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Sample records for expression cellular distribution

  1. Hepatic expression and cellular distribution of the glucose transporter family

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sumera; Adams, David H; Lalor, Patricia F

    2012-01-01

    Glucose and other carbohydrates are transported into cells using members of a family of integral membrane glucose transporter (GLUT) molecules. To date 14 members of this family, also called the solute carrier 2A proteins have been identified which are divided on the basis of transport characteristics and sequence similarities into several families (Classes 1 to 3). The expression of these different receptor subtypes varies between different species, tissues and cellular subtypes and each has differential sensitivities to stimuli such as insulin. The liver is a contributor to metabolic carbohydrate homeostasis and is a major site for synthesis, storage and redistribution of carbohydrates. Situations in which the balance of glucose homeostasis is upset such as diabetes or the metabolic syndrome can lead metabolic disturbances that drive chronic organ damage and failure, confirming the importance of understanding the molecular regulation of hepatic glucose homeostasis. There is a considerable literature describing the expression and function of receptors that regulate glucose uptake and release by hepatocytes, the most import cells in glucose regulation and glycogen storage. However there is less appreciation of the roles of GLUTs expressed by non parenchymal cell types within the liver, all of which require carbohydrate to function. A better understanding of the detailed cellular distribution of GLUTs in human liver tissue may shed light on mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. This review summarises the available literature on hepatocellular expression of GLUTs in health and disease and highlights areas where further investigation is required. PMID:23239915

  2. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  3. Pulmonary cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 cellular expression and distribution after respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Meyerholz, David K; Ackermann, Mark R

    2010-02-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) play an important role in pulmonary physiology and various pathophysiological processes following infection. The initial step in the biosynthesis of PGs is regulated by two distinct cyclooxygenase enzymes, cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2. The goal of this study was to investigate the pulmonary cellular localization and distribution of COX-1 and COX-2 in a neonatal lamb model following respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza virus 3 (PI3) infection, organisms that also cause significant respiratory disease in children. No significant differences were seen in pulmonary COX-1 expression at various microanatomical locations following RSV or PI3 infection compared to controls. In contrast, COX-2 was upregulated following RSV and PI3 infection. Strong expression was restricted to bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells and macrophages, while minimal expression was present in the same microanatomical locations in the uninfected lungs. Other microanatomical locations in both the controls and the infected lungs lacked expression. This work suggests that during RSV or PI3 infection: (1) COX-1 cellular expression is not altered, (2) COX-2 cellular expression is upregulated in airway bronchiolar and bronchial epithelial cells and macrophages, (3) respiratory epithelium along with macrophages are important microanatomical compartments regulating the host inflammatory response during viral infection, and (4) COX-2 may be a potential target for RSV and PI3 therapy.

  4. GLP-1 receptor is expressed in human stomach mucosa: analysis of its cellular association and distribution within gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Broide, Efrat; Bloch, Olga; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2013-09-01

    The stomach is a target organ of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). However, the cellular expression and glandular distribution of its receptor (GLP-1R) in human gastric mucosa are not known. We determined the expression of GLP-1R in different regions of human stomach mucosa and its specific cellular association and distribution within gastric glands. Tissue samples from stomach body and antrum were obtained from 20 patients during routine esophagogastroduodenoscopy. mRNA encoding GLP-1R protein expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. Determination of cell types bearing GLP-1R, their localization, and their frequency in gastric glands in different gastric regions were estimated by immunohistochemical morphological analysis. Levels of GLP-1R mRNA were similar in body and antrum. GLP-1R immunoreactivity was found throughout the gastric mucosa in various types of glandular cells. The highest frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells was found in the neck area of the principal glands in cells morphologically identified as parietal cells. GLP-1R immunostaining was also found on enteroendocrine-like cells in the pyloric glands. This study provides the first description of GLP-1R expression in human gastric glands and its specific cellular association. Our data suggest that GLP-1 may act directly on the gastric mucosa to modulate its complex functions.

  5. Expression and cellular distribution of ubiquitin in response to injury in the developing spinal cord of Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Noor, Natassya M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J; Steer, David L; Truettner, Jessie S; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Dietrich, W Dalton; Smith, A Ian; Saunders, Norman R

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to postnatal day P35 in control opossums (Monodelphis domestica) and in response to complete spinal transection (T10) at P7, when axonal growth through site of injury occurs, and P28 when this is no longer possible. Cords were collected 1 or 7 days after injury, with age-matched controls and segments rostral to lesion were studied. Following spinal injury ubiquitin levels (western blotting) appeared reduced compared to controls especially one day after injury at P28. In contrast, after injury mRNA expression (qRT-PCR) was slightly increased at P7 but decreased at P28. Changes in isoelectric point of separated ubiquitin indicated possible post-translational modifications. Cellular distribution demonstrated a developmental shift between earliest (P8) and latest (P35) ages examined, from a predominantly cytoplasmic immunoreactivity to a nuclear expression; staining level and shift to nuclear staining was more pronounced following injury, except 7 days after transection at P28. After injury at P7 immunostaining increased in neurons and additionally in oligodendrocytes at P28. Mass spectrometry showed two ubiquitin bands; the heavier was identified as a fusion product, likely to be an ubiquitin precursor. Apparent changes in ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in development and response to spinal injury suggest an intricate regulatory system that modulates these responses which, when better understood, may lead to potential therapeutic targets.

  6. Expression pattern and sub-cellular distribution of phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C enzymes after treatment with U-73122 in rat astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Panetta, Barbara; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Cocco, Lucio

    2010-07-01

    Phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes interfere with the metabolism of inositol phospholipids (PI), molecules involved in signal transduction, a complex process depending on various components. Many evidences support the hypothesis that, in the glia, isoforms of PI-PLC family display different expression and/or sub cellular distribution under non-physiological conditions such as the rat astrocytes activation during neurodegeneration, the tumoural progression of some neoplasms and the inflammatory cascade activation after lipopolysaccharide administration, even if their role remains not completely elucidated. Treatment of a cultured established glioma cell line (C6 rat astrocytoma cell line) induces a modification in the pattern of expression and of sub cellular distribution of PI-PLCs compared to untreated cells. Special attention require PI-PLC beta3 and PI-PLC gamma2 isoforms, whose expression and sub cellular localization significantly differ after U-73122 treatment. The meaning of these modifications is unclear, also because the use of this N-aminosteroid compound remains controversial, inasmuch it has further actions which might contribute to the global effect recorded on the treated cells.

  7. Expression and cellular distribution of estrogen and progesterone receptors and the real-time proliferation of porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Piotrowska, Hanna; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Although the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors within porcine ovary and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) is well recognized, still little information is known regarding expression of the progesterone receptor (PGR), PGR membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) and of estrogen-related receptors (ERRγ and ERRβ/γ) in separated cumulus cells in relation to real-time proliferation. In this study, a model of oocytes-separated cumulus cells was used to analyze the cell proliferation index and the expression PGR, PGRMC1 and of ERRγ and ERRβ/γ during 96-h cultivation in vitro using real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and confocal microscopic observation. We found that PGR protein expression was increased at 0 h, compared with PGR protein expression after 96 h of culture (P < 0.001). The expression of PGRMC1, ERRγ and ERRβ/γ was unchanged. After using qRT-PCR we did not found statistical differences in expression of PGR, PGRMC1, ERRγ and ERRβ/γ during 96 h of cumulus cells in vitro culture (IVC). We supposed that the differential expression of the PGR protein at 0 h and after 96 h is related to a time-dependent down-regulation, which may activate a negative feedback. The distribution of PGR, PGRMC1 proteins may be linked with the translocation of receptors to the cytoplasm after the membrane binding of respective agonists and intra-cytoplasmic signal transduction. Furthermore, cumulus cells analyzed at 0 h were characterized by decreased proliferation index, whereas those after 96 h of culture revealed a significant increase of proliferation index, which may be associated with differentiation/luteinization of these cells during real-time proliferation.

  8. Expression and cellular distribution of INHA and INHB before and after in vitro cultivation of porcine oocytes isolated from follicles of different size.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Jackowska, Marta; Woźna, Magdalena; Antosik, Paweł; Piotrowska, Hanna; Zawierucha, Piotr; Bukowska, Dorota; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Nowicki, Michał; Brüssow, Klaus P

    2012-01-01

    Cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COCs) were collected from small (<3 mm), medium (3-5 mm), and large (>5 mm) porcine follicles, and the INHA and INHB expression and cellular localization were studied. Developmentally competent (BCB+) COCs were cultured for 44 h. Samples of mRNA were isolated before and after in vitro maturation (IVM) from oocytes collected from follicles of different size for RQ-PCR assay. The INHA and INHB protein distribution within the oocytes was observed by confocal microscopy. INHA mRNA expression was increased in oocytes from large compared to medium and small follicles before IVM (P < 0.001), and to oocytes of small follicles after IVM (P < 0.001). The INHB expression was not different before IVM, but the IHNB mRNA level was gradually higher in oocytes from large follicles after IVM (P < 0.01). INHA was not differently expressed before IVM; however, in large follicle oocytes the protein was distributed in the peripheral area of the cytoplasm; in oocytes from small follicles it was in the entire cytoplasm. After IVM, INHA was strongly expressed in oocytes from small follicles and distributed particularly in the zona pellucida (ZP). Similarly and both before and after IVM, INHB protein was highly expressed in small follicle oocytes and within the cytoplasm. In summary, INHs can be recognized as a marker of porcine oocyte quality.

  9. Study on connexin gene and protein expression and cellular distribution in relation to real-time proliferation of porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, B; Ziółkowska, A; Ciesiółka, S; Piotrowska, H; Antosik, P; Bukowska, D; Nowicki, M; Brüssow, K P; Zabel, M

    2014-01-01

    Granulosa cells (GCs) play an important role during follicle growth and development in preovulatory stage. Moreover, the proteins such as connexins are responsible for formation of protein channel between follicular-cumulus cells and oocyte. This study was aimed to investigate the role of connexin expression in porcine GCs in relation to their cellular distribution and real-time cell proliferation. In the present study, porcine GCs were isolated from the follicles of puberal gilts and then cultured in a real-time cellular analyzer (RTCA) system for 168 h. The expression levels of connexins (Cxs) Cx36, Cx37, Cx40 and Cx43 mRNA were measured by RQ-PCR analysis, and differences in the expression and distribution of Cx30, Cx31, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45 proteins were analyzed by confocal microscopic visualization. We found higher level of Cx36, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA expression in GCs at recovery (at 0 h of in vitro culture, IVC) compared to all analyzed time periods of IVC (24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h; P<0.001). On the other hand, the expression level of Cx40 transcripts was higher after 24 h of IVC compared to 0 h and the other times of IVC (P<0.001). Similarly to mRNAs, the expression levels of Cx31, Cx37 and Cx45 proteins were higher before (0 h) compared to after 168 h of IVC. The expression of Cx30 and Cx43, however, did not vary between the groups. In all, the proteins were distributed throughout the cell membrane rather than in the cytoplasm both before and after IVC. After 24 h of IVC, we observed a significant increase in the proliferation of GCs (log phase). We found differences in the proliferation index between 72-96 and 96- 140 h within the same population of GCs. In conclusion, the decrease in the expression of Cx mRNAs and proteins following IVC could be associated with a breakdown in gap-junction connections (GJCs), and leads to the decreased of their activity, which may be a reason of non-functional existence of connexon in follicular granulosa cells

  10. Cellular Automata Simulation for Wealth Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Ching

    2009-08-01

    Wealth distribution of a country is a complicate system. A model, which is based on the Epstein & Axtell's "Sugars cape" model, is presented in Netlogo. The model considers the income, age, working opportunity and salary as control variables. There are still other variables should be considered while an artificial society is established. In this study, a more complicate cellular automata model for wealth distribution model is proposed. The effects of social welfare, tax, economical investment and inheritance are considered and simulated. According to the cellular automata simulation for wealth distribution, we will have a deep insight of financial policy of the government.

  11. Expression of Cellular Oncogenes in Human Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamon, Dennis J.; Dekernion, Jean B.; Verma, Inder M.; Cline, Martin J.

    1984-04-01

    Cellular oncogenes have been implicated in the induction of malignant transformation in some model systems in vitro and may be related to malignancies in vivo in some vertebrate species. This article describes a study of the expression of 15 cellular oncogenes in fresh human tumors from 54 patients, representing 20 different tumor types. More than one cellular oncogene was transcriptionally active in all of the tumors examined. In 14 patients it was possible to study normal and malignant tissue from the same organ. In many of these patients, the transcriptional activity of certain oncogenes was greater in the malignant than the normal tissue. The cellular fes (feline sarcoma) oncogene, not previously known to be transcribed in mammalian tissue, was found to be active in lung and hematopoietic malignancies.

  12. Cellular localization and tissue distribution of endogenous DFCP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Nanao, Tomohisa; Koike, Masato; Yamaguchi, Junji; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Uchiyama, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the maintenance of cellular metabolism. Once autophagy is induced in cells, the isolation membrane forms a so-called phagophore. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is one of several candidates for the membrane source for phagophores. Recently, LC3-positive isolation membranes were found to emerge from a DFCP1 (double FYVE domain-containing protein)-positive, ER-associated compartment called the omegasome. Although the GFP-tagged DFCP1 protein has been examined in cultured cells, little is known about the precise cellular and tissue distribution of this endogenous protein. To determine the expression of the endogenous DFCP1 protein, we produced antibodies specific to mouse DFCP1 protein. The antibody recognized both human and mouse DFCP1 proteins, both of which have molecular masses of approximately 87 kDa. In HeLa cells under normal conditions, immunoreactivity for DFCP1 was found dotted or tubular along Tom20-positive filamentous mitochondria and was only partially co-localized in the ER or Golgi apparatus. Moreover, under starved conditions, distinct DFCP1-positive structures became more dotted and scattered in the cytoplasm, while one part of the LC3-positive autophagosomes were immunopositive for DFCP1. These results indicate that an antibody raised against DFCP1 could be a useful tool in explaining the mechanism of phagophore formation from omegasome compartments.

  13. Characterization of cellular uptake and distribution of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Nishio, Keiko; Hayakawa, Mieko; Niki, Etsuo

    2004-12-01

    We previously reported that tocotrienols acted as more potent inhibitors against selenium deficiency-induced cell death than the corresponding tocopherol isoforms (J. Biol. Chem. 2003;278:39428-39434). In the present study, we first compared the differences in the cellular uptake between alpha-tocopherol (alpha-Toc) and alpha-tocotrienol (alpha-Toc-3). The initial rate of cellular uptake of alpha-Toc-3 was 70-fold higher than that of alpha-Toc. Subcellular fractionation analysis of alpha-Toc-3 and alpha-Toc-fortified cells showed similar cellular distribution of these antioxidants, which was directly proportional to the lipid distribution. The cells containing similar amounts of alpha-Toc-3 and alpha-Toc showed similar resistance against the oxidative stress caused by peroxides. These results suggest that the apparent higher cytoprotective effect of alpha-Toc-3 than alpha-Toc is primarily ascribed to its higher cellular uptake.

  14. Molecular crowding shapes gene expression in synthetic cellular nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheemeng; Saurabh, Saumya; Bruchez, Marcel P; Schwartz, Russell; Leduc, Philip

    2013-08-01

    The integration of synthetic and cell-free biology has made tremendous strides towards creating artificial cellular nanosystems using concepts from solution-based chemistry, where only the concentrations of reacting species modulate gene expression rates. However, it is known that macromolecular crowding, a key feature in natural cells, can dramatically influence biochemical kinetics via volume exclusion effects, which reduce diffusion rates and enhance binding rates of macromolecules. Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding can increase the robustness of gene expression by integrating synthetic cellular components of biological circuits and artificial cellular nanosystems. Furthermore, we reveal how ubiquitous cellular modules, including genetic components, a negative feedback loop and the size of the crowding molecules can fine-tune gene circuit response to molecular crowding. By bridging a key gap between artificial and living cells, our work has implications for efficient and robust control of both synthetic and natural cellular circuits.

  15. Molecular crowding shapes gene expression in synthetic cellular nanosystems

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cheemeng; Saurabh, Saumya; Bruchez, Marcel; Schwartz, Russell; LeDuc, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Summary The integration of synthetic and cell-free biology has made tremendous strides towards creating artificial cellular nanosystems using concepts from solution-based chemistry: only the concentrations of reacting species modulate gene expression rates. However, it is known that macromolecular crowding, a key feature of natural cells, can dramatically influence biochemical kinetics by volume exclusion effects that reduce diffusion rates and enhance binding rates of macromolecules. Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding can increase the robustness of gene expression through integrating synthetic cellular components of biological circuits and artificial cellular nanosystems. In addition, we reveal how ubiquitous cellular modules, including genetic components, a negative feedback loop, and the size of crowding molecules, can fine tune gene circuit response to molecular crowding. By bridging a key gap between artificial and living cells, our work has implications for efficient and robust control of both synthetic and natural cellular circuits. PMID:23851358

  16. p38 MAP kinase-dependent regulation of the expression level and subcellular distribution of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 and its involvement in cellular senescence in normal human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Naoko; Rios, Ileana; Moran, Heriberto; Sayers, Brendan; Hubbard, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a RNA binding protein that plays important role in the biogenesis of mRNA, such as alternative splicing and mRNA stability. We have previously demonstrated that hnRNP A1 has diminished protein levels and shows cytoplasmic accumulation in senescent human diploid fibroblasts. Recent reports showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK), a member of the MAP kinase family is necessary and sufficient for the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 by stress stimuli such as osmotic shock. p38 MAP kinase has been shown to be involved in cell proliferation and the induction of senescence in response to extracellular stimuli. However, the relationship between hnRNP A1 and p38 MAPK and the roles of hnRNP A1 in cellular senescence have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that hnRNP A1 forms a complex with phospho-p38 MAPK in vivo. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580 elevated hnRNP A1 protein levels and prohibited the cytoplasmic accumulation of the protein, but not hnRNP A2, in senescent cells. The phosphorylation level of hnRNP A1 was elevated in senescent cells. Reduction of hnRNP A1 and A2 levels by siRNA transfection induced a senescence-like morphology and elevated the level of F-actin, a marker of senescence. These results suggest that the expression levels and subcellular distribution of hnRNP A1 are regulated in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner, probably via its phosphorylation. Our results also suggest that hnRNP A2 in addition to hnRNP A1 may play a role in establishing the senescence phenotype. PMID:19430204

  17. Sub-cellular distribution and translocation of TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Toro, Carlos A; Arias, Luis A; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Cellular electrical activity is the result of a highly complex processes that involve the activation of ion channel proteins. Ion channels make pores on cell membranes that rapidly transit between conductive and non-conductive states, allowing different ions to flow down their electrochemical gradients across cell membranes. In the case of neuronal cells, ion channel activity orchestrates action potentials traveling through axons, enabling electrical communication between cells in distant parts of the body. Somatic sensation -our ability to feel touch, temperature and noxious stimuli- require ion channels able to sense and respond to our peripheral environment. Sensory integration involves the summing of various environmental cues and their conversion into electrical signals. Members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of ion channels have emerged as important mediators of both cellular sensing and sensory integration. The regulation of the spatial and temporal distribution of membrane receptors is recognized as an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of the cellular response and the time scale on which cellular signaling occurs. Several studies have shown that this mechanism is also used by TRP channels to modulate cellular response and ultimately fulfill their physiological function as sensors. However, the inner-working of this mode of control for TRP channels remains poorly understood. The question of whether TRPs intrinsically regulate their own vesicular trafficking or weather the dynamic regulation of TRP channel residence on the cell surface is caused by extrinsic changes in the rates of vesicle insertion or retrieval remain open. This review will examine the evidence that sub-cellular redistribution of TRP channels plays an important role in regulating their activity and explore the mechanisms that control the trafficking of vesicles containing TRP channels.

  18. Stably Expressed Genes Involved in Basic Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Fuscoe, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Stably Expressed Genes (SEGs) whose expression varies within a narrow range may be involved in core cellular processes necessary for basic functions. To identify such genes, we re-analyzed existing RNA-Seq gene expression profiles across 11 organs at 4 developmental stages (from immature to old age) in both sexes of F344 rats (n = 4/group; 320 samples). Expression changes (calculated as the maximum expression / minimum expression for each gene) of >19000 genes across organs, ages, and sexes ranged from 2.35 to >109-fold, with a median of 165-fold. The expression of 278 SEGs was found to vary ≤4-fold and these genes were significantly involved in protein catabolism (proteasome and ubiquitination), RNA transport, protein processing, and the spliceosome. Such stability of expression was further validated in human samples where the expression variability of the homologous human SEGs was significantly lower than that of other genes in the human genome. It was also found that the homologous human SEGs were generally less subject to non-synonymous mutation than other genes, as would be expected of stably expressed genes. We also found that knockout of SEG homologs in mouse models was more likely to cause complete preweaning lethality than non-SEG homologs, corroborating the fundamental roles played by SEGs in biological development. Such stably expressed genes and pathways across life-stages suggest that tight control of these processes is important in basic cellular functions and that perturbation by endogenous (e.g., genetics) or exogenous agents (e.g., drugs, environmental factors) may cause serious adverse effects. PMID:28125669

  19. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body.

  20. Passive drug permeation through membranes and cellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Scott, D O; Ghosh, A; Di, L; Maurer, T S

    2017-03-01

    Although often overlooked, passive mechanisms can lead to significant accumulation or restriction of drugs to intracellular sites of drug action. These mechanisms include lipoidal diffusion of ionized species and pH partitioning according to the electrochemical potential and to pH gradients that exist across subcellular compartments, respectively. These mechanisms are increasingly being exploited in the design of safe and effective drugs for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. In this work, the authors review these efforts and the associated passive mechanisms of cellular drug permeation. A generic mathematical model of the cell is provided and used to illustrate concepts relevant to steady-state intracellular distribution. Finally, the authors review methods for estimating determinant parameters and measuring the net effect at the level of unbound intracellular drug concentrations.

  1. Nanoscale distribution of mitochondrial import receptor Tom20 is adjusted to cellular conditions and exhibits an inner-cellular gradient.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Harke, Benjamin; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2011-08-16

    The translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM) complex is the main import pore for nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, yet little is known about its spatial distribution within the outer membrane. Super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to determine quantitatively the nanoscale distribution of Tom20, a subunit of the TOM complex, in more than 1,000 cells. We demonstrate that Tom20 is located in clusters whose nanoscale distribution is finely adjusted to the cellular growth conditions as well as to the specific position of a cell within a microcolony. The density of the clusters correlates to the mitochondrial membrane potential. The distributions of clusters of Tom20 and of Tom22 follow an inner-cellular gradient from the perinuclear to the peripheral mitochondria. We conclude that the nanoscale distribution of the TOM complex is finely adjusted to the cellular conditions, resulting in distribution gradients both within single cells and between adjacent cells.

  2. Cellular Proteomes Have Broad Distributions of Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kingshuk; Dill, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Biological cells are extremely sensitive to temperature. What is the mechanism? We compute the thermal stabilities of the whole proteomes of Escherichia coli, yeast, and Caenorhabditis elegans using an analytical model and an extensive database of stabilities of individual proteins. Our results support the hypothesis that a cell's thermal sensitivities arise from the collective instability of its proteins. This model shows a denaturation catastrophe at temperatures of 49–55°C, roughly the thermal death point of mesophiles. Cells live on the edge of a proteostasis catastrophe. According to the model, it is not that the average protein is problematic; it is the tail of the distribution. About 650 of E. coli's 4300 proteins are less than 4 kcal mol−1 stable to denaturation. And upshifting by only 4° from 37° to 41°C is estimated to destabilize an average protein by nearly 20%. This model also treats effects of denaturants, osmolytes, and other physical stressors. In addition, it predicts the dependence of cellular growth rates on temperature. This approach may be useful for studying physical forces in biological evolution and the role of climate change on biology. PMID:21156142

  3. Genetic determinants and cellular constraints in noisy gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Golding, Ido

    2014-01-01

    In individual cells, transcription is a random process obeying single-molecule kinetics. Often, it occurs in a bursty, intermittent manner. The frequency and size of these bursts affect the magnitude of temporal fluctuations in mRNA and protein content within a cell, creating variation or “noise” in gene expression. It is still unclear to what degree transcriptional kinetics are specific to each gene and determined by its promoter sequence. Alternative scenarios have been proposed, where the kinetics of transcription are governed by cellular constraints and follow universal rules across the genome. Evidence from genome-wide noise studies and from systematic perturbations of promoter sequences suggest that both scenarios—namely gene-specific versus genome-wide regulation of transcription kinetics— may be present to different degrees in bacteria, yeast and animal cells. PMID:24311680

  4. The Effect of Gravity Fields on Cellular Gene Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    1999-01-01

    Early theoretical analysis predicted that microgravity effects on the isolated cell would be minuscule at the subcellular level; however, these speculations have not proven true in the real world. Astronauts experience a significant bone and muscle loss in as little as 2 weeks of spaceflight and changes are seen at the cellular level soon after exposure to microgravity. Changes in biological systems may be primarily due to the lack of gravity and the resulting loss of mechanical stress on tissues and cells. Recent ground and flight studies examining the effects of gravity or mechanical stress on cells demonstrate marked changes in gene expression when relatively small changes in mechanical forces or gravity fields were made. Several immediate early genes (IEG) like c-fos and c-myc are induced by mechanical stimulation within minutes. In contrast, several investigators report that the absence of mechanical forces during space flight result in decreased sera response element (SRE) activity and attenuation of expression of IEGs such as c-fos, c-jun and cox-2 mRNAs. Clearly, these early changes in gene expression may have long term consequences on mechanically sensitive cells. In our early studies on STS-56, we reported four major changes in the osteoblast; 1) prostaglandin synthesis in flight, 2) changes in cellular morphology, 3) altered actin cytoskeleton and 4) reduced osteoblast growth after four days exposure to microgravity. Initially, it was believed that changes in fibronectin (FN) RNA, FN protein synthesis or subsequent FN matrix formation might account for the changes in cytoskeleton and/ or reduction of growth. However our recent studies on Biorack (STS-76, STS-81 and STS-84), using ground and in-flight 1-G controls, demonstrated that fibronectin synthesis and matrix formation were normal in microgravity. In addition, in our most recent Biorack paper, our laboratory has documented that relative protein synthesis and mRNA synthesis are not changed after 24

  5. Distribution of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules in human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Torlakovic, Hong; Bjerkan, Louise; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2012-10-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) are glycoproteins produced in epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules mediate cell-cell contact and host-pathogen interactions. The aims of this study were to map the distribution and examine the regulation of CEACAMs in human gingival sites. Quantitative real-time PCR performed on human gingival biopsies from periodontitis sites revealed mRNA coding for CEACAM1, -5, -6, and -7. Immunohistochemistry showed that CEACAMs were not found in oral gingival epithelium, except for CEACAM5 in periodontitis. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules 1, 5, and 6 were present in the oral sulcular epithelium of periodontitis but not in that of healthy gingiva. In junctional epithelium, all three molecules were present in healthy gingiva, but in periodontitis only CEACAM1 and -6 were detected. Staining for CEACAM1 and -6 was also seen in the inflammatory cell infiltrate in periodontitis. No staining for CEACAM7 was found. Proinflammatory mediators, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), increased the expression of CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs in cultured human oral keratinocytes. CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs were also strongly up-regulated upon stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid. In conclusion, the distribution of different CEACAMs was related to specific sites in the gingiva. This might reflect different functional roles in this tissue.

  6. Cellular distribution of Egr1 transcription in the male rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Man, Pui-Sin; Wells, Timothy; Carter, David A

    2014-10-01

    The transcription factor gene Egr1 is necessary for female fertility; EGR1 protein is an established molecular regulator of adult female gonadotroph function where it mediates GNRH-stimulated transcription of the Lhb gene. Recent studies have also implicated pituitary EGR1 in the mediation of other physiological signals indicating an integrative function. However, the role of EGR1 in males is less well defined and this uncertainty is compounded by the absence of cellular expression data in the male pituitary gland. The aim of this study, therefore, was to define the distribution of Egr1 gene expression in the adult male rat pituitary. To further this aim, we have evaluated cellular populations in a transgenic rat model (Egr1-d2EGFP), in which we demonstrate regulated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in EGR1+ pituitary cells. Cellular filling by GFP enabled morphological and molecular differentiation of different populations of gonadotrophs; Egr1 transcription and LHB were highly co-localised in a major population of large cells but only minimally co-localised in small GFP+ cells; the latter cells were shown to be largely (80%) composed of minority populations of GH+ somatotrophs (9% of total GH+) and PRL+ lactotrophs (3% of total PRL+). Egr1 transcription was not found in TSH+, ACTH+ or SOX2+ precursor cells and was only minimally co-localised in S-100β+ folliculostellate cells. Our demonstration that the Egr1 gene is actively and selectively transcribed in a major sub-population of male LHB+ cells indicates a largely conserved role in gonadotroph function and has provided a basis for further defining this role.

  7. Transient expression and cellular localization of recombinant proteins in cultured insect cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterologous protein expression systems are used for production of recombinant proteins, interpretation of cellular trafficking/localization, and for the determination of biochemical function of proteins at the sub-organismal level. Although baculovirus expression systems are increasingly used for ...

  8. Physical Property Control on the Cellular Uptake Pathway and Spatial Distribution of Nanoparticles in Cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungsook; Seo, Eunseok; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles have been developed in broad biomedical research in terms of effective cellular interactions to treat and visualize diseased cells. Considering the charge and polar functional groups of proteins that are embedded in cellular membranes, charged nanoparticles have been strategically developed to enhance electrostatic cellular interactions. In this study, we show that cellular uptake efficiency, pathway, and spatial distribution of gold nanoparticles in a cell are significantly modulated based on the surface condition of gold nanoparticles and human cancer cells that were tuned by controlling the pH of the medium and by introducing an electron beam. Cellular uptake efficiency is increased when electrostatic attraction is induced between the cells and the gold nanoparticles. Cell surface modification changes the cellular uptake pathways of the gold nanoparticles and concentrates the gold nanoparticles at the membrane region. Surface modification of the gold nanoparticles also contributes to deep penetration and homogeneous spatial distributions in a cell.

  9. Impact of Adenovirus E4-ORF3 Oligomerization and Protein Localization on Cellular Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Vink, Elizabeth I; Zheng, Yueting; Yeasmin, Rukhsana; Stamminger, Thomas; Krug, Laurie T; Hearing, Patrick

    2015-05-13

    The Adenovirus E4-ORF3 protein facilitates virus replication through the relocalization of cellular proteins into nuclear inclusions termed tracks. This sequestration event disrupts antiviral properties associated with target proteins. Relocalization of Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 proteins prevents the DNA damage response from inhibiting Ad replication. Relocalization of PML and Daxx impedes the interferon-mediated antiviral response. Several E4-ORF3 targets regulate gene expression, linking E4-ORF3 to transcriptional control. Furthermore, E4-ORF3 was shown to promote the formation of heterochromatin, down-regulating p53-dependent gene expression. Here, we characterize how E4-ORF3 alters cellular gene expression. Using an inducible, E4-ORF3-expressing cell line, we performed microarray experiments to highlight cellular gene expression changes influenced by E4-ORF3 expression, identifying over four hundred target genes. Enrichment analysis of these genes suggests that E4-ORF3 influences factors involved in signal transduction and cellular defense, among others. The expression of mutant E4-ORF3 proteins revealed that nuclear track formation is necessary to induce these expression changes. Through the generation of knockdown cells, we demonstrate that the observed expression changes may be independent of Daxx and TRIM33 suggesting that an additional factor(s) may be responsible. The ability of E4-ORF3 to manipulate cellular gene expression through the sequestration of cellular proteins implicates a novel role for E4-ORF3 in transcriptional regulation.

  10. Inhibition of luciferase expression by synthetic hammerhead ribozymes and their cellular uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Bramlage, B; Alefelder, S; Marschall, P; Eckstein, F

    1999-01-01

    Two synthetic hammerhead ribozymes, one unmodified and the other with 2"-modifications and four phosphorothioate groups, targeting a single GUA site in the luciferase mRNA, were compared for their inhibition of gene expression in cell cultureand their cellular uptake was also analysed. A HeLa X1/5 cell line stably expressing luciferase, under an inducible promoter, was treated with these ribozymes by liposome-mediated transfection to determine their activity.Luciferase expression in cells was inhibited to approximately 50% with little difference between the unmodified and the 2"-modified ribozyme. A similar degree of inhibition was observed with two catalytically inactive ribozymes, indicating that inhibition was mainly due to an antisense effect. A ribozyme carrying a cholesterol moiety, applied to the cells without carrier, showed no inhibition. Northern blotting indicated a similar amount of cellular uptake of all ribozymes. The unmodified ribozyme was essentially evenly distributed between cytoplasm and nucleus, whereas a higher proportion of the phosphorothioate-containing ribozyme was observed in the nucleus. Fluorescence microscopy, including confocal microscopy using 5"-fluorescein-labelled ribozymes, showed that the unmodified and 2"-modified ribozymes were present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus to a similar extent, whereas the fluorescence of the phosphorothioate-containing ribozyme was much stronger in the nucleus. Both ribozymes inhibited luciferase expression to a comparable degree, suggesting that the ribozyme in the nucleus did not contribute significantly to the inhibition. Ribozymes with a cholesterol moiety were predominantly trapped in the cell membrane, explaining their inability to interfere with gene expression. PMID:10454613

  11. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Jennifer E. Fewell, Claire Yin, Qinyan McBride, Jane Wang Xia Lin Zhen

    2008-12-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers.

