to a widely held view, basic emotions such as happiness or anger are reflected in facial expressions that are invariant and uniquely defined by specific facial muscle movements. Accordingly, expression perception should not be vulnerable to influences outside the face. Here, we test this assumption by manipulating the emotional valence of biographical knowledge associated with individual persons. Faces of well-known and initially unfamiliar persons displaying neutral expressions were associated with socially relevant negative, positive or comparatively neutral biographical information. The expressions of faces associated with negative information were classified as more negative than faces associated with neutral information. Event-related brain potential modulations in the early posterior negativity, a component taken to reflect early sensory processing of affective stimuli such as emotional facial expressions, suggest that negative affective knowledge can bias the perception of faces with neutral expressions toward subjectively displaying negative emotions. PMID:24948155

  11. NF-kappaB inhibitor dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin suppresses osteoclastogenesis and expression of NFATc1 in mouse arthritis without affecting expression of RANKL, osteoprotegerin or macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Machiko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Komano, Yukiko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of NF-kappaB is known to be effective in reducing both inflammation and bone destruction in animal models of arthritis. Our previous study demonstrated that a small cell-permeable NF-kappaB inhibitor, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), suppresses expression of proinflammatory cytokines and ameliorates mouse arthritis. It remained unclear, however, whether DHMEQ directly affects osteoclast precursor cells to suppress their differentiation to mature osteoclasts in vivo. The effect of DHMEQ on human osteoclastogenesis also remained elusive. In the present study, we therefore examined the effect of DHMEQ on osteoclastogenesis using a mouse collagen-induced arthritis model, and using culture systems of fibroblast-like synovial cells obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and of osteoclast precursor cells from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. DHMEQ significantly suppressed formation of osteoclasts in arthritic joints, and also suppressed expression of NFATc1 along the inner surfaces of bone lacunae and the eroded bone surface, while serum levels of soluble receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin and macrophage colony-stimulating factor were not affected by the treatment. DHMEQ also did not suppress spontaneous expression of RANKL nor of macrophage colony-stimulating factor in culture of fibroblast-like synovial cells obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These results suggest that DHMEQ suppresses osteoclastogenesis in vivo, through downregulation of NFATc1 expression, without significantly affecting expression of upstream molecules of the RANKL/receptor activator of NF-kappaB/osteoprotegerin cascade, at least in our experimental condition. Furthermore, in the presence of RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor, differentiation and activation of human osteoclasts were also suppressed by DHMEQ, suggesting the possibility of future application of NF-kappaB inhibitors to rheumatoid arthritis

  12. Expression of membrane receptor for tumour necrosis factor on human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Flego, L; Weedon, H

    1993-08-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody against the human p75 tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR-I) combined with a high-sensitivity immunofluorescence flow cytometric procedure, a proportion of peripheral blood lymphocytes can be shown to express TNFR-I constitutively. Approximately 50% of peripheral blood lymphocytes consisting mostly of CD4 cells and including most CD45R0-positive cells, express TNFR-I. Receptor expression is increased by a variety of activation signals. Only a minority (up to 30%) of tonsil B cells express measurable levels of TNFR-I. The tonsil B cells which express TNFR-I include both cells with a germinal centre cell phenotype and cells with the phenotype of the follicular mantle zone. Activation of B cells with anti-immunoglobulin, alone or in combination with interleukin-4 or interleukin-2, increases receptor expression, particularly in cells with the phenotype of mantle zone cells. The functional significance of constitutive expression of TNFR by blood and tissue lymphocytes is discussed.

  13. Gene expression profiling of blood in ruptured intracranial aneurysms: in search of biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Joanna; Korostynski, Michal; Golda, Slawomir; Piechota, Marcin; Dzbek, Jaroslaw; Krzyszkowski, Tadeusz; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Moskala, Marek; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Slowik, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the systemic response to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RAs) are not fully understood. We investigated whether the analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood could provide clinically relevant information regarding the biologic consequences of SAH. Transcriptomics were performed using Illumina HumanHT-12v4 microarrays for 43 RA patients and 18 controls (C). Differentially expressed transcripts were analyzed for overrepresented functional groups and blood cell type-specific gene expression. The set of differentially expressed transcripts was validated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in an independent group of subjects (15 RA patients and 14 C). There were 135 differentially expressed genes (false discovery rate ⩽1%, absolute fold change ⩾1.7): the abundant levels of 78 mRNAs increased and 57 mRNAs decreased. Among RA patients, transcripts specific to T lymphocyte subpopulations were downregulated, whereas those related to monocytes and neutrophils were upregulated. Expression profiles of a set of 16 genes and lymphocyte-to-monocyte-and-neutrophil gene expression ratios distinguished RA patients from C. These results indicate that SAH from RAs strongly influences the transcription profiles of blood cells. A specific pattern of these changes suggests suppression in lymphocyte response and enhancements in monocyte and neutrophil activities. This is probably related to the immunodepression observed in SAH. PMID:23512133

  14. Timing of adding blood to prime affects inflammatory response to neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Benjamin S; Jordan, James E; Lane, Magan R; DiPasquale, Vanessa M; Graf, Lori P; Ootaki, Yoshio; Ungerleider, Ross M

    2016-07-08

    Complications from systemic inflammation are reported in neonates following exposure to cardiopulmonary bypass. Although the use of asanguinous primes can reduce these complications, in neonates, this can result in significant haemodilution, requiring addition of blood. This study investigates whether the addition of blood after institution of bypass alters the inflammatory response compared with a blood prime. Neonatal swine were randomised into four groups: blood prime, blood after bypass but before cooling, blood after cooling but before low flow, and blood after re-warming. All groups were placed on central bypass, cooled, underwent low flow, and then re-warmed for a total bypass time of 2 hours. Although haematocrit values between groups varied throughout bypass, all groups ended with a similar value. Although they spent time with a lower haematocrit, asanguinous prime groups did not have elevated lactate levels at the end of bypass compared with blood prime. Asanguinous primes released less tumour necrosis factor α than blood primes (p=0.023). Asanguinous primes with blood added on bypass produced less interleukin 10 and tumour necrosis factor α (p=0.006, 0.019). Animals receiving blood while cool also showed less interleukin 10 and tumour necrosis factor α production than those that received blood warm (p=0.026, 0.033). Asanguinous primes exhibited less oedema than blood primes, with the least body weight gain noted in the end cool group (p=0.011). This study suggests that using an asanguinous prime for neonates being cooled to deep hypothermia is practical, and the later addition of blood reduces inflammation.

  15. Comparison of gene expression profiles of T cells in porcine colostrum and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shohei; Okutani, Mie; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Fukuta, Kikuto; Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A; Ushida, Kazunari; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare gene expression patterns of T cells in porcine colostrum and peripheral blood. ANIMALS 10 multiparous sows. PROCEDURES Cytotoxic and CD4-CD8 double-positive T cells were separated from porcine colostrum and peripheral blood. Total RNA was extracted. The cDNA prepared from RNA was amplified, labeled, fragmented, and competitively hybridized to DNA microarray slides. The DNA microarray data were validated by use of a real-time reverse-transcription PCR assay, and expression of the genes FOS, NFKBI, IFNG, CXCR6, CCR5, ITGB2, CCR7, and SELL was assessed. Finally, DNA microarray data were validated at the protein level by use of flow cytometry via expression of c-Fos and integrin β-2. RESULTS Evaluation of gene expression profiles indicated that in contrast to results for peripheral blood, numerous cell-signaling pathways might be activated in colostrum. Profile analysis also revealed that FOS and NFKBI (genes of transcription factors) were involved in most cell-signaling pathways and that expression of these genes was significantly higher in colostral T cells than in peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, CCR7 and SELL (genes of T-cell differentiation markers) in colostral T cells had expression patterns extremely similar to those found in effector or effector memory T cells. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE All or most of the T cells in colostrum had an effector-like phenotype and thus were more activated than those in peripheral blood. This gene expression profile would enable T cells to migrate to mammary glands, be secreted in colostrum, and likely contribute to passive immunity provided by sows to newborn pigs.

  16. Facial Expression of Affect in Children with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, L.; Moss, J.; Jutley, J.; Cornish, K.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) have been reported to show comparatively high levels of flat and negative affect but there have been no empirical evaluations. In this study, we use an objective measure of facial expression to compare affect in CdLS with that seen in Cri du Chat syndrome (CDC) and a group of…

  17. HLA-G Expression on Blasts and Tolerogenic Cells in Patients Affected by Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tomasoni, Daniela; Ciceri, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) contributes to cancer cell immune escape from host antitumor responses. The clinical relevance of HLA-G in several malignancies has been reported. However, the role of HLA-G expression and functions in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is still controversial. Our group identified a subset of tolerogenic dendritic cells, DC-10 that express HLA-G and secrete IL-10. DC-10 are present in the peripheral blood and are essential in promoting and maintaining tolerance via the induction of adaptive T regulatory (Treg) cells. We investigated HLA-G expression on blasts and the presence of HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of AML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, we explored the possible influence of the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of HLA-G, which has been associated with HLA-G expression, on AML susceptibility. Results showed that HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells are highly represented in AML patients with HLA-G positive blasts. None of the HLA-G variation sites evaluated was associated with AML susceptibility. This is the first report describing HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells in AML patients, suggesting that they may represent a strategy by which leukemic cells escape the host's immune system. Further studies on larger populations are required to verify our findings. PMID:24741612

  18. Changes in winter depression phenotype correlate with white blood cell gene expression profiles: a combined metagene and gene ontology approach.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Fokko J; Terpstra, Peter; Gladkevich, Anatoliy V; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; te Meerman, Gerard; Nolen, Willem A; Schoevers, Robert A; Meesters, Ybe

    2015-04-03

    In the present study we evaluate the feasibility of gene expression in white blood cells as a peripheral marker for winter depression. Sixteen patients with winter type seasonal affective disorder were included in the study. Blood was taken by venous puncture at three time points; in winter prior and following bright light therapy and in summer. RNA was isolated, converted into cRNA, amplified and hybridized on Illumina® gene expression arrays. The raw optical array data were quantile normalized and thereafter analyzed using a metagene approach, based on previously published Affymetrix gene array data. The raw data were also subjected to a secondary analysis focusing on circadian genes and genes involved in serotonergic neurotransmission. Differences between the conditions were analyzed, using analysis of variance on the principal components of the metagene score matrix. After correction for multiple testing no statistically significant differences were found. Another approach uses the correlation between metagene factor weights and the actual expression values, averaged over conditions. When comparing the correlations of winter vs. summer and bright light therapy vs. summer significant changes for several metagenes were found. Subsequent gene ontology analyses (DAVID and GeneTrail) of 5 major metagenes suggest an interaction between brain and white blood cells. The hypothesis driven analysis with a smaller group of genes failed to demonstrate any significant effects. The results from the combined metagene and gene ontology analyses support the idea of communication between brain and white blood cells. Future studies will need a much larger sample size to obtain information at the level of single genes.

  19. Reversible Demyelination, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown, and Pronounced Neutrophil Recruitment Induced by Chronic IL-1 Expression in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Depino, Amaicha M.; Prada, Federico; Muraro, Nara; Campbell, Sandra; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Perry, V. Hugh; Anthony, Daniel C.; Pitossi, Fernando J.

    2004-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1) expression is associated with a spectrum of neuroinflammatory processes related to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. The single-bolus microinjection of IL-1 into the central nervous system (CNS) parenchyma gives rise to delayed and localized neutrophil recruitment, transient blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, but no overt damage to CNS integrity. However, acute microinjections of IL-1 do not mimic the chronic IL-1 expression, which is a feature of many CNS diseases. To investigate the response of the CNS to chronic IL-1 expression, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing IL-1 into the striatum. At the peak of IL-1 expression (days 8 and 14 post-injection), there was a marked recruitment of neutrophils, vasodilatation, and breakdown of the BBB. Microglia and astrocyte activation was evident during the first 14 days post-injection. At days 8 and 14, extensive demyelination was observed but the number of neurons was not affected by any treatment. Finally, at 30 days, signs of inflammation were no longer present, there was evidence of tissue reorganization, the BBB was intact, and the process of remyelination was noticeable. In summary, our data show that chronic expression of IL-1, in contrast to its acute delivery, can reversibly damage CNS integrity and implicates this cytokine or downstream components as major mediators of demyelination in chronic inflammatory and demyelinating diseases. PMID:15509551

  20. Blood group ABO and Lewis antigens in bladder tumors: correlation between glycosyltransferase activity and antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Orntoft, T F; Wolf, H

    1988-01-01

    Pronounced changes in the expression of ABO and Lewis antigens have been observed in transitional cell carcinomas compared with normal urothelium. These changes are associated with changes in the activity of blood-group gene-encoded glycosyltransferases. This paper describes the correlation between blood-group antigen expression and the activity of glycosyltransferases in transitional cell carcinomas. Examined individuals were A1A2BO, Lewis, and secretor typed by the use of blood and saliva. The activity of alpha-2-, and alpha-4-L-fucosyltransferases as well as the alpha-3-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase were determined as p-moles of labelled sugar incorporated by Lacto-N-biose I and 2'-fucosyllactose, respectively, per 100,000 carcinoma cells. In 3 non-secretors whose erythrocytes types as Le(a+b-), the alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase activity was similar to that in 3 secretors, and the Leb antigen could be demonstrated to be present by monoclonal antibodies, both by immunohistological and immunochemical means. In 11 tumors from A individuals, the A1-transferase was severely reduced in 9 individuals who showed a loss of A antigen expression, and present in 2 individuals with A antigen expression in cytoplasmic vesicles. In conclusion, we demonstrate a good correlation between individual glycosyltransferase activity and expression of blood group Leb and loss of expression of blood group A in transitional cell carcinomas. Immunostaining of neutral glycolipids separated by TLC showed the Leb-active glycolipids to be simple hexa-saccharides in both secretors and non-secretors.

  1. Deletion of Rictor in brain and fat alters peripheral clock gene expression and increases blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Drägert, Katja; Bhattacharya, Indranil; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Seebeck, Petra; Azzi, Abdelhalim; Brown, Steven A; Georgiopoulou, Stavroula; Held, Ulrike; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Arras, Margarete; Humar, Rok; Hall, Michael N; Battegay, Edouard; Haas, Elvira

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) contains the essential protein RICTOR and is activated by growth factors. mTORC2 in adipose tissue contributes to the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. In the perivascular adipose tissue, mTORC2 ensures normal vascular reactivity by controlling expression of inflammatory molecules. To assess whether RICTOR/mTORC2 contributes to blood pressure regulation, we applied a radiotelemetry approach in control and Rictor knockout (Rictor(aP2KO)) mice generated using adipocyte protein-2 gene promoter-driven CRE recombinase expression to delete Rictor. The 24-hour mean arterial pressure was increased in Rictor(aP2KO) mice, and the physiological decline in mean arterial pressure during the dark period was impaired. In parallel, heart rate and locomotor activity were elevated during the dark period with a pattern similar to blood pressure changes. This phenotype was associated with mild cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, decreased cardiac natriuretic peptides, and their receptor expression in adipocytes. Moreover, clock gene expression was reduced or phase-shifted in perivascular adipose tissue. No differences in clock gene expression were observed in the master clock suprachiasmatic nucleus, although Rictor gene expression was also lower in brain of Rictor(aP2KO) mice. Thus, this study highlights the importance of RICTOR/mTORC2 for interactions between vasculature, adipocytes, and brain to tune physiological outcomes, such as blood pressure and locomotor activity.

  2. Increased expression of blood mononuclear cell nitric oxide synthase type 2 in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    St Clair, E W; Wilkinson, W E; Lang, T; Sanders, L; Misukonis, M A; Gilkeson, G S; Pisetsky, D S; Granger, D I; Weinberg, J B

    1996-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important inflammatory mediator in nonhuman animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether blood mononuclear cells from patients with active RA (as compared to control subjects) have higher levels of NO synthase type 2 (NOS2) and produce more NO in vitro. Leukocytes from 25 RA patients and 20 normal subjects were examined. Arthritis activity was assessed by tender and swollen joint counts, duration of morning stiffness, patient assessment of pain, physician and patient global assessment of disease activity, the modified Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire, and by blood levels of acute phase reactants. Blood mononuclear cell NOS enzyme activity/antigen content and nitrite/nitrate formation in vitro were measured. Blood mononuclear cells from RA patients had increased NOS activity and increased NOS2 antigen content as compared to those from normal subjects, and responded to interferon-gamma with increased NOS expression and nitrite/nitrate production in vitro. NOS activity of freshly isolated blood mononuclear cells correlated significantly with disease activity, as assessed by render and swollen joint counts. Our results demonstrate that patients with RA have systemic activation for NOS2 expression, and that the degree of activation correlates with disease activity. Increased NOS2 expression and NO generation may be important in the pathogenesis of RA.

  3. STUDIES IN RESUSCITATION: I. THE GENERAL CONDITIONS AFFECTING RESUSCITATION, AND THE RESUSCITATION OF THE BLOOD AND OF THE HEART

    PubMed Central

    Pike, F. H.; Guthrie, C. C.; Stewart, G. N.

    1908-01-01

    Our results may be briefly summarized: 1. Blood, when defibrinated, soon loses its power to maintain the activity of the higher nervous centers, and its nutritive properties for all tissues quickly diminish. 2. Artificial fluids, as a substitute for blood, are not satisfactory. 3. The proper oxygenation of the blood is an indispensable adjunct in the resuscitation of an animal. 4. The heart usually continues to beat for some minutes after it ceases to affect a mercury manometer, and resuscitation of it within this period by extra-thoracic massage and artificial respiration is sometimes successful. 5. Resuscitation of the heart by direct massage is the most certain method at our command. 6. A proper blood-pressure is an indispensable condition for the continued normal activity of the heart. 7. Anæsthetics, hemorrhage and induced currents applied to the heart render resuscitation more difficult than asphyxia alone. PMID:19867138

  4. Common inversion polymorphism at 17q21.31 affects expression of multiple genes in tissue-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromosome 17q21.31 contains a common inversion polymorphism of approximately 900 kb in populations with European ancestry. Two divergent MAPT haplotypes, H1 and H2 are described with distinct linkage disequilibrium patterns across the region reflecting the inversion status at this locus. The MAPT H1 haplotype has been associated with progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease, while the H2 is linked to recurrent deletion events associated with the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, a disease characterized by developmental delay and learning disability. Results In this study, we investigate the effect of the inversion on the expression of genes in the 17q21.31 region. We find the expression of several genes in and at the borders of the inversion to be affected; specific either to whole blood or different regions of the human brain. The H1 haplotype was found to be associated with an increased expression of LRRC37A4, PLEKH1M and MAPT. In contrast, a decreased expression of MGC57346, LRRC37A and CRHR1 was associated with H1. Conclusions Studies thus far have focused on the expression of MAPT in the inversion region. However, our results show that the inversion status affects expression of other genes in the 17q21.31 region as well. Given the link between the inversion status and different neurological diseases, these genes may also be involved in disease pathology, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:22950410

  5. FOS Expression in Blood as a LDL-Independent Marker of Statin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Sung, Ho Joong; Jawed, Sarah I.; Brenneman, Cynthia L.; Rao, Yesoda N.; Sher, Salman; Facio, Flavia M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Sachdev, Vandana; Hwang, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The expression of FOS, a gene critical for monocyte and macrophage function, can be inhibited by statins through the disruption of a cholesterol independent signaling pathway. In this pilot study, we hypothesized that blood FOS mRNA levels will be sensitive to statin treatment independent of LDL cholesterol levels. Methods Three cohorts at increased risk of or with cardiovascular disease (CVD) were studied. Blood FOS mRNA levels were measured before and after statin treatment or in patients under stable treatment. Results Statin treatment for three months significantly reduced blood FOS mRNA and LDL cholesterol levels. However, in subjects with similar LDL levels achieved by different doses of long term statin treatment, there was an inverse relationship between statin dose and FOS expression. Conclusions FOS mRNA levels appear to be a sensitive marker of statin treatment that is dissociated from cholesterol levels. PMID:20619839

  6. Expression analysis of psychological stress-associated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kyoko; Saito, Toshiro; Ohta, Masayuki; Ohmori, Tetsuro; Kawai, Kaori; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    In this study, we have developed a microarray including 1467 cDNAs that were selected to specifically measure stress response in peripheral blood leukocytes. Venous blood was collected from 10 graduate students 2 h before and 2 or 24 h after an open presentation for their Ph.D. The mRNA levels in leukocytes were compared with those prepared 4 weeks before the presentation. Hierarchical cluster showed that distinct groups of genes uniformly changed their expression values in response to the stress. Bayesian t test identified significantly up-regulated 49 genes and down-regulated 21 genes. Most of them are categorized into cytokines, cytokine receptors, growth- or apoptosis-related molecules, and heat shock proteins, suggesting that stressful life events trigger acute responses in leukocytes. Our results suggest that gene expression profile in peripheral blood leukocytes may be a potentially useful method for the assessment of complex stress responses.

  7. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  8. PYGM expression analysis in white blood cells: a complementary tool for diagnosing McArdle disease?

    PubMed

    de Luna, Noemí; Brull, Astrid; Lucia, Alejandro; Santalla, Alfredo; Garatachea, Nuria; Martí, Ramon; Andreu, Antoni L; Pinós, Tomàs

    2014-12-01

    McArdle disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme myophosphorylase, resulting in exercise intolerance from childhood and acute crises of early fatigue and contractures. In severe cases, these manifestations can be accompanied by rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, and fatal renal failure. Diagnosis of McArdle disease is based on clinical diagnostic tests, together with an absence of myophosphorylase activity in skeletal muscle biopsies and genetic analysis of the myophosphorylase-encoding gene, PYGM. The recently reported association between myophosphorylase and Rac1 GTPase in a T lymphocyte cell line prompted us to study myophosphorylase expression in white blood cells (WBCs) from 20 healthy donors and 30 McArdle patients by flow cytometry using a fluorescent-labeled PYGM antibody. We found that T lymphocytes expressed myophosphorylase in healthy donors, but expression was significantly lower in McArdle patients (p<0.001). PYGM mRNA levels were also lower in white blood cells from McArdle patients. Nevertheless, in 13% of patients (who were either heterozygotes or homozygotes for the most common PYGM pathogenic mutation among Caucasians (p.R50X)), the percentage of myophosphorylase-positive white blood cells was not different compared with the control group. Our findings suggest that analysis of myophosphorylase expression in white blood cells might be a useful, less-invasive, complementary test for diagnosing McArdle disease.

  9. Blood-Based Gene Expression Signatures of Infants and Toddlers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatt, Stephen J.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Winn, Mary; Chandler, Sharon D.; Collins, Melanie; Lopez, Linda; Weinfeld, Melanie; Carter, Cindy; Schork, Nicholas; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that onset clinically during the first years of life. ASD risk biomarkers expressed early in life could significantly impact diagnosis and treatment, but no transcriptome-wide biomarker classifiers derived from fresh blood samples from children with…

  10. Lactation-Related MicroRNA Expression in Microvesicles of Human Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Wang, De-jing; Wang, Chen-meiyi; Wang, Yi-ting; Qiao, Hai; Fang, Liao-qiong; Wang, Zhi-biao

    2016-01-01

    Background The complex process by which lactation is initiated upon neonate delivery remains incompletely understood. Microvesicles (MVs) can transmit microRNAs (miRNAs) into recipient cells to influence cell function, and recent studies have identified miRNAs essential for mammary gland development and lactation. This study aimed to investigate the expression of lactation-related miRNAs in MVs isolated from human umbilical cord blood immediately after delivery. Material/Methods Umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 70 healthy pregnant women, and MVs were isolated through differential centrifugation and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Western blotting, and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Lactation-related miRNAs were screened using bioinformatics tools for miRNA target prediction, gene ontology, and signaling pathway analyses. miRNA PCR arrays were used for miRNA expression analysis, and the results were validated by real-time PCR. Upon exposure of HBL-100 human mammary epithelial cells to MVs, MV uptake was examined by fluorescence confocal microscopy and β-casein secretion was detected by ELISA. Results Spherical MVs extracted from umbilical cord blood expressed CD63 and had an average diameter of 167.0±77.1 nm. We profiled 337 miRNAs in human umbilical cord blood MVs and found that 85 were related to lactation by bioinformatics analysis. The 25 most differentially expressed lactation-related miRNAs were validated by real-time PCR. MV uptake by HBL-100 cells was after 4 h in culture, and significantly increased secretion of β-casein was observed after 96 h from cells exposed to MVs (P<0.05). Conclusions Umbilical cord blood MVs contain many lactation-related miRNAs and can induce β-casein production by HBL-100 cells in vitro. Thus, umbilical cord blood MVs may mediate secretion of β-casein through miRNAs, thereby playing an important role in fetal-maternal crosstalk. PMID:27885249

  11. Vasovagal Syncope and Blood Donor Return: Examination of the Role of Experience and Affective Expectancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Etzel, Erin N.; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    Vasovagal sensations (e.g., dizziness, nausea, and fainting) are one of the main reasons people find blood donation unpleasant. A better understanding of predictors of vasovagal sensations during blood donation could inform interventions designed to increase donor return rates. The present investigation examined the extent to which experience with…

  12. Universal and culture-specific factors in the recognition and performance of musical affect expressions.

    PubMed

    Laukka, Petri; Eerola, Tuomas; Thingujam, Nutankumar S; Yamasaki, Teruo; Beller, Grégory

    2013-06-01

    We present a cross-cultural study on the performance and perception of affective expression in music. Professional bowed-string musicians from different musical traditions (Swedish folk music, Hindustani classical music, Japanese traditional music, and Western classical music) were instructed to perform short pieces of music to convey 11 emotions and related states to listeners. All musical stimuli were judged by Swedish, Indian, and Japanese participants in a balanced design, and a variety of acoustic and musical cues were extracted. Results first showed that the musicians' expressive intentions could be recognized with accuracy above chance both within and across musical cultures, but communication was, in general, more accurate for culturally familiar versus unfamiliar music, and for basic emotions versus nonbasic affective states. We further used a lens-model approach to describe the relations between the strategies that musicians use to convey various expressions and listeners' perceptions of the affective content of the music. Many acoustic and musical cues were similarly correlated with both the musicians' expressive intentions and the listeners' affective judgments across musical cultures, but the match between musicians' and listeners' uses of cues was better in within-cultural versus cross-cultural conditions. We conclude that affective expression in music may depend on a combination of universal and culture-specific factors.

  13. Two Different Virulence-Related Regulatory Pathways in Borrelia burgdorferi Are Directly Affected by Osmotic Fluxes in the Blood Meal of Feeding Ixodes Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Lawrence, Kevin; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is a vector-borne illness that requires the bacteria to adapt to distinctly different environments in its tick vector and various mammalian hosts. Effective colonization (acquisition phase) of a tick requires the bacteria to adapt to tick midgut physiology. Successful transmission (transmission phase) to a mammal requires the bacteria to sense and respond to the midgut environmental cues and up-regulate key virulence factors before transmission to a new host. Data presented here suggest that one environmental signal that appears to affect both phases of the infective cycle is osmolarity. While constant in the blood, interstitial fluid and tissue of a mammalian host (300 mOsm), osmolarity fluctuates in the midgut of feeding Ixodes scapularis. Measured osmolarity of the blood meal isolated from the midgut of a feeding tick fluctuates from an initial osmolarity of 600 mOsm to blood-like osmolarity of 300 mOsm. After feeding, the midgut osmolarity rebounded to 600 mOsm. Remarkably, these changes affect the two independent regulatory networks that promote acquisition (Hk1-Rrp1) and transmission (Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS) of B. burgdorferi. Increased osmolarity affected morphology and motility of wild-type strains, and lysed Hk1 and Rrp1 mutant strains. At low osmolarity, Borrelia cells express increased levels of RpoN-RpoS-dependent virulence factors (OspC, DbpA) required for the mammalian infection. Our results strongly suggest that osmolarity is an important part of the recognized signals that allow the bacteria to adjust gene expression during the acquisition and transmission phases of the infective cycle of B. burgdorferi. PMID:27525653

  14. From specificity to sensitivity: affective states modulate visual working memory for emotional expressive faces

    PubMed Central

    Maran, Thomas; Sachse, Pierre; Furtner, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Previous findings suggest that visual working memory (VWM) preferentially remembers angry looking faces. However, the meaning of facial actions is construed in relation to context. To date, there are no studies investigating the role of perceiver-based context when processing emotional cues in VWM. To explore the influence of affective context on VWM for faces, we conducted two experiments using both a VWM task for emotionally expressive faces and a mood induction procedure. Affective context was manipulated by unpleasant (Experiment 1) and pleasant (Experiment 2) IAPS pictures in order to induce an affect high in motivational intensity (defensive or appetitive, respectively) compared to a low arousal control condition. Results indicated specifically increased sensitivity of VWM for angry looking faces in the neutral condition. Enhanced VWM for angry faces was prevented by inducing affects of high motivational intensity. In both experiments, affective states led to a switch from specific enhancement of angry expressions in VWM to an equally sensitive representation of all emotional expressions. Our findings demonstrate that emotional expressions are of different behavioral relevance for the receiver depending on the affective context, supporting a functional organization of VWM along with flexible resource allocation. In VWM, stimulus processing adjusts to situational requirements and transitions from a specifically prioritizing default mode in predictable environments to a sensitive, hypervigilant mode in exposure to emotional events. PMID:26379609

  15. The alterations of CD11A expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes/monocytes and CD62L expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes in Graves' disease and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kretowski, A; Myśliwiec, J; Kinalska, I

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the alterations of function and/or level of adhesion molecules play a key role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as Graves' disease or type 1 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 alpha (LFA-1 alpha, CD11a) and L-selectin (CD62L) molecules on peripheral mononuclear cells in Graves disease and type 1 diabetes in comparison to healthy controls, since they were shown to play an important role in lymphocytes and/or monocytes migration into the organs affected by immune process and are suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of Graves disease and type 1 diabetes. The percentages of monocytes/lymphocytes expressing LFA-1 alpha antigen and lymphocytes expressing L-selectin antigen and the fluorescence intensity of the studied molecules were measured by flow cytometry. At the onset of both autoimmune diseases the percentage of highly CD11a positive lymphocytes and the mean fluorescence intensity were statistically higher than in the healthy controls and patients with Graves' disease after thyreostatic therapy. The fluorescence intensity of LFA-1 alpha on monocytes was also increased in type 1 diabetic patients, but not in Graves' disease. The analysis of CD62L antigen expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed decreased percentages of L-selectin positive cells in patients with Graves' disease (before and after treatment) and insulin-dependent diabetes in comparison to the controls. Our study suggests that the alterations of the expression of CD11a and/or CD62L molecules on peripheral blood lymphocytes could be the markers of ongoing autoimmune process in Graves disease and type 1 diabetes.

  16. Classification of complex information: inference of co-occurring affective states from their expressions in speech.

    PubMed

    Sobol-Shikler, Tal; Robinson, Peter

    2010-07-01

    We present a classification algorithm for inferring affective states (emotions, mental states, attitudes, and the like) from their nonverbal expressions in speech. It is based on the observations that affective states can occur simultaneously and different sets of vocal features, such as intonation and speech rate, distinguish between nonverbal expressions of different affective states. The input to the inference system was a large set of vocal features and metrics that were extracted from each utterance. The classification algorithm conducted independent pairwise comparisons between nine affective-state groups. The classifier used various subsets of metrics of the vocal features and various classification algorithms for different pairs of affective-state groups. Average classification accuracy of the 36 pairwise machines was 75 percent, using 10-fold cross validation. The comparison results were consolidated into a single ranked list of the nine affective-state groups. This list was the output of the system and represented the inferred combination of co-occurring affective states for the analyzed utterance. The inference accuracy of the combined machine was 83 percent. The system automatically characterized over 500 affective state concepts from the Mind Reading database. The inference of co-occurring affective states was validated by comparing the inferred combinations to the lexical definitions of the labels of the analyzed sentences. The distinguishing capabilities of the system were comparable to human performance.

  17. Unstable Expression of Commonly Used Reference Genes in Rat Pancreatic Islets Early after Isolation Affects Results of Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Kosinová, Lucie; Cahová, Monika; Fábryová, Eva; Týcová, Irena; Koblas, Tomáš; Leontovyč, Ivan; Saudek, František; Kříž, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The use of RT-qPCR provides a powerful tool for gene expression studies; however, the proper interpretation of the obtained data is crucially dependent on accurate normalization based on stable reference genes. Recently, strong evidence has been shown indicating that the expression of many commonly used reference genes may vary significantly due to diverse experimental conditions. The isolation of pancreatic islets is a complicated procedure which creates severe mechanical and metabolic stress leading possibly to cellular damage and alteration of gene expression. Despite of this, freshly isolated islets frequently serve as a control in various gene expression and intervention studies. The aim of our study was to determine expression of 16 candidate reference genes and one gene of interest (F3) in isolated rat pancreatic islets during short-term cultivation in order to find a suitable endogenous control for gene expression studies. We compared the expression stability of the most commonly used reference genes and evaluated the reliability of relative and absolute quantification using RT-qPCR during 0-120 hrs after isolation. In freshly isolated islets, the expression of all tested genes was markedly depressed and it increased several times throughout the first 48 hrs of cultivation. We observed significant variability among samples at 0 and 24 hrs but substantial stabilization from 48 hrs onwards. During the first 48 hrs, relative quantification failed to reflect the real changes in respective mRNA concentrations while in the interval 48-120 hrs, the relative expression generally paralleled the results determined by absolute quantification. Thus, our data call into question the suitability of relative quantification for gene expression analysis in pancreatic islets during the first 48 hrs of cultivation, as the results may be significantly affected by unstable expression of reference genes. However, this method could provide reliable information from 48 hrs onwards.

  18. Whole blood gene expression profile associated with spontaneous preterm birth in women with threatened preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yujing Jan; Pennell, Craig Edward; Chua, Hon Nian; Perkins, Jonathan Edward; Lye, Stephen James

    2014-01-01

    Threatened preterm labor (TPTL) is defined as persistent premature uterine contractions between 20 and 37 weeks of gestation and is the most common condition that requires hospitalization during pregnancy. Most of these TPTL women continue their pregnancies to term while only an estimated 5% will deliver a premature baby within ten days. The aim of this work was to study differential whole blood gene expression associated with spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) within 48 hours of hospital admission. Peripheral blood was collected at point of hospital admission from 154 women with TPTL before any medical treatment. Microarrays were utilized to investigate differential whole blood gene expression between TPTL women who did (n = 48) or did not have a sPTB (n = 106) within 48 hours of admission. Total leukocyte and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (35% and 41% respectively) in women who had sPTB than women who did not deliver within 48 hours (p<0.001). Fetal fibronectin (fFN) test was performed on 62 women. There was no difference in the urine, vaginal and placental microbiology and histopathology reports between the two groups of women. There were 469 significant differentially expressed genes (FDR<0.05); 28 differentially expressed genes were chosen for microarray validation using qRT-PCR and 20 out of 28 genes were successfully validated (p<0.05). An optimal random forest classifier model to predict sPTB was achieved using the top nine differentially expressed genes coupled with peripheral clinical blood data (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 75.5%). These differentially expressed genes may further elucidate the underlying mechanisms of sPTB and pave the way for future systems biology studies to predict sPTB.

  19. Inhalation of ultrafine particles alters blood leukocyte expression of adhesion molecules in humans.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Mark W; Stewart, Judith C; Oberdörster, Günter; Morrow, Paul E; Chalupa, David; Pietropaoli, Anthony P; Frasier, Lauren M; Speers, Donna M; Cox, Christopher; Huang, Li-Shan; Utell, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs; aerodynamic diameter < 100 nm) may contribute to the respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with particulate air pollution. We tested the hypothesis that inhalation of carbon UFPs has vascular effects in healthy and asthmatic subjects, detectable as alterations in blood leukocyte expression of adhesion molecules. Healthy subjects inhaled filtered air and freshly generated elemental carbon particles (count median diameter approximately 25nm, geometric standard deviation approximately 1.6), for 2 hr, in three separate protocols: 10 microg/m3 at rest, 10 and 25 microg/m3 with exercise, and 50 microg/m3 with exercise. In a fourth protocol, subjects with asthma inhaled air and 10 microg/m3 UFPs with exercise. Peripheral venous blood was obtained before and at intervals after exposure, and leukocyte expression of surface markers was quantitated using multiparameter flow cytometry. In healthy subjects, particle exposure with exercise reduced expression of adhesion molecules CD54 and CD18 on monocytes and CD18 and CD49d on granulocytes. There were also concentration-related reductions in blood monocytes, basophils, and eosinophils and increased lymphocyte expression of the activation marker CD25. In subjects with asthma, exposure with exercise to 10 microg/m3 UFPs reduced expression of CD11b on monocytes and eosinophils and CD54 on granulocytes. Particle exposure also reduced the percentage of CD4+ T cells, basophils, and eosinophils. Inhalation of elemental carbon UFPs alters peripheral blood leukocyte distribution and expression of adhesion molecules, in a pattern consistent with increased retention of leukocytes in the pulmonary vascular bed.

  20. Enhanced tissue factor expression by blood eosinophils from patients with hypereosinophilia: a possible link with thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Marzano, Angelo V; Lorini, Maurizio; Carbonelli, Vincenzo; Tedeschi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic risk is increased in eosinophil-mediated disorders, and several hypotheses have been proposed to link eosinophilia and thrombosis. In particular, eosinophils have been described as source of tissue factor (TF), the main initiator of blood coagulation; however, this aspect is still controversial. This study was aimed to evaluate whether TF expression varies in eosinophils isolated from normal subjects and patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions. Eosinophils were immunologically purified from peripheral blood samples of 9 patients with different hypereosinophilic conditions and 9 normal subjects. Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed to test eosinophil TF expression. For comparison, TF expression was evaluated in monocytes from blood donors and in human endothelial (ECV304) and fibroblast (IMR90) cell lines. Western blot analysis revealed a major band of 47,000 corresponding to native TF in homogenates of purified eosinophils with a higher intensity in the 9 patients than in the 9 controls (p<0.0001). According to RT-PCR cycle threshold (Ct), TF gene expression was higher in eosinophils from patients than in those from controls, median (range) 35.10 (19.45-36.50) vs 37.17 (35.33-37.87) (p = 0.002), and was particularly abundant in one patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and ischemic heart attacks (Ct: 19.45). TF gene expression was moderate in monocytes, Ct: 31.32 (29.82-33.49) and abundant in endothelial cells, Ct: 28.70 (27.79-29.57) and fibroblasts, Ct: 22.77 (19.22-25.05). Our results indicate that human blood eosinophils contain variable amounts of TF. The higher TF expression in patients with hypereosinophilic disorders may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk.

  1. Radiation-Induced Micro-RNA Expression Changes in Peripheral Blood Cells of Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Templin, Thomas; Paul, Sunirmal; Amundson, Sally A.; Young, Erik F.; Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Smilenov, Lubomir B.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding small RNAs that regulate gene expression, are involved in numerous physiologic processes in normal and malignant cells. Our in vivo study measured miRNA and gene expression changes in human blood cells in response to ionizing radiation, to develop miRNA signatures that can be used as biomarkers for radiation exposure. Methods and Materials: Blood from 8 radiotherapy patients in complete remission 1 or 2 was collected immediately before and 4 hours after total body irradiation with 1.25 Gy x-rays. Both miRNA and gene expression changes were measured by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction and microarray hybridization, respectively. Hierarchic clustering, multidimensional scaling, class prediction, and gene ontology analysis were performed to investigate the potential of miRNAs to serve as radiation biomarkers and to elucidate their likely physiologic roles in the radiation response. Results: The expression levels of 45 miRNAs were statistically significantly upregulated 4 hours after irradiation with 1.25 Gy x-rays, 27 of them in every patient. Nonirradiated and irradiated samples form separate clusters in hierarchic clustering and multidimensional scaling. Out of 223 differentially expressed genes, 37 were both downregulated and predicted targets of the upregulated miRNAs. Paired and unpaired miRNA-based classifiers that we developed can predict the class membership of a sample with unknown irradiation status, with accuracies of 100% when all 45 upregulated miRNAs are included. Both miRNA control of and gene involvement in biologic processes such as hemopoiesis and the immune response are increased after irradiation, whereas metabolic processes are underrepresented among all differentially expressed genes and the genes controlled by miRNAs. Conclusions: Exposure to ionizing radiation leads to the upregulation of the expression of a considerable proportion of the human miRNAome of peripheral blood cells

  2. Dissecting Daily and Circadian Expression Rhythms of Clock-Controlled Genes in Human Blood.

    PubMed

    Lech, Karolina; Ackermann, Katrin; Revell, Victoria L; Lao, Oscar; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    The identification and investigation of novel clock-controlled genes (CCGs) has been conducted thus far mainly in model organisms such as nocturnal rodents, with limited information in humans. Here, we aimed to characterize daily and circadian expression rhythms of CCGs in human peripheral blood during a sleep/sleep deprivation (S/SD) study and a constant routine (CR) study. Blood expression levels of 9 candidate CCGs (SREBF1, TRIB1, USF1, THRA1, SIRT1, STAT3, CAPRIN1, MKNK2, and ROCK2), were measured across 48 h in 12 participants in the S/SD study and across 33 h in 12 participants in the CR study. Statistically significant rhythms in expression were observed for STAT3, SREBF1, TRIB1, and THRA1 in samples from both the S/SD and the CR studies, indicating that their rhythmicity is driven by the endogenous clock. The MKNK2 gene was significantly rhythmic in the S/SD but not the CR study, which implies its exogenously driven rhythmic expression. In addition, we confirmed the circadian expression of PER1, PER3, and REV-ERBα in the CR study samples, while BMAL1 and HSPA1B were not significantly rhythmic in the CR samples; all 5 genes previously showed significant expression in the S/SD study samples. Overall, our results demonstrate that rhythmic expression patterns of clock and selected clock-controlled genes in human blood cells are in part determined by exogenous factors (sleep and fasting state) and in part by the endogenous circadian timing system. Knowledge of the exogenous and endogenous regulation of gene expression rhythms is needed prior to the selection of potential candidate marker genes for future applications in medical and forensic settings.

  3. The Blood Group A Genotype Determines the Level of Expression of the Blood Group A on Platelets But Not the Anti-B Isotiter

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Barbara; Eichelberger, Beate; Jungbauer, Christof; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The extent of expression of the blood group A on platelets is controversial. Further, the relation between platelets' blood group A expression and the titers of isoagglutinins has not been thoroughly investigated, so far. Methods We evaluated the relation between the genotype with platelets' blood group A and H expression estimated by flow cytometry and the titers of isoagglutinins. Results The A expression varied between genotypes and within genotypes. However, the expression in A1 was stronger than in all other genotypes (p < 0.0001). An overlap of expression levels was apparent between homozygous A1A1 and heterozygous A1 individuals. Still, The A1A1 genotype is associated with a particularly high antigen expression (p = 0.009). Platelets' A expression in A2 versus blood group O donors was also significant (p = 0.007), but there was again an overlap of expression. The secretor status had only little influence on the expression (p = 0.18). Also, isoagglutinin titers were not associated with genotypes. Conclusion: To distinguish between A1 and A2 donors may reduce incompatible platelet transfusions and therefore be favorable on platelet transfusion increment. Clinical data are needed to support this notion. PMID:26733767

  4. Interspecies systems biology uncovers metabolites affecting C. elegans gene expression and life history traits.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Ritter, Ashlyn D; Yilmaz, L Safak; Rosebrock, Adam P; Caudy, Amy A; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2014-02-13

    Diet greatly influences gene expression and physiology. In mammals, elucidating the effects and mechanisms of individual nutrients is challenging due to the complexity of both the animal and its diet. Here, we used an interspecies systems biology approach with Caenorhabditis elegans and two of its bacterial diets, Escherichia coli and Comamonas aquatica, to identify metabolites that affect the animal's gene expression and physiology. We identify vitamin B12 as the major dilutable metabolite provided by Comamonas aq. that regulates gene expression, accelerates development, and reduces fertility but does not affect lifespan. We find that vitamin B12 has a dual role in the animal: it affects development and fertility via the methionine/S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) cycle and breaks down the short-chain fatty acid propionic acid, preventing its toxic buildup. Our interspecies systems biology approach provides a paradigm for understanding complex interactions between diet and physiology.

  5. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    PubMed Central

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring. PMID:27731423

  6. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-10-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring.

  7. Blood lactate concentrations are mildly affected by mobile gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, F; Wochatz, M; Otto, C; Cassel, M; Mayer, F; Scharhag, J

    2014-06-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of wearing a mobile respiratory gas analysis system during a treadmill test on blood lactate (bLa) concentrations and commonly applied bLa thresholds. A total of 16 recreational athletes (31±3 years, VO2max: 58±6 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)) performed one multistage treadmill test with and one without gas exchange measurements (GEM and noGEM). The whole bLa curve, the lactate threshold (LT), the individual anaerobic thresholds according to Stegmann (IATSt) and Dickhuth (IATDi), and a fixed bLa concentration of 4 mmol ∙ l(-1) (OBLA) were evaluated. The bLa curve was shifted slightly leftward in GEM compared to noGEM (P<0.05), whereas the heart rate response was not different between conditions (P=0.89). There was no difference between GEM and noGEM for LT (2.61±0.34 vs. 2.64±0.39 m · s(-1), P=0.49) and IATSt (3.47±0.42 vs. 3.55±0.47 m · s(-1), P=0.12). However, IATDi (3.57±0.39 vs. 3.66±0.44 m · s(-1), P<0.01) and OBLA (3.85±0.46 vs. 3.96±0.47 m · s(-1), P<0.01) occurred at slower running velocities in GEM. The bLa response to treadmill tests is mildly affected by wearing a mobile gas analysis system. This also applies to bLa thresholds located at higher exercise intensities. While the magnitude of the effects is of little importance for recreational athletes, it might be relevant for elite athletes and scientific studies.

  8. Decoding the Regulatory Network for Blood Development from Single-Cell Gene Expression Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Haghverdi, Laleh; Lilly, Andrew J.; Tanaka, Yosuke; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Buettner, Florian; Macaulay, Iain C.; Jawaid, Wajid; Diamanti, Evangelia; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Piterman, Nir; Kouskoff, Valerie; Theis, Fabian J.; Fisher, Jasmin; Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the use of diffusion maps and network synthesis from state transition graphs to better understand developmental pathways from single cell gene expression profiling. We map the progression of mesoderm towards blood in the mouse by single-cell expression analysis of 3,934 cells, capturing cells with blood-forming potential at four sequential developmental stages. By adapting the diffusion plot methodology for dimensionality reduction to single-cell data, we reconstruct the developmental journey to blood at single-cell resolution. Using transitions between individual cellular states as input, we develop a single-cell network synthesis toolkit to generate a computationally executable transcriptional regulatory network model that recapitulates blood development. Model predictions were validated by showing that Sox7 inhibits primitive erythropoiesis, and that Sox and Hox factors control early expression of Erg. We therefore demonstrate that single-cell analysis of a developing organ coupled with computational approaches can reveal the transcriptional programs that control organogenesis. PMID:25664528

  9. Effects of red grape juice polyphenols in NADPH oxidase subunit expression in human neutrophils and mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, Alberto; de la Peña, Gema; Sánchez-Martín, Carolina C; Teresa Guerra, M; Bartolomé, Begoña; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2009-10-01

    The NADPH oxidase enzyme system is the main source of superoxide anions in phagocytic and vascular cells. NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide generation has been found to be abnormally enhanced in several chronic diseases. Evidence is accumulating that polyphenols may have the potential to improve cardiovascular health, although the mechanism is not fully established. Consumption of concentrated red grape juice, rich in polyphenols, has been recently shown to reduce NADPH oxidase activity in circulating neutrophils from human subjects. In the present work we studied whether red grape juice polyphenols affected NADPH oxidase subunit expression at the transcription level. For this, we used human neutrophils and mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, HL-60-derived neutrophils and the endothelial cell line EA.hy926.Superoxide production was measured with 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate or lucigenin, mRNA expression by real-time RT-PCR and protein expression by Western blot. Each experiment was performed at least three times. In all cell types tested, red grape juice, dealcoholised red wine and pure polyphenols decreased superoxide anion production. Red grape juice and dealcoholised red wine selectively reduced p47phox, p22phox and gp91phox expression at both mRNA and protein levels, without affecting the expression of p67phox. Pure polyphenols, particularly quercetin, also reduced NADPH oxidase subunit expression, especially p47phox, in all cell types tested. The present results showing that red grape juice polyphenols reduce superoxide anion production provide an alternative mechanism by which consumption of grape derivatives may account for a reduction of oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular and/or inflammatory diseases related to NADPH oxidase superoxide overproduction.

  10. Increased cerebral blood flow during hypercapnia is not affected by lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus

    SciTech Connect

    Harik, S.I.; Prado, R.; Busto, R.; Ginsberg, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the putative noradrenergic innervation of intraparenchymal cerebral blood vessels from the nucleus locus ceruleus mediates the vasodilatory response to hypercapnia, regional cerebral blood flow was measured by iodo-(/sup 14/C)antipyrine autoradiography in awake and restrained rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus and in unlesioned control rats. Hypercapnia, induced by the inhalation of 5% or 8% CO/sub 2/ in air for 8 minutes caused a 2 to 5-fold increase in regional cerebral blood flow. However, despite a marked reduction of about 90% in cortical norepinephrine levels ipsilateral to the lesion, blood flow to the frontal and parietal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum increased to the same extent in ipsilateral and contralateral regions. Thus, lesion of the locus ceruleus and the resultant depletion of endogenous cortical and hippocampal norepinephrine, does not influence the cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Lithium Chloride on the Expression of P-Glycoprotein at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Newman, Stephanie A; Pan, Yijun; Short, Jennifer L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-01-16

    In addition to extruding drugs from the brain, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) facilitates the brain-to-blood clearance of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and is down-regulated in Alzheimer's disease. Studies suggest that the mood-stabilizing drug lithium exerts a protective effect against Alzheimer's disease. Although the mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully understood, evidence suggests that lithium chloride (LiCl) increases P-gp expression in vitro, albeit at concentrations substantially outside the therapeutic window. Therefore, we investigated the effects of pharmacologically-relevant concentrations of LiCl on P-gp expression using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Swiss outbred mice administered LiCl (300 mg/kg/day, 21 days) showed no change in brain microvascular P-gp protein expression. Furthermore, P-gp transcript and protein levels were unaltered by LiCl (1.25-5 mM, 24 h) in human immortalized brain endothelial cells, while both gene and protein expression were significantly enhanced by the P-gp up-regulator, SR12813 by 1.5-fold and 2.0-fold, respectively. P-gp efflux function was also unaffected by LiCl in vitro, by measuring accumulation of the fluorescent P-gp substrate rhodamine-123. This suggests therefore that LiCl is unlikely to affect the BBB efflux of Aβ or other P-gp substrates at pharmacologically-relevant concentrations, suggesting that the Aβ-lowering effects of LiCl are unrelated to elevated BBB P-gp expression.

  12. Genetic analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression levels in whole blood of healthy human subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The predominant model for regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation is an inverse association in which increased methylation results in decreased gene expression levels. However, recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic variation, DNA methylation and expression is more complex. Results Systems genetic approaches for examining relationships between gene expression and methylation array data were used to find both negative and positive associations between these levels. A weighted correlation network analysis revealed that i) both transcriptome and methylome are organized in modules, ii) co-expression modules are generally not preserved in the methylation data and vice-versa, and iii) highly significant correlations exist between co-expression and co-methylation modules, suggesting the existence of factors that affect expression and methylation of different modules (i.e., trans effects at the level of modules). We observed that methylation probes associated with expression in cis were more likely to be located outside CpG islands, whereas specificity for CpG island shores was present when methylation, associated with expression, was under local genetic control. A structural equation model based analysis found strong support in particular for a traditional causal model in which gene expression is regulated by genetic variation via DNA methylation instead of gene expression affecting DNA methylation levels. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms between genetic markers, epigenetic mechanisms and gene expression. We find strong support for the classical model of genetic variants regulating methylation, which in turn regulates gene expression. Moreover we show that, although the methylation and expression modules differ, they are highly correlated. PMID:23157493

  13. Whole Blood Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Gene Expression Differences between Dapulian and Landrace Piglets.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiaqing; Yang, Dandan; Chen, Wei; Li, Chuanhao; Wang, Yandong; Zeng, Yongqing; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    There is little genomic information regarding gene expression differences at the whole blood transcriptome level of different pig breeds at the neonatal stage. To solve this, we characterized differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the whole blood of Dapulian (DPL) and Landrace piglets using RNA-seq (RNA-sequencing) technology. In this study, 83 DEGs were identified between the two breeds. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses identified immune response and metabolism as the most commonly enriched terms and pathways in the DEGs. Genes related to immunity and lipid metabolism were more highly expressed in the DPL piglets, while genes related to body growth were more highly expressed in the Landrace piglets. Additionally, the DPL piglets had twofold more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alternative splicing (AS) than the Landrace piglets. These results expand our knowledge of the genes transcribed in the piglet whole blood of two breeds and provide a basis for future research of the molecular mechanisms underlying the piglet differences.

  14. Whole Blood Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Gene Expression Differences between Dapulian and Landrace Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dandan; Li, Chuanhao; Wang, Yandong

    2016-01-01

    There is little genomic information regarding gene expression differences at the whole blood transcriptome level of different pig breeds at the neonatal stage. To solve this, we characterized differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the whole blood of Dapulian (DPL) and Landrace piglets using RNA-seq (RNA-sequencing) technology. In this study, 83 DEGs were identified between the two breeds. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses identified immune response and metabolism as the most commonly enriched terms and pathways in the DEGs. Genes related to immunity and lipid metabolism were more highly expressed in the DPL piglets, while genes related to body growth were more highly expressed in the Landrace piglets. Additionally, the DPL piglets had twofold more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alternative splicing (AS) than the Landrace piglets. These results expand our knowledge of the genes transcribed in the piglet whole blood of two breeds and provide a basis for future research of the molecular mechanisms underlying the piglet differences. PMID:28105431

  15. Preliminary investigation of gene expression profiles in peripheral blood lymphocytes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Nikola A; Weidenhofer, Judith; Scott, Rodney J; Schall, Ulrich; Todd, Juanita; Michie, Patricia T; Tooney, Paul A

    2006-02-28

    Schizophrenia is a heterogenous disorder that is phenomenologically characterised by a combination of negative, positive, and cognitive symptoms with variable expression in the course of illness. Here, we investigated differential gene expression in relation to age to address the heterogeneity of this disorder We used 6000 gene cDNA microarrays to generate gene expression profiles from peripheral blood lymphocytes from 14 individuals with schizophrenia and 14 non-psychiatric controls. Genes showing altered expression were identified and 18 genes with brain-related functions were altered, 4 of which, endothelial differentiation gene 2 (Edg-2), ezrin-radixin-moesin phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), Myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ) and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 (TNFR2), were confirmed by relative real-time PCR. Dendrograms were constructed using genes that showed significantly different expression (p<0.05) between groups based on median split of age dividing the matched pairs into distinct subclasses. Our findings suggest that distinct gene expression profiles in peripheral blood lymphocytes associated with schizophrenia phenotypes may provide a first step towards the biological classification of schizophrenia subtypes. The validity of this approach may lead to better methods of defining this enigmatic disease.

  16. Cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of dogs with mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulou, A; Guazzetti, S; Borghetti, P; De Angelis, E; Quintavalla, C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure (CHF). In humans with CHF, increased production and high plasma concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, IL-8 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) have been associated with disease progression and a negative prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether differences in cytokine blood mRNA expression exist between clinically healthy dogs and dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD); to determine if the expression was related to the severity of MMVD, and to detect any correlations with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodelling. Twenty-three dogs with MMVD of varying severity and six clinically healthy dogs were included in the study. Whole blood samples were obtained for measurement of mRNA expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TGF-β1, TNF-α by reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). There were statistically significant differences between clinically healthy dogs and dogs with MMVD for IL-8 and TGF-β1 gene expression. IL-8 expression increased with increasing MMVD severity and TGF-β1 expression was higher in asymptomatic dogs with echocardiographic signs of cardiac remodelling (American College Veterinary Internal Medicine class B2) than in all other groups. These results could suggest the involvement of these cytokines at different stages of the disease.

  17. Expression profiling associates blood and brain glucocorticoid receptor signaling with trauma-related individual differences in both sexes

    PubMed Central

    Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.; Cohen, Hagit; Cai, Guiqing; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Delineating the molecular basis of individual differences in the stress response is critical to understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this study, 7 d after predator-scent-stress (PSS) exposure, male and female rats were classified into vulnerable (i.e., “PTSD-like”) and resilient (i.e., minimally affected) phenotypes on the basis of their performance on a variety of behavioral measures. Genome-wide expression profiling in blood and two limbic brain regions (amygdala and hippocampus), followed by quantitative PCR validation, was performed in these two groups of animals, as well as in an unexposed control group. Differentially expressed genes were identified in blood and brain associated with PSS-exposure and with distinct behavioral profiles postexposure. There was a small but significant between-tissue overlap (4–21%) for the genes associated with exposure-related individual differences, indicating convergent gene expression in both sexes. To uncover convergent signaling pathways across tissue and sex, upstream activated/deactivated transcription factors were first predicted for each tissue and then the respective pathways were identified. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling was the only convergent pathway associated with individual differences when using the most stringent statistical threshold. Corticosterone treatment 1 h after PSS-exposure prevented anxiety and hyperarousal 7 d later in both sexes, confirming the GR involvement in the PSS behavioral response. In conclusion, genes and pathways associated with extreme differences in the traumatic stress behavioral response can be distinguished from those associated with trauma exposure. Blood-based biomarkers can predict aspects of brain signaling. GR signaling is a convergent signaling pathway, associated with trauma-related individual differences in both sexes. PMID:25114262

  18. Expression and hypoxic regulation of hif1alpha and hif2alpha during early blood and endothelial cell differentiation in chick.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kanako; Nagai, Hiroki; Sheng, Guojun

    2007-08-01

    HIF1 and HIF2 are major mediators for hypoxia sensing and response. Their roles in early differentiation of two key cell types involved in oxygen supply in amniotes, the primitive blood cells and endothelial cells, are unclear. We show that, in pre-circulation avian embryos, hif1alpha and hif2alpha are expressed in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues, respectively. hif2alpha, first identified as epas1, is not present in endothelial cells at any pre-circulation stage under either normoxia or hypoxia conditions. Differentiating blood cells express low levels of hif2alpha under normoxia, but show a strong and rapid upregulation under hypoxia. Blood cell differentiation, however, is not affected under either hypoxia or hyperoxia conditions.

  19. Does hormone therapy affect blood pressure changes in the Diabetes Prevention Program?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Golden, Sherita H.; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Mather, Kieren J.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether blood pressure reductions differ by estrogen use among overweight glucose-intolerant women. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of postmenopausal Diabetes Prevention Program participants who used oral estrogen with or without progestogen at baseline and at 1-year follow-up (n=324) vs. those who did not use at either time point (n=382). Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) changes were examined by randomization arm (intensive lifestyle change (ILS), metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo). Associations between changes in blood pressure with changes in sex hormone binding globulin, estradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were also examined. Results Estrogen users and non-users had similar prevalences of baseline hypertension (33% vs. 34%, p=0.82) and use of blood pressure medications at baseline (p=0.25) and follow-up (p=0.10). Estrogen users and non-users randomized to ILS had similar decreases in SBP (-3.3 vs. -4.7 mmHg, p=0.45) and DBP (-3.1 vs. -4.7 mmHg, p=0.16). Among estrogen users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in SBP (p=0.016) and DBP (p=0.009) vs. placebo. Among non-users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in DBP (p=0.001) vs. placebo, but declines in SBP were not significant (p=0.11). Metformin was not associated with blood pressure reductions vs. placebo regardless of estrogen therapy. Blood pressure changes were not associated with changes in sex hormones regardless of estrogen therapy. Conclusions Among overweight women with dysglycemia, the magnitude of blood pressure reductions after ILS was unrelated to postmenopausal estrogen use. PMID:23942251

  20. Chemical factors affecting the interpretation of blood cyanide concentrations in fire victims.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of methemoglobinemia caused by fire gases on blood cyanide concentrations in fire victims. Twenty-two fire victims with postmortem intervals of 8-48 h were involved. Blood cyanide concentrations at the time of death (C(0)) were estimated using the formula: C(0)=Ce(0.046 t) (C=blood cyanide concentration detected at autopsy, 0.046=first-order rate constant of cyanide disappearing from blood in corpses, and t=postmortem interval). Total (free and combined with cyanide) methemoglobin (MetHb) content was used to estimate the maximum capacity of MetHb for combining cyanide. Blood cyanide concentrations at the time of death were very high (5.32-6.47 mg/l) in five victims. Three showed high saturation (54.7-63.0%) of carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) and elevated total MetHb contents (2.6-5.0%). MetHb at these levels is capable of scavenging up to 8.6-11.4 mg/l of blood cyanide. Thus, blood cyanide might have been completely combined with MetHb at the time of their death. In the remaining two victims, CO-Hb saturation was not high (30.9 and 37.9%) and no free MetHb was detected. As a result they may have exhibited severe toxic effects of cyanide at the time of their death. Our results indicate that MetHb contents and CO-Hb saturation should be determined to evaluate the toxic effects of cyanide in fire victims.

  1. RANK Expression and Osteoclastogenesis in Human Monocytes in Peripheral Blood from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appears as inflammation of synovial tissue and joint destruction. Receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) is a member of the TNF receptor superfamily and a receptor for the RANK ligand (RANKL). In this study, we examined the expression of RANKhigh and CCR6 on CD14+ monocytes from patients with RA and healthy volunteers. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from both the RA patients and the healthy volunteers. Osteoclastogenesis from monocytes was induced by RANKL and M-CSF in vitro. To study the expression of RANKhigh and CCR6 on CD14+ monocytes, two-color flow cytometry was performed. Levels of expression of RANK on monocytes were significantly correlated with the level of osteoclastogenesis in the healthy volunteers. The expression of RANKhigh on CD14+ monocyte in RA patients without treatment was elevated and that in those receiving treatment was decreased. In addition, the high-level expression of RANK on CD14+ monocytes was correlated with the high-level expression of CCR6 in healthy volunteers. Monocytes expressing both RANK and CCR6 differentiate into osteoclasts. The expression of CD14+RANKhigh in untreated RA patients was elevated. RANK and CCR6 expressed on monocytes may be novel targets for the regulation of bone resorption in RA and osteoporosis. PMID:27822475

  2. Factors affecting the blood concentration of ionized magnesium in patients in the acute phase of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ueshima, Kenji; Tachibana, Hideaki; Suzuki, Tomomi; Hiramori, Katsuhiko

    2004-11-01

    Magnesium is physiologically active in its free state (Mg2+). In the present study, we attempted to clarify factors affecting blood concentrations of Mg2+ in the acute phase of myocardial infarction (AMI). Subjects were 84 consecutive patients with AMI. Blood samples were collected at the time of admission, 24h after admission, and 1 week after admission, to measure blood concentration of Mg2+ and noradrenaline (NA). Furthermore, to assess daily Mg intake the hardness of local drinking water was determined, and a survey was conducted regarding dietary preferences and habits. Based on the results of this survey, the patients were defined as having a low Mg intake (L Group) or not. In addition, based on chronological shifts in blood Mg2+ concentrations, subjects were divided into the following four groups: Normal group, blood concentration of Mg2+ within normal range at all measurement points; Early recovery group, low at time of admission, but normalized on the next day; Delayed recovery group, low at time of admission, but normalized 1 week after admission; and Unrecovered group, below normal range at all measurement points. The mean blood Mg2+ concentration on admission was 0.52 +/- 0.06 mmol/l, significantly lower than the normal range (P < 0.05). A negative correlation between blood Mg2+ and NA concentrations on admission was observed (r = 0.49, P < 0.005). As a result, blood Mg2+ concentrations were normalized in 94% of subjects by 1 week after admission. Mean blood Mg2+ concentration on admission in the L Group was 0.47 +/- 0.05 mmol/l, significantly lower than that found in other subjects (0.52 +/- 0.05 mmol/l, P < 0.01). Eighty percent of the patients classified into the Unrecovered group belonged to the L Group. These findings suggest that lower blood concentrations of Mg2+ and higher plasma NA levels may be a result of serious AMI. However, chronic Mg intake deficiency may play a partial role in patients whose blood concentrations of Mg2+ remain low for

  3. DNA demethylation induced by 5-azacytidine does not affect fragile X expression.

    PubMed Central

    Glover, T W; Coyle-Morris, J; Pearce-Birge, L; Berger, C; Gemmill, R M

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the role of DNA demethylation in fragile X expression. Fragile X positive lymphoblastoid cells were treated with 5-azacytidine and harvested for analysis of fragile X expression both directly following treatment and after a recovery period in the absence of the drug. The effectiveness of 5-azacytidine treatment in inducing DNA demethylation was concurrently monitored by analysis of methylation changes at random autosomal loci in isolated DNA from treated cells. Under conditions where 5-azacytidine was found to inhibit fragile X expression, no DNA demethylation was observed. At the time when demethylation did occur, fragile X expression was not affected. These results strongly indicate that DNA demethylation is not involved in fragile X expression. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2420174

  4. The Child Affective Facial Expression (CAFE) set: validity and reliability from untrained adults.

    PubMed

    LoBue, Vanessa; Thrasher, Cat

    2014-01-01

    Emotional development is one of the largest and most productive areas of psychological research. For decades, researchers have been fascinated by how humans respond to, detect, and interpret emotional facial expressions. Much of the research in this area has relied on controlled stimulus sets of adults posing various facial expressions. Here we introduce a new stimulus set of emotional facial expressions into the domain of research on emotional development-The Child Affective Facial Expression set (CAFE). The CAFE set features photographs of a racially and ethnically diverse group of 2- to 8-year-old children posing for six emotional facial expressions-angry, fearful, sad, happy, surprised, and disgusted-and a neutral face. In the current work, we describe the set and report validity and reliability data on the set from 100 untrained adult participants.

  5. Skin blood flow differentially affects near-infrared spectroscopy-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation and blood volume at rest and during dynamic leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Ruddock, Alan D; Saxton, John M

    2010-11-01

    The impact of skin blood flow changes on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation (SmO(2)) and blood volume has not been fully established. We measured SmO(2) and total hemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) responses of the right vastus lateralis during rest and dynamic knee extension exercise in ten young, healthy males. The protocol was repeated four times: twice without thigh heating for reliability, and twice with different grades of thigh heating for assessing the impact of cutaneous vasodilation on SmO(2) and Δ[tHb]. The reliability of our SmO(2) and [tHb] measurements was good. Thigh heating at 37 and 42°C caused marked increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during rest and exercise (P < 0.001 between each condition), and small increases in SmO(2) during rest (from 69 ± 8% to 71 ± 7% and 73 ± 6%, respectively; P < 0.05 between each condition), but not during exercise (e.g. 1 min exercise: 51 ± 11% vs. 51 ± 11% and 52 ± 11%, respectively; P > 0.05 at all time points). In contrast, heating-induced increases in %CVC(peak) were accompanied by increases in [tHb] at rest and during exercise and a decrease in Δ[tHb] during exercise (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that NIRS-derived measures of SmO(2) and blood volume are differentially affected by skin blood flow at rest and during exercise. The findings from this study should be considered in NIRS experiments where skin blood flow can change markedly (e.g. high-intensity and/or prolonged exercise).

  6. [Factors affecting the control of blood pressure and lipid levels in patients with cardiovascular disease: the PREseAP Study].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo; Brotons, Carlos; Moral, Irene; Soriano, Nuria; Del Valle, María A; Rodríguez, Ana I; Pepió, Josep M; Pastor, Ana

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this observational study was to identify factors influencing the control of blood pressure (i.e., <140/90 mmHg, or <130/80 mmHg in diabetic patients) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level (<100 mg/dL) in 1223 patients with cardiovascular disease. Overall, 70.2% of patients were men, and their mean age was 66.4 years. Blood pressure was poorly controlled in 50.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 46.9%-54.8%) and the LDL cholesterol level was poorly controlled in 60.1% (95% CI, 56.3%-63.9%). Determinants of poor blood pressure control were diabetes, hypertension, no previous diagnosis of heart failure, previous diagnosis of peripheral artery disease or stroke, obesity, and no lipid-lowering treatment. Determinants of poor LDL cholesterol control were no lipid-lowering treatment, no previous diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, no antihypertensive treatment, and dyslipidemia. The factors affecting blood pressure control were different from those affecting LDL cholesterol control, an observation that should be taken into account when implementing treatment recommendations for achieving therapeutic objectives in secondary prevention.

  7. Antibiotics in ingested human blood affect the mosquito microbiota and capacity to transmit malaria

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Rodgers, Faye H.; Yerbanga, Rakiswendé S.; Ouédraogo, Jean Bosco; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Cohuet, Anna; Christophides, George K.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria reduction is most efficiently achieved by vector control whereby human populations at high risk of contracting and transmitting the disease are protected from mosquito bites. Here, we identify the presence of antibiotics in the blood of malaria-infected people as a new risk of increasing disease transmission. We show that antibiotics in ingested blood enhance the susceptibility of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to malaria infection by disturbing their gut microbiota. This effect is confirmed in a semi-natural setting by feeding mosquitoes with blood of children naturally infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Antibiotic exposure additionally increases mosquito survival and fecundity, which are known to augment vectorial capacity. These findings suggest that malaria transmission may be exacerbated in areas of high antibiotic usage, and that regions targeted by mass drug administration programs against communicable diseases may necessitate increased vector control. PMID:25562286

  8. Factors affecting transfusion requirement after hip fracture: Can we reduce the need for blood?

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sagar J.; Wood, Kristi S.; Marsh, Jackie; Bryant, Dianne; Abdo, Hussein; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman; Sanders, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are common injuries that result in blood loss and frequently require the transfusion of blood products. We sought to identify risk factors leading to increased blood transfusion in patients presenting with hip fractures, especially those factors that are modifiable. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of all patients who had fixation of their hip fractures between October 2005 and February 2010. The need for transfusion was correlated with potential risk factors, including age, sex, preoperative hemoglobin, fracture type, fixation method and more. Results A total of 835 patients had fixation of their hip fractures during the study period; 631 met the inclusion criteria and 249 of them (39.5%) were transfused. We found an association between need for blood transfusion and female sex (p = 0.018), lower preoperative hemoglobin (p < 0.001), fracture type (p < 0.001) and fixation method (p < 0.001). Compared with femoral neck fractures, there was a 2.37 times greater risk of blood transfusion in patients with intertrochanteric fractures (p < 0.001) and a 4.03 times greater risk in those with subtrochanteric fractures (p < 0.001). Dynamic hip screw (DHS) fixation decreased the risk of transfusion by about half compared with intramedullary nail or hemiarthroplasty. We found no association with age, delay to operation (p = 0.17) or duration of surgery (p = 0.30). Conclusion The only modifiable risk factor identified was fixation method. When considering blood transfusion requirements in isolation, we suggest a potential benefit in using a DHS for intertrochanteric and femoral neck fractures amenable to DHS fixation. PMID:25265109

  9. Does tropicamide affect choroidal blood flow in humans? a laser Doppler flowmetry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, Nithiyanantham; Riva, Charles E.; Rovati, Luigi; Cellini, Mauro; Gizzi, Corrado; Strobbe, Ernesto; Campos, Emilio C.

    2012-03-01

    The measurement of blood flow in the ocular fundus is of scientific and clinical interest. Investigating ocular blood flow in the choroid may be important to understand the pathogenesis of numerous ocular diseases, such as glaucoma or agerelated macular degeneration (AMD). Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) was applied to measure relative velocity, volume and flux of red blood cells in the tissues of human eye. Its main application lies in the possibility of assessing alterations in blood flow early in the course of diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of pupil dilatation with one drop of 1% tropicamide on blood flow in the foveal region of the choroid of the human fundus. The blood flow parameters were measured in 24 eyes during 30 minutes (one measurement in every 3 minutes) after the application of the drop. Since the Doppler parameters depend on the scattering geometry, which may change as the pupil dilates; an artificial pupil of 4mm in diameter was placed directly in front the eye. Following the administration of tropicamide the mean pupil diameter was increased from 3.29 mm to 8.25 mm (P<0.0001, Paired student t-test). In comparison to the baseline values, the data shows no significant increases were observed in velocity, volume, and flow with 4 mm artificial pupil (0.2%, 1.3%, 0.8% respectively) and a statistically significant increases were observed without artificial pupil (10.7%, 13.9%, 12.8% respectively) following the application of tropicamide.

  10. Expression Profiling of Solute Carrier Gene Families at the Blood-CSF Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Horace T. B.; Dahlin, Amber; Wang, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) is a highly vascularized tissue in the brain ventricles and acts as the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB). A main function of the CP is to secrete CSF, which is accomplished by active transport of small ions and water from the blood side to the CSF side. The CP also supplies the brain with certain nutrients, hormones, and metal ions, while removing metabolites and xenobiotics from the CSF. Numerous membrane transporters are expressed in the CP in order to facilitate the solute exchange between the blood and the CSF. The solute carrier (SLC) superfamily represents a major class of transporters in the CP that constitutes the molecular mechanisms for CP function. Recently, we systematically and quantitatively examined Slc gene expression in 20 anatomically comprehensive brain areas in the adult mouse brain using high-quality in situ hybridization data generated by the Allen Brain Atlas. Here we focus our analysis on Slc gene expression at the BCSFB using previously obtained data. Of the 252 Slc genes present in the mouse brain, 202 Slc genes were found at detectable levels in the CP. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the CP Slc gene expression pattern is substantially different from the other 19 analyzed brain regions. The majority of the Slc genes in the CP are expressed at low to moderate levels, whereas 28 Slc genes are present in the CP at the highest levels. These highly expressed Slc genes encode transporters involved in CSF secretion, energy production, and transport of nutrients, hormones, neurotransmitters, sulfate, and metal ions. In this review, the functional characteristics and potential importance of these Slc transporters in the CP are discussed, with particular emphasis on their localization and physiological functions at the BCSFB. PMID:22936914

  11. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  12. Gene Expression Differences in Peripheral Blood of Parkinson’s Disease Patients with Distinct Progression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Lobo, Patrícia P.; Mestre, Tiago; Coelho, Miguel; Rosa, Mário M.; Gonçalves, Nilza; Wales, Pauline; Mendes, Tiago; Gerhardt, Ellen; Fahlbusch, Christiane; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Bonin, Michael; Miltenberger-Miltényi, Gabriel; Borovecki, Fran; Soreq, Hermona; Ferreira, Joaquim J.; F. Outeiro, Tiago

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of neurodegenerative disorders is clinically challenging due to the inexistence of established biomarkers for predicting disease progression. Here, we performed an exploratory cross-sectional, case-control study aimed at determining whether gene expression differences in peripheral blood may be used as a signature of Parkinson’s disease (PD) progression, thereby shedding light into potential molecular mechanisms underlying disease development. We compared transcriptional profiles in the blood from 34 PD patients who developed postural instability within ten years with those of 33 patients who did not develop postural instability within this time frame. Our study identified >200 differentially expressed genes between the two groups. The expression of several of the genes identified was previously found deregulated in animal models of PD and in PD patients. Relevant genes were selected for validation by real-time PCR in a subset of patients. The genes validated were linked to nucleic acid metabolism, mitochondria, immune response and intracellular-transport. Interestingly, we also found deregulation of these genes in a dopaminergic cell model of PD, a simple paradigm that can now be used to further dissect the role of these molecular players on dopaminergic cell loss. Altogether, our study provides preliminary evidence that expression changes in specific groups of genes and pathways, detected in peripheral blood samples, may be correlated with differential PD progression. Our exploratory study suggests that peripheral gene expression profiling may prove valuable for assisting in prediction of PD prognosis, and identifies novel culprits possibly involved in dopaminergic cell death. Given the exploratory nature of our study, further investigations using independent, well-characterized cohorts will be essential in order to validate our candidates as predictors of PD prognosis and to definitively confirm the value of gene expression analysis in aiding

  13. Post-Weaning Diet Affects Faecal Microbial Composition but Not Selected Adipose Gene Expression in the Cat (Felis catus)

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Kittelmann, Sandra; Young, Wayne; Kerr, Katherine R.; Swanson, Kelly S.; Roy, Nicole C.; Thomas, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pre- (i.e., gestation and during lactation) and post-weaning diet on the composition of faecal bacterial communities and adipose expression of key genes in the glucose and insulin pathways were investigated in the cat. Queens were maintained on a moderate protein:fat:carbohydrate kibbled (“Diet A”; 35:20:28% DM; n  =  4) or high protein:fat:carbohydrate canned (“Diet B”; 45:37:2% DM; n = 3) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Offspring were weaned onto these diets in a nested design (n  =  5 per treatment). Faecal samples were collected at wk 8 and 17 of age. DNA was isolated from faeces and bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons were analysed by pyrosequencing. RNA was extracted from blood (wk 18) and adipose tissue and ovarian/testicular tissues (wk 24) and gene expression levels determined using RT-qPCR. Differences (P<0.05) in composition of faecal bacteria were observed between pregnant queens fed Diet A or B. However, pre-weaning diet had little effect on faecal bacterial composition in weaned kittens. In contrast, post-weaning diet altered bacterial population profiles in the kittens. Increased (P<0.05) abundance of Firmicutes (77% vs 52% of total reads) and Actinobacteria (0.8% vs 0.2% of total reads), and decreased (P<0.05) abundance of Fusobacteria (1.6% vs 18.4% of total reads) were observed for kittens fed the Diet A compared to those fed Diet B post-weaning. Feeding Diet B pre-weaning increased (P<0.05) the expression levels of INRS, LEPT, PAI-1 and tended to increase GLUT1, while the expression levels of IRS-1 in blood increased in kittens fed Diet A pre-weaning. Post-weaning diet had no effect on expression levels of target genes. Correlations between the expression levels of genes involved in glucose and insulin pathways and faecal Bacteriodetes and Firmicutes phyla were identified. The reasons for why post-weaning diet affects microbial populations and not gene expression levels are of interest. PMID:24312255

  14. Accessibility of blood affects the attractiveness of cattle to horn flies.

    PubMed

    Breijo, M; Rocha, S; Ures, X; Pedrana, G; Alonzo, P; Meikle, A

    2014-03-01

    The burden of infestation of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Muscidae), differs among bovines within the same herd. We hypothesized that these differences might be related to the epidermal thickness of the cattle and the blood intake capacity of the fly. Results showed that dark animals carried more flies and had a thinner epidermis than light-coloured animals, which was consistent with the greater haemoglobin content found in flies caught on darker cattle. Similarly, epidermal thickness increased with body weight, whereas haemoglobin content decreased. Overall, we suggest that accessibility of blood is a factor that partially explains cattle attractiveness to flies.

  15. Early Experiences Can Alter Gene Expression and Affect Long-Term Development. Working Paper #10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2010

    2010-01-01

    New scientific research shows that environmental influences can actually affect whether and how genes are expressed. Thus, the old ideas that genes are "set in stone" or that they alone determine development have been disproven. In fact, scientists have discovered that early experiences can determine how genes are turned on and off and even…

  16. Effectiveness of Adaptive Pretend Play on Affective Expression and Imagination of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty participating in role-pretending activities. The concept of adaptive play makes play accessible by modifying play materials for different needs or treatment goals for children with CP. This study examines the affective expressions and imagination in children with CP as a function of…

  17. Happy babies, chatty toddlers: infant positive affect facilitates early expressive, but not receptive language.

    PubMed

    Laake, Lauren M; Bridgett, David J

    2014-02-01

    Eighty-three mother-infant dyads participated in this study. Positive affect (PA) broadly, along with fine-grained aspects of PA, was measured at 10 months of age. Language was measured at 14 months. Infant PA predicted expressive, but not receptive, language. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Temperature stress affects the expression of immune response genes in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata) is affected by a fungal disease called chalkbrood. In several species of bees, chalkbrood is more likely to occur in larvae kept at 25-30 C than at 35 C. We found that both high and low temperature stress increased the expression of immune response g...

  19. How Does Natural Environment Affect American and Japanese Ways of Expressing Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    An essay compares Japanese and American language, reflecting on the fundamental culture-based differences between methods of communication in Japan and the United States. Japanese and Americans have different systems of logic and thought, attitudes, and ways of expressing themselves, all of which are affected by their respective background…

  20. Soybean oil increases SERCA2a expression and left ventricular contractility in rats without change in arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our aim was to evaluate the effects of soybean oil treatment for 15 days on arterial and ventricular pressure, myocardial mechanics and proteins involved in calcium handling. Methods Wistar rats were divided in two groups receiving 100 μL of soybean oil (SB) or saline (CT) i.m. for 15 days. Ventricular performance was analyzed in male 12-weeks old Wistar rats by measuring left ventricle diastolic and systolic pressure in isolated perfused hearts according to the Langendorff technique. Protein expression was measured by Western blot analysis. Results Systolic and diastolic arterial pressures did not differ between CT and SB rats. However, heart rate was reduced in the SB group. In the perfused hearts, left ventricular isovolumetric systolic pressure was higher in the SB hearts. The inotropic response to extracellular Ca2+ and isoproterenol was higher in the soybean-treated animals than in the control group. Myosin ATPase and Na+-K+ATPase activities, the expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump (SERCA2a) and sodium calcium exchanger (NCX) were increased in the SB group. Although the phosfolamban (PLB) expression did not change, its phosphorylation at Ser16 was reduced while the SERCA2a/PLB ratio was increased. Conclusions In summary, soybean treatment for 15 days in rats increases the left ventricular performance without affecting arterial blood pressure. These changes might be associated with an increase in the myosin ATPase activity and SERCA2a expression. PMID:20504316

  1. Does the Presence of Blood in the Catheter or the Degree of Difficulty of Embryo Transfer Affect Live Birth?

    PubMed

    Plowden, Torie C; Hill, Micah J; Miles, Shana M; Hoyt, Benjamin; Yauger, Belinda; Segars, James H; Csokmay, John M; Chason, Rebecca J

    2016-09-21

    The technique used for embryo transfer (ET) can affect implantation. Prior research that evaluated the effect of postprocedural blood of the transfer catheter tip have yielded mixed results, and it is unclear whether this is actually a marker of difficulty of the transfer. Our objective was to estimate the effect of blood at the time of ET and the difficulty of ET on live birth rates (LBR). This retrospective cohort study utilized generalized estimating equations (GEEs) with nesting for repeated cycles for all analyses. Univariate modeling was performed and a final multivariate (adjusted) GEE model accounted for all significant confounders. Embryo transfers were subjectively graded (easy, medium, or hard) by a physician at the time of transfer. The presence of blood at ET was associated with more difficult ETs, retained embryos, and presence of mucous in the catheter. In the univariate analysis, ET with blood was not associated with live birth, while the degree of difficulty for ET had a negative impact on LBR. In the final multivariate GEE model, which accounts for repeated cycles from a patient, the only factors associated with an increased LBR were the degree of difficulty of the ET, female age, and blastocyst transfer. After controlling for confounding variables, the presence of blood in the transfer catheter was not associated with the likelihood of pregnancy and thus was not an independent predictor of cycle outcome. This indicates that the difficulty of the transfer itself was a strong negative predictor of pregnancy.

  2. Predicting Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Blood-based Gene Expression Signatures and Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Il Bin; Kim, Seok Hyeon; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify a transcriptomic signature that could be used to classify subjects with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to controls on the basis of blood gene expression profiles. The gene expression profiles could ultimately be used as diagnostic biomarkers for ASD. Methods We used the published microarray data (GSE26415) from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included 21 young adults with ASD and 21 age- and sex-matched unaffected controls. Nineteen differentially expressed probes were identified from a training dataset (n=26, 13 ASD cases and 13 controls) using the limma package in R language (adjusted p value <0.05) and were further analyzed in a test dataset (n=16, 8 ASD cases and 8 controls) using machine learning algorithms. Results Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that subjects with ASD were relatively well-discriminated from controls. Based on the support vector machine and K-nearest neighbors analysis, validation of 19-DE probes with a test dataset resulted in an overall class prediction accuracy of 93.8% as well as a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusion The results of our exploratory study suggest that the gene expression profiles identified from the peripheral blood samples of young adults with ASD can be used to identify a biological signature for ASD. Further study using a larger cohort and more homogeneous datasets is required to improve the diagnostic accuracy. PMID:28138110

  3. Task difficulty and response complexity modulate affective priming by emotional facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Federica; Campoy, Guillermo; Castillo, Alejandro; Inuggi, Alberto; Fuentes, Luis J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we used an affective priming task to address the issue of whether the processing of emotional facial expressions occurs automatically independent of attention or attentional resources. Participants had to attend to the emotion expression of the prime face, or to a nonemotional feature of the prime face, the glasses. When participants attended to glasses (emotion unattended), they had to report whether the face wore glasses or not (the glasses easy condition) or whether the glasses were rounded or squared (the shape difficult condition). Affective priming, measured on valence decisions on target words, was mainly defined as interference from incongruent rather than facilitation from congruent trials. Significant priming effects were observed just in the emotion and glasses tasks but not in the shape task. When the key-response mapping increased in complexity, taxing working memory load, affective priming effects were reduced equally for the three types of tasks. Thus, attentional load and working memory load affected additively to the observed reduction in affective priming. These results cast some doubts on the automaticity of processing emotional facial expressions.

  4. Cell-type specific gene expression profiles of leukocytes in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Chana; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A; Brown, Patrick O

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood is a complex tissue comprising numerous cell types with distinct functions and corresponding gene expression profiles. We attempted to define the cell type specific gene expression patterns for the major constituent cells of blood, including B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, lymphocytes and granulocytes. We did this by comparing the global gene expression profiles of purified B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, granulocytes, and lymphocytes using cDNA microarrays. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that similar cell populations from different donors share common gene expression profiles. Supervised analyses identified gene expression signatures for B-cells (427 genes), T-cells (222 genes), CD8+ T-cells (23 genes), granulocytes (411 genes), and lymphocytes (67 genes). No statistically significant gene expression signature was identified for CD4+ cells. Genes encoding cell surface proteins were disproportionately represented among the genes that distinguished among the lymphocyte subpopulations. Lymphocytes were distinguishable from granulocytes based on their higher levels of expression of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, while granulocytes exhibited characteristic expression of various cell surface and inflammatory proteins. Conclusion The genes comprising the cell-type specific signatures encompassed many of the genes already known to be involved in cell-type specific processes, and provided clues that may prove useful in discovering the functions of many still unannotated genes. The most prominent feature of the cell type signature genes was the enrichment of genes encoding cell surface proteins, perhaps reflecting the importance of specialized systems for sensing the environment to the physiology of resting leukocytes. PMID:16704732

  5. Hypothyroidism affects D2 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2014-03-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age-matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a peripheral D2 receptor agonist), increased oxygen consumption and body temperature in awake air-exposed hypothyroid female hamsters and stimulated their ventilation before and following exposure to hypoxia. Carmoxirole depressed frequency of breathing in euthyroid hamsters prior to, during and following hypoxia exposures and stimulated it in the hypothyroid hamsters following hypoxia. Although hypothyroidism did not affect expression of D2 receptors, it influenced central D2 modulation of breathing in a disparate manner relative to euthyroid hamsters.

  6. AP-2α-dependent regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression affects apoptosis in the trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Jia, Liting; Cui, Shihong; Shi, Ying; Chang, Aimin; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Zhan

    2012-12-01

    Enhanced apoptosis of the cytotrophoblast in early pregnancy is associated with a high risk of preeclampsia. We and others have previously reported that the transcriptional factor, activator protein AP-2α, suppressed trophoblast migration and invasion. However, it is not clear whether AP-2α affects apoptosis in trophoblast cells and whether it regulates expression of apoptosis-related factors Bcl-2 and Bax. We analyzed the expression of AP-2α, Bcl-2 and Bax in placental tissues in severe preeclamptic pregnancies and normotensive pregnancies using immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Further, apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometric analysis in the human trophoblastic cell line, BeWo cells, in which AP-2α expression was transiently overexpressed or down-regulated by siRNA. There was significantly higher expression of AP-2α and Bax, but lower expression of Bcl-2 in severe preeclampsia placentas as compared to the control placentas. Overexpression of AP-2α in BeWo cells led to an increased rate of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was decreased when AP-2α expression was reduced. Furthermore, overexpression of AP-2α increased Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2 expression, whereas down-regulation of AP-2α expression resulted in a decrease in Bax expression and an increase in Bcl-2 expression. AP-2α regulates expression of Bcl-2 and Bax and apoptosis in BeWo cells. These results suggest that AP-2α-mediated regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax regulation influences apoptosis which in turn leads to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  7. Expression and function of COX isoforms in renal medulla: evidence for regulation of salt sensitivity and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenling; Zhang, Hui; Hillas, Elaine; Kohan, Donald E; Miller, R Lance; Nelson, Raoul D; Honeggar, Matthew; Yang, Tianxin

    2006-02-01

    Expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, but not COX-1, in the renal medulla is stimulated by chronic salt loading; yet the functional implication of this phenomenon is incompletely understood. The present study examined the cellular localization and antihypertensive function of high-salt-induced COX-2 expression in the renal medulla, with a parallel assessment of the function of COX-1. COX-2 protein expression in response to high-salt loading, assessed by immunostaining, was found predominantly in inner medullary interstitial cells, whereas COX-1 protein was abundant in collecting duct (CD) and inner medullary interstitial cells and was not affected by high salt. We compared mRNA expressions of COX-1 and COX-2 in CD vs. non-CD cells isolated from aquaporin 2-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. A low level of COX-2 mRNA, but a high level of COX-1 mRNA, as determined by real-time RT-PCR, was detected in CD compared with non-CD segments. During high-salt intake, chronic infusions of the COX-2 blocker NS-398 and the COX-1 blocker SC-560 into the renal medulla of Sprague-Dawley rats for 5 days induced approximately 30- and 15-mmHg increases in mean arterial pressure, respectively. During similar high-salt intake, COX-1 knockout mice exhibited a gradual, but significant, increase in systolic blood pressure that was associated with a marked suppression of urinary PGE2 excretion. Therefore, we conclude that the two COX isoforms in the renal medulla play a similar role in the stabilization of arterial blood pressure during salt loading.

  8. Cytokine expression in cord blood cells of children of healthy and allergic mothers.

    PubMed

    Hrdý, J; Zanvit, P; Novotná, O; Kocourková, I; Zižka, J; Prokešová, L

    2010-09-01

    To determine some early signs connected with the increased risk of future allergy development, gene expression and production of selected cytokines were tested in children of allergic mothers and compared with newborns of healthy mothers. Expression of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, TGF-β and EGF was tested in cord blood cells using real-time PCR and production of these cytokines was evaluated in cord sera by ELISA. Gene expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-1β, TNF-α and TGF-β was decreased and that of IL-10, IL-13 and EGF increased in children of allergic mothers in comparison with those of healthy mothers. Significant differences in sera of healthy and allergic groups were only in IL-10 and EGF. Different relationship among serum cytokine levels reflects the fact that the cytokines are not produced only by blood cells. Significantly decreased production of EGF in newborns of allergic mothers could negatively influence maturation of mucosal membranes of these children and support thus their easier allergization. Allergic phenotype pointing to the bias to T(H)2 response and to possibly impaired intestine maturation was apparent already on the level of cord blood and could serve as a predictive sign of increased allergy risk.