  12. Asymmetric purine-pyrimidine distribution in cellular small RNA population of papaya

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The small RNAs (sRNA) are a regulatory class of RNA mainly represented by the 21 and 24-nucleotide size classes. The cellular sRNAs are processed by RNase III family enzyme dicer (Dicer like in plant) from a self-complementary hairpin loop or other type of RNA duplexes. The papaya genome has been sequenced, but its microRNAs and other regulatory RNAs are yet to be analyzed. Results We analyzed the genomic features of the papaya sRNA population from three sRNA deep sequencing libraries made from leaves, flowers, and leaves infected with Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRSV). We also used the deep sequencing data to annotate the micro RNA (miRNA) in papaya. We identified 60 miRNAs, 24 of which were conserved in other species, and 36 of which were novel miRNAs specific to papaya. In contrast to the Chargaff’s purine-pyrimidine equilibrium, cellular sRNA was significantly biased towards a purine rich population. Of the two purine bases, higher frequency of adenine was present in 23nt or longer sRNAs, while 22nt or shorter sRNAs were over represented by guanine bases. However, this bias was not observed in the annotated miRNAs in plants. The 21nt species were expressed from fewer loci but expressed at higher levels relative to the 24nt species. The highly expressed 21nt species were clustered in a few isolated locations of the genome. The PRSV infected leaves showed higher accumulation of 21 and 22nt sRNA compared to uninfected leaves. We observed higher accumulation of miRNA* of seven annotated miRNAs in virus-infected tissue, indicating the potential function of miRNA* under stressed conditions. Conclusions We have identified 60 miRNAs in papaya. Our study revealed the asymmetric purine-pyrimidine distribution in cellular sRNA population. The 21nt species of sRNAs have higher expression levels than 24nt sRNA. The miRNA* of some miRNAs shows higher accumulation in PRSV infected tissues, suggesting that these strands are not totally functionally redundant. The

  13. Cellular distribution of the fragile X mental retardation protein in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zorio, Diego A R; Jackson, Christine M; Liu, Yong; Rubel, Edwin W; Wang, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) plays an important role in normal brain development. Absence of FMRP results in abnormal neuronal morphologies in a selected manner throughout the brain, leading to intellectual deficits and sensory dysfunction in the fragile X syndrome (FXS). Despite FMRP importance for proper brain function, its overall expression pattern in the mammalian brain at the resolution of individual neuronal cell groups is not known. In this study we used FMR1 knockout and isogenic wildtype mice to systematically map the distribution of FMRP expression in the entire mouse brain. Using immunocytochemistry and cellular quantification analyses, we identified a large number of prominent cell groups expressing high levels of FMRP at the subcortical levels, in particular sensory and motor neurons in the brainstem and thalamus. In contrast, many cell groups in the midbrain and hypothalamus exhibit low FMRP levels. More important, we describe differential patterns of FMRP distribution in both cortical and subcortical brain regions. Almost all major brain areas contain high and low levels of FMRP cell groups adjacent to each other or between layers of the same cortical areas. These differential patterns indicate that FMRP expression appears to be specific to individual neuronal cell groups instead of being associated with all neurons in distinct brain regions, as previously considered. Taken together, these findings support the notion of FMRP differential neuronal regulation and strongly implicate the contribution of fundamental sensory and motor processing at subcortical levels to FXS pathology. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:818-849, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Distinct cellular and subcellular distributions of G protein-coupled receptor kinase and arrestin isoforms in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B; Ahmed, Mohamed R; Gurevich, Eugenia V

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling.

  15. Distinct Cellular and Subcellular Distributions of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase and Arrestin Isoforms in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Bychkov, Evgeny; Zurkovsky, Lilia; Garret, Mika B.; Ahmed, Mohamed R.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins mediate desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Arrestins also mediate G protein-independent signaling via GPCRs. Since GRK and arrestins demonstrate no strict receptor specificity, their functions in the brain may depend on their cellular complement, expression level, and subcellular targeting. However, cellular expression and subcellular distribution of GRKs and arrestins in the brain is largely unknown. We show that GRK isoforms GRK2 and GRK5 are similarly expressed in direct and indirect pathway neurons in the rat striatum. Arrestin-2 and arrestin-3 are also expressed in neurons of both pathways. Cholinergic interneurons are enriched in GRK2, arrestin-3, and GRK5. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons express more of GRK2 and less of arrestin-2 than medium spiny neurons. The GRK5 subcellular distribution in the human striatal neurons is altered by its phosphorylation: unphosphorylated enzyme preferentially localizes to synaptic membranes, whereas phosphorylated GRK5 is found in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions. Both GRK isoforms are abundant in the nucleus of human striatal neurons, whereas the proportion of both arrestins in the nucleus was equally low. However, overall higher expression of arrestin-2 yields high enough concentration in the nucleus to mediate nuclear functions. These data suggest cell type- and subcellular compartment-dependent differences in GRK/arrestin-mediated desensitization and signaling. PMID:23139825

  16. Cloning, expression, cellular distribution, and role in chemotaxis of a C5a receptor in rainbow trout: the first identification of a C5a receptor in a nonmammalian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boshra, Hani; Li, Jun; Peters, Rodney; Hansen, John; Matlapudi, Anjan; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2004-01-01

    C3a, C4a, and C5a anaphylatoxins generated during complement activation play a key role in inflammation. C5a is the most potent of the three anaphylatoxins in eliciting biological responses. The effects of C5a are mediated by its binding to C5a receptor (C5aR, CD88). To date, C5aR has only been identified and cloned in mammalian species, and its evolutionary history remains ill-defined. To gain insights into the evolution, conserved structural domains, and functions of C5aR, we have cloned and characterized a C5aR in rainbow trout, a teleost fish. The isolated cDNA encoded a 350-aa protein that showed the highest sequence similarity to C5aR from other species. Genomic analysis revealed the presence of one continuous exon encoding the entire open reading frame. Northern blot analysis showed significant expression of the trout C5a receptor (TC5aR) message in PBLs and kidney. Flow cytometric analysis showed that two Abs generated against two different areas of the extracellular N-terminal region of TC5aR positively stained the same leukocyte populations from PBLs. B lymphocytes and granulocytes comprised the majority of cells recognized by the anti-TC5aR. More importantly, these Abs inhibited chemotaxis of PBLs toward a chemoattractant fraction purified from complement-activated trout serum. Our data suggest that the split between C5aR and C3aR from a common ancestral molecule occurred before the emergence of teleost fish. Moreover, we demonstrate that the overall structure of C5aR as well as its role in chemotaxis have remained conserved for >300 million years.

  17. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-syndrome affecting its cellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Kersseboom, Simone; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Friesema, Edith C H; Visser, W Edward; Klootwijk, Wim; Peeters, Robin P; Visser, Theo J

    2013-05-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of different MCT8 mutations in detail, we combined functional analysis in different cell types with live-cell imaging of the cellular distribution of seven mutations that we identified in patients with AHDS. We used two cell models to study the mutations in vitro: 1) transiently transfected COS1 and JEG3 cells, and 2) stably transfected Flp-in 293 cells expressing a MCT8-cyan fluorescent protein construct. All seven mutants were expressed at the protein level and showed a defect in T3 and T4 transport in uptake and metabolism studies. Three mutants (G282C, P537L, and G558D) had residual uptake activity in Flp-in 293 and COS1 cells, but not in JEG3 cells. Four mutants (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) were expressed at the plasma membrane. The mobility in the plasma membrane of P537L was similar to WT, but the mobility of P321L was altered. The other mutants studied (insV236, G282C, G558D) were predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. In essence, loss of function by MCT8 mutations can be divided in two groups: mutations that result in partial or complete loss of transport activity (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) and mutations that mainly disturb protein expression and trafficking (insV236, G282C, G558D). The cell type-dependent results suggest that MCT8 mutations in AHDS patients may have tissue-specific effects on TH transport probably caused by tissue-specific expression of yet unknown MCT8-interacting proteins.

  18. Tenomodulin Expression in the Periodontal Ligament Enhances Cellular Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, Yuske; Ohba, Shinsuke; Shimohata, Nobuyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Hojo, Hironori; Yano, Fumiko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Docheva, Denitsa; Shukunami, Chisa; Hiraki, Yuji; Chung, Ung-il

    2013-01-01

    Tenomodulin (Tnmd) is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL) has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain. PMID:23593173

  19. Cellular distribution of okadaic acid in the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck, 1819).

    PubMed

    Rossignoli, Araceli E; Blanco, Juan

    2008-12-15

    The distribution of okadaic acid between the digestive and the secretory cells of the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied for the main purpose of determining if they might be responsible for the two-compartment depuration kinetics found in previous studies. The two cell types did not accumulate okadaic acid to the same degree. However, the concentrations found in each cellular type were not consistent with those expected from the output of the two-compartment depuration model, suggesting that a mechanism other that the differential accumulation in cellular types is involved. Binding to some yet undetermined cellular components is suggested.

  20. HIF-1α expression correlates with cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liu; Tao, Lin; Dawei, He; Xuliang, Li; Xiaodong, Luo

    2014-07-01

    Regional hypoxia caused by accelerated cell proliferation and overgrowth is an important characteristic of neoplasm. Hypoxia can cause a series of changes in gene transcription and protein expression, thereby not only inducing tumor cell resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy but also promoting tumor invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HIF-1α expression and cellular apoptosis, angiogenesis and clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. In 113 rectal carcinoma cases, cellular apoptosis was analyzed by the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, whereas the levels of HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression, microvessel density (MVD) and lymphatic vessel density(LVD) were examined by immunohistochemical staining. HIF-1 expression was detected in 67 of 113 rectal carcinoma cases (59.3 %). A positive correlation was found among HIF-1α expression, cellular apoptosis and angiogenesis. The 5-year survival rate in the HIF-1α-negative group was significantly higher than that in the HIF-1α-positive group (81.34 % versus 50 %, P < 0.05). According to the Cox regression analysis, HIF-1α expression, VEGF expression and cellular apoptosis index were independent risk factors for clinical prognosis in rectal carcinoma. Aberrant HIF-1α expression correlates with apoptosis inhibition, angiogenesis and poor prognosis in rectal carcinoma.

  1. Prion search and cellular prion protein expression in stranded dolphins.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, G; Cocumelli, C; Meoli, R; Barbaro, K; Terracciano, G; Di Francesco, C E; Mazzariol, S; Eleni, C

    2012-01-01

    The recent description of a prion disease (PD) case in a free-ranging bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) prompted us to carry out an extensive search for the disease-associated isoform (PrPSc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the brain and in a range of lymphoid tissues from 23 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba), 5 bottlenose dolphins and 2 Risso s dolphins (Grampus griseus) found stranded between 2007 and 2012 along the Italian coastline. Three striped dolphins and one bottlenose dolphin showed microscopic lesions of encephalitis, with no evidence of spongiform brain lesions being detected in any of the 30 free-ranging cetaceans investigated herein. Nevertheless, we could still observe a prominent PrPC immunoreactivity in the brain as well as in lymphoid tissues from these dolphins. Although immunohistochemical and Western blot investigations yielded negative results for PrPSc deposition in all tissues from the dolphins under study, the reported occurrence of a spontaneous PD case in a wild dolphin is an intriguing issue and a matter of concern for both prion biology and intra/inter-species transmissibility, as well as for cetacean conservation medicine.

  2. CXCL11 Expression by Keratinocytes Occurs Transiently Between Reaching Confluence and Cellular Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Arthur C.; Marathi, Archana; Nam, Peter K.; Wells, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether differentiation or cellular confluence is responsible for CXCL11 expression patterns in re-epithelialization. Approach: In vitro model systems of re-epithelialization using the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line were utilized in monitoring expression of differentiation markers, including desmoplakin and various cytokeratins while evaluating for an association with chemokine CXCL11 expression. Results: CXCL11 expression was elevated in sparse culture with peak expression near the time of confluence. This somewhat followed the accumulation of desmoplakin in detergent-insoluble pool of proteins. However, in postconfluent, despite continued accumulation of desmoplakin within cells, CXCL11 expression decreased to baseline levels. This biphasic pattern was also seen in low calcium culture, an environment that inhibits keratinocyte differentiation and accumulation of desmosomal proteins. Highest CXCL11-expressing areas best correlated with newly confluent areas within culture expressing basal keratin 14, but also activated keratin 6. Innovation: Achievement of a threshold cellular density induces cell signaling cascade through CXCR3 that, in addition to other undiscovered pathways, can progress cutaneous wounds from the proliferative into the remodeling phases of cutaneous wound healing. Conclusion: These results suggest that the achievement of confluence with increased cellular density by migrating keratinocytes at the wound edge triggers expression of CXCL11. Since CXCR3 stimulation in endothelial cells results in apoptosis and causes neovascular pruning, whereas stimulation of CXCR3 in fibroblasts results decreased motility and cellular contraction, we speculate that CXCL11 expression by epidermal cells upon achieving cellular confluence could be the source of CXCR3 stimulation in the dermis ushering a transition from proliferative to remodeling phases of wound healing. PMID:28078185

  3. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  4. Spinophilin expression determines cellular growth, cancer stemness and 5-flourouracil resistance in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Deutsch, Alexander; Perakis, Samantha; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George Adrian; Rinner, Beate; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The putative tumor suppressor gene spinophilin has been involved in cancer progression in several types of cancer. In this study, we explored the prognostic value of spinophilin expression in 162 colon adenocarcinoma patients. In addition, we generated stably expressing spinophilin-directed shRNA CRC cell lines and studied the influence of spinophilin expression on cellular phenotypes and molecular interactions. We independently confirmed that low spinophilin expression levels are associated with poor prognosis in CRC patients (p = 0.038). A reduction of spinophilin levels in p53 wild-type HCT116 and p53-mutated Caco-2 cells led to increased cellular growth rates and anchorage-independent growth (p<0.05). At molecular level, reduced spinophilin levels increased the expression of the transcription factor E2F-1. In addition, we observed an increased formation of tumor spheres, increased number of CD133 positive cells and an increased resistance to 5-flourouracil (p<0.05). Finally, treatment with the de-methylating agent 5-aza-dC increased spinophilin expression in CRC cells (p<0.05), corroborated by a correlation of spinophilin expression and extent of methylated CpG sites in the gene promoter region (p<0.001). In conclusion, gain of aggressive biological properties of CRC cells including cellular growth, cancer stem cell features and 5-flourouracil resistance partly explains the role of spinophilin in CRC. PMID:25261368

  5. Cell Type-Specific Expression Analysis to Identify Putative Cellular Mechanisms for Neurogenetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Wells, Alan B.; O'Brien, David R.; Nehorai, Arye

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances have substantially increased the number of genes that are statistically associated with complex genetic disorders of the CNS such as autism and schizophrenia. It is now clear that there will likely be hundreds of distinct loci contributing to these disorders, underscoring a remarkable genetic heterogeneity. It is unclear whether this genetic heterogeneity indicates an equal heterogeneity of cellular mechanisms for these diseases. The commonality of symptoms across patients suggests there could be a functional convergence downstream of these loci upon a limited number of cell types or circuits that mediate the affected behaviors. One possible mechanism for this convergence would be the selective expression of at least a subset of these genes in the cell types that comprise these circuits. Using profiling data from mice and humans, we have developed and validated an approach, cell type-specific expression analysis, for identifying candidate cell populations likely to be disrupted across sets of patients with distinct genetic lesions. Using human genetics data and postmortem gene expression data, our approach can correctly identify the cell types for disorders of known cellular etiology, including narcolepsy and retinopathies. Applying this approach to autism, a disease where the cellular mechanism is unclear, indicates there may be multiple cellular routes to this disorder. Our approach may be useful for identifying common cellular mechanisms arising from distinct genetic lesions. PMID:24453331

  6. Tat is a multifunctional viral protein that modulates cellular gene expression and functions.

    PubMed

    Clark, Evan; Nava, Brenda; Caputi, Massimo

    2017-02-07

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) has developed several strategies to condition the host environment to promote viral replication and spread. Viral proteins have evolved to perform multiple functions, aiding in the replication of the viral genome and modulating the cellular response to the infection. Tat is a small, versatile, viral protein that controls transcription of the HIV genome, regulates cellular gene expression and generates a permissive environment for viral replication by altering the immune response and facilitating viral spread to multiple tissues. Studies carried out utilizing biochemical, cellular, and genomic approaches show that the expression and activity of hundreds of genes and multiple molecular networks are modulated by Tat via multiple mechanisms.

  7. Imaging self-assembly dependent spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Kuang, Yi; Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Chandran, Preethi; Horkay, Ferenc; Xu, Bing

    2013-12-10

    Self-assembly of small molecules, as a more common phenomenon than one previously thought, can be either beneficial or detrimental to cells. Despite its profound biological implications, how the self-assembly of small molecules behave in a cellular environment is largely unknown and barely explored. This work studies four fluorescent molecules that consist of the same peptidic backbone (e.g., Phe-Phe-Lys) and enzyme trigger (e.g., a phosphotyrosine residue), but bear different fluorophores on the side chain of the lysine residue of the peptidic motif. These molecules, however, exhibit a different ability of self-assembly before and after enzymatic transformation (e.g., dephosphorylation). Fluorescent imaging reveals that self-assembly directly affects the distribution of these small molecules in a cellular environment. Moreover, cell viability tests suggest that the states and the locations of the molecular assemblies in the cellular environment control the phenotypes of the cells. For example, the molecular nanofibers of one of the small molecules apparently stabilize actin filaments and alleviate the insult of an F-actin toxin (e.g., latrunculin A). Combining fluorescent imaging and enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small peptidic molecules, this work demonstrates self-assembly as a key factor for dictating the spatial distribution of small molecules in a cellular environment. In addition, it illustrates a useful approach, based on enzyme-instructed self-assembly of small molecules, to modulate spatiotemporal profiles of small molecules in a cellular environment, which allows the use of the emergent properties of small molecules to control the fate of cells.

  8. A signature microRNA expression profile for the cellular response to thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ketchum, Norma; Ibey, Bennett L.; Waterworth, Angela; Suarez, Maria; Roach, William P.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, an extensive layer of intra-cellular signals was discovered that was previously undetected by genetic radar. It is now known that this layer consists primarily of a class of short noncoding RNA species that are referred to as microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs regulate protein synthesis at the post-transcriptional level, and studies have shown that they are involved in many fundamental cellular processes. In this study, we hypothesized that miRNAs may be involved in cellular stress response mechanisms, and that cells exposed to thermal stress may exhibit a signature miRNA expression profile indicative of their functional involvement in such mechanisms. To test our hypothesis, human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to an established hyperthermic protocol, and the ensuing miRNA expression levels were evaluated 4 hr post-exposure using microRNA microarray gene chips. The microarray data shows that 123 miRNAs were differentially expressed in cells exposed to thermal stress. We collectively refer to these miRNAs as thermalregulated microRNAs (TRMs). Since miRNA research is in its infancy, it is interesting to note that only 27 of the 123 TRMs are currently annotated in the Sanger miRNA registry. Prior to publication, we plan to submit the remaining novel 96 miRNA gene sequences for proper naming. Computational and thermodynamic modeling algorithms were employed to identify putative mRNA targets for the TRMs, and these studies predict that TRMs regulate the mRNA expression of various proteins that are involved in the cellular stress response. Future empirical studies will be conducted to validate these theoretical predictions, and to further examine the specific role that TRMs play in the cellular stress response.

  9. Cellular and temporal expression of NADPH oxidase (NOX) isotypes after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain injury results in an increase in the activity of the reactive oxygen species generating NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes. Preliminary studies have shown that NOX2, NOX3, and NOX4 are the most prominently expressed NOX isotypes in the brain. However, the cellular and temporal expression profile of these isotypes in the injured and non-injured brain is currently unclear. Methods Double immunofluorescence for NOX isotypes and brain cell types was performed at acute (24 hours), sub-acute (7 days), and chronic (28 days) time points after controlled cortical impact-induced brain injury or sham-injury in rats. Results NOX2, NOX3, and NOX4 isotypes were found to be expressed in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia, and this expression was dependent on both cellular source and post-injury time. NOX4 was found in all cell types assessed, while NOX3 was positively identified in neurons only, and NOX2 was identified in microglia and neurons. NOX2 was the most responsive to injury, increasing primarily in microglia in response to injury. Quantitation of this isotype showed a significant increase in NOX2 expression at 24 hours, with reduced expression at 7 days and 28 days post-injury, although expression remained above sham levels at later time points. Cellular confirmation using purified primary or cell line culture demonstrated similar patterns in microglia, astrocytes, and neurons. Further, inhibition of NOX, and more specifically NOX2, reduced pro-inflammatory activity in microglia, demonstrating that NOX is not only up-regulated after stimulation, but may also play a significant role in post-injury neuroinflammation. Conclusions This study illustrates the expression profiles of NOX isotypes in the brain after injury, and demonstrates that NOX2, and to a lesser extent, NOX4, may be responsible for the majority of oxidative stress observed acutely after traumatic brain injury. These data may provide insight into the design of future therapeutic approaches. PMID

  10. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  11. Cellular expansion and gene expression in the developing grape (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Schlosser, J; Olsson, N; Weis, M; Reid, K; Peng, F; Lund, S; Bowen, P

    2008-01-01

    Expression profiles of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and water transport were compared with changes in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berry growth, basic chemical composition, and the shape, size, and wall thickness of cells within tissues of the berry pericarp. Expression of cell wall-modifying and aquaporin genes in berry pericarp tissues generally followed a bimodal expression profile with high levels of expression coinciding with the two periods of rapid berry growth, stages I and III, and low levels of expression corresponding to the slow-growth period, stage II. Cellular expansion was observed throughout all tissues during stage I, and only mesocarp cellular expansion was observed during stage III. Expansion of only exocarp cells was evident during transition between stages II and III. Cell wall-modifying and aquaporin gene expression profiles followed similar trends in exocarp and mesocarp tissues throughout berry development, with the exception of the up-regulation of pectin methylesterase, pectate lyase, two aquaporin genes (AQ1 and AQ2), and two expansin genes (EXP3 and EXPL) during stage II, which was delayed in the exocarp tissue compared with mesocarp tissue. Exocarp endo-(1-->3)-beta-glucanase and expansin-like gene expression was concurrent with increases in epidermal and hypodermal cell wall thickness. These results indicate a potential role of the grape berry skin in modulating grape berry growth.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Early Cellular Responses to Intracellular Magnetic Labeling with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kedziorek, Dorota A.; Muja, Naser; Walczak, Piotr; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus; Gilad, Assaf A.; Jie, Chunfa C.; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2010-01-01

    With MRI (stem) cell tracking having entered the clinic, studies on the cellular genomic response toward labeling are warranted. Gene expression profiling was applied to C17.2 neural stem cells following superparamagnetic iron oxide/PLL (poly-L-lysine) labeling over the course of 1 week. Relative to unlabeled cells, less than 1% of genes (49 total) exhibited greater than 2-fold difference in expression in response to superparamagnetic iron oxide/PLL labeling. In particular, transferrin receptor 1 (Tfrc) and heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) expression was downregulated early, whereas genes involved in lysosomal function (Sulf1) and detoxification (Clu, Cp, Gstm2, Mgst1) were upregulated at later time points. Relative to cells treated with PLL only, cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide/PLL complexes exhibited differential expression of 1399 genes. Though these differentially expressed genes exhibited altered expression over time, the overall extent was limited. Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes showed that genes encoding zinc-binding proteins are enriched after superparamagnetic iron oxide/PLL labeling relative to PLL only treatment, whereas members of the apoptosis/ programmed cell death pathway did not display increased expression. Overexpression of the differentially expressed genes Rnf138 and Abcc4 were confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results demonstrate that, although early reactions responsible for iron homeostasis are induced, overall neural stem cell gene expression remains largely unaltered following superparamagnetic iron oxide/PLL labeling. PMID:20373404

  13. Cellular uptake, subcellular distribution and toxicity of arsenic compounds in methylating and non-methylating cells.

    PubMed

    Dopp, E; von Recklinghausen, U; Diaz-Bone, R; Hirner, A V; Rettenmeier, A W

    2010-07-01

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen, inducing tumors of the skin, urinary bladder, liver and lung. Inorganic arsenic, existing in highly toxic trivalent and significantly less toxic pentavalent forms, is methylated to mono- and di-methylated species mainly in the liver. Due to the low toxicity of pentavalent methylated species, methylation has been regarded as a detoxification process for many years; however, recent findings of a high toxicity of trivalent methylated species have indicated the contrary. In order to elucidate the role of speciation and methylation for the toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic, systematic studies were conducted comparing cellular uptake, subcellular distribution as well as toxic and genotoxic effects of organic and inorganic pentavalent and trivalent arsenic species in both non-methylating (urothelial cells and fibroblasts) and methylating cells (hepatocytes). The membrane permeability was found to be dependent upon both the arsenic species and the cell type. Uptake rates of trivalent methylated species were highest and exceeded those of their pentavalent counterparts by several orders of magnitude. Non-methylating cells (urothelial cells and fibroblasts) seem to accumulate higher amounts of arsenic within the cell than the methylating hepatocytes. Cellular uptake and extrusion seem to be faster in hepatocytes than in urothelial cells. The correlation of uptake with toxicity indicates a significant role of membrane permeability towards toxicity. Furthermore, cytotoxic effects are more distinct in hepatocytes. Differential centrifugation studies revealed that elevated concentrations of arsenic are present in the ribosomal fraction of urothelial cells and in nucleic and mitochondrial fractions of hepatic cells. Further studies are needed to define the implications of the observed enrichment of arsenic in specific cellular organelles for its carcinogenic activity. This review summarizes our recent research on cellular uptake

  14. Building quantitative, three dimensional atlases of gene expression and morphology at cellular resolution

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Animals comprise dynamic three-dimensional arrays of cells that express gene products in intricate spatial and temporal patterns that determine cellular differentiation and morphogenesis. A rigorous understanding of these developmental processes requires automated methods that quantitatively record and analyze complex morphologies and their associated patterns of gene expression at cellular resolution. Here we summarize light microscopy based approaches to establish permanent, quantitative datasets—atlases—that record this information. We focus on experiments that capture data for whole embryos or large areas of tissue in three dimensions, often at multiple time points. We compare and contrast the advantages and limitations of different methods and highlight some of the discoveries made. We emphasize the need for interdisciplinary collaborations and integrated experimental pipelines that link sample preparation, image acquisition, image analysis, database design, visualization and quantitative analysis. PMID:24123936

  15. Expression of virus-encoded proteinases: functional and structural similarities with cellular enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, W G; Semler, B L

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses express their genome, or part of their genome, initially as a polyprotein precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing. Molecular genetic analyses of viral gene expression have revealed that many of these processing events are mediated by virus-encoded proteinases. Biochemical activity studies and structural analyses of these viral enzymes reveal that they have remarkable similarities to cellular proteinases. However, the viral proteinases have evolved unique features that permit them to function in a cellular environment. In this article, the current status of plant and animal virus proteinases is described along with their role in the viral replication cycle. The reactions catalyzed by viral proteinases are not simple enzyme-substrate interactions; rather, the processing steps are highly regulated, are coordinated with other viral processes, and frequently involve the participation of other factors. Images PMID:8302216

  16. Distinct 5′ UTRs regulate XIAP expression under normal growth conditions and during cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Alura; Jordan, Lindsay E.; Holcik, Martin

    2010-01-01

    X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis, XIAP, is cellular caspase inhibitor and a key regulator of apoptosis. We and others have previously shown that XIAP expression is regulated primarily at the level of protein synthesis; the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of XIAP mRNA contains an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) that supports cap-independent expression of XIAP protein during conditions of pathophysiological stress, such as serum deprivation or gamma irradiation. Here, we show that XIAP is encoded by two distinct mRNAs that differ in their 5′ UTRs. We further show that the dominant, shorter, 5′ UTR promotes a basal level of XIAP expression under normal growth conditions. In contrast, the less abundant longer 5′ UTR contains an IRES and supports cap-independent translation during stress. Our data suggest that the combination of alternate regulatory regions and distinct translational initiation modes is critical in maintaining XIAP levels in response to cellular stress and may represent a general mechanism of cellular adaptation. PMID:20385593

  17. Cellular oncogene expression following exposure of mice to {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1991-06-12

    We examined the effects of total body exposure of BCF1 mice to {gamma}-rays (300 cGy) in modulating expression of cellular oncogenes in both gut and liver tissues. We selected specific cellular oncogenes (c-fos, c-myc, c-src, and c-H-ras), based on their normal expression in liver and gut tissues from untreated mice. As early as 5 min. following whole body exposure of BCF1 mice to {gamma}-rays we detected induction of mRNA specific for c-src and c-H-ras in both liver and gut tissues. c-fos RNA was slightly decreased in accumulation in gut but was unaffected in liver tissue from irradiated mice relative to untreated controls. c-myc mRNA accumulation was unaffected in all tissues examined. These experiments document that modulation of cellular oncogene expression can occur as an early event in tissues following irradiation and suggest that this modulation may play a role in radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  18. Posttranscriptional regulation of cellular gene expression by the c-myc oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, G.C.; Cole, M.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been implicated in the development of many different cancers, yet the mechanism by which the c-myc protein alters cellular growth control has proven elusive. The authors used a cDNA hybridization difference assay to isolate two genes, mr1 and mr2, that were constitutively expressed (i.e., deregulated) in rodent fibroblast cell lines immortalized by transfection of a viral promoter-linked c-myc gene. Both cDNAs were serum inducible in quiescent G/sub o/ fibroblasts, suggesting that they are functionally related to cellular proliferative processes. Although there were significant differences in cytoplasmic mRNA levels between myc-immortalized and control cells, the rates of transcription and mRNA turnover of both genes were similar, suggesting that c-myc regulates mr1 and mr2 expression by some nuclear posttranscriptional mechanism. Their results provide evidence that c-myc can rapidly modulate cellular gene expression and suggest that c-myc may function in gene regulation at the level of RNA export, splicing, or nuclear RNA turnover.

  19. Addressing population heterogeneity and distribution in epidemics models using a cellular automata approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The spread of an infectious disease is determined by biological and social factors. Models based on cellular automata are adequate to describe such natural systems consisting of a massive collection of simple interacting objects. They characterize the time evolution of the global system as the emergent behaviour resulting from the interaction of the objects, whose behaviour is defined through a set of simple rules that encode the individual behaviour and the transmission dynamic. Methods An epidemic is characterized trough an individual–based–model built upon cellular automata. In the proposed model, each individual of the population is represented by a cell of the automata. This way of modeling an epidemic situation allows to individually define the characteristic of each individual, establish different scenarios and implement control strategies. Results A cellular automata model to study the time evolution of a heterogeneous populations through the various stages of disease was proposed, allowing the inclusion of individual heterogeneity, geographical characteristics and social factors that determine the dynamic of the desease. Different assumptions made to built the classical model were evaluated, leading to following results: i) for low contact rate (like in quarantine process or low density population areas) the number of infective individuals is lower than other areas where the contact rate is higher, and ii) for different initial spacial distributions of infected individuals different epidemic dynamics are obtained due to its influence on the transition rate and the reproductive ratio of disease. Conclusions The contact rate and spatial distributions have a central role in the spread of a disease. For low density populations the spread is very low and the number of infected individuals is lower than in highly populated areas. The spacial distribution of the population and the disease focus as well as the geographical characteristic of the area

  20. Cellular prion protein in the bovine mammary gland is selectively expressed in active lactocytes.

    PubMed

    Didier, Andrea; Dietrich, Richard; Steffl, Martin; Gareis, Manfred; Groschup, Martin H; Müller-Hellwig, Simone; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Amselgruber, Werner M

    2006-11-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein with a still enigmatic physiological function. It is mainly expressed in the central nervous system but accumulating data suggest that PrP(c) is also found in a broad spectrum of non-neuronal tissue. Here we investigated the cell-type-related PrP(c) expression in the bovine mammary gland by using immunohistochemistry (IHC), ELISA, Western blot, and real-time RT-PCR. Specific immunostaining of serial sections revealed that PrP(c) is selectively localized in mammary gland epithelial cells. Particularly strong expression was found at the basolateral surface of those cells showing active secretion. Results obtained by RT-PCR and ELISA complemented IHC findings. No correlation was found between the level of PrP(c) expression and other parameters such as age of the animals under study or stage of lactation.

  1. Expression of cellular oncogenes in primary cells from human acute leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Mavilio, F; Sposi, N M; Petrini, M; Bottero, L; Marinucci, M; De Rossi, G; Amadori, S; Mandelli, F; Peschle, C

    1986-01-01

    The structure and the expression of 11 cellular oncogenes (protooncogenes) were analyzed in primary cells from 20 acute lymphocytic (ALL) and 31 acute myelogenous (AML) leukemia patients. Neoplastic cells, obtained prior to initiation of therapy, were purified and classified, on the basis of both surface antigen pattern and morphology, into pre-B, B, and T ALL and M1-M5 AML. RNA was extracted and analyzed for expression of cellular oncogenes coding for nuclear proteins (c-myc, c-myb, c-fos), the beta-chain of platelet-derived growth factor (c-sis), growth factor receptors or related proteins (c-src, c-abl, c-fes, c-erbB), or putative intermediate transducers of mitogenic signals (c-Ha-ras, c-Ki-ras, c-N-ras). Quantitative analysis of total RNA was carried out by dot blot hybridization to specific cDNA or genomic probes. Number and size of transcripts were evaluated by blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A)+ RNA. Expression of c-myc and c-myb was detected in all leukemic cells at variable levels and was characterized by well-defined patterns within ALL subtypes. Conversely, significant levels of c-fos transcripts were detected only in myelomonocytic (M4) and monocytic (M5) leukemias. Among the "src-family," c-fes was expressed more in AML than ALL, and c-abl was expressed at variable but not elevated levels in all leukemia types. c-Ha-ras was uniformly expressed at low levels, as in non-neoplastic cells. c-Ki-ras transcription was detected only in T ALL; N-ras expression was barely demonstrable. The structure of these protooncogenes was not grossly modified, as evaluated by Southern analysis, except for c-myc rearrangement in B ALL. These studies indicate that cellular oncogene expression in specific subtypes of leukemic cells may relate to either the proliferative activity (c-myc, c-myb) or the differentiation state (c-fos) of the cells, or possibly to expression of receptors for putative hemopoiesis-related growth factors (c-fes, c

  2. Cellular distribution of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and procollagen types I, III, and IV transcripts in carbon tetrachloride-induced rat liver fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsukasa, H; Nagy, P; Evarts, R P; Hsia, C C; Marsden, E; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1990-01-01

    The cellular distribution and temporal expression of transcripts from transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and procollagen alpha 1(I), alpha 1(III), and alpha 1(IV) genes were studied in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced rat liver fibrosis by using in situ hybridization technique. During the fibrotic process, TGF-beta 1 and procollagen genes were similarly and predominantly expressed in Desmin-positive perisinusoidal cells (e.g., fat-storing cells and myofibroblasts) and fibroblasts and their expression continued to be higher than those observed in control rats. These transcripts were also observed in inflammatory cells mainly granulocytes and macrophage-like cells at the early stages of liver fibrosis. The production of extracellular matrix along small blood vessels and fibrous septa coincided with the expression of these genes. Expression of TGF-beta 1 and procollagen genes were not detected in hepatocytes throughout the experiment. No significant differences in cellular distribution or time course of gene expression among procollagen alpha 1(I), alpha 1(III), and alpha 1(IV) were observed. Desmin-positive perisinusoidal cells and fibroblasts appeared to play the principal role in synthesis of collagens in CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis. The simultaneous expression of TGF-beta 1 and procollagen genes in mesenchymal cells, including Desmin-positive perisinusoidal cells, during hepatic fibrosis suggests the possibility that TGF-beta 1 may have an important role in the production of fibrosis. Images PMID:1693377

  3. 75 FR 72686 - Express Mail Open and Distribute and Priority Mail Open and Distribute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Mail Open and Distribute sacks. DATES: Effective Date: January 2, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... and Special Postage Payment Systems * * * * * 16.0 Express Mail Open and Distribute and Priority Mail... 111 Express Mail Open and Distribute and Priority Mail Open and Distribute AGENCY: Postal...

  4. Cellular Location and Expression of Na+, K+-ATPase α Subunits Affect the Anti-Proliferative Activity of Oleandrin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peiying; Cartwright, Carrie; Efuet, Ekem; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivan; Menter, David; Addington, Crandell; Shureiqi, Imad; Newman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether intracellular distribution of Na+, K+-ATPase α3 subunit, a receptor for cardiac glycosides including oleandrin, is differentially altered in cancer versus normal cells and whether this altered distribution can be therapeutically targeted to inhibit cancer cell survival. The cellular distribution of Na+, K+-ATPase α3 isoform was investigated in paired normal and cancerous mucosa biopsy samples from patients with lung and colorectal cancers by immunohistochemical staining. The effects of oleandrin on α3 subunit intracellular distribution, cell death, proliferation, and EKR phosphorylation were examined in differentiated and undifferentiated human colon cancer CaCO-2 cells. While Na+, K+-ATPase α3 isoform was predominantly located near the cytoplasmic membrane in normal human colon and lung epithelia, the expression of this subunit in their paired cancer epithelia was shifted to a peri-nuclear position in both a qualitative and quantitative manner. Similarly, distribution of α3 isoform was also shifted from a cytoplasmic membrane location in differentiated human colon cancer CaCO-2 cells to a peri-nuclear position in undifferentiated CaCO-2 cells. Intriguingly, oleandrin exerted threefold stronger anti-proliferative activity in undifferentiated CaCO-2 cells (IC50, 8.25 nM) than in differentiated CaCO-2 cells (IC50, >25 nM). Oleandrin (10 to 20 nM) caused an autophagic cell death and altered ERK phosphorylation in undifferentiated but not in differentiated CaCO-2 cells. These data demonstrate that the intracellular location of Na+, K+-ATPase α3 isoform is altered in human cancer versus normal cells. These changes in α3 cellular location and abundance may indicate a potential target of opportunity for cancer therapy. PMID:23073998

  5. Sequential expression of cellular fibronectin by platelets, macrophages, and mesangial cells in proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, J. L.; Hastings, R. R.; De la Garza, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) regulates cell migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix formation during embryogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fn also promotes mesangial cell migration and proliferation in vitro and contributes to extracellular matrix formation and tissue remodeling during glomerular disease. In this study, we examined, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, the temporal glomerular localization and cellular sources of Fn in Habu snake venom (HSV)-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis. Early HSV-induced glomerular lesions consisted of microaneurysms devoid of resident glomerular cells and filled with platelets, leukocytes, and erythrocytes. Over the course of the disease, mesangial cells migrated into the lesions, proliferated, and formed a confluent cellular mass. Fn was present in lesions beginning at 8 hours, with highest intensity at 72 hours and diminishing at 2 weeks after HSV. Staining for Fn at 8 and 24 hours after HSV was attributed to platelets and macrophages. In situ hybridization and phenotypic identification of cell types within lesions revealed macrophages as the predominant source of cellular Fn mRNA at these times. At 48 hours after HSV, Fn mRNA was expressed in proliferating mesangial cells in addition to macrophages. Most cells in lesions at 72 hours after HSV were mesangial, at a time when expression of Fn mRNA peaked. Cellular expression for Fn mRNA and translated protein declined at 2 weeks after HSV. These studies support the hypothesis that Fn, derived from platelets and macrophages, provides a provisional matrix involved with mesangial cell migration into glomerular lesions. Fn produced by mesangial cells might contribute to the formation of a stable extracellular matrix. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8080041

  6. BMP2 Regulation of CXCL12 Cellular, Temporal, and Spatial Expression is Essential During Fracture Repair.

    PubMed

    Myers, Timothy J; Longobardi, Lara; Willcockson, Helen; Temple, Joseph D; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Ye, Ping; Li, Tieshi; Esposito, Alessandra; Moats-Staats, Billie M; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-11-01

    The cellular and humoral responses that orchestrate fracture healing are still elusive. Here we report that bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2)-dependent fracture healing occurs through a tight control of chemokine C-X-C motif-ligand-12 (CXCL12) cellular, spatial, and temporal expression. We found that the fracture repair process elicited an early site-specific response of CXCL12(+)-BMP2(+) endosteal cells and osteocytes that was not present in unfractured bones and gradually decreased as healing progressed. Absence of a full complement of BMP2 in mesenchyme osteoprogenitors (BMP2(cKO/+)) prevented healing and led to a dysregulated temporal and cellular upregulation of CXCL12 expression associated with a deranged angiogenic response. Healing was rescued when BMP2(cKO/+) mice were systemically treated with AMD3100, an antagonist of CXCR4 and agonist for CXCR7 both receptors for CXCL12. We further found that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), capable of delivering BMP2 at the endosteal site, restored fracture healing when transplanted into BMP2(cKO/+) mice by rectifying the CXCL12 expression pattern. Our in vitro studies showed that in isolated endosteal cells, BMP2, while inducing osteoblastic differentiation, stimulated expression of pericyte markers that was coupled with a decrease in CXCL12. Furthermore, in isolated BMP2(cKO/cKO) endosteal cells, high expression levels of CXCL12 inhibited osteoblastic differentiation that was restored by AMD3100 treatment or coculture with BMP2-expressing MSCs that led to an upregulation of pericyte markers while decreasing platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM). Taken together, our studies show that following fracture, a CXCL12(+)-BMP2(+) perivascular cell population is recruited along the endosteum, then a timely increase of BMP2 leads to downregulation of CXCL12 that is essential to determine the fate of the CXCL12(+)-BMP2(+) to osteogenesis while departing their supportive role to angiogenesis. Our findings have far

  7. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  8. Cellular pathways involved in the ex vivo expression of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhofs, P; Adam, E; Droogmans, L; Portetelle, D; Mammerickx, M; Burny, A; Kettmann, R; Willems, L

    1996-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the etiologic agent of enzootic bovine leukosis. The virus adopts a strategy based on the lack of viral expression in vivo; only very rare BLV-infected B lymphocytes express viral information. When the cells are isolated from animals in persistent lymphocytosis and cultivated ex vivo, a tremendous increase in viral expression occurs. To gain insight into this mechanism, we employed a general approach using chemicals that interfere specifically with cellular pathways involved in signal transduction from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Our data demonstrate that BLV expression is not correlated with the activity of protein kinase A (PKA) and is even inhibited by cyclic AMP (cAMP). The cAMP/PKA pathway is thus apparently not involved in ex vivo viral expression. In contrast, PKC appears to play a key role in this process. Phorbol myristate acetate can directly activate viral expression in B cells (in the absence of T cells). Furthermore, calphostin C, a highly specific inhibitor of PKC, partly decreases ex vivo BLV expression. Our data further demonstrate that calmodulin and calcineurin, a calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, play a key role in the induction of viral expression. The involvement of this calmodulin-dependent pathway could explain the induction of expression that cannot be assigned to PKC. Furthermore, it appears that the activation of viral expression requires a calmodulin but not a PKA-dependent pathway. These data highlight major differences between transient transfection and ex vivo experiments. Finally, despite their homologies, BLV and human T-cell leukemia virus appear to use different signal transduction pathways to induce viral expression. PMID:8642639

  9. Introns and gene expression: Cellular constraints, transcriptional regulation, and evolutionary consequences

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Patricia; Kalinka, Alex T; Tomancak, Pavel; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2015-01-01

    A gene's “expression profile” denotes the number of transcripts present relative to all other transcripts. The overall rate of transcript production is determined by transcription and RNA processing rates. While the speed of elongating RNA polymerase II has been characterized for many different genes and organisms, gene-architectural features – primarily the number and length of exons and introns – have recently emerged as important regulatory players. Several new studies indicate that rapidly cycling cells constrain gene-architecture toward short genes with a few introns, allowing efficient expression during short cell cycles. In contrast, longer genes with long introns exhibit delayed expression, which can serve as timing mechanisms for patterning processes. These findings indicate that cell cycle constraints drive the evolution of gene-architecture and shape the transcriptome of a given cell type. Furthermore, a tendency for short genes to be evolutionarily young hints at links between cellular constraints and the evolution of animal ontogeny. PMID:25400101

  10. A cellular memory module conveys epigenetic inheritance of hedgehog expression during Drosophila wing imaginal disc development.

    PubMed

    Maurange, Cédric; Paro, Renato

    2002-10-15

    In Drosophila, the Trithorax-group (trxG) and Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins interact with chromosomal elements, termed Cellular Memory Modules (CMMs). By modifying chromatin, this ensures a stable heritable maintenance of the transcriptional state of developmental regulators, like the homeotic genes, that is defined embryonically. We asked whether such CMMs could also control expression of genes involved in patterning imaginal discs during larval development. Our results demonstrate that expression of the hedgehog gene, once activated, is maintained by a CMM. In addition, our experiments indicate that the switching of such CMMs to an active state during larval stages, in contrast to embryonic stages, may require specific trans-activators. Our results suggest that the patterning of cells in particular developmental fields in the imaginal discs does not only rely on external cues from morphogens, but also depends on the previous history of the cells, as the control by CMMs ensures a preformatted gene expression pattern.

  11. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Heat Stress-Induced Up-Regulation of Occludin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dokladny, Karol; Ye, Dongmei; Kennedy, John C.; Moseley, Pope L.; Ma, Thomas Y.

    2008-01-01

    The heat stress (HS)-induced increase in occludin protein expression has been postulated to be a protective response against HS-induced disruption of the intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier. The aim of this study was to elucidate the cellular and molecular processes that mediate the HS-induced up-regulation of occludin expression in Caco-2 cells. Exposure to HS (39°C or 41°C) resulted in increased expression of occludin protein; this was preceded by an increase in occludin mRNA transcription and promoter activity. HS-induced activation of heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) resulted in cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation of HSF-1 and binding to its binding motif in the occludin promoter region. HSF-1 activation was associated with an increase in occludin promoter activity, mRNA transcription, and protein expression; which were abolished by the HSF-1 inhibitor quercetin. Targeted HSF-1 knock-down by siRNA transfection inhibited the HSF-1-induced increase in occulin expression and junctional localization of occulin protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of the HSF-1 binding motif in the occludin promoter region inhibited HS-induced binding of HSF-1 to the occludin promoter region and subsequent promoter activity. In conclusion, our data show for the first time that the HS-induced increase in occludin protein expression is mediated by HSF-1 activation and subsequent binding of HSF-1 to the occludin promoter, which initiates a series of molecular and cellular events culminating in increased junctional localization of occludin protein. PMID:18276783

  12. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  13. Cellular distribution of glucose and monocarboxylate transporters in human brain white matter and multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Philip G; Michailidou, Iliana; Witte, Maarten E; Mizee, Mark R; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Het Hof, Bert; Reijerkerk, Arie; Pellerin, Luc; van der Valk, Paul; de Vries, Helga E; van Horssen, Jack

    2014-07-01

    To ensure efficient energy supply to the high demanding brain, nutrients are transported into brain cells via specific glucose (GLUT) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT). Mitochondrial dysfunction and altered glucose metabolism are thought to play an important role in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we investigated the cellular localization of key GLUT and MCT proteins in human brain tissue of non-neurological controls and MS patients. We show that in control brain tissue GLUT and MCT proteins were abundantly expressed in a variety of central nervous system cells, particularly in microglia and endothelial cells. In active MS lesions, GLUTs and MCTs were highly expressed in infiltrating leukocytes and reactive astrocytes. Astrocytes manifest increased MCT1 staining and maintain GLUT expression in inactive lesions, whereas demyelinated axons exhibit significantly reduced GLUT3 and MCT2 immunoreactivity in inactive lesions. Finally, we demonstrated that the co-transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), an important protein involved in energy metabolism, is highly expressed in reactive astrocytes in active MS lesions. Overexpression of PGC-1α in astrocyte-like cells resulted in increased production of several GLUT and MCT proteins. In conclusion, we provide for the first time a comprehensive overview of key nutrient transporters in white matter brain samples. Moreover, our data demonstrate an altered expression of these nutrient transporters in MS brain tissue, including a marked reduction of axonal GLUT3 and MCT2 expression in chronic lesions, which may impede efficient nutrient supply to the hypoxic demyelinated axons thereby contributing to the ongoing neurodegeneration in MS.

  14. Cellular distribution of AMPA receptor subunits and mGlu5 following acute and repeated administration of morphine or methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Herrold, Amy A; Persons, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2013-08-01

    Ionotropic AMPA receptors (AMPAR) and metabotropic glutamate group I subtype 5 receptors (mGlu5) mediate neuronal and behavioral effects of abused drugs. mGlu5 stimulation increases expression of striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase isoform 61 (STEP61 ) which internalizes AMPARs. We determined the rat brain profile of these proteins using two different classes of abused drugs, opiates, and stimulants. STEP61 levels, and cellular distribution/expression of AMPAR subunits (GluA1, GluA2) and mGlu5, were evaluated via a protein cross-linking assay in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and ventral pallidum (VP) harvested 1 day after acute, or fourteen days after repeated morphine (8 mg/kg) or methamphetamine (1 mg/kg) (treatments producing behavioral sensitization). Acute morphine decreased GluA1 and GluA2 surface expression in mPFC and GluA1 in NAc. Fourteen days after repeated morphine or methamphetamine, mGlu5 surface expression increased in VP. In mPFC, mGlu5 were unaltered; however, after methamphetamine, STEP61 levels decreased and GluA2 surface expression increased. Pre-treatment with a mGlu5-selective negative allosteric modulator, blocked methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization and changes in mPFC GluA2 and STEP61 . These data reveal (i) region-specific distinctions in glutamate receptor trafficking between acute and repeated treatments of morphine and methamphetamine, and (ii) that mGlu5 is necessary for methamphetamine-induced alterations in mPFC GluA2 and STEP61 .

  15. Expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor and its cellular localization in myocardial tissues of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Tripta; Mishra, Baijayantimala; Saikia, Uma Nahar; Sharma, Mirnalini; Bahl, Ajay; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) are common causes of morbidity and mortality in children and adults. Recently, the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a common receptor for coxsackieviruses and adenoviruses, was discovered and its increased expression has been reported in patients with DCM and myocarditis. OBJECTIVE: To measure the expression of CAR in myocardial tissues of patients with DCM and its cellular localization in DCM cases. METHODS: Formalin-fixed myocardial tissues collected during autopsy from 26 cases of DCM, and 20 cases each of noncardiac disease and cardiac disease other than DCM were included as the test group, and control groups A and B, respectively. Expression of CAR was studied using immunohistochemical staining of myocardial tissue with a CAR-specific rabbit polyclonal antibody. CAR messenger RNA was semiquantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by agarose gel analysis and measurement of band intensity. RESULTS: CAR positivity in DCM cases was found to be 96% (25 of 26) compared with 30% in control group A and 40% in control group B. CAR was found to be expressed in myocytes, endothelial and interstitial cells; however, positivity in myocytes was significantly higher than in other cells in all groups. The site of CAR expression was predominantly the sarcolemma along with cytoplasm in cardiomyocytes. CONCLUSIONS: The present study highlighted the increased expression of CAR in DCM cases, with localization in myocytes and endothelial cells. PMID:23592932

  16. Cellular differentiation and I-FABP protein expression modulate fatty acid uptake and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, B P; Foxworth, W B; Frolov, A; Roths, J B; Kier, A B; Oetama, B K; Piedrahita, J A; Schroeder, F

    1998-03-01

    The effect of cellular differentiation on fatty acid uptake and intracellular diffusion was examined in transfected pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells stably expressing intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP). Control ES cells, whether differentiated or undifferentiated, did not express I-FABP. The initial rate and maximal uptake of the fluorescent fatty acid, 12-(N-methyl)-N-[(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-octadec anoic acid (NBD-stearic acid), was measured in single cells by kinetic digital fluorescence imaging. I-FABP expression in undifferentiated ES cells increased the initial rate and maximal uptake of NBD-stearic acid 1.7- and 1.6-fold, respectively, as well as increased its effective intracellular diffusion constant (Deff) 1.8-fold as measured by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In contrast, ES cell differentiation decreased I-FABP expression up to 3-fold and decreased the NBD-stearic acid initial rate of uptake, maximal uptake, and Deff by 10-, 4.7-, and 2-fold, respectively. There were no significant differences in these parameters between the differentiated control and differentiated I-FABP-expressing ES cell lines. In summary, differentiation and expression of I-FABP oppositely modulated NBD-stearic acid uptake parameters and intracellular diffusion in ES cells.

  17. GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR IN BREAST CANCER MEDIATES CELLULAR MIGRATION AND INTERLEUKIN-8 EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Celia; Ives, Kirk; Hellmich, Helen L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancers aberrantly express gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) hormone and its cognate receptor, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R). Experimental evidence suggests that bombesin (BBS), the pharmacological homologue of GRP, promotes breast cancer growth and progression. The contribution of GRP-R to other poor prognostic indicators in breast cancer, such as the expression of the EGF-R family of growth factors, and hormone insensitivity is unknown. Materials and Methods Two estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines were used. MDA-MB-231 overexpress both EGFR and GRPR, whereas SK-BR-3 cells express EGF-R but lack GRP-R. Cellular proliferation was assessed by Coulter counter. Chemotactic migration was performed using Transwell chambers and the migrated cells were quantified. Northern blot and real-time PCR were used to evaluate if pro-angiogenic factor interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expression. Results In MDA-MB-231 cells, GRP-R and EGF-R synergize to regulate cell migration, IL-8 expression, but not cell proliferation. In SK-BR-3 cells, ectopic expression of GRP-R was sufficient to increase migration and IL-8 mRNA. Conclusions These data suggest relevant roles for GRP-R in ER-negative breast cancer progression. Future mechanistic studies to define the molecular role of GRP-R in breast cancer metastasis provide novel targets for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:19631337

  18. Cellular responses and disease expression in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) exposed to suspended field contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fu-Lin E; Volety, Aswani K; Hale, Robert C; Huang, Yongqin

    2002-02-01

    Exposure of oysters to water soluble fractions derived from field-contaminated sediments (FCS) containing predominantly lower molecular weight organic aromatic compounds, has been previously demonstrated to enhance pre-existing infections caused by the protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus (Dermo), and the prevalence of experimentally induced infections. To further explore the role of pollution on the onset and progression of disease, effects of suspended FCS from an estuarine creek in Virginia, USA, dominated by higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on cellular responses and Dermo disease expression in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were examined. Sediments were collected from a PAH polluted estuarine creek in Virginia, USA. To test effects on cellular response, oysters from Maine were exposed daily to 0, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 g suspended FCS (corresponding to 0, 70.2, 105, or 140 microg PAHs, respectively) for 5, 10, 20, and 40 days. Hemocyte activities and plasma lipid, protein and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were then measured. Exposure stimulated neutral red uptake, MTT reduction, and 3H-leucine incorporation in oyster hemocytes at various exposure times, but did not affect the plasma protein, lipid and LDH levels. To test effects on Dermo expression, oysters from a Dermo enzootic area, with an initial estimated infection prevalence of 39%, were exposed daily to 0, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 g suspended FCS (corresponding to 0, 75.0, 113, or 150 microg PAHs, respectively) for 30 days. Exposure enhanced disease expression in oysters. However, no significant change was noted in any measured cellular or humoral parameters.

  19. Cellular prion protein directly interacts with and enhances lactate dehydrogenase expression under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramljak, Sanja; Schmitz, Matthias; Zafar, Saima; Wrede, Arne; Schenkel, Sara; Asif, Abdul R; Carimalo, Julie; Doeppner, Thorsten R; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Weise, Jens; Zerr, Inga

    2015-09-01

    Although a physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) is still not fully clarified, a PrP(c)-mediated neuroprotection against hypoxic/ischemic insult is intriguing. After ischemic stroke prion protein knockout mice (Prnp(0/0)) display significantly greater lesions as compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Earlier reports suggested an interaction between the glycolytic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and PrP(c). Since hypoxic environment enhances LDH expression levels and compels neurons to rely on lactate as an additional oxidative substrate for energy metabolism, we examined possible differences in LDH protein expression in WT and Prnp(0/0) knockout models under normoxic/hypoxic conditions in vitro and in vivo, as well as in a HEK293 cell line. While no differences are observed under normoxic conditions, LDH expression is markedly increased after 60-min and 90-min of hypoxia in WT vs. Prnp(0/0) primary cortical neurons with concurrent less hypoxia-induced damage in the former group. Likewise, cerebral ischemia significantly increases LDH levels in WT vs. Prnp(0/0) mice with accompanying smaller lesions in the WT group. HEK293 cells overexpressing PrP(c) show significantly higher LDH expression/activity following 90-min of hypoxia as compared to control cells. Moreover, a cytoplasmic co-localization of LDH and PrP(c) was recorded under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Interestingly, an expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1, responsible for cellular lactate uptake, increases with PrP(c)-overexpression under normoxic conditions. Our data suggest LDH as a direct PrP(c) interactor with possible physiological relevance under low oxygen conditions.

  20. Regional, cellular, and subcellular variations in the distribution of D1 and D5 dopamine receptors in primate brain.

    PubMed

    Bergson, C; Mrzljak, L; Smiley, J F; Pappy, M; Levenson, R; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1995-12-01

    The pathways governing signal transduction in the mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopamine systems of the brain are of central importance in a variety of drug actions and neurological diseases. We have analyzed the regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution of the closely related D1 and D5 subtypes of dopamine receptors in the cerebral cortex and selected subcortical structures of rhesus monkey using subtype specific antibodies. The distribution of D1 and D5 receptors was highly differentiated in subcortical structures. In the neostriatum, both D1 and to a lesser extent D5 antibodies labeled medium spiny neurons, while only D5 antibodies labeled the large aspiny neurons typical of cholinergic interneurons. In the caudate nucleus, D1 labeling was concentrated in the spines and shafts of projection neurons, whereas D5 antibodies predominantly labeled the shafts, and less commonly, the spines of these cells. The D1 receptor was abundantly expressed in the neuropil of the substantia nigra pars reticulata while the D5 antibodies labeled only a few scattered cell bodies in this structure. Conversely, D5 antibodies labeled cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain more intensely than D1 antibodies. Within the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, D1 and D5 antibody labeling was prominent in pyramidal cells. Double-label experiments revealed that the two receptors were frequently coexpressed in neurons of both structures. Ultrastructurally, D1 receptors were especially prominent in dendritic spines whereas dendritic shafts were more prominently labeled by the D5 receptor. The anatomical segregation of the D1 and D5 receptors at the subcellular level in cerebral cortex and at the cellular level in subcortical areas suggest that these closely related receptors may be preferentially associated with different circuit elements and may play distinct regulatory roles in synaptic transmission.

  1. Zea mays Taxilin protein negatively regulates opaque-2 transcriptional activity by causing a change in its sub-cellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Qiao, Zhenyi; Liang, Zheng; Mei, Bing; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2012-01-01

    Zea mays (maize) Opaque-2 (ZmO2) protein is an important bZIP transcription factor that regulates the expression of major storage proteins (22-kD zeins) and other important genes during maize seed development. ZmO2 is subject to functional regulation through protein-protein interactions. To unveil the potential regulatory network associated with ZmO2, a protein-protein interaction study was carried out using the truncated version of ZmO2 (O2-2) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a maize seed cDNA library. A protein with homology to Taxilin was found to have stable interaction with ZmO2 in yeast and was designated as ZmTaxilin. Sequence analysis indicated that ZmTaxilin has a long coiled-coil domain containing three conserved zipper motifs. Each of the three zipper motifs is individually able to interact with ZmO2 in yeast. A GST pull-down assay demonstrated the interaction between GST-fused ZmTaxilin and ZmO2 extracted from developing maize seeds. Using onion epidermal cells as in vivo assay system, we found that ZmTaxilin could change the sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2. We also demonstrated that this change significantly repressed the transcriptional activity of ZmO2 on the 22-kD zein promoter. Our study suggests that a Taxilin-mediated change in sub-cellular distribution of ZmO2 may have important functional consequences for ZmO2 activity.

  2. 75 FR 56920 - Express Mail Open and Distribute and Priority Mail Open and Distribute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Express Mail Express Mail Open and Distribute service is designed to provide mailers... scan information is exclusive to the Open and Distribute service and will assist in facilitating... information on the destination entry office where the enclosed mail is to be distributed. 1. For...

  3. Expression and cellular localization of the Toucan protein during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grammont, M; Berson, G; Dastugue, B; Couderc, J L

    2000-02-01

    The toucan (toc) gene is required in the germline for somatic cell patterning during Drosophila oogenesis. To better understand the function of toc, we performed a detailed analysis of the distribution of the Toucan protein during oogenesis. Toc expression is restricted to the germline cells and shows a dynamic distribution pattern throughout follicle development. Mislocalization of the Toc protein in mutant follicles in which the microtubule network is altered indicates that microtubules play a role in Toc localization during oogenesis.

  4. Cellular and tissue distribution of potassium: physiological relevance, mechanisms and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Izhar; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2014-05-15

    Potassium (K(+)) is the most important cationic nutrient for all living organisms. Its cellular levels are significant (typically around 100mM) and are highly regulated. In plants K(+) affects multiple aspects such as growth, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress and movement of plant organs. These processes occur at the cell, organ and whole plant level and not surprisingly, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms for the uptake, efflux and distribution of K(+) both within cells and between organs. Great progress has been made in the last decades regarding the molecular mechanisms of K(+) uptake and efflux, particularly at the cellular level. For long distance K(+) transport our knowledge is less complete but the principles behind the overall processes are largely understood. In this chapter we will discuss how both long distance transport between different organs and intracellular transport between organelles works in general and in particular for K(+). Where possible, we will provide examples of specific genes and proteins that are responsible for these phenomena.

  5. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Giampieri, Enrico; De Cecco, Marco; Remondini, Daniel; Sedivy, John; Castellani, Gastone

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF) undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction), and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome. PMID:26115222

  6. GIM3E: Condition-specific Models of Cellular Metabolism Developed from Metabolomics and Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Brian; Ebrahim, Ali; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernard O.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2013-11-15

    Motivation: Genome-scale metabolic models have been used extensively to investigate alterations in cellular metabolism. The accuracy of these models to represent cellular metabolism in specific conditions has been improved by constraining the model with omics data sources. However, few practical methods for integrating metabolomics data with other omics data sources into genome-scale models of metabolism have been reported. Results: GIMMME (Gene Inactivation Moderated by Metabolism, Metabolomics, and Expression) is an algorithm that enables the development of condition-specific models based on an objective function, transcriptomics, and intracellular metabolomics data. GIMMME establishes metabolite utilization requirements with metabolomics data, uses model-paired transcriptomics data to find experimentally supported solutions, and also provides calculations of the turnover (production / consumption) flux of metabolites. GIMMME was employed to investigate the effects of integrating additional omics datasets to create increasingly constrained solution spaces of Salmonella Typhimurium metabolism during growth in both rich and virulence media. This integration proved to be informative and resulted in a requirement of additional active reactions (12 in each case) or metabolites (26 or 29, respectively). The addition of constraints from transcriptomics also impacted the allowed solution space, and the cellular metabolites with turnover fluxes that were necessarily altered by the change in conditions increased from 118 to 271 of 1397. Availability: GIMMME has been implemented in Python and requires a COBRApy 0.2.x. The algorithm and sample data described here are freely available at: http://opencobra.sourceforge.net/

  7. Irradiation affects cellular properties and Eph receptor expression in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mosch, Birgit; Pietzsch, Doreen; Pietzsch, Jens

    2012-01-01

    X-ray irradiation influences metastatic properties of tumor cells and, moreover, metastasis and cellular motility can be modified by members of the Eph receptor/ephrin family of receptor tyrosine kinases. We hypothesized that irradiation-induced changes in cellular properties relevant for metastasis in melanoma cells could be mediated by Eph receptor/ephrin signaling. In this pilot study, we analyzed one pre-metastatic (Mel-Juso) and three metastatic human melanoma (Mel-Juso-L3, A375, and A2058) cells lines and predominantly found anti-metastatic effects of X-ray irradiation with impaired cell growth, clonal growth and motility. Additionally, we observed an irradiation-induced increase in adhesion paralleled by a decrease in migration in Mel-Juso and Mel-Juso-L3 cells and, in part, also in A375 cells. We further demonstrate a decrease of EphA2 both in expression and activity at 7 d after irradiation paralleled by an upregulation of EphA3. Analyzing downstream signaling after irradiation, we detected decreased Src kinase phosphorylation, but unchanged focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, indicating, in part, irradiation-induced downregulation of signaling via the EphA2-Src-FAK axis in melanoma cells. However, to which extent this finding contributes to the modification of metastasis-relevant cellular properties remains to be elucidated. PMID:22568947

  8. Tracking and quantifying polymer therapeutic distribution on a cellular level using 3D dSTORM

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Jonathan M.; Zhang, Rui; Gudheti, Manasa; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2016-01-01

    We used a single-molecule localization technique called direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to quantify both colocalization and spatial distribution on a cellular level for two conceptually different N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer conjugates. Microscopy images were acquired of entire cells with resolutions as high as 25 nm revealing the nanoscale distribution of the fluorescently labeled therapeutic components. Drug-free macromolecular therapeutics consisting of two self-assembling nanoconjugates showed slight increase in nanoclusters on the cell surface with time. Additionally, dSTORM provided high resolution images of the nanoscale organization of the self-assembling conjugates at the interface between two cells. A conjugate designed for treating ovarian cancer showed that the model drug (Cy3) and polymer bound to Cy5 were colocalized at an early time point before the model drug was enzymatically cleaved from the polymer. Using spatial descriptive statistics it was found that the drug was randomly distributed after 24 h while the polymer bound dye remained in clusters. Four different fluorescent dyes were used and two different therapeutic systems were tested to demonstrate the versatility and possible general applicability of dSTORM for use in studying drug delivery systems. PMID:26855050

  9. [Distribution of carbon isotopes ((13)C/(12)C) in cells and temporal organization of cellular processes].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on fractionation of carbon isotopes in biological systems are reviewed. It follows that direct experimental proofs have been obtained that 1) basic fractionation of carbon isotopes in the cell is related to isotope effect in pyruvate decarboxylation; 2) fractionation of carbon isotopes in the above reaction in vivo proceeds with exhausting substrate pool. The latter provides natural relationship between metabolites isotope distribution and sequence of their synthesis in the cell cycle, or with the temporal organization of cellular metabolism. The non-steady and periodic pattern of pyruvate decarboxylation due to the exhausting substrate pool well agrees with the existing notions on reciprocal oscillations in the cell glycolytic chain. Experimental data are presented corroborating indirectly the existence of oscillations in bacterial cells. Earlier proposed model of the mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation based on the above principles can be used for analysing changes in isotopic characteristics of the organisms and interpreting their relations with metabolic processes.

  10. Radiation effects on cellularity, proliferation and EGFR expression in mouse bladder urothelium.

    PubMed

    Jaal, Jana; Dörr, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    This study was designed to determine changes in cell numbers, proliferation (using Ki-67) and EGFR expression in mouse bladder urothelium during the early and late radiation response. Groups of mice were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy and assayed 0-360 days later. Urothelial cells were counted. After immunohistochemistry, the absolute and relative numbers of Ki-67(+) and EGFR(+) cells were analyzed. Radiation exposure resulted in a decrease in total urothelial cell numbers to 49% by day 31, with restoration of cellularity by day 180. In contrast, at day 360, an increase in total cell number (143%) was seen. Slightly increased Ki-67 expression was found at days 120 and 180 after treatment, followed by a pronounced elevation at days 240 and 360. Compared to controls, higher EGFR expression was detected up to day 360 after irradiation. A positive correlation was found between total urothelial cells numbers and Ki-67 as well as EGFR expression. Radiation exposure results in an increased urothelial expression of EGFR that precedes urothelial restoration, indicating a contribution of the EGF/EGFR system to urothelial proliferation and differentiation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of EGFR inhibition on radiation effects in the urinary bladder.