  9. Full-length dysferlin expression driven by engineered human dystrophic blood derived CD133+ stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Navarro, Claire; Sitzia, Clementina; Farini, Andrea; Montani, Erica; Wein, Nicolas; Razini, Paola; Beley, Cyriaque; Cassinelli, Letizia; Parolini, Daniele; Belicchi, Marzia; Parazzoli, Dario; Garcia, Luis; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-12-01

    The protein dysferlin is abundantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles, where its main function is membrane repair. Mutations in the dysferlin gene are involved in two autosomal recessive muscular dystrophies: Miyoshi myopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B. Development of effective therapies remains a great challenge. Strategies to repair the dysferlin gene by skipping mutated exons, using antisense oligonucleotides (AONs), may be suitable only for a subset of mutations, while cell and gene therapy can be extended to all mutations. AON-treated blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from patients with Miyoshi myopathy led to partial dysferlin reconstitution in vitro but failed to express dysferlin after intramuscular transplantation into scid/blAJ dysferlin null mice. We thus extended these experiments producing the full-length dysferlin mediated by a lentiviral vector in blood-derived CD133+ stem cells isolated from the same patients. Transplantation of engineered blood-derived CD133+ stem cells into scid/blAJ mice resulted in sufficient dysferlin expression to correct functional deficits in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Our data suggest for the first time that lentivirus-mediated delivery of full-length dysferlin in stem cells isolated from Miyoshi myopathy patients could represent an alternative therapeutic approach for treatment of dysferlinopathies.

  10. Blood-Based Gene Expression Signatures of Autistic Infants and Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, Stephen J.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Winn, Mary; Chandler, Sharon D.; Collins, Melanie; Lopez, Linda; Weinfeld, Melanie; Carter, Cindy; Schork, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Objective Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that onset clinically during the first years of life. ASD-risk biomarkers expressed early in life could significantly impact diagnosis and treatment, but no transcriptome-wide biomarker classifiers derived from fresh blood samples from children with autism have yet emerged. Method Using a community-based, prospective, longitudinal method, we identified 60 infants and toddlers at-risk for ASDs (autistic disorder and pervasive developmental disorder), 34 at-risk for language delay (LD), 17 at-risk for global developmental delay (DD), and 68 typically developing (TD) comparison children. Diagnoses were confirmed via longitudinal follow-up. Each child's mRNA expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was determined by microarray. Results Potential ASD biomarkers were discovered in one half of the sample and used to build a classifier with high diagnostic accuracy in the remaining half of the sample. Conclusions The mRNA expression abnormalities reliably observed in PBMCs, which are safely and easily assayed in babies, offer the first potential peripheral blood-based early biomarker panel of risk for autism in infants and toddlers. Future work should verify these biomarkers and evaluate if they may also serve as indirect indices of deviant molecular neural mechanisms in autism. PMID:22917206

  11. Differential expression of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) cannabinoid receptor protein by human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Kiertscher, Sylvia M; Roth, Jeffrey D; Roth, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    mRNA encoding for the CB(2) cannabinoid receptor is expressed by many subsets of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), but little is known about the resulting protein expression and function. Employing clones from the A549 and 293T cell lines that were constructed to express both full-length human CB(2) and GFP, we developed a flow cytometry assay for characterizing CB(2) protein expression. A monoclonal antibody directed against human CB(2) selectively stained the surface of transduced but not parental cell lines. When cells were fixed and permeabilized, imaging flow cytometry identified large stores of intracellular protein. Total cellular staining for CB(2) corresponded closely with the level of GFP expression. When exposed to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, CB(2)-expressing cells internalized cell surface CB(2) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Applying these approaches to human PBL, CB(2) protein was identified on the surface of human B cells but not on T cells or monocytes. In contrast, when PBL were fixed and permeabilized, intracellular CB(2) expression was readily detected in all three subsets by both conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Similar to the protein expression pattern observed in fixed and permeabilized PBL, purified B cells, T cells, and monocytes expressed relatively equal levels of CB(2) mRNA by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our findings confirm that human PBL express CB(2) protein but that its distribution is predominantly intracellular with only B cells expressing CB(2) protein at the extracellular membrane. The differential role of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) receptors in mediating ligand signaling and immune function remains to be determined.

  12. Megakaryocytes and platelets express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors but nicotine does not affect megakaryopoiesis or platelet function.

    PubMed

    Schedel, Angelika; Kaiser, Kerstin; Uhlig, Stefanie; Lorenz, Florian; Sarin, Anip; Starigk, Julian; Hassmann, Dennis; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In our previous investigations we have shown that platelets and their precursors express nicotinic α7 acetylcholine receptors (nAChRα7) that are involved in platelet function and in vitro differentiation of the megakaryoblastic cell line MEG-01. In this study, we were interested in the expression analysis of additional nAChR and the effects of nicotine in an ex vivo model using megakaryocytic cells differentiated from cord blood derived CD34(+) cells (CBMK) and an in vivo model using blood samples from smokers. CBMK were differentiated with thrombopoietin (TPO) for up to 17 days. Quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and flow cytometry were used to investigate nAChR expression (nAChRα7, nAChRα4, nAChRβ2) and nicotine effects. In blood samples of 15 nonsmokers and 16 smokers platelet parameters (count, mean platelet volume--MPV and platelet distribution width--PDW) were determined as indicators for changes of in vivo megakaryopoiesis. Platelet function was determined by the use of whole blood aggregometry and flow cytometry. The functional role of nAChR was evaluated using specific antagonists in aggregometry. CHRNA7, CHRNA4 and CHRNB2 gene transcripts and the corresponding proteins could be identified in CBMK during all stages of differentiation. Platelets contain nAChRα7 and nAChRβ2 but not nAChRα4. Nicotine had no effect on TPO-induced differentiation of CBMK. There was no significant difference in all platelet parameters of the smokers compared to the nonsmokers. In line with this, cholinergic gene transcripts as well as the encoded proteins were equally expressed in both the study groups. Despite our observation of nAChR expression in megakaryopoiesis and platelets, we were not able to detect effects of nicotine in our ex vivo and in vivo models. Thus, the functional role of the nAChR in these cells remains open.

  13. Sex differences in the perception of affective facial expressions: do men really lack emotional sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Montagne, Barbara; Kessels, Roy P C; Frigerio, Elisa; de Haan, Edward H F; Perrett, David I

    2005-06-01

    There is evidence that men and women display differences in both cognitive and affective functions. Recent studies have examined the processing of emotions in males and females. However, the findings are inconclusive, possibly the result of methodological differences. The aim of this study was to investigate the perception of emotional facial expressions in men and women. Video clips of neutral faces, gradually morphing into full-blown expressions were used. By doing this, we were able to examine both the accuracy and the sensitivity in labelling emotional facial expressions. Furthermore, all participants completed an anxiety and a depression rating scale. Research participants were 40 female students and 28 male students. Results revealed that men were less accurate, as well as less sensitive in labelling facial expressions. Thus, men show an overall worse performance compared to women on a task measuring the processing of emotional faces. This result is discussed in relation to recent findings.

  14. The Child Affective Facial Expression (CAFE) set: validity and reliability from untrained adults

    PubMed Central

    LoBue, Vanessa; Thrasher, Cat

    2014-01-01

    Emotional development is one of the largest and most productive areas of psychological research. For decades, researchers have been fascinated by how humans respond to, detect, and interpret emotional facial expressions. Much of the research in this area has relied on controlled stimulus sets of adults posing various facial expressions. Here we introduce a new stimulus set of emotional facial expressions into the domain of research on emotional development—The Child Affective Facial Expression set (CAFE). The CAFE set features photographs of a racially and ethnically diverse group of 2- to 8-year-old children posing for six emotional facial expressions—angry, fearful, sad, happy, surprised, and disgusted—and a neutral face. In the current work, we describe the set and report validity and reliability data on the set from 100 untrained adult participants. PMID:25610415

  15. The CJIE1 prophage of Campylobacter jejuni affects protein expression in growth media with and without bile salts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The presence of Campylobacter jejuni temperate bacteriophages has increasingly been associated with specific biological effects. It has recently been demonstrated that the presence of the prophage CJIE1 is associated with increased adherence and invasion of C. jejuni isolates in cell culture assays. Results Quantitative comparative proteomics experiments were undertaken using three closely related isolates with CJIE1 and one isolate without CJIE1 to determine whether there was a corresponding difference in protein expression levels. Initial experiments indicated that about 2% of the total proteins characterized were expressed at different levels in isolates with or without the prophage. Some of these proteins regulated by the presence of CJIE1 were associated with virulence or regulatory functions. Additional experiments were conducted using C. jejuni isolates with and without CJIE1 grown on four different media: Mueller Hinton (MH) media containing blood; MH media containing 0.1% sodium deoxycholate, which is thought to result in increased expression of virulence proteins; MH media containing 2.5% Oxgall; and MHwithout additives. These experiments provided further evidence that CJIE1 affected protein expression, including virulence-associated proteins. They also demonstrated a general bile response involving a majority of the proteome and clearly showed the induction of almost all proteins known to be involved with iron acquisition. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000798, PXD000799, PXD000800, and PXD000801. Conclusion The presence of the CJIE1 prophage was associated with differences in protein expression levels under different conditions. Further work is required to determine what genes are involved in causing this phenomenon. PMID:24641125

  16. Do GSM 900MHz signals affect cerebral blood circulation? A near-infrared spectrophotometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Martin; Haensse, Daniel; Morren, Geert; Froehlich, Juerg

    2006-06-01

    Effects of GSM 900MHz signals (EMF) typical for a handheld mobile phone on the cerebral blood circulation were investigated using near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) in a three armed (12W/kg, 1.2W/kg, sham), double blind, randomized crossover trial in 16 healthy volunteers. During exposure we observed borderline significant short term responses of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration, which correspond to a decrease of cerebral blood flow and volume and were smaller than regular physiological changes. Due to the relatively high number of statistical tests, these responses may be spurious and require further studies. There was no detectable dose-response relation or long term response within 20min. The detection limit was a fraction of the regular physiological changes elicited by functional activation. Compared to previous studies using PET, NIRS provides a much higher time resolution, which allowed investigating the short term effects efficiently, noninvasively, without the use of radioactive tracers and with high sensitivity.

  17. Novel Genes Affecting Blood Pressure Detected Via Gene-Based Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Mo, Xing-Bo; Xu, Tan; Bu, Xiao-Qing; Lei, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder and one of the most important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to identify more novel genes for blood pressure. Based on the publically available SNP-based P values of a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies, we performed an initial gene-based association study in a total of 69,395 individuals. To find supplementary evidence to support the importance of the identified genes, we performed GRAIL (gene relationships among implicated loci) analysis, protein–protein interaction analysis, functional annotation clustering analysis, coronary artery disease association analysis, and other bioinformatics analyses. Approximately 22,129 genes on the human genome were analyzed for blood pressure in gene-based association analysis. A total of 43 genes were statistically significant after Bonferroni correction (P < 2.3×10−6). The evidence obtained from the analyses of this study suggested the importance of ID1 (P = 2.0×10−6), CYP17A1 (P = 4.58×10−9), ATXN2 (P = 1.07×10−13), CLCN6 (P = 4.79×10−9), FURIN (P = 1.38×10−6), HECTD4 (P = 3.95×10−11), NPPA (P = 1.60×10−6), and PTPN11 (P = 8.89×10−10) in the genetic basis of blood pressure. The present study found some important genes associated with blood pressure, which might provide insights into the genetic architecture of hypertension. PMID:25820152

  18. Hypercholesterolemia screening. Does knowledge of blood cholesterol level affect dietary fat intake?

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, M.; Godin, G.; Vézina, L.; Maziade, J.; Desharnais, R.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether knowing blood cholesterol test results influences people's intention to lower their dietary fat intake and to assess changes in diet after 3 months. DESIGN: Randomized clinical study. SETTING: Two hospital-based family medicine centres. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 526 patients aged 18 to 65, without prior knowledge of their blood cholesterol levels, were recruited. Seventy did not appear for their appointments, and 37 did not meet study criteria, leaving 419 participants. From that group, 391 completed the study. INTERVENTIONS: Patients submitted to cholesterol screening were randomly assigned to one of two groups, completing the study questionnaires either before (control group) or after (experimental group) being informed of their screening test results. All participants were called 3 months after transmission of test results to assess their dietary fat intake at that time. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Differences in intention to adopt a low-fat diet reported between the experimental and control groups and differences in dietary fat intake modification after 3 months between patients with normal and abnormal blood cholesterol test results. RESULTS: Knowledge of test results influenced patients' intentions to adopt low-fat diets (F1,417 = 5.4, P = .02). Patients reported lower mean dietary fat intake after 3 months than at baseline (P < .0001). The reduction was greater in patients with abnormal screening results (F2,388 = 3.6, P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: Being informed of personal blood cholesterol levels effects an immediate change in eating habits that translates into reduced dietary fat intake. PMID:9640523

  19. When emotions are expressed figuratively: Psycholinguistic and Affective Norms of 619 Idioms for German (PANIG).

    PubMed

    Citron, Francesca M M; Cacciari, Cristina; Kucharski, Michael; Beck, Luna; Conrad, Markus; Jacobs, Arthur M

    2016-03-01

    Despite flourishing research on the relationship between emotion and literal language, and despite the pervasiveness of figurative expressions in communication, the role of figurative language in conveying affect has been underinvestigated. This study provides affective and psycholinguistic norms for 619 German idiomatic expressions and explores the relationships between affective and psycholinguistic idiom properties. German native speakers rated each idiom for emotional valence, arousal, familiarity, semantic transparency, figurativeness, and concreteness. They also described the figurative meaning of each idiom and rated how confident they were about the attributed meaning. The results showed that idioms rated high in valence were also rated high in arousal. Negative idioms were rated as more arousing than positive ones, in line with results from single words. Furthermore, arousal correlated positively with figurativeness (supporting the idea that figurative expressions are more emotionally engaging than literal expressions) and with concreteness and semantic transparency. This suggests that idioms may convey a more direct reference to sensory representations, mediated by the meanings of their constituting words. Arousal correlated positively with familiarity. In addition, positive idioms were rated as more familiar than negative idioms. Finally, idioms without a literal counterpart were rated as more emotionally valenced and arousing than idioms with a literal counterpart. Although the meanings of ambiguous idioms were less correctly defined than those of unambiguous idioms, ambiguous idioms were rated as more concrete than unambiguous ones. We also discuss the relationships between the various psycholinguistic variables characterizing idioms, with reference to the literature on idiom structure and processing.

  20. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people's perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness) from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects' personality (the Big Five Inventory), empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index) and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs' emotional facial expressions.

  1. Human Empathy, Personality and Experience Affect the Emotion Ratings of Dog and Human Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kujala, Miiamaaria V.; Somppi, Sanni; Jokela, Markus; Vainio, Outi; Parkkonen, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Facial expressions are important for humans in communicating emotions to the conspecifics and enhancing interpersonal understanding. Many muscles producing facial expressions in humans are also found in domestic dogs, but little is known about how humans perceive dog facial expressions, and which psychological factors influence people’s perceptions. Here, we asked 34 observers to rate the valence, arousal, and the six basic emotions (happiness, sadness, surprise, disgust, fear, and anger/aggressiveness) from images of human and dog faces with Pleasant, Neutral and Threatening expressions. We investigated how the subjects’ personality (the Big Five Inventory), empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index) and experience of dog behavior affect the ratings of dog and human faces. Ratings of both species followed similar general patterns: human subjects classified dog facial expressions from pleasant to threatening very similarly to human facial expressions. Subjects with higher emotional empathy evaluated Threatening faces of both species as more negative in valence and higher in anger/aggressiveness. More empathetic subjects also rated the happiness of Pleasant humans but not dogs higher, and they were quicker in their valence judgments of Pleasant human, Threatening human and Threatening dog faces. Experience with dogs correlated positively with ratings of Pleasant and Neutral dog faces. Personality also had a minor effect on the ratings of Pleasant and Neutral faces in both species. The results imply that humans perceive human and dog facial expression in a similar manner, and the perception of both species is influenced by psychological factors of the evaluators. Especially empathy affects both the speed and intensity of rating dogs’ emotional facial expressions. PMID:28114335

  2. Predictive Blood Chemistry Parameters for Pansteatitis-Affected Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Cantu, Theresa M; Chapman, Robert W; Somerville, Stephen E; Guillette, Matthew P; Botha, Hannes; Hoffman, Andre; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J; Smit, Willem J; Lebepe, Jeffrey; Myburgh, Jan; Govender, Danny; Tucker, Jonathan; Boggs, Ashley S P; Guillette, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest river systems in South Africa, the Olifants River, has experienced significant changes in water quality due to anthropogenic activities. Since 2005, there have been various "outbreaks" of the inflammatory disease pansteatitis in several vertebrate species. Large-scale pansteatitis-related mortality events have decimated the crocodile population at Lake Loskop and decreased the population at Kruger National Park. Most pansteatitis-related diagnoses within the region are conducted post-mortem by either gross pathology or histology. The application of a non-lethal approach to assess the prevalence and pervasiveness of pansteatitis in the Olifants River region would be of great importance for the development of a management plan for this disease. In this study, several plasma-based biomarkers accurately classified pansteatitis in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) collected from Lake Loskop using a commercially available benchtop blood chemistry analyzer combined with data interpretation via artificial neural network analysis. According to the model, four blood chemistry parameters (calcium, sodium, total protein and albumin), in combination with total length, diagnose pansteatitis to a predictive accuracy of 92 percent. In addition, several morphometric traits (total length, age, weight) were also associated with pansteatitis. On-going research will focus on further evaluating the use of blood chemistry to classify pansteatitis across different species, trophic levels, and within different sites along the Olifants River.

  3. Factors affecting drug and gene delivery: effects of interaction with blood components.

    PubMed

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems have been used extensively to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic activities of a wide variety of drugs and genes. In this article, we summarize the factors determining the tissue disposition of delivery systems: the physicochemical and biological characteristics of the delivery system and the anatomic and physiological characteristics of the tissues. There are several modes of drug and gene targeting, ranging from passive to active targeting, and each of these can be achieved by optimizing the design of the delivery system to suit a specific aim. After entering the systemic circulation, either by an intravascular injection or through absorption from an administration site, however, a delivery system encounters a variety of blood components, including blood cells and a range of serum proteins. These components are by no means inert as far as interaction with the delivery system is concerned, and they can sometimes markedly effect its tissue disposition. The interaction with blood components is known to occur with particulate delivery systems, such as liposomes, or with cationic charge-mediated delivery systems for genes. In addition to these rather nonspecific ones, interactions via the targeting ligand of the delivery system can occur. We recently found that mannosylated carriers interact with serum mannan binding protein, greatly altering their tissue disposition in a number of ways that depend on the properties of the carriers involved.

  4. Predictive Blood Chemistry Parameters for Pansteatitis-Affected Mozambique Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Robert W.; Somerville, Stephen E.; Guillette, Matthew P.; Botha, Hannes; Hoffman, Andre; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J.; Smit, Willem J.; Lebepe, Jeffrey; Myburgh, Jan; Govender, Danny; Tucker, Jonathan; Boggs, Ashley S. P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest river systems in South Africa, the Olifants River, has experienced significant changes in water quality due to anthropogenic activities. Since 2005, there have been various “outbreaks” of the inflammatory disease pansteatitis in several vertebrate species. Large-scale pansteatitis-related mortality events have decimated the crocodile population at Lake Loskop and decreased the population at Kruger National Park. Most pansteatitis-related diagnoses within the region are conducted post-mortem by either gross pathology or histology. The application of a non-lethal approach to assess the prevalence and pervasiveness of pansteatitis in the Olifants River region would be of great importance for the development of a management plan for this disease. In this study, several plasma-based biomarkers accurately classified pansteatitis in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) collected from Lake Loskop using a commercially available benchtop blood chemistry analyzer combined with data interpretation via artificial neural network analysis. According to the model, four blood chemistry parameters (calcium, sodium, total protein and albumin), in combination with total length, diagnose pansteatitis to a predictive accuracy of 92 percent. In addition, several morphometric traits (total length, age, weight) were also associated with pansteatitis. On-going research will focus on further evaluating the use of blood chemistry to classify pansteatitis across different species, trophic levels, and within different sites along the Olifants River. PMID:27115488

  5. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood cells: new insights into Ewing sarcoma biology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Przybyl, Joanna; Kozak, Katarzyna; Kosela, Hanna; Falkowski, Slawomir; Switaj, Tomasz; Lugowska, Iwona; Szumera-Cieckiewicz, Anna; Ptaszynski, Konrad; Grygalewicz, Beata; Chechlinska, Magdalena; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Siedlecki, Janusz A; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a group of highly aggressive small round cell tumors of bone or soft tissue with high metastatic potential and low cure rate. ES tumors are associated with a rapid osteolysis and necrosis. The currently accepted clinical prognostic parameters do not accurately predict survival of high-risk patients. Moreover, neither the subtype of EWS-FLI1/ERG in the tumor, nor the detection of fusion transcripts in the peripheral blood (PB) samples, has prognostic value in ES patients. We evaluated the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in 34 adult ES patients. Since CTCs were confirmed in only small subset of patients, we further explored the expression profiles of PB leukocytes using a panel of genes associated with immune system status and increased tumor invasiveness. Moreover, we analyzed the alterations of the routine blood tests in the examined cohort of patients and correlated our findings with the clinical outcome. A uniform decrease in ZAP70 expression in PB cells among all ES patients, as compared to healthy individuals, was observed. Monocytosis and the abnormal expression of CDH2 and CDT2 genes in the PB cells significantly correlated with poor prognosis in ES patients. Our study supports the previously proposed hypothesis of systemic nature of ES. Based on the PB cell expression profiles, we propose a mechanism by which immune system may be involved in intensification of osteoclastogenesis and disease progression in ES patients. Moreover, we demonstrate the prognostic value of molecular PB testing at the time of routine histopathological diagnosis.

  6. Drinking Water Sodium and Elevated Blood Pressure of Healthy Pregnant Women in Salinity-Affected Coastal Areas.

    PubMed

    Scheelbeek, Pauline F D; Khan, Aneire E; Mojumder, Sontosh; Elliott, Paul; Vineis, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Coastal areas in Southeast Asia are experiencing high sodium concentrations in drinking water sources that are commonly consumed by local populations. Salinity problems caused by episodic cyclones and subsequent seawater inundations are likely (partly) related to climate change and further exacerbated by changes in upstream river flow and local land-use activities. Dietary (food) sodium plays an important role in the global burden of hypertensive disease. It remains unknown, however, if sodium in drinking water-rather than food-has similar effects on blood pressure and disease risk. In this study, we examined the effect of drinking water sodium on blood pressure of pregnant women: increases in blood pressure in this group could severely affect maternal and fetal health. Data on blood pressure, drinking water source, and personal, lifestyle, and environmental confounders was obtained from 701 normotensive pregnant women residing in coastal Bangladesh. Generalized linear mixed regression models were used to investigate association of systolic and diastolic blood pressure of these-otherwise healthy-women with their water source. After adjustment for confounders, drinkers of tube well and pond water (high saline sources) were found to have significantly higher average systolic (+4.85 and +3.62 mm Hg) and diastolic (+2.30 and +1.72 mm Hg) blood pressures than rainwater drinkers. Drinking water salinity problems are expected to exacerbate in the future, putting millions of coastal people-including pregnant women-at increased risk of hypertension and associated diseases. There is an urgent need to further explore the health risks associated to this understudied environmental health problem and feasibility of possible adaptation strategies.

  7. Understanding How Space Travel Affects Blood Vessels: Arterial Remodeling and Functional Adaptations Induced by Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, Michael; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ever rise quickly from the couch to get something from the kitchen and suddenly feel dizzy? With a low heart rate and relaxed muscles, the cardiovascular system does not immediately provide the resistance necessary to keep enough blood going to your head. Gravity wins, at least for a short time, before your heart and blood vessels can respond to the sudden change in position and correct the situation. Actually, the human cardiovascular system is quite well adapted to the constant gravitational force of the Earth. When standing, vessels in the legs constrict to prevent blood from collecting in the lower extremities. In the space environment, the usual head-to-foot blood pressure and tissue fluid gradients that exist during the upright posture on Earth are removed. The subsequent shift in fluids from the lower to the upper portions of the body triggers adaptations within the cardiovascular system to accommodate the new pressure and fluid gradients. In animal models that simulate microgravity, the vessels in the head become more robust while those in the lower limbs become thin and lax. Similar changes may also occur in humans during spaceflight and while these adaptations are appropriate for a microgravity environment, they can cause problems when the astronauts return to Earth or perhaps another planet. Astronauts often develop orthostatic intolerance which means they become dizzy or faint when standing upright. This dizziness can persist for a number of days making routine activities difficult. In an effort to understand the physiological details of these cardiovascular adaptations, Dr. Michael Delp at Texas A&M University, uses the rat as a model for his studies. For the experiment flown on STS-107, he will test the hypothesis that blood vessels in the rats' hindlimbs become thinner, weaker, and constrict less in response to pressure changes and to chemical signals when exposed to microgravity. In addition, he will test the hypothesis that arteries in the brain

  8. RADIATION-INDUCED MICRO-RNA EXPRESSION CHANGES IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD CELLS OF RADIOTHERAPY PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Templin, Thomas; Paul, Sunirmal; Amundson, Sally A.; Young, Erik F.; Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Smilenov, Lubomir B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding small RNAs that regulate gene expression, are involved in numerous physiologic processes in normal and malignant cells. Our in vivo study measured miRNA and gene expression changes in human blood cells in response to ionizing radiation, to develop miRNA signatures that can be used as biomarkers for radiation exposure. Methods and Materials Blood from 8 radiotherapy patients in complete remission 1 or 2 was collected immediately before and 4 hours after total body irradiation with 1.25 Gy x-rays. Both miRNA and gene expression changes were measured by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction and microarray hybridization, respectively. Hierarchic clustering, multidimensional scaling, class prediction, and gene ontology analysis were performed to investigate the potential of miRNAs to serve as radiation biomarkers and to elucidate their likely physiologic roles in the radiation response. Results The expression levels of 45 miRNAs were statistically significantly upregulated 4 hours after irradiation with 1.25 Gy x-rays, 27 of them in every patient. Nonirradiated and irradiated samples form separate clusters in hierarchic clustering and multidimensional scaling. Out of 223 differentially expressed genes, 37 were both down-regulated and predicted targets of the upregulated miRNAs. Paired and unpaired miRNA-based classifiers that we developed can predict the class membership of a sample with unknown irradiation status, with accuracies of 100% when all 45 upregulated miRNAs are included. Both miRNA control of and gene involvement in biologic processes such as hemopoiesis and the immune response are increased after irradiation, whereas metabolic processes are underrepresented among all differentially expressed genes and the genes controlled by miRNAs. Conclusions Exposure to ionizing radiation leads to the upregulation of the expression of a considerable proportion of the human miRNAome of peripheral blood cells

  9. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  10. Heparanase Overexpression Reduces Hepcidin Expression, Affects Iron Homeostasis and Alters the Response to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Asperti, Michela; Stuemler, Tanja; Poli, Maura; Gryzik, Magdalena; Lifshitz, Lena; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G.; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is the key regulator of systemic iron availability that acts by controlling the degradation of the iron exporter ferroportin. It is expressed mainly in the liver and regulated by iron, inflammation, erythropoiesis and hypoxia. The various agents that control its expression act mainly via the BMP6/SMAD signaling pathway. Among them are exogenous heparins, which are strong hepcidin repressors with a mechanism of action not fully understood but that may involve the competition with the structurally similar endogenous Heparan Sulfates (HS). To verify this hypothesis, we analyzed how the overexpression of heparanase, the HS degrading enzyme, modified hepcidin expression and iron homeostasis in hepatic cell lines and in transgenic mice. The results showed that transient and stable overexpression of heparanase in HepG2 cells caused a reduction of hepcidin expression and of SMAD5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, the clones showed also altered level of TfR1 and ferritin, indices of a modified iron homeostasis. The heparanase transgenic mice showed a low level of liver hepcidin, an increase of serum and liver iron with a decrease in spleen iron content. The hepcidin expression remained surprisingly low even after treatment with the inflammatory LPS. The finding that modification of HS structure mediated by heparanase overexpression affects hepcidin expression and iron homeostasis supports the hypothesis that HS participate in the mechanisms controlling hepcidin expression. PMID:27711215

  11. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-06

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  12. Dopamine Transporter Gene Variant Affecting Expression in Human Brain is Associated with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pinsonneault, Julia K; Han, Dawn D; Burdick, Katherine E; Kataki, Maria; Bertolino, Alessandro; Malhotra, Anil K; Gu, Howard H; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The gene encoding the dopamine transporter (DAT) has been implicated in CNS disorders, but the responsible polymorphisms remain uncertain. To search for regulatory polymorphisms, we measured allelic DAT mRNA expression in substantia nigra of human autopsy brain tissues, using two marker SNPs (rs6347 in exon 9 and rs27072 in the 3′-UTR). Allelic mRNA expression imbalance (AEI), an indicator of cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms, was observed in all tissues heterozygous for either of the two marker SNPs. SNP scanning of the DAT locus with AEI ratios as the phenotype, followed by in vitro molecular genetics studies, demonstrated that rs27072 C>T affects mRNA expression and translation. Expression of the minor T allele was dynamically regulated in transfected cell cultures, possibly involving microRNA interactions. Both rs6347 and rs3836790 (intron8 5/6 VNTR) also seemed to affect DAT expression, but not the commonly tested 9/10 VNTR in the 3′UTR (rs28363170). All four polymorphisms (rs6347, intron8 5/6 VNTR, rs27072 and 3′UTR 9/10 VNTR) were genotyped in clinical cohorts, representing schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and controls. Only rs27072 was significantly associated with bipolar disorder (OR=2.1, p=0.03). This result was replicated in a second bipolar/control population (OR=1.65, p=0.01), supporting a critical role for DAT regulation in bipolar disorder. PMID:21525861

  13. Leucine metabolism regulates TRI6 expression and affects deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Narayanan, Swara; Walkowiak, Sean; Wang, Li; Joshi, Manisha; Rocheleau, Hélène; Ouellet, Thérèse; Harris, Linda J

    2015-11-01

    TRI6 is a positive regulator of the trichothecene gene cluster and the production of trichothecene mycotoxins [deoxynivalenol (DON)] and acetylated forms such as 15-Acetyl-DON) in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. As a global transcriptional regulator, TRI6 expression is modulated by nitrogen-limiting conditions, sources of nitrogen and carbon, pH and light. However, the mechanism by which these diverse environmental factors affect TRI6 expression remains underexplored. In our effort to understand how nutrients affect TRI6 regulation, comparative digital expression profiling was performed with a wild-type F. graminearum and a Δtri6 mutant strain, grown in nutrient-rich conditions. Analysis showed that TRI6 negatively regulates genes of the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway. Feeding studies with deletion mutants of MCC, encoding methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase, one of the key enzymes of leucine metabolism, showed that addition of leucine specifically down-regulated TRI6 expression and reduced 15-ADON accumulation. Constitutive expression of TRI6 in the Δmcc mutant strain restored 15-ADON production. A combination of cellophane breach assays and pathogenicity experiments on wheat demonstrated that disrupting the leucine metabolic pathway significantly reduced disease. These findings suggest a complex interaction between one of the primary metabolic pathways with a global regulator of mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence in F. graminearum.

  14. Ectopic lymphokine gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.A.; Kang, Joonsoo; Hozumi, Nobumichi Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario )

    1992-02-01

    An animal model to study the effects of ectopic expression of cytokines involved in cell growth and differentiation has been established. Retrovirus vectors containing the human interleukin 6 cDNA were used to produce high titer virus-producing lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) were successfully infected with the retrovirus and engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The majority of the animals were engrafted with hPBLs, as determined by the presence of human glucose phosphate isomerase. Furthermore, six of seven mice engrafted with hPBLs infected with high titer virus and detectable hPBLs present in the spleen expressed the retroviral human interleukin 6 gene. Importantly, human interleukin 6 protein was expressed at physiologically significant levels in these mice. These results demonstrate that models for human disease and immunotherapy involving retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human cells can be developed in mice.

  15. Gene Expression Patterns in Peripheral Blood Leukocytes in Patients with Recurrent Ciguatera Fish Poisoning: Preliminary Studies.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Ungaro, Ricardo F; Baker, Henry V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Robertson, Alison; Abbott, Margaret; Roberts, Sparkle M; Grattan, Lynn M; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (ciguatera) is a common clinical syndrome in areas where there is dependence on tropical reef fish for food. A subset of patients develops recurrent and, in some instances, chronic symptoms, which may result in substantial disability. To identify possible biomarkers for recurrent/chronic disease, and to explore correlations with immune gene expression, peripheral blood leukocyte gene expression in 10 ciguatera patients (7 recurrent, 3 acute) from the U.S. Virgin Islands, and 5 unexposed Florida controls were evaluated. Significant differences in gene expression were noted when comparing ciguatera patients and controls; however, it was not possible to differentiate between patients with acute and recurrent disease, possibly due to the small sample sizes involved.

  16. A survey of affect recognition methods: audio, visual, and spontaneous expressions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhihong; Pantic, Maja; Roisman, Glenn I; Huang, Thomas S

    2009-01-01

    Automated analysis of human affective behavior has attracted increasing attention from researchers in psychology, computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, and related disciplines. However, the existing methods typically handle only deliberately displayed and exaggerated expressions of prototypical emotions despite the fact that deliberate behaviour differs in visual appearance, audio profile, and timing from spontaneously occurring behaviour. To address this problem, efforts to develop algorithms that can process naturally occurring human affective behaviour have recently emerged. Moreover, an increasing number of efforts are reported toward multimodal fusion for human affect analysis including audiovisual fusion, linguistic and paralinguistic fusion, and multi-cue visual fusion based on facial expressions, head movements, and body gestures. This paper introduces and surveys these recent advances. We first discuss human emotion perception from a psychological perspective. Next we examine available approaches to solving the problem of machine understanding of human affective behavior, and discuss important issues like the collection and availability of training and test data. We finally outline some of the scientific and engineering challenges to advancing human affect sensing technology.

  17. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene. PMID:28289142

  18. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-02-15

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene.

  19. Evaluation of CD11b expression on peripheral blood neutrophils for early detection of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Adib, Minoo; Ostadi, Vajiheh; Navaei, Fakhri; Saheb Fosoul, Fereshteh; Oreizi, Farzad; Shokouhi, Raheleh; Bakhshiani, Zahra

    2007-06-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a disease of infants who are less than 1 month of age. These infants are clinically ill, and their blood culture are positive for bacteria. The reported incidence of neonatal sepsis for all infants is 1 to 10 per 1000 live births. The mortality rate is 4.2-26%. The clinical signs are not specific and diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is one of the most difficult tasks in clinical medicine. The aim of this work was determination of CD11b sensitivity and specificity for early detection of neonatal sepsis. We studied 65 neonates with gestational age of 27 to 38 weeks who were suspected for sepsis within the 28 days of life. Whole blood was obtained from neonates to determine CD11b expression on peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. C-Reactive protein (CRP) was measured qualitatively. Neonates were divided into two groups. Classification was based on the result of the blood culture. In the sepsis group all of the neonates (n=8) showed positive blood culture and clinical symptoms. In the suspected group (n=57) the neonates showed clinical signs but blood cultures were negative. Sensitivity and specificity of CD11b were 75%, 100% respectively. Also positive and negative predictive values of CD11b were 100% and 86% respectively. Results of present study and previous studies showed that measurement of neutrophil surface markers can be useful for diagnosis of infection in the early phases. Also, the quantitative measurement of CRP in addition to CD11b further enhances the ability to diagnose infections and improves sensitivity and negative predictive value by 100%.

  20. Persistent alterations of gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from smokers.

    PubMed

    Weng, Daniel Y; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P; Loffredo, Christopher A; Shields, Peter G

    2016-10-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers' blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Persistent Alterations of Gene Expression Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Daniel Y.; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Shields, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers’ blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. PMID:26294040

  2. Expression of candidate genes associated with obesity in peripheral white blood cells of Mexican children

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa-Martínez, Marcela; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Murugesan, Selvasankar; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos; Cruz-Lopez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a chronic, complex, and multifactorial disease, characterized by excess body fat. Diverse studies of the human genome have led to the identification of susceptibility genes that contribute to obesity. However, relatively few studies have addressed specifically the association between the level of expression of these genes and obesity. Material and methods We studied 160 healthy and obese unrelated Mexican children aged 6 to 14 years. We measured the transcriptional expression of 20 genes associated with obesity, in addition to the biochemical parameters, in peripheral white blood cells. The detection of mRNA levels was performed using the OpenArray Real-Time PCR System (Applied Biosystems). Results Obese children exhibited higher values of fasting glucose (p = 0.034), fasting insulin (p = 0.004), low-density lipoprotein (p = 0.006), triglycerides (p < 0.001), systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.001), and lower values of high-density lipoprotein (p < 0.001) compared to lean children. Analysis of transcriptional expression data showed a difference for ADRB1 (p = 0.0297), ADIPOR1 (p = 0.0317), GHRL (p = 0.0060) and FTO (p = 0.0348) genes. Conclusions Our results suggest that changes in the expression level of the studied genes are involved in biological processes implicated in the development of childhood obesity. Our study contributes new perspectives for a better understanding of biological processes involved in obesity. The protocol was approved by the National Committee and Ethical Committee Board from the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) (IMSS FIS/IMSS/PRIO/10/011). PMID:27695486

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Early Pregnancy-Specific Genes Expressed in Peripheral Blood of Pregnant Sows

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shien; Shi, Wenqing; Hu, Maishun; Fu, Xiangwei; Wang, Chuduan; Wang, Yachun; Zhang, Qin; Yu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of pregnancy is important for effective management of an economical pig farm. Besides the currently available methods used in early diagnosis of sows, circulating nucleic acids in peripheral blood may contain some early pregnancy-specific molecular markers. For the first time, microarray analysis of peripheral blood from pregnant sows versus non-pregnant sows identified 127 up-regulated and 56 down-regulated genes at day 14 post-insemination. Gene Ontology annotation grouped the total differently expressed genes into 3 significantly enriched terms, cell surface receptor linked signal transduction, G-protein coupled receptor protein signaling pathway and regulation of vesicle-mediated transport. Signaling pathway analysis revealed the only one significantly changed pathway was arachidonic acid metabolism. Of the differently expressed genes, nine (including LPAR3, RXFP4, GALP, CBR1, CBR2, GPX6, USP18, LHB and NR5A1) were found to exert function related to early pregnancy processes. This study provides a clue that differentially abundant RNAs in maternal peripheral blood can help to identify the molecular markers of early pregnancy in pigs. PMID:25479131

  4. The effects of calpain inhibition upon IL-2 and CD25 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    2001-10-01

    Calcium is an important contributor to T cell activation; it is also the major factor in the activation of the calcium-activated neutral proteinase, calpain. For this reason, we wanted to investigate if calpain has a role in T cell activation and what aspects of this activation calpain affects. As measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), calpain inhibition decreased interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, at early time points following the initial activation, and over extended periods of time in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Using an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) specific for human IL-2, we found that calpain inhibition decreased IL-2 secretion in a dose-dependent manner, shortly after activation, and continuously over time. Inhibiting calpain caused a dose-dependent inhibition of CD25 cell surface expression and also inhibited expression shortly after activation and for at least 48 h. This study showed that calpain has an integral role in the synthesis of the two important T cell activation factors, IL-2 and CD25.

  5. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain gene expression by activated blood monocytes precedes the expression of the PDGF A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Martinet, Y.; Jaffe, H.A.; Yamauchi, K.; Betsholtz, C.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H.; Crystal, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    When activated, normal human blood monocytes are known to express the c-sis proto-oncogene coding for PDGF B-chain. Since normal human platelet PDGF molecules are dimers of A and B chains and platelets and monocytes are derived from the same marrow precursors, activated blood monocytes were simultaneously evaluated for their expression of PDGF A and B chain genes. Human blood monocytes were purified by adherence, cultured with or without activation by lipopolysaccharide and poly(A)+ RNA evaluated using Northern analysis and /sup 32/P-labeled A-chain and B-chain (human c-sis) probes. Unstimulated blood monocytes did not express either A-chain or B-chain genes. In contrast, activated monocytes expressed a 4.2 kb mRNA B-chain transcript at 4 hr, but the B-chain mRNA levels declined significantly over the next 18 hr. In comparison, activated monocytes expressed very little A-chain mRNA at 4 hr, but at 12 hr 1.9, 2.3, and 2.8 kb transcripts were observed and persisted through 24 hr. Thus, activation of blood monocytes is followed by PDGF B-chain gene expression preceding PDGF A-chain gene expression, suggesting a difference in the regulation of the expression of the genes for these two chains by these cells.

  6. Hydrogen-rich water affected blood alkalinity in physically active men.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Stojanovic, Marko D

    2014-01-01

    Possible appliance of effective and safe alkalizing agent in the treatment of metabolic acidosis could be of particular interest to humans experiencing an increase in plasma acidity, such as exercise-induced acidosis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the daily oral intake of 2L of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) for 14 days would increase arterial blood alkalinity at baseline and post-exercise as compared with the placebo. This study was a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 52 presumably healthy physically active male volunteers. Twenty-six participants received HRW and 26 a placebo (tap water) for 14 days. Arterial blood pH, partial pressure for carbon dioxide (pCO2), and bicarbonates were measured at baseline and postexercise at the start (day 0) and at the end of the intervention period (day 14). Intake of HRW significantly increased fasting arterial blood pH by 0.04 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.08; p < 0.001), and postexercise pH by 0.07 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.10; p = 0.03) after 14 days of intervention. Fasting bicarbonates were significantly higher in the HRW trial after the administration regimen as compared with the preadministration (30.5 ± 1.9 mEq/L vs. 28.3 ± 2.3 mEq/L; p < 0.0001). No volunteers withdrew before the end of the study, and no participant reported any vexatious side effects of supplementation. These results support the hypothesis that HRW administration is safe and may have an alkalizing effect in young physically active men.

  7. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  8. Sesame ingestion affects sex hormones, antioxidant status, and blood lipids in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Huey; Kang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Nai-Hung; Jou, Hei-Jen; Wang, Tzong-An

    2006-05-01

    Sesame ingestion has been shown to improve blood lipids in humans and antioxidative ability in animals. Sesamin, a sesame lignan, was recently reported to be converted by intestinal microflora to enterolactone, a compound with estrogenic activity and also an enterometabolite of flaxseed lignans, which are known to be phytoestrogens. Whether sesame can be a source of phytoestrogens is unknown. This study was designed to investigate the effect of sesame ingestion on blood sex hormones, lipids, tocopherol, and ex vivo LDL oxidation in postmenopausal women. Twenty-six healthy subjects attended, and 24 completed, this randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Half of them consumed 50 g sesame seed powder daily for 5 wk, followed by a 3-wk washout period, then a 5-wk 50-g rice powder placebo period. The other half received the 2 supplements in reverse order. After sesame treatment, plasma total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, the ratio of LDL-C to HDL-C, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in oxidized LDL, and serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate decreased significantly by 5, 10, 6, 23, and 18%, respectively. The ratio of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol to TC increased significantly by 18 and 73%, respectively. All of these variables differed significantly between the 2 treatments. Serum sex hormone-binding globulin and urinary 2-hydroxyestrone (n = 8) increased significantly by 15 and 72%, respectively, after sesame treatment, and these concentrations tended to differ (P = 0.065 and P = 0.090, respectively) from those after the placebo treatment. These results suggest that sesame ingestion benefits postmenopausal women by improving blood lipids, antioxidant status, and possibly sex hormone status.

  9. Early exposure to caffeine affects gene expression of adenosine receptors, DARPP-32 and BDNF without affecting sensibility and morphology of developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Nazario, Luiza Reali; Pohlmann, Julhana Bianchini; de Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Fazenda, Lidiane; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are the most important biochemical targets of caffeine, a common trimethylxanthine found in food and beverages. Adenosine plays modulatory action during the development through adenosine receptors and their intracellular pathways activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate if caffeine gave to zebrafish in the very first steps of development is able to affect its direct targets, through the adenosine receptors mRNA expression evaluation, and latter indirect targets, through evaluation of the pattern of dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression. Here, we demonstrate that zebrafish express adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A1, A2A2 and A2B) since 24h post-fertilization (hpf) and that caffeine exposure is able to affect the expression of these receptors. Caffeine exposure from 1 hpf is able to increase A1 expression at 72-96 hpf and A2A1 expression at 72 hpf. No alterations occurred in A2A2 and A2B expression after caffeine treatment. DARPP-32, a phosphoprotein involved in adenosine intracellular pathway is also expressed since 24 hpf and early exposure to caffeine increased DARPP-32 expression at 168 hpf. We also evaluate the expression of BDNF as one of the targets of adenosine intracellular pathway activation. BDNF was also expressed since 24 hpf and caffeine treatment increased its expression at 48 and 72 hpf. No morphological alterations induced by caffeine treatment were registered by the check of general body features and total body length. Assessment of tactile sensibility also demonstrated no alterations by caffeine treatment. Altogether, these results suggest that caffeine is able to affect expression of its cellular targets since early phases of development in zebrafish without affect visible features. The up-regulation of direct and indirect targets of caffeine presents as a compensatory mechanism of maintenance of adenosinergic modulation during the developmental phase.