  11. Self-assembly of patterned nanoparticles on cellular membranes: effect of charge distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2013-06-06

    Nanoparticle-assisted drug delivery has been emerging as an active research area. Achieving high drug loading is only one facet of drug delivery issues; it is also important to investigate the effect of surface charge distribution on self-assembly of nanoparticles on cellular membranes. By considering the electrostatic distribution of patterned nanoparticles, we used dissipative particle dynamics simulations to investigate the self-assembly of pattern charged nanoparticles with five different surface charged patterns. It is found that both surface charged pattern and nanoparticle size significantly affect the self-assembly of nanoparticles on cellular membranes. Results indicate that 1/2 pattern charged small nanoparticles can self-assemble into dendritic structures, while those with a 1/4 pattern self-assemble into clusters. As the nanoparticle size increases, 1/2 pattern charged medium nanoparticles can self-assemble into linear structures, while those with a 1/4 pattern self-assemble into clusters. For very large nanoparticles, both 1/2 pattern and 1/4 pattern charged nanoparticles self-assemble into flaky structures with different connections. By considering the effects of surface charged pattern and nanoparticle size on self-assembly, we found that nanoparticle self-assembly requires a minimum effective charged area. When the local charged area of nanoparticles is less than the threshold, surface charge cannot induce nanoparticle self-assembly; that is, the surface charged pattern of a nanoparticle would determine effectively the self-assembly structure. It is expected that this work will provide guidance for nanoparticle-assisted drug delivery.

  12. Roles of neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 in tumor-associated cellular processes (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sisen; Wu, Lihua

    2015-11-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 (NEDD9), a gene exclusively expressed in the brain during embryonic stages but not in brains of adult mice, is an important cytoskeletal protein and regarded as a 'router/hub' in cellular signal transduction processes connecting external stimulation signals with downstream target proteins that can directly promote tumor metastasis. Numerous studies showed that NEDD9 has an essential role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, migration and invasion. The roles of NEDD9, including the underlying mechanisms of its regulation of cell migration, its distinctive functions in various tumor stages and its association with other diseases, are required to be elucidated at large. Future studies of NEDD9 may provide a more profound understanding of the development of tumor invasiveness and NEDD9 may serve as a potential novel target for tumor therapy. The present review examined the significant roles of NEDD9 in the abovementioned processes.

  13. Cellular Distribution and Subcellular Localization of Molecular Components of Vesicular Transmitter Release in Horizontal Cells of Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN H.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism underlying transmitter release from retinal horizontal cells is poorly understood. We investigated the possibility of vesicular transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells by examining the expression of synaptic proteins that participate in vesicular transmitter release at chemical synapses. Using immunocytochemistry, we evaluated the cellular and subcellular distribution of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit retina. Strong labeling for complexin I/II, proteins that regulate a late step in vesicular transmitter release, was found in both synaptic layers of the retina, and in somata of A- and B-type horizontal cells, of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glycinergic amacrine cells, and of ganglion cells. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of complexin I/II in horizontal cell processes postsynaptic to rod and cone ribbon synapses. Syntaxin-1, a core protein of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex known to bind to complexin, and synapsin I, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein involved in the Ca2+-dependent recruitment of synaptic vesicles for transmitter release, were also present in the horizontal cells and their processes at photoreceptor synapses. Photoreceptors and bipolar cells did not express any of these proteins at their axon terminals. The presence of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit horizontal cell processes and tips suggests that a vesicular mechanism may underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells. PMID:15912504

  14. Zoledronic acid and geranylgeraniol regulate cellular behaviour and angiogenic gene expression in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zafar, S; Coates, D E; Cullinan, M P; Drummond, B K; Milne, T; Seymour, G J

    2014-10-01

    The mevalonate pathway (MVP) and the anti-angiogenic effect of bisphosphonates have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). This study determined the effect of the bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid and the replenishment of the MVP by geranylgeraniol on human gingival fibroblasts. Cell viability, apoptosis, morphological analysis using transmission electron microscopy, and gene expression for vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenic protein 2, ras homologue gene family member B, epiregulin and interferon-alpha were conducted. Results showed cellular viability was decreased in the presence of zoledronic acid and the co-addition of zoledronic acid with geranylgeraniol restored cell viability to control levels. Caspase 3/7 was detected in zoledronic-acid-treated cells indicating apoptosis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed dilation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum with zoledronic acid and the appearance of multiple lipid-like vesicles following the addition of geranylgeraniol. Zoledronic acid significantly (P < 0.05, FR > ± 2) up-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenic protein 2, ras homologue gene family member B and epiregulin at one or more time points but not interferon-alpha. Addition of geranylgeraniol resulted in a reduction in the expression of all five genes compared with zoledronic-acid-treated human gingival fibroblasts. The study concluded geranylgeraniol partially reversed the effects of zoledronic acid in human gingival fibroblasts both at the cellular and genetic levels, suggesting the regulation of these genes is mediated via the mevalonate pathway.

  15. Vitamin D Metabolites Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus and Modulate Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Julio A.; Jones, Krysten A.; Flores, Roxana; Singhania, Akul; Woelk, Christopher H.; Schooley, Robert T.; Wyles, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous studies suggest that low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] levels are associated with reduced responsiveness to interferon and ribavirin therapy. We investigated the impact of vitamin D metabolites on HCV and cellular gene expression in cultured hepatoma cells. Methods HCV Replicon cell lines stably expressing luciferase reporter constructs (genotype 1b and 2a replicon) or JC1-Luc2a were incubated in the presence of vitamin D2, vitamin D3 or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Presence of HCV was quantified by a luciferase reporter assay and immunoblot of the Core protein. Synergy of interferon-alpha A/D (IFN-α) and 1,25(OH)2D3 was evaluated using the Chou-Talalay method. Cellular gene expression by microarray analysis using Illumina Bead Chips and real-time quantitative PCR. Results Vitamin D2, D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3 each demonstrated anti-HCV activity at low micro molar concentrations. In vitro conversion from D3 to 25(OH)D3 was shown by LC/MS/MS. Combination indices of 1,25(OH)2D3 and IFN-α demonstrated a synergistic effect (0.23-0.46) and significantly reduced core expression by immunoblot. Differentially expressed genes were identified between Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence and absence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and HCV. Genes involved with classical effects of vitamin D metabolism and excretion were activated, along with genes linked to autophagy such as G-protein coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) and Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1a). Additionally, additive effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 and IFN-α were seen on mRNA expression of chemokine motif ligand 20 (CCL20). Conclusions This study shows that vitamin D reduces HCV protein production in cell culture synergistically with IFN-α. Vitamin D also activates gene expression independently and additively with IFN-α and this may explain its ability to aid in the clearance of HCV in vivo. PMID:26594646

  16. High expression of cellular retinol binding protein-1 in lung adenocarcinoma is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Pompeo, Eugenio; Agostinelli, Sara; Bellezza, Guido; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Giunta, Alessandro; Sidoni, Angelo; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenocarcinoma, the most common non-small cell lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with a low overall survival (OS) despite increasing attempts to achieve an early diagnosis and accomplish surgical and multimodality treatment strategies. Cellular retinol binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) regulates retinol bioavailability and cell differentiation, but its role in lung cancerogenesis remains uncertain. Experimental design CRBP-1 expression, clinical outcome and other prognostic factors were investigated in 167 lung adenocarcinoma patients. CRBP-1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarray sections, gene copy number analysis and tumor methylation specific PCR. Effects of CRBP-1 expression on proliferation/apoptosis gene array, protein and transcripts were investigated in transfected A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Results CRBP-1High expression was observed in 62.3% of adenocarcinomas and correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS as an independent prognostic factor. CRBP-1 gene copy gain also associated with tumor CRBP-1High status and dedifferentiation. CRBP-1-transfected (CRBP-1+) A549 grew more than CRBP-1− A549 cells. At >1μM concentrations, all trans-retinoic acid and retinol reduced viability more in CRBP-1+ than in CRBP-1− A549 cells. CRBP-1+ A549 cells showed up-regulated RARα/ RXRα and proliferative and transcriptional genes including pAkt, pEGFR, pErk1/2, creb1 and c-jun, whereas RARβ and p53 were strongly down-regulated; pAkt/pErk/ pEGFR inhibitors counteracted proliferative advantage and increased RARα/RXRα, c-jun and CD44 expression in CRBP-1+ A549 cells. Conclusion CRBP-1High expression in lung adenocarcinoma correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS, likely through increased Akt/Erk/EGFR-mediated cell proliferation and differentiation. CRBP-1High expression can be considered an additional marker of poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:26807202

  17. Genome Wide Expression Profiling during Spinal Cord Regeneration Identifies Comprehensive Cellular Responses in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Subhra Prakash; Sengupta, Dhriti; Lee, Serene Gek Ping; Sen, Triparna; Kundu, Sudip; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan; Ghosh, Sukla

    2014-01-01

    Background Among the vertebrates, teleost and urodele amphibians are capable of regenerating their central nervous system. We have used zebrafish as a model to study spinal cord injury and regeneration. Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord regeneration and information based on high density oligonucleotide microarray was not available. We have used a high density microarray to profile the temporal transcriptome dynamics during the entire phenomenon. Results A total of 3842 genes expressed differentially with significant fold changes during spinal cord regeneration. Cluster analysis revealed event specific dynamic expression of genes related to inflammation, cell death, cell migration, cell proliferation, neurogenesis, neural patterning and axonal regrowth. Spatio-temporal analysis of stat3 expression suggested its possible function in controlling inflammation and cell proliferation. Genes involved in neurogenesis and their dorso-ventral patterning (sox2 and dbx2) are differentially expressed. Injury induced cell proliferation is controlled by many cell cycle regulators and some are commonly expressed in regenerating fin, heart and retina. Expression pattern of certain pathway genes are identified for the first time during regeneration of spinal cord. Several genes involved in PNS regeneration in mammals like stat3, socs3, atf3, mmp9 and sox11 are upregulated in zebrafish SCI thus creating PNS like environment after injury. Conclusion Our study provides a comprehensive genetic blue print of diverse cellular response(s) during regeneration of zebrafish spinal cord. The data highlights the importance of different event specific gene expression that could be better understood and manipulated further to induce successful regeneration in mammals. PMID:24465396

  18. HMGA2 expression in white adipose tissue linking cellular senescence with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Dominique Nadine; Thies, Helge Wilhelm; Gottlieb, Andrea; Wenk, Heiner; Wischnewsky, Manfred; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2013-09-01

    There is a clear link between overweight, gain of white adipose tissue, and diabetes type 2 (T2D). The molecular mechanism of the gain of adipose tissue is linked with the expression of high mobility group protein AT-hook 2 (HMGA2), and recent studies revealed an association with a SNP near HMGA2. In this study, we investigated the gene expression of HMGA2, p14 (Arf) , CDKN1A, and BAX in human abdominal subcutaneous white adipose tissue from 157 patients. We found a significant higher HMGA2 expression in obese individuals than in non-obese patients. Furthermore, the HMGA2 expression in white adipose tissue in patient with type 2 diabetes was significantly higher than in nondiabetic patients. There is an association between the DNA-binding nonhistone protein HMGA2 and the risk of developing T2D that remains mechanistically unexplained so far. Likewise, p14(Arf), an inducer of cellular senescence, has been associated with the occurrence of T2D. The data of the present study provide evidence that both proteins act within the same network to drive proliferation of adipose tissue stem and precursor cells, senescence, and increased risk of T2D, respectively.

  19. Cloning, expression and cellular localization of Daphnia pulex senescence-associated protein, DpSAP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ajing; Kong, Ling; Zhang, Mingqing; Wu, Donglei; Wang, Danli; Zhao, Yunlong

    2014-01-25

    Daphnia (water fleas) are small crustaceans that undergo an unusual switch from asexual to sexual reproduction that is dependent on environmental conditions. In this study, a senescence-associated protein (SAP) from the common freshwater species Daphnia pulex was cloned using primers based on homologous sequences and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Real-time PCR was employed to quantify the expression of D. pulex SAP (DpSAP) in individual organisms. The role of DpSAP in the reproductive transformation was further investigated in both parthenogenetic and sexual females by using digoxin-labeled SAP RNA probes and RNA whole-mount in situ hybridization. DpSAP was more highly expressed in sexual females, indicating a role in growth and reproduction. Cellular localization studies using RNA whole-mount in situ hybridization showed specific expression in the second tentacle joints. These expression patterns suggest an important role for DpSAP in the reproductive transformation of D. pulex.

  20. Cellular Stress Response Gene Expression During Upper and Lower Body High Intensity Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Kochanowicz, Andrzej; Sawczyn, Stanisław; Niespodziński, Bartłomiej; Mieszkowski, Jan; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to compare the effect of upper and lower body high-intensity exercise on chosen genes expression in athletes and non-athletes. Method Fourteen elite male artistic gymnasts (EAG) aged 20.6 ± 3.3 years and 14 physically active men (PAM) aged 19.9 ± 1.0 years performed lower and upper body 30 s Wingate Tests. Blood samples were collected before, 5 and 30 minutes after each effort to assess gene expression via PCR. Results Significantly higher mechanical parameters after lower body exercise was observed in both groups, for relative power (8.7 ± 1.2 W/kg in gymnasts, 7.2 ± 1.2 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01) and mean power (6.7 ± 0.7 W/kg in gymnasts, 5.4 ± 0.8 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01). No differences in lower versus upper body gene expression were detected for all tested genes as well as between gymnasts and physical active man. For IL-6 m-RNA time-dependent effect was observed. Conclusions Because of no significant differences in expression of genes associated with cellular stress response the similar adaptive effect to exercise may be obtained so by lower and upper body exercise. PMID:28141870

  1. Cellular distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 in benign and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Reinicke, Karin; Sotomayor, Paula; Cisterna, Pedro; Delgado, Carolina; Nualart, Francisco; Godoy, Alejandro

    2012-02-01

    Over-expression of hexose transporters (Gluts), specifically Glut-1, is a common event in human malignancies. In prostate cancer (CaP), however, expression of Gluts has been characterized poorly. In this study, expression and distribution of Glut-1 and Glut-5 proteins were characterized using immunohistochemistry in 76 specimens of benign prostate, 10 specimens of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and 28 specimens of CaP. In addition, mRNA expression of Glut-2, Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 was analyzed in a set of five specimens of benign prostate and CaP. In benign prostate, Glut-1 localized to the basal cells and to the basolateral membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of secretory/luminal epithelial cells. In HGPIN, Glut-1 was immunohistochemically undetectable. Glut-5, however, localized to the apical membrane of the neoplastic epithelial cells. In CaP, Glut-1 and Glut-5, were immunohistochemically undetectable. However, over-expression of GLUT1 was observed in some specimens of highly proliferative intraductal CaP. Glut-7, Glut-9, and Glut-11 mRNAs were detected in benign prostate and CaP, however, only Glut-11 mRNA was consistently up-regulated in CaP compared to benign prostate. Low levels of expression of Glut-1 protein in the majority of CaP could explain, at least in part, the limited clinical applicability of positron emission tomography using 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for imaging CaP. Moreover, expression of Glut-5 in HGPIN suggested that fructose could be utilized as potential metabolic substrate in HGPIN. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation/dysregulation of Gluts in CaP could provide insight in the understanding of hexose metabolism in CaP.

  2. A scale-invariant cellular-automata model for distributed seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barriere, Benoit; Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    In the standard cellular-automata model for a fault an element of stress is randomly added to a grid of boxes until a box has four elements, these are then redistributed to the adjacent boxes on the grid. The redistribution can result in one or more of these boxes having four or more elements in which case further redistributions are required. On the average added elements are lost from the edges of the grid. The model is modified so that the boxes have a scale-invariant distribution of sizes. The objective is to model a scale-invariant distribution of fault sizes. When a redistribution from a box occurs it is equivalent to a characteristic earthquake on the fault. A redistribution from a small box (a foreshock) can trigger an instability in a large box (the main shock). A redistribution from a large box always triggers many instabilities in the smaller boxes (aftershocks). The frequency-size statistics for both main shocks and aftershocks satisfy the Gutenberg-Richter relation with b = 0.835 for main shocks and b = 0.635 for aftershocks. Model foreshocks occur 28 percent of the time.

  3. On Cesàro Limit Distribution of a Class of Permutative Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Alejandro; Martinez, Servet

    1998-01-01

    We study Cesàro means (time averages) of the evolution measures of the class of permutative cellular automata over {0, 1}ℕ defined by (\\varphi _B x)_n = x_{n{kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} + {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} R} + Pi _{j{kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} = {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} 0}^{R{kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} - {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} 1} {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} (1 + b_j + x_{n{kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} + {kern 1pt} {kern 1pt} j} ) where B= b 0 ⋯ b R-1is an aperiodic block in {0, 1} R and operations are taken mod 2. If the initial measure is Bernoulli, we prove that the limit of the Cesàro mean of the first column distribution exists. When R = 1 and B = 1, φ B is the mod 2 sum automaton. For this automaton we show that the limit is the (1/2, 1/2(-Bernoulli measure, and if the initial measure is Markov, we show that the limit of Cesàro mean of the one-site distribution is equidistributed.

  4. Diacylglycerol levels modulate the cellular distribution of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Kamerbeek, Constanza B; Mateos, Melina V; Vallés, Ana S; Pediconi, María F; Barrantes, Francisco J; Borroni, Virginia

    2016-05-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG), a second messenger involved in different cell signaling cascades, activates protein kinase C (PKC) and D (PKD), among other kinases. The present work analyzes the effects resulting from the alteration of DAG levels on neuronal and muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) distribution. We employ CHO-K1/A5 cells, expressing adult muscle-type AChR in a stable manner, and hippocampal neurons, which endogenously express various subtypes of neuronal AChR. CHO-K1/A5 cells treated with dioctanoylglycerol (DOG) for different periods showed augmented AChR cell surface levels at short incubation times (30min-4h) whereas at longer times (18h) the AChR was shifted to intracellular compartments. Similarly, in cultured hippocampal neurons surface AChR levels increased as a result of DOG incubation for 4h. Inhibition of endogenous DAG catabolism produced changes in AChR distribution similar to those induced by DOG treatment. Specific enzyme inhibitors and Western blot assays revealed that DAGs exert their effect on AChR distribution through the modulation of the activity of classical PKC (cPKC), novel PKC (nPKC) and PKD activity.

  5. Spatial distribution and cellular composition of adult brain proliferative zones in the teleost, Gymnotus omarorum

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Pasilio, Valentina; Peterson, Daniel A.; Castelló, María E.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of stem/progenitor cells during development provides for the generation of mature cell types in the CNS. While adult brain proliferation is highly restricted in the mammals, it is widespread in teleosts. The extent of adult neural proliferation in the weakly electric fish, Gymnotus omarorum has not yet been described. To address this, we used double thymidine analog pulse-chase labeling of proliferating cells to identify brain proliferation zones, characterize their cellular composition, and analyze the fate of newborn cells in adult G. omarorum. Short thymidine analog chase periods revealed the ubiquitous distribution of adult brain proliferation, similar to other teleosts, particularly Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Proliferating cells were abundant at the ventricular-subventricular lining of the ventricular-cisternal system, adjacent to the telencephalic subpallium, the diencephalic preoptic region and hypothalamus, and the mesencephalic tectum opticum and torus semicircularis. Extraventricular proliferation zones, located distant from the ventricular-cisternal system surface, were found in all divisions of the rombencephalic cerebellum. We also report a new adult proliferation zone at the caudal-lateral border of the electrosensory lateral line lobe. All proliferation zones showed a heterogeneous cellular composition. The use of short (24 h) and long (30 day) chase periods revealed abundant fast cycling cells (potentially intermediate amplifiers), sparse slow cycling (potentially stem) cells, cells that appear to have entered a quiescent state, and cells that might correspond to migrating newborn neural cells. Their abundance and migration distance differed among proliferation zones: greater numbers and longer range and/or pace of migrating cells were associated with subpallial and cerebellar proliferation zones. PMID:25249943

  6. Expression and cellular localization of monocarboxylate transporters (MCT2, MCT7, and MCT8) along the cattle gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kirat, Doaa; Sallam, Khalid I; Kato, Seiyu

    2013-06-01

    Fourteen members of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT, SLC16) family have been identified, each having a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. The expression of monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 have been studied in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants; however, details of the expression of other MCT isoforms in the various parts of ruminant gastrointestinal tract are lacking. Reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction was used to study the regional distribution of MCT2, MCT3, and MCT5-MCT14 in the cattle gastrointestinal tract and verified the existence of MCT mRNA transcripts for MCT2, MCT3, MCT4, MCT7, MCT8, MCT9, MCT10, MCT13, and MCT14 in the ruminal and abomasal epithelia, mRNA transcripts for MCT2, MCT3, MCT4, MCT7, MCT8, MCT10, MCT13, and MCT14 in the jejunum, and mRNA transcripts for MCT2, MCT3, MCT4, MCT7, MCT8, MCT13, and MCT14 in the caecum of cattle. At the cellular level, immunohistochemical studies localized MCT2, MCT7, and MCT8 proteins in the cattle rumen, abomasum, jejunum, and caecum. This is the first study to detect the expression of various MCT isoforms in the gastrointestinal tract of a ruminant species. Our data suggest that these transporter proteins are involved in essential physiologic processes and are possible molecular targets for studying the regulation of the transport of short-chain monocarboxylates, aromatic amino acids, and thyroid hormones across the gastrointestinal tract of cattle.

  7. Cellular Expression, Trafficking, and Function of Two Isoforms of Human ULBP5/RAET1G

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Robert A.; Flack, Gillian; Warford, Anthony; Martínez-Borra, Jesús; Jafferji, Insiya; Traherne, James A.; Ohashi, Maki; Boyle, Louise H.; Barrow, Alexander D.; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Young, Neil T.; Trowsdale, John

    2009-01-01

    Background The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D is expressed on Natural Killer (NK) cells and subsets of T cells. NKG2D contributes to anti-tumour and anti-viral immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The ligands for NKG2D in humans are diverse proteins of the MIC and ULBP/RAET families that are upregulated on the surface of virally infected cells and tumours. Two splicing variants of ULBP5/RAET1G have been cloned previously, but not extensively characterised. Methodology/Principal Findings We pursue a number of approaches to characterise the expression, trafficking, and function of the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G. We show that both transcripts are frequently expressed in cell lines derived from epithelial cancers, and in primary breast cancers. The full-length transcript, RAET1G1, is predicted to encode a molecule with transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are unique amongst NKG2D ligands. Using specific anti-RAET1G1 antiserum to stain tissue microarrays we show that RAET1G1 expression is highly restricted in normal tissues. RAET1G1 was expressed at a low level in normal gastrointestinal epithelial cells in a similar pattern to MICA. Both RAET1G1 and MICA showed increased expression in the gut of patients with celiac disease. In contrast to healthy tissues the RAET1G1 antiserum stained a wide variety or different primary tumour sections. Both endogenously expressed and transfected RAET1G1 was mainly found inside the cell, with a minority of the protein reaching the cell surface. Conversely the truncated splicing variant of RAET1G2 was shown to encode a soluble molecule that could be secreted from cells. Secreted RAET1G2 was shown to downregulate NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells and hence may represent a novel tumour immune evasion strategy. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that the expression patterns of ULBP5RAET1G are very similar to the well-characterised NKG2D ligand, MICA. However the two isoforms of ULBP5/RAET1G have very different cellular

  8. Cellular Defense System Gene Expression Profiling of Human Whole Blood: Opportunities to Predict Health Benefits in Response to Diet12

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Janice E.

    2012-01-01

    Diet is a critical factor in the maintenance of human cellular defense systems, immunity, inflammation, redox regulation, metabolism, and DNA repair that ensure optimal health and reduce disease risk. Assessment of dietary modulation of cellular defense systems in humans has been limited due to difficulties in accessing target tissues. Notably, peripheral blood gene expression profiles associated with nonhematologic disease are detectable. Coupled with recent innovations in gene expression technologies, gene expression profiling of human blood to determine predictive markers associated with health status and dietary modulation is now a feasible prospect for nutrition scientists. This review focuses on cellular defense system gene expression profiling of human whole blood and the opportunities this presents, using recent technological advances, to predict health status and benefits conferred by diet. PMID:22797985

  9. Quality Controls in Cellular Immunotherapies: Rapid Assessment of Clinical Grade Dendritic Cells by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers. PMID:23147403

  10. Regulation of metallothionein gene expression and cellular zinc accumulation in a rat small intestinal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.M.; Cousins, R.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The effects of extracellular zinc concentration on metallothionein gene expression and cellular zinc accumulation were studied in IRD-98 cells. This is a non-transformed clonal line established by Negrel, et al. from fetal rat small intestine which possess characteristics of small bowel epithelial cells. Cells were maintained in DMEM and grown to confluent monolayers. The response to media zinc concentrations over the range of 5-150 {mu}mol/L was assessed. After 24 h in culture, cell zinc and metallothionein protein concentrations were significantly increased in cells provided higher levels of media zinc. Subsequent time course experiments showed that cells exposed to higher zinc levels had significant elevations in both metallothionein mRNA, peaking at 24 h, and metallothionein protein increasing through 48 h. Furthermore, cell zinc concentrations were significantly increased. At 48 h of culture, greater than 50% of the additional cellular zinc accumulated could be attributed to elevated metallothionein protein levels. These cells represent a zinc-responsive model to examine the mechanism of zinc uptake and transcellular transport by intestinal cells and the regulatory factors involved.

  11. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, Jessica A.; Rickel, Kirby E.; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A.; Carlisle, Gabriel B.; Nelson, Heidi J.; Cardillo, Andrew L.; Weber, Emily A.; Vitiello, Peter F.; Pearce, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  12. The expression pattern and cellular localisation of Myosin VI during the Drosophila melanogaster life cycle.

    PubMed

    Millo, Hadas; Bownes, Mary

    2007-02-01

    Myosin VI is a motor protein which is necessary for the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues during Drosophila development. The spatial and temporal expression of Myosin VI was examined by expressing a GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) tagged Myosin VI molecule (PGM), under the control of a Myosin VI-Gal4 line. PGM was present in tissues that were shown previously to express Myosin VI, such as the ovarian follicle epithelium, and the individualization complex; and in other tissues, including the trachea, the midgut, the salivary glands and the imaginal discs. The GFP-tagged Myosin V1 rescued the male sterile phenotype of Jaguar showing it is functional in vivo. Within individual cells, the role of the head and neck domain and the tail domain in targeting of the Myosin V1 molecule was examined by investigating the localisation of the separate domains tagged to GFP. In salivary glands and follicle cells the head and neck domains were concentrated in the cell nucleus, where the minus end of each actin filament is located. We found that the tail domain anchors the whole molecule outside of the nucleus. Similarly, in the individualization complex in the testes, the tail anchors the whole molecule to the base of the complex while the separated head with neck domain becomes scattered along the entire actin molecule suggesting the cellular location may be determined by cargo proteins that bind to the tail domain rather than by the movement of Myosin VI along the actin filaments.

  13. Molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a truncated dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Banks, Glen B; Combs, Ariana C; Chamberlain, Joel R; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2008-12-15

    Myotendinous strain injury is the most common injury of human skeletal muscles because the majority of muscle forces are transmitted through this region. Although the immediate response to strain injury is well characterized, the chronic response to myotendinous strain injury is less clear. Here we examined the molecular and cellular adaptations to chronic myotendinous strain injury in mdx mice expressing a microdystrophin transgene (microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23)). We found that muscles with myotendinous strain injury had an increased expression of utrophin and alpha7-integrin together with the dramatic restructuring of peripheral myofibrils into concentric rings. The sarcolemma of the microdystrophin(DeltaR4-R23)/mdx gastrocnemius muscles was highly protected from experimental lengthening contractions, better than wild-type muscles. We also found a positive correlation between myotendinous strain injury and ringed fibers in the HSA(LR) (human skeletal actin, long repeat) mouse model of myotonic dystrophy. We suggest that changes in protein expression and the formation of rings are adaptations to myotendinous strain injury that help to prevent muscle necrosis and retain the function of necessary muscles during injury, ageing and disease.

  14. Expression of galectin-8 on human endometrium: Molecular and cellular aspects

    PubMed Central

    Nikzad, Hossein; Haddad Kashani, Hamed; Kabir-Salmani, Maryam; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The up-regulation of galectin-3, galectin-9, and galectin-15 expression in the luminal and glandular epithelium was reported in preparation of the endometrium for embryo implantation at the midlutheal phase. However, no data was available regarding the expression and the distribution pattern of galectin-8 in the human endometrium during a regular menstrual cycle. Objective: The current study designed to investigate the expression and the distribution pattern of galectin-8, a beta-galactoside-binding lectin in the human endometrium during both proliferative and luteal phases of a regular menstrual cycle. Materials and Methods: Endometrial biopsies were obtained from the anterior wall of the uterine cavity of 16 women (proliferative phase: n=4, lutheal phase: n=12). All female patients with mean age of 37.5 years were fertile (range 25-45). Each biopsy was divided into three pieces; one piece was fixed in formaldehyde for light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The second portion fixed in glutaraldehyde for scanning electron microscopy and the third portion was prepared for western blot analysis. Results: Data of immunoblotting revealed a molecular weight of 34 kD band with high intensity in the lutheal phase samples. The immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated that galectin-8 expressed at a very low concentration during the proliferative phase, but showed a high expression throughout the lutheal phase. The expression of galectin-8 observed in luminal surface epithelium, glandular epithelium and stroma. Conclusion: The up-regulation of the expression of galectin-8 during lutheal phase may suggest galectin-8 as one of the potential molecular marker of the endometrial receptivity. These data propose that galectin-8 may play an important role during the initial events of human embryo implantation. PMID:24639695

  15. Differential regional and cellular distribution of TFF3 peptide in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Trübner, Kurt; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Werner

    2015-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the trefoil factor family (TFF) predominantly secreted by mucous epithelia. Minute amounts are also expressed in the immune system and the brain. In the latter, particularly the hypothalamo-pituitary axis has been investigated in detail in the past. Functionally, cerebral TFF3 has been reported to be involved in several processes such as fear, depression, learning and object recognition, and opiate addiction. Furthermore, TFF3 has been linked with neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and alcoholism). Here, using immunohistochemistry, a systematic survey of the TFF3 localization in the adult human brain is presented focusing on extrahypothalamic brain areas. In addition, the distribution of TFF3 in the developing human brain is described. Taken together, neurons were identified as the predominant cell type to express TFF3, but to different extent; TFF3 was particularly enriched in various midbrain and brain stem nuclei. Besides, TFF3 immunostaining staining was observed in oligodendroglia and the choroid plexus epithelium. The wide cerebral distribution should help to explain its multiple effects in the CNS.

  16. Cellular distribution of calcium current is unaltered during compensated hypertrophy in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Mark R; Orchard, Clive H; Harrison, Simon M

    2007-01-01

    Changes in cellular calcium (Ca(2+)) handling are thought to underlie the altered contraction that occurs during cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Recent work has highlighted the importance of t-tubules in the control of intracellular Ca(2+). The present study was performed to investigate whether changes in the distribution of I (Ca) between the surface and t-tubule membranes might contribute to the altered Ca(2+) handling observed during compensated hypertrophy in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Experiments were performed on ventricular myocytes isolated from 5-month-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats. Osmotic shock using formamide was used to disrupt the t-tubular system and the whole-cell patch clamp technique used to monitor I (Ca) in the presence and absence of t-tubules. Membrane capacitance and I (Ca) were greater in control SHR than WKY myocytes; following detubulation, cell capacitance and I (Ca) both decreased and were no longer significantly different in the two cell types. The density of I (Ca) was not significantly different in control SHR and WKY cells or in detubulated myocytes from the two species. These data suggest that the distribution of I (Ca) is unchanged in SHR myocytes compared to WKY controls; I (Ca) density in the t-tubules was 1.2-fold greater than in the sarcolemma in both strains. These data also imply that the increase in surface area in SHR myocytes is due principally to an increase in t-tubular area, which is accompanied by an approximately equivalent increase in I (Ca), so that the density of I (Ca) at the cell surface and in the t-tubules remains the same. These changes would be expected to retain cell function and synchronicity of Ca(2+) release in the SHR at this stage of compensated hypertrophy.

  17. Histochemical observation and cellular distribution of ascorbic acid in persimmon leaves.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, K; Hara, T; Fujita, M; Minari, Y; Tadokoro, T; Innami, S; Maekawa, A

    1998-02-01

    This study was carried out to resolve the discrepancy of data for the proportion of ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid in persimmon leaves at the final stage of the season and to clarify their cellular distributions using histochemical and biochemical techniques. Fresh persimmon leaves were collected and used on July 31, September 5 and October 7, 1996. Ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid in subcellular fractions were determined by the HPLC method that was found to be the most reliable for separation. The percent of dehydroascorbic acid in the total leaves was found to be almost constant (between 32 and 37%) in all preparations tested. In all preparations, more than 90% of the ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid was found in the soluble fraction. The histochemical detection of ascorbic acid and an electron micrograph of persimmon leaf cells showed that the reactive color, after the reduction of silver nitrate under acidic conditions, in the leaves of all three preparations was mainly found on the face side of columned-type palisade parenchyma cells where chloroplasts were not rich and large vacuoles were seen. On the inner side of the palisade parenchyma cells where chloroplasts were the richest, only weak color development was observed. This study demonstrates that the percent of dehydroascorbic acid in persimmon leaves did not exceed 40% at least until October 7. It also shows that in persimmon leaf cells, ascorbic acid is mainly localized in the cytosol of palisade parenchyma tissue cells where large vacuoles are seen.

  18. In silico analyses of dystrophin Dp40 cellular distribution, nuclear export signals and structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Herrera, Alejandro; Aragón, Jorge; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa Ma; Bazán, Ma Luisa; Soid-Raggi, Gabriela; Ceja, Víctor; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Alemán, Víctor; Depardón, Francisco; Montañez, Cecilia

    2015-09-01

    Dystrophin Dp40 is the shortest protein encoded by the DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy) gene. This protein is unique since it lacks the C-terminal end of dystrophins. In this data article, we describe the subcellular localization, nuclear export signals and the three-dimensional structure modeling of putative Dp40 proteins using bioinformatics tools. The Dp40 wild type protein was predicted as a cytoplasmic protein while the Dp40n4 was predicted to be nuclear. Changes L93P and L170P are involved in the nuclear localization of Dp40n4 protein. A close analysis of Dp40 protein scored that amino acids (93)LEQEHNNLV(101) and (168)LLLHDSIQI(176) could function as NES sequences and the scores are lost in Dp40n4. In addition, the changes L93/170P modify the tertiary structure of putative Dp40 mutants. The analysis showed that changes of residues 93 and 170 from leucine to proline allow the nuclear localization of Dp40 proteins. The data described here are related to the research article entitled "EF-hand domains are involved in the differential cellular distribution of dystrophin Dp40" (J. Aragón et al. Neurosci. Lett. 600 (2015) 115-120) [1].

  19. In silico analyses of dystrophin Dp40 cellular distribution, nuclear export signals and structure modeling

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Herrera, Alejandro; Aragón, Jorge; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa Ma.; Bazán, Ma. Luisa; Soid-Raggi, Gabriela; Ceja, Víctor; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Alemán, Víctor; Depardón, Francisco; Montañez, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophin Dp40 is the shortest protein encoded by the DMD (Duchenne muscular dystrophy) gene. This protein is unique since it lacks the C-terminal end of dystrophins. In this data article, we describe the subcellular localization, nuclear export signals and the three-dimensional structure modeling of putative Dp40 proteins using bioinformatics tools. The Dp40 wild type protein was predicted as a cytoplasmic protein while the Dp40n4 was predicted to be nuclear. Changes L93P and L170P are involved in the nuclear localization of Dp40n4 protein. A close analysis of Dp40 protein scored that amino acids 93LEQEHNNLV101 and 168LLLHDSIQI176 could function as NES sequences and the scores are lost in Dp40n4. In addition, the changes L93/170P modify the tertiary structure of putative Dp40 mutants. The analysis showed that changes of residues 93 and 170 from leucine to proline allow the nuclear localization of Dp40 proteins. The data described here are related to the research article entitled “EF-hand domains are involved in the differential cellular distribution of dystrophin Dp40” (J. Aragón et al. Neurosci. Lett. 600 (2015) 115–120) [1]. PMID:26217814

  20. Distribution of elements in individual blood cells in metabolic disorders at the cellular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Erland; Lindh, Ulf

    1985-08-01

    In comparison with controls neutrophil granulocytes from Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (INCL), Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia (L) and Aplastic Anemia (AA) displayed significant alterations in essential and non-essential elements which might be interpreted as fingerprints of these deseases. The neutrophils from RA patients displayed alterations in the concentrations of iron, calcium, strontium, manganese, zinc and copper. INCL displayed alterations in the concentrations of iron and copper but in the INCL disease the iron concentration was about 2 times higher than in RA. In leukemia, aluminium was observed but not in the controls (< 0.5 μg/ g). The zinc concentration was lowered in leukemia. Aplastic anemia displayed alterations in zirconium, arsenic, molybdenum, iron and zinc. The platelets from RA, INCL, L and AA patients also displayed alterations in the elemental profiles. The platelets from AA patients displayed a unique elemental distribution of arsenic, zirconium and molybdenum. The elemental profiles of the thrombocytes and neutrophils might be used as a complement in the diagnosis of the examined diseases and in therapy the elemental profile might be used to monitor drugs at the cellular level.

  1. Distribution of the cellular prion protein in the central nervous system of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2009-12-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrP), a cell membrane-bound glycoprotein mainly located in the dendrites and axons of the central nervous system (CNS), is responsible for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in mammals. PrP genes are widely conserved in vertebrates. In birds, the presence of PrP mRNA has been confirmed in neurons of the chicken brain, but localization of the protein remains to be determined. In the present study, we demonstrated the regional distribution of PrP in the CNS of adult chickens by immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody that recognizes chicken PrP 161-164. Immunoreactivity was observed in the neuropil, but not in neuronal somata or glial cells. It was preferentially intense in the olfactory bulb, the dorsal thalamus, the hypothalamus, and most regions of the telencephalon. Immunostaining became less intense toward the brainstem, but many nuclei were immunoreactive. Among brainstem nuclei, moderate immunostaining was observed in the nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, and substantia gelatinosa Rolandi. The cerebellar cortex was devoid of PrP immunoreactivity. The dorsal horn in the spinal cord was strongly immunoreactive. In situ hybridization with two probes of the C-terminal portion demonstrated localization of PrP mRNA in neurons of the brain and spinal cord. These findings suggest that PrP in the chicken CNS is localized in the dendrites and axons of neurons and that it is associated with certain sensory systems.

  2. A note on oligonucleotide expression values not being normally distributed.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Johanna; Wilson, Jason

    2009-07-01

    Novel techniques for analyzing microarray data are constantly being developed. Though many of the methods contribute to biological discoveries, inability to properly evaluate the novel techniques limits their ability to advance science. Because the underlying distribution of microarray data is unknown, novel methods are typically tested against the assumed normal distribution. However, microarray data are not, in fact, normally distributed, and assuming so can have misleading consequences. Using an Affymetrix technical replicate spike-in data set, we show that oligonucleotide expression values are not normally distributed for any of the standard methods for calculating expression values. The resulting data tend to have a large proportion of skew and heavy tailed genes. Additionally, we show that standard methods can give unexpected and misleading results when the data are not well approximated by the normal distribution. Robust methods are therefore recommended when analyzing microarray data. Additionally, new techniques should be evaluated with skewed and/or heavy-tailed data distributions.

  3. A Stable HeLa Cell Line That Inducibly Expresses Poliovirus 2Apro: Effects on Cellular and Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Angel; Feduchi, Elena; Carrasco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2Apro) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2Apro induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2Apro cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2Apro, prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2Apro still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2Apro. Moreover, synthesis of 2Apro in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2Apro-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2Apro expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2Apro functions, to complement poliovirus 2Apro mutants, and to test antiviral compounds. PMID:10666269

  4. Oscillations in probability distributions for stochastic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosyan, K. G. Hu, Chin-Kun

    2014-05-28

    The phenomenon of oscillations in probability distribution functions of number of components is found for a model of stochastic gene expression. It takes place in cases of low levels of molecules or strong intracellular noise. The oscillations distinguish between more probable even and less probable odd number of particles. The even-odd symmetry restores as the number of molecules increases with the probability distribution function tending to Poisson distribution. We discuss the possibility of observation of the phenomenon in gene, protein, and mRNA expression experiments.

  5. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to altered expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation and development.

    PubMed

    Feilotter, Harriet E; Michel, Claire; Uy, Paolo; Bathurst, Lauren; Davey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous) BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes.

  6. Cellular localization of human p53 expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effect of NLSI deletion.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Delahodde, Agnès; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2011-07-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, over-expression of the human wtp53 leads to growth inhibition and cell death on minimal medium. In the present work, we showed that deletion of the nuclear localization signal (NLSI) of p53 restores the yeast growth. In this heterologous context, the level of p53∆NLSI was low and the protein mainly located in the cytoplasm while the wtp53 was observed in both the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Interestingly, the wtp53 protein was observed in the mitochondria, whereas the p53∆NLSI protein failed to localize in mitochondria. Moreover, mitochondrial morphology defect and release of cytochrome c in the cytosol were noticed only in the yeast strain expressing the wtp53. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the human wtp53 is active in S. cerevisiae probably through dependent and independent transcriptional mechanisms leading to cell death. The deletion of the NLSI sequence decreases p53 nuclear translocation as well as its mitochondrial localization and consequently its effect on yeast growth.

  7. FAT/CD36 expression alone is insufficient to enhance cellular uptake of oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Eyre, Nicholas S.; Cleland, Leslie G.; Mayrhofer, Graham

    2008-06-06

    Fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is one of several proteins implicated in receptor-mediated uptake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). We have tested whether levels of FAT/CD36 correlate with cellular oleic acid import, using a Tet-Off inducible transfected CHO cell line. Consistent with our previous findings, FAT/CD36 was enriched in lipid raft-derived detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) that also contained caveolin-1, the marker protein of caveolae. Furthermore in transfected cells, plasma membrane FAT/CD36 co-localized extensively with the lipid raft-enriched ganglioside GM1, and partially with a caveolin-1-EGFP fusion protein. Nevertheless, even at high levels of expression, FAT/CD36 did not affect uptake of oleic acid. We propose that the ability of FAT/CD36 to mediate enhanced uptake of LCFAs is dependent on co-expression of other proteins or factors that are lacking in CHO cells.

  8. Replication-dependent downregulation of cellular angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 protein expression by human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Dijkman, Ronald; Jebbink, Maarten F; Deijs, Martin; Milewska, Aleksandra; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Buelow, Elena; van der Bijl, Anna; van der Hoek, Lia

    2012-09-01

    Like severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 employs angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a receptor for cellular entry. SARS-CoV infection causes robust downregulation of cellular ACE2 expression levels and it has been suggested that the SARS-CoV effect on ACE2 is involved in the severity of disease. We investigated whether cellular ACE2 downregulation occurs at optimal replication conditions of HCoV-NL63 infection. The expression of the homologue of ACE2, the ACE protein not used as a receptor by HCoV-NL63, was measured as a control. A specific decrease for ACE2 protein level was observed when HCoV-NL63 was cultured at 34 °C. Culturing the virus at the suboptimal temperature of 37 °C resulted in low replication of the virus and the effect on ACE2 expression was lost. We conclude that the decline of ACE2 expression is dependent on the efficiency of HCoV-NL63 replication, and that HCoV-NL63 and SARS-CoV both affect cellular ACE2 expression during infection.

  9. Cellular and intracellular distribution of growth hormone in the adult chicken testis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, C G; Palma, L; Carranza, M; Harvey, S; Arámburo, C; Luna, M

    2011-07-01

    Endocrine actions of growth hormone (GH) have been implicated during the development of adult testicular function in several mammalian species, and recently intracrine, autocrine, and paracrine effects have been proposed for locally expressed GH. Previous reports have shown the distribution of GH mRNA and the molecular heterogeneity of GH protein in both adult chicken testes and vas deferens. This study provides evidence of the presence and distribution of GH and its receptor (GHR) during all stages of spermatogenesis in adult chicken testes. This hormone and its receptor are not restricted to the cytoplasm; they are also found in the nuclei of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids. The pattern of GH isoforms was characterized in the different, isolated germ cell subpopulations, and the major molecular variant in all subpopulations was 17 kDa GH, as reported in other chicken extra-pituitary tissues. Another molecular variant, the 29 kDa moiety, was found mainly in the enriched spermatocyte population, suggesting that it acts at specific developmental stages. The co-localization of GH with the proliferative cell nuclear antigen PCNA (a DNA replication marker present in spermatogonial cells) was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. These results show for the first time that GH and GHR are present in the nuclei of adult chicken germinal cells, and suggest that GH could participate in proliferation and differentiation during the complex process of spermatogenesis.

  10. Adrenoceptors in Brain: Cellular Gene Expression and Effects on Astrocytic Metabolism and [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Lovatt, Ditte; Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Recent in vivo studies have established astrocytes as a major target for locus coeruleus activation (Bekar et al., Cereb. Cortex 18, 2789–2795), renewing interest in cell culture studies on noradrenergic effects on astrocytes in primary cultures and calling for additional information about the expression of adrenoceptor subtypes on different types of brain cells. In the present communication, mRNA expression of α1-, α2- and β-adrenergic receptors and their subtypes was determined in freshly-isolated, cell marker-defined populations of astrocytes, NG2-positive cells, microglia, endothelial cells, and Thy1-positive neurons (mainly glutamatergic projection neurons) in murine cerebral cortex. Immediately after dissection of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex of 10–12-week-old transgenic mice, which combined each cell-type marker with a specific fluorescent signal, the tissue was digested, triturated and centrifuged, yielding a solution of dissociated cells of all types, which were separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). mRNA expression in each cell fraction was determined by microarray analysis. α1A-Receptors were unequivocally expressed in astrocytes and NG2-positive cells, but absent in other cell types, and α1B-receptors were not expressed in any cell population. Among α2-receptors only α2A-receptors were expressed, unequivocally in astrocytes and NG-positive cells, tentatively in microglia and questionably in Thy1-positive neurons and endothelial cells. β1-Receptors were unequivocally expressed in astrocytes, tentatively in microglia, and questionably in neurons and endothelial cells, whereas β2-adrenergic receptors showed tentative expression in neurons and astrocytes and unequivocal expression in other cell types. This distribution was supported by immunochemical data and its relevance established by previous studies in well-differentiated primary cultures of mouse astrocytes, showing that stimulation of α2-adrenoceptors

  11. Acute changes in cellular zinc alters zinc uptake rates prior to zinc transporter gene expression in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Holland, Tai C; Killilea, David W; Shenvi, Swapna V; King, Janet C

    2015-12-01

    A coordinated network of zinc transporters and binding proteins tightly regulate cellular zinc levels. Canonical responses to zinc availability are thought to be mediated by changes in gene expression of key zinc transporters. We investigated the temporal relationships of actual zinc uptake with patterns of gene expression in membrane-bound zinc transporters in the human immortalized T lymphocyte Jurkat cell line. Cellular zinc levels were elevated or reduced with exogenous zinc sulfate or N,N,N',N-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), respectively. Excess zinc resulted in a rapid 44 % decrease in the rate of zinc uptake within 10 min. After 120 min, the expression of metallothionein (positive control) increased, as well as the zinc exporter, ZnT1; however, the expression of zinc importers did not change during this time period. Zinc chelation with TPEN resulted in a rapid twofold increase in the rate of zinc uptake within 10 min. After 120 min, the expression of ZnT1 decreased, while again the expression of zinc importers did not change. Overall, zinc transporter gene expression kinetics did not match actual changes in cellular zinc uptake with exogenous zinc or TPEN treatments. This suggests zinc transporter regulation may be the initial response to changes in zinc within Jurkat cells.

  12. Salinity and temperature variations reflecting on cellular PCNA, IGF-I and II expressions, body growth and muscle cellularity of a freshwater fish larvae.

    PubMed

    Martins, Y S; Melo, R M C; Campos-Junior, P H A; Santos, J C E; Luz, R K; Rizzo, E; Bazzoli, N

    2014-06-01

    The present study assessed the influence of salinity and temperature on body growth and on muscle cellularity of Lophiosilurus alexaxdri vitelinic larvae. Slightly salted environments negatively influenced body growth of freshwater fish larvae and we observed that those conditions notably act as an environmental influencer on muscle growth and on local expression of hypertrophia and hypeplasia markers (IGFs and PCNA). Furthermore, we could see that salinity tolerance for NaCl 4gl(-)(1) diminishes with increasing temperature, evidenced by variation in body and muscle growth, and by irregular morphology of the lateral skeletal muscle of larvae. We saw that an increase of both PCNA and autocrine IGF-II are correlated to an increase in fibre numbers and fibre diameter as the temperature increases and salinity diminishes. On the other hand, autocrine IGF-I follows the opposite way to the other biological parameters assessed, increasing as salinity increases and temperature diminishes, showing that this protein did not participate in muscle cellularity, but participating in molecular/cellular repair. Therefore, slightly salted environments may provide adverse conditions that cause some obstacles to somatic growth of this species, suggesting some osmotic expenditure with a salinity increment.

  13. Comparative expression and tissue distribution analyses of astacin-like squid metalloprotease in squid and cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Takuya; Asakura, Masanori; Okiyama, Keisuke; Honda, Michiyo; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2008-01-01

    Astacin-like squid metalloprotease (ALSM) is a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases. In the present study, we investigated the expression and tissue distribution of ALSM in bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) and golden cuttlefish (Sepia esculenta). Myosin heavy chain hydrolysis tests showed ALSM-I-like activity in both species. We isolated partial cDNA clones showing high sequence similarity to ALSM-I and -III, suggesting that ALSM is common to squid and cuttlefish. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ALSMs are classified into two clades: ALSM-I forms one clade, and ALSM-II and -III form the other. ALSM was expressed in several tissues in bigfin reef squid, though expression was confined to the liver in cuttlefish. ALSMs are distributed in digestive organs but not in mantle muscle of squid and cuttlefish. Immunofluorescence analysis further showed that cellular localization of ALSM is evident not only in hepatic cells but also in pancreatic cells of bigfin reef squid. Thus, ALSM is commonly expressed in squid and cuttlefish, but its expression levels and distribution are distinct.

  14. Adult Drosophila melanogaster evolved for antibacterial defense invest in infection-induced expression of both humoral and cellular immunity genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While the transcription of innate immunity genes in response to bacterial infection has been well-characterised in the Drosophila model, we recently demonstrated the capacity for such transcription to evolve in flies selected for improved antibacterial defense. Here we use this experimental system to examine how insects invest in constitutive versus infection-induced transcription of immunity genes. These two strategies carry with them different consequences with respect to energetic and pleiotropic costs and may be more or less effective in improving defense depending on whether the genes contribute to humoral or cellular aspects of immunity. Findings Contrary to expectation we show that selection preferentially increased the infection-induced expression of both cellular and humoral immunity genes. Given their functional roles, infection induced increases in expression were expected for the humoral genes, while increases in constitutive expression were expected for the cellular genes. We also report a restricted ability to improve transcription of immunity genes that is on the order of 2-3 fold regardless of total transcription level of the gene. Conclusions The evolved increases in infection-induced expression of the cellular genes may result from specific cross talk with humoral pathways or from generalised strategies for enhancing immunity gene transcription. A failure to see improvements in constitutive expression of the cellular genes suggests either that increases might come at too great a cost or that patterns of expression in adults are decoupled from the larval phase where increases would be most effective. The similarity in fold change increase across all immunity genes may suggest a shared mechanism for the evolution of increased transcription in small, discrete units such as duplication of cis-regulatory elements. PMID:21859495

  15. Structural and biochemical characterization of the C₃-C₄ intermediate Brassica gravinae and relatives, with particular reference to cellular distribution of Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of its CO(2) compensation concentration, Brassica gravinae Ten. has been reported to be a C(3)-C(4) intermediate. This study investigated the structural and biochemical features of photosynthetic metabolism in B. gravinae. The cellular distribution of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was also examined in B. gravinae, B. napus L. (C(3)), Raphanus sativus L. (C(3)), and Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC. (C(3)-C(4)) by immunogold electron microscopy to elucidate Rubisco expression during the evolution from C(3) to C(3)-C(4) intermediate plants. The bundle sheath (BS) cells of B. gravinae contained centrifugally located chloroplasts as well as centripetally located chloroplasts and mitochondria. Glycine decarboxylase P-protein was localized in the BS mitochondria. Brassica gravinae had low C(4) enzyme activities and high activities of Rubisco and photorespiratory enzymes, suggesting that it reduces photorespiratory CO(2) loss by the glycine shuttle. In B. gravinae, the labelling density of Rubisco was higher in the mesophyll chloroplasts than in the BS chloroplasts. A similar cellular pattern was found in other Brassicaceae species. These data demonstrate that, during the evolution from C(3) to C(3)-C(4) intermediate plants, the intercellular pattern of Rubisco expression did not change greatly, although the amount of chloroplasts in the BS cells increased. It also appears that intracellular variation in Rubisco distribution may occur within the BS cells of B. gravinae.

  16. Hypoxia-induced expression of cellular prion protein improves the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jun Hee; Yoon, Yeo Min; Yun, Chul Won; Noh, Hyunjin; Lee, Sang Hun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ‘adult' multipotent cells that promote regeneration of injured tissues in vivo. However, differences in oxygenation levels between normoxic culture conditions (21% oxygen) and both the MSC niche (2–8% oxygen) and ischemic injury-induced oxidative stress conditions in vivo have resulted in low efficacy of MSC therapies in both pre-clinical and clinical studies. To address this issue, we examined the effectiveness of hypoxia preconditioning (2% oxygen) for enhancing the bioactivity and tissue-regenerative potential of adipose-derived MSCs. Hypoxia preconditioning enhanced the proliferative potential of MSCs by promoting the expression of normal cellular prion protein (PrPC). In particular, hypoxia preconditioning-mediated MSC proliferation was regulated by PrPC-dependent JAK2 and STAT3 activation. In addition, hypoxia preconditioning-induced PrPC regulated superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, and inhibited oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via inactivation of cleaved caspase-3. In a murine hindlimb ischemia model, hypoxia preconditioning enhanced the survival and proliferation of transplanted MSCs, ultimately resulting in improved functional recovery of the ischemic tissue, including the ratio of blood flow perfusion, limb salvage, and neovascularization. These results suggest that Hypo-MSC offer a therapeutic strategy for accelerated neovasculogenesis in ischemic diseases, and that PrPC comprises a potential target for MSC-based therapies. PMID:27711081

  17. Three-dimensional morphology and gene expression in the Drosophila blastoderm at cellular resolution I: data acquisition pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Keränen, Soile VE; Fowlkes, Charless C; Simirenko, Lisa; Weber, Gunther H; DePace, Angela H; Henriquez, Clara; Kaszuba, David W; Hamann, Bernd; Eisen, Michael B; Malik, Jitendra; Sudar, Damir; Biggin, Mark D; Knowles, David W

    2006-01-01

    Background To model and thoroughly understand animal transcription networks, it is essential to derive accurate spatial and temporal descriptions of developing gene expression patterns with cellular resolution. Results Here we describe a suite of methods that provide the first quantitative three-dimensional description of gene expression and morphology at cellular resolution in whole embryos. A database containing information derived from 1,282 embryos is released that describes the mRNA expression of 22 genes at multiple time points in the Drosophila blastoderm. We demonstrate that our methods are sufficiently accurate to detect previously undescribed features of morphology and gene expression. The cellular blastoderm is shown to have an intricate morphology of nuclear density patterns and apical/basal displacements that correlate with later well-known morphological features. Pair rule gene expression stripes, generally considered to specify patterning only along the anterior/posterior body axis, are shown to have complex changes in stripe location, stripe curvature, and expression level along the dorsal/ventral axis. Pair rule genes are also found to not always maintain the same register to each other. Conclusion The application of these quantitative methods to other developmental systems will likely reveal many other previously unknown features and provide a more rigorous understanding of developmental regulatory networks. PMID:17184546

  18. Cellular protein and mRNA expression of β1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit in brain, skeletal muscle and placenta.

    PubMed

    Aishah, Atqiya; Hinton, Tina; Machaalani, Rita

    2017-01-30

    The β1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit is a muscle type subunit of this family and as such, is found predominantly in muscle. Recent reports document its expression in other tissues and cell lines including adrenal glands, carcinomas, lung and brain. However, the majority of studies were of tissue lysates, thus the cellular distribution was not determined. This study aimed to determine the cellular distribution of the β1 nAChR subunit in the brain, at both the mRNA and protein levels, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively, and to compare it to two muscle tissue types, skeletal and placenta. Tissue was formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (all tissue types) and frozen (placenta) from humans. Additional control tissue from the piglet and mouse brain were also studied, as was mRNA for the α3 nAChR and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 1 (NR1) subunit. We found no β1 nAChR subunit mRNA expression in the human and piglet brain despite strong protein expression. Some signal was seen in the mouse brain but considered inconclusive given the probes designed were not of 100% homology to the mouse. In the skeletal muscle and placenta tissues, β1 nAChR subunit mRNA expression was prominent and mirrored protein expression. No α3 nAChR or NR1 mRNA was seen in the skeletal muscle, as expected, although both subunit mRNAs were present in the placenta. This study concludes that further experiments are required to conclusively state that the β1 nAChR subunit is expressed in the human, piglet and mouse brain.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of phylogeny, expression profile and sub-cellular localization of SKP1-Like genes in wild tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YueQin; Wang, CuiPing; Lin, QingFang; Gao, FengHua; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Min; Lin, YueHui; Ma, QingHu; Hua, XueJun

    2015-09-01

    SKP1 is a core component of SCF complex, a major type of E3 ubiquitin ligase catalyzing the last step in ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway. In present study, SKP1 gene family in Solanum pimpinellifolium (SSK), a wild species of tomato, was investigated. A total of 19 SSK genes were identified through homologous search. Their chromosomal locations, gene structures, phylogeny, expression profiles, sub-cellular localizations and protein-protein interaction patterns with putative F-box proteins were analyzed in detail. The high homology and similar expression patterns among clustered SSK genes in chromosome suggested that they may have evolved from duplication events and are functionally redundant. Sub-cellular localization indicated that most of the SSK proteins are distributed in both cytosol and nucleus, except for SSK8, which is detected in cytosol only. Tissue-specific expression patterns suggested that many SSK genes may be involved in tomato fruit development. Furthermore, several SSK genes were found to be responsive to heat stress and salicylic acid treatment. Based on phylogenetic analysis, expression profiles and protein interaction property, we proposed that tomato SSK1 and SSK2 might have similar function to ASK1 and ASK2 in Arabidopsis.

  20. Baicalin increases developmental competence of mouse embryos in vitro by inhibiting cellular apoptosis and modulating HSP70 and DNMT expression

    PubMed Central

    QI, Xiaonan; LI, Huatao; CONG, Xia; WANG, Xin; JIANG, Zhongling; CAO, Rongfeng; TIAN, Wenru

    2016-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis has been effectively used in Chinese traditional medicine to prevent miscarriages. However, little information is available on its mechanism of action. This study is designed specifically to reveal how baicalin, the main effective ingredient of S. baicalensis, improves developmental competence of embryos in vitro, using the mouse as a model. Mouse pronuclear embryos were cultured in KSOM medium supplemented with (0, 2, 4 and 8 μg/ml) baicalin. The results demonstrated that in vitro culture conditions significantly decreased the blastocyst developmental rate and blastocyst quality, possibly due to increased cellular stress and apoptosis. Baicalin (4 µg/ml) significantly increased 2- and 4-cell cleavage rates, morula developmental rate, and blastocyst developmental rate and cell number of in vitro-cultured mouse embryos. Moreover, baicalin increased the expression of Gja1, Cdh1, Bcl-2, and Dnmt3a genes, decreased the expression of Dnmt1 gene, and decreased cellular stress and apoptosis as it decreased the expression of HSP70, CASP3, and BAX and increased BCL-2 expression in blastocysts cultured in vitro. In conclusion, baicalin improves developmental competence of in vitro-cultured mouse embryos through inhibition of cellular apoptosis and HSP70 expression, and improvement of DNA methylation. PMID:27478062

  1. Cellular and biological evaluation and diagnostic immunohistochemistry of cytokeratin 15/19 expression in distinguishing cutaneous basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ziari, Katayoun; Behdad, Behnoosh; Mohammadshahi, Ali; Pirasteh, Hamid Reza; Sharifi, Mohammad Davood; Dadpay, Masoomeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have investigated the expression of proliferative markers, but little is known about the expression of cytokeratin 15 and 19 in different histological subtypes of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We conducted cellular, biological, clinicopathological and immunohistochemical analysis on the manifestations of 8 BCC by hematoxylin and eosin stain (H&E) staining and immunohistochemistry and reviewed relevant literature. Microscopically, the tumor cells were multiple remarkable foci of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis with large pleomorphic nuclei and scant cytoplasm together with peripheral palisading and forming solid nests. Furthermore, the most tumors were composed of highly cellular areas with a homogenous population of round, ovoid and spindle cells, hyperchromatic nuclei, high cellular pleomorphism, high mitotic index and various morphologic patterns. Moreover, the tumors displayed an invasive growth, with positive expression of Cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and negative expression of CK15. Our study revealed that the expression of CK19 was associated with progression and invasion in cases with BCC and immunohistochemistry is indispensable in distinguishing this tumor from other types of cutaneous carcinoma. To our best knowledge, it may be a considerable biomarker to assess invasiveness of cutaneous-surface BCC and to guide clinical management of such tumors.

  2. Exact Distributions for Stochastic Gene Expression Models with Bursting and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2014-12-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression can give rise to fluctuations in protein levels and lead to phenotypic variation across a population of genetically identical cells. Recent experiments indicate that bursting and feedback mechanisms play important roles in controlling noise in gene expression and phenotypic variation. A quantitative understanding of the impact of these factors requires analysis of the corresponding stochastic models. However, for stochastic models of gene expression with feedback and bursting, exact analytical results for protein distributions have not been obtained so far. Here, we analyze a model of gene expression with bursting and feedback regulation and obtain exact results for the corresponding protein steady-state distribution. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of bursting and feedback in noise regulation and optimization. Furthermore, for a specific choice of parameters, the system studied maps on to a two-state biochemical switch driven by a bursty input noise source. The analytical results derived provide quantitative insights into diverse cellular processes involving noise in gene expression and biochemical switching.

  3. Distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in cellular models and C9orf72 mutation cases suggests link to transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Schludi, Martin H; May, Stephanie; Grässer, Friedrich A; Rentzsch, Kristin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Küpper, Clemens; Klopstock, Thomas; Arzberger, Thomas; Edbauer, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    A massive expansion of a GGGGCC repeat upstream of the C9orf72 coding region is the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Despite its intronic localization and lack of a canonical start codon, both strands are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins: poly-GA, poly-GP, poly-GR, poly-PR and poly-PA. To address conflicting findings on the predominant toxicity of the different DPR species in model systems, we compared the expression pattern of the DPR proteins in rat primary neurons and postmortem brain and spinal cord of C9orf72 mutation patients. Only poly-GA overexpression closely mimicked the p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions commonly observed for all DPR proteins in patients. In contrast, overexpressed poly-GR and poly-PR formed nucleolar p62-negative inclusions. In patients, most of the less common neuronal intranuclear DPR inclusions were para-nucleolar and p62 positive. Neuronal nucleoli in C9orf72 cases showed normal size and morphology regardless of the presence of poly-GR and poly-PR inclusions arguing against widespread nucleolar stress, reported in cellular models. Colocalization of para-nucleolar DPR inclusions with heterochromatin and a marker of transcriptional repression (H3K9me2) indicates a link to gene transcription. In contrast, we detected numerous intranuclear DPR inclusions not associated with nucleolar structures in ependymal and subependymal cells. In patients, neuronal inclusions of poly-GR, poly-GP and the poly-GA interacting protein Unc119 were less abundant than poly-GA inclusions, but showed similar regional and subcellular distribution. Regardless of neurodegeneration, all inclusions were most abundant in neocortex, hippocampus and thalamus, with few inclusions in brain stem and spinal cord. In the granular cell layer of the cerebellum, poly-GA and Unc119 inclusions were significantly more abundant in cases with FTLD than in cases with MND and FTLD/MND. Poly

  4. Measuring Cellular-scale Nutrient Distribution in Algal Biofilms with Synchrotron Confocal Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    J Murdock; W Dodds; J Reffner; D Wetzel

    2011-12-31

    The microscope and infrared spectrometer are two of the most useful tools for the study of biological materials, and their combined analytical power far exceeds the sum of the two. Performing molecular spectroscopy through a microscope superimposes chemical information onto the physical microstructure obtained from the optical microscope when visible and infrared information are collected under the same conditions. The instrument developments that enable current infrared microspectroscopic studies began with the introduction of the first research-grade infrared microscope, patented in 1989 (1). By 1993, published reports using this method to determine macroalgae (seaweed) cell-wall composition appeared (2-4). Since these initial reports, the use of infrared microspectroscopy (IMS) in microalgal (single cells or groups of cells) research has grown. Primarily, cultured algae have been used to hone IMS methodology and evaluate its capabilities in algal research (5-8). Studies involving natural, mixed species assemblages, which can utilize the spatial resolution potential of this technique fully are rare (9-11). For instance, in a recent review of IMS microalgal ecological research (12), only 3 of the 29 peer-reviewed publications investigated natural algal assemblages. Both thermal and synchrotron infrared sources provide a resolution capable of measuring individual algae in mixed species assemblages, and each has its advantages. For example, thermal source IMS is more accessible, allowing more samples to be analyzed than synchrotron IMS. However, synchrotron IMS with confocal masking provides superior resolution, which can be critical in isolating small or contiguous cells. Algal ecology is the study of the interaction between algae and their environment. Infrared microspectroscopy addresses a major logistical problem in this field, obtaining species-specific cellular biochemical information from natural, mixed-species assemblages (11,12). Benthic (bottom

  5. Interaction of HSP20 with a viral RdRp changes its sub-cellular localization and distribution pattern in plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Xiang, Cong-Ying; Yang, Jian; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Heng-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) perform a fundamental role in protecting cells against a wide array of stresses but their biological function during viral infection remains unknown. Rice stripe virus (RSV) causes a severe disease of rice in Eastern Asia. OsHSP20 and its homologue (NbHSP20) were used as baits in yeast two-hybrid (YTH) assays to screen an RSV cDNA library and were found to interact with the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of RSV. Interactions were confirmed by pull-down and BiFC assays. Further analysis showed that the N-terminus (residues 1–296) of the RdRp was crucial for the interaction between the HSP20s and viral RdRp and responsible for the alteration of the sub-cellular localization and distribution pattern of HSP20s in protoplasts of rice and epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana. This is the first report that a plant virus or a viral protein alters the expression pattern or sub-cellular distribution of sHSPs. PMID:26359114

  6. Distribution of LCA protein subspecies and the cellular adhesion molecules LFA-1, ICAM-1 and p150,95 within human foetal thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, J E; Jones, D B

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of leucocyte common antigen (LCA) protein subspecies and the cellular adhesion molecules LFA-1 (CD11a), ICAM-1 (CD54) and p150,95 (CD11c) has been established within frozen sections of human foetal thymus. Whereas over 95% of foetal cortical thymocytes and approximately 85% of medullary thymocytes were CD45RO positive, CD45RA was only expressed by approximately 29% of medullary thymocytes. The majority of foetal thymocytes also expressed CD11a, whereas CD54 was expressed by thymic epithelial and accessory cells and also apparently by some cortical thymocytes adjacent to epithelial cells. The distribution of CD54 and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule HLA-DR, demonstrated with a monoclonal antibody to a monomorphic determinant, was similar. The CD11c molecule was present on a population of dendritic-type accessory cells, but was absent from the large, scavenger, KiM8-positive macrophages occurring throughout the thymic cortex. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1973681

  7. Fat depot-specific differences in pref-1 gene expression and adipocyte cellularity between Wagyu and Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoya; Higuchi, Mikito; Nakanishi, Naoto

    2014-03-07

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (pref-1) is specifically expressed in preadipocytes and acts as a gatekeeper of adipogenesis by maintaining the preadipocyte state and preventing adipocyte differentiation. We hypothesized that the breed differences of adipogenic capacity in cattle could be explained by the expression level of pref-1. In this experiment, we studied the expression level of the pref-1 gene and adipocyte cellularity in subcutaneous and mesenteric adipose tissues of Japanese Black (Wagyu) and Holstein fattening cattle. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, there were no significant differences in the pref-1 gene expression levels and adipocyte sizes between the breeds. In contrast, the expression level of the pref-1 gene in mesenteric adipose tissue of Holsteins was significantly higher than that of Wagyu. In addition, the size of mesenteric adipocytes in Holsteins was significantly smaller than that of Wagyu. These results indicate that the breed differences of fattening cattle affect the expression pattern of the pref-1 gene and adipocyte cellularity in a fat depot-specific manner.