  10. Fibroblast growth factor signaling affects vascular outgrowth and is required for the maintenance of blood vessel integrity.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Frederik; Tembuyser, Bieke; Lenard, Anna; Claes, Filip; Zhang, Jie; Michielsen, Christof; Van Schepdael, Ann; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Bono, Françoise; Affolter, Markus; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter

    2014-10-23

    Angiogenesis contributes to the development of numerous disorders. Even though fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were discovered as mediators of angiogenesis more than 30 years ago, their role in developmental angiogenesis still remains elusive. We use a recently described chemical probe, SSR128129E (SSR), that selectively inhibits the action of multiple FGF receptors (FGFRs), in combination with the zebrafish model to examine the role of FGF signaling in vascular development. We observe that while FGFR signaling is less important for vessel guidance, it affects vascular outgrowth and is especially required for the maintenance of blood vessel integrity by ensuring proper cell-cell junctions between endothelial cells. In conclusion, our work illustrates the power of a small molecule probe to reveal insights into blood vessel formation and stabilization and thus of broad interest to the vascular biology community.

  11. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Channel Expression on Peripheral Blood Leukocytes from Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients and Correlation with Pain and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Ione; Mendes, Saulo J. F.; Pereira, Domingos M. S.; Muniz, Thayanne F.; Colares, Valderlane L. P.; Monteiro, Cinara R. A. V.; Martins, Mahiba M. R. de S.; Grisotto, Marcos A. G.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Monteiro, Sílvio G.; Calixto, João B.; Brain, Susan D.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer from pain and joint disability. The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel expressed on sensory neurones and non-neuronal cells mediates pain transduction and inflammation and it has been implicated in RA. However, there is little information on the contribution of TRPA1 for human disease. Here, we investigated the expression of TRPA1 on peripheral blood leukocytes and the circulating levels of its endogenous activators 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in RA patients treated or not with the anti-rheumatic leflunomide (LFN) or the anti-TNFα adalimumab (ADA). We also assessed whether TRPA1 expression correlates with joint pain and disability, in addition to the immune changes in RA. TRPA1 expression on peripheral blood leukocytes correlated with pain severity and disability. TRPA1 levels on these cells were associated with the numbers of polymorphonuclear and the activation of CD14+ cells. No correlations were found between the lymphocyte population and TRPA1 expression, pain or disability. Patients recently diagnosed with RA expressed increased levels of TRPA1 on their leukocytes whilst treatment with either LFN or ADA down-regulated this receptor probably by reducing the numbers of polymorphonuclears and the activation of CD14+ cells. We suggest that the activation levels of CD14+ cells, the numbers of PMNs in the peripheral blood and the expression of TRPA1 on peripheral blood leukocytes correlate with RA progression, affecting joint pain sensitivity and loss of function. PMID:28239353

  12. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  13. Camphene, a Plant Derived Monoterpene, Exerts Its Hypolipidemic Action by Affecting SREBP-1 and MTP Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    The control of hyperlipidemia plays a central role in cardiovascular disease. Previously, we have shown that camphene, a constituent of mastic gum oil, lowers cholesterol and triglycerides (TG) in the plasma of hyperlipidemic rats without affecting HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. In the present study, we examine the mechanism by which camphene exerts its hypolipidemic action. We evaluated the effect of camphene on the de novo synthesis of cholesterol and TG from [14C]-acetate in HepG2 cells, along with the statin mevinolin. Camphene inhibited the biosynthesis of cholesterol in a concentration-dependent manner, and a maximal inhibition of 39% was observed at 100 μM while mevinolin nearly abolished cholesterol biosynthesis. Moreover, treatment with camphene reduced TG by 34% and increased apolipoprotein AI expression. In contrast, mevinolin increased TG by 26% and had a modest effect on apolipoprotein AI expression. To evaluate the mode of action of camphene, we examined its effects on the expression of SREBP-1, which affects TG biosynthesis and SREBP-2, which mostly affects sterol synthesis. Interestingly, camphene increased the nuclear translocation of the mature form of SREBP-1 while mevinolin was found to increase the amount of the mature form of SREBP-2. The effect of camphene is most likely regulated through SREBP-1 by affecting MTP levels in response to a decrease in the intracellular cholesterol. We propose that camphene upregulates SREBP-1 expression and MTP inhibition is likely to be a probable mechanism whereby camphene exerts its hypolipidemic effect. PMID:26784701

  14. Camphene, a Plant Derived Monoterpene, Exerts Its Hypolipidemic Action by Affecting SREBP-1 and MTP Expression.

    PubMed

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    The control of hyperlipidemia plays a central role in cardiovascular disease. Previously, we have shown that camphene, a constituent of mastic gum oil, lowers cholesterol and triglycerides (TG) in the plasma of hyperlipidemic rats without affecting HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. In the present study, we examine the mechanism by which camphene exerts its hypolipidemic action. We evaluated the effect of camphene on the de novo synthesis of cholesterol and TG from [14C]-acetate in HepG2 cells, along with the statin mevinolin. Camphene inhibited the biosynthesis of cholesterol in a concentration-dependent manner, and a maximal inhibition of 39% was observed at 100 μM while mevinolin nearly abolished cholesterol biosynthesis. Moreover, treatment with camphene reduced TG by 34% and increased apolipoprotein AI expression. In contrast, mevinolin increased TG by 26% and had a modest effect on apolipoprotein AI expression. To evaluate the mode of action of camphene, we examined its effects on the expression of SREBP-1, which affects TG biosynthesis and SREBP-2, which mostly affects sterol synthesis. Interestingly, camphene increased the nuclear translocation of the mature form of SREBP-1 while mevinolin was found to increase the amount of the mature form of SREBP-2. The effect of camphene is most likely regulated through SREBP-1 by affecting MTP levels in response to a decrease in the intracellular cholesterol. We propose that camphene upregulates SREBP-1 expression and MTP inhibition is likely to be a probable mechanism whereby camphene exerts its hypolipidemic effect.

  15. Homocysteine and its thiolactone-mediated modification of fibrinogen affect blood platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Joanna; Olas, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcys) and homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) concentrations in organism are correlated with a number of serious pathologies. In the literature, there are few papers describing studies on the effects of homocysteine on proteins that participate in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in human. However, mechanisms involved in the relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and hemostatic process are still unclear. The role of N- or S-homocysteinylation (induced by Hcys and its derivatives) of different hemostatic proteins, including fibrinogen is also still poorly known. The aim of this study was to establish the functional changes of the fibrinogen molecule induced by Hcys (at final doses of 10-100 µM) and the most reactive form of Hcys - its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (0.1-1 µM), and to examine the effects of these changes on the capability of fibrinogen to interact with human blood platelets (by measuring the platelet adhesion). Our present results demonstrated that Hcys-treated fibrinogen in comparison with native molecule had a distinct capability to mediate platelet adhesion. Both, unstimulated and thrombin-activated platelets showed a reduced ability to adhere to Hcys-mediated fibrinogen. HTL (at all tested concentrations) had similar properties when we used thrombin-activated platelets. In conclusion, the results reported in this study could be useful for a better understanding of changes in hemostasis during hyperhomocysteinemia.

  16. The sex of the foetus affects maternal blood glucose concentrations in overweight and obese pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Sumudu N; Derraik, José G B; Jiang, Yannan; McCowan, Lesley M E; Gusso, Silmara; Cutfield, Wayne S; Hofman, Paul L

    2016-12-26

    There is increasing evidence that the sex of the foetus may alter the maternal metabolic milieu during pregnancy. Following a randomized controlled trial of exercise in overweight and obese pregnant women, we assessed whether the sex of the foetus was associated with changes in maternal metabolism. Data were analysed on 74 randomized participants who completed the trial, including 38 mothers carrying males and 36 mothers carrying females. At 19 weeks of gestation, mothers carrying boys had higher blood glucose concentrations than those carrying girls (5.4 vs 4.9 mmol/l; p = .046). At 36 weeks of gestation, differences were more marked, with blood glucose concentrations 15% higher in mothers carrying females (5.7 vs 5.0 mmol/l; p = .004). In addition, mothers carrying girls had higher concentrations of hs-CRP across pregnancy (5.0 vs 3.6 mg/l; p = .029). Our findings provide further evidence that the sex of the foetus appears to influence maternal metabolism.

  17. Peripheral Blood Cell Gene Expression Diagnostic for Identifying Symptomatic Transthyretin Amyloidosis Patients: Male and Female Specific Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Sunil M.; Novais, Marta; Whisenant, Thomas; Gelbart, Terri; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Coelho, Teresa; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early diagnosis of familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloid diseases remains challenging because of variable disease penetrance. Currently, patients must have an amyloid positive tissue biopsy to be eligible for disease-modifying therapies. Endomyocardial biopsies are typically amyloid positive when cardiomyopathy is suspected, but this disease manifestation is generally diagnosed late. Early diagnosis is often difficult because patients exhibit apparent symptoms of polyneuropathy, but have a negative amyloid biopsy. Thus, there is a pressing need for an additional early diagnostic strategy for TTR-aggregation-associated polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy. Methods and Findings: Global peripheral blood cell mRNA expression profiles from 263 tafamidis-treated and untreated V30M Familiar Amyloid Neuropathy patients, asymptomatic V30M carriers, and healthy, age- and sex-matched controls without TTR mutations were used to differentiate symptomatic from asymptomatic patients. We demonstrate that blood cell gene expression patterns reveal sex-independent, as well as male- and female-specific inflammatory signatures in symptomatic FAP patients, but not in asymptomatic carriers. These signatures differentiated symptomatic patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers with >80% accuracy. There was a global downregulation of the eIF2 pathway and its associated genes in all symptomatic FAP patients. We also demonstrated that the molecular scores based on these signatures significantly trended toward normalized values in an independent cohort of 46 FAP patients after only 3 months of tafamidis treatment. Conclusions: This study identifies novel molecular signatures that differentiate symptomatic FAP patients from asymptomatic V30M carriers as well as affected males and females. We envision using this approach, initially in parallel with amyloid biopsies, to identify individuals who are asymptomatic gene carriers that may convert to FAP patients. Upon further validation

  18. Maternal in utero exposure to the endocrine disruptor di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate affects the blood pressure of adult male offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez–Arguelles, D.B.; McIntosh, M.; Rohlicek, C.V.; Culty, M.; Zirkin, B.R.; Papadopoulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is used industrially to add flexibility to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) polymers and is ubiquitously found in the environment, with evidence of prenatal, perinatal and early infant exposure in humans. In utero exposure to DEHP decreases circulating testosterone levels in the adult rat. In addition, DEHP reduces the expression of the angiotensin II receptors in the adrenal gland, resulting in decreased circulating aldosterone levels. The latter may have important effects on water and electrolyte balance as well as systemic arterial blood pressure. Therefore, we determined the effects of in utero exposure to DEHP on systemic arterial blood pressure in the young (2 month-old) and older (6.5 month-old) adult rats. Sprague-Dawley pregnant dams were exposed from gestational day 14 until birth to 300 mg DEHP/kg/day. Blood pressure, heart rate, and activity data were collected using an intra-aortal transmitter in the male offspring at postnatal day (PND) 60 and PND200. A low (0.01%) and high-salt (8%) diet was used to challenge the animals at PND200. In utero exposure to DEHP resulted in reduced activity at PND60. At PND200, systolic and diastolic systemic arterial pressures as well as activity were reduced in response to DEHP exposure. This is the first evidence showing that in utero exposure to DEHP has cardiovascular and behavioral effects in the adult male offspring. Highlights: ► In utero exposure to 300 mg DEHP/kg/day decreases activity at postnatal day 60. ► In utero exposure to DEHP decreases aldosterone levels at postnatal day 200. ► In utero exposure to DEHP decreases systolic blood pressure at postnatal day 200. ► An 8% salt diet recovers the decreased blood pressure at postnatal day 200.

  19. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell harvest: Collection efficiency and factors affecting it

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Aseem K.; Pandey, Prashant; Subbaraman, Harini; Bhargava, Rahul; Rawat, Ganesh; Madiraju, Shivani; Raina, Vimarsh; Bhargava, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Harvest of hematopoietic progenitor cells via leukapheresis is being used increasingly for transplants in India. Adequate yield of cells per kilogram body weight of recipient is required for successful engraftment. Collection efficiency (CE) is an objective quality parameter used to assess the quality of leukapheresis program. In this study, we calculated the CE of the ComTec cell separator (Fresenius Kabi, Germany) using two different formulae (CE1 and CE2) and analyzed various patient and procedural factors, which may affect it. Materials and Methods: One hundred and one consecutive procedures in 77 autologous donors carried out over 3 years period were retrospectively reviewed. Various characteristics like gender, age, weight, disease status, hematocrit, preprocedure total leukocyte count, preprocedure CD34 positive (CD34+) cells count, preprocedure absolute CD34+ cell count and processed apheresis volume effect on CE were compared. CE for each procedure was calculated using two different formulae, and results were compared using statistical correlation and regression analysis. Results: The mean CE1 and CE2 was 41.2 and 49.1, respectively. CE2 appeared to be more accurate indicator of overall CE as it considered the impact of continued mobilization of stem cells during apheresis procedure, itself. Of all the factors affecting CE, preprocedure absolute CD34+ was the only independent factor affecting CE. Conclusion: The only factor affecting CE was preprocedure absolute CD34+ cells. Though the mean CE2 was higher than CE1, it was not statistically significant. PMID:27011680

  20. A family with a dystrophin gene mutation specifically affecting dystrophin expression in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Muntoni, F.; Davies, K.; Dubowitz, V.

    1994-09-01

    We recently described a family with X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy where a large deletion in the muscle promoter region of the dystrophin gene was associated with a severe dilated cardiomyopathy in absence of clinical skeletal muscle involvement. The deletion removed the entire muscle promoter region, the first muscle exon and part of intron 1. The brain and Purkinje cell promoters were not affected by the deletion. Despite the lack of both the muscle promoter and the first muscle exon, dystrophin was detected immunocytochemically in relative high levels in the skeletal muscle of the affected males. We have now found that both the brain and Purkinje cell promoters were transcribed at high levels in the skeletal muscle of these individuals. This phenomenon, that does not occur in normal skeletal muscle, indicates that these two isoforms, physiologically expressed mainly in the central nervous system, can be transcribed and be functionally active in skeletal muscle under specific circumstances. Contrary to what is observed in skeletal muscle, dystrophin was not detected in the heart of one affected male using immunocytochemistry and an entire panel of anti-dystrophin antibodies. This was most likely the cause for the pronounced cardiac fibrosis observed and eventually responsible for the severe cardiac involvement invariably seen in seven affected males. In conclusion, the mutation of the muscle promoter, first muscle exon and part of intron 1 specifically affected expression of dystrophin in the heart. We believe that this deletion removes sequences involved in regulation of dystrophin expression in the heart and are at the moment characterizing other families with X-linked cardiomyopathy secondary to a dystrophinopathy.

  1. MPL expression on AML blasts predicts peripheral blood neutropenia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Philipp J; Ellegast, Jana M; Widmer, Corinne C; Fritsch, Kristin; Goede, Jeroen S; Valk, Peter J M; Löwenberg, Bob; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Manz, Markus G

    2016-11-03

    Although the molecular pathways that cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are increasingly well understood, the pathogenesis of peripheral blood cytopenia, a major cause of AML mortality, remains obscure. A prevailing assumption states that AML spatially displaces nonleukemic hematopoiesis from the bone marrow. However, examining an initial cohort of 223 AML patients, we found no correlation between bone marrow blast content and cytopenia, questioning the displacement theory. Measuring serum concentration of thrombopoietin (TPO), a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cells and megakaryocytes, revealed loss of physiologic negative correlation with platelet count in AML cases with blasts expressing MPL, the thrombopoietin (scavenging) receptor. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that MPL(hi) blasts could indeed clear TPO, likely therefore leading to insufficient cytokine levels for nonleukemic hematopoiesis. Microarray analysis in an independent multicenter study cohort of 437 AML cases validated MPL expression as a central predictor of thrombocytopenia and neutropenia in AML. Moreover, t(8;21) AML cases demonstrated the highest average MPL expression and lowest average platelet and absolute neutrophil counts among subgroups. Our work thus explains the pathophysiology of peripheral blood cytopenia in a relevant number of AML cases.

  2. Using Blood Informative Transcripts in Geographical Genomics: Impact of Lifestyle on Gene Expression in Fijians

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Artika Praveeta; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg

    2012-01-01

    In previous geographical genomics studies of the impact of lifestyle on gene expression inferred from microarray analysis of peripheral blood samples, we described the complex influences of culture, ethnicity, and gender in Morocco, and of pregnancy in Brisbane. Here we describe the use of nanofluidic Fluidigm quantitative RT-PCR arrays targeted at a set of 96 transcripts that are broadly informative of the major axes of immune gene expression, to explore the population structure of transcription in Fiji. As in Morocco, major differences are seen between the peripheral blood transcriptomes of rural villagers and residents of the capital city, Suva. The effect is much greater in Indian villages than in Melanesian highlanders and appears to be similar with respect to the nature of at least two axes of variation. Gender differences are much smaller than ethnicity or lifestyle effects. Body mass index is shown to associate with one of the axes as it does in Atlanta and Brisbane, establishing a link between the epidemiological transition of human metabolic disease, and gene expression profiles. PMID:23162571

  3. Widespread Decreased Expression of Immune Function Genes in Human Peripheral Blood Following Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a large-scale reduced expression of genes in pathways related to cell-type specific immunity functions that emerges from microarray analysis 48 h after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 8 Gy) of human peripheral blood from five donors. This response is similar to that seen in patients at 24 h after the start of total-body irradiation and strengthens the rationale for the ex vivo model as an adjunct to human in vivo studies. The most marked response was in genes associated with natural killer (NK) cell immune functions, reflecting a relative loss of NK cells from the population. T- and B-cell mediated immunity genes were also significantly represented in the radiation response. Combined with our previous studies, a single gene expression signature was able to predict radiation dose range with 97% accuracy at times from 6–48 h after exposure. Gene expression signatures that may report on the loss or functional deactivation of blood cell subpopulations after radiation exposure may be particularly useful both for triage biodosimetry and for monitoring the effect of radiation mitigating treatments. PMID:24168352

  4. Molecular characterization of porcine Siglec-10 and analysis of its expression in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Z; Álvarez, B; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Yuste, M; Revilla, C; del Moral, M Gómez; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2015-01-01

    Siglecs are sialic acid binding Ig-like proteins involved in the control of leukocyte responses. In this study we describe the characterization of a porcine orthologue of Siglec-10. A cDNA clone was obtained from a porcine library which encodes a protein with sequence homology to human Siglec-10. This cDNA codes for a type I transmembrane protein containing four Ig-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail with three tyrosine-based motifs, including a membrane-proximal Grb2-binding motif, and two ITIM motifs. When expressed on transfected cells, porcine Siglec-10 was able to bind red blood cells in a sialic acid-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibodies were developed against this protein and used to examine its cell and tissue distribution in the pig. Siglec-10 was found to be expressed on blood B cells and B cell areas of the spleen and lymph nodes. A weak expression was also detected on monocytes.

  5. Connexin 43 expression on peripheral blood eosinophils: role of gap junctions in transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Vliagoftis, Harissios; Ebeling, Cory; Ilarraza, Ramses; Mahmudi-Azer, Salahaddin; Abel, Melanie; Adamko, Darryl; Befus, A Dean; Moqbel, Redwan

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils circulate in the blood and are recruited in tissues during allergic inflammation. Gap junctions mediate direct communication between adjacent cells and may represent a new way of communication between immune cells distinct from communication through cytokines and chemokines. We characterized the expression of connexin (Cx)43 by eosinophils isolated from atopic individuals using RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy and studied the biological functions of gap junctions on eosinophils. The formation of functional gap junctions was evaluated measuring dye transfer using flow cytometry. The role of gap junctions on eosinophil transendothelial migration was studied using the inhibitor 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid. Peripheral blood eosinophils express Cx43 mRNA and protein. Cx43 is localized not only in the cytoplasm but also on the plasma membrane. The membrane impermeable dye BCECF transferred from eosinophils to epithelial or endothelial cells following coculture in a dose and time dependent fashion. The gap junction inhibitors 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid and octanol did not have a significant effect on dye transfer but reduced dye exit from eosinophils. The gap junction inhibitor 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid inhibited eosinophil transendothelial migration in a dose dependent manner. Thus, eosinophils from atopic individuals express Cx43 constitutively and Cx43 may play an important role in eosinophil transendothelial migration and function in sites of inflammation.

  6. Expression of surface markers on the blood cells during the delayed asthmatic response to allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bronchial asthma develop various types of asthmatic response to bronchial challenge with allergen, such as immediate/early asthmatic response (IAR), late asthmatic response (LAR) or delayed asthmatic response (DYAR), because of different immunologic mechanisms. The DYAR, occurring between 24 and 56 hours after the bronchial allergen challenge (p < 0.01), differs from IAR and LAR in clinical as well as immunologic features. This study investigates the expression of CD molecules (markers) on the surface of particular cell populations in the peripheral blood and their changes during the DYAR. In 17 patients developing the DYAR (p < 0.01), the bronchial challenge with allergen was repeated 2–6 weeks later. The repeated DYAR (p < 0.001) was combined with recording of CD molecule expression on various types of blood cells by means of flow cytometry up to 72 hours after the challenge. The results were expressed in percent of the mean relative fluorescence intensity. The DYAR was accompanied by (a) increased expression of CD11b, CD11b/18, CD16,CD32, CD35, CD62E, CD62L, CD64, and CD66b on neutrophils; CD203C on basophils; CD25 and CD62L on eosinophils; CD14, CD16, CD64, and CD86 on monocytes; CD3, CD4, CD8, CD11a, CD18, and CD69 on lymphocytes; CD16, CD56, CD57, and CD94 on natural killer (NK) cells; and CD31, CD41, CD61, CD62P, and CD63 on thrombocytes and (b) decreased expression of CD18 and CD62L on eosinophils, CD15 on neutrophils, and CD40 on lymphocytes. These results suggest involvement of cell-mediated hypersensitivity mechanism, on participation of Th1- lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, NK cells, and thrombocytes in the DYAR. PMID:24988283

  7. Whole blood gene expression profiles distinguish clinical phenotypes of venous thromboembolism☆

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Deborah A.; Suchindran, Sunil; Beckman, Michele G.; Hooper, W. Craig; Grant, Althea M.; Heit, John A.; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn; Moll, Stephan; Philipp, Claire S.; Kenney, Kristy; De Staercke, Christine; Pyle, Meredith E.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Ortel, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs infrequently following a provoked event but occurs in up to 30% of individuals following an initial unprovoked event. There is limited understanding of the biological mechanisms that predispose patients to recurrent VTE. Objectives To identify whole blood gene expression profiles that distinguished patients with clinically distinct patterns of VTE. Patients/Methods We studied 107 patients with VTE separated into 3 groups: (1) ‘low-risk’ patients had one or more provoked VTE; (2) ‘moderate-risk’ patients had a single unprovoked VTE; (3) ‘high-risk’ patients had ≥2 unprovoked VTE. Each patient group was also compared to twenty-five individuals with no personal history of VTE. Total RNA from whole blood was isolated and hybridized to Illumina HT-12 V4 Beadchips to assay whole genome expression. Results Using class prediction analysis, we distinguished high-risk patients from low-risk patients and healthy controls with good receiver operating curve characteristics (AUC = 0.81 and 0.84, respectively). We also distinguished moderate-risk individuals and low-risk individuals from healthy controls with AUC’s of 0.69 and 0.80, respectively. Using differential expression analysis, we identified several genes previously implicated in thrombotic disorders by genetic analyses, including SELP, KLKB1, ANXA5, and CD46. Protein levels for several of the identified genes were not significantly different between the different groups. Conclusion Gene expression profiles are capable of distinguishing patients with different clinical presentations of VTE, and genes relevant to VTE risk are frequently differentially expressed in these comparisons. PMID:25684211

  8. TITER AND PRODUCT AFFECTS THE DISTRIBUTION OF GENE EXPRESSION AFTER INTRAPUTAMINAL CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Emborg, Marina E.; Hurley, Samuel A.; Joers, Valerie; Tromp, Do P.M.; Swanson, Christine R.; Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Cummisford, Kyle; Sonnemans, Marc; Hermening, Stephan; Blits, Bas; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficacy and safety of intracerebral gene therapy for brain disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, depends on appropriate distribution of gene expression. Objectives To assess if the distribution of gene expression is affected by vector titer and protein type. Methods Four adult macaque monkeys seronegative for adeno-associated virus 5 (AAV5) received in the right and left ventral postcommisural putamen 30μl inoculation of a high or low titer suspension of AAV5 encoding glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Inoculations were performed using convection enhanced delivery and intraoperative MRI (IMRI). Results IMRI confirmed targeting and infusion cloud irradiating from the catheter tip into surrounding area. Postmortem analysis six weeks after surgery revealed GFP and GDNF expression ipsilateral to the injection side that had a titer-dependent distribution. GFP and GDNF expression was also observed in fibers in the Substantia Nigra (SN) pars reticulata (pr), demonstrating anterograde transport. Few GFP-positive neurons were present in the SN pars compacta (pc), possibly by direct retrograde transport of the vector. GDNF was present in many SNpc and SNpr neurons. Conclusions After controlling for target and infusate volume, intracerebral distribution of gene product is affected by vector titer and product biology. PMID:24943657

  9. Investigating the Effect of Gaze Cues and Emotional Expressions on the Affective Evaluations of Unfamiliar Faces

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Yoshihisa; Howe, Piers D. L.

    2016-01-01

    People look at what they are interested in, and their emotional expressions tend to indicate how they feel about the objects at which they look. The combination of gaze direction and emotional expression can therefore convey important information about people’s evaluations of the objects in their environment, and can even influence the subsequent evaluations of those objects by a third party, a phenomenon known as the emotional gaze effect. The present study extended research into the effect of emotional gaze cues by investigating whether they affect evaluations of the most important aspect of our social environment–other people–and whether the presence of multiple gaze cues enhances this effect. Over four experiments, a factorial within-subjects design employing both null hypothesis significance testing and a Bayesian statistical analysis replicated previous work showing an emotional gaze effect for objects, but found strong evidence that emotional gaze cues do not affect evaluations of other people, and that multiple, simultaneously presented gaze cues do not enhance the emotional gaze effect for either the evaluations of objects or of people. Overall, our results suggest that emotional gaze cues have a relatively weak influence on affective evaluations, especially of those aspects of our environment that automatically elicit affectively valenced reactions, including other humans. PMID:27682017

  10. Role of negative affects in pathophysiology and clinical expression of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2014-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is regarded as a multifactorial disease in which alterations in the brain-gut axis signaling play a major role. The biopsychosocial model applied to the understanding of IBS pathophysiology assumes that psychosocial factors, interacting with peripheral/central neuroendocrine and immune changes, may induce symptoms of IBS, modulate symptom severity, influence illness experience and quality of life, and affect outcome. The present review focuses on the role of negative affects, including depression, anxiety, and anger, on pathogenesis and clinical expression of IBS. The potential role of the autonomic nervous system, stress-hormone system, and immune system in the pathophysiology of both negative affects and IBS are taken into account. Psychiatric comorbidity and subclinical variations in levels of depression, anxiety, and anger are further discussed in relation to the main pathophysiological and symptomatic correlates of IBS, such as sensorimotor functions, gut microbiota, inflammation/immunity, and symptom reporting.

  11. EFFECTS OF STORAGE, RNA EXTRACTION, GENECHIP TYPE, AND DONOR SEX ON GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF HUMAN WHOLE BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Gene expression profiling of whole blood may be useful for monitoring toxicological exposure and for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases. Several methods are available that can be used to transport, store, and extract RNA from whole blood, but it is not clear...

  12. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Affected by Promoter Hypermethylation Induces Aberrant Gli2 Expression in Spina Bifida.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Li; Chang, Shao-Yan; Shangguan, Shao-Fang; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Li-Hua; Zou, Ji-Zhen; Xiao, Ping; Li, Rui; Bao, Yi-Hua; Qiu, Z-Y; Zhang, Ting

    2016-10-01

    GLI2 is a key mediator of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway and plays an important role in neural tube development during vertebrate embryogenesis; however, the role of gli2 in human folate-related neural tube defects remains unclear. In this study, we compared methylation status and polymorphisms of gli2 between spina bifida patients and a control group to explore the underlying mechanisms related to folate deficiency in spina bifida. No single nucleotide polymorphism was found to be significantly different between the two groups, although gli2 methylation levels were significantly increased in spina bifida samples, accompanied by aberrant GLI2 expression. Moreover, a prominent negative correlation was found between the folate level in brain tissue and the gli2 methylation status (r = -0.41, P = 0.014), and gli2 hypermethylation increased the risk of spina bifida with an odds ratio of 12.45 (95 % confidence interval: 2.71-57.22, P = 0.001). In addition, we established a cell model to illustrate the effect of gli2 expression and the accessibility of chromatin affected by methylation. High gli2 and gli1 mRNA expression was detected in 5-Aza-treated cells, while gli2 hypermethylation resulted in chromatin inaccessibility and a reduced association with nuclear proteins containing transcriptional factors. More meaningful to the pathway, the effect gene of the Shh pathway, gli1, was found to have a reduced level of expression along with a decreased expression of gli2 in our cell model. Aberrant high methylation resulted in the low expression of gli2 in spina bifida, which was affected by the change in chromatin status and the capacity of transcription factor binding.

  13. Thrombolytic therapy reduces red blood cell aggregation in plasma without affecting intrinsic aggregability.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami, R; Sheinman, G; Yedgar, S; Eldor, A; Roth, A; Berliner, A S; Barshtein, G

    2002-03-15

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation may contribute to occlusion of the coronary microcirculation during myocardial infarction. We studied the effect of thrombolytic therapy on RBC aggregation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Compared with patients with myocardial infarction who did not receive thrombolytic therapy, those treated with systemic thrombolysis exhibited significantly reduced RBC aggregation, reduced plasma fibrinogen levels and increased plasma D-dimer levels. Using measurement of RBC aggregation in a standardized dextran-500 solution, reduction in RBC aggregation after thrombolysis was shown to be plasma dependent. Thrombolytic therapy had no direct effect on intrinsic RBC aggregability in patients with AMI. We conclude that thrombolytic therapy has rheologic consequences that may contribute to its overall efficacy. Inhibition of RBC aggregation by thrombolytic therapy may result from the degradation of fibrinogen, a key factor in the formation of RBC aggregates, and from the generation of fibrinogen degradation products capable of disaggregating RBCs.

  14. Smooth muscle-selective CPI-17 expression increases vascular smooth muscle contraction and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Wen; Xie, Zhongwen; Liu, Shu; Calderon, Lindsay E.; Guo, Zhenheng

    2013-01-01

    Recent data revealed that protein kinase C-potentiated myosin phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kDa (CPI-17), a myosin phosphatase inhibitory protein preferentially expressed in smooth muscle, is upregulated/activated in several diseases but whether this CPI-17 increase plays a causal role in pathologically enhanced vascular smooth muscle contractility and blood pressure remains unclear. To address this possibility, we generated a smooth muscle-specific CPI-17 transgenic mouse model (CPI-17-Tg) and demonstrated that the CPI-17 transgene was selectively expressed in smooth muscle-enriched tissues, including mesenteric arteries. The isometric contractions in the isolated second-order branch of mesenteric artery helical strips from CPI-17-Tg mice were significantly enhanced compared with controls in response to phenylephrine, U-46619, serotonin, ANG II, high potassium, and calcium. The perfusion pressure increases in isolated perfused mesenteric vascular beds in response to norepinephrine were also enhanced in CPI-17-Tg mice. The hypercontractility was associated with increased phosphorylation of CPI-17 and 20-kDa myosin light chain under basal and stimulated conditions. Surprisingly, the protein levels of rho kinase 2 and protein kinase Cα/δ were significantly increased in CPI-17-Tg mouse mesenteric arteries. Radiotelemetry measurements demonstrated that blood pressure was significantly increased in CPI-17-Tg mice. However, no vascular remodeling was detected by morphometric analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that increased CPI-17 expression in smooth muscle promotes vascular smooth muscle contractility and increases blood pressure, implicating a pathological significant role of CPI-17 upregulation. PMID:23604714

  15. Expression Profiling Reveals Novel Hypoxic Biomarkers in Peripheral Blood of Adult Mice Exposed to Chronic Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Ulrike; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia induces a myriad of changes including an increase in hematocrit due to erythropoietin (EPO) mediated erythropoiesis. While hypoxia is of importance physiologically and clinically, lacunae exist in our knowledge of the systemic and temporal changes in gene expression occurring in blood during the exposure and recovery from hypoxia. To identify these changes expression profiling was conducted on blood obtained from cohorts of C57Bl-10 wild type mice that were maintained at normoxia (NX), exposed for two weeks to normobaric chronic hypoxia (CH) or two weeks of CH followed by two weeks of normoxic recovery (REC). Using stringent bioinformatic cut-offs (0% FDR, 2 fold change cut-off), 230 genes were identified and separated into four distinct temporal categories. Class I) contained 1 transcript up-regulated in both CH and REC; Class II) contained 202 transcripts up-regulated in CH but down-regulated after REC; Class III) contained 9 transcripts down-regulated both in CH and REC; Class IV) contained 18 transcripts down-regulated after CH exposure but up-regulated after REC. Profiling was independently validated and extended by analyzing expression levels of selected genes as novel biomarkers from our profile (e.g. spectrin alpha-1, ubiquitin domain family-1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase-1) by performing qPCR at 7 different time points during CH and REC. Our identification and characterization of these genes define transcriptome level changes occurring during chronic hypoxia and normoxic recovery as well as novel blood biomarkers that may be useful in monitoring a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with hypoxia. PMID:22629407

  16. Blood withdrawal affects iron store dynamics in primates with consequences on monoaminergic system function.

    PubMed

    Hyacinthe, C; De Deurwaerdere, P; Thiollier, T; Li, Q; Bezard, E; Ghorayeb, I

    2015-04-02

    Iron homeostasis is essential for the integrity of brain monoaminergic functions and its deregulation might be involved in neurological movement disorders such as the restless legs syndrome (RLS). Although iron metabolism breakdown concomitantly appears with monoaminergic system dysfunction in iron-deficient rodents and in RLS patients, the direct consequences of peripheral iron deficiency in the central nervous system (CNS) of non-human primates have received little attention. Here, we evaluated the peripheral iron-depletion impact on brain monoamine levels in macaque monkeys. After documenting circadian variations of iron and iron-related proteins (hemoglobin, ferritin and transferrin) in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of normal macaques, repeated blood withdrawals (RBW) were used to reduce peripheral iron-related parameter levels. Decreased serum iron levels were paradoxically associated with increased CSF iron concentrations. Despite limited consequences on tissue monoamine contents (dopamine - DA, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid - DOPAC, homovanillic acid, L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine - L-DOPA, 5-8 hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid - 5-HIAA and noradrenaline) measured with post-mortem chromatography, we found distinct and region-dependent relationships of these tissue concentrations with CSF iron and/or serum iron and/or blood hemoglobin. Additionally, striatal extracellular DA, DOPAC and 5-HIAA levels evaluated by in vivo microdialysis showed a substantial increase, suggesting an overall increase in both DA and 5-HT tones. Finally, a trending increase in general locomotor activity, measured by actimetry, was observed in the most serum iron-depleted macaques. Taken together, our data are compatible with an increase in nigrostriatal DAergic function in the event of iron deficiency and point to a specific alteration of the 5-HT/DA interaction in the CNS that is possibly involved in the etiology of RLS.

  17. [Epidermal growth factor receptor expression and epidermal growth factor blood plasma content in simple and complex endometrial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Dznelashvili, N; Kasradze, D; Tavartkiladze, A; Mariamidze, A

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to concurrently determine the prognostic significance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) expression in endometrium and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) blood content in simple and complex hyperplasia. In order to detect EGFR expression, immunohistochemical examination of endometrial scarp from 35 patients was done along with HPLC (High performance liquid chromatography) method, for measuring EGF blood plasma content. The numerical data obtained were processed statistically using computer program SPSS-12. According to the results: 1. A significant/marked increase in EGF blood plasma level together with pronounced EGFR expression in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) suggests that simple hyperplasia is likely to transform into complex form, while unchanged level of EGF against the background of mild EGFR expression is probably indicative of not very bad prognosis. 2. Normal indices of EGF blood plasma level in simple endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia), accompanied by mild EGFR expression is suggestive of good prognosis. 3. A sharp or extremely sharp increase in EGF blood plasma level with pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. However, unchanged EGF blood plasma level against the background of mild EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to point to not very bad prognosis. 4. A marked increase in EGF blood plasma level with a pronounced EGFR expression in complex endometrial hyperplasia (without atypia) is likely to indicate poor prognosis that may lead to the transformation into atypical form. Because it is evident that drastic increase in EGF blood plasma level is not necessary, other factor should be suspected to play the major role, i.e the substance that will (or will not) withstand neoplasia.

  18. Peripheral blood monocyte gene expression profile clinically stratifies patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Katharine M; Gallego, Patricia; An, Xiaoyu; Best, Shannon E; Thomas, Gethin; Wells, Christine; Harris, Mark; Cotterill, Andrew; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2012-05-01

    Novel biomarkers of disease progression after type 1 diabetes onset are needed. We profiled peripheral blood (PB) monocyte gene expression in six healthy subjects and 16 children with type 1 diabetes diagnosed ∼3 months previously and analyzed clinical features from diagnosis to 1 year. Monocyte expression profiles clustered into two distinct subgroups, representing mild and severe deviation from healthy control subjects, along the same continuum. Patients with strongly divergent monocyte gene expression had significantly higher insulin dose-adjusted HbA(1c) levels during the first year, compared with patients with mild deviation. The diabetes-associated expression signature identified multiple perturbations in pathways controlling cellular metabolism and survival, including endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress (e.g., induction of HIF1A, DDIT3, DDIT4, and GRP78). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) of a 9-gene panel correlated with glycemic control in 12 additional recent-onset patients. The qPCR signature was also detected in PB from healthy first-degree relatives. A PB gene expression signature correlates with glycemic control in the first year after diabetes diagnosis and is present in at-risk subjects. These findings implicate monocyte phenotype as a candidate biomarker for disease progression pre- and postonset and systemic stresses as contributors to innate immune function in type 1 diabetes.

  19. Red blood cell aquaporin-1 expression is decreased in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Renée L; Maltaneri, Romina E; Vittori, Daniela C; Solari, Liliana; Gammella, Daniel; Schvartzman, Gabriel; García, Eliana; Rapetti, María C; Donato, Hugo; Nesse, Alcira

    2016-10-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the membrane water channel responsible for changes in erythrocyte volume in response to the tonicity of the medium. As the aberrant distribution of proteins in hereditary spherocytosis (HS) generates deficiencies of proteins other than those codified by the mutated gene, we postulated that AQP1 expression might be impaired in spherocytes. AQP1 expression was evaluated through flow cytometry in 5 normal controls, 1 autoimmune hemolytic anemia, 10 HS (2 mild, 3 moderate, 2 severe, and 3 splenectomized), and 3 silent carriers. The effect of AQP1 inhibitors was evaluated through water flow-based tests: osmotic fragility and hypertonic cryohemolysis. Serum osmolality was measured in 20 normal controls and 13 HS. The effect of erythropoietin (Epo) on AQP1 expression was determined in cultures of erythroleukemia UT-7 cells, dependent on Epo to survive. Independent of erythrocyte size, HS patients showed a lower content of AQP1 in erythrocyte membranes which correlated with the severity of the disease. Accordingly, red blood cells from HS subjects were less sensitive to cryohemolysis than normal erythrocytes after inhibition of the AQP1 water channel. A lower serum osmolality in HS with respect to normal controls suggests alterations during reticulocyte remodeling. The decreased AQP1 expression could contribute to explain variable degrees of anemia in hereditary spherocytosis. The finding of AQP1 expression induced by Epo in a model of erythroid cells may be interpreted as a mechanism to restore the balance of red cell water fluxes.

  20. Structure and immune expression analysis of hemoglobin genes from the blood clam Tegillarca granosa.

    PubMed

    Bao, Y B; Wang, Q; Guo, X M; Lin, Z H

    2013-02-28

    Hemoglobin (Hb) is the major protein component of erythrocytes in animals with red blood, although it can serve additional functions beyond the transport of oxygen. The blood clam (Tegillarca granosa) is one of the few mollusks that has Hb, although the structure and function of molluskan Hbs remain unclear. We characterized two unique and highly compartmentalized blood clam hemoglobin genes, Tg-HbIIA and Tg-HbIIB, at the molecular level. The full-length cDNA of Tg-HbIIA was 731 bp with a 450-bp open reading frame encoding 150 amino acids; that of Tg-HbIIB was 698 bp, with a 456-bp open reading frame encoding 152 amino acids. Their intronic regions were amplified by PCR. The two genes showed the typical 2 intron/3 exon organization found in T. granosa. The 3-D structures of the three blood clam Tg-Hbs were predicted using the SWISS-MODEL Protein Modeling Server, and a phylogenetic analysis was conducted to investigate its evolution. As quantified by qRT-PCR, the expression levels of Tg-HbIIA and Tg-HbIIB were significantly upregulated upon challenge by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, lipopolysaccharides, and peptidoglycans. Three Hb isoforms, Tg-HbI, Tg-HbIIA, and Tg-HbIIB, were found. Specific structures and evolutionary features were found in these molluskan Hb genes. Challenge experiments indicated that Tg-Hbs are involved in immune defense responses against bacterial infection and bacterial pathogenic factors. As this is the first functional research on Hb genes in the blood clam, our findings provide new insight into the innate immune defense mechanisms of T. granosa.

  1. Why bodies? Twelve reasons for including bodily expressions in affective neuroscience.

    PubMed

    de Gelder, Beatrice

    2009-12-12

    Why bodies? It is rather puzzling that given the massive interest in affective neuroscience in the last decade, it still seems to make sense to raise the question 'Why bodies' and to try to provide an answer to it, as is the goal of this article. There are now hundreds of articles on human emotion perception ranging from behavioural studies to brain imaging experiments. These experimental studies complement decades of reports on affective disorders in neurological patients and clinical studies of psychiatric populations. The most cursory glance at the literature on emotion in humans, now referred to by the umbrella term of social and affective neuroscience, shows that over 95 per cent of them have used faces as stimuli. Of the remaining 5 per cent, a few have used scenes or auditory information including human voices, music or environmental sounds. But by far the smallest number has looked into whole-body expressions. As a rough estimate, a search on PubMed today, 1 May 2009, yields 3521 hits for emotion x faces, 1003 hits for emotion x music and 339 hits for emotion x bodies. When looking in more detail, the body x emotion category in fact yields a majority of papers on well-being, nursing, sexual violence or organ donation. But the number of cognitive and affective neuroscience studies of emotional body perception as of today is lower than 20. Why then have whole bodies and bodily expressions not attracted the attention of researchers so far? The goal of this article is to contribute some elements for an answer to this question. I believe that there is something to learn from the historical neglect of bodies and bodily expressions. I will next address some historical misconceptions about whole-body perception, and in the process I intend not only to provide an impetus for this kind of work but also to contribute to a better understanding of the significance of the affective dimension of behaviour, mind and brain as seen from the vantage point of bodily

  2. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    PubMed

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids.

  3. Altered expression of adhesion molecules on peripheral blood leukocytes in feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Vermeulen, Ben L; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-10-25

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, coronavirus-induced systemic disease in domestic and wild felids. The pathology associated with FIP (multifocal granulomatous vasculitis) is considered to be elicited by exaggerated activation and subsequent extravasation of leukocytes. As changes in the expression of adhesion molecules on circulating leukocytes precede their margination and emigration, we reasoned that the expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules may be altered in FIP. In present study, the expression of principal adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte transmigration (CD15s, CD11a, CD11b, CD18, CD49d, and CD54) on peripheral blood leukocytes from cats with naturally occurring FIP (n=15) and controls (n=12) was quantified by flow cytometry using a formaldehyde-based rapid leukocyte preparation technique. T- and B-lymphocytes from FIP patients exhibit higher expression of both subunits (CD11a and CD18) composing the β2 integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1. In addition, the expression of the α4 subunit (CD49d) of the β1 integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 was elevated on B-lymphocytes from FIP patients. The expression of CD11b and CD18, that combine to form the β2 integrin macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1), was elevated on monocytes, whereas the density of CD49d was reduced on this population in FIP. Granulocytes of FIP cats displayed an increased expression of the α chain of Mac-1 (CD11b). These observations suggest that leukocytes from FIP patients show signs of systemic activation causing them to extravasate into surrounding tissues and ultimately contribute to pyogranuloma formation seen in FIP.

  4. Human peripheral blood granulocytes and myeloid leukemic cell lines express both transcripts encoding for stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Ramenghi, U; Ruggieri, L; Dianzani, I; Rosso, C; Brizzi, M F; Camaschella, C; Pietsch, T; Saglio, G

    1994-09-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand for the c-kit proto-oncogene, has been shown to play a critical role in the migration of melanocytes and germ cells during embryogenesis as well as in the proliferative control of the hematopoietic compartment. In this study we investigated the expression of both the soluble and transmembrane SCF forms in purified peripheral blood populations and in several hematopoietic cell lines. Expression of both transcripts, though in different ratios, was identified in whole bone marrow, in bone marrow stromal cells and in human peripheral blood. In peripheral blood, SCF expression could be ascribable to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), whereas no SCF expression was detected in isolated lymphocytes, monocytes and in some T lymphoid cell lines. Conversely, some hematopoietic myeloid cell lines, such as HL-60, KG1 and K562, express SCF with similar patterns.