  8. Characterization of effector components from the humoral and cellular immune response stimulated by melanoma cells exhibiting modified IGF-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chaobin; Trabado, Séverine; Fan, Ye; Trojan, Jerzy; Lone, Yu-Chun; Giron-Michel, Julien; Duc, Huynh-Thien

    2015-03-01

    Modified melanoma B16 cells inhibited in their IGF-1 expression (B16MOD), on the contrary to the IGF-1 fully expressed parental wild-type (B16WT) counterpart, were shown to stimulate humoral as well as cellular immune responses. Among humoral components, the neutralizing and complement-fixing antibodies of IgM and essentially IgG2 (a+b) isotypes exhibited in vitro and in vivo effects upon tumour growth, while the IgG1 antibody isotype promoted enhanced tumour proliferation. As for the cellular immunity, it was found that the T CD8(+) lymphocyte subpopulation remained the main potent and long lasting immune active effector regulating tumour growth.

  9. Cellular responses and gene expression profile changes due to bleomycin-induced DNA damage in human fibroblasts in space

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Living organisms in space are constantly exposed to radiation, toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage is essential for assessing the radiation risk for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. In a study conducted on the International Space Station, confluent human fibroblasts in culture were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment. The degree of DNA damage was quantified by immunofluorescence staining for γ-H2AX, which is manifested in three types of staining patterns. Although similar percentages of these types of patterns were found between flight and ground cells, there was a slight shift in the distribution of foci counts in the flown cells with countable numbers of γ-H2AX foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. We also performed a microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment. A qualitative comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. The microarray data was confirmed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly upregulated in both flight and ground cells after bleomycin treatment. Our results suggest that whether microgravity affects DNA damage response in space can be dependent on the cell type and cell growth condition. PMID:28248986

  10. A Single-Cell Gene-Expression Profile Reveals Inter-Cellular Heterogeneity within Human Monocyte Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gren, Susanne T.; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Håkansson, Katarina; Gerwien, Jens G.; Grip, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population classified into three different subsets: Classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+, and non-classical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. These subsets are distinguished by their differential expression of CD14 and CD16, and unique gene expression profile. So far, the variation in inter-cellular gene expression within the monocyte subsets is largely unknown. In this study, the cellular variation within each human monocyte subset from a single healthy donor was described by using a novel single-cell PCR gene-expression analysis tool. We investigated 86 different genes mainly encoding cell surface markers, and proteins involved in immune regulation. Within the three human monocyte subsets, our descriptive findings show multimodal expression of key immune response genes, such as CD40, NFⱪB1, RELA, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9. Furthermore, we discovered one subgroup of cells within the classical monocytes, which showed alterations of 22 genes e.g. IRF8, CD40, CSF1R, NFⱪB1, RELA and TNF. Additionally one subgroup within the intermediate and non-classical monocytes also displayed distinct gene signatures by altered expression of 8 and 6 genes, respectively. Hence the three monocyte subsets can be further subdivided according to activation status and differentiation, independently of the traditional classification based on cell surface markers. Demonstrating the use and the ability to discover cell heterogeneity within defined populations of human monocytes is of great importance, and can be useful in unravelling inter-cellular variation in leukocyte populations, identifying subpopulations involved in disease pathogenesis and help tailor new therapies. PMID:26650546

  11. Pancreatic α- and β-cellular clocks have distinct molecular properties and impact on islet hormone secretion and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Volodymyr; Saini, Camille; Giovannoni, Laurianne; Gobet, Cedric; Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael; Heddad Masson, Mounia; Gu, Guoqiang; Bosco, Domenico; Gachon, Frédéric; Philippe, Jacques; Dibner, Charna

    2017-02-15

    A critical role of circadian oscillators in orchestrating insulin secretion and islet gene transcription has been demonstrated recently. However, these studies focused on whole islets and did not explore the interplay between α-cell and β-cell clocks. We performed a parallel analysis of the molecular properties of α-cell and β-cell oscillators using a mouse model expressing three reporter genes: one labeling α cells, one specific for β cells, and a third monitoring circadian gene expression. Thus, phase entrainment properties, gene expression, and functional outputs of the α-cell and β-cell clockworks could be assessed in vivo and in vitro at the population and single-cell level. These experiments showed that α-cellular and β-cellular clocks are oscillating with distinct phases in vivo and in vitro. Diurnal transcriptome analysis in separated α and β cells revealed that a high number of genes with key roles in islet physiology, including regulators of glucose sensing and hormone secretion, are differentially expressed in these cell types. Moreover, temporal insulin and glucagon secretion exhibited distinct oscillatory profiles both in vivo and in vitro. Altogether, our data indicate that differential entrainment characteristics of circadian α-cell and β-cell clocks are an important feature in the temporal coordination of endocrine function and gene expression.

  12. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and cellular localization of an LFRFamide gene in the cuttlefish Sepiella japonica.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zi-Hao; Sun, Lian-Lian; Chi, Chang-Feng; Liu, Hui-Hui; Zhou, Li-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Ming; Wu, Chang-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes in metazoans, such as feeding, reproduction, and heart activities. In this study, an LFRFamide gene was identified from the cuttlefish Sepiella japonica (designated as SjLFRFamide). The full-length sequence of SjLFRFamide cDNA has 841bp, and the open reading frame contains 567bp encoding 188 amino acids, which shared high similarity with precursor SOFaRP2 from Sepia officinalis. The deduced SjLFRFamdie precursor protein contains a signal peptide and four different FLPs (FMRFamide-like peptides): one pentapeptide (TIFRFamide), two hexapeptides (NSLFRFamide and GNLFRFamide) and one heptapeptide (PHTPFRFamide). Multiple sequence alignment showed that SjLFRFamide contains rather conserved mature peptides, which all ended in FRF. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that SjLFRFamide belongs to the LFRFamide subfamily. The tissue distribution analysis through quantitative real-time PCR method showed that SjLFRFamide mRNA is significantly expressed in the brain, and slight trace are detected in female nidamental gland and accessory nidamental gland. In situ hybridization assay of the brain indicated that SjLFRFamide is transcribed in several different functional lobes, suggesting SjLFRFamide might associate with multiple physiological regulations, such as feeding, chromatophore regulation and reproduction. This is the first study describing LFRFamide in S. japonica, which might have great importance for cuttlefish artificial breeding.

  13. SELDI-TOF analysis of glioblastoma cyst fluid is an approach for assessing cellular protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Hoelscher, Martin; Richter, Nina; Melle, Christian; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Schaenzer, Anne; Nestler, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In about 10% of glioblastoma patients, preoperative MRI discloses the presence of tumor cysts. Whereas the impact of cystic appearance on prognosis has been discussed extensively, only little is known about the tumor cyst fluid. In this study, we tested the feasibility of the surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF) technique to detect cyst fluid proteins. Methods: Cyst fluid was collected from 21 glioblastoma patients for SELDI-TOF analysis and compared to control cerebrospinal fluids from 15 patients with spinal stenosis. Resulting protein peaks with significant differences between groups were further described, using the molecular weight in an internet search of protein databases and publications. Two potential cyst fluid proteins, basigin and ferritin light chain, were selected for immunohistological detection in the histologic slides of the patients, metallothionein (MT) served as negative control. Results: As supposed from the results of the SELDI-TOF analysis, basigin and ferritin were detected immunohistochemically in the cyst wall, whereas MT was more equally distributed between the cyst wall and the surrounding tumor tissue. Median survival time of the patients was 20 months (range 2 to 102 months) and correlated with age, but not with expression of the three proteins. Discussion: The SELDI-TOF approach reveals a number of proteins, potentially present in glioblastoma cyst fluid. Identification of these proteins in tumor cells may help understand the pathogenetic pathways and the prognostic value of cystic changes. PMID:24225180

  14. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Khadeer, M A; Shimmo, R; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R

    2014-04-25

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN-229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN-229)) and (CMAC(LN-229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns were characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs. 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs. 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs. 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of eight compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN-229) column and decreased it (-5%) on the NMAC(LN-229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences.

  15. Changing expression and subcellular distribution of karyopherins during murine oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mihalas, Bettina P; Western, Patrick S; Loveland, Kate L; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Holt, Janet E

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian oocyte growth and development is driven by a strict program of gene expression that relies on the timely presence of transcriptional regulators via nuclear pores. By targeting specific cargos for nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, karyopherin (KPN) proteins are key to the relocation of essential transcription factors and chromatin-remodelling factors into and out of the nucleus. Using multiple complementary techniques, here we establish that KPNA genes and proteins are dynamically expressed and relocalised throughout mouse oogenesis and folliculogenesis. Of the KPNAs examined (Kpna1, Kpna2, Kpna3, Kpna4, Kpna6, Kpna7, Kpnb1, Ipo5 and Xpo1), all were expressed in the embryonic ovary with up-regulation of protein levels concomitant with meiotic entry for KPNA2, accompanied by the redistribution of the cellular localisation of KPNA2 and XPO1. In contrast, postnatal folliculogenesis revealed significant up-regulation of Kpna1, Kpna2, Kpna4, Kpna6 and Ipo5 and down-regulation of Kpnb1, Kpna7 and Xpo1 at the primordial to primary follicle transition. KPNAs exhibited different localisation patterns in both oocytes and granulosa cells during folliculogenesis, with three KPNAs--KPNA1, KPNA2 and IPO5--displaying marked enrichment in the nucleus by antral follicle stage. Remarkably, varied subcellular expression profiles were also identified in isolated pre-ovulatory oocytes with KPNAs KPNA2, KPNB1 and IPO5 detected in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear rim and XPO1 in cytoplasmic aggregates. Intriguingly, meiotic spindle staining was also observed for KPNB1 and XPO1 in meiosis II eggs, implying roles for KPNAs outside of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Thus, we propose that KPNAs, by targeting specific cargoes, are likely to be key regulators of oocyte development.

  16. Expression and Distribution Pattern of Aquaporin 4, 5 and 11 in Retinas of 15 Different Species

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Barbara; Kleinwort, Kristina J. H.; Hirmer, Sieglinde; Sekundo, Walter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Deeg, Cornelia A.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are small integral membrane proteins with 13 members in mammals and are essential for water transport across membranes. They are found in many different tissues and cells. Currently, there are conflicting results regarding retinal aquaporin expression and subcellular localization between genome and protein analyses and among various species. AQP4, 7, 9 and 11 were described in the retina of men; whereas AQP6, 8 and 10 were earlier identified in rat retinas and AQP4, 5 and 11 in horses. Since there is a lack of knowledge regarding AQP expression on protein level in retinas of different animal models, we decided to analyze retinal cellular expression of AQP4, 5 and 11 in situ with immunohistochemistry. AQP4 was detected in all 15 explored species, AQP5 and AQP11 in 14 out of 15. Interestingly, AQP4 was unambiguously expressed in Muller glial cells, whereas AQP5 was differentially allocated among the species analyzed. AQP11 expression was Muller glial cell-specific in 50% of the animals, whereas in the others, AQP11 was detected in ganglion cell layer and at photoreceptor outer segments. Our data indicate a disparity in aquaporin distribution in retinas of various animals, especially for AQP5 and 11. PMID:27438827

  17. ATR controls cellular adaptation to hypoxia through positive regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) expression.

    PubMed

    Fallone, F; Britton, S; Nieto, L; Salles, B; Muller, C

    2013-09-12

    Tumor cells adaptation to severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) plays a major role in tumor progression. The transcription factor HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1), whose α-subunit is stabilized under hypoxic conditions is a key component of this process. Recent studies showed that two members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) family, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase), regulate the hypoxic-dependent accumulation of HIF-1. These proteins initiate cellular stress responses when DNA damage occurs. In addition, it has been demonstrated that extreme hypoxia induces a replicative stress resulting in regions of single-stranded DNA at stalled replication forks and the activation of ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related protein), another member of the PIKKs family. Here, we show that even less severe hypoxia (0.1% O2) also induces activation of ATR through replicative stress. Importantly, in using either transiently silenced ATR cells, cells expressing an inactive form of ATR or cells exposed to an ATR inhibitor (CGK733), we demonstrate that hypoxic ATR activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 independently of the checkpoint kinase Chk1. We show that ATR kinase activity regulates HIF-1α at the translational level and we find that the elements necessary for the regulation of HIF-1α translation are located within the coding region of HIF-1α mRNA. Finally, by using three independent cellular models, we clearly show that the loss of ATR expression and/or kinase activity results in the decrease of HIF-1 DNA binding under hypoxia and consequently affects protein expression levels of two HIF-1 target genes, GLUT-1 and CAIX. Taken together, our data show a new function for ATR in cellular adaptation to hypoxia through regulation of HIF-1α translation. Our work offers new prospect for cancer therapy using ATR inhibitors with the potential to decrease cellular adaptation in hypoxic

  18. Adipose depots differ in cellularity, adipokines produced, gene expression, and cell systems

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Michael V; Du, Min; Wang, Songbo; Bergen, Werner G; Fernyhough-Culver, Melinda; Basu, Urmila; Poulos, Sylvia P; Hausman, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    The race to manage the health concerns related to excess fat deposition has spawned a proliferation of clinical and basic research efforts to understand variables including dietary uptake, metabolism, and lipid deposition by adipocytes. A full appreciation of these variables must also include a depot-specific understanding of content and location in order to elucidate mechanisms governing cellular development and regulation of fat deposition. Because adipose tissue depots contain various cell types, differences in the cellularity among and within adipose depots are presently being documented to ascertain functional differences. This has led to the possibility of there being, within any one adipose depot, cellular distinctions that essentially result in adipose depots within depots. The papers comprising this issue will underscore numerous differences in cellularity (development, histogenesis, growth, metabolic function, regulation) of different adipose depots. Such information is useful in deciphering adipose depot involvement both in normal physiology and in pathology. Obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, carcass composition of meat animals, performance of elite athletes, physiology/pathophysiology of aging, and numerous other diseases might be altered with a greater understanding of adipose depots and the cells that comprise them—including stem cells—during initial development and subsequent periods of normal/abnormal growth into senescence. Once thought to be dormant and innocuous, the adipocyte is emerging as a dynamic and influential cell and research will continue to identify complex physiologic regulation of processes involved in adipose depot physiology. PMID:26317047

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat increases the expression of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 73-kilodalton subunit modulating cellular and viral expression.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3'-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression.

  20. Cellular expression of a sodium-dependent monocarboxylate transporter (Slc5a8) and the MCT family in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Haruko; Takebe, Kumiko; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Takahashi-Iwanaga, Hiromi; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2008-11-01

    Expression analysis of transporters selective for monocarboxylates such as lactate and ketone bodies in the kidney contributes to understanding the renal energy metabolism. Distribution and expression intensity of a sodium-dependent monocarboxylate transporter (SMCT) and proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) were examined in the mouse kidney. In situ hybridization survey detected significant mRNA expressions of SMCT and MCT-1, 2, 5, 8, 9, 10, and 12. Among these, signals for SMCT, MCT2 and MCT8 were predominant; transcripts of SMCT were restricted to the cortex and the outer stripe of outer medulla, while those of MCT2 and MCT8 gathered in the inner stripe of outer medulla and the cortex, respectively. Immunohistochemically, SMCT was present at the brush border in S2 and S3 of proximal tubules, suggesting the active uptake of luminal monocarboxylates here. MCT1 and MCT2 immunoreactivities were respectively found baso-laterally in S1 and thick ascending limbs of Henle's loop. The cellular localization of transporters suggests the involvement of SMCT in the uptake of filtrated lactate and ketone bodies and that of MCTs in the transport of monocarboxylate metabolites between tubular cells and circulation, but the different distribution patterns do not support the notion of a functional linkage between SMCT and MCT1/MCT2.

  1. Expression profiles of subtracted mRNAs during cellular senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jung Ki; Choi, Seong-jun; Kim, Jin Kyeoung

    2013-05-01

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible cell cycle arrest that limits the replicative lifespan of cells. Senescence suppresses development of tumors by regulating aging factors, such as cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) and telomerase. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed between young human mesenchymal stem cells (Y-hMSCs) and senescent human mesenchymal stem cells (S-hMSCs). We selected positive clones that were functionally characterized by referring to public databases using NCBI BLAST tool. This search revealed that 19 genes were downregulated, and 43 genes were upregulated in S-hMSCs relative to Y-hMSCs. Among subtracted clones in Y-hMSCs, most of genes markedly were related to metabolic functions. These genes, PDIA3, WDR1, FSTL1, COPG1, LMAN1, and PDIA6, significantly downregulated. Conversely, genes for subtracted clones in S-hMSCs were mostly associated with cell adhesion. In particular, the expression levels of 9 genes, HSP90B1, EID1, ATP2B4, DDAH1, PRNP, RAB1A, PGS5, TM4SF1 and SSR3, gradually increased during senescence. These genes have not previously been identified as being related to cellular senescence, but they seemed to be potentially affected during cellular senescence.

  2. Cellular RNA homologous to the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene: expression and relationship to the viral sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J Y; Baltimore, D

    1983-01-01

    To examine the expression of the cellular homolog of the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene (the v-abl sequence), a DNA probe representing the v-abl sequence was prepared. The probe detected two cytoplasmic polyadenylic acid-containing c-abl RNAs of about 6.5 and 5.5 kilobases in a variety of rodent cells, and slightly larger RNAs were detected in human cells. These two RNA species were found in all normal tissues or cell lines examined, but at differing concentrations: liver cells had the least, fibroblastic cell lines had the most. By using a probe able to detect the cellular but not the viral gene, the two RNAs were shown to be present in Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed cells at levels found either in their untransformed counterparts or in similar cell types transformed by other means. The target cells of the virus have a somewhat elevated level of the two RNAs although expression of the c-abl gene is not restricted to these cells. The v-abl sequence lacks 0.35 and 0.85 kilobases of the c-abl RNA on the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. Thus, the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene is an internal fragment of the transcript of a normal cellular gene. Images PMID:6306446

  3. Single-cell gene expression analyses of cellular reprogramming reveal a stochastic early and hierarchic late phase

    PubMed Central

    Buganim, Yosef; Faddah, Dina A.; Cheng, Albert W.; Itskovich, Elena; Markoulaki, Styliani; Ganz, Kibibi; Klemm, Sandy L.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    During cellular reprogramming only a small fraction of cells become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Previous analyses of gene expression during reprogramming were based on populations of cells, impeding single-cell level identification of reprogramming events. We utilized two gene expression technologies to profile 48 genes in single cells at various stages during the reprogramming process. Analysis of early stages revealed considerable variation in gene expression between cells in contrast to late stages. Expression of Esrrb, Utf1, Lin28, and Dppa2 is a better predictor for cells to progress into iPSCs than expression of Fbxo15, Fgf4, and Oct4 previously suggested to be reprogramming markers. Stochastic gene expression early in reprogramming is followed by a late hierarchical phase with Sox2 being the upstream factor in a gene expression hierarchy. Finally, downstream factors derived from the late phase, which do not include Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc and Nanog, can activate the pluripotency circuitry. PMID:22980981

  4. Fluorescent Tagging and Cellular Distribution of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF45 Tegument Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bergson, Shir; Kalt, Inna; Itzhak, Inbal; Brulois, Kevin F.; Jung, Jae U.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), is a cancer-related human virus, classified as a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily. We report here the construction of a dual fluorescent-tagged KSHV genome (BAC16-mCherry-ORF45), which constitutively expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and contains the tegument multifunctional ORF45 protein as a fusion protein with monomeric Cherry fluorescent protein (mCherry). We confirmed that this virus is properly expressed and correctly replicates and that the mCherry-ORF45 protein is incorporated into the virions. Using this labeled virus, we describe the dynamics of mCherry-ORF45 expression and localization in newly infected cells as well as in latently infected cells undergoing lytic induction and show that mCherry can be used to monitor cells undergoing the lytic viral cycle. This virus is likely to enable future studies monitoring the dynamics of viral trafficking and tegumentation during viral ingress and egress. IMPORTANCE The present study describes the construction and characterization of a new recombinant KSHV genome BAC16 clone which expresses mCherry-tagged ORF45. This virus enables the tracking of cells undergoing lytic infection and can be used to address issues related to the trafficking and maturation pathways of KSHV virions. PMID:25165104

  5. Specificity of cellular expression of C. variopedatus polychaete innexin in the developing embryo: evolutionary aspects of innexins' heterogeneous gene structures.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Nicoletta; del Gaudio, Rosanna; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Russo, Giuseppina Maria Rosaria; Geraci, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Innexins are a family of membrane proteins involved in the formation of gap junctions in invertebrates. They have been found to participate in several aspects of cell differentiation and in embryonic patterning through the formation of specific intercellular communication channels. We present here data showing that the recently identified innexin of the marine worm Chaetopterus variopedatus is expressed only in particular cells of the early stage, demonstrating cell specificity of innexin expression also in polychaete annelids. Phylogenetic analysis of all known innexins results in a phylogenetic tree clearly distinguishing insect, nematode, and other invertebrate innexins. Comparative analysis of proteins and known related genes shows that the apparent similarity of protein composition, overall structural organization, and specificity of cellular expression, typical of innexins of all studied organisms, correspond to highly heterogeneous gene structures even for genes that are in close contiguity on the same chromosome. A possible evolutionary motive producing this situation is discussed.

  6. Recombinant measles viruses expressing single or multiple antigens of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) induce cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liniger, Matthias; Zuniga, Armando; Morin, Teldja Neige Azzouz; Combardiere, Behazine; Marty, Rene; Wiegand, Marian; Ilter, Orhan; Knuchel, Marlyse; Naim, Hussein Y

    2009-05-26

    Recombinant measles viruses (rMV) based on the live attenuated measles vaccine strain (MVb) expressing antigens of HIV-1 clade B were generated by reverse genetics. Recombinants expressing single or double antigens of HIV-1 (rMV-HIV) were genetically highly stable on human diploid cells. The production process of these viruses was essentially similar to the parental MV strain, yielding comparative end titers. Immunization of tg-mice by different regimens and formulations showed potent humoral and cellular immune responses against MV and HIV antigens. Recombinant MV-HIV expressing Gag protein conferred protective immunity in tg-mice after a high-dose pseudochallenge with recombinant vaccinia virus. In addition, rMV-HIV boosted anti-HIV antibodies, in the presence of pre-existing anti-vector antibodies.

  7. Lead tolerance and cellular distribution in Elsholtzia splendens using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Shohag, M J I; Liao, Haibing; Yang, Xiaoe

    2011-12-15

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the tolerance and spatial distribution of lead (Pb) in Elsholtzia splendens-a copper (Cu) accumulator plant using synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence. According to chlorophyll concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, E. splendens displayed certain tolerance at 100 μM Pb treatment. Lead concentration in roots, stems and leaves of E. splendens reached 45,183.6, 1657.6, and 380.9 mg kg(-1), respectively. Pb was mostly accumulated in the roots, and there were also high concentrations of Pb been transported into stems and leaves. Micro-XRF analysis of the stem and leaf cross section revealed that Pb was mostly restricted in the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues of both stem and leaf of E. splendens. The correlation between distribution of K, Ca, Zn and Pb were analyzed. There were significant positive correlations (P<0.01) among Pb and Ca, K, Zn distribution both in stem and leaf of E. splendens. However, among the three elements, Ca shared the most similar distribution pattern and the highest correlation coefficients with Pb in both stem and leaf cross section of E. splendens. This suggests that Ca may play an important role in Pb accumulation in stem and leaf of E. splendens.

  8. Differential cellular expression of neurotrophins in cortical tubers of the tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Kyin, R; Hua, Y; Baybis, M; Scheithauer, B; Kolson, D; Uhlmann, E; Gutmann, D; Crino, P B

    2001-10-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors modulate cerebral cortical development. Tubers in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are characterized histologically by disorganized cortical cytoarchitecture and thus, we hypothesized that expression of neurotrophin mRNAs and proteins might be altered in tubers. Using in situ transcription and mRNA amplification to probe cDNA arrays, we found that neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and trkB mRNA expression were reduced whereas neurotrophin-4 (NT4) and trkC mRNA expression were increased in whole tuber sections. Alterations in mRNA abundance were defined in single microdissected dysplastic neurons (DNs) and giant cells (GCs). NT3 mRNA expression was reduced in GCs and trkB mRNA expression was reduced in DNs. NT4 mRNA expression was increased in DNs and trkC mRNA expression was increased in both DNs and GCs. In three patients, TSC2 locus mutations were confirmed and the mean tuberin mRNA expression levels was reduced across all nine cases. Consistent with these observations, NT3 mRNA expression was reduced but trkC mRNA expression was increased in vitro in human NTera2 neurons (NT2N) transfected with a tuberin antisense construct that reduced tuberin expression. Western analysis of tuber homogenates and computer-assisted densitometry of immunolabeled sections confirmed the neurotrophin mRNA expression data in whole sections and single neurotrophin immunoreactive cells. We conclude that alterations in NT4/trkB and NT3/trkC expression may contribute to tuber formation during brain development as downstream effects of the hamartin and tuberin pathway in TSC.

  9. Myocardial Gene Transfer: Routes and Devices for Regulation of Transgene Expression by Modulation of Cellular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heart diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality in Western society. Gene therapy approaches are becoming promising therapeutic modalities to improve underlying molecular processes affecting failing cardiomyocytes. Numerous cardiac clinical gene therapy trials have yet to demonstrate strong positive results and advantages over current pharmacotherapy. The success of gene therapy depends largely on the creation of a reliable and efficient delivery method. The establishment of such a system is determined by its ability to overcome the existing biological barriers, including cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking as well as modulation of cellular permeability. In this article, we describe a variety of physical and mechanical methods, based on the transient disruption of the cell membrane, which are applied in nonviral gene transfer. In addition, we focus on the use of different physiological techniques and devices and pharmacological agents to enhance endothelial permeability. Development of these methods will undoubtedly help solve major problems facing gene therapy. PMID:23427834

  10. Dystrophin Distribution and Expression in Human and Experimental Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ruben G. F.; Schipper, Sandra; Hoogland, Govert; Schijns, Olaf E. M. G.; Dings, Jim T. A.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Vles, Johan S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Dystrophin is part of a protein complex that connects the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. In addition to its role in muscle tissue, it functions as an anchoring protein within the central nervous system such as in hippocampus and cerebellum. Its presence in the latter regions is illustrated by the cognitive problems seen in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Since epilepsy is also supposed to constitute a comorbidity of DMD, it is hypothesized that dystrophin plays a role in neuronal excitability. Here, we aimed to study brain dystrophin distribution and expression in both, human and experimental temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Method: Regional and cellular dystrophin distribution was evaluated in both human and rat hippocampi and in rat cerebellar tissue by immunofluorescent colocalization with neuronal (NeuN and calbindin) and glial (GFAP) markers. In addition, hippocampal dystrophin levels were estimated by Western blot analysis in biopsies from TLE patients, post-mortem controls, amygdala kindled (AK)-, and control rats. Results: Dystrophin was expressed in all hippocampal pyramidal subfields and in the molecular-, Purkinje-, and granular cell layer of the cerebellum. In these regions it colocalized with GFAP, suggesting expression in astrocytes such as Bergmann glia (BG) and velate protoplasmic astrocytes. In rat hippocampus and cerebellum there were neither differences in dystrophin positive cell types, nor in the regional dystrophin distribution between AK and control animals. Quantitatively, hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels were about 60% higher in human TLE patients than in post-mortem controls (p < 0.05), whereas the level of the shorter Dp71 isoform did not differ. In contrast, AK animals showed similar dystrophin levels as controls. Conclusion: Dystrophin is ubiquitously expressed by astrocytes in the human and rat hippocampus and in the rat cerebellum. Hippocampal full-length dystrophin (Dp427) levels are upregulated

  11. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  12. Keratin-containing inclusions affect cell morphology and distribution of cytosolic cellular components.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Shinichiro; Harada, Masaru; Kumemura, Hiroto; Omary, M Bishr; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Koga, Hironori; Yoshida, Takafumi; Maeyama, Michiko; Baba, Shinji; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio

    2005-04-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the presence of protein aggregates bundled with intermediate filaments (IFs) and similar structures, known as Mallory bodies (MBs), are observed in various liver diseases. IFs are anchored at desmosomes and hemidesmosomes, however, interactions with other intercellular junctions have not been determined. We investigated the effect of IF inclusions on junction-associated and cytosolic proteins in various cultured cells. We performed gene transfection of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged cytokeratin (CK) 18 mutant arg89cys (GFP-CK18 R89C) in cultured cells and observed CK aggregations as well as loss of IF networks. Among various junction-associated proteins, zonula occludens-1 and beta-catenin were colocalized with CK aggregates on immunofluorescent analyses. Similar results were obtained on immunostaining for cytosolic proteins, 14-3-3 zeta protein, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and DsRed. E-cadherin, a basolateral membrane protein in polarized epithelia, was present on both the apical and basolateral domains in GFP-CK18 R89C-transfected cells. Furthermore, cells containing CK aggregates were significantly larger than GFP-tagged wild type CK18 (GFP-WT CK18)-transfected or non-transfected cells (P < 0.01) and sometimes their morphology was significantly altered. Our data indicate that CK aggregates affect not only cell morphology but also the localization of various cytosolic components, which may affect the cellular function.

  13. Cellular uptake and distribution of graphene oxide coated with layer-by-layer assembled polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiye; Lu, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhongjun; Nie, Guangjun; Fang, Ying

    2014-05-01

    We report a facile approach for the fabrication of a new class of graphene oxide (GO)-based nanoassemblies by layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The single-layer thickness and intrinsic negatively charged carboxyl groups of GO nanosheets provide a natural platform for LbL assembly of polyelectrolyte nanofilms by electrostatic forces at mild and aqueous conditions. The general applicability of our approach is demonstrated by the preparation of GO nanoassemblies with sizes of 100-200 nm using various charged polyelectrolytes, including synthetic polymers, polypeptides, and DNA oligonucleotides. Systemic assessment of cytotoxicity and acute stress response show that no discernable signs of cytotoxicity are associated with exposure of GO and its nanoassemblies [GO/PLL (poly ( l-lysine)), GO/PLL/PSS (poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate)), GO/PLL-PEG (PEGlayted PLL), GO/PLL/PLGA-PEG (PEGlayted poly ( l-glutamic acid))] up to 1 μg/mL. Studies on cellular uptake and subcellular localization show that a representative nanoassembly, GO/PLL-PEG, can effectively cross cell membranes and localize mainly in lysosomal compartments, without induction of noticeable harmful effects as confirmed by detection of mitochondrial depolarization and lysosomal pH.

  14. Computational approaches to analyse and predict small molecule transport and distribution at cellular and subcellular levels.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Zhang, Xinyuan; Yu, Jing-yu; Rosania, Gus R

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies and mechanistic mathematical modeling approaches have been independently employed for analysing and predicting the transport and distribution of small molecule chemical agents in living organisms. Both of these computational approaches have been useful for interpreting experiments measuring the transport properties of small molecule chemical agents, in vitro and in vivo. Nevertheless, mechanistic cell-based pharmacokinetic models have been especially useful to guide the design of experiments probing the molecular pathways underlying small molecule transport phenomena. Unlike QSAR models, mechanistic models can be integrated from microscopic to macroscopic levels, to analyse the spatiotemporal dynamics of small molecule chemical agents from intracellular organelles to whole organs, well beyond the experiments and training data sets upon which the models are based. Based on differential equations, mechanistic models can also be integrated with other differential equations-based systems biology models of biochemical networks or signaling pathways. Although the origin and evolution of mathematical modeling approaches aimed at predicting drug transport and distribution has occurred independently from systems biology, we propose that the incorporation of mechanistic cell-based computational models of drug transport and distribution into a systems biology modeling framework is a logical next step for the advancement of systems pharmacology research.

  15. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  16. Cellular distribution of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and B (VEGFB) and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in focal cortical dysplasia type IIB

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Karin; Troost, Dirk; Spliet, Wim G. M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Gorter, Jan A.

    2008-01-01

    Members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are key signaling proteins in the induction and regulation of angiogenesis, both during development and in pathological conditions. However, signaling mediated through VEGF family proteins and their receptors has recently been shown to have direct effects on neurons and glial cells. In the present study, we immunocytochemically investigated the expression and cellular distribution of VEGFA, VEGFB, and their associated receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIB from patients with medically intractable epilepsy. Histologically normal temporal cortex and perilesional regions displayed neuronal immunoreactivity (IR) for VEGFA, VEGFB, and VEGF receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2), mainly in pyramidal neurons. Weak IR was observed in blood vessels and there was no notable glial IR within the grey and white matter. In all FCD specimens, VEGFA, VEGFB, and both VEGF receptors were highly expressed in dysplastic neurons. IR in astroglial and balloon cells was observed for VEGFA and its receptors. VEGFR-1 displayed strong endothelial staining in FCD. Double-labeling also showed expression of VEGFA, VEGFB and VEGFR-1 in cells of the microglia/macrophage lineage. The neuronal expression of both VEGFA and VEGFB, together with their specific receptors in FCD, suggests autocrine/paracrine effects on dysplastic neurons. These autocrine/paracrine effects could play a role in the development of FCD, preventing the death of abnormal neuronal cells. In addition, the expression of VEGFA and its receptors in glial cells within the dysplastic cortex indicates that VEGF-mediated signaling could contribute to astroglial activation and associated inflammatory reactions. PMID:18317782

  17. Haemopexin affects iron distribution and ferritin expression in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Noemi; Tonoli, Elisabetta; Logrand, Federica; Fiorito, Veronica; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Vercelli, Alessandro; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Haemopexin (Hx) is an acute phase plasma glycoprotein, mainly produced by the liver and released into plasma where it binds heme with high affinity and delivers it to the liver. This system provides protection against free heme-mediated oxidative stress, limits access by pathogens to heme and contributes to iron homeostasis by recycling heme iron. Hx protein has been found in the sciatic nerve, skeletal muscle, retina, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, a comparative proteomic analysis has shown an increase of Hx in CSF from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, thus suggesting its involvement in heme detoxification in brain. Here, we report that Hx is synthesised in brain by the ventricular ependymal cells. To verify whether Hx is involved in heme scavenging in brain, and consequently, in the control of iron level, iron deposits and ferritin expression were analysed in cerebral regions known for iron accumulation. We show a twofold increase in the number of iron-loaded oligodendrocytes in the basal ganglia and thalamus of Hx-null mice compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, there was no increase in H- and L-ferritin expression in these regions. This condition is common to several human neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in which iron loading is not associated with an adequate increase in ferritin expression. However, a strong reduction in the number of ferritin-positive cells was observed in the cerebral cortex of Hx-null animals. Consistent with increased iron deposits and inadequate ferritin expression, malondialdehyde level and Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase-1 expression were higher in the brain of Hx-null mice than in that of wild-type controls. These data demonstrate that Hx plays an important role in controlling iron distribution within brain, thus suggesting its involvement in iron-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19120692

  18. Functional expression of P-glycoprotein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confers cellular resistance to the immunosuppressive and antifungal agent FK520.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, M; Ruetz, S; Thomas, D Y; Gros, P

    1994-01-01

    We have recently reported that expression in yeast cells of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the mouse multidrug resistance mdr3 gene (Mdr3) can complement a null ste6 mutation (M. Raymond, P. Gros, M. Whiteway, and D. Y. Thomas, Science 256:232-234, 1992). Here we show that Mdr3 behaves as a fully functional drug transporter in this heterologous expression system. Photolabelling experiments indicate that Mdr3 synthesized in yeast cells binds the drug analog [125I]iodoaryl azidoprazosin, this binding being competed for by vinblastine and tetraphenylphosphonium bromide, two known multidrug resistance drugs. Spheroplasts expressing wild-type Mdr3 (Ser-939) exhibit an ATP-dependent and verapamil-sensitive decreased accumulation of [3H]vinblastine as compared with spheroplasts expressing a mutant form of Mdr3 with impaired transport activity (Phe-939). Expression of Mdr3 in yeast cells can confer resistance to growth inhibition by the antifungal and immunosuppressive agent FK520, suggesting that this compound is a substrate for P-gp in yeast cells. Replacement of Ser-939 in Mdr3 by a series of amino acid substitutions is shown to modulate both the level of cellular resistance to FK520 and the mating efficiency of yeast mdr3 transformants. The effects of these mutations on the function of Mdr3 in yeast cells are similar to those observed in mammalian cells with respect to drug resistance and transport, indicating that transport of a-factor and FK520 in yeast cells is mechanistically similar to drug transport in mammalian cells. The ability of P-gp to confer cellular resistance to FK520 in yeast cells establishes a dominant phenotype that can be assayed for the positive selection of intragenic revertants of P-gp inactive mutants, an important tool for the structure-function analysis of mammalian P-gp in yeast cells. Images PMID:7505392

  19. Modulation of Estrogen Response Element-Driven Gene Expressions and Cellular Proliferation with Polar Directions by Designer Transcription Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Muyan, Mesut; Güpür, Gizem; Yaşar, Pelin; Ayaz, Gamze; User, Sırma Damla; Kazan, Hasan Hüseyin; Huang, Yanfang

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα), as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates 17β-estradiol (E2) effects. ERα is a modular protein containing a DNA binding domain (DBD) and transcription activation domains (AD) located at the amino- and carboxyl-termini. The interaction of the E2-activated ERα dimer with estrogen response elements (EREs) of genes constitutes the initial step in the ERE-dependent signaling pathway necessary for alterations of cellular features. We previously constructed monomeric transcription activators, or monotransactivators, assembled from an engineered ERE-binding module (EBM) using the ERα-DBD and constitutively active ADs from other transcription factors. Monotransactivators modulated cell proliferation by activating and repressing ERE-driven gene expressions that simulate responses observed with E2-ERα. We reasoned here that integration of potent heterologous repression domains (RDs) into EBM could generate monotransrepressors that alter ERE-bearing gene expressions and cellular proliferation in directions opposite to those observed with E2-ERα or monotransactivators. Consistent with this, monotransrepressors suppressed reporter gene expressions that emulate the ERE-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, a model monotransrepressor regulated DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation of recombinant adenovirus infected ER-negative cells through decreasing as well as increasing gene expressions with polar directions compared with E2-ERα or monotransactivator. Our results indicate that an ‘activator’ or a ‘repressor’ possesses both transcription activating/enhancing and repressing/decreasing abilities within a chromatin context. Offering a protein engineering platform to alter signal pathway-specific gene expressions and cell growth, our approach could also be used for the development of tools for epigenetic modifications and for clinical interventions wherein multigenic de-regulations are an issue. PMID:26295471

  20. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  1. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  2. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyanka L.; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc–dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  3. Cellular distribution of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in Vicia faba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, V.; Assmann, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-binding proteins within Vicia faba was investigated. Both CaM and CaM-binding proteins were found to be differentially distributed among organs, tissues, and protoplast types. CaM levels, on a per protein basis, were found to be the highest in leaf epidermis, containing 3-fold higher levels of CaM than in total leaf. Similarly, guard cell and epidermal cell protoplasts were also found to have higher levels of CaM than mesophyll cell protoplasts. 125I-CaM blot overlay assays were performed to qualitatively examine CaM-binding proteins in these protoplast types as well as in whole tissues and organs. CaM-binding proteins with Mr 52,000, 78,000, and 115,000 were common in all metabolically active plant parts. Unique CaM-binding protein bands were detected in guard cell protoplasts (Mr 39,000, 88,000), stems (Mr 45,000, 60,000, 64,000), and roots (Mr 62,000), suggesting the presence of specialized CaM-dependent processes in these cells and organs.

  4. Expression of transferrin receptors on mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes: relation to cellular activation and related metabolic events.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M

    1981-01-01

    Mitogen-activated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes bind transferrin to specific membrane receptors. In this study, lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin for 0-66 hr were examined to determine the relation of this phenomenon to cellular activation and related metabolic events. Transferrin receptors were first detected at 20-24 hr. This event was consistently preceded by RNA and protein turnover which commenced during the first 6 hr of culture, whereas initiation of DNA synthesis was detected concurrently with the appearance of receptors or slightly later (24-30 hr). Exposure of cells to inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis early during culture (at 0 or 24 hr) prevented the expression of transferrin receptors, but also caused generalized metabolic failure, and abrogated cellular activation. In contrast, later addition of these agents at 48 hr did not interfere significantly with the process of activation, but did suppress the terminal increase in receptor-bearing cells observed during the final 18 hr in control cultures lacking inhibitor. After deliberate thermal stripping of receptors from activated cells, the reappearance of membrance binding sites which normally occurred within 30 min, was also blocked by cycloheximide, puromycin and actinomycin D. However, similar inhibition of DNA which was induced by hydroxyurea had much less effect upon both the initial appearance of receptors and their reappearance after ligand-induced depletion. These results demonstrate that the appearance of transferrin receptors upon human lymphocytes is dependent upon cellular activation and requires synthesis of protein and RNA. PMID:6172372

  5. First cellular approach of the effects of global warming on groundwater organisms: a study of the HSP70 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Colson-Proch, Céline; Morales, Anne; Hervant, Frédéric; Konecny, Lara; Moulin, Colette; Douady, Christophe J

    2010-05-01

    Whereas the consequences of global warming at population or community levels are well documented, studies at the cellular level are still scarce. The study of the physiological or metabolic effects of such small increases in temperature (between +2 degrees C and +6 degrees C) is difficult because they are below the amplitude of the daily or seasonal thermal variations occurring in most environments. In contrast, subterranean biotopes are highly thermally buffered (+/-1 degrees C within a year), and underground water organisms could thus be particularly well suited to characterise cellular responses of global warming. To this purpose, we studied genes encoding chaperone proteins of the HSP70 family in amphipod crustaceans belonging to the ubiquitous subterranean genus Niphargus. An HSP70 sequence was identified in eight populations of two complexes of species of the Niphargus genus (Niphargus rhenorhodanensis and Niphargus virei complexes). Expression profiles were determined for one of these by reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, confirming the inducible nature of this gene. An increase in temperature of 2 degrees C seemed to be without effect on N. rhenorhodanensis physiology, whereas a heat shock of +6 degrees C represented an important thermal stress for these individuals. Thus, this study shows that although Niphargus individuals do not undergo any daily or seasonal thermal variations in underground water, they display an inducible HSP70 heat shock response. This controlled laboratory-based physiological experiment constitutes a first step towards field investigations of the cellular consequences of global warming on subterranean organisms.

  6. Selective Regulation of FGF19 and FGF21 Expression by Cellular and Nutritional Stress.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Makoto; Morimoto, Hitomi; Maruyama, Ryuto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and FGF21 are members of a subfamily of the FGFs called endocrine FGFs. FGF19 regulates the bile acid synthetic pathway. FGF19 expression is induced by farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear hormone receptor activated by bile acids in the small intestine. FGF21 plays an important role in lipolysis that occurs in white adipose tissue. FGF21 expression is stimulated by the nuclear fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in the liver. FGF19 and FGF21 were recently identified as targets of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), which is activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ATF4 is also activated by oxidative stress and amino acid deprivation. In this study, we investigated FGF19 and FGF21 expression in response to oxidative stress and amino acid deprivation. We found that FGF19 mRNA is induced by oxidative stress inducers in Caco-2 cells, which are derived from the human intestinal epithelium, and rat intestinal epithelial IEC6 cells. In contrast, ileal FGF15 expression, the rodent ortholog of human FGF19, is not increased by oxidative stress. No notable changes in expression of FGF15/19 took place under amino acid deprivation either in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, FGF21 expression is induced by oxidative stress and amino acid deprivation both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate distinctive patterns of regulation of FGF19 expression by ER stress, and FGF21 expression by ER stress, oxidative stress, and amino acid deprivation through ATF4 activation.

  7. The expression of AIP-related molecules in elucidation of cellular pathways in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Heliövaara, Elina; Raitila, Anniina; Launonen, Virpi; Paetau, Anders; Arola, Johanna; Lehtonen, Heli; Sane, Timo; Weil, Robert J; Vierimaa, Outi; Salmela, Pasi; Tuppurainen, Karoliina; Mäkinen, Markus; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Karhu, Auli

    2009-12-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose to the development of pituitary adenomas. Here, we characterized AIP mutation positive (AIPmut+) and AIP mutation negative (AIPmut-) pituitary adenomas by immunohistochemistry. The expressions of the AIP-related proteins aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B encoding p27(Kip1), and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha were examined in 14 AIPmut+ and 53 AIPmut- pituitary adenomas to detect possible expression differences. In addition, the expression of CD34, an endothelial and hematopoietic stem cell marker, was analyzed. We found ARNT to be less frequently expressed in AIPmut+ pituitary adenomas (P = 0.001), suggesting that AIP regulates the ARNT levels. AIP small interfering RNA-treated HeLa, HEK293, or Aip-null mouse embryonic fibroblast cells did not show lowered expression of ARNT. Instead, in the pituitary adenoma cell line GH3, Aip silencing caused a partial reduction of Arnt and a clear increase in cell proliferation. We also observed a trend for increased expression of nuclear AHR in AIPmut+ samples, although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.06). The expressions of p27(Kip1), hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, or CD34 did not differ between tumor types. The present study shows that the expression of ARNT protein is significantly reduced in AIPmut+ tumors. We suggest that the down-regulation of ARNT may be connected to an imbalance in AHR/ARNT complex formation arising from aberrant cAMP signaling.

  8. Effect of solid distribution on elastic properties of open-cell cellular solids using numerical and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2014-09-01

    Effect of solid distribution between edges and vertices of three-dimensional cellular solid with an open-cell structure was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Finite element analysis (FEA) with continuum elements and appropriate periodic boundary condition was employed to calculate the elastic properties of cellular solids using tetrakaidecahedral (Kelvin) unit cell. Relative densities between 0.01 and 0.1 and various values of solid fractions were considered. In order to validate the numerical model, three scaffolds with the relative density of 0.08, but different amounts of solid in vertices, were fabricated via 3-D printing technique. Good agreement was observed between numerical simulation and experimental results. Results of numerical simulation showed that, at low relative densities (<0.03), Young׳s modulus increased by shifting materials away from edges to vertices at first and then decreased after reaching a critical point. However, for the high values of relative density, Young׳s modulus increased monotonically. Mechanisms of such a behavior were discussed in detail. Results also indicated that Poisson׳s ratio decreased by increasing relative density and solid fraction in vertices. By fitting a curve to the data obtained from the numerical simulation and considering the relative density and solid fraction in vertices, empirical relations were derived for Young׳s modulus and Poisson׳s ratio.

  9. Distribution and Cellular Uptake of PEGylated Polymeric Particles in the Lung Towards Cell-Specific Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tammy W.; Fromen, Catherine A.; Kai, Marc P.; Luft, J. Christopher; Rahhal, Tojan B.; Robbins, Gregory R.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the role of a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) surface coating to increase residence times and alter the cellular fate of nano- and microparticles delivered to the lung. Methods Three sizes of PRINT hydrogel particles (80×320 nm, 1.5 and 6 um donuts) with and without a surface PEG coating were instilled in the airways of C57/b6 mice. At time points of 1, 7, and 28 days, BALF and whole lungs were evaluated for the inflammatory cytokine Il-6 and chemokine MIP-2, histopathology, cellular populations of macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), and granulocytes, and particulate uptake within these cells through flow cytometry, ELISAs, and fluorescent imaging. Results Particles of all sizes and surface chemistries were readily observed in the lung with minimal inflammatory response at all time points. Surface modification with PEGylation was found to significantly increase lung residence times and homogeneous lung distribution, delaying macrophage clearance of all sizes, with the largest increase in residence time observed for 80×320 nm particles. Additionally, it was observed that DCs were recruited to the airway following administration of unPEGylated particles and preferentially associated with these particles. Conclusions Pulmonary drug delivery vehicles designed with a PEG surface coating can be used to delay particle uptake and promote cell-specific targeting of therapeutics. PMID:26002743

  10. Microarray analysis of changes in cellular gene expression induced by productive infection of primary human astrocytes: implications for HAD.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Young; Li, Jinliang; Bentsman, Galina; Brooks, Andrew I; Volsky, David J

    2004-12-01

    The role of astrocytes in HIV-1 associated dementia (HAD) is not well understood. HIV-1 binds efficiently to astrocytes but infects only a small fraction of the cells in vitro and in vivo. To gain insight into the biology of HIV-1-expressing astrocytes, we productively infected human fetal astrocytes with pseudotyped HIV-1 and employed Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays to determine global changes in cellular gene expression at the peak of virus production. With a twofold change as a cutoff, HIV-1 increased transcription of 266 genes in astrocytes and suppressed expression of 468. The functions of highly expressed genes included interferon-mediated antiviral responses (OAS1, IFIT1), intercellular contacts (SH3, glia-derived nexin), cell homing/adhesion (matrix metalloproteinases), and cell-cell signaling (neuropilin 1 and 2). Surprisingly, genes involved in innate immune responses of astrocytes were largely unaffected. The single most significant effect of HIV-1, however, was down-modulation of at least 55 genes involved in control of cell cycle, DNA replication, and cell proliferation, which were overrepresented in these categories with probability scores of 10(-10)-10(-26). Our data suggest that HIV-1 expression in astrocytes profoundly alters host cell biology, with potential consequences for the physiological function of astrocytes during HIV-1 infection in the brain.

  11. Aldosterone regulates cellular turnover and mitogen-activated protein kinase family expression in the neonatal rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Bae, In Sun; Jang, Gi Young; Hong, Young Sook; Lee, Joo Won

    2009-06-01

    Growing evidence indicates that aldosterone is a potent mitogenic signal regulating genes involved in antiapoptosis, cell proliferation and growth. We investigated the role of endogenous aldosterone in renal development, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family expression. Newborn rats were treated with either spironolactone (200 mg/kg/d) in olive oil or only olive oil for 7 days. TUNEL assay and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) stain were performed on kidney sections. Immunoblots, immunohistochemical (IHC) stain, and reverse transcriptase-PCR for MAPKs were performed. PCNA-positive proliferating cells decreased and apoptotic cells increased significantly with spironolactone (P < 0.05). In the spironolactone-treated group, c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-2 expression increased, whereas extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)-2 and p38 expressions decreased in immunoblots (P < 0.05) and IHC stain. ERK-2 and p38 mRNA expressions increased in the spironolactone-treated group (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that aldosterone blockade in the developing kidney decreases cellular proliferation, increases apoptosis, and modulates the expressions of JNK-2, ERK-2, and p38. Aldosterone possibly participates in renal development and MAPK family may serve as, in part, the signaling intermediate through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the developing kidney. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 724-733, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. DNA Demethylation Upregulated Nrf2 Expression in Alzheimer’s Disease Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huimin; Wang, Li; Chen, Beibei; Zheng, Peng; He, Yi; Ding, Yubin; Deng, Yushuang; Lu, Xi; Guo, Xiuming; Zhang, Yuping; Li, Yu; Yu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an important transcription factor in the defense against oxidative stress. Cumulative evidence has shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previous animal and clinical studies had observed decreased expression of Nrf2 in AD. However, the underlying regulation mechanisms of Nrf2 in AD remain unclear. Here, we used the DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) to test whether Nrf2 expression was regulated by methylation in N2a cells characterizing by expressing human Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (N2a/APPswe). We found 5-Aza treatment increased Nrf2 at both messenger RNA and protein levels via downregulating the expression of Dnmts and DNA demethylation. In addition, 5-Aza-mediated upregulation of Nrf2 expression was concomitant with increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and higher expression of Nrf2 downstream target gene NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductas (NQO1). Our study showed that DNA demethylation promoted the Nrf2 cell signaling pathway, which may enhance the antioxidant system against AD development. PMID:26779013

  13. PROX1 Gene is Differentially Expressed in Oral Cancer and Reduces Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria F.S.D.; de Oliveira Rodini, Camila; de Aquino Xavier, Flávia C.; Paiva, Katiúcia B.; Severino, Patrícia; Moyses, Raquel A.; López, Rossana M.; DeCicco, Rafael; Rocha, Lília A.; Carvalho, Marcos B.; Tajara, Eloiza H.; Nunes, Fabio D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Homeobox genes are a family of transcription factors that play a pivotal role in embryogenesis. Prospero homeobox 1 (PROX1) has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor gene or oncogene in various types of cancer, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We have previously identified PROX1 as a downregulated gene in OSCC. The aim of this study is to clarify the underlying mechanism by which PROX1 regulates tumorigenicity of OSCC cells. PROX1 mRNA and protein expression levels were first investigated in 40 samples of OSCC and in nontumor margins. Methylation and amplification analysis was also performed to assess the epigenetic and genetic mechanisms involved in controlling PROX1 expression. OSCC cell line SCC9 was also transfected to stably express the PROX1 gene. Next, SCC9-PROX1-overexpressing cells and controls were subjected to proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion assays in vitro. OSCC samples showed reduced PROX1 expression levels compared with nontumor margins. PROX1 amplification was associated with better overall survival. PROX1 overexpression reduces cell proliferation and downregulates cyclin D1. PROX1-overexpressing cells also exhibited reduced CK18 and CK19 expression and transcriptionally altered the expression of WISP3, GATA3, NOTCH1, and E2F1. Our results suggest that PROX1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25526434

  14. Cellular distribution, subcellular localization and possible functions of basic and acidic fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed

    Eckenstein, F P; Kuzis, K; Nishi, R; Woodward, W R; Meshul, C; Sherman, L; Ciment, G

    1994-01-13

    The distribution in the rat nervous system of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) was analysed by a combination of biochemical and anatomical methods. Acidic FGF (aFGF) was found to be present exclusively in specific neuronal populations, such as motor neurons and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Basic FGF (bFGF) was found in astrocytes and in neurons in hippocampal area CA2. Within labelled astrocytes and CA2-neurons, bFGF was detected in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The levels of intracellular bFGF were manipulated by antisense oligonucleotide treatment of cultures of developing neural crest cells. Results indicated that the amount of melanogenesis in the cultures is likely to be regulated by intracellular, possibly nuclear bFGF.

  15. Nutrient sensing and insulin signaling in neuropeptide-expressing immortalized, hypothalamic neurons: A cellular model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fick, Laura J; Belsham, Denise D

    2010-08-15

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus represent a significant global health crisis. These two interrelated diseases are typified by perturbed insulin signaling in the hypothalamus. Using novel hypothalamic cell lines, we have begun to elucidate the molecular and intracellular mechanisms involved in the hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis and insulin resistance. In this review, we present evidence of insulin and glucose signaling pathways that lead to changes in neuropeptide gene expression. We have identified some of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of de novo hypothalamic insulin mRNA expression. And finally, we have defined key mechanisms involved in the etiology of cellular insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons that may play a fundamental role in cases of high levels of insulin or saturated fatty acids, often linked to the exacerbation of obesity and diabetes.

  16. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD.

  17. EZH2 mediates lidamycin-induced cellular senescence through regulating p21 expression in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Ming-Quan; Zhao, Xiao-Li; Li, Liang; Li, Li-Hui; Li, Yi; Dong, Tian-Geng; Niu, Wei-Xin; Jia, Li-Jun; Shao, Rong-Guang; Zhen, Yong-Su; Wang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Lidamycin (LDM) is a novel member of the enediyne antibiotics identified in China with potent antitumor activity. However, it remains unclear whether LDM has potential molecular targets that may affect its antitumor activity. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) functions as a histone lysine methyltransferase and mediates trimethylation on histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). High EZH2 level is found to be positively correlated with the aggressiveness, metastasis and poor prognosis of cancer. Here, we aim to study the role of EZH2 in LDM-induced senescence, as well as in the cytotoxicity of LDM in human colon cancer cells. LDM is found to be relatively more potent in inhibiting the colon cancer cells harboring high EZH2 level and induces irreversible cellular senescence at IC50 dose range, as evidenced by senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining, cell cycle arrest and molecular changes of senescence regulators including p21 in HCT116 and SW620 cells. More importantly, LDM is found to markedly inhibit EZH2 expression at both protein and mRNA levels upon the induction of p21 and cellular senescence. LDM also selectively inhibits EZH2 expression as compared with other histone lysine methyltransferases. Knockdown of p21 with siRNAs abolishes LDM-induced senescence, whereas EZH2 knockdown markedly increases p21 expression and causes senescent phenotype. Enrichment of both EZH2 and H3K27me3 levels in the p21 promoter region is reduced by LDM. Moreover, EZH2 overexpression reduces cellular senescence, p21 expression and DNA damage response upon LDM exposure. LDM also demonstrates potent antitumor efficacy in xenografted animal models. Collectively, our work provides first demonstration that EZH2 may mediate, at least partially, the senescence-inducing effects of LDM by regulating p21 expression and DNA damage effect. Thus, EZH2 may serve as a potential target and biomarker to indicate the clinical efficacy of the potent enediyne antitumor drug. PMID:27882937

  18. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Zhu, Yong; Dayal, Sahil; Whitman, Austin A.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties. PMID:27304954

  19. Expression of Arabidopsis FCS-Like Zinc finger genes is differentially regulated by sugars, cellular energy level, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer K, Muhammed; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Cellular energy status is an important regulator of plant growth, development, and stress mitigation. Environmental stresses ultimately lead to energy deficit in the cell which activates the SNF1-RELATED KINASE 1 (SnRK1) signaling cascade which eventually triggering a massive reprogramming of transcription to enable the plant to survive under low-energy conditions. The role of Arabidopsis thaliana FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) gene family in energy and stress signaling is recently come to highlight after their interaction with kinase subunits of SnRK1 were identified. In a detailed expression analysis in different sugars, energy starvation, and replenishment series, we identified that the expression of most of the FLZ genes is differentially modulated by cellular energy level. It was found that FLZ gene family contains genes which are both positively and negatively regulated by energy deficit as well as energy-rich conditions. Genetic and pharmacological studies identified the role of HEXOKINASE 1- dependent and energy signaling pathways in the sugar-induced expression of FLZ genes. Further, these genes were also found to be highly responsive to different stresses as well as abscisic acid. In over-expression of kinase subunit of SnRK1, FLZ genes were found to be differentially regulated in accordance with their response toward energy fluctuation suggesting that these genes may work downstream to the established SnRK1 signaling under low-energy stress. Taken together, the present study provides a conceptual framework for further studies related to SnRK1-FLZ interaction in relation to sugar and energy signaling and stress response.

  20. Heterologous expression, and biochemical and cellular characterization of CaPLA1 encoding a hot pepper phospholipase A1 homolog.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Eun Yu; Mang, Hyung Gon; Kim, Woo Taek

    2008-03-01

    Phospholipid signaling has been recently implicated in diverse cellular processes in higher plants. We identified a cDNA encoding the phospholipase A1 homolog (CaPLA1) from 5-day-old early roots of hot pepper. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the lipase-specific catalytic triad is well conserved in CaPLA1. In vitro lipase assays and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that CaPLA1 possesses PLA1 activity, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of phospholipids at the sn-1 position. CaPLA1 was selectively expressed in young roots, at days 4-5 after germination, and rapidly declined thereafter, suggesting that the expression of CaPLA1 is subject to control by a development-specific mechanism in roots. Because transgenic work was extremely difficult in hot peppers, in this study we overexpressed CaPLA1 in Arabidopsis so as to provide cellular information on the function of this gene. CaPLA1 overexpressors had significantly longer roots, leaves and petioles, and grew more rapidly than the wild-type plants, leading to an early bolting phenotype with prolonged inflorescence. Microscopic analysis showed that the vegetative tissues of 35S:CaPLA1 plants contained an increased number of small-sized cells, which resulted in highly populated cell layers. In addition, mRNAs for cell cycle-controlled proteins and fatty acid catabolizing enzymes were coordinately upregulated in CaPLA1-overexpressing plants. These results suggest that CaPLA1 is functionally relevant in heterologous Arabidopsis cells, and hence might participate in a subset of positive control mechanisms of cell and tissue growth in transgenic lines. We discuss possible biochemical and cellular functions of CaPLA1 in relation to the phospholipid signaling pathway in hot pepper and transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  1. Effects of polyamines on cellular innate immune response and the expression of immune-relevant genes in gilthead seabream leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Becerril, Martha; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Tovar-Ramírez, Dariel; Meseguer, José; Esteban, María Ángeles

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the polyamines spermidine and spermine, along with the diamine putrescine, are involved in many cellular processes and they are known to play an important role in the control of the innate immune response in higher vertebrates. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies have focused on their immunological implications in other vertebrates, such as fish. For this reason, the effects of polyamines on the cellular innate immune response and immune-related gene expression were evaluated in vitro, using seabream head-kidney leucocytes (HKL). For this study, head-kidney leucocytes were incubated with the polyamines putrescine, spermine or spermidine (0.005 and 0.0025%) for 0.50, 1, 2 or 4 h. No significant effect was observed on either leucocyte viability or the innate cellular immune responses (peroxidase content and phagocytic and respiratory burst activities). The polyamines produced an increase in respiratory burst and phagocytic ability when leucocytes were incubated principally with putrescine (0.005 and 0.0025%) after 2 and 4 h of the experiment. Finally, the expression levels of immune-associated genes (IgM, MHCIα, MHCIIα, C3, IL-1β, CD8, Hep, NCCRP-1, CSF-1 and TLR) were quantified by real-time PCR and some of them (C3, MHCI, CD8, IgM and Hep) were up-regulated by the higher polyamine concentration. Further studies are needed to ascertain how polyamines control the immune system of seabream as well as which mechanisms are involved.

  2. P-TEFb Kinase Complex Phosphorylates Histone H1 to Regulate Expression of Cellular and HIV-1 Genes*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Siobhan K.; Cao, Hong; Nathans, Robin; Ali, Akbar; Rana, Tariq M.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription of HIV-1 genes depends on the RNA polymerase II kinase and elongation factor positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), the complex of cyclin T1 and CDK9. Recent evidence suggests that regulation of transcription by P-TEFb involves chromatin binding and modifying factors. To determine how P-TEFb may connect chromatin remodeling to transcription, we investigated the relationship between P-TEFb and histone H1. We identify histone H1 as a substrate for P-TEFb involved in cellular and HIV-1 transcription. We show that P-TEFb interacts with H1 and that P-TEFb inhibition by RNAi, flavopiridol, or dominant negative CDK9 expression correlates with loss of phosphorylation and mobility of H1 in vivo. Importantly, P-TEFb directs H1 phosphorylation in response to wild-type HIV-1 infection, but not Tat-mutant HIV-1 infection. Our results show that P-TEFb phosphorylates histone H1 at a specific C-terminal phosphorylation site. Expression of a mutant H1.1 that cannot be phosphorylated by P-TEFb also disrupts Tat transactivation in an HIV reporter cell line as well as transcription of the c-fos and hsp70 genes in HeLa cells. We identify histone H1 as a novel P-TEFb substrate, and our results suggest new roles for P-TEFb in both cellular and HIV-1 transcription. PMID:20551309

  3. Strong reduction of AGO2 expression in melanoma and cellular consequences

    PubMed Central

    Völler, D; Reinders, J; Meister, G; Bosserhoff, A-K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Processing of microRNAs (miRNAs) is a highly controlled process. Deregulation of miRNA expression was observed in several types of cancer but changes in the miRNA-processing enzymes have not been analysed until today. In this study, we analysed Argonaute2 (AGO2, EIF2C2), as one main factor of the miRNA processing ensemble, in the context of cancer development, especially in melanoma. Methods: We determined the AGO2 expression level in melanoma, as well as in other cancers, with biochemical approaches (qRT–PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence studies) and analysed the cell behaviour in migration assays. Results: Specifically in melanoma, we revealed a strong reduction of AGO2 expression compared with primary melanocytes. The reduction of AGO2 expression was only found on protein level, whereas the mRNA level stayed unchanged hinting to post-transcriptional regulation. We could show that re-expression of AGO2 in melanoma leads to a strong improvement of regulatory effects due to increased functionality of small-interfering RNAs and short hairpin RNAs. Conclusion: We identified melanoma-specific downregulation of AGO2 and corresponding reduced RNAi efficiency. These findings will help to understand the molecular basis of malignant melanoma and can potentially lead to an improvement of therapeutic strategies. PMID:24169347

  4. Kinetics of the cellular intake of a gene expression inducer at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huy; Oliveira, Samuel M D; Goncalves, Nadia; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2015-09-01

    From in vivo single-event measurements of the transient and steady-state transcription activity of a single-copy lac-ara-1 promoter in Escherichia coli, we characterize the intake kinetics of its inducer (IPTG) from the media. We show that the empirical data are well-fit by a model of intake assuming a bilayer membrane, with the passage through the second layer being rate-limiting, coupled to a stochastic, sub-Poissonian, multi-step transcription process. Using this model, we show that for a wide range of extracellular inducer levels (up to 1.25 mM) the intake process is diffusive-like, suggesting unsaturated membrane permeability. Inducer molecules travel from the periplasm to the cytoplasm in, on average, 31.7 minutes, strongly affecting cells' response time. The novel methodology followed here should aid the study of cellular intake mechanisms at the single-event level.

  5. Expression of Cellular Components in Granulomatous Inflammatory Response in Piaractus mesopotamicus Model

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Wilson Gómez; da Silva Claudiano, Gustavo; de Castro, Marcello Pardi; Petrillo, Thalita Regina; Figueiredo, Mayra Araguaia Pereira; de Andrade Belo, Marco Antonio; Berdeal, María Isabel Quiroga; de Moraes, Julieta Engracia Rodini; de Moraes, Flávio Ruas

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to describe and characterize the cellular components during the evolution of chronic granulomatous inflammation in the teleost fish pacus (P. mesopotamicus) induced by Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), using S-100, iNOS and cytokeratin antibodies. 50 fish (120±5.0 g) were anesthetized and 45 inoculated with 20 μL (40 mg/mL) (2.0 x 106 CFU/mg) and five inoculated with saline (0,65%) into muscle tissue in the laterodorsal region. To evaluate the inflammatory process, nine fish inoculated with BCG and one control were sampled in five periods: 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 33rd days post-inoculation (DPI). Immunohistochemical examination showed that the marking with anti-S-100 protein and anti-iNOS antibodies was weak, with a diffuse pattern, between the third and seventh DPI. From the 14th to the 33rd day, the marking became stronger and marked the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Positivity for cytokeratin was initially observed in the 14th DPI, and the stronger immunostaining in the 33rd day, period in which the epithelioid cells were more evident and the granuloma was fully formed. Also after the 14th day, a certain degree of cellular organization was observed, due to the arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculated material, with little evidence of edema. The arrangement of the macrophages around the inoculum, the fibroblasts, the lymphocytes and, in most cases, the presence of melanomacrophages formed the granuloma and kept the inoculum isolated in the 33rd DPI. The present study suggested that the granulomatous experimental model using teleost fish P. mesopotamicus presented a similar response to those observed in mammals, confirming its importance for studies of chronic inflammatory reaction. PMID:25811875

  6. Cellular distribution of orally and intramuscularly administered iron dextran in newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Thorén-Tolling, K; Jönsson, L

    1977-01-01

    Histochemical studies were performed on tissues from piglets of different ages treated orally with iron dextran soon after birth. The mucosal cells in the distal region of the small intestine were heavily laden with stainable iron granules during the first three days after the iron administration. The absorptive epithelial cells are desquamated within seven to ten days after birth. Consequently, the number of iron granules gradually diminishes during the first seven days after treatment and no iron granules are demonstrated 12 days after the administration of iron. The iron dextran complex is pinocytosed in newborn piglets and then transported via the lymphatic system. Thus the sinusoidal lining cells of the body and mesenteric lymph nodes are already heavily laden with iron granules 24 hours after oral treatment. This iron store is released only slowing during the first weeks of life. Great amounts of iron granules are demonstrated in the liver and spleen macrophages during the first week after the administration of iron. Due to the rapid utilization of iron in growing piglets these iron stores diminish sharply during the weeks following birth. The distribution of stainable iron in the lymph nodes, liver and spleen seven days after intramuscular injection of iron dextran in newborn piglets was comparable to that for oral administration at that stage of the experiment. Images Fig. 1a-e. Fig. 2a-e. Fig. 3a-d. Fig. 4a-d. Fig. 5a-d. PMID:907907

  7. Foraminiferal cellular Calcium and pH distribution by laboratory observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyofuku, T.; Nomaki, H.; Tsuchiya, M.; Kitazato, H.