  5. Combined non-adaptive light and smell stimuli lowered blood pressure, reduced heart rate and reduced negative affect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan; Jacob, Tim J C

    2016-03-15

    Bright light therapy has been shown to have a positive impact on seasonal affective disorder (SAD), depression and anxiety. Smell has also has been shown to have effects on mood, stress, anxiety and depression. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination of light and smell in a non-adaptive cycle. Human subjects were given smell (lemon, lavender or peppermint) and light stimuli in a triangular wave (60scycle) for 15min. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored before and after each session for 5 consecutive days and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) test was administered before and after the sensory stimulation on days 1, 3 and 5. The light-smell stimulus lowered blood pressure, both systolic and diastolic, and reduced heart rate for all odours compared to control. Of the two sensory stimuli, the odour stimulus contributed most to this effect. The different aromas in the light-smell combinations could be distinguished by their different effects on the mood factors with lemon inducing the greatest mood changes in Dejection-Depression, Anger-Hostility, Tension-Anxiety. In conclusion, combined light and smell stimulation was effective in lowering blood pressure, reducing heart rate and improving mood. The combination was more effective than either smell or light stimuli alone, suggesting that a light-smell combination would be a more robust and efficacious alternative treatment for depression, anxiety and stress.

  6. Is platelet function as measured by Thrombelastograph monitoring in whole blood affected by platelet inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Lori A; Sistino, Joseph J; Uber, Walter E

    2005-03-01

    Platelet inhibitors, especially the glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists, have demonstrated their effectiveness in reducing the acute ischemic complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and in improving clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary crisis. Three common platelet inhibitors observed in emergent cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for failed PCI are abciximab, eptifibatide, and tirofiban. An in vitro model was constructed in two parts to determine whether platelet aggregation inhibition induced by platelet inhibitors would be demonstrated by the Thrombelastograph (TEG) monitor when compared with baseline samples with no platelet inhibitor. In part A, 20 mL of fresh whole blood was divided into four groups: group I = baseline, group A = abcix-imab microg/mL, group E = eptifibatide ng/mL, and group T = tirofiban ng/mL. Platelet inhibitor concentrations in whole blood were derived starting with reported serum concentrations with escalation to achieve 80% platelet inhibition using the Medtronic hemoSTATUS and/or Lumi-aggregometer. A concentration range determined by our in vitro tests were chosen for each drug using concentrations achieving less than, equal to, or greater than 80% platelet inhibition. In part B, TEG analysis was then performed using baseline and concentrations for each drug derived in part A. Parameters measured were clot formation reaction time (R), coagulation time (K), maximum amplitude (MA) and alpha angle (A). Groups E1000 and E2000 extended R over control by 37% and 23%, respectively (p = 0.01 and 0.03). Groups E1000 and E2000 increased K times by 45% and 58% (p = .02 and .04). T160 samples prolonged K by 20% (p = 0.01). The angle or clot strength (A) was decreased in groups T160 and E1000 by 23% (+ 7.06 SD) and 18% (+ 11.23 SD), respectively (p = 0.001 and 0.01). The MA decrease was statistically significant in the T160, E1000 and E2000 by 9%, 6% and 13% respectively (p = 0.01). Samples treated with abciximab

  7. Children's affect expression and frontal EEG asymmetry: transactional associations with mothers' depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Erika E; Shaw, Daniel S; Silk, Jennifer S; Feng, Xin; Cohn, Jeffrey F; Fox, Nathan A; Kovacs, Maria

    2008-02-01

    Although parents and children are thought to influence one another's affect and behavior, few studies have examined the direction of effects from children to parents, particularly with respect to parental psychopathology. We tested the hypothesis that children's affective characteristics are associated with the course of mothers' depressive symptoms. Children's affect expression was observed during a series of mother-child interaction tasks, and children's resting frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry was assessed in a psychophysiology laboratory. Mothers' depressive symptoms were assessed at two time points, approximately one year apart, at the mother-child interaction visits. Depressive symptoms increased over time for mothers with a history of childhood-onset depression whose children exhibited right frontal EEG asymmetry. Depressive symptoms were associated with high child negative affect at both time points for mothers whose children exhibited right frontal EEG asymmetry. Cross-lagged models with a subset of participants provided some evidence of both parent-to-child and child-to-parent directions of effects. Findings suggest that akin to other interpersonal stressors, children's affective characteristics may contribute to maternal depressive symptoms.

  8. Children's Affect Expression and Frontal EEG Asymmetry: Transactional Associations with Mothers Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Daniel S.; Silk, Jennifer S.; Feng, Xin; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Fox, Nathan A.; Kovacs, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Although parents and children are thought to influence one another's affect and behavior, few studies have examined the direction of effects from children to parents, particularly with respect to parental psychopathology. We tested the hypothesis that children's affective characteristics are associated with the course of mothers’ depressive symptoms. Children's affect expression was observed during a series of mother–child interaction tasks, and children's resting frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry was assessed in a psychophysiology laboratory. Mothers’ depressive symptoms were assessed at two time points, approximately one year apart, at the mother–child interaction visits. Depressive symptoms increased over time for mothers with a history of childhood-onset depression whose children exhibited right frontal EEG asymmetry. Depressive symptoms were associated with high child negative affect at both time points for mothers whose children exhibited right frontal EEG asymmetry. Cross-lagged models with a subset of participants provided some evidence of both parent-to-child and child-to-parent directions of effects. Findings suggest that akin to other interpersonal stressors, children's affective characteristics may contribute to maternal depressive symptoms. PMID:17851752

  9. Endometriosis Located Proximal to or Remote From the Uterus Differentially Affects Uterine Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Hanyia; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Krikun, Graciela; Taylor, Hugh S

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms that lead to the altered uterine gene expression in women with endometriosis are poorly understood. Are these changes in gene expression mediated by proximity to endometriotic lesions or is endometriosis a systemic disease where the effect is independent of proximity to the uterus? To answer this question, we created endometriosis in a murine model either in the peritoneal cavity (proximal) or at a subcutaneous remote site (distal). The expression of several genes that are involved in endometrial receptivity (homeobox A10 [Hoxa10], homeobox A11 [Hoxa11], insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 [Igfbp1], Kruppel-like factor 9 [Klf9], and progesterone receptor [Pgr]) was measured in the eutopic endometrium of mice transplanted with either proximal or distal endometriosis lesions. Decreased expression of Hoxa10, Igfbp1, Klf9, and total Pgr genes was observed in the eutopic endometrium of mice with peritoneal endometriosis. In the mice with distal lesions, overall expression of these genes was not as severely affected, however, Igfbp1 expression was similarly decreased and the effect on Pgr was more pronounced. Endometriosis does have a systemic effect that varies with distance to the end organ. However, even remote disease selectively and profoundly alters the expression of genes such as Pgr. This is the first controlled experiment demonstrating that endometriosis is not simply a local peritoneal disease. Selective alteration of genes critical for endometrial receptivity and endometriosis propagation may be systemic. Similarly, systemic effects of endometriosis on other organs may also be responsible for the widespread manifestations of the disease.

  10. Gene Expression of VEGF-A and VEGF-C in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Iranian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aliparasti, Mohammad Reza; Almasi, Shohreh; Sanaat, Zohreh; Movasaghpoor, Aliakbar; Khalili-Dizaji, Reza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The crucial role of angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been proposed. One of the key regulators of angiogenesis is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Among the VEGF family, it has been observed that VEGF-A and VEGF-C are expressed by AML cells and mediate leukemic cell proliferation, survival, and resistance to chemotherapy. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that elevated levels of VEGF or a proangiogenic phenotype may impede, rather than promote, early tumor development and progression. As the significance of VEGF-A and VEGF-C levels in the pathogenesis of AML has not been clarified well, the aim of this study is to evaluate gene expression of these angiogenesis promoters and its possible prognostic value in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Iranian patients with AML. Materials and Methods: We investigated the mRNA expression of VEGF-A and VEGF-C in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 27 patients with newly diagnosed AML and 28 healthy controls by quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Expression of VEGF-C mRNA was significantly lower in AML patients than in healthy controls (p<0.001). However, there was no significant decrement in expression of VEGF-A mRNA of AML patients compared to the control group (p=0.861). VEGF-A and VEGF-C expression were not able to predict clinical outcome. Conclusion: Our data showed that AML is associated with a decreased expression of VEGF-C mRNA. However, expression levels did not influence the clinical outcome in our study. It seems that angiogenesis is affected by different cytokines other than VEGF-C or VEGF-A, and VEGF is also affected by different cytokines. Taken together, these findings help to provide new insights into the investigation of other angiogenic factors and cytokines that may play roles in the pathogenesis of AML. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385776

  11. Perfectionism Affects Blood Pressure in Response to Repeated Exposure to Stress.

    PubMed

    Albert, Phebe; Rice, Kenneth G; Caffee, Lauren

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study examined the effects of perfectionism on blood pressure (BP) in response to repeated exposure to mental arithmetic stressors. College students (N = 30) in a laboratory setting were administered a series of challenging mathematical tasks. BP was measured at baseline and after each task. Multilevel modelling analyses revealed that BP tended to decline over the course of the mathematical tasks. However, higher levels of performance standards predicted relatively stable levels of systolic BP, whereas moderate and lower levels of standards predicted declines in systolic BP. Higher levels of self-critical perfectionism predicted generally sustained levels of diastolic BP, with moderate and low self-criticism predicting declines in diastolic BP during the repeated stressors. These preliminary results suggest that students with higher levels of perfectionism may be at risk for physiological problems associated with stress reactivity, perhaps especially so in situations in which they experience persistent stress. Although results were qualified by a relatively small sample size, effects were statistically significant and supported the importance of examining the short-term and long-term implications of the effects of perfectionism on cardiovascular function and the different implications of elevations in systolic and diastolic BP.

  12. Rock squirrel (Spermophilus variegatus) blood sera affects proteolytic and hemolytic activities of rattlesnake venoms.

    PubMed

    Biardi, James E; Coss, Richard G

    2011-02-01

    Rock squirrels (Spermophilus variegatus) from two sites in south central New Mexico, where prairie (Crotalus viridis viridis) and western diamondback (Crotalus atrox) rattlesnakes are common predators, were assayed for inhibition of rattlesnake venom digestive and hemostatic activities. At statistically significant levels rock squirrel blood sera reduced the metalloprotease and hemolytic activity of venoms from C. v. viridis and C. atrox more than venom from an allopatric snake species, the northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus). In contrast, general proteolytic activity of venom from C. oreganus was inhibited more by S. variegatus serum defenses than activity of venom from sympatric snakes. For all three venoms, incubation with squirrel sera increased the level of fibrinolysis over venom-only treatments. These results suggest that rock squirrels (S. variegatus) can defend against metalloproteases and other proteases after envenomation from at least two of five rattlesnake predators they might encounter. However, there were statistically significant differences between general proteolytic activity and fibrinolytic activity of C. v. viridis and C. atrox venom, suggesting that rock squirrels might be differentially vulnerable to these two predators. The hypothesis that prey resistance influences snake venom evolution in a predator-prey arms race is given further support by the previously cryptic variation in venoms detected when assayed against prey defenses.

  13. Does Magnetic Field Affect Malaria Parasite Replication in Human Red Blood Cells?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanturiya, Alexandr N.; Glushakova, Svetlana; Yin, Dan; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    Digestion of red blood cell (RBC) hemoglobin by the malaria parasite results in the formation of paramagnetic hemazoin crystals inside the parasite body. A number of reports suggest that magnetic field interaction with hamazoin crystals significantly reduces the number of infected cells in culture, and thus magnetic field can be used to combat malaria. We studies the effects of magnetic filed on the Plasmodium falciparum asexual life cycle inside RBCs under various experimental conditions. No effect was found during prolonged exposure of infected RBCs to constant magnetic fields up to 6000 Gauss. Infected RBCs were also exposed, under temperature-controlled conditions, to oscillating magnetic fields with frequencies in the range of 500-20000 kHz, and field strength 30-600 Gauss. This exposure often changed the proportion of different parasite stages in treated culture compared to controls. However, no significant effect on parasitemia was observed in treated cultures. This result indicates that the magnetic field effect on Plasmodium falciparum is negligible, or that hypothetical negative and positive effects on different stages within one 48-hour compensate each other.

  14. Endurance exercise beneficially affects ambulatory blood pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Véronique A; Buys, Roselien; Smart, Neil A

    2013-04-01

    Exercise is widely recommended as one of the key preventive lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of hypertension and to manage high blood pressure (BP), but individual studies investigating the effect of exercise on ambulatory BP have remained inconclusive. Therefore, the primary purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the effect of aerobic endurance training on daytime and night-time BP in healthy adults. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Cochrane Controlled Clinical trial registry from their inception to May 2012. Randomized controlled trials of at least 4 weeks investigating the effects of aerobic endurance training on ambulatory BP in healthy adults were included. Inverse weighted random effects models were used for analyses, with data reported as weighted means and 95% confidence limits. We included 15 randomized controlled trials, involving 17 study groups and 633 participants (394 exercise participants and 239 control participants). Overall, endurance training induced a significant reduction in daytime SBP [-3.2 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI), -5.0 to-1.3] and daytime DBP (-2.7 mmHg, 95% CI, -3.9 to -1.5). No effect was observed on night-time BP. The findings from this meta-analysis suggest that aerobic endurance exercise significantly decreases daytime, but not night-time, ambulatory BP.

  15. Umbilical cord blood and placental mercury, selenium and selenoprotein expression in relation to maternal fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Christy L; Soon, Reni; Sauvage, Lynnae; Ralston, Nicholas V C; Berry, Marla J

    2015-04-01

    Seafood is an important source of nutrients for fetal neurodevelopment. Most individuals are exposed to the toxic element mercury through seafood. Due to the neurotoxic effects of mercury, United States government agencies recommend no more than 340g (12oz) per week of seafood consumption during pregnancy. However, recent studies have shown that selenium, also abundant in seafood, can have protective effects against mercury toxicity. In this study, we analyzed mercury and selenium levels and selenoprotein mRNA, protein, and activity in placenta of a cohort of women in Hawaii in relation to maternal seafood consumption assessed with dietary surveys. Fish consumption resulted in differences in mercury levels in placenta and cord blood. When taken as a group, those who consumed no fish exhibited the lowest mercury levels in placenta and cord blood. However, there were numerous individuals who either had higher mercury with no fish consumption or lower mercury with high fish consumption, indicating a lack of correlation. Placental expression of selenoprotein mRNAs, proteins and enzyme activity was not statistically different in any region among the different dietary groups. While the absence of seafood consumption correlates with lower average placental and cord blood mercury levels, no strong correlations were seen between seafood consumption or its absence and the levels of either selenoproteins or selenoenzyme activity.

  16. Umbilical cord blood and placental mercury, selenium and selenoprotein expression in relation to maternal fish consumption

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Christy L.; Soon, Reni; Sauvage, Lynnae; Ralston, Nicholas V.C.; Berry, Marla J.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is an important source of nutrients for fetal neurodevelopment. Most individuals are exposed to the toxic element mercury through seafood. Due to the neurotoxic effects of mercury, United States government agencies recommend no more than 340 g (12 oz) per week of seafood consumption during pregnancy. However, recent studies have shown that selenium, also abundant in seafood, can have protective effects against mercury toxicity. In this study, we analyzed mercury and selenium levels and selenoprotein mRNA, protein, and activity in placenta of a cohort of women in Hawaii in relation to maternal seafood consumption assessed with dietary surveys. Fish consumption resulted in differences in mercury levels in placenta and cord blood. When taken as a group, those who consumed no fish exhibited the lowest mercury levels in placenta and cord blood. However, there were numerous individuals who either had higher mercury with no fish consumption or lower mercury with high fish consumption, indicating a lack of correlation. Placental expression of selenoprotein mRNAs, proteins and enzyme activity was not statistically different in any region among the different dietary groups. While the absence of seafood consumption correlates with lower average placental and cord blood mercury levels, no strong correlations were seen between seafood consumption or its absence and the levels of either selenoproteins or selenoenzyme activity. PMID:25744505

  17. Pvr expression regulators in equilibrium signal control and maintenance of Drosophila blood progenitors.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Bama Charan; Shim, Jiwon; Evans, Cory J; Banerjee, Utpal

    2014-09-08

    Blood progenitors within the lymph gland, a larval organ that supports hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster, are maintained by integrating signals emanating from niche-like cells and those from differentiating blood cells. We term the signal from differentiating cells the 'equilibrium signal' in order to distinguish it from the 'niche signal'. Earlier we showed that equilibrium signaling utilizes Pvr (the Drosophila PDGF/VEGF receptor), STAT92E, and adenosine deaminase-related growth factor A (ADGF-A) (Mondal et al., 2011). Little is known about how this signal initiates during hematopoietic development. To identify new genes involved in lymph gland blood progenitor maintenance, particularly those involved in equilibrium signaling, we performed a genetic screen that identified bip1 (bric à brac interacting protein 1) and Nucleoporin 98 (Nup98) as additional regulators of the equilibrium signal. We show that the products of these genes along with the Bip1-interacting protein RpS8 (Ribosomal protein S8) are required for the proper expression of Pvr.

  18. Tuning LeSPL-CNR expression by SlymiR157 affects tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Kong, Junhua; Lai, Tongfei; Manning, Kenneth; Wu, Chaoqun; Wang, Ying; Qin, Cheng; Li, Bin; Yu, Zhiming; Zhang, Xian; He, Meiling; Zhang, Pengcheng; Gu, Mei; Yang, Xin; Mahammed, Atef; Li, Chunyang; Osman, Toba; Shi, Nongnong; Wang, Huizhong; Jackson, Stephen; Liu, Yule; Gallusci, Philippe; Hong, Yiguo

    2015-01-19

    In plants, microRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in growth, development, yield, stress response and interactions with pathogens. However no miRNA has been experimentally documented to be functionally involved in fruit ripening although many miRNAs have been profiled in fruits. Here we show that SlymiR157 and SlymiR156 differentially modulate ripening and softening in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SlymiR157 is expressed and developmentally regulated in normal tomato fruits and in those of the Colourless non-ripening (Cnr) epimutant. It regulates expression of the key ripening gene LeSPL-CNR in a likely dose-dependent manner through miRNA-induced mRNA degradation and translation repression. Viral delivery of either pre-SlymiR157 or mature SlymiR157 results in delayed ripening. Furthermore, qRT-PCR profiling of key ripening regulatory genes indicates that the SlymiR157-target LeSPL-CNR may affect expression of LeMADS-RIN, LeHB1, SlAP2a and SlTAGL1. However SlymiR156 does not affect the onset of ripening, but it impacts fruit softening after the red ripe stage. Our findings reveal that working together with a ripening network of transcription factors, SlymiR157 and SlymiR156 form a critical additional layer of regulatory control over the fruit ripening process in tomato.

  19. Global Deletion of TSPO Does Not Affect the Viability and Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaishan; Yang, Jia; Yang, Qi; Fu, Yi; Hu, Yu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Weiqing; Cui, Lianxian; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Translocator Protein (18kDa, TSPO) is a mitochondrial outer membrane transmembrane protein. Its expression is elevated during inflammation and injury. However, the function of TSPO in vivo is still controversial. Here, we constructed a TSPO global knockout (KO) mouse with a Cre-LoxP system that abolished TSPO protein expression in all tissues and showed normal phenotypes in the physiological condition. The birth rates of TSPO heterozygote (Het) x Het or KO x KO breeding were consistent with Mendel’s Law, suggesting a normal viability of TSPO KO mice at birth. RNA-seq analysis showed no significant difference in the gene expression profile of lung tissues from TSPO KO mice compared with wild type mice, including the genes associated with bronchial alveoli immune homeostasis. The alveolar macrophage population was not affected by TSPO deletion in the physiological condition. Our findings contradict the results of Papadopoulos, but confirmed Selvaraj’s findings. This study confirms TSPO deficiency does not affect viability and bronchial alveolar immune homeostasis. PMID:27907096

  20. A gene expression signature for recent onset rheumatoid arthritis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, N; Sokka, T; Seehorn, C; Kraft, B; Maas, K; Moore, J; Aune, T

    2004-01-01

    Background: In previous studies the presence of a distinct gene expression pattern has been shown in peripheral blood cells from patients with autoimmune disease. Objective: To determine whether other specific signatures might be used to identify subsets of these autoimmune diseases and whether gene expression patterns in early disease might identify pathogenetic factors. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were acquired from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and analysed by microarrays containing over 4300 named human genes. Patients with RA for <2 years were compared with subjects with longstanding RA (average duration 10 years) and with patients with other immune or autoimmune diagnoses. Results: Cluster analyses permitted separation of the patients with early RA (ERA) from those with longstanding disease. Comparison with other patient groups suggested that the ERA signature showed some overlap with that seen in the normal immune response to viral antigen as well as with a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Conclusions: The ERA signature may reflect, in part, a response to an unknown infectious agent. Furthermore, shared features with some lupus patients suggest that common aetiological factors and pathogenetic pathways may be involved in these two autoimmune disorders. PMID:15479887

  1. Molecular identification and expression analysis of lipocalins from blood feeding taiga tick, Ixodes persulcatus Schulze.

    PubMed

    Konnai, Satoru; Nishikado, Hideto; Yamada, Shinji; Imamura, Saiki; Ito, Takuya; Onuma, Misao; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2011-02-01

    Lipocalins have been known for their several biological activities in blood-sucking arthropods. Recently, the identification and characterization of lipocalins from Ixodes ricinus (LIRs) have been reported and functions of lipocalins are well documented. In this study, we have characterized four Ixodes persulcatus lipocalins that were discovered while analyzing I. persulcatus tick salivary gland EST library. We show that the four I. persulcatus lipocalins, here after named LIPERs (lipocalin from I. persulcatus) are 28.8-94.4% identical to LIRs from I. ricinus. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that lipocalin genes were expressed specifically in the salivary glands throughout life cycle stages of the ticks and were up-regulated by blood feeding. The specific expressions were also confirmed by Western blotting analysis. Furthermore, to investigate whether native lipocalins are secreted into the host during tick feeding, the reactivity of anti-serum raised against saliva of adult ticks to recombinant lipocalins was tested by Western blotting. The lipocalins are potentially secreted into the host during tick feeding as revealed by specific reactivity of recombinant lipocalins with mouse antibodies to I. persulcatus tick saliva. Preliminary vaccination of mice with recombinant lipocalins elicited that period to reach engorgement was significantly delayed and the engorgement weight was significantly reduced as compared to the control. Further elucidation of the biological functions of LIPERs are required to fully understand the pathways involved in the modulation of host immune responses.

  2. Gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of ulcerative colitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ying-Lei; Xiao, Yu-Liang; Du, Yan; Duan, Li-Ping

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To identify peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression profiles of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, using oligonucleotide microarrays, to gain insights into UC molecular mechanisms. METHODS: The Human OneArray microarrays were used for a complete genome-wide transcript profiling of PBMCs from 12 UC patients and 6 controls. Differential analysis per gene was performed with a random variance model; t test and P values were adjusted to control the false discovery rate (5%). Gene ontology (GO) was deployed to analyze differentially expressed genes at significant levels between patients and controls to identify the biological processes involved in UC. RESULTS: Comparative analysis revealed that 4438 probes (4188 genes) were differentially expressed between the two groups, of which 3689 probes (3590 genes) were down-regulated whereas 749 probes (598 genes) were up-regulated. Many disregulated genes in our data have been reported by previous microarray studies carried out on intestinal mucosa samples, such as S100A8, CEACAM1 and S100A9. GO enrichment analysis revealed 67 high enrichment up-regulated categories and one significant down-regulated category. The up-regulated genes were mainly involved in immune and inflammatory response, cell cycle and proliferation, DNA metabolism and repair. CONCLUSION: Gene expression profiling of PBMCs from patients with UC has highlighted several novel gene categories that could contribute to the pathogenesis of UC. PMID:23745037

  3. mRNA expression of dopamine receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes of computer game addicts.

    PubMed

    Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Eghbali, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Excessive playing of computer games like some other behaviors could lead to addiction. Addictive behaviors may induce their reinforcing effects through stimulation of the brain dopaminergic mesolimbic pathway. The status of dopamine receptors in the brain may be parallel to their homologous receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Here, we have investigated the mRNA expression of dopamine D3, D4 and D5 receptors in PBLs of computer game addicts (n = 20) in comparison to normal subjects (n = 20), using a real-time PCR method. The results showed that the expression level of D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts were not statistically different from the control group. However, the expression of the mRNA of D5 dopamine receptor was significantly down-regulated in PBLs of computer game addicts and reached 0.42 the amount of the control group. It is concluded that unlike with drug addiction, the expression levels of the D3 and D4 dopamine receptors in computer game addicts are not altered compared to the control group. However, reduced level of the D5 dopamine receptor in computer game addicts may serve as a peripheral marker in studies where the confounding effects of abused drugs are unwanted.

  4. In vitro gene expression profile of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells in early Mycobacterium bovis infection

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, YAFEN; CHOU, CHUNG-HSI; TSAI, HSIANG-JUNG

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes tuberculosis in cattle and humans. Understanding the interactions between M. bovis and host cells is essential in developing tools for the prevention, detection, and treatment of M. bovis infection. Gene expression profiles provide a large amount of information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions. The present study analyzed changes in gene expression in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at 0, 4 and 24 h following exposure to M. bovis. Using bovine whole-genome microarrays, a total of 420 genes were identified that exhibited significant alterations in expression (≥2-fold). Significantly enriched genes were identified using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, of which the highest differentially expressed genes were associated with the immune system, signal transduction, endocytosis, cellular transport, inflammation, and apoptosis. Of the genes associated with the immune system, 84.85% displayed downregulation. These findings support the view that M. bovis inhibits signaling pathways of antimycobacterial host defense in bovine PBMCs. These in vitro data demonstrated that molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of tuberculosis begin early, during the initial 24 h following M. bovis infection. PMID:26668602

  5. Latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression in the peripheral blood of astronauts.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Raymond P; Kozlova, Elena V; Sams, Clarence F; Pierson, Duane L; Walling, Dennis M

    2011-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent and replicative gene transcription was analyzed in peripheral blood B-lymphocytes from astronauts who flew on short-duration (∼11 days) Shuttle missions and long-duration (∼180 days) International Space Station (ISS) missions. Latent, immediate-early, and early gene replicative viral transcripts were detected in samples from six astronauts who flew on short-duration Shuttle missions, whereas viral gene transcription was mostly absent in samples from 24 healthy donors. Samples from six astronauts who flew on long-duration ISS missions were characterized by expanded expression of latent, immediate-early, and early gene transcripts and new onset expression of late replicative transcription upon return to Earth. These data indicate that EBV-infected cells are no longer expressing the restricted set of viral genes that characterize latency but are expressing latent and lytic gene transcripts. These data also suggest the possibility of EBV-related complications in future long-duration missions, in particular interplanetary travel.

  6. Country of birth affects blood pressure in the French hypertensive diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Aoun Bahous, Sola; Thomas, Frédérique; Pannier, Bruno; Danchin, Nicolas; Safar, Michel E.

    2015-01-01

    In a population of 56,242 individuals living in France, we showed that individuals born in France have significantly different levels of blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors than African and Asian populations born in their own country but living long-term in France (average duration of stay, 5–10 years). The objective of our study was to investigate the impact of country of birth on BP and CV risk factors in a subpopulation of 9245 patients selected solely on the diagnosis of hypertension, either alone or with simultaneous type 2 diabetes. In the subgroup of individuals with hypertension alone, brachial systolic, diastolic, mean and pulse pressure (PP), heart rate (HR), augmentation index and PP amplification were significantly higher in African-born than French- and Asian-born populations. In the subgroup of individuals with both hypertension and diabetes, only augmentation index, PP amplification and brachial and central PP, but not brachial systolic, diastolic, mean BP, and HR, were elevated when the African-born subgroup was compared to the French- and Asian-born populations. Increased body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR), and deprivation scores, but not increased plasma lipids or glycemia, were consistently associated with the African-born population. The combination of diabetes and hypertension in African populations was associated with increased aortic stiffness and PP, together with greater body weight and WHR. In individuals with increased PP and hence systolic hypertension, increased PP requires systolic BP to be reduced whereas notable reductions in diastolic BP may have deleterious consequences. PMID:26388785

  7. Ethanol affects acylated and total ghrelin levels in peripheral blood of alcohol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Michal; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Geppert, Bogna; Wachowiak, Roman; Dyr, Wanda; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, Teresa

    2013-07-01

    There is a hypothesis that ghrelin could take part in the central effects of alcohol as well as function as a peripheral indicator of the changes which occur during long-term alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to determine a correlation between alcohol concentration and acylated and total form of ghrelin after a single administration of alcohol (intraperitoneal, i.p.) (experiment 1) and prolonged ethanol consumption (experiment 2). The study was performed using Wistar alcohol preferring (PR) and non-preferring (NP) rats and rats from inbred line (Warsaw High Preferring, WHP; Warsaw Low Preferring, WLP). It was found that ghrelin in ethanol-naive WHP animals showed a significantly lower level when compared with the ethanol-naive WLP or Wistar rats. After acute ethanol administration in doses of 1.0; 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg, i.p., the simple (WHP) or inverse (WLP and Wistar) relationship between alcohol concentration and both form of ghrelin levels in plasma were found. Chronic alcohol intake in all groups of rats led to decrease of acylated ghrelin concentration. PR and WHP rats, after chronic alcohol drinking, had lower levels of both form of ghrelin in comparison with NP and WLP rats, respectively, and the observed differences in ghrelin levels were in inverse relationship with their alcohol intake. In conclusion, it is suggested that there is a strong relationship between alcohol administration or intake, ethanol concentration in blood and both active and total ghrelin level in the experimental animals, and that ghrelin plasma concentration can be a marker of alcohol drinking predisposition.

  8. Can Acupuncture Affect the Circadian Rhythm of Blood Pressure? A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Mi; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Sohn, Il-Suk; Jung, Woo-Sang; Moon, Sang-Kwan; Park, Jung-Mi; Ko, Chang-Nam; Cho, Ki-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) in patients with hypertension. Design The study was designed as a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial. Subjects were randomly divided into an active acupuncture group and a sham acupuncture group. Each patient received real or sham acupuncture treatment twice a week for 8 weeks. Acupuncture needles were inserted at bilateral ST 36 plus PC 6; placebo points. Subjects Thirty-three (33) patients with essential hypertension were the subjects. Outcome measures Twenty-four (24)-hour ambulatory BP was assessed before and after treatment. Results After the treatment period, there was a significant increase in nocturnal diastolic BP dipping compared to that at baseline (10.20±7.56 mm Hg versus 5.21±10.19 mm Hg, p=0.038) in the active acupuncture group but not in the sham acupuncture group. The nocturnal diastolic BP dipping response to active acupuncture treatment was significantly different from the response seen with the sham acupuncture treatment (p=0.041). The number of dippers also increased from 4 to 8 in the active acupuncture group. Average systolic and diastolic BP was not changed significantly except for nighttime diastolic BP (90.32±11.47 mm Hg to 87.83±9.16 mm Hg, p=0.041). Conclusions It is suggested that acupuncture treatment could be useful for improving the circadian rhythm of BP in patients with hypertension. PMID:22906144

  9. Hormonal and nonhormonal factors affecting sex hormone-binding globulin levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, J H

    1988-01-01

    Researchers in Utrecht, the Netherlands have studied the effects of different factors, such as oral contraceptives (OCs), on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in blood. The SHBG levels in women who continuously used OCs consisting only of .05 mg of ethinyl estradiol (EE2) rose as high as 260% + or - 25% of those in women not using OCs. Further, mean SHBG levels of women using combination OCs of EE2 and levonorgestrel were 10-60% higher than women not using OCs. SHBG levels were significantly higher than the use of a sequential OC containing decreasing amounts of EE2 and increasing amounts of levonorgestrel than those cause by use of a continuous combined OC with .03 mg and .15 mg respectively. As the dosage of EE2 increased in combination OCs with 2.5 mg lynestrenol, the SHBG increased from 20% (.05 mg EE2) to 150% (.75 mg EE2). SHBG levels after taking EE2 and cyproterone acetate increased significantly more (240%) than levels after EE2 and desogestrel (170%), or after EE2 and gestoden (140%) [p.001]. SHBG levels of women who took OCs containing only .03 mg of levonorgestrel daily decreased 35% (p.01). These levels fell by 30% in women who received 150 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate intramuscularly every 3 months (p.001). SHBG concentrations increased when estrogens were taken orally for noncontraceptive purposes, but they did not change when they were administered percutaneously. As body weight increased the SHBG levels decreased despite hormonal status or sex. Further, the lower the fat content of one's diet the higher the SHBG levels and vice versa. SHBG levels are higher in males with flaccid lungs than they are in males with healthy lungs.

  10. Squeezing Blood From a Stone: How Income Inequality Affects the Health of the American Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Income inequality is very topical—in both political and economic circles—but although income and socioeconomic status are known determinants of health status, income inequality has garnered scant attention with respect to the health of US workers. By several measures, income inequality in the United States has risen since 1960. In addition to pressures from an increasingly competitive labor market, with cash wages losing out to benefits, workers face pressures from changes in work organization. We explored these factors and the mounting evidence of income inequality as a contributing factor to poorer health for the workforce. Although political differences may divide the policy approaches undertaken, addressing income inequality is likely to improve the overall social and health conditions for those affected. PMID:25713936

  11. Modulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression by red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Yalcin, Ozlem; Ozdem, Sadi; Armstrong, Jonathan K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2004-01-01

    The effects of enhanced red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular control mechanisms have been investigated in a rat exchange transfusion model. RBC aggregation for cells in native plasma was increased via a novel method using RBCs covalently coated with a 13-kDa poloxamer copolymer (Pluronic F-98); control experiments used RBCs coated with a nonaggregating 8.4-kDa poloxamer (Pluronic F-68). Rats exchange transfused with aggregating RBC suspensions demonstrated significantly enhanced RBC aggregation throughout the 5-day follow-up period, with mean arterial blood pressure increasing gradually over this period. Arterial segments ( approximately 300 microm in diameter) were isolated from gracilis muscle on the fifth day and mounted between two glass micropipettes in a special chamber equipped with pressure servo-control system. Dose-dependent dilation by ACh and flow-mediated dilation of arterial segments pressurized to 30 mmHg and preconstricted to 45-55% of the original diameter by phenylephrine were significantly blunted in rats with enhanced RBC aggregation. Both responses were totally abolished by nonspecific NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor (Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester) treatment of arterial segments, indicating that the responses were NO related. Additionally, expression of endothelial NOS protein was found to be decreased in muscle samples obtained from rats exchanged with aggregating cell suspensions. These results imply that enhanced RBC aggregation results in suppressed expression of NO synthesizing mechanisms, thereby leading to altered vasomotor tonus; the mechanisms involved most likely relate to decreased wall shear stresses due to decreased blood flow and/or increased axial accumulation of RBCs.

  12. Gene Expression Profile of Peripheral Blood Monocytes: A Step towards the Molecular Diagnosis of Celiac Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Cielo, Donatella; Morelli, Marinita; Gambino, Giuseppina; Zanzi, Delia; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Greco, Luigi; Auricchio, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Aim Celiac disease (CD) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease induced by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Despite technological progress, the diagnosis of CD is still based on duodenal biopsy as it was 50 years ago. In this study we analysed the expression of CD-associated genes in small bowel biopsies of patients and controls in order to explore the multivariate pathway of the expression profile of CD patients. Then, using multivariant discriminant analysis, we evaluated whether the expression profiles of these genes in peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) differed between patients and controls. Participants Thirty-seven patients with active and 11 with treated CD, 40 healthy controls and 9 disease controls (Crohn’s disease patients) were enrolled. Results Several genes were differentially expressed in CD patients versus controls, but the analysis of each single gene did not provided a comprehensive picture. A multivariate discriminant analysis showed that the expression of 5 genes in intestinal mucosa accounted for 93% of the difference between CD patients and controls. We then applied the same approach to PBMs, on a training set of 20 samples. The discriminant equation obtained was validated on a testing cohort of 10 additional cases and controls, and we obtained a correct classification of all CD cases and of 91% of the control samples. We applied this equation to treated CD patients and to disease controls and obtained a discrimination of 100%. Conclusions The combined expression of 4 genes allows one to discriminate between CD patients and controls, and between CD patients on a gluten-free diet and disease controls. Our results contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions among CD-associated genes, and they may represent a starting point for the development of a molecular diagnosis of celiac disease. PMID:24069342

  13. Changes in gene expression and methylation in the blood of patients with first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi; Noto, Cristiano; Gadelha, Ary; Santoro, Marcos Leite; Spindola, Leticia Maria; Gouvea, Eduardo Sauerbronn; Stilhano, Roberta Sessa; Ortiz, Bruno Bertolucci; Silva, Patricia Natalia; Sato, João Ricardo; Han, Sang Won; Cordeiro, Quirino; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Belangero, Sintia Iole

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental health disorder with high heritability. The investigation of individuals during their first-episode psychosis (FEP), before the progression of psychotic disorders and especially before treatment with antipsychotic medications, is particularly helpful for understanding this complex disease and for the identification of potential biomarkers. In this study, we compared the expression of genes that are involved in neurotransmission and neurodevelopment of antipsychotic-naive FEP in the peripheral blood of patients (n=51) and healthy controls (n=51). In addition, we investigated the differentially expressed genes with respect to a) DNA methylation, b) the correlation between gene expression and clinical variables (PANSS), and c) gene expression changes after risperidone treatment. Expression levels of 11 genes were quantified with SYBR Green. For methylation analysis, bisulfite sequencing was performed. A significant decrease in GCH1 mRNA levels was observed in FEP patients relative to controls. Also, when we compare the FEP patients after risperidone treatment with controls, this difference remains significant, and no significant differences were observed in GCH1 mRNA levels when comparing patients before and after risperidone treatment. Additionally, although the differences were non-significant after Bonferroni correction, the expression of GCH1 seemed to be correlated with PANSS scores, and the GCH1 promoter region was more methylated in FEP than in controls, thus corroborating the results obtained at the mRNA level. Few studies have been conducted on GCH1, and future studies are needed to clarify its potential role in the progression of schizophrenia.

  14. Expression of ABH blood group antigens, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I, and type IV collagen in the sinusoids of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Terada, T; Nakanuma, Y

    1991-01-01

    The expression of blood group antigens (A, B, H, Lewis(a) and Lewis(b)), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), factor VIII-related antigen, and type IV collagen on the sinusoids was examined immunohistochemically in 15 cases of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 11 cases of cirrhosis, 12 cases of chronic active hepatitis, and in a control sample of 16 normal livers. Sinusoidal endothelial cells of HCC characteristically showed a diffuse and strong immunoreactivity to ABH blood group antigens in the specimen with a comparable ABO blood group. The sinusoidal endothelial cells were also diffusely and strongly positive for UEA-I receptors. In contrast, in cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis a few sinusoidal endothelial cells were positive for ABH blood group antigens and UEA-I receptors. In normal livers, only a few sinusoidal endothelial cells were positive for ABH blood group antigens and UEA-1 receptors. Tests for factor VIII-related antigen and Lewis blood group antigens were almost negative on sinusoidal endothelial cells. Although type IV collagen was distributed diffusely in the space of Disse in these four groups, its expression was strongest in HCC. Blood vessels of portal tracts and fibrous septa were positive for ABH blood group antigens, UEA-1 receptors, factor VIII-related antigen, and type IV collagen, but negative for Lewis blood group antigens. These findings suggest that some sinusoidal endothelial cells undergo "capillarization" in cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis, and that the majority of sinusoidal endothelial cells of HCC have phenotypic characteristics of capillaries.

  15. Ectopic Expression of WRINKLED1 Affects Fatty Acid Homeostasis in Brachypodium distachyon Vegetative Tissues1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Munz, Jacob; Cass, Cynthia; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kong, Que; Ma, Wei; Sedbrook, John; Benning, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) is a storage lipid used for food purposes and as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production. WRINKLED1 (WRI1) is a transcription factor that governs fatty acid (FA) synthesis and, indirectly, TAG accumulation in oil-storing plant tissues, and its ectopic expression has led to TAG accumulation in vegetative tissues of different dicotyledonous plants. The ectopic expression of BdWRI1 in the grass Brachypodium distachyon induced the transcription of predicted genes involved in glycolysis and FA biosynthesis, and TAG content was increased up to 32.5-fold in 8-week-old leaf blades. However, the ectopic expression of BdWRI1 also caused cell death in leaves, which has not been observed previously in dicotyledonous plants such as Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Lipid analysis indicated that the free FA content was 2-fold elevated in BdWRI1-expressing leaf blades of B. distachyon. The transcription of predicted genes involved in β-oxidation was induced. In addition, linoleic FA treatment caused cell death in B. distachyon leaf blades, an effect that was reversed by the addition of the FA biosynthesis inhibitor cerulenin. Taken together, ectopic expression of BdWRI1 in B. distachyon enhances FA biosynthesis and TAG accumulation in leaves, as expected, but also leads to increased free FA content, which has cytotoxic effects leading to cell death. Thus, while WRI appears to ubiquitously affect FA biosynthesis and TAG accumulation in diverse plants, its ectopic expression can lead to undesired side effects depending on the context of the specific lipid metabolism of the respective plant species. PMID:26419778

  16. Ectopic Expression of WRINKLED1 Affects Fatty Acid Homeostasis in Brachypodium distachyon Vegetative Tissues.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Munz, Jacob; Cass, Cynthia; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kong, Que; Ma, Wei; Sedbrook, John; Benning, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) is a storage lipid used for food purposes and as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production. WRINKLED1 (WRI1) is a transcription factor that governs fatty acid (FA) synthesis and, indirectly, TAG accumulation in oil-storing plant tissues, and its ectopic expression has led to TAG accumulation in vegetative tissues of different dicotyledonous plants. The ectopic expression of BdWRI1 in the grass Brachypodium distachyon induced the transcription of predicted genes involved in glycolysis and FA biosynthesis, and TAG content was increased up to 32.5-fold in 8-week-old leaf blades. However, the ectopic expression of BdWRI1 also caused cell death in leaves, which has not been observed previously in dicotyledonous plants such as Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Lipid analysis indicated that the free FA content was 2-fold elevated in BdWRI1-expressing leaf blades of B. distachyon. The transcription of predicted genes involved in β-oxidation was induced. In addition, linoleic FA treatment caused cell death in B. distachyon leaf blades, an effect that was reversed by the addition of the FA biosynthesis inhibitor cerulenin. Taken together, ectopic expression of BdWRI1 in B. distachyon enhances FA biosynthesis and TAG accumulation in leaves, as expected, but also leads to increased free FA content, which has cytotoxic effects leading to cell death. Thus, while WRI appears to ubiquitously affect FA biosynthesis and TAG accumulation in diverse plants, its ectopic expression can lead to undesired side effects depending on the context of the specific lipid metabolism of the respective plant species.

  17. In vitro neuropeptide Y mRNA expressing model for screening essences that may affect appetite using Rolf B1.T cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiau-Wei; Wu, Po-Ju; Chiang, Been-Huang

    2012-08-15

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is the most important appetite regulator. This study aimed to establish an in vitro NPY mRNA expression model for screening essences to determine if they are an appetite stimulator or inhibitor. We cultured the olfactory nerve cells Rolf B1.T for 2 days and then treated the cells with the known appetite inhibitor limonene and stimulator linalool. It was found that linalool could significantly stimulate NPY mRNA expression in 10 min, and limonene had the opposite effect. Similar results were also found in primary olfactory ensheathing cells isolated from rats. Further clinical trials using human subjects found that, when 10 min of treatment was applied, linalool indeed increased the serum NPY level in human peripheral blood. Limonene, on the other hand, decreased the serum NPY level. Thus, NPY mRNA expression in Rolf B1.T cells could be used as an in vitro model for screening essences that may affect appetite.

  18. Perinatal exposure to diesel exhaust affects gene expression in mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Tsukue, Naomi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kumamoto, Takayuki; Takano, Hirohisa; Takeda, Ken

    2009-11-01

    Many environmental toxins alter reproductive function and affect the central nervous system (CNS). Gonadal steroid hormones cause differentiation of neurons and affect brain function and behavior during the perinatal period, and the CNS is thought to be particularly susceptible to toxic insult during this period. It was, therefore, hypothesized that inhalation of diesel exhaust (DE) during the fetal or suckling period would disrupt the sexual differentiation of brain function in mice, and the effects of exposure to DE during the perinatal period on sexual differentiation related gene expression of the brain were investigated. In the fetal period exposure group, pregnant ICR mice were exposed to DE from 1.5 days post-coitum (dpc) until 16 dpc. In the neonatal period exposure group, dams and their offspring were exposed to DE from the day of birth [postnatal day (PND)-0] until PND-16. Then, the cerebrums of males and females at PND-2, -5, and -16 from both groups were analyzed for expression level of mRNA encoding stress-related proteins [cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)] and steroid hormone receptors [estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha), estrogen receptor beta (ER beta), androgen receptor (AR)]. Expression levels of ER alpha and ER beta mRNA were increased in the cerebrum of newborns in the DE exposure groups as well as mRNA for CYP1A1 and HO-1. Results indicate that perinatal exposure to DE during the critical period of sexual differentiation of the brain may affect endocrine function.

  19. Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein affect protein expression and dictate the clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Hans D

    2009-01-01

    Mutations of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP) are responsible for classic Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS), X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and in rare instances congenital X-linked neutropenia (XLN). WASP is a regulator of actin polymerization in hematopoietic cells with well-defined functional domains that are involved in cell signaling and cell locomotion, immune synapse formation, and apoptosis. Mutations of WASP are located throughout the gene and either inhibit or disregulate normal WASP function. Analysis of a large patient population demonstrates a strong phenotype-genotype correlation. Classic WAS occurs when WASP is absent, XLT when mutated WASP is expressed and XLN when missense mutations occur in the Cdc42-binding site. However, because there are exceptions to this rule it is difficult to predict the long-term prognosis of a given affected boy solely based on the analysis of WASP expression.

  20. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Mencalha, A. L.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2014-11-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  1. Food source affects the expression of vitellogenin and fecundity of a biological control agent, Neoseiulus cucumeris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunlong; Li, Dunsong; Zhang, Min; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Guren

    2014-07-01

    Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is one of the most widely used and important biological control agents for thrips and other small pests worldwide. In the present study, we cloned two cDNAs of vitellogenins (Vgs, NcVg1 and NcVg2) and analyzed the effect of food source on the expression of both Vgs and fecundity in female adults. NcVgs showed higher sequence similarity to Vgs from Parasitiformes. Both neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods for phylogenetic analysis of NcVgs yielded similar topologies and showed that the Parasitiformes except Haemaphysalis longicornis segregated into a single clade that was separated into two subclades including one of both Vgs from N. cucumeris. Both transcripts, NcVg1 and NcVg2 revealed similar trends during developmental periods and reached the maximum level at the pre-oviposition period. When fed with different food sources, both NcVg1 and NcVg2 of female adults demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05) during the pre-oviposition period. Meanwhile, a positive correlation between the expression of Vgs and fecundity was observed. Therefore, the nutrients provided by the food sources affected fecundity resulting in differential expression of Vgs. Vitellogenin expression can be used as a molecular marker of fecundity of N. cucumeris.

  2. Paternal benzo[a]pyrene exposure affects gene expression in the early developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Brevik, Asgeir; Lindeman, Birgitte; Rusnakova, Vendula; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Duale, Nur

    2012-09-01

    The health of the offspring depends on the genetic constitution of the parental germ cells. The paternal genome appears to be important; e.g., de novo mutations in some genes seem to arise mostly from the father, whereas epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones are frequent in the paternal gonads. Environmental contaminants which may affect the integrity of the germ cells comprise the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). B[a]P has received much attention due to its ubiquitous distribution, its carcinogenic and mutagenic potential, and also effects on reproduction. We conducted an in vitro fertilization (IVF) experiment using sperm cells from B[a]P-exposed male mice to study effects of paternal B[a]P exposure on early gene expression in the developing mouse embryo. Male mice were exposed to a single acute dose of B[a]P (150 mg/kg, ip) 4 days prior to isolation of cauda sperm, followed by IVF of oocytes from unexposed superovulated mice. Gene expression in fertilized zygotes/embryos was determined using reverse transcription-qPCR at the 1-, 2-, 4-, 8-, and blastocyst cell stages of embryo development. We found that paternal B[a]P exposure altered the expression of numerous genes in the developing embryo especially at the blastocyst stage. Some genes were also affected at earlier developmental stages. Embryonic gene expression studies seem useful to identify perturbations of signaling pathways resulting from exposure to contaminants, and can be used to address mechanisms of paternal effects on embryo development.

  3. Berberine lowers blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients through increasing insulin receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wei, Jing; Xue, Rong; Wu, Jin-Dan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Zi-Zheng; Wang, Shu-Kui; Zhou, Zheng-Xian; Song, Dan-Qing; Wang, Yue-Ming; Pan, Huai-Ning; Kong, Wei-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2010-02-01

    Our previous work demonstrated that berberine (BBR) increases insulin receptor (InsR) expression and improves glucose utility both in vitro and in animal models. Here, we study the InsR-up-regulating and glucose-lowering activities of BBR in humans. Our results showed that BBR increased InsR messenger RNA and protein expression in a variety of human cell lines, including CEM, HCT-116, SW1990, HT1080, 293T, and hepatitis B virus-transfected human liver cells. Accordingly, insulin-stimulated phosphorylations of InsR beta-subunit and Akt were increased after BBR treatment in cultured cells. In the clinical study, BBR significantly lowered fasting blood glucose (FBG), hemoglobin A(1c), triglyceride, and insulin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The FBG- and hemoglobin A(1c)-lowering efficacies of BBR were similar to those of metformin and rosiglitazone. In the BBR-treated patients, the percentages of peripheral blood lymphocytes that express InsR were significantly elevated after therapy. Berberine also lowered FBG effectively in chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C patients with T2DM or impaired fasting glucose. Liver function was improved greatly in these patients by showing reduction of liver enzymes. Our results confirmed the activity of BBR on InsR in humans and its relationship with the glucose-lowering effect. Together with our previous report, we strongly suggest BBR as an ideal medicine for T2DM with a mechanism different from metformin and rosiglitazone.

  4. Dopamine D5 receptor expression is unchanged in peripheral blood lymphocytes in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ricci, A; Chiandussi, L; Schena, M; Schiavone, D; Veglio, F; Amenta, F

    1995-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate possible changes in the expression of lymphocyte dopamine receptor in essential hypertension. The expression of dopamine D5 receptor was evaluated by radioligand binding techniques using [3H]-SCH 23390 as ligand. Plasma catecholamines, aldosterone levels and plasma renin activity were also measured. Eleven borderline hypertensive patients, 15 patient with the mild essential hypertension, 7 patients with moderate essential hypertension and 5 patients with severe essential hypertension were examined. Plasma catecholamine levels were assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Dopamine D5 receptor was measured by radioligand binding techniques. Plasma aldosterone levels and renin activity were determined by radio immunoassay. [3H]-SCH 23390 was specifically bound to human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The binding was time-, temperature- and concentration-dependent with a dissociation constant (Kd) value of 0.59 nM and a maximum density of binding sites (Bmax) of 223 pmol/10(6) cells. Dopamine competed with [3H]-SCH 23390 binding in the submicromolar range suggesting the labelling of a dopamine D5 receptor. No changes in the density of [3H]-SCH 23390 binding sites were observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes between essential hypertensive patients and normotensive subjects. Also catecholamines, plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels were unchanged. In spite of the availability of a sensitive technique for measuring dopamine receptors in human peripheral lymphocytes, no change in their expression was noticeable in essential hypertension. This suggests that dopamine receptor analysis in essential hypertension is not a useful marker for investigating hypertension-dependent changes of the peripheral dopaminergic system.

  5. Differential expression of the granzymes A, K and M and perforin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bade, Britta; Boettcher, Heidrun Elise; Lohrmann, Jens; Hink-Schauer, Clara; Bratke, Kai; Jenne, Dieter E; Virchow, J Christian; Luttmann, Werner

    2005-11-01

    Granzymes (Gzm) are a group of serine proteases which are stored in the granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In humans, five granzymes have been characterized to date at the molecular level. While GzmA and GzmB have been extensively studied, little is known about GzmH, GzmK and GzmM. In this study, we describe the generation of mAbs against human GzmK and GzmM by genetic immunization. The obtained anti-GzmK and anti-GzmM mAbs are not cross-reactive with GzmA, GzmB, GzmM and GzmA, GzmB, GzmK, respectively, and show a granular staining pattern in human lymphocytes. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed that GzmA, GzmM and perforin show a similar distribution. They are expressed in almost all CD16+CD56+ NK cells, CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and gammadelta T cells as well as in 20-30% of all CD3+CD8+ TC cells. Surprisingly, GzmK was not detected in the highly cytotoxic CD16+CD56+ NK cells but was preferentially expressed in lymphocytes of the T cell lineage, staining 20% of CD3+CD8+ TC cells, 50% of CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and 40% of gammadelta T cells, as well as 60% of the small sub-population of CD56bright+ NK cells. Our data suggest that human granzymes are differentially expressed in distinct sub-populations of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  6. The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome associated protein interacts with HsNip7 and its down-regulation affects gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hesling, Cedric; Oliveira, Carla C.; Castilho, Beatriz A.; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2007-12-10

    The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal disorder with pleiotropic phenotypes including pancreatic, skeletal and bone marrow deficiencies and predisposition to hematological dysfunctions. SDS has been associated to mutations in the SBDS gene, encoding a highly conserved protein that was shown to function in ribosome biogenesis in yeast. In this work, we show that SBDS is found in complexes containing the human Nip7 ortholog. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing in a stable SBDS knock-down HEK293-derivative cell line revealed accumulation of a small RNA which is a further indication of SBDS involvement in rRNA biosynthesis. Global transcription and polysome-bound mRNA profiling revealed that SBDS knock-down affects expression of critical genes involved in brain development and function, bone morphogenesis, blood cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell adhesion. Expression of a group of growth and signal transduction factors and of DNA damage response genes is also affected. In SBDS knock-down cells, 34 mRNAs showed decreased and 55 mRNAs showed increased association to polysomes, among which is a group encoding proteins involved in alternative splicing and RNA modification. These results indicate that SBDS is required for accurate expression of genes important for proper brain, skeletal, and blood cell development.

  7. Cellular Defense System Gene Expression Profiling of Human Whole Blood: Opportunities to Predict Health Benefits in Response to Diet12

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Janice E.

    2012-01-01

    Diet is a critical factor in the maintenance of human cellular defense systems, immunity, inflammation, redox regulation, metabolism, and DNA repair that ensure optimal health and reduce disease risk. Assessment of dietary modulation of cellular defense systems in humans has been limited due to difficulties in accessing target tissues. Notably, peripheral blood gene expression profiles associated with nonhematologic disease are detectable. Coupled with recent innovations in gene expression technologies, gene expression profiling of human blood to determine predictive markers associated with health status and dietary modulation is now a feasible prospect for nutrition scientists. This review focuses on cellular defense system gene expression profiling of human whole blood and the opportunities this presents, using recent technological advances, to predict health status and benefits conferred by diet. PMID:22797985

  8. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men.

  9. Deficits in plasma oxytocin responses and increased negative affect, stress, and blood pressure in mothers with cocaine exposure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Light, Kathleen C; Grewen, Karen M; Amico, Janet A; Boccia, Maria; Brownley, Kimberly A; Johns, Josephine M

    2004-11-01

    In animals, oxytocin enhances maternal behavior and lowers blood pressure (BP) and negative affect, while parturitional cocaine disrupts oxytocin activity and increases maternal neglect and aggression. Thus, we compared oxytocin, BP, maternal behavior, and affect in mothers of infants who used cocaine (cocaine, n = 10) or did not (no drug, n = 25) during pregnancy. Laboratory BP and circulating oxytocin, catecholamines, and cortisol were examined before and during a speech stressor on 2 days, with vs. without prestress baby holding. Ambulatory monitoring assessed BP, urinary norepinephrine, and cortisol for 24 h at home. The cocaine group had lower oxytocin levels, greater hostility and depressed mood, less support from others and mastery over life events, higher BP during all events of testing without the baby, and higher ambulatory BP and urinary norepinephrine at home, while cortisol and epinephrine responses were blunted. Although they tended to hold their babies less often at home, baby holding in the laboratory led to decreased BP in cocaine mothers who then did not differ from no-drug mothers in BP or observed affect.

  10. Seawater Acidification and Elevated Temperature Affect Gene Expression Patterns of the Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenguang; Huang, Xiande; Lin, Jianshi; He, Maoxian

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide results in decrease in seawater pH and increase in temperature. In this study, we demonstrated the synergistic effects of elevated seawater temperature and declined seawater pH on gene expression patterns of aspein, calmodulin, nacrein, she-7-F10 and hsp70 in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Under ‘business-as-usual’ scenarios, four treatments were examined: (1) ambient pH (8.10) and ambient temperature (27°C) (control condition), (2) ambient pH and elevated temperature (+3°C), (3) declined pH (7.70) and ambient temperature, (4) declined pH and elevated temperature. The results showed that under warming and acidic seawater conditions, expression of aspein and calmodulin showed no significant differences among different time point in condition 8.10 T. But the levels of aspein and calmodulin in conditions 8.10 T+3, 7.70 T and 7.70 T+3, and levels of nacrein, she-7-F10 in all the four treatments changed significantly. Low pH and pH×temperature interaction influenced the expression of aspein and calmodulin significantly after hours 48 and 96. Significant effects of low pH and pH×temperature interaction on the expression of nacrein were observed at hour 96. The expression level of she-7-F10 was affected significantly by pH after hours 48 and 96. The expression of hsp70 was significantly affected by temperature, pH, temperature×pH interaction at hour 6, and by temperature×pH interaction at hour 24. This study suggested that declined pH and pH×temperature interaction induced down regulation of calcification related genes, and the interaction between declined seawater pH and elevated temperature caused up regulation of hsp70 in P. facata. These results demonstrate that the declined seawater pH and elevated temperature will impact the physiological process, and potentially the adaptability of P. fucata to future warming and acidified ocean. PMID:22438983

  11. Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the setting of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a relatively common manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis that leads to progressive narrowing of the lumen of leg arteries. Circulating monocytes are in contact with the arterial wall and can serve as reporters of vascular pathology in the setting of PAD. We performed gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with PAD and controls without PAD to identify differentially regulated genes. Methods PAD was defined as an ankle brachial index (ABI) ≤0.9 (n = 19) while age and gender matched controls had an ABI > 1.0 (n = 18). Microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix HG-U133 plus 2.0 gene chips and analyzed using GeneSpring GX 11.0. Gene expression data was normalized using Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) normalization method, differential expression was defined as a fold change ≥1.5, followed by unpaired Mann-Whitney test (P < 0.05) and correction for multiple testing by Benjamini and Hochberg False Discovery Rate. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes was performed using an integrated bioinformatics pipeline with tools for enrichment analysis using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, pathway analysis using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), molecular event enrichment using Reactome annotations and network analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis suite. Extensive biocuration was also performed to understand the functional context of genes. Results We identified 87 genes differentially expressed in the setting of PAD; 40 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated. We employed an integrated bioinformatics pipeline coupled with literature curation to characterize the functional coherence of differentially regulated genes. Conclusion Notably, upregulated genes mediate immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, stress response, phosphorylation, hemostasis, platelet activation and platelet aggregation. Downregulated genes included several genes from

  12. Peripheral blood RNA gene expression profiling in patients with bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Margit; Kõks, Sulev; Soomets, Ursel; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Fernandes, Cathy; Lutsar, Irja; Taba, Pille

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of present study was to find genetic pathways activated during infection with bacterial meningitis (BM) and potentially influencing the course of the infection using genome-wide RNA expression profiling combined with pathway analysis and functional annotation of the differential transcription. Methods: We analyzed 21 patients with BM hospitalized in 2008. The control group consisted of 18 healthy subjects. The RNA was extracted from whole blood, globin mRNA was depleted and gene expression profiling was performed using GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays which can assess the transcription of 28,869 genes. Gene expression profile data were analyzed using Bioconductor packages and Bayesian modeling. Functional annotation of the enriched gene sets was used to define the altered genetic networks. We also analyzed whether gene expression profiles depend on the clinical course and outcome. In order to verify the microarray results, the expression levels of ten functionally relevant genes with high statistical significance (CD177, IL1R2, IL18R1, IL18RAP, OLFM4, TLR5, CPA3, FCER1A, IL5RA, and IL7R) were confirmed by quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR. Results: There were 8569 genes displaying differential expression at a significance level of p < 0.05. Following False Discovery Rate (FDR) correction, a total of 5500 genes remained significant at a p-value of < 0.01. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression in 10 selected genes. Functional annotation and network analysis indicated that most of the genes were related to activation of humoral and cellular immune responses (enrichment score 43). Those changes were found in both adults and in children with BM compared to the healthy controls. The gene expression profiles did not significantly depend on the clinical outcome, but there was a strong influence of the specific type of pathogen underlying BM. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that there is a very strong activation of immune response

  13. Factors circulating in the blood of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients affect osteoblast maturation – Description of a novel in vitro model

    SciTech Connect

    Ehnert, Sabrina; Freude, Thomas; Ihle, Christoph; Mayer, Larissa; Braun, Bianca; Graeser, Jessica; Flesch, Ingo; and others

    2015-03-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most frequent metabolic disorders in industrialized countries. Among other complications, T2DM patients have an increased fracture risk and delayed fracture healing. We have demonstrated that supraphysiological glucose and insulin levels inhibit primary human osteoblasts' maturation. We aimed at developing a more physiologically relevant in vitro model to analyze T2DM-mediated osteoblast changes. Therefore, SCP-1-immortalized pre-osteoblasts were differentiated with T2DM or control (non-obese and obese) sera. Between both control groups, no significant changes were observed. Proliferation was significantly increased (1.69-fold), while AP activity and matrix mineralization was significantly reduced in the T2DM group. Expression levels of osteogenic marker genes and transcription factors were altered, e.g. down-regulation of RUNX2 and SP-7 or up-regulation of STAT1, in the T2DM group. Active TGF-β levels were significantly increased (1.46-fold) in T2DM patients' sera. SCP-1 cells treated with these sera showed significantly increased TGF-β signaling (2.47-fold). Signaling inhibition effectively restored osteoblast maturation in the T2DM group. Summarizing our data, SCP-1 cells differentiated in the presence of T2DM patients' serum exhibit reduced osteoblast function. Thus, this model has a high physiological impact, as it can identify circulating factors in T2DM patients' blood that may affect bone function, e.g. TGF-β. - Highlights: • We present here a physiologically relevant in vitro model for diabetic osteopathy. • Blood of T2DM patients contains factors that affect osteoblasts' function. • The model developed here can be used to identify these factors, e.g. TGF-β. • Blocking TGF-β signaling partly rescues the osteoblasts' function in the T2DM group. • The model is useful to demonstrate the role of single factors in diabetic osteopathy.

  14. Huntington’s disease blood and brain show a common gene expression pattern and share an immune signature with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hensman Moss, Davina J.; Flower, Michael D.; Lo, Kitty K.; Miller, James R. C.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; ’t Hoen, Peter A. C.; Stone, Timothy C.; Guinee, Amelia; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Jones, Lesley; Plagnol, Vincent; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.; Holmans, Peter; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2017-01-01

    There is widespread transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington’s disease (HD) brain, but analysis is inevitably limited by advanced disease and postmortem changes. However, mutant HTT is ubiquitously expressed and acts systemically, meaning blood, which is readily available and contains cells that are dysfunctional in HD, could act as a surrogate for brain tissue. We conducted an RNA-Seq transcriptomic analysis using whole blood from two HD cohorts, and performed gene set enrichment analysis using public databases and weighted correlation network analysis modules from HD and control brain datasets. We identified dysregulated gene sets in blood that replicated in the independent cohorts, correlated with disease severity, corresponded to the most significantly dysregulated modules in the HD caudate, the most prominently affected brain region, and significantly overlapped with the transcriptional signature of HD myeloid cells. High-throughput sequencing technologies and use of gene sets likely surmounted the limitations of previously inconsistent HD blood expression studies. Our results suggest transcription is disrupted in peripheral cells in HD through mechanisms that parallel those in brain. Immune upregulation in HD overlapped with Alzheimer’s disease, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism involving macrophage phagocytosis and microglial synaptic pruning, and raises the potential for shared therapeutic approaches. PMID:28322270

  15. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Does Not Affect MicroRNA Expression When Suppressing Human Th17 Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Liang, Zibin; Kuang, Ying; Jia, Fujie; Yang, Yaqi; Kang, Miaomiao; Xie, Muke; Li, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is an import regulator of T helper 17 (Th17) differentiation, but our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. In the present study, we aimed to detect the expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) during human Th17 differentiation and evaluate the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the bioactive form of vitamin D, on Th17 differentiation and miRNA expression. Material/Methods We cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro and activated them with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies in the presence of Th17-promoting cytokines interleukin (IL)-23, IL-1β, TGF-β1, and IL-6 for 72 hours. 1,25(OH)2D3 was added to the medium at a final concentration of 100 nM on day 0. The production of IL-17A in culture medium was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression levels of miRNAs during Th17 differentiation were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results Six miRNAs were found to be dysregulated during human Th17 differentiation. Of these miRNAs, hsa-miR-155 was significantly up-regulated (median fold change: 3.61, P<0.05), whereas hsa-miR-20b, hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-181a, hsa-miR-210, and hsa-miR-301a were significantly down-regulated (median fold change: 0.44, 0.37, 0.18, 0.15, and 0.26, respectively, P<0.05). 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment significantly decreased IL-17A production (median [interquartile range], 745.7 [473.5] pg/mL vs. 2535.4 [2153.3] pg/mL, P<0.05). However, expression of these miRNAs was not changed after 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment. Conclusions 1,25(OH)2D3 suppressed human Th17 differentiation without affecting miRNA expression. PMID:28133358

  16. Modulation of ABH histo-blood group antigen expression in normal and myasthenic human thymus.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Victoria S; Marinova, Tsvetana T

    2006-10-01

    The role of ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) in intercellular communication during normal and pathological processes is still uncertain. The present work investigates the expression of ABH HBGA in epithelial cells and lymphocytes in normal thymus, and characterizes the modulation of their immunoreactivity during myasthenic transformation. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were applied on normal young thymus and on myasthenia gravis-associated thymomas and thymic hyperplasias. The Hassall's corpuscules in the thymus of young individuals were homogeneously stained for HBGA, while in hyperplastic glands only their central part was positive. Stromal epithelial cells permanently expressed HBGA in all tissue samples. In thymomas, mainly the lymphocytes in close proximity to antigen expressing epithelial cells were positive, while in the hyperplastic gland the most intensely stained lymphocytes were those within Hassall's corpuscules. Novel evidence for modulation of ABH antigen reactivity in normal and myasthenic human thymus is presented. It suggests that HBGA might participate in the regulation of the cross-talk in the thymocyte microenvironment throughout the ontogeny, as well as during the myasthenic transformation.

  17. Endothelial cell heterogeneity of blood-brain barrier gene expression along the cerebral microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Jennifer A; Murugesan, Nivetha; Pachter, Joel S

    2010-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) refers to the network of microvessels that selectively restricts the passage of substances between the circulation and the central nervous system (CNS). This microvascular network is comprised of arterioles, capillaries and venules, yet the respective contribution of each of these to the BBB awaits clarification. In this regard, it has been postulated that brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) from these different tributaries might exhibit considerable heterogeneity in form and function, with such diversity underlying unique roles in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Means to begin exploring such endothelial differences in situ, free from caveats associated with cell isolation and culturing procedures, are crucial to comprehending the nature and treatment of CNS diseases with vascular involvement. Here, the recently validated approach of immuno-laser capture microdissection (immuno-LCM) coupled to quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze gene expression patterns of BMEC retrieved in situ from either capillaries or venules. From profiling 87 genes known to play a role in BBB function and/or be enriched in isolated brain microvessels, results imply that most BBB properties reside in both segments, but that capillaries preferentially express some genes related to solute transport, while venules tend toward higher expression of an assortment of genes involved in inflammatory-related tasks. Fuller appreciation of such heterogeneity will be critical for efficient therapeutic targeting of the endothelium and the management of CNS disease.

  18. Cord blood-derived neuronal cells by ectopic expression of Sox2 and c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti, Alessandra; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Yu, Diana; Fazzina, Raffaella; Mu, Yangling; Adamo, Antonio; Paramonov, Ida; Cardoso, Julio Castaño; Monasterio, Montserrat Barragan; Bardy, Cedric; Cassiani-Ingoni, Riccardo; Liu, Guang-Hui; Gage, Fred H.; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The finding that certain somatic cells can be directly converted into cells of other lineages by the delivery of specific sets of transcription factors paves the way to novel therapeutic applications. Here we show that human cord blood (CB) CD133+ cells lose their hematopoietic signature and are converted into CB-induced neuronal-like cells (CB-iNCs) by the ectopic expression of the transcription factor Sox2, a process that is further augmented by the combination of Sox2 and c-Myc. Gene-expression analysis, immunophenotyping, and electrophysiological analysis show that CB-iNCs acquire a distinct neuronal phenotype characterized by the expression of multiple neuronal markers. CB-iNCs show the ability to fire action potentials after in vitro maturation as well as after in vivo transplantation into the mouse hippocampus. This system highlights the potential of CB cells and offers an alternative means to the study of cellular plasticity, possibly in the context of drug screening research and of future cell-replacement therapies. PMID:22814375

  19. Cord blood-derived neuronal cells by ectopic expression of Sox2 and c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Alessandra; Marchetto, Maria C N; Li, Mo; Yu, Diana; Fazzina, Raffaella; Mu, Yangling; Adamo, Antonio; Paramonov, Ida; Cardoso, Julio Castaño; Monasterio, Montserrat Barragan; Bardy, Cedric; Cassiani-Ingoni, Riccardo; Liu, Guang-Hui; Gage, Fred H; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-07-31

    The finding that certain somatic cells can be directly converted into cells of other lineages by the delivery of specific sets of transcription factors paves the way to novel therapeutic applications. Here we show that human cord blood (CB) CD133(+) cells lose their hematopoietic signature and are converted into CB-induced neuronal-like cells (CB-iNCs) by the ectopic expression of the transcription factor Sox2, a process that is further augmented by the combination of Sox2 and c-Myc. Gene-expression analysis, immunophenotyping, and electrophysiological analysis show that CB-iNCs acquire a distinct neuronal phenotype characterized by the expression of multiple neuronal markers. CB-iNCs show the ability to fire action potentials after in vitro maturation as well as after in vivo transplantation into the mouse hippocampus. This system highlights the potential of CB cells and offers an alternative means to the study of cellular plasticity, possibly in the context of drug screening research and of future cell-replacement therapies.

  20. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-04-23

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic {beta}-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  1. Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines Mediates trans-Infection of HIV-1 from Red Blood Cells to Target Cells and Affects HIV-AIDS Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    He, Weijing; Neil, Stuart; Kulkarni, Hemant; Wright, Edward; Agan, Brian K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Weiss, Robin A.; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) expressed on red blood cells (RBCs) influences plasma levels of HIV-1-suppressive and proinflammatory chemokines such as CCL5/RANTES. DARC is also the RBC receptor for Plasmodium vivax. Africans with DARC −46C/C genotype, which confers a DARC-negative phenotype, are resistant to vivax malaria. Here, we show that HIV-1 attaches to RBCs via DARC, effecting trans-infection of target cells. In African Americans, DARC −46C/C is associated with 40% increase in the odds of acquiring HIV-1. If extrapolated to Africans, ∼11% of the HIV-1 burden in Africa may be linked to this genotype. After infection occurs, however, DARC-negative RBC status is associated with slower disease progression. Furthermore, the disease-accelerating effect of a previously described CCL5 polymorphism is evident only in DARC-expressing and not in DARC-negative HIV-infected individuals. Thus, DARC influences HIV/AIDS susceptibility by mediating trans-infection of HIV-1 and by affecting both chemokine-HIV interactions and chemokine-driven inflammation. PMID:18621010

  2. Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis: variable phenotypic expression in three affected sisters from Mexican ancestry.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, María E; Hunziker, Walter; Teo, Audrey S M; Hillmer, Axel M; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M

    2015-02-01

    Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis is a rare autosomal recessive renal disease caused by mutations in genes for the tight junction transmembrane proteins Claudin-16 (CLDN16) and Claudin-19 (CLDN19). We present the first case report of a Mexican family with three affected sisters carrying a p.Gly20Asp mutation in CLDN19 whose heterozygous mother showed evident hypercalciuria and normal low magnesemia without any other clinical, laboratory, and radiological symptoms of renal disease making of her an unsuitable donor. The affected sisters showed variable phenotypic expression including age of first symptoms, renal urinary tract infections, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and eye symptoms consisting in retinochoroiditis, strabismus, macular scars, bilateral anisocoria, and severe myopia and astigmatism. End stage renal disease due to renal failure needed kidney transplantation in the three of them. Interesting findings were a heterozygous mother with asymptomatic hypercalciuria warning on the need of carefully explore clinical, laboratory, kidney ultrasonograpy, and mutation status in first degree asymptomatic relatives to avoid inappropriate kidney donors; an evident variable phenotypic expression among patients; the identification of a mutation almost confined to Spanish cases and a 3.5 Mb block of genomic homozygosis strongly suggesting a common remote parental ancestor for the gene mutation reported.

  3. FAK and HAS Inhibition Synergistically Decrease Colon Cancer Cell Viability and Affect Expression of Critical Genes

    PubMed Central

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William; Dunn, Kelli B.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p<0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p<0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heat-shock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways. PMID:22934709

  4. FAK and HAS inhibition synergistically decrease colon cancer cell viability and affect expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William G; Dunn, Kelli B

    2013-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2 μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p < 0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p < 0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heatshock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways.

  5. Asthma-Related Immune Responses in Youth With Asthma: Associations With Maternal Responsiveness and Expressions of Positive and Negative Affect in Daily Life

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Erin T.; Kane, Heidi S.; Saleh, Daniel J.; Wildman, Derek E.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Secord, Elizabeth; Slatcher, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stressful family environments early in life have negative effects on physical health. However, less is known about the health effects of positive aspects of families. We examined the associations between maternal responsiveness and immune markers among youth with asthma and identified youth expressions of positive affect as a potential mechanism of these associations. Methods Forty-three youths with asthma (26 males; aged 10-17) wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) for four days to assess maternal responsiveness and youth expressions of affect from audio-recordings of daily life. Trained coders rated EAR sound files for expressions of maternal responsiveness and affect displayed by the youth. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultured, and assayed to determine stimulated levels of interleukin(IL)-5, IL-13, and interferon(IFN)- γ. Results Greater maternal responsiveness was associated with decreased stimulated production of IL-5 (r = −.38, p = .012) and IL-13 (r = −.33, p = .031). Greater total positive affect in youth was linked with decreased stimulated production of IL-5 (r = −.46, p = .002) and IL-13 (r = −.37, p = .014). Total negative affect among youth was unrelated to immune responses. There was a significant indirect effect of maternal responsiveness via positive affect in youth on lower levels of IL-5 (95% CI = −3.41, −.03) and IL-13 (95% CI = −2.34, −.01) when adjusting for caregiver-youth conflict and negative affect among youth. Conclusions These results indicate the importance of positive family interactions for youth and provide preliminary evidence for a mechanism through which parenting can influence immune responses in youths with asthma. PMID:26407226

  6. Metalloproteases Affecting Blood Coagulation, Fibrinolysis and Platelet Aggregation from Snake Venoms: Definition and Nomenclature of Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kini, R. Manjunatha; Koh, Cho Yeow

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases, in addition to their contribution to the digestion of the prey, affect various physiological functions by cleaving specific proteins. They exhibit their activities through activation of zymogens of coagulation factors, and precursors of integrins or receptors. Based on their structure–function relationships and mechanism of action, we have defined classification and nomenclature of functional sites of proteases. These metalloproteases are useful as research tools and in diagnosis and treatment of various thrombotic and hemostatic conditions. They also contribute to our understanding of molecular details in the activation of specific factors involved in coagulation, platelet aggregation and matrix biology. This review provides a ready reference for metalloproteases that interfere in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet aggregation. PMID:27690102

  7. Effects of alprostadil on blood rheology and nucleoside metabolism in patients affected with lower limb chronic ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Acciavatti, A; Laghi Pasini, F; Capecchi, P L; Messa, G L; Lazzerini, P E; De Giorgi, L; Acampa, M; Di Perri, T

    2001-01-01

    The acute (0.57 microg/kg i.v. in 2 hours) and long-term (0.57 microg/kg i.v. in 2 hours for 5 days over 4 weeks) effects of the PGE1 analogue alprostadil were studied in patients affected with intermittent claudication. Whole Blood Viscosity (WBV), Whole Blood Filterability (WBF), haematocrit (Htc) and fibrinogen plasma concentration, were studied together with P50, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and adenosine plasma levels. Moreover, in the long-term study, pain-free (PFWD) and maximal walking distance (MWD) were measured. Single alprostadil infusion induced an improvement in WBV, WBF, and oxygen transport, and an increase in adenosine plasma levels. Long-term alprostadil administration produced a decrease in WBV only, without significant changes in WBF, Htc, fibrinogen, P50, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, also inducing a significant prolongation of PFWD and MWD. The possibility is suggested that pulse rises in adenosine plasma levels play a role in the effects of chronic alprostadil administration, maybe in a way similar to that observed in the phenomenon of ischaemic preconditioning,

  8. Phospholipid-protein balance in affective disorders: Analysis of human blood serum using Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Depciuch, Joanna; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Nowak, Gabriel; Dudek, Dominika; Siwek, Marcin; Styczeń, Krzysztof; Parlińska-Wojtan, Magdalena

    2016-11-30

    Raman and FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra Red) spectroscopies provide information on the chemical structure of compounds through identification and analysis of functional groups. In the present study, both spectroscopic techniques were used for investigating the phospholipid - protein balance in blood serum of depressed subjects (major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder type I or II) taking also into account their age and gender. The obtained results were compared with those of healthy subjects. The Raman and FTIR (using ATR (Attenuated Total Reflectance) technique), spectra show that a correlation between the level of phospholipids and proteins exists. Indeed, in depressed subjects the quantity of phospholipids and proteins is lower, compared to healthy ones. The second derivative of FTIR spectra shows that phospholipids directly affect the structure of proteins and their functions. In all male depressed subjects a higher amount of phospholipids and proteins compared to female depressed subjects was measured, offering them faster recovery perspectives. Spectroscopy results show that the phospholipids' and proteins' levels are lower in depressed subjects from 41 to 65 compared to the age group between 20 and 40, independently from the gender. Consequently, this study shows that Raman and infrared spectroscopies might be applied as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the balance between phospholipids and proteins in blood serum as a potential biomarker in depressive disorders.

  9. Cell-surface expression of PrPC and the presence of scrapie prions in the blood of goats.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Schneider, David A; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Truscott, Thomas C; Davis, William C; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2012-05-01

    Although host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)) expression in ovine PBMCs and prion infectivity in scrapie-infected sheep blood have been demonstrated, such studies have not been reported in goats. Therefore, this study characterized cell-surface expression of PrP(C) on PBMC subsets derived from normal goats and sheep, by flow cytometry, and determined prion infectivity in blood from a scrapie-infected goat using a transfusion bioassay in goat kids. Cell-surface PrP(C) expression was detected on all subsets of goat PBMCs. The highest PrP(C) cell-surface expression was found in CD2(+) T lymphocytes in goats. Transmission of infection was detected in all three recipients who received whole blood from a goat with classical scrapie. It was concluded that caprine PBMCs express PrP(C) similarly to sheep but with relative differences among PBMCs subsets, and that blood-borne infectious prions can be detected in scrapie-infected goats. Thus, similar to sheep, goat blood may be a suitable diagnostic target for the detection of scrapie infection.

  10. In vivo treatments with fulvestrant and anastrozole differentially affect gene expression in the rat efferent ductules.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Gisele Renata Oliveira; Yasuhara, Fabiana; Siu, Erica Rosanna; Fernandes, Sheilla Alessandra Ferreira; Avellar, Maria Christina Werneck; Lazari, Maria Fatima Magalhaes; Porto, Catarina Segreti

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen plays a key role in maintaining the morphology and function of the efferent ductules. We previously demonstrated that the antiestrogen fulvestrant markedly affected gene expression in the rat efferent ductules. The mechanism of fulvestrant action to modulate gene expression may involve not only the blockade of ESR1 and ESR2 estrogen receptors, but also the activation of ESR1 and ESR2 when the receptors are tethered to AP-1 or SP1 transcription factors, or the activation of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1. We therefore compared the effects of two strategies to interfere with estrogen action in the rat efferent ductules: treatment with fulvestrant or with the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole. Whereas fulvestrant markedly increased Mmp7 and Spp1, and reduced Nptx1 mRNA levels, no changes were observed with anastrozole. Fulvestrant caused changes in epithelial morphology that were not seen with anastrozole. Fulvestrant shifted MMP7 immunolocalization in the epithelial cells from the supranuclear to the apical region; this effect was less pronounced with anastrozole. In vitro studies of (35)S-methionine incorporation showed that protein release was increased, whereas tissue protein content in the efferent ductules of fulvestrant-treated rats was decreased. Although fulvestrant markedly affected gene expression, no changes were observed on AP-1 and SP1 DNA-binding activity. The blockade of ESRs seems to be the major reason explaining the differences between both treatments. At least some of the effects of fulvestrant appear to result from compensatory mechanisms activated by the dramatic changes caused by ESR1 blockade.

  11. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1) affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL) gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Klotho (KL), originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (−418 bp to −3 bp) as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G) in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1), which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP). Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1. PMID:27478698

  12. HB-EGF affects astrocyte morphology, proliferation, differentiation, and the expression of intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Till B; Zandén, Carl; Lebkuechner, Isabell; Philippot, Camille; de Pablo, Yolanda; Liu, Johan; Pekny, Milos

    2014-03-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), a vascular-derived trophic factor, belongs to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of neuroprotective, hypoxia-inducible proteins released by astrocytes in CNS injuries. It was suggested that HB-EGF can replace fetal calf serum (FCS) in astrocyte cultures. We previously demonstrated that in contrast to standard 2D cell culture systems, Bioactive3D culture system, when used with FCS, minimizes the baseline activation of astrocytes and preserves their complex morphology. Here, we show that HB-EGF induced EGF receptor (EGFR) activation by Y1068 phosphorylation, Mapk/Erk pathway activation, and led to an increase in cell proliferation, more prominent in Bioactive3D than in 2D cultures. HB-EGF changed morphology of 2D and Bioactive3D cultured astrocytes toward a radial glia-like phenotype and induced the expression of intermediate filament and progenitor cell marker protein nestin. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin protein expression was unaffected. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated that HB-EGF affected the expression of Notch signaling pathway genes, implying a role for the Notch signaling in HB-EGF-mediated astrocyte response. HB-EGF can be used as a FCS replacement for astrocyte expansion and in vitro experimentation both in 2D and Bioactive3D culture systems; however, caution should be exercised since it appears to induce partial de-differentiation of astrocytes.

  13. Vanillin differentially affects azoxymethane-injected rat colon carcinogenesis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ket Li; Chong, Pei Pei; Yazan, Latifah Saiful; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-12-01

    Vanillin is the substance responsible for the flavor and smell of vanilla, a widely used flavoring agent. Previous studies reported that vanillin is a good antimutagen and anticarcinogen. However, there are also some contradicting findings showing that vanillin was a comutagen and cocarcinogen. This study investigated whether vanillin is an anticarcinogen or a cocarcinogen in rats induced with azoxymethane (AOM). Rats induced with AOM will develop aberrant crypt foci (ACF). AOM-challenged rats were treated with vanillin orally and intraperitoneally at low and high concentrations and ACF density, multiplicity, and distribution were observed. The gene expression of 14 colorectal cancer-related genes was also studied. Results showed that vanillin consumed orally had no effect on ACF. However, high concentrations (300 mg/kg body weight) of vanillin administered through intraperitoneal injection could increase ACF density and ACF multiplicity. ACF were mainly found in the distal colon rather than in the mid-section and proximal colon. The expression of colorectal cancer biomarkers, protooncogenes, recombinational repair, mismatch repair, and cell cycle arrest, and tumor suppressor gene expression were also affected by vanillin. Vanillin was not cocarcinogenic when consumed orally. However, it was cocarcinogenic when being administered intraperitoneally at high concentration. Hence, the use of vanillin in food should be safe but might have cocarcinogenic potential when it is used in high concentration for therapeutic purposes.

  14. Reprogramming Methods Do Not Affect Gene Expression Profile of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Marta; Desole, Giovanna; Costanzi, Giulia; Lavezzo, Enrico; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are pluripotent cells derived from adult somatic cells. After the pioneering work by Yamanaka, who first generated iPSCs by retroviral transduction of four reprogramming factors, several alternative methods to obtain iPSCs have been developed in order to increase the yield and safety of the process. However, the question remains open on whether the different reprogramming methods can influence the pluripotency features of the derived lines. In this study, three different strategies, based on retroviral vectors, episomal vectors, and Sendai virus vectors, were applied to derive iPSCs from human fibroblasts. The reprogramming efficiency of the methods based on episomal and Sendai virus vectors was higher than that of the retroviral vector-based approach. All human iPSC clones derived with the different methods showed the typical features of pluripotent stem cells, including the expression of alkaline phosphatase and stemness maker genes, and could give rise to the three germ layer derivatives upon embryoid bodies assay. Microarray analysis confirmed the presence of typical stem cell gene expression profiles in all iPSC clones and did not identify any significant difference among reprogramming methods. In conclusion, the use of different reprogramming methods is equivalent and does not affect gene expression profile of the derived human iPSCs. PMID:28117672

  15. Heterogeneity of the Mac-1 expression on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with different types of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Klink, Magdalena; Wilczyński, Jacek R; Szyłło, Krzysztof; Malinowski, Andrzej; Sułowska, Zofia; Nowak, Marek

    2016-02-01

    The expression level of Mac-1 on the surface of neutrophils is an important indicator of neutrophil activation. Under pathological conditions, Mac-1 is believed a key adhesion molecule that facilitates cancer progression and mediates the adhesion of tumour cells to the endothelium of blood vessels. Our previous findings indicated that circulating peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) expressed enhanced levels of Mac-1, which was functionally associated with an increased adhesive function of neutrophils. The objective of the current study was to analyse whether the value of individual components of the differential white cell count, including the neutrophil and lymphocyte ratios, which are markers of blood neutrophil activation, might be associated with certain types of ovarian cancer. We showed the increase in Mac-1 expression along with a parallel decrease of L-selectin and PSGL-1 on peripheral blood neutrophils of patients with EOC of early and advanced FIGO stages, which indicates an activated state of neutrophils in comparison to neutrophils of individuals without cancer. Despite a significant difference between Mac-1 expression in patients with and without cancer, a dramatic increase in Mac-1 expression was observed in the blood of patients with undifferentiated carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC. Moreover, the expression level of Mac-1 correlated with the number of neutrophils in patients with serous, endometrioid and undifferentiated EOC. The results of an ROC analysis demonstrated that the patients with the undifferentiated type of EOC form a distinct group with regard to Mac-1 expression on blood neutrophils. The results suggested a diverse biological cadre of immune cells in patients with undifferentiated ovarian carcinomas compared with patients with other histological types of EOC.

  16. A gene expression signature of confinement in peripheral blood of red wolves (Canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Kennerly, Erin; Ballmann, Anne; Martin, Stanton; Wolfinger, Russ; Gregory, Simon; Stoskopf, Michael; Gibson, Greg

    2008-06-01

    The stresses that animals experience as a result of modification of their ecological circumstances induce physiological changes that leave a signature in profiles of gene expression. We illustrate this concept in a comparison of free range and confined North American red wolves (Canis rufus). Transcription profiling of peripheral blood samples from 13 red wolf individuals in the Alligator River region of North Carolina revealed a strong signal of differentiation. Four hundred eighty-two out of 2980 transcripts detected on Illumina HumanRef8 oligonucleotide bead arrays were found to differentiate free range and confined wolves at a false discovery rate of 12.8% and P < 0.05. Over-representation of genes in focal adhesion, insulin signalling, proteasomal, and tryptophan metabolism pathways suggests the activation of pro-inflammatory and stress responses in confined animals. Consequently, characterization of differential transcript abundance in an accessible tissue such as peripheral blood identifies biomarkers that could be useful in animal management practices and for evaluating the impact of habitat changes on population health, particularly as attention turns to the impact of climate change on physiology and in turn species distributions.

  17. Expression sequence tag library derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the chlorocebus sabaeus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background African Green Monkeys (AGM) are amongst the most frequently used nonhuman primate models in clinical and biomedical research, nevertheless only few genomic resources exist for this species. Such information would be essential for the development of dedicated new generation technologies in fundamental and pre-clinical research using this model, and would deliver new insights into primate evolution. Results We have exhaustively sequenced an Expression Sequence Tag (EST) library made from a pool of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from sixteen Chlorocebus sabaeus monkeys. Twelve of them were infected with the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus. The mononuclear cells were or not stimulated in vitro with Concanavalin A, with lipopolysacharrides, or through mixed lymphocyte reaction in order to generate a representative and broad library of expressed sequences in immune cells. We report here 37,787 sequences, which were assembled into 14,410 contigs representing an estimated 12% of the C. sabaeus transcriptome. Using data from primate genome databases, 9,029 assembled sequences from C. sabaeus could be annotated. Sequences have been systematically aligned with ten cDNA references of primate species including Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, and Macaca mulatta to identify ortholog transcripts. For 506 transcripts, sequences were quasi-complete. In addition, 6,576 transcript fragments are potentially specific to the C. sabaeus or corresponding to not yet described primate genes. Conclusions The EST library we provide here will prove useful in gene annotation efforts for future sequencing of the African Green Monkey genomes. Furthermore, this library, which particularly well represents immunological and hematological gene expression, will be an important resource for the comparative analysis of gene expression in clinically relevant nonhuman primate and human research. PMID:22726727

  18. Genome-wide expression profiling in the peripheral blood of patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kim D.; Gelbart, Terri; Whisenant, Thomas C.; Waalen, Jill; Mondala, Tony S.; Iklé, David N.; Salomon, Daniel R.; Bennett, Robert M.; Kurian, Sunil M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common pain disorder characterised by nociceptive dysregulation. The basic biology of FM is poorly understood. Herein we have used agnostic gene expression as a potential probe for informing its underlying biology and the development of a proof-of-concept diagnostic gene expression signature. Methods We analysed RNA expression in 70 FM patients and 70 healthy controls. The isolated RNA was amplified and hybridised to Affymetrix® Human Gene 1.1 ST Peg arrays. The data was analysed using Partek Genomics Suite v. 6.6. Results Fibromyalgia patients exhibited a differential expression of 421 genes (p<0.001), several relevant to pathways for pain processing, such as glutamine/glutamate signaling and axonal development. There was also an upregulation of several inflammatory pathways and downregulation of pathways related to hypersensitivity and allergy. Using rigorous diagnostic modeling strategies, we show “locked” gene signatures discovered on Training and Test cohorts, that have a mean Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.81 on randomised, independent external data cohorts. Lastly, we identified a subset of 10 probesets that provided a diagnostic sensitivity for FM of 95% and a specificity of 96%. We also show that the signatures for FM were very specific to FM rather than common FM comorbidities. Conclusion These findings provide new insights relevant to the pathogenesis of FM, and provide several testable hypotheses that warrant further exploration and also establish the foundation for a first blood-based molecular signature in FM that needs to be validated in larger cohorts of patients. PMID:27157394

  19. A gene co-expression network in whole blood of schizophrenia patients is independent of antipsychotic-use and enriched for brain-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Simone; Boks, Marco P M; Fuller, Tova F; Strengman, Eric; Janson, Esther; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Ori, Anil P S; Vi, Nancy; Mulder, Flip; Blom, Jan Dirk; Glenthøj, Birte; Schubart, Chris D; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Horvath, Steve; Ophoff, Roel A

    2012-01-01

    Despite large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the underlying genes for schizophrenia are largely unknown. Additional approaches are therefore required to identify the genetic background of this disorder. Here we report findings from a large gene expression study in peripheral blood of schizophrenia patients and controls. We applied a systems biology approach to genome-wide expression data from whole blood of 92 medicated and 29 antipsychotic-free schizophrenia patients and 118 healthy controls. We show that gene expression profiling in whole blood can identify twelve large gene co-expression modules associated with schizophrenia. Several of these disease related modules are likely to reflect expression changes due to antipsychotic medication. However, two of the disease modules could be replicated in an independent second data set involving antipsychotic-free patients and controls. One of these robustly defined disease modules is significantly enriched with brain-expressed genes and with genetic variants that were implicated in a GWAS study, which could imply a causal role in schizophrenia etiology. The most highly connected intramodular hub gene in this module (ABCF1), is located in, and regulated by the major histocompatibility (MHC) complex, which is intriguing in light of the fact that common allelic variants from the MHC region have been implicated in schizophrenia. This suggests that the MHC increases schizophrenia susceptibility via altered gene expression of regulatory genes in this network.

  20. The expression and function of human CD300 receptors on blood circulating mononuclear cells are distinct in neonates and adults

    PubMed Central

    Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Vitallé, Joana; García-Obregón, Susana; Astigarraga, Itziar; Eguizabal, Cristina; Santos, Silvia; Simhadri, Venkateswara R.; Borrego, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are more susceptible to infections than adults. This susceptibility is thought to reflect neonates’ qualitative and quantitative defects in the adaptive and innate immune responses. Differential expression of cell surface receptors may result in altered thresholds of neonatal immune cell activation. We determined whether the expression and function of the lipid-binding CD300 family of receptors are different on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. A multiparametric flow cytometry analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD300 receptors on adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells. The expression of the CD300a inhibitory receptor was significantly reduced on cells from the newborn adaptive immune system, and neonatal antigen presenting cells exhibited a different CD300 receptors expression pattern. We also found differential LPS-mediated regulation of CD300 receptors expression on adult monocytes compared to cord blood monocytes, and that CD300c and CD300e-mediated activation was quantitatively different in neonatal monocytes. This is the first complete study examining the expression of CD300 receptors on human neonatal immune cells compared with adult immune cells. Significant differences in the expression and function of CD300 receptors may help to explain the peculiarities and distinctness of the neonatal immune responses. PMID:27595670

  1. Timed food availability affects circadian behavior but not the neuropeptide Y expression in Indian weaverbirds exposed to atypical light environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devraj; Trivedi, Neerja; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis whether daily food availability period would restore rhythmicity in individuals with disrupted circadian behavior with no effect on appetite regulation. Particularly, we investigated the effects of timed food availability on activity behavior, and Fos and neuropeptide Y expressions in Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) under atypical light conditions. Initially, weaverbirds in 3 groups of 7-8 each were entrained to 7L:17D (25: <0.3lx) with food ad libitum. Thereafter, food availability was restricted for 7h such that it overlapped with the light period. After a week, 7L:17D was replaced with 3.5L: 3.5D (T7, group 1), 3.5L: 20.5D (T24, group 2) or constant dim light, LLdim (<0.3lx, group 3) for 5weeks. Food cycles synchronized the circadian activity behavior, albeit with group differences, but did not affect body mass, blood glucose levels or testis size. Further, Fos, not NPY mRNA or peptide, expression measured at ZT2 and ZT14 (ZT0=time of food given) showed significant group differences in the hippocampus, dorsomedial hypothalamus and infundibular nuclear complex. Another identical experiment examined after-effects of the 3 light conditions on persistence of the circadian rhythms. Weaverbirds exposed for 4weeks to identical food but different light conditions, as above, were released into the free-running condition of food ad libitum and LLdim. Circadian rhythms were decayed in birds previously exposed to T7 LD cycle. Overall, these results show that timed meal restores rhythmicity in individuals with circadian rhythm disruptions without involving neuropeptide Y, the key appetite regulatory molecule.

  2. Environmental enrichment lessens cognitive decline in APP23 mice without affecting brain sirtuin expression.

    PubMed

    Polito, Letizia; Chierchia, Armando; Tunesi, Marta; Bouybayoune, Ihssane; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin; Albani, Diego; Forloni, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a non-pharmacological intervention reported to counteract pathological signs in models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We developed EE protocols in APP23 mice and evaluated how they influenced cognitive decline and brain amyloid-β (Aβ) burden. We also investigated the involvement of sirtuins (SIRTs) as a possible molecular mediator of EE, by assessing hippocampal and cortical mRNA and protein levels of the SIRT family members (SIRT1 to SIRT7). APP23 transgenic mice were moved to EE cages (TG-EEs) starting from 3 months of age. TG-EEs were compared to transgenic mice housed in standard cages (TG-SHs) and to wild-type littermates in the two housing conditions (WT-EEs and WT-SHs). At 7 months of age, all mice were tested for behavioral performance with Morris Water Maze (MWM) and visual novel Object Recognition Test (vORT). After a month, a group underwent biochemical analyses, while another group continued in the EE environment till 18 months of age, when Aβ plaque load was assessed. At 7 months, TG-SHs had impaired behavioral performance in MWM and vORT. In contrast, TG-EE mice had restored behavioral performance. At 8 months, EE did not affect AβPP expression or processing, Aβ40/42, pGlu-Aβ3-40/3-42, or Aβ oligomer level. The expression of two Aβ degrading enzymes (insulin degrading enzyme and neprilysin) was not modulated by EE. Brain sirtuin mRNA and protein levels were unchanged, while brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased after EE. Aβ deposition was attenuated in 18-month-old TG-EE mice, without apparent reduction of neuroinflammatory signs. We suggest that EE had a beneficial effect on cognitive performance and lessened long-term Aβ accumulation, but brain sirtuin expression was not modulated when cognitive impairment was restored.

  3. Hypoxia Affects Neprilysin Expression Through Caspase Activation and an APP Intracellular Domain-dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kerridge, Caroline; Kozlova, Daria I.; Nalivaeva, Natalia N.; Turner, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    While gene mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the presenilins lead to an accumulation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain causing neurodegeneration and familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), over 95% of all AD cases are sporadic. Despite the pathologies being indistinguishable, relatively little is known about the mechanisms affecting generation of Aβ in the sporadic cases. Vascular disorders such as ischaemia and stroke are well established risk factors for the development of neurodegenerative diseases and systemic hypoxic episodes have been shown to increase Aβ production and accumulation. We have previously shown that hypoxia causes a significant decrease in the expression of the major Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin (NEP) which might deregulate Aβ clearance. Aβ itself is derived from the transmembrane APP along with several other biologically active metabolites including the C-terminal fragment (CTF) termed the APP intracellular domain (AICD), which regulates the expression of NEP and some other genes in neuronal cells. Here we show that in hypoxia there is a significantly increased expression of caspase-3, 8, and 9 in human neuroblastoma NB7 cells, which can degrade AICD. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we have revealed that there was also a reduction of AICD bound to the NEP promoter region which underlies the decreased expression and activity of the enzyme under hypoxic conditions. Incubation of the cells with a caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK could rescue the effect of hypoxia on NEP activity protecting the levels of AICD capable of binding the NEP promoter. These data suggest that activation of caspases might play an important role in regulation of NEP levels in the brain under pathological conditions such as hypoxia and ischaemia leading to a deficit of Aβ clearance and increasing the risk of development of AD. PMID:26617481

  4. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  5. Multidrug-resistance gene (P-glycoprotein) is expressed by endothelial cells at blood-brain barrier sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; O'Brien, J.P.; Casals, D.; Biedler, J.L.; Melamed, M.R.; Bertino, J.R. ); Rittman-Grauer, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells of human capillary blood vessels at the blood-brain and other blood-tissue barrier sites express P-glycoprotein as detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies against the human multidrug-resistance gene product. This pattern of endothelial cell expression may indicate a physiological role for P-glycoprotein in regulating the entry of certain molecules into the central nervous system and other anatomic compartments, such as the testes. These tissues, which limit the access of systemic drugs, are known pharmacologic sanctuaries for metastatic cancer. P-glycoprotein expression in capillary endothelium of brain and testes and not other tissues (i.e., kidney and placenta) may in part explain this phenomenon and could have important implications in cancer chemotherapy.

  6. High-sensitivity array analysis of gene expression for the early detection of disseminated breast tumor cells in peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katherine J.; Graner, Edgard; Li, Yi; Price, Laura M.; Kritzman, Brian M.; Fournier, Marcia V.; Rhei, Esther; Pardee, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    Early detection is an effective means of reducing cancer mortality. Here, we describe a highly sensitive high-throughput screen that can identify panels of markers for the early detection of solid tumor cells disseminated in peripheral blood. The method is a two-step combination of differential display and high-sensitivity cDNA arrays. In a primary screen, differential display identified 170 candidate marker genes differentially expressed between breast tumor cells and normal breast epithelial cells. In a secondary screen, high-sensitivity arrays assessed expression levels of these genes in 48 blood samples, 22 from healthy volunteers and 26 from breast cancer patients. Cluster analysis identified a group of 12 genes that were elevated in the blood of cancer patients. Permutation analysis of individual genes defined five core genes (P ≤ 0.05, permax test). As a group, the 12 genes generally distinguished accurately between healthy volunteers and patients with breast cancer. Mean expression levels of the 12 genes were elevated in 77% (10 of 13) untreated invasive cancer patients, whereas cluster analysis correctly classified volunteers and patients (P = 0.0022, Fisher's exact test). Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed array results and indicated that the sensitivity of the assay (1:2 × 108 transcripts) was sufficient to detect disseminated solid tumor cells in blood. Expression-based blood assays developed with the screening approach described here have the potential to detect and classify solid tumor cells originating from virtually any primary site in the body. PMID:11226293

  7. Ischemia-reperfusion impairs blood-brain barrier function and alters tight junction protein expression in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Threlkeld, S W; Cummings, E E; Juan, I; Makeyev, O; Besio, W G; Gaitanis, J; Banks, W A; Sadowska, G B; Stonestreet, B S

    2012-12-13

    The blood-brain barrier is a restrictive interface between the brain parenchyma and the intravascular compartment. Tight junctions contribute to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Hypoxic-ischemic damage to the blood-brain barrier could be an important component of fetal brain injury. We hypothesized that increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia depend upon the duration of reperfusion and that decreases in tight junction proteins are associated with the ischemia-related impairment in blood-brain barrier function in the fetus. Blood-brain barrier function was quantified with the blood-to-brain transfer constant (K(i)) and tight junction proteins by Western immunoblot in fetal sheep at 127 days of gestation without ischemia, and 4, 24, or 48 h after ischemia. The largest increase in K(i) (P<0.05) was 4 h after ischemia. Occludin and claudin-5 expressions decreased at 4 h, but returned toward control levels 24 and 48 h after ischemia. Zonula occludens-1 and -2 decreased after ischemia. Inverse correlations between K(i) and tight junction proteins suggest that the decreases in tight junction proteins contribute to impaired blood-brain barrier function after ischemia. We conclude that impaired blood-brain barrier function is an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the fetus, and that increases in quantitatively measured barrier permeability (K(i)) change as a function of the duration of reperfusion after ischemia. The largest increase in permeability occurs 4 h after ischemia and blood-brain barrier function improves early after injury because the blood-brain barrier is less permeable 24 and 48 than 4 h after ischemia. Changes in the tight junction molecular composition are associated with increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia.

  8. Gene expression signature in peripheral blood cells from medical students exposed to chronic psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tomoko; Morita, Kyoko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Nishida, Kensei; Shikishima, Michiyo; Ohta, Masayuki; Saito, Toshiro; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2007-10-01

    To assess response to chronic psychological stress, gene expression profiles in peripheral blood from 18 medical students confronting license examination were analyzed using an original microarray. Total RNA was collected from each subject 9 months before the examination and mixed to be used as a universal control. At that time, most students had normal scores on the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI). However, STAI scores were significantly elevated at 2 months and at 2 days before the examination. Pattern of the gene expression profile was more uniform 2 days before than 2 months before the examination. We identified 24 genes that significantly and uniformly changed from the universal control 2 days before the examination. Of the 24 genes, real-time PCR validated changes in mRNA levels of 10 (PLCB2, CSF3R, ARHGEF1, DPYD, CTNNB1, PPP3CA, POLM, IRF3, TP53, and CCNI). The identified genes may be useful to assess chronic psychological stress response.

  9. Over-expression of dopamine D2 receptor and inwardly rectifying potassium channel genes in drug-naive schizophrenic peripheral blood lymphocytes as potential diagnostic markers.

    PubMed

    Zvara, Agnes; Szekeres, György; Janka, Zoltán; Kelemen, János Z; Cimmer, Csongor; Sántha, Miklós; Puskás, László G

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting nearly 1% of the human population. Current diagnosis of schizophrenia is based on complex clinical symptoms. The use of easily detectable peripheral molecular markers could substantially help the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders. Recent studies showed that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) express subtypes of D1 and D2 subclasses of dopamine receptors. Recently, dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) was found to be over-expressed in schizophrenic PBL and proposed to be a diagnostic and follow-up marker for schizophrenia. In this study we screened PBL of 13 drug-naive/drug-free schizophrenic patients to identify additional markers of schizophrenia. One of the benefits of our study is the use of blood samples of non-medicated, drug-naive patients. This excludes the possibility that changes detected in gene expression levels might be attributed to the medication rather than to the disorder itself. Among others, genes for dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir2.3) were found to be over-expressed in microarray analysis. Increased mRNA levels were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR) using the SybrGreen method and dual labeled TaqMan probes. The use of both molecular markers allows a more rapid and precise prediction of schizophrenia and might help find the optimal medication for schizophrenic patients.

  10. Protective Vaccination against Blood-Stage Malaria of Plasmodium chabaudi: Differential Gene Expression in the Liver of Balb/c Mice toward the End of Crisis Phase

    PubMed Central

    Al-Quraishy, Saleh A.; Dkhil, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem A.; Delic, Denis; Wunderlich, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Protective vaccination induces self-healing of otherwise fatal blood-stage malaria of Plasmodium chabaudi in female Balb/c mice. To trace processes critically involved in self-healing, the liver, an effector against blood-stage malaria, is analyzed for possible changes of its transcriptome in vaccination-protected in comparison to non-protected mice toward the end of the crisis phase. Gene expression microarray analyses reveal that vaccination does not affect constitutive expression of mRNA and lincRNA. However, malaria induces significant (p < 0.01) differences in hepatic gene and lincRNA expression in vaccination-protected vs. non-vaccinated mice toward the end of crisis phase. In vaccination-protected mice, infections induce up-regulations of 276 genes and 40 lincRNAs and down-regulations of 200 genes and 43 lincRNAs, respectively, by >3-fold as compared to the corresponding constitutive expressions. Massive up-regulations, partly by >100-fold, are found for genes as RhD, Add2, Ank1, Ermap, and Slc4a, which encode proteins of erythrocytic surface membranes, and as Gata1 and Gfi1b, which encode transcription factors involved in erythrocytic development. Also, Cldn13 previously predicted to be expressed on erythroblast surfaces is up-regulated by >200-fold, though claudins are known as main constituents of tight junctions acting as paracellular barriers between epithelial cells. Other genes are up-regulated by <100- and >10-fold, which can be subgrouped in genes encoding proteins known to be involved in mitosis, in cell cycle regulation, and in DNA repair. Our data suggest that protective vaccination enables the liver to respond to P. chabaudi infections with accelerated regeneration and extramedullary erythropoiesis during crisis, which contributes to survival of otherwise lethal blood-stage malaria. PMID:27471498

  11. Cross-sectional study of expression of divalent metal transporter-1, transferrin, and hepcidin in blood of smelters who are occupationally exposed to manganese

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Yu, Changyin; Chen, Jian; Shi, Xiujuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2016-01-01

    Background Manganese (Mn) is widely used in industries including the manufacture of Mn-iron (Fe) alloy. Occupational Mn overexposure causes manganism. Mn is known to affect Fe metabolism; this study was designed to test the hypothesis that workers exposed to Mn may have an altered expression of mRNAs encoding proteins in Fe metabolism. Methods Workers occupationally exposed to Mn (n = 71) from a Mn–Fe alloy factory and control workers without Mn-exposure (n = 48) from a pig-iron plant from Zunyi, China, were recruited for this study. Blood samples were collected into Trizol-containing tubes. Total RNA was isolated, purified, and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis. Metal concentrations were quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results Working environment and genetic background of both groups were similar except for marked differences in airborne Mn concentrations (0.18 mg/m3 in Mn–Fe alloy factory vs. 0.0022 mg/m3 in pig-Fe plant), and in blood Mn levels (34.3 µg/L vs. 10.4 µg/L). Mn exposure caused a significant decrease in the expression of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1), transferrin (Tf) and hepcidin by 58.2%, 68.5% and 61.5%, respectively, as compared to controls, while the expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) was unaltered. Linear regression analysis revealed that expressions of DMT1, Tf and hepcidin were inversely correlated with the accumulative Mn exposure; the correlation coefficients (r) are −0.47, −0.54, and −0.49, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusion The data suggest that occupational Mn exposure causes decreased expressions of DMT1, Tf and hepcidin in blood cells; the finding will help understand the mechanism underlying Mn exposure-associated alteration in Fe homeostasis among workers. PMID:27635361

  12. Expression of the thyroid hormone transporters monocarboxylate transporter-8 (SLC16A2) and organic ion transporter-14 (SLCO1C1) at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lori M; Woodford, Kathleen; Zhou, Mei; Black, Deborah S; Haggerty, Jill E; Tate, Emily H; Grindstaff, Kent K; Mengesha, Wondwessen; Raman, Chandrasekaran; Zerangue, Noa

    2008-12-01

    Thyroid hormones require transport across cell membranes to carry out their biological functions. The importance of transport for thyroid hormone signaling was highlighted by the discovery that inactivating mutations in the human monocarboxylate transporter-8 (MCT8) (SLC16A2) cause severe psychomotor retardation due to thyroid hormone deficiency in the central nervous system. It has been reported that Mct8 expression in the mouse brain is restricted to neurons, leading to the model that organic ion transporter polypeptide-14 (OATP14, also known as OATP1C1/SLCO1C1) is the primary thyroid hormone transporter at the blood-brain barrier, whereas MCT8 mediates thyroid hormone uptake into neurons. In contrast to these reports, we report here that in addition to neuronal expression, MCT8 mRNA and protein are expressed in cerebral microvessels in human, mouse, and rat. In addition, OATP14 mRNA and protein are strongly enriched in mouse and rat cerebral microvessels but not in human microvessels. In rat, Mct8 and Oatp14 proteins localize to both the luminal and abluminal microvessel membranes. In human and rodent choroid plexus epithelial cells, MCT8 is concentrated on the epithelial cell apical surface and OATP14 localizes primarily to the basal-lateral surface. Mct8 and Oatp14 expression was also observed in mouse and rat tanycytes, which are thought to form a barrier between hypothalamic blood vessels and brain. These results raise the possibility that reduced thyroid hormone transport across the blood-brain barrier contributes to the neurological deficits observed in affected patients with MCT8 mutations. The high microvessel expression of OATP14 in rodent compared with human brain may contribute to the relatively mild phenotype observed in Mct8-null mice, in contrast to humans lacking functional MCT8.

  13. Hypericum perforatum differentially affects corticosteroid receptor-mRNA expression in human monocytic U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    Enning, F; Murck, H; Krieg, J-C; Vedder, H

    2011-09-01

    A dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis represents a prominent finding in major depression, possibly related to a dysfunction of the corticosteroid receptor system. Antidepressants are involved in the restoration of the altered feed-back mechanism of the HPA-axis, probably via normalization of corticosteroid receptor functions. Since Hypericum perforatum has antidepressive properties, we here examined its putative actions on glucocorticosteroid receptor mRNA levels in human blood cells as a peripheral model for neuroendocrine effects in human brain cells. Our data show that Hypericum (LI 160) affects the cellular mRNA levels of both, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-α and its inhibitory counterpart, the GR-β, at clinically-relevant concentrations. Under these conditions, a bimodal effect was observed. Dose-response studies suggest a rather small effective concentration range and time-effect data show a primary and transient up-regulation of GR-α mRNA levels and a down-regulation of GR-β mRNA levels after 16 h of treatment. The sodium channel blocker benzamil neutralized the effects of Hypericum, pointing to an at least partial mechanism of action via this pathway. In conclusion, Hypericum treatment differentially affects GR-mRNA levels in the human system. Our data suggest a bimodal effect on GR, resulting in a time-and dose-related modification of GR-mediated cellular effects. Such a mechanism has been alleged as an important way of action for a number of antidepressants. It is the first time that a specific effect on both receptors, especially on the subtype of GR-β, is shown under antidepressive treatment in a human system under in vitro conditions.

  14. Multiple Polymorphisms Affect Expression and Function of the Neuropeptide S Receptor (NPSR1)

    PubMed Central

    Anedda, Francesca; Zucchelli, Marco; Schepis, Danika; Hellquist, Anna; Corrado, Lucia; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Achour, Adnane; McInerney, Gerald; Bertorello, Alejandro; Lördal, Mikael; Befrits, Ragnar; Björk, Jan; Bresso, Francesca; Törkvist, Leif; Halfvarson, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Background neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor NPSR1 act along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to modulate anxiety, fear responses, nociception and inflammation. The importance of the NPS-NPSR1 signaling pathway is highlighted by the observation that, in humans, NPSR1 polymorphism associates with asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, panic disorders, and intermediate phenotypes of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Because of the genetic complexity at the NPSR1 locus, however, true causative variations remain to be identified, together with their specific effects on receptor expression or function. To gain insight into the mechanisms leading to NPSR1 disease-predisposing effects, we performed a thorough functional characterization of all NPSR1 promoter and coding SNPs commonly occurring in Caucasians (minor allele frequency >0.02). Principal Findings we identified one promoter SNP (rs2530547 [−103]) that significantly affects luciferase expression in gene reporter assays and NPSR1 mRNA levels in human leukocytes. We also detected quantitative differences in NPS-induced genome-wide transcriptional profiles and CRE-dependent luciferase activities associated with three NPSR1 non-synonymous SNPs (rs324981 [Ile107Asn], rs34705969 [Cys197Phe], rs727162 [Arg241Ser]), with a coding variant exhibiting a loss-of-function phenotype (197Phe). Potential mechanistic explanations were sought with molecular modelling and bioinformatics, and a pilot study of 2230 IBD cases and controls provided initial support to the hypothesis that different cis-combinations of these functional SNPs variably affect disease risk. Significance these findings represent a first step to decipher NPSR1 locus complexity and its impact on several human conditions NPS antagonists have been recently described, and our results are of potential pharmacogenetic relevance. PMID:22216302

  15. Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression is affected by exercise in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiqin; Zhu, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 proteins belong to the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and play important roles in skeletal muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that exercise would affect MRF mRNA and protein abundance in postnatal chicken skeletal muscle driving molecular changes that could ultimately lead to increased muscle fiber diameter. At day (d) 43, twelve hundred chickens with similar body weight were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range groups. The MRF mRNA abundance was measured in the pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d56, d70, and d84, and the protein levels of MRFs were determined from the thigh muscle at d84. The results showed no significant difference in mRNA of the MRFs among the three groups at d56 (P>0.05). At d84, chicken in the pen and free-range group showed higher MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 mRNA abundance compared to the caged chickens (P<0.05). Free-range chickens had higher Mrf4 and MyoG expression than those in penned ones (P<0.05). Protein abundances of all four factors were lowest in the caged group, and Mrf4 and MyoG protein quantities were greatest in free-range chickens (P<0.05), but Myf5 and MyoD1 protein abundance did not differ between penned and caged groups. The results suggested that exercise up-regulated MRF expression in the postnatal skeletal muscles, which led to an increase in muscle fiber diameter, and eventually affected the meat quality of the skeletal muscles in adult chickens.

  16. Infliximab reduces CD147, MMP-3, and MMP-9 expression in peripheral blood monocytes in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianlin; Xie, Baozhao; Li, Qiuxia; Xie, Xujing; Zhu, Shangling; Wang, Mingxia; Peng, Weixiang; Gu, Jieruo

    2013-01-05

    Recent studies have reported elevated expression levels in active rheumatoid arthritis patients of the cluster of differentiation (CD) 147 on CD14(+) peripheral blood monocytes and as a result, CD147 may be a target for the development of a novel rheumatoid arthritis therapy. This report describes the inhibitory effects of infliximab on CD147 and metalloproteinases (MMP)-3 and MMP-9 overexpression in peripheral blood monocytes obtained from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. Thirty patients with active rheumatoid arthritis that were refractory to methotrexate therapy were randomized at a 4:1 ratio into groups A and B, respectively. Group A received three to four infusions of infliximab (3mg/kg) and group B participants received four infusions of placebo. Both groups were also treated with a stable background dose of methotrexate. The CD147 expression levels on CD14(+) peripheral blood monocytes of rheumatoid arthritis patients was detected by flow cytometry. The expression of CD147, MMP-3, and, MMP-9 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was assayed by real-time quantitative PCR, and the expression of MMP-3 and MMP-9 in serum was measured by a multiplexed microsphere-based flow assay. Results showed that the expression of CD147 and MMP-9 mRNA in group A decreased compared to group B. Expression of CD147 on CD14(+) monocytes was reduced (P<0.05), and serum MMP-3 and -9 levels in group A were decreased by week 18. These data suggested that infliximab could inhibit CD147 expression on CD14(+) monocytes as well as reduce the levels of MMP-3 and MMP-9 in peripheral blood monocytes.

  17. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Elisa; Argentino, Giuseppe; Beri, Ruggero; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC) and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice. Methods PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators. Results Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN) inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation) involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium) suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides. Conclusions We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum. PMID

  18. Differential miRNA expressions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Lin, Yanli; Zhan, Min; Mann, Dean L; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made to develop cancer biomarkers by detecting circulating extracellular miRNAs directly released from tumors. Yet, none of the cell-free biomarkers has been accepted to be used for early detection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) act as the first line of defense against malignancy in immune system, their dysfunction may occur as an early event in cancer immunogenicity or immune evasion. We proposed to investigate whether analysis of miRNA expressions of PBMCs has diagnostic value for NSCLC. We first used a microarray to analyze PBMCs of 16 stage I NSCLC patients and 16 cancer-free smokers, and identified seven PBMC miRNAs with a significantly altered expression level in NSCLC patients. In a training set of 84 NSCLC patients and 69 cancer-free smokers, a panel of two miRNAs (miRs-19b-3p and -29b-3p) were developed from the seven PBMC miRNAs, producing 72.62% sensitivity and 82.61% specificity in identifying NSCLC. Furthermore, the miRNAs could identify squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC), a major type of NSCLC, with 80.00% sensitivity and 89.86% specificity. The expression levels of the miRNAs were independent of disease stage. In a testing set of 56 NSCLC patients and 46 controls, the performance of the biomarkers was reproducibly confirmed. The study presents the first in-depth analysis of PBMC miRNA profile of NSCLC patients. The assessment of PBMC miRNAs may provide a new diagnostic approach for the early detection of NSCLC.

  19. Regulation of interferon receptor expression in human blood lymphocytes in vitro and during interferon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A.S.; Hannigan, G.E.; Freedman, M.H.; Williams, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    Interferons (IFN) elicit antiviral and antineoplastic activities by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface. The binding characteristics of IFN to human lymphocytes were studied using IFN alpha 2 labeled with /sup 125/I to high specific activity. The specific binding curves generated were analyzed by the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard to determine receptor numbers. The number of receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tonsillar B-lymphocytes (TBL) from normal individuals were 505 +/- 293 (n = 10) and 393 +/- 147 (n = 3) respectively. When these cells were preincubated in vitro with unlabeled IFN alpha 2, the receptor number decreased to 82 +/- 45 and 61 +/- 16 respectively. Receptor binding activities recovered gradually over a period of 72 h when the cells were incubated in IFN-free medium. This recovery of receptors could be blocked by the addition of actinomycin D to the incubation medium. A similar decrease in receptor expression was observed in vivo in PBL from patients being treated daily with 5 X 10(6) units/m2 per d of IFN alpha 2 by subcutaneous injection, for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or papilloma virus infections. Receptor numbers in PBL in vivo were further reduced concurrent with the progression of IFN therapy. Thus, the reduction in IFN receptor expression observed in vitro can be demonstrated in vivo. These studies indicate that monitoring IFN receptor expression in vivo can provide information regarding the availability of IFN receptors at the cell surface for the mediation of IFN actions during the course of IFN therapy.

  20. Impact of Neutron Exposure on Global Gene Expression in a Human Peripheral Blood Model.

    PubMed

    Broustas, Constantinos G; Xu, Yanping; Harken, Andrew D; Chowdhury, Mashkura; Garty, Guy; Amundson, Sally A

    2017-04-01

    The detonation of an improvised nuclear device would produce prompt radiation consisting of both photons (gamma rays) and neutrons. While much effort in recent years has gone into the development of radiation biodosimetry methods suitable for mass triage, the possible effect of neutrons on the endpoints studied has remained largely uninvestigated. We have used a novel neutron irradiator with an energy spectrum based on that 1-1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima blast to begin examining the effect of neutrons on global gene expression, and the impact this may have on the development of gene expression signatures for radiation biodosimetry. We have exposed peripheral blood from healthy human donors to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 or 1 Gy of neutrons ex vivo using our neutron irradiator, and compared the transcriptomic response 24 h later to that resulting from sham exposure or exposure to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 Gy of photons (X rays). We identified 125 genes that responded significantly to both radiation qualities as a function of dose, with the magnitude of response to neutrons generally being greater than that seen after X-ray exposure. Gene ontology analysis suggested broad involvement of the p53 signaling pathway and general DNA damage response functions across all doses of both radiation qualities. Regulation of immune response and chromatin-related functions were implicated only following the highest doses of neutrons, suggesting a physiological impact of greater DNA damage. We also identified several genes that seem to respond primarily as a function of dose, with less effect of radiation quality. We confirmed this pattern of response by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for BAX, TNFRSF10B, ITLN2 and AEN and suggest that gene expression may provide a means to differentiate between total dose and a neutron component.

  1. Administration of thyroxine affects the morphometric parameters and VEGF expression in the uterus and placenta and the uterine vascularization but does not affect reproductive parameters in gilts during early gestation.

    PubMed

    Souza, C A; Ocarino, N M; Silva, J F; Boeloni, J N; Nascimento, E F; Silva, I J; Castro, R D; Moreira, L P; Almeida, F R C L; Chiarini-Garcia, H; Serakides, R

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of thyroxine administration on morphometric parameters, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascularization in the uterus and placenta and reproductive parameters in gilts at 70 days of gestation. At 150 days of age, i.e., before first heat, 20 gilts were randomly divided into two experimental groups: treated (n=10) and control (n=10). The treated group received a daily dose of 400 μg of L-thyroxine (T(4)) in their diet until slaughter and the control group received only typical meals. Before artificial insemination, blood was collected to determine plasma total T(4). The gilts were inseminated in the second oestrus and slaughtered at 70 days of gestation. The foetal thyroid follicular epithelium height, number, size and weight of foetuses; foetal myogenesis, corpora lutea number, embryonic mortality rate, uterine weight, placental weight and placental fluid volume were measured. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analysis of uterus and placenta were determined. The averages of all variables were compared by the Student's t-test. The gilts treated with thyroxine showed significant increase of plasma total T(4). At 70 days of gestation, the heights of the trophoblastic epithelium, endometrial epithelium and endometrial gland epithelium were significantly higher in the group treated with T(4). The expression of cytoplasmatic and nuclear VEGF in trophoblastic cells and the number of blood vessels per field in endometrial stroma were significantly higher in the gilts treated with T(4). No other significant differences between groups were obtained with respect to other parameters (p>0.05). We conclude that oral administration of T(4) up to 70 days of pregnancy in gilts affects the morphometric parameters, the expression of placental VEGF and the uterine vascularization but does not affect reproductive parameters in gilts during early gestation.

  2. Iron nanoparticles significantly affect the in vitro and in vivo expression of Id genes.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinglu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Jinke

    2015-03-16

    In recent DNA microarray studies, we found that the transcription of the Id3 gene was significantly down-regulated in five cell lines (RAW264.7, Hepa1-6, THP-1, HepG2, and HL7702) treated with two doses (50 and 100 μg/mL) of a DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticle. Given the regulatory roles of Id genes in the cell cycle, growth, and differentiation, we wanted to do more investigations on the effect of the nanoparticle upon the Id genes. This study detected the expression of Id genes in six cell lines (the above cell lines plus HeLa) treated with the nanoparticle at the same doses using quantitative PCR. The results revealed that the expression of Id genes was significantly affected by the nanoparticle in these cell lines. Under each treatment, the Id3 gene was significantly (p < 0.01) down-regulated in all cell lines, the Id1 gene was significantly down-regulated in all cell lines except the RAW264.7 cells, and the Id2 gene was significantly down-regulated in the HepG2, HL7702, and HeLa cells. Because the Id1, Id2, and Id3 genes were significantly down-regulated in three liver-derived cell lines (Hepa1-6, HepG2, and HL7702) in both microarray and PCR detections, this study then detected the expression of Id genes in the liver tissues of mice that were intravenously injected with the nanoparticle at two doses (2 and 5 mg/kg body weight). The results revealed that the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 genes was also significantly down-regulated in the liver tissues under each treatment. Another Id gene, Id4, was also significantly regulated in some cells or liver tissues treated with the nanoparticle. These results reveal that the nanoparticle exerts a significant effect on the in vitro and in vivo expression of Id genes. This study thus provides new insights into the Id-related nanotoxicity of the nanoparticle and the close relationship between the regulation of Id genes and iron.

  3. Cortisol increases CXCR4 expression but does not affect CD62L and CCR7 levels on specific T cell subsets in humans.

    PubMed

    Besedovsky, Luciana; Linz, Barbara; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Groch, Sabine; Born, Jan; Lange, Tanja

    2014-06-01

    Glucocorticoids are well known to affect T cell migration, leading to a redistribution of the cells from blood to the bone marrow, accompanied by a concurrent suppression of lymph node homing. Despite numerous studies in this context, with most of them employing synthetic glucocorticoids in nonphysiological doses, the mechanisms of this redistribution are not well understood. Here, we investigated in healthy men the impact of cortisol at physiological concentrations on the expression of different migration molecules on eight T cell subpopulations in vivo and in vitro. Hydrocortisone (cortisol, 22 mg) infused during nocturnal rest when endogenous cortisol levels are low, compared with placebo, differentially reduced numbers of T cell subsets, with naive CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets exhibiting the strongest reduction. Hydrocortisone in vivo and in vitro increased CXCR4 expression, which presumably mediates the recruitment of T cells to the bone marrow. Expression of the lymph node homing receptor CD62L on total CD3(+) and CD8(+) T cells appeared reduced following hydrocortisone infusion. However, this was due to a selective extravasation of CD62L(+) T cell subsets, as hydrocortisone affected neither CD62L expression on a subpopulation level nor CD62L expression in vitro. Corresponding results in the opposite direction were observed after blocking of endogenous cortisol synthesis by metyrapone. CCR7, another lymph node homing receptor, was also unaffected by hydrocortisone in vitro. Thus, cortisol seems to redirect T cells to the bone marrow by upregulating their CXCR4 expression, whereas its inhibiting effect on T cell homing to lymph nodes is apparently regulated independently of the expression of classical homing receptors.

  4. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    PubMed

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function.

  5. Stochasticity in the Expression of LamB and its Affect on λ phage Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Emily; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2006-03-01

    λ phage binds to E. Coli's lamB protein and injects its DNA into the cell. The phage quickly replicates and after a latent period the bacteria bursts, emitting mature phages. We developed a mathematical model based on the known physical events that occur when a λ phage infects an E.Coli cell. The results of these models predict that the bacteria and phage populations become extinct unless the parameters of the model are very finely tuned, which is untrue in the nature. The lamB protein is part of the maltose regulon and can be repressed to minimal levels when grown in the absence of inducer. Therefore, a cell that is not expressing any lamB protein at that moment is resistant against phage infection. We studied the dynamic relationship between λ phage and E. Coli when the concentration of phage greatly outnumbers the concentration of bacteria. We study how the stochasticity of the expression of lamB affects the percentage of cells that the λ phage infects. We show that even in the case when the maltose regulon is fully induced a percentage of cells continue to persist against phage infection.

  6. Blood born miRNAs signatures that can serve as disease specific biomarkers are not significantly affected by overall fitness and exercise.

    PubMed

    Backes, Christina; Leidinger, Petra; Keller, Andreas; Hart, Martin; Meyer, Tim; Meese, Eckart; Hecksteden, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Blood born micro(mi)RNA expression pattern have been reported for various human diseases with signatures specific for diseases. To evaluate these biomarkers, it is mandatory to know possible changes of miRNA signatures in healthy individuals under different physiological conditions. We analyzed the miRNA expression in peripheral blood of elite endurance athletes and moderatly active controls. Blood drawing was done before and after exhaustive exercise in each group. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment we did not find any miRNA with significant p-values when comparing miRNA expression between the different groups. We found, however, 24 different miRNAs with an expression fold change of minimum 1.5 in at least one of the comparisons (athletes before vs after exercise, athletes before exercise vs controls and athletes after exercise vs controls). The observed changes are not significant in contrast to the expression changes of the blood born miRNA expression reported for many human diseases. These data support the idea of disease associated miRNA patterns useful as biomarkers that are not readily altered by physiological conditions.

  7. Nephrology pre-dialysis care affects the psychological adjustment, not only blood pressure, anemia, and phosphorus control.

    PubMed

    Furusho, Masahide; Kawazu, Minami; Takeda, Kazuhito; Kurachi, Emiko; Nakashima, Takafumi; Sagara, Rikako; Hara, Takashi; Mukai, Hideyuki; Miura, Shuhei; Sugawara, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have suggested that pre-dialysis care is associated with clinical outcomes. However, little has been reported on the influence of pre-dialysis care on the psychological adjustment to dialysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pre-dialysis care on psychological adjustment to dialysis and clinical characteristics. In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 52 patients who started hemodialysis at our hospital. They were divided into two groups according to the time of referral to our hospital: the early referral group (over 1 year prior to first dialysis: 19 patients, mean age 69.3 ± 11.1) and the late referral group (within 1 year prior to first dialysis: 33 patients, mean age 72.3 ± 8.9). We measured the clinical characteristics and evaluated the psychological adjustment to dialysis by Shontz's stage theory. Compared with the late referral group, the early referral group had a significantly better clinical characteristics concerning blood pressure (140.2 ± 23.7 vs. 156.9 ± 23.3 mmHg, P = 0.0150), hemoglobin (10.3 ± 1.5 vs. 9.4 ± 1.0 g/dL, P = 0.0078), and phosphorus (4.5 ± 1.5 vs. 5.5 ± 1.3 mg/dL, P = 0.0166). In addition, psychological adjustment to dialysis evaluated by Shontz's stage theory was significantly better in the early referral group (P = 0.017). Our results indicate that nephrology pre-dialysis care affects not only blood pressure, anemia, and phosphorus control but also the psychological adjustment to dialysis.

  8. Very-low-frequency oscillations of cerebral hemodynamics and blood pressure are affected by aging and cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Anouk; Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; Kessels, Roy P C; van Beek, Arenda H E A; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2014-01-15

    Spontaneous slow oscillations occur in cerebral hemodynamics and blood pressure (BP), and may reflect neurogenic, metabolic or myogenic control of the cerebral vasculature. Aging is accompanied by a degeneration of the vascular system, which may have consequences for regional cerebral blood flow and cognitive performance. This degeneration may be reflected in a reduction of spontaneous slow oscillations of cerebral hemodynamics and BP. Therefore, we aimed to establish the dependency of slow oscillations of cerebral hemodynamics and BP on the factors age and cognitive load, by using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Fourteen healthy young (23-32 years) and 14 healthy older adults (64-78 years) performed a verbal n-back working-memory task. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration changes were registered by two fNIRS channels located over left and right prefrontal cortex. BP was measured in the finger by photoplethysmography. We found that very-low-frequency oscillations (0.02-0.07 Hz) and low-frequency oscillations (0.07-0.2 Hz) of cerebral hemodynamics and BP were reduced in the older adults compared to the young during task performance. In young adults, very-low-frequency oscillations of cerebral hemodynamics and BP reduced with increased cognitive load. Cognitive load did not affect low-frequency oscillations of the cerebral hemodynamics and BP. Transfer function analysis indicated that the relationship between BP and cerebral hemodynamic oscillations does not change under influence of age and cognitive load. Our results suggest aging-related changes in the microvasculature such as declined spontaneous activity in microvascular smooth muscle cells and vessel stiffness. Moreover, our results indicate that in addition to local vasoregulatory processes, systemic processes also influence cerebral hemodynamic signals. It is therefore crucial to take the factors age and BP into consideration for the analysis and interpretation of hemodynamic

  9. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  10. Tetracycline treatment targeting Wolbachia affects expression of an array of proteins in Brugia malayi parasite.

    PubMed

    Dangi, Anil; Vedi, Satish; Nag, Jeetendra Kumar; Paithankar, Sameer; Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Kar, Santosh Kumar; Dube, Anuradha; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2009-09-01

    Wolbachia is an intracellular endosymbiont of Brugia malayi parasite whose presence is essential for the survival of the parasite. Treatment of B. malayi-infected jirds with tetracycline eliminates Wolbachia, which affects parasite survival and fitness. In the present study we have tried to identify parasite proteins that are affected when Wolbachia is targeted by tetracycline. For this Wolbachia depleted parasites (B. malayi) were obtained by tetracycline treatment of infected Mongolian jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) and their protein profile after 2-DE separation was compared with that of untreated parasites harboring Wolbachia. Approximately 100 protein spots could be visualized followed by CBB staining of 2-D gel and included for comparative analysis. Of these, 54 showed differential expressions, while two new protein spots emerged (of 90.3 and 64.4 kDa). These proteins were subjected to further analysis by MALDI-TOF for their identification using Brugia coding sequence database composed of both genomic and EST sequences. Our study unravels two crucial findings: (i) the parasite or Wolbachia proteins, which disappeared/down-regulated appear be essential for parasite survival and may be used as drug targets and (ii) tetracycline treatment interferes with the regulatory machinery vital for parasites cellular integrity and defense and thus could possibly be a molecular mechanism for the killing of filarial parasite. This is the first proteomic study substantiating the wolbachial genome integrity with its nematode host and providing functional genomic data of human lymphatic filarial parasite B. malayi.

  11. Age affects gene expression in mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kokkinaki, Maria; Lee, Tin-Lap; He, Zuping; Jiang, Jiji; Golestaneh, Nady; Hofmann, Marie-Claude; Chan, Wai-Yee; Dym, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Spermatogenesis in man starts with spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), and leads to the production of sperm in approximately 64 days, common to old and young men. Sperm from elderly men are functional and able to fertilize eggs and produce offspring, even though daily sperm production is more than 50% lower and damage to sperm DNA is significantly higher in older men than in those who are younger. Our hypothesis is that the SSC/spermatogonial progenitors themselves age. To test this hypothesis, we studied the gene expression profile of mouse SSC/progenitor cells at several ages using microarrays. After sequential enzyme dispersion, we purified the SSC/progenitors with immunomagnetic cell sorting using an antibody to GFRA1, a known SSC/progenitor cell marker. RNA was isolated and used for the in vitro synthesis of amplified and labeled cRNAs that were hybridized to the Affymetrix mouse genome microarrays. The experiments were repeated twice with different cell preparations, and statistically significant results are presented. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to confirm the microarray results. Comparison of four age groups (6 days, 21 days, 60 days, and 8 months old) showed a number of genes that were expressed specifically in the older mice. Two of them (i.e. Icam1 and Selp) have also been shown to mark aging hematopoietic stem cells. On the other hand, the expression levels of the genes encoding the SSC markers Gfra1 and Plzf did not seem to be significantly altered by age, indicating that age affects only certain SSC/progenitor properties.

  12. Self administration of oxycodone by adolescent and adult mice affects striatal neurotransmitter receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Blackwell, B; Schlussman, S D; Butelman, E R; Ho, A; Ott, J; Kreek, M J; Zhang, Y

    2014-01-31

    Illicit use of prescription opioid analgesics (e.g., oxycodone) in adolescence is a pressing public health issue. Our goal was to determine whether oxycodone self administration differentially affects striatal neurotransmitter receptor gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent compared to adult C57BL/6J mice. Groups of adolescent mice (4 weeks old, n=12) and of adult mice (11 weeks old, n=11) underwent surgery during which a catheter was implanted into their jugular veins. After recovering from surgery, mice self administered oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg/infusion) 2 h/day for 14 consecutive days or served as yoked saline controls. Mice were sacrificed within 1h after the last self-administration session and the dorsal striatum was isolated for mRNA analysis. Gene expression was analyzed with real time PCR using a commercially available neurotransmitter receptor PCR array containing 84 genes. We found that adolescent mice self administered less oxycodone than adult mice over the 14 days. Monoamine oxidase A (Maoa) and neuropeptide Y receptor 5 mRNA levels were lower in adolescent mice than in adult mice without oxycodone exposure. Oxycodone self administration increased Maoa mRNA levels compared to controls in both age groups. There was a positive correlation of the amount of oxycodone self administered in the last session or across 14 sessions with Maoa mRNA levels. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor mRNA showed a significant Drug × Age interaction, with point-wise significance. More genes in the dorsal striatum of adolescents (19) changed in response to oxycodone self administration compared to controls than in adult (4) mice. Overall, this study demonstrates that repeated oxycodone self administration alters neurotransmitter receptors gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent and adult mice.

  13. Identification of Phosphoglycerate Kinase 1 (PGK1) as a reference gene for quantitative gene expression measurements in human blood RNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood is a convenient sample and increasingly used for quantitative gene expression measurements with a variety of diseases including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Quantitative gene expression measurements require normalization of target genes to reference genes that are stable and independent from variables being tested in the experiment. Because there are no genes that are useful for all situations, reference gene selection is an essential step to any quantitative reverse transcription-PCR protocol. Many publications have described appropriate genes for a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions, however, reference genes that may be suitable for the analysis of CFS, or human blood RNA derived from whole blood as well as isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), have not been described. Findings Literature review and analyses of our unpublished microarray data were used to narrow down the pool of candidate reference genes to six. We assayed whole blood RNA from Tempus tubes and cell preparation tube (CPT)-collected PBMC RNA from 46 subjects, and used the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms to select the most stable reference genes. Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) was one of the optimal normalization genes for both whole blood and PBMC RNA, however, additional genes differed for the two sample types; Ribosomal protein large, P0 (RPLP0) for PBMC RNA and Peptidylprolyl isomerase B (PPIB) for whole blood RNA. We also show that the use of a single reference gene is sufficient for normalization when the most stable candidates are used. Conclusions We have identified PGK1 as a stable reference gene for use with whole blood RNA and RNA derived from PBMC. When stable genes are selected it is possible to use a single gene for normalization rather than two or three. Optimal normalization will improve the ability of results from PBMC RNA to be compared with those from whole blood RNA and potentially allows comparison of gene expression results

  14. Systemic sclerosis sera affect fibrillin-1 deposition by dermal blood microvascular endothelial cells: therapeutic implications of cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by endothelial cell injury, autoimmunity and fibrosis. The following three fibrillin-1 alterations have been reported in SSc. (1) Fibrillin-1 microfibrils are disorganized in SSc dermis. (2) Fibrillin-1 microfibrils produced by SSc fibroblasts are unstable. (3) Mutations in the FBN1 gene and anti-fibrillin-1 autoantibodies have been reported in SSc. Fibrillin-1 microfibrils, which are abundantly produced by blood and lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs, respectively), sequester in the extracellular matrix the latent form of the potent profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SSc sera on the deposition of fibrillin-1 and microfibril-associated glycoprotein 1 (MAGP-1) and the expression of focal adhesion molecules by dermal B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs. Methods Dermal B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs were challenged with sera from SSc patients who were treatment-naïve or under cyclophosphamide (CYC) treatment and with sera from healthy controls. Fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 synthesis and deposition and the expression of αvβ3 integrin/phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase and vinculin/actin were evaluated by immunofluorescence and quantified by morphometric analysis. Results Fibrillin-1 and MAGP-1 colocalized in all experimental conditions, forming a honeycomb pattern in B-MVECs and a dense mesh of short segments in Ly-MVECs. In B-MVECs, fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 production and αvβ3 integrin expression significantly decreased upon challenge with sera from naïve SSc patients compared with healthy controls. Upon challenge of B-MVECs with sera from CYC-treated SSc patients, fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 and αvβ3 integrin levels were comparable to those of cells treated with healthy sera. Ly-MVECs challenged with SSc sera did not differ from those treated with healthy control sera in the expression of any of the molecules assayed

  15. Expression polymorphism of the blood-brain barrier component P-glycoprotein (MDR1) in relation to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Furuno, Taku; Landi, Maria-Teresa; Ceroni, Mauro; Caporaso, Neil; Bernucci, Ilaria; Nappi, Giuseppe; Martignoni, Emilia; Schaeffeler, Elke; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2002-10-01

    Because drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein, the product of the multidrug resistance (MDR1 ) gene, contribute to the function of the blood-brain barrier, we hypothesized that differences in their expression could affect the uptake of neurotoxic xenobiotics, thereby modulating interindividual susceptibility for neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In a pilot case-control study comprising 95 Parkinson's disease patients (25 early-onset patients with onset age < or = 45 years) and 106 controls we analysed the three common polymorphisms, 3435C >T in exon 26, 2677G > T,A in exon 21, and -129T > C in exon 1b. There were no statistically significant associations between any of these polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease. However, a distribution pattern consistent with our hypothesis was observed in that the frequency of the 3435T/T genotype, which had previously been associated with decreased P-glycoprotein expression and function, was highest in the early-onset Parkinson's disease group (36.0%), second-highest in the late-onset Parkinson's disease group (22.9%), and lowest in the control group (18.9%). Furthermore, we confirmed that the MDR1 exon 21 and exon 26 polymorphisms are in significant linkage disequilibrium since the [2677G, 3435C] and [2677T, 3435T] haplotypes were far more frequently observed than expected. In conclusion, MDR1 and other drug transporters represent plausible candidates as Parkinson's disease risk genes. Larger studies are required to confirm this role in the etiology of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Fibronectin-binding protein of Borrelia hermsii expressed in the blood of mice with relapsing fever.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eric R G; Marcsisin, Renee A; Campeau Miller, Shelley A; Hue, Fong; Phillips, April; Aucoin, David P; Barbour, Alan G

    2014-06-01

    To identify and characterize surface proteins expressed by the relapsing fever (RF) agent Borrelia hermsii in the blood of infected mice, we used a cell-free filtrate of their blood to immunize congenic naive mice. The resultant antiserum was used for Western blotting of cell lysates, and gel slices corresponding to reactive bands were subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, followed by a search of the proteome database with the peptides. One of the immunogens was identified as the BHA007 protein, which is encoded by a 174-kb linear plasmid. BHA007 had sequence features of lipoproteins, was surface exposed by the criteria of in situ protease susceptibility and agglutination of Vtp(-) cells by anti-BHA007 antibodies, and was not essential for in vitro growth. BHA007 elicited antibodies during experimental infection of mice, but immunization with recombinant protein did not confer protection against needle-delivered infection. Open reading frames (ORFs) orthologous to BHA007 were found on large plasmids of other RF species, including the coding sequences for the CihC proteins of Borrelia duttonii and B. recurrentis, but not in Lyme disease Borrelia species. Recombinant BHA007 bound both human and bovine fibronectin with Kd (dissociation constant) values of 22 and 33 nM, respectively, and bound to C4-binding protein with less affinity. The distant homology of BHA007 and its orthologs to BBK32 proteins of Lyme disease species, as well as to previously described BBK32-like proteins in relapsing fever species, indicates that BHA007 is a member of a large family of multifunctional proteins in Borrelia species that bind to fibronectin as well as other host proteins.

  17. Fibronectin-Binding Protein of Borrelia hermsii Expressed in the Blood of Mice with Relapsing Fever

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Eric R. G.; Marcsisin, Renee A.; Campeau Miller, Shelley A.; Hue, Fong; Phillips, April; AuCoin, David P.

    2014-01-01

    To identify and characterize surface proteins expressed by the relapsing fever (RF) agent Borrelia hermsii in the blood of infected mice, we used a cell-free filtrate of their blood to immunize congenic naive mice. The resultant antiserum was used for Western blotting of cell lysates, and gel slices corresponding to reactive bands were subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, followed by a search of the proteome database with the peptides. One of the immunogens was identified as the BHA007 protein, which is encoded by a 174-kb linear plasmid. BHA007 had sequence features of lipoproteins, was surface exposed by the criteria of in situ protease susceptibility and agglutination of Vtp− cells by anti-BHA007 antibodies, and was not essential for in vitro growth. BHA007 elicited antibodies during experimental infection of mice, but immunization with recombinant protein did not confer protection against needle-delivered infection. Open reading frames (ORFs) orthologous to BHA007 were found on large plasmids of other RF species, including the coding sequences for the CihC proteins of Borrelia duttonii and B. recurrentis, but not in Lyme disease Borrelia species. Recombinant BHA007 bound both human and bovine fibronectin with Kd (dissociation constant) values of 22 and 33 nM, respectively, and bound to C4-binding protein with less affinity. The distant homology of BHA007 and its orthologs to BBK32 proteins of Lyme disease species, as well as to previously described BBK32-like proteins in relapsing fever species, indicates that BHA007 is a member of a large family of multifunctional proteins in Borrelia species that bind to fibronectin as well as other host proteins. PMID:24686059

  18. Analysis of blood flow and local expression of angiogenesis‑associated growth factors in infected wounds treated with negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cheng-Yan; Yu, Ai-Xi; Qi, Baiwen; Zhou, Min; Li, Zong-Huan; Wang, Wei-Yang

    2014-05-01

    Angiogenesis is involved in the wound healing process. Increased angiogenesis and blood flow constitute a major mechanism of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), which has been shown to facilitate the healing of infected wounds. However, the effect on the expression of angiogensis‑related growth factor remains unknown. The goal of the current study was to investigate the angiogenic factor levels prior to and following NPWT in infected wounds. A total of 20 patients with infected wounds treated with NPWT were included in the study. Patients acted as their own control; the postoperative measurements of patients were considered as the experimental group, while preoperative measurements were considered as the controlled group. Blood flow was recorded prior to and during NPWT. A total of 10 angiogensis‑related growth factors were detected using a protein biochip array to analyze the change in protein levels prior to NPWT, and on the third day during NPWT. All wounds were successfully reconstructed by skin grafting or using local flaps following NPWT. NPWT resulted in significantly increased blood flow in the wound. There was a significant increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), EGF, platelet‑derived growth factor and angiotesin‑2 following NPWT, while basic fibroblast growth factor decreased significantly. NPWT affects the local expression of angiogenesis‑associated growth factors, which represents another mechanism to explain how NPWT accelerates wound healing.

  19. Increased renal epithelial na channel expression and activity correlate with elevation of blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Haloui, Mounsif; Tremblay, Johanne; Seda, Ondrej; Koltsova, Svetlana V; Maksimov, Georgy V; Orlov, Sergei N; Hamet, Pavel

    2013-10-01

    Elevation of blood pressure with age is one of the hallmarks of hypertension in both males and females. This study examined transcriptomic profiles in the kidney of 12-, 40-, and 80-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats and 4 recombinant inbred strains in search for functional genetic elements supporting temporal dynamics of blood pressure elevation. We found that both in males and females of spontaneously hypertensive rats and hypertensive recombinant inbred strains age-dependent blood pressure increment was accompanied by 50% heightened expression of epithelial sodium channel β- and γ-subunits. Epithelial sodium channel subunit expression correlated positively with blood pressure but correlated negatively with renin expression. Increased epithelial sodium channel activity was observed in cultured epithelial cells isolated from the kidney medulla of 80-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats but not in age-matched normotensive Wistar Kyoto. This difference remained evident after 24-hour treatment with aldosterone. 22Na uptake in the perfused kidney medulla was increased whereas the urinary Na/K ratio was decreased in old spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with normotensive controls. The difference was eliminated by the administration of epithelial sodium channel inhibitor benzamil. Observations in recombinant inbred strains representing various mixtures of parental hypertensive and normotensive genomes suggest that Scnn1g and Scnn1b genes themselves are not implicated in heightened expression and that the increased expression is neither secondary nor required for a partial elevation of blood pressure in contrast to spontaneously hypertensive rats. We suggest that spontaneously hypertensive rats display an intact negative feed-back between renin-angiotensin-system and epithelial Na channel activity whose upregulated expression is supported by a yet unknown mechanism.

  20. PD-1 mRNA expression in peripheral blood cells and its modulation characteristics in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Ge; Wu, Shikai; Song, Shiping; Ni, Yanli; Suo, Zhuoyao; Meng, Xiangying; Li, Dan; Zhou, Lin; Hao, Rimin; Zhao, Yaowei; Bai, Li; Hou, Lili; Liu, Bing; Liu, Guangxian

    2017-02-02

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors that block the PD-1/PD-L1 signaling pathway have been used to treat a wide variety of cancers. Although results have been promising, significant inter-individual and inter-tumor variability has been observed. It is believed that better clinical outcome could be achieved if the treatment was individually designed based on the functional status of the PD-1/PD-L1 signaling and the cellular immunity. In this study, we analyzed the mRNA expression of PD-1 and other immunomodulatory genes in peripheral blood from cancer patients, and immunomodulatory gene expression during radiotherapy and immunomodulation therapy with cytokines. Our results show that the PD-1 mRNA expression is significantly increased in peripheral blood in cancer patients. Anti-cancer treatments can significantly modulate the PD-1 expression, but this is largely dependent on the initial immune status. Moreover, the PD-1 expression on peripheral lymphocytes can be immunoactivation-derived. These results suggest that the regulation and expression pattern of PD-1/PD-L1 signal is complicated which will influence the effect of blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 signaling pathway for cancer treatment. Through combined analysis of PD-1, CTLA-4, and other immune markers in peripheral blood, we may accurately evaluate the functional status of PD-1/PD-L1 signaling and cellular immunity, thereby providing clues for guiding anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 treatment.

  1. Fluoride at non-toxic dose affects odontoblast gene expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wurtz, Tilmann; Houari, Sophia; Mauro, Nicole; MacDougall, Mary; Peters, Heiko; Berdal, Ariane

    2008-07-10

    Elevated fluoride intake may lead to local tissue disturbances, known as fluorosis. Towards an understanding of this effect, fluoride-induced molecular responses were analyzed in MO6-G3 cultured odontoblasts cells. NaF at 1mM changed expression of genes implicated in tissue formation and growth, without affecting cell proliferation or inducing stress factor RNAs. Up to 1mM NaF, DNA accumulation was not inhibited, whereas at 3mM, cells detached from their support and did not proliferate. Intracellular structures, characterized by EM, were normal up to 1mM, but at 3mM, necrotic features were evident. No sign of apoptotic transformation appeared at any NaF concentration. Fluoride-sensitive genes were identified by microarray analysis; expression levels of selected RNAs were determined by conventional and real-time RT-PCR. At 1mM fluoride, RNAs encoding the extracellular matrix proteins asporin and fibromodulin, and the cell membrane associated proteins periostin and IMT2A were 10-fold reduced. RNA coding for signaling factor TNF-receptor 9 was diminished to one-third, whereas that for the chemokine Scya-5 was enhanced 2.5-fold. These RNAs are present in vivo in tooth forming cells. This was demonstrated by in situ hybridization and RT-PCR on RNA from dissected tissue samples; for the presence and functioning of fibromodulin in dentin matrix, a more comprehensive study has earlier been performed by others [Goldberg, M., Septier, D., Oldberg, A., Young, M.F., Ameye, L.G., 2006. Fibromodulin deficient mice display impaired collagen fibrillogenesis in predentin as well as altered dentin mineralization and enamel formation. J. Histochem. Cytochem. 54, 525-537]. Expression of most other RNA species, in particular of stress factor coding RNAs, was not altered. It was concluded that fluoride could influence the transcription pattern without inducing cell stress or apoptosis. In odontoblasts in vivo, aberrant expression of these fluoride-sensitive genes may impair the

  2. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes through Integrated Study of Alzheimer’s Disease Affected Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in older adults that damages the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behaviour. The identification of differentially expressed genes and related pathways among affected brain regions can provide more information on the mechanisms of AD. In the past decade, several studies have reported many genes that are associated with AD. This wealth of information has become difficult to follow and interpret as most of the results are conflicting. In that case, it is worth doing an integrated study of multiple datasets that helps to increase the total number of samples and the statistical power in detecting biomarkers. In this study, we present an integrated analysis of five different brain region datasets and introduce new genes that warrant further investigation. Methods The aim of our study is to apply a novel combinatorial optimisation based meta-analysis approach to identify differentially expressed genes that are associated to AD across brain regions. In this study, microarray gene expression data from 161 samples (74 non-demented controls, 87 AD) from the Entorhinal Cortex (EC), Hippocampus (HIP), Middle temporal gyrus (MTG), Posterior cingulate cortex (PC), Superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and visual cortex (VCX) brain regions were integrated and analysed using our method. The results are then compared to two popular meta-analysis methods, RankProd and GeneMeta, and to what can be obtained by analysing the individual datasets. Results We find genes related with AD that are consistent with existing studies, and new candidate genes not previously related with AD. Our study confirms the up-regualtion of INFAR2 and PTMA along with the down regulation of GPHN, RAB2A, PSMD14 and FGF. Novel genes PSMB2, WNK1, RPL15, SEMA4C, RWDD2A and LARGE are found to be differentially expressed across all brain regions. Further investigation on these genes may provide new insights into the development of AD

  3. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C) for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and citrate synthase (CS), which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan (ACAN), was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  4. Factors circulating in the blood of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients affect osteoblast maturation - description of a novel in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Ehnert, Sabrina; Freude, Thomas; Ihle, Christoph; Mayer, Larissa; Braun, Bianca; Graeser, Jessica; Flesch, Ingo; Stöckle, Ulrich; Nussler, Andreas K; Pscherer, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most frequent metabolic disorders in industrialized countries. Among other complications, T2DM patients have an increased fracture risk and delayed fracture healing. We have demonstrated that supraphysiological glucose and insulin levels inhibit primary human osteoblasts׳ maturation. We aimed at developing a more physiologically relevant in vitro model to analyze T2DM-mediated osteoblast changes. Therefore, SCP-1-immortalized pre-osteoblasts were differentiated with T2DM or control (non-obese and obese) sera. Between both control groups, no significant changes were observed. Proliferation was significantly increased (1.69-fold), while AP activity and matrix mineralization was significantly reduced in the T2DM group. Expression levels of osteogenic marker genes and transcription factors were altered, e.g. down-regulation of RUNX2 and SP-7 or up-regulation of STAT1, in the T2DM group. Active TGF-β levels were significantly increased (1.46-fold) in T2DM patients׳ sera. SCP-1 cells treated with these sera showed significantly increased TGF-β signaling (2.47-fold). Signaling inhibition effectively restored osteoblast maturation in the T2DM group. Summarizing our data, SCP-1 cells differentiated in the presence of T2DM patients׳ serum exhibit reduced osteoblast function. Thus, this model has a high physiological impact, as it can identify circulating factors in T2DM patients׳ blood that may affect bone function, e.g. TGF-β.

  5. Elevated ERCC-1 Gene Expression in blood cells associated with exposure to arsenic from drinking water in Inner Mongolia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Chronic arsenic exposure has been associated with human cancers. The objective of this study was to investigate arsenic effects on a DNA nucleotide excision repair gene, ERCC1, expression in human blood cells. Material and Methods: Water and toe nail samples were coll...

  6. Cholesterol Transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavoosi, Zahra; Moradi-Sardareh, Hemen; Saidijam, Massoud; Yadegarazari, Reza; Borzuei, Shiva; Soltanian, Alireza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes encode the cholesterol transporter proteins that play a key role in cholesterol and phospholipids homeostasis. This study was aimed at evaluating and comparing ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes expression in metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals. This case-control study was performed on 36 patients with metabolic syndrome and the same number of healthy individuals in Hamadan (west of Iran) during 2013-2014. Total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells and purified using RNeasy Mini Kit column. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes was performed by qRT-PCR. Lipid profile and fasting blood glucose were measured using colorimetric procedures. ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients was significantly lower (about 75%) compared to that of control group, while for ABCA1 expression, there was no significant difference between the two studied groups. Comparison of other parameters such as HDL-C, FBS, BMI, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure between metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals showed significant differences (P < 0.05). Decrease in ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients compared to healthy individuals suggests that hyperglycemia, related metabolites, and hyperlipidemia over the transporter capacity resulted in decreased expression of ABCG1. Absence of a significant change in ABCA1 gene expression between two groups can indicate a different regulation mechanism for ABCA1 expression. PMID:26788366

  7. Dyslipidemia rather than Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus or Chronic Periodontitis Affects the Systemic Expression of Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Sâmia Cruz Tfaile; Bastos, Alliny De Souza; Dos Santos, Raquel Alves; Orrico, Silvana Regina Perez

    2017-01-01

    A high percentage of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) patients are also affected by dyslipidemia and chronic periodontitis (CP), but no studies have determined the gene expression in patients that are simultaneously affected by all three diseases. We investigated the systemic expression of immune-related genes in T2D, dyslipidemia, and CP patients. One hundred and fifty patients were separated into five groups containing 30 individuals each: (G1) poorly controlled T2D with dyslipidemia and CP; (G2) well-controlled T2D with dyslipidemia and CP; (G3) normoglycemic individuals with dyslipidemia and CP; (G4) healthy individuals with CP; (G5) systemic and periodontally healthy individuals. Blood analyses of lipid and glycemic profiles were carried out. The expression of genes, including IL10, JAK1, STAT3, SOCS3, IP10, ICAM1, IFNA, IFNG, STAT1, and IRF1, was investigated by RT-qPCR. Patients with dyslipidemia demonstrated statistically higher expression of the IL10 and IFNA genes, while IFNG, IP10, IRF1, JAK1, and STAT3 were lower in comparison with nondyslipidemic patients. Anti-inflammatory genes, such as IL10, positively correlated with parameters of glucose, lipid, and periodontal profiles, while proinflammatory genes, such as IFNG, were negatively correlated with these parameters. We conclude that dyslipidemia appears to be the primary disease that is associated with gene expression of immune-related genes, while parameters of T2D and CP were correlated with the expression of these important immune genes. PMID:28316372

  8. microRNA expression profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Klinefelter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    SUI, WEIGUO; OU, MINGLIN; CHEN, JIEJING; LI, HUAN; LIN, HUA; ZHANG, YUE; LI, WUXIAN; XUE, WEN; TANG, DONGE; GONG, WEIWEI; ZHANG, RUOHAN; LI, FENGYAN; DAI, YONG

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs are a type of small non-coding RNAs which play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation, and the characterization of microRNA expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Klinefelter syndrome requires further investigation. In this study, PBMCs were obtained from patients with Klinefelter syndrome and normal controls. After preparation of small RNA libraries, the two groups of samples were sequenced simultaneously using next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, and novel and known microRNAs were analyzed. A total of 9,772,392 and 9,717,633 small RNA reads were obtained; 8,014,466 (82.01%) and 8,104,423 (83.40%) genome-matched reads, 64 and 49 novel microRNAs were identified in the library of Klinefelter syndrome and the library of healthy controls, respectively. There were 71 known microRNAs with differential expression levels between the two libraries. Clustering of over-represented gene ontology (GO) classes in predicted targets of novel microRNAs in the Klinefelter syndrome library showed that the most significant GO terms were genes involved in the endomembrane system, nucleotide binding and kinase activity. Our data revealed that there are a large number of microRNAs deregulated in PBMCs taken from patients with Klinefelter syndrome, of which certain novel and known microRNAs may be involved in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome. Further studies are necessary to determine the roles of microRNAs in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome in the future. PMID:23226734

  9. microRNA expression profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Ou, Minglin; Chen, Jiejing; Li, Huan; Lin, Hua; Zhang, Yue; Li, Wuxian; Xue, Wen; Tang, Donge; Gong, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruohan; Li, Fengyan; Dai, Yong

    2012-11-01

    microRNAs are a type of small non-coding RNAs which play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation, and the characterization of microRNA expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Klinefelter syndrome requires further investigation. In this study, PBMCs were obtained from patients with Klinefelter syndrome and normal controls. After preparation of small RNA libraries, the two groups of samples were sequenced simultaneously using next generation high-throughput sequencing technology, and novel and known microRNAs were analyzed. A total of 9,772,392 and 9,717,633 small RNA reads were obtained; 8,014,466 (82.01%) and 8,104,423 (83.40%) genome-matched reads, 64 and 49 novel microRNAs were identified in the library of Klinefelter syndrome and the library of healthy controls, respectively. There were 71 known microRNAs with differential expression levels between the two libraries. Clustering of over-represented gene ontology (GO) classes in predicted targets of novel microRNAs in the Klinefelter syndrome library showed that the most significant GO terms were genes involved in the endomembrane system, nucleotide binding and kinase activity. Our data revealed that there are a large number of microRNAs deregulated in PBMCs taken from patients with Klinefelter syndrome, of which certain novel and known microRNAs may be involved in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome. Further studies are necessary to determine the roles of microRNAs in the pathological process of Klinefelter syndrome in the future.

  10. Changes in Whole Blood Gene Expression in Obese Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Following Bariatric Surgery: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Stela Z.; Serre, David; Schauer, Philip; Kashyap, Sangeeta R.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background A pilot study was performed in order to investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on whole blood gene expression profiles in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Whole blood from eleven obese subjects with type 2 diabetes was collected in PAXgene tubes prior to and 6–12 months after bariatric surgery. Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Illumina gene expression microarrays. Clinical and expression data were analyzed using a paired t-test, and correlations between changes in clinical trait and transcript levels were calculated. Pathways were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and DAVID gene ontology software. Overall, bariatric surgery resulted in significant reduction of body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, and normalization of glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The expression levels of 204 transcripts, representing 200 unique genes, were significantly altered after bariatric surgery. Among the significantly regulated genes were GGT1, CAMP, DEFA1, LCN2, TP53, PDSS1, OLR1, CNTNAP5, DHCR24, HHAT and SARDH, which have been previously implicated in lipid metabolism, obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. Selected findings were replicated by quantitative real-time-PCR. The changes in expression of seven transcripts, WDR35, FLF45244, DHCR24, TIGD7, TOPBP1, TSHZ1, and FAM8A1 were strongly correlated with the changes in body weight, fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin content. The top pathways associated with gene expression changes after bariatric surgery was lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and gene expression. Two antimicrobial peptides were among the transcripts with the largest changes in gene expression after bariatric surgery. Conclusions/Significance Data from this pilot study suggest that whole blood expression levels of specific transcripts may be useful as biomarkers associated with susceptibility for type 2 diabetes and/or therapeutic

  11. The Interaction between Fluid Wall Shear Stress and Solid Circumferential Strain Affects Endothelial Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Ronny; Pierides, Alexis; Tarbell, John M

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells lining the walls of blood vessels are exposed simultaneously to wall shear stress (WSS) and circumferential stress (CS) that can be characterized by the temporal phase angle between WSS and CS (stress phase angle - SPA). Regions of the circulation with highly asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA close to -180°) such as coronary arteries are associated with the development of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia whereas more synchronous regions (SPA closer to 0°) are spared of disease. The present study evaluates endothelial cell gene expression of 42 atherosclerosis-related genes under asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) and synchronous hemodynamics (SPA=0 °). This study used a novel bioreactor to investigate the cellular response of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECS) exposed to a combination of pulsatile WSS and CS at SPA=0 or SPA=-180. Using a PCR array of 42 genes, we determined that BAECS exposed to non-reversing sinusoidal WSS (10±10 dyne/cm2) and CS (4 ± 4%) over a 7 hour testing period displayed 17 genes that were up regulated by SPA = -180 °, most of them pro-atherogenic, including NFκB and other NFκB target genes. The up regulation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65 by SPA =-180° was confirmed by Western blots and immunofluorescence staining demonstrating the nuclear translocation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65. These data suggest that asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) can elicit proatherogenic responses in endothelial cells compared to synchronous hemodynamics without shear stress reversal, indicating that SPA may be an important parameter characterizing arterial susceptibility to disease.

  12. ABCB1 (MDR1)-type P-glycoproteins at the blood-brain barrier modulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system: implications for affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Müller, Marianne B; Keck, Martin E; Binder, Elisabeth B; Kresse, Adelheid E; Hagemeyer, Thomas P; Landgraf, Rainer; Holsboer, Florian; Uhr, Manfred

    2003-11-01

    Multidrug-resistance gene 1-type P-glycoproteins (ABCB1-type P-gps) protect the brain against the accumulation of many toxic xenobiotics and drugs. We recently could show that the access of the endogenous glucocorticoids corticosterone and cortisol to the brain are regulated by ABCB1-type P-gps in vivo. ABCB1-type P-gp function, therefore, is likely to exert a profound influence on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system. Hyperactivity of the HPA system is frequently observed in human affective disorder, and a considerable amount of evidence has been accumulated suggesting that normalization of the HPA system might be the final step necessary for stable remission of the disease. To examine whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) function influences neuroendocrine regulation, we investigated HPA system activity in abcb1ab (-/-) mice under basal conditions and following stress. Abcb1ab (-/-) mice showed consistently lower plasma ACTH levels and lower evening plasma corticosterone levels. CRH mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was decreased and pituitary POMC mRNA expressing cells were significantly reduced in number in abcb1ab (-/-) mutants; however, they showed a normal activation of the HPA system following CRH stimulation. Lower doses of dexamethasone were required to suppress plasma corticosterone levels in mutants. Our data thus provide evidence for a sustained suppression of the HPA system at the hypothalamic level in abcb1ab (-/-) mice, suggesting that BBB function significantly regulates HPA system activity. Whether naturally occurring polymorphisms in the human ABCB1 gene might result in persistent changes in the responsiveness and regulation of the HPA system will be the subject of future investigations, correlating both genetic information with individual characteristics of the neuroendocrine phenotype.

  13. Plectin isoform 1-dependent nuclear docking of desmin networks affects myonuclear architecture and expression of mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Staszewska, Ilona; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin is a highly versatile cytoskeletal protein that acts as a mechanical linker between intermediate filament (IF) networks and various cellular structures. The protein is crucial for myofiber integrity. Its deficiency leads to severe pathological changes in skeletal muscle fibers of patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD). Skeletal muscle fibers express four major isoforms of plectin which are distinguished solely by alternative, relatively short, first exon-encoded N-terminal sequences. Each one of these isoforms is localized to a different subcellular compartment and plays a specific role in maintaining integrity and proper function(s) of myofibers. The unique role of individual isoforms is supported by distinct phenotypes of isoform-specific knockout mice and recently discovered mutations in first coding exons of plectin that lead to distinct, tissue-specific, pathological abnormalities in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that the lack of plectin isoform 1 (P1) in myofibers of mice leads to alterations of nuclear morphology, similar to those observed in various forms of MD. We show that P1-mediated targeting of desmin IFs to myonuclei is essential for maintenance of their typically spheroidal architecture as well as their proper positioning and movement along the myofiber. Furthermore, we show that P1 deficiency affects chromatin modifications and the expression of genes involved in various cellular functions, including signaling pathways mediating mechanotransduction. Mechanistically, P1 is shown to specifically interact with the myonuclear membrane-associated (BAR domain-containing) protein endophilin B. Our results open a new perspective on cytoskeleton-nuclear crosstalk via specific cytolinker proteins. PMID:26487297

  14. CP27 affects viability, proliferation, attachment and gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Luan, X; Diekwisch, T G H

    2002-08-01

    CP27 is a gene that has been cloned from an E11 early embryonic library and has been suggested to mediate early organogenesis (Diekwisch et al., 1999, Gene 235, 19). We have hypothesized that CP27 exhibits its effects on organogenesis by affecting individual cell function. Based on the CP27 expression pattern we have selected the CP27 expressing embryonic fibroblast cell line BALB/c 3T3 to determine the effects of CP27 on cell function. CP27 loss of function strategies were performed by adding 5, 12.5 or 25 micro g/ml anti-CP27 antibody to cultured BALB/c 3T3 cells and comparing the results to controls in which identical concentrations of rabbit serum were added to the culture medium. Other controls included an antibody against another extracellular matrix protein amelogenin (negative control) and anti-CP27 antibodies directed against other areas of the CP27 molecule (positive control). Following cell culture, cell viability, apoptosis, cell proliferation, cell shape, cellular attachment and fibronectin matrix production were assayed using MTT colourimetric assay, BrdU staining, morphometry, immunostaining and western blot analysis. Block of CP27 function using an antibody strategy resulted in the following significant changes: (i) reduced viability, (ii) increased number of apoptotic cells, (iii) reduced proliferation, (iv) alterations in cell shape, (v) loss of attachment, and (vi) reduction in fibronectin matrix production. There was also a redistribution in fibronectin matrix organization demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that CP27 plays an important role in the maintance of normal cell function and that CP27 block leads to significant changes in cellular behaviour.

  15. CD24 expression does not affect dopamine neuronal survival in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shaista; Carnwath, Tom; Garas, Shaady; Sleeman, Jonathan P.; Barker, Roger A.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that is characterised by the loss of specific populations of neurons in the brain. The mechanisms underlying this selective cell death are unknown but by using laser capture microdissection, the glycoprotein, CD24 has been identified as a potential marker of the populations of cells that are affected in PD. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry on sections of mouse brain, we confirmed that CD24 is robustly expressed by many of these subsets of cells. To determine if CD24 may have a functional role in PD, we modelled the dopamine cell loss of PD in Cd24 mutant mice using striatal delivery of the neurotoxin 6-OHDA. We found that Cd24 mutant mice have an anatomically normal dopamine system and that this glycoprotein does not modulate the lesion effects of 6-OHDA delivered into the striatum. We then undertook in situ hybridization studies on sections of human brain and found—as in the mouse brain—that CD24 is expressed by many of the subsets of the cells that are vulnerable in PD, but not those of the midbrain dopamine system. Finally, we sought to determine if CD24 is required for the neuroprotective effect of Glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. Our results indicate that in the absence of CD24, there is a reduction in the protective effects of GDNF on the dopaminergic fibres in the striatum, but no difference in the survival of the cell bodies in the midbrain. While we found no obvious role for CD24 in the normal development and maintenance of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system in mice, it may have a role in mediating the neuroprotective aspects of GDNF in this system. PMID:28182766

  16. The role of the experience and expression of anger and anxiety in elevated blood pressure among black and white adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between black and white adolescents in the experience and expression of anger and anxiety, traditional risk factors for hypertension, and blood pressure were examined among adolescents enrolled in a health science course in Tampa, Florida. Relationships between blood pressure and anger/anxiety and traditional risk factors were also examined. Black adolescents of both genders experienced feelings of anxiety more frequently and with greater intensity than did their white counterparts. Although black and white adolescents did not differ in their ability to experience anger, blacks experienced more intense reactions in situations involving unfair criticism and time pressure. More importantly, black males and females suppressed the expression of their anger more often than did their white counterparts. The blood pressure of black adolescent males and females was found to be significantly higher than their white counterparts. Blacks were also more likely to have a family history of hypertension, but were less likely to smoke cigarettes. Racial differences on other risk factors were found only among black females who were heavier and consumed more salty junk foods than white females. Although a number of the personality and risk factor measures were significantly correlated with blood pressure, measures of suppressed anger were more strongly correlated with blood pressure for both black and white adolescents. Findings from the multiple regression analyses showed that suppressed anger was the best independent predictor of blood pressure for all groups except white females. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate that adolescents with elevated blood pressure can be identified by emotional/psychological factors, which are predictive of high blood pressure for both blacks and whites. PMID:2746680

  17. Identification of context-dependent expression quantitative trait loci in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zhernakova, Daria V; Deelen, Patrick; Vermaat, Martijn; van Iterson, Maarten; van Galen, Michiel; Arindrarto, Wibowo; van 't Hof, Peter; Mei, Hailiang; van Dijk, Freerk; Westra, Harm-Jan; Bonder, Marc Jan; van Rooij, Jeroen; Verkerk, Marijn; Jhamai, P Mila; Moed, Matthijs; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Bot, Jan; Nooren, Irene; Pool, René; van Dongen, Jenny; Hottenga, Jouke J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Li, Yang; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; de Klein, Niek; Beekman, Marian; Deelen, Joris; van Heemst, Diana; van den Berg, Leonard H; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; Veldink, Jan H; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Slagboom, P Eline; Swertz, Morris A; Isaacs, Aaron; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Jansen, Rick; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Franke, Lude

    2017-01-01

    Genetic risk factors often localize to noncoding regions of the genome with unknown effects on disease etiology. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) help to explain the regulatory mechanisms underlying these genetic associations. Knowledge of the context that determines the nature and strength of eQTLs may help identify cell types relevant to pathophysiology and the regulatory networks underlying disease. Here we generated peripheral blood RNA-seq data from 2,116 unrelated individuals and systematically identified context-dependent eQTLs using a hypothesis-free strategy that does not require previous knowledge of the identity of the modifiers. Of the 23,060 significant cis-regulated genes (false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.05), 2,743 (12%) showed context-dependent eQTL effects. The majority of these effects were influenced by cell type composition. A set of 145 cis-eQTLs depended on type I interferon signaling. Others were modulated by specific transcription factors binding to the eQTL SNPs.

  18. PD-1 expression on peripheral blood T-cell subsets correlates with prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayoko; Yamada, Teppei; Yoshiyama, Koichi; Terazaki, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Shinjiro; Matsueda, Satoko; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Sugawara, Shunichi; Takamori, Shinzo; Itoh, Kyogo; Yamada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    PD-1 expression in peripheral blood T-cells has been reported in several kinds of cancers, including lung cancer. However, the relationship between PD-1 expression in peripheral blood T-cells and prognosis after treatment with a cancer vaccine has not been reported. To elucidate this relationship, we analyzed PD-1 expression in the peripheral blood T-cells of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The blood samples used in this study were obtained from patients enrolled in phase II clinical trials of a personalized peptide vaccine. Seventy-eight samples obtained before and after a single vaccination cycle (consisting of six or eight doses) were subjected to the analysis. PD-1 was expressed on lymphocytes in the majority of samples. The relative contents of PD1+CD4+ T-cells against total lymphocytes before and after the vaccination cycle correlated with overall survival (OS) with a high degree of statistical significance (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0014). A decrease in PD-1+CD8+ T-cells after one cycle of vaccination also correlated with longer OS (P = 0.032). The IgG response to the non-vaccinated peptides suggested that the epitope spreading seemed to occur more frequently in high-PD-1+CD4+ T-cell groups. Enrichment of CD45RA−CCR7− effector-memory phenotype cells in PD-1+ T-cells in PBMCs was also shown. These results suggest that PD-1 expression on the peripheral blood T-cell subsets can become a new prognostic marker in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with personalized peptide vaccination. PMID:25117757

  19. Down-regulation of pigment epithelium-derived factor in uveitic lesion associates with focal vascular endothelial growth factor expression and breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Deeg, Cornelia A; Altmann, Frank; Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius

    2007-05-01

    Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an incurable autoimmune disease affecting the eye. Identifying biological markers or pathways associated with this disease may allow the understanding of its pathogenesis at a molecular level. The vitreous is the body fluid closest to the disease-affected tissue and possibly also an effector of pathological processes relevant for ERU. Surgical removal of vitreous leads to cessation of relapses in spontaneous uveitis of both man and horse, therefore vitreous composites are likely to contribute to disease progression. Uveitic vitreous is likely to contain potential biomarkers in relatively undiluted quantities. With the goal to identify these markers, we systematically compared vitreous from healthy and disease-affected eyes by proteomic profiling. Nine differentially expressed proteins were identified, that are functionally related to immune response, inflammation, and maintenance of the blood-retinal barrier. One of these, pigment epithelium-derived factor, a protein involved in maintaining a proper blood-retina barrier as well as protecting from neoangiogenesis was additionally found to be down-regulated within uveitic retinal lesions whereas, conversely, vascular endothelial growth factor was found to be up-regulated at these sites. Together, these changes point to as of yet undiscovered biological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease.

  20. Skin-infiltrating T cells and cytokine expression in Icelandic horses affected with insect bite hypersensitivity: a possible role for regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Mareike; Janda, Jozef; Sigurdardottir, Olöf G; Svansson, Vilhjalmur; Klukowska, Jolanta; von Tscharner, Claudia; Doherr, Marcus; Broström, Hans; Andersson, Lisa S; Einarsson, Sigurjón; Marti, Eliane; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjörg

    2011-03-15

    Equine insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a seasonally recurrent, pruritic skin disorder caused by an IgE-mediated reaction to salivary proteins of biting flies, predominantly of the genus Culicoides. The aim of this study was to define T cell subsets and cytokine profile in the skin of IBH-affected Icelandic horses with particular focus on the balance between T helper (Th) 1, Th2 and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Distribution and number of CD4+, CD8+ and Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells were characterized by immunohistochemical staining in lesional and non-lesional skin of moderately and severely IBH-affected horses (n=14) and in the skin of healthy control horses (n=10). Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, mRNA expression levels of Th2 cytokines (Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13), Th1 cytokines (Interferon-γ), regulatory cytokines (Transforming Growth Factor β1, IL-10) and the Treg transcription factor FoxP3 were measured in skin and blood samples. Furthermore, Culicoides nubeculosus specific serum IgE levels were assessed. Lesions of IBH-affected horses contained significantly higher numbers of CD4+ cells than skin of healthy control horses. Furthermore, the total number of T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) was significantly increased in lesional compared to non-lesional skin and there was a tendency (p=0.07) for higher numbers of CD4+ cells in lesional compared to non-lesional skin. While the number of FoxP3+ T cells did not differ significantly between the groups, the ratio of Foxp3 to CD4+ cells was significantly lower in lesions of severely IBH-affected horses than in moderately affected or control horses. Interestingly, differences in FoxP3 expression were more striking at the mRNA level. FoxP3 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in lesional skin, compared both to non-lesional and to healthy skin and were also significantly lower in non-lesional compared to healthy skin. Expression levels of IL-13, but not IL-4 or IL-5

  1. Detection of differentially expressed genes in broiler pectoralis major muscle affected by White Striping - Wooden Breast myopathies.

    PubMed

    Zambonelli, Paolo; Zappaterra, Martina; Soglia, Francesca; Petracci, Massimiliano; Sirri, Federico; Cavani, Claudio; Davoli, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    White Striping and Wooden Breast (WS/WB) are abnormalities increasingly occurring in the fillets of high breast yield and growth rate chicken hybrids. These defects lead to consistent economic losses for poultry meat industry, as affected broiler fillets present an impaired visual appearance that negatively affects consumers' acceptability. Previous studies have highlighted in affected fillets a severely damaged muscle, showing profound inflammation, fibrosis, and lipidosis. The present study investigated the differentially expressed genes and pathways linked to the compositional changes observed in WS/WB breast muscles, in order to outline a more complete framework of the gene networks related to the occurrence of this complex pathological picture. The biochemical composition was performed on 20 pectoralis major samples obtained from high breast yield and growth rate broilers (10 affected vs. 10 normal) and 12 out of the 20 samples were used for the microarray gene expression profiling (6 affected vs. 6 normal). The obtained results indicate strong changes in muscle mineral composition, coupled to an increased deposition of fat. In addition, 204 differentially expressed genes (DEG) were found: 102 up-regulated and 102 down-regulated in affected breasts. The gene expression pathways found more altered in WS/WB muscles are those related to muscle development, polysaccharide metabolic processes, proteoglycans synthesis, inflammation, and calcium signaling pathway. On the whole, the findings suggest that a multifactorial and complex etiology is associated with the occurrence of WS/WB muscle abnormalities, contributing to further defining the transcription patterns associated with these myopathies.

  2. ST6GALNAC5 Expression Decreases the Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and the Human Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Delannoy, Clément Philippe; Dewald, Justine Hélène; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Julien, Sylvain; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Delannoy, Philippe; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-08-11

    The ST6GALNAC5 gene that encodes an α2,6-sialyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of α-series gangliosides, was previously identified as one of the genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain. We have shown that the expression of ST6GALNAC5 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the expression of GD1α ganglioside at the cell surface. By using a human blood-brain barrier in vitro model recently developed, consisting in CD34⁺ derived endothelial cells co-cultivated with pericytes, we show that ST6GALNAC5 expression decreased the interactions between the breast cancer cells and the human blood-brain barrier.

  3. ST6GALNAC5 Expression Decreases the Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and the Human Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Delannoy, Clément Philippe; Dewald, Justine Hélène; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Julien, Sylvain; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Delannoy, Philippe; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The ST6GALNAC5 gene that encodes an α2,6-sialyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of α-series gangliosides, was previously identified as one of the genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain. We have shown that the expression of ST6GALNAC5 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the expression of GD1α ganglioside at the cell surface. By using a human blood-brain barrier in vitro model recently developed, consisting in CD34+ derived endothelial cells co-cultivated with pericytes, we show that ST6GALNAC5 expression decreased the interactions between the breast cancer cells and the human blood-brain barrier. PMID:27529215

  4. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Karina M.; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M.; Siddiqui, Waleed T.; Opsasnick, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4′,4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  5. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mata, Karina M; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-11-15

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rat