    2012-04-01

    Foraminifera, marine unicellular organism, have been considered as one of the major carbonate producer in ocean. Their calcareous tests are broadly utilized as paleo-environmental indicators in various studies of earth science because their tests have been archived as numerous fossil in sediment for long time and various environmental information are brought by population, morphology and geochemical fingerprints. The knowledge about the cytological process on carbonate precipitation has been described for couples of decade using by OM, SEM and TEM. Foraminiferal management of calcium and carbonate ion uptake into foraminiferal tests from ambient seawater are of great interest. Our previous studies showed the potential to understanding the biomineralization of foraminifera by the application of fluorescent indicators. Recently, we visualize the spatial distributions of cytological calcium and pH in living cell at same time. Observed results show that foraminifera controls very detailed timing of pH variation and concentration of calcium at any stage of chamber formation dynamically. These observations results will help to consider how the geochemical compositions arranging on the foraminiferal test, sensitivity of pH proxy of boron and others.

  8. Cellular turnover and expression of hypoxic-inducible factor in acute acalculous and calculous cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Vakkala, Merja; Laurila, Jouko J; Saarnio, Juha; Koivukangas, Vesa; Syrjälä, Hannu; Karttunen, Tuomo; Soini, Ylermi; Ala-Kokko, Tero I

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Epithelial corrective and destructive mechanisms have not been studied in inflammatory gallbladder disease. Methods Epithelial apoptosis, cell proliferation and expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α were compared in gallbladders from patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC; n = 30) and acute calculous cholecystitis (ACC; n = 21), and from patients undergoing surgery for other reasons (normal gallbladders; n = 9), which were removed during open cholecystectomy. The immunohistochemical stains included antibodies to Ki-67 (proliferation), M30 (apoptosis) and HIF-1α. Proliferation and apoptosis were expressed as percentages of positive cells. HIF-1α expression was expressed as absent, weak, or strong. Results Apoptosis (median [25th to 75th percentile]) was significantly increased in AAC (1.31% [0.75% to 1.8%], P < 0.001) and ACC (1.10% [0.63% to 1.64%], P = 0.001), compared with control samples (0.20% [0.07% to 0.45%]. The proliferation rate was significantly increased in AAC (8.0% [4.0% to 17.0%], P < 0.001) and ACC (14% [7.5% to 26.5%], P = 0.001) compared with control samples (1.0% [1.0% to 3.0%]). Strong HIF-1α staining was observed in 57% of AAC, in 100% of ACC and in 44% of control specimens (P < 0.001). Intense HIF-1α expression was associated with increased cell proliferation (P = 0.002). Conclusion Cell proliferation and apoptosis were increased in AAC and ACC, as compared with normal gallbladders. Expression of HIF-1α was lower in AAC than in ACC. PMID:17974017

  9. Root structure and cellular chloride, sodium and potassium distribution in salinized grapevines.

    PubMed

    Storey, R.; Schachtman, D. P.; Thomas, M. R.

    2003-06-01

    X-ray microanalysis was used to study the patterns of K+, Na+ and Cl- accumulation in salinized (25 mm NaCl) and non-salinized grapevine (Vitis) roots. The aim was to determine whether NaCl affects patterns of Cl- accumulation differentially in the roots of a Cl--excluding genotype and a non-excluding genotype. Two regions of fibrous roots were analysed: (1) a region 2-3 mm basipetal to the root tip; and (2) a region of the root 10-12 mm basipetal to the root tip where the outermost layer is the hypodermis. The ion contents of the hypodermis, cortex, endodermis and pericycle vacuoles were analysed. Data were also collected from the cytoplasm of the endodermal and pericycle cells. The analyses showed that the ion profiles of the hypodermis and the endodermis were significantly different from those of the cortex and pericycle. The hypodermis and endodermis had higher K+ and lower Na+ and Cl- than surrounding cells. Some changes due to salinity such as increased K+ concentrations in the hypodermis were also noted. Chloride concentrations did not differ between the genotypes in the hypodermis, across the cortex or in the endodermis, but were higher in the pericycle of the excluder in comparison with the non-excluding genotype. However, K+/Na+ ratios of the cortex and endodermis were higher in the excluder. The pericycle cells exhibited the greatest ability to sequester Na+ and Cl- in vacuoles. Overall the data show cell-type-specific ion accumulation patterns and small but significant differences were found between genotypes. The possibility that these accumulation patterns arise from differences in uptake properties of cell types and/or result from the spatial distribution of the cell types along the competing symplastic and apoplastic ion transport pathways across the root is discussed.

  10. Cellular Localization and Regulation of Expression of the PLET1 Gene in Porcine Placenta.

    PubMed

    Teng, Liu; Hong, Linjun; Liu, Ruize; Chen, Ran; Li, Xinyun; Yu, Mei

    2016-12-07

    The placenta expressed transcript 1 (PLET1) gene, which is expressed in placentas of pigs and mice, has been found to have a potential role in trophoblast cell fate decision in mice. Results of this study showed that the porcine PLET1 mRNA and protein were expressed exclusively in trophoblast cells on Days 15, 26, 50, and 95 of gestation (gestation length in the pig is 114 days), indicating that the PLET1 could be a useful marker for porcine trophoblast cells. Additionally, PLET1 protein was found to be redistributed from cytoplasm to the apical side of trophoblast cells as gestation progresses, which suggests a role of PLET1 in the establishment of a stable trophoblast and endometrial epithelial layers. In addition, two transcripts that differ in the 3' UTR length but encode identical protein were identified to be generated by the alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), and the expression of PLET1-L transcript was significantly upregulated in porcine placentas as gestation progresses. Furthermore, we demonstrated the interaction between the miR-365-3p and PLET1 gene using luciferase assay system. Our findings imply an important role of PLET1 in the placental development in pigs.

  11. Cellular Localization and Regulation of Expression of the PLET1 Gene in Porcine Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Liu; Hong, Linjun; Liu, Ruize; Chen, Ran; Li, Xinyun; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The placenta expressed transcript 1 (PLET1) gene, which is expressed in placentas of pigs and mice, has been found to have a potential role in trophoblast cell fate decision in mice. Results of this study showed that the porcine PLET1 mRNA and protein were expressed exclusively in trophoblast cells on Days 15, 26, 50, and 95 of gestation (gestation length in the pig is 114 days), indicating that the PLET1 could be a useful marker for porcine trophoblast cells. Additionally, PLET1 protein was found to be redistributed from cytoplasm to the apical side of trophoblast cells as gestation progresses, which suggests a role of PLET1 in the establishment of a stable trophoblast and endometrial epithelial layers. In addition, two transcripts that differ in the 3′ UTR length but encode identical protein were identified to be generated by the alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), and the expression of PLET1-L transcript was significantly upregulated in porcine placentas as gestation progresses. Furthermore, we demonstrated the interaction between the miR-365-3p and PLET1 gene using luciferase assay system. Our findings imply an important role of PLET1 in the placental development in pigs. PMID:27941613

  12. Effect of passage number on cellular response DNA-damaging agents: cell survival and gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Wolschak, G.E.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of different passage numbers on plating efficiency, doubling time, cell growth, and radiation sensitivity was assessed in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Changes in gene expression after UV or {gamma}-ray irradiation at different passage numbers were also examined. The SHE cells were maintained in culture medium for up to 64 passages. Cells were exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 254-m UV radiation. Differential display of cDNAs and Northern blots were used for the study of gene expression. With increasing passage number, SHE cells demonstrated decreased doubling time, increased plating efficiency, and a decreased yield in the number of cells per plate. Between passages 41 and 48 a ``crisis`` period was evident during which time cell growth in high serum (20%) was no longer optimal, and serum concentrations were reduced (to 10%) to maintain cell growth. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was no different between early- and intermediate-passage cells. However, after UV exposure at low passages (passage 3), confluent cells were more sensitive to the killing effects of UV than were log-phase cells. At intermediate passages (passages 43, 48), confluent cells were slightly more radioresistant- than were log-phase cells. By passage 64, however, both confluent and log-phase cells showed similar patterns of UV sensitivity. Expression of {gamma}-actin, PCNA, and p53 transcripts did not change following UV exposure. p53 mRNA was induced following {gamma}-ray exposure of the intermediate (passage 45) epithelial cells. Differential display, however, revealed changes in expression of several transcripts following exposure to ionizing and ultraviolet radiations. The observed differences in radiation sensitivity associated with increasing passage number may be influenced by radiation-induced gene expression. We are conducting experiments to identify these genes.

  13. Alterations in microRNA Expression in Stress-induced Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guorong; Luna, Coralia; Qiu, Jianming; Epstein, David L.; Gonzalez, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Summary We investigated miRNA expression changes associated with stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) in primary cultures of human diploid fibroblasts (HDF) and human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells. Twenty-five miRNAs were identified by miRNA microarray analysis and their changes in expression were validated by TaqMan realtime RT-PCR in three independent cell lines of HTM and HDF. SIPS in both HTM and HDF cell types was associated with significant down-regulation of four members of the miR-15 family and five miRNAs of the miR-106b family located in the oncogenic clusters miR-17–92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25. SIPS was also associated with up-regulation of two miRNAs (182 and 183) from the miR-183-96-182 cluster. Transfection with miR-106a agomir inhibited the up-regulation of p21CDKN1A associated with SIPS while transfection with miR-106a antagomir led to increased p21CDKN1A expression in senescent cells. In addition, we identified retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARG) as a target of miR-182 and showed that this protein was down-regulated during SIPS in HDF and HTM cells. These results suggest that changes in miRNA expression might contribute to phenotypic alterations of senescent cells by modulating the expression of key regulatory proteins such as p21CDKN1A as well as by targeting genes that are down-regulated in senescent cells such as RARG. PMID:19782699

  14. Cellular retinol-binding protein-1 is transiently expressed in granulation tissue fibroblasts and differentially expressed in fibroblasts cultured from different organs.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, G.; Redard, M.; Gabbiani, G.; Neuville, P.

    1997-01-01

    We have reported that cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) is transiently expressed by arterial smooth muscle cells during experimental intimal repair (P. Neuville, A. Geinoz, G. Benzonana, M. Redard, F. Gabbiani, P. Ropraz, G. Gabbiani: Am J Pathol 1997, 150:509-521). We have examined here the expression of CRBP-1 during wound healing after a full-thickness rat skin wound. CRBP-1 was transiently expressed by a significant proportion of fibroblastic cells including myofibroblasts. Expression started 4 days after wounding, reached a maximum at 12 days, and persisted up to 30 days when a scar was formed. After wound closure, most CRBP-1-containing fibroblastic cells underwent apoptosis. We have further investigated CRBP-1 expression in rat fibroblasts cultured from different organs. CRBP-1 was abundant in lung and heart fibroblasts and was detected in decreasing amounts in muscle, tendon, subcutaneous tissue, and granulation tissue fibroblasts. Dermis fibroblasts contained no detectable levels of CRBP-1. All-trans retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibited cell proliferation and increased CRBP-1 expression in fibroblastic populations except dermis fibroblasts. We demonstrate that during granulation tissue formation a subpopulation of fibroblastic cells express CRBP-1 de novo. We also demonstrate that CRBP-1 expression by fibroblasts is regulated in vitro by retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1. Our results suggest that CRBP-1 and possibly retinoic acid play a role in the evolution of granulation tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9403724

  15. Cellular distribution of chromogranin A in excitatory, inhibitory, aminergic and peptidergic neurons of the rodent central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M.K.-H.; Mahata, S.K.; Stroth, N.; Eiden, L.E.; Weihe, E.

    2010-01-01

    Immunoreactivity for both processed and unprocessed forms of chromogranin A (CGA) was examined, using an antibody recognizing the WE14 epitope, among terminal fields and cell bodies of anatomically defined GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic, catecholaminergic, and peptidergic cell groups in the rodent central nervous system. CGA is ubiquitous within neuronal cell bodies, with no obvious anatomical or chemically-coded subdivision of the nervous system in which CGA is not expressed in most neurons. CGA expression is essentially absent from catecholaminergic terminal fields in the CNS, suggesting a relative paucity of large dense-core vesicles in CNS compared to peripheral catecholaminergic neurons. Extensive synaptic co-localization with classical transmitter markers is not observed even in areas such as amygdala, where CGA fibers are numerous, suggesting preferential segregation of CGA to peptidergic terminals in CNS. Localization of CGA in dendrites in some areas of CNS may indicate its involvement in regulation of dendritic release mechanisms. Finally, the ubiquitous presence of CGA in neuronal cell somata, especially pronounced in GABAergic neurons, suggests a second non-secretory vesicle-associated function for CGA in CNS. We propose that CGA may function in the CNS as a prohormone and granulogenic factor in some terminal fields, but also possesses as-yet unknown unique cellular functions within neuronal somata and dendrites. PMID:20005907

  16. Changes in the expression of the human adenine nucleotide translocase isoforms condition cellular metabolic/proliferative status

    PubMed Central

    Mampel, Teresa; Viñas, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Human cells express four mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (hANT) isoforms that are tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. hANT1 is mainly expressed in terminally differentiated muscle cells; hANT2 is growth-regulated and is upregulated in highly glycolytic and proliferative cells; and hANT3 is considered to be ubiquitous and non-specifically regulated. Here, we studied how the expression of hANT isoforms is regulated by proliferation and in response to metabolic stimuli, and examined the metabolic consequences of their silencing and overexpression. In HeLa and HepG2 cells, expression of hANT3 was upregulated by shifting metabolism towards oxidation or by slowed growth associated with contact inhibition or growth-factor deprivation, indicating that hANT3 expression is highly regulated. Under these conditions, changes in hANT2 mRNA expression were not observed in either HeLa or HepG2 cells, whereas in SGBS preadipocytes (which, unlike HeLa and HepG2 cells, are growth-arrest-sensitive cells), hANT2 mRNA levels decreased. Additionally, overexpression of hANT2 promoted cell growth and glycolysis, whereas silencing of hANT3 decreased cellular ATP levels, limited cell growth and induced a stress-like response. Thus, cancer cells require both hANT2 and hANT3, depending on their proliferation status: hANT2 when proliferation rates are high, and hANT3 when proliferation slows. PMID:26842067

  17. Primate Lentiviruses Modulate NF-κB Activity by Multiple Mechanisms to Fine-Tune Viral and Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Heusinger, Elena; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) plays a complex role during the replication of primate lentiviruses. On the one hand, NF-κB is essential for induction of efficient proviral gene expression. On the other hand, this transcription factor contributes to the innate immune response and induces expression of numerous cellular antiviral genes. Recent data suggest that primate lentiviruses cope with this challenge by boosting NF-κB activity early during the replication cycle to initiate Tat-driven viral transcription and suppressing it at later stages to minimize antiviral gene expression. Human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) initially exploit their accessory Nef protein to increase the responsiveness of infected CD4+ T cells to stimulation. Increased NF-κB activity initiates Tat expression and productive replication. These events happen quickly after infection since Nef is rapidly expressed at high levels. Later during infection, Nef proteins of HIV-2 and most SIVs exert a very different effect: by down-modulating the CD3 receptor, an essential factor for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, they prevent stimulation of CD4+ T cells via antigen-presenting cells and hence suppress further induction of NF-κB and an effective antiviral immune response. Efficient LTR-driven viral transcription is maintained because it is largely independent of NF-κB in the presence of Tat. In contrast, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and its simian precursors have lost the CD3 down-modulation function of Nef and use the late viral protein U (Vpu) to inhibit NF-κB activity by suppressing its nuclear translocation. In this review, we discuss how HIV-1 and other primate lentiviruses might balance viral and antiviral gene expression through a tight temporal regulation of NF-κB activity throughout their replication cycle. PMID:28261165

  18. Concomitant cellular and humoral expression of a regulatory cross-reactive idiotype in acute Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kresina, T F; Olds, G R

    1986-01-01

    In this study the expression of a regulatory cross-reactive idiotype (SJ-CRIM), which is associated with anti-soluble egg antigen (SEA) molecules in murine Schistosoma japonicum infection, is described. Both humoral and cellular components of the immune response were analyzed during the course of infection with S. japonicum. In the humoral immune response, the content of SJ-CRIM decreases as the titer of anti-SEA antibody increases throughout infection. Quantitatively, values for serum ranged from 13.8 +/- 0.3 micrograms of SJ-CRIM, which binds anti-idiotypic antibody per ml of serum at 6 weeks postinfection, to 1.3 +/- 1.8 micrograms/ml at 30 weeks postinfection. Analysis of splenic cell subpopulations for expression of SJ-CRIM revealed that only splenic B cells expressed SJ-CRIM during acute infection (5 to 10 weeks postinfection). On the other hand, thymic cells with a high expression of the SJ-CRIM and Ly-1 marker were observed in acute infections up to 15 weeks postinfection. These data indicate that SJ-CRIM-bearing T cells are selectively localized in acute infection. In addition, the disappearance of expression of SJ-CRIM in serum and cells of chronically infected animals parallels the modulation of granulomatous inflammation and portal hypertension. Results of this study suggest that expression of SJ-CRIM on anti-SEA molecules could represent a marker for acute infection, while its disappearance from serum serves as a marker for modulation of disease. PMID:2873105

  19. Minireview: Long Noncoding RNAs: New “Links” Between Gene Expression and Cellular Outcomes in Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Miao

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies have revealed that the genome is extensively transcribed, yielding a large repertoire of noncoding RNAs. These include long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), mRNA-like molecules that do not code for proteins, which are emerging as a new class of RNAs that play important roles in a variety of cellular processes. Ongoing studies are revealing new insights about lncRNAs, including their physiological functions, disease relationships, and molecular mechanisms of action. Characterized lncRNAs have been shown to interact with and modulate the activity of other RNAs and protein partners, leading to alterations in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory processes. In this review, we summarize the key features of lncRNAs, their molecular mechanisms of action, biological functions, and therapeutic implications, particularly as they apply to the field of molecular endocrinology. In addition, we provide a brief overview of how molecular biologists are beginning to probe the identity, mechanisms, and functions of this emerging class of RNA molecules. PMID:23885095

  20. Identification, expression pattern, cellular location and potential role of the caveolin-1 gene from Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejie; Yao, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Cheng; Chu, Bing; Liu, Yan; Mei, Yanli; Wu, Yang; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2014-05-01

    Caveolins are integral membrane proteins that serve as scaffolds to recruit numerous signaling molecules. Caveolins play an important role in membrane trafficking, signal transduction, substrate transport and endocytosis in differentiated cells. In this study, a caveolin-1 gene from Artemia sinica (As-cav-1) was successfully cloned for the first time. The full-length cDNA of As-cav-1 comprises 974 bp, with a 675 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a polypeptide of 224 amino acids with a caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD) and two transmembrane domains. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the putative As-CAV-1 protein sequence was relatively conserved across species, especially in the CSD domain. Real-time PCR revealed high levels of the As-cav-1 transcript at 0h of embryo development. Furthermore, As-cav-1 transcripts were highly upregulated under high salinity (200‰) and low temperature stresses (15°C). To further characterize As-cav-1, recombinant pET30a-cav-1 protein was expressed using a prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant protein comprised 290 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 32kDa, and a predicted isoelectric point of 5.6. Western blotting of the expression levels of As-CAV-1 during different embryo development stages revealed that As-CAV-1 levels decreased gradually during development stages from 0 h to 40 h, and increased at 3d. Furthermore, western blotting showed that As-CAV-1 was upregulated to its highest expression level by low temperature stress (15°C) and high salinity. Confocal laser microscopy analysis, using antibodies generated against the recombinant As-CAV-1 protein, showed that As-CAV-1 was mostly located in the cell membrane. Our results suggested that As-cav-1 plays a vital role in protecting embryos from high salt damage and low temperature stress, especially during post-diapause embryonic development.

  1. The cellular context of AID expressing cells in fish lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Holly L; Oko, Andrea L; Scott, Amanda N; Fan, Chia Wei; Magor, Brad G

    2010-06-01

    It has long been held that the cold-blooded vertebrates lack mammalian-like germinal centers, though they do have affinity maturation and the immunoglobulin mutator activation-induced cytidine deaminase or AID. Using AID as a marker of sites of somatic hypermutation, we have identified discrete cell clusters of up to several thousand cells, in the spleen and kidney of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), which may be primordial germinal centers. In situ hybridization revealed that AID expressing cells are interspersed or surrounded by a population of pigmented CSF1-R expressing cells called melano-macrophages. Significantly, melano-macrophages or associated reticular cells have been previously noted for their ability to retain soluble antigen on or near their surface for several weeks following vaccination. Laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR were used to establish that these cell clusters also contained cells expressing Ig heavy chain transcripts as well as transcripts of TcRbeta and the putative CD4 homologue of fish. These observations, coupled with past work showing that mutations develop in B-cell lineages in fishes, allow us to develop a model for how affinity maturation may have evolved in early gnathostome vertebrates.

  2. Adaptive expression pattern of different proteins involved in cellular calcium homeostasis in denervated rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Quintas, Luis Eduardo M; Cunha, Valéria M N; Scaramello, Christianne B V; da Silva, Cláudia L M; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Lafayette, Simone S L; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Noël, François

    2005-11-21

    The activity and protein expression of plasma membrane and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPases and ryanodine receptors were investigated in surgically denervated rat vas deferens. The function of thapsigargin-sensitive but not thapsigargin-resistant (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase (from sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum and plasma membrane, respectively), evidenced by enzyme activity and Ca2+ uptake experiments, was significantly depressed by 30-50% when compared to innervated vas. Western blots showed that such reduction in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase performance was accompanied by a decrement of similar magnitude in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase type 2 protein expression, without any significant change in plasma membrane (Ca2+-Mg2+)ATPase expression. Finally, [3H]ryanodine binding revealed that the density of ryanodine binding sites was reduced by 45% after denervation without modification in affinity. The present findings demonstrate that sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum proteins involved in intracellular calcium homeostasis are clearly down-regulated and brings further evidence of a modified calcium translocation in denervated rat vas deferens.

  3. Sodium Methyldithiocarbamate Exerts Broad Inhibition of Cellular Signaling and Expression of Effector Molecules of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD) is one of the most abundantly used conventional pesticides in the United States. At dosages relevant to occupational exposure, it causes major effects on the immune system in mice, including a decreased resistance to sepsis. This lab has identified some of the mechanisms of action of this compound and some of the immunological parameters affected, but the global effects have not previously been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to conduct transcriptomic analysis of the effects of SMD on lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of mediators important in innate immunity and inflammation. The results revealed broad effects on expression of transcription factors in both branches of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling (MyD88 and TRIF). However, TLR3 and interferon signaling pathways were decreased to a greater extent, and assessment of the effects of SMD on polyinosinic polycytidylic acid–induced cytokine and chemokine production revealed that these responses mediated by TLR3 were indeed sensitive to the effects of SMD, with inhibition occurring at lower dosages than required to inhibit responses to other immunological stimuli tested in our previous studies. In the downstream signaling pathways of these TLRs, functional analysis also revealed that NF-κB activation was inhibited by SMD, as indicated by gene expression analysis and a reporter construct in mice. A previously unreported effect on luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone pathways was also observed. PMID:24056979

  4. Physiological, cellular and biochemical thermal stress response of intertidal shrimps with different vertical distributions: Palaemon elegans and Palaemon serratus.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joana; Costa, Pedro M; Larguinho, Miguel; Vinagre, Catarina; Diniz, Mário S

    2015-05-01

    The ability to cope with high temperature variations is a critical factor in intertidal communities. Two species of intertidal rocky shore shrimps (Palaemon sp.) with different vertical distributions were collected from the Portuguese coast in order to test if they were differentially sensitive to thermal stress. Three distinct levels of biological organization (organismal, biochemical, and cellular) were surveyed. The shrimp were exposed to a constant rate of temperature increase of 1°C x h(-1), starting at 20°C until reaching the CTMax (critical thermal maximum). During heat stress, two biomarkers of protein damage were quantified in the muscle via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays: heat shock proteins HSP70 (hsp70/hsc70) and total ubiquitin. Muscle histopathological alterations caused by temperature were also evaluated. CTMax values were not significantly different between the congeners (P. elegans 33.4 ± 0.5 °C; P. serratus 33.0 ± 0.5 °C). Biomarker levels did not increase along the temperature trial, but P. elegans (higher intertidal) showed higher amounts of HSP70 and total ubiquitin than P. serratus (lower intertidal). HSP70 and total ubiquitin levels showed a positive significant correlation in both species, suggesting that their association is important in thermal tolerance. Histopathological observations of muscle tissue in P. serratus showed no gross alterations due to temperature but did show localized atrophy of muscle fibers at CTMax. In P. elegans, alterations occurred at a larger scale, showing multiple foci of atrophic muscular fascicles caused by necrotic or autolytic processes. In conclusion, Palaemon congeners displayed different responses to stress at a cellular level, with P. elegans having greater biomarker levels and histopathological alterations.

  5. BDNF and NT-3 expression by using glucocorticoid-induced bicistronic expression vector pGC-BDNF-IRES-NT3 protects apoptotic cells in a cellular injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Gu, Jiaxiang; Wang, Jingcheng; Feng, Xingmin; Tao, Yuping; Jiang, Baichuan; He, Jinshan; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Jiandong; Zhang, Shenfei; Cai, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2012-04-11

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe traumatic disease in the central nervous system with high incidence and high morbidity. Recent study demonstrated that cell transplantation therapy may improve local microenvironment of the injury site and promote nerve regeneration to restore spinal cord functions. In this study, we constructed a glucocorticoid-induced bicistronic eukaryotic expression vector pGC-BDNF-IRES-NT3 by using molecular cloning techniques and examined the protective effect of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expressed by this vector in a rat spinal cord injury (SCI) model. We first connected glucocorticoid response element (GRE) to cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter and then the GRE-CMV gene was inserted into pEGFP-1 vector to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pGC-EGFP. Western blot analysis was used to confirm the expression of EGFP by transfecting this vector in RN-DSC cells. The IRES was used to connect BDNF gene and NT-3 gene and replaced the EGFP gene in pGC-EGFP plasmid to form the bicistronic expression vector-pGC-BDNF-IRES-NT3. After RN-DSC cells were transfected with the plasmid and treated with glucocorticoid, BDNF and NT-3 expression in the culture medium were measured by ELISA method. Finally, we found that combination therapy with the transfection of this vector and glucocorticoid had an anti-apoptotic effect in a cellular SCI model of RN-DSC cells. Therefore, the co-expression of BDNF and NT-3 by using this vector rescued the injured cells. This provided useful information for the gene-modification cell transplantation combined with glucocorticoid for the treatment of SCI.

  6. Secretory proteins characteristic of environmental changes in cellular signal transduction: Expression in oral fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Burke, J. C.; Sivakumar, T. P.; Hand, A. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Past studies have shown that both hypo- and hyper-gravity have significant consequences on a variety of tissues and organ systems. It is not known if the effects of environmental stimuli such as altered gravity are beneficial or detrimental, and if the effects can be prevented or reversed. Animal experiments from the Space Lab and Cosmos missions indicate that events that are mediated by cyclic AMP, such as cellular responses to catecholamine and peptide hormone action, are significantly altered in a number of tissues as a consequence of space flight. A secretory cyclic AMP-receptor protein (cARP), is present in saliva, and can serve as an indicator of individual responses to physiologic and environmental stress. Animal experiments have shown that the hypergravity component of space flight is a significant stress factor. In humans, cARP levels in each individual are constant under normal conditions, but elevated after acute stress. Additionally, the levels of cARP in secreted saliva can be compared to those in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), which reflects the protein composition of serum. The ratio of cARP in saliva to that in GCF can be used as a measure of basal compared to hyper-or hypo-gravity values. An ultimate goal is to test hyper and zero G responses in human saliva to determine if cARP is a suitable index of acute and chronic stress. A miniaturized test kit for saliva collection has been designed. Samples can be collected and stored till analyses are carried out that will distinguish the effects of increased gravity from those of one and zero G. Such tests can serve as an individualized monitoring system for physiologic responses either in space or on earth. .

  7. Mutant IDH1 Expression Drives TERT Promoter Reactivation as Part of the Cellular Transformation Process.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Johannessen, Tor-Christian; Mancini, Andrew; Chow, Tracy T; Wood, Matthew; Jones, Lindsey; Mazor, Tali; Marshall, Roxanne E; Viswanath, Pavithra; Walsh, Kyle M; Perry, Arie; Bell, Robert J A; Phillips, Joanna J; Costello, Joseph F; Ronen, Sabrina M; Pieper, Russell O

    2016-11-15

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene IDH1 are common in low-grade glioma, where they result in the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), disrupted patterns of histone methylation, and gliomagenesis. IDH1 mutations also cosegregate with mutations in the ATRX gene and the TERT promoter, suggesting that IDH mutation may drive the creation or selection of telomere-stabilizing events as part of immortalization/transformation process. To determine whether and how this may occur, we investigated the phenotype of pRb-/p53-deficient human astrocytes engineered with IDH1 wild-type (WT) or R132H-mutant (IDH1(mut)) genes as they progressed through their lifespan. IDH1(mut) expression promoted 2HG production and altered histone methylation within 20 population doublings (PD) but had no effect on telomerase expression or telomere length. Accordingly, cells expressing either IDH1(WT) or IDH1(mut) entered a telomere-induced crisis at PD 70. In contrast, only IDH1(mut) cells emerged from crisis, grew indefinitely in culture, and formed colonies in soft agar and tumors in vivo Clonal populations of postcrisis IDH1(mut) cells displayed shared genetic alterations, but no mutations in ATRX or the TERT promoter were detected. Instead, these cells reactivated telomerase and stabilized their telomeres in association with increased histone lysine methylation (H3K4me3) and c-Myc/Max binding at the TERT promoter. Overall, these results show that although IDH1(mut) does not create or select for ATRX or TERT promoter mutations, it can indirectly reactivate TERT, and in doing so contribute to astrocytic immortalization and transformation. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6680-9. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    High-voltage-activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes, including the influx of extracellular Ca(2+), neurotransmitter release, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α(1) pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α(2)δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α(2)δ(3) subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study using RT-PCR, a single band at ∼ 305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α(2)δ(3) subunit fragment was found in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123-kDa band. Immunohistochemistry with an affinity-purified antibody to the α(2)δ(3) subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer and the outer plexiform layer. α(2)δ(3) immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine, and bipolar cells and photoreceptors, but not horizontal cells. The expression of the α(2)δ(3) calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests that this subunit participates widely in Ca-channel-mediated signaling in the retina.

  9. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Luis Pérez de Sevilla; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    High voltage activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes including the influx of extracellular Ca2+, neurotransmitter release, gene transcription and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α1 pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α2δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α2δ3 subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study, using RT-PCR a single band at ~305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α2δ3 subunit fragment was in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123 kDa band. Immunohistochemistry using an affinity purified antibody to the α2δ3 subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL), and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the outer plexiform layer (OPL). α2δ3 immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine and bipolar cells, and photoreceptors, but not by horizontal cells. The expression of the α2δ3 calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests this subunit participates widely in Ca channel-mediated signaling in the retina. PMID:25631988

  10. Cellular localization, expression and functional implications of the utero-placental endothelin system during maintenance and termination of canine gestation.

    PubMed

    Gram, Aykut; Boos, Alois; Kowalewski, Mariusz P

    2017-02-20

    Utero-placental (Ut-Pl) angiogenesis and blood flow are fundamental for successful outcome of pregnancy. They are controlled by numerous vasodilator and vasoconstrictor systems such as endothelins (EDNs) and the renin angiotensin system. Dogs possess an invasive type of placentation, classified as endotheliochorial. Despite increasing knowledge regarding canine Ut-Pl function, little information exists on uterine and placental vascular activity during initiation, maintenance and termination of pregnancy in this species. The current study investigated expression of EDNs and their receptors (EDNRA and EDNRB) in the pre-implantation uterus and Ut-Pl compartments during gestation and at normal parturition, as well as in mid-pregnant dogs treated with the antigestagen aglepristone. The Ut-Pl mRNA expression of EDN1 and EDNRA was constant until mid-gestation and increased significantly during prepartum luteolysis. In contrast, EDN2 was highest pre-implantation and decreased following placentation, remaining low thereafter. Expression of the EDN-activating enzyme ECE1 and mRNA of EDNRB increased towards mid-gestation and was further elevated at prepartum luteolysis. Antigestagen treatment resulted in increased levels of EDN1 and EDNRA. At the cellular level, the uterine expression of EDN1, ECE1 and EDNRB was found predominantly in the endometrial surface and glandular epithelial cells; uterine signals for EDNRA were weak. In Ut-Pl all targets were mainly localized in the placenta fetalis, with syncytiotrophoblast staining stronger for ECE1 and EDNRB. In contrast, EDNRA stained strongly at the base of the placental labyrinth. Expression and localization of EDNs (EDN-1, -2), EDN receptors and ECE1 in the placenta fetalis suggests their involvement in the trophoblast invasion and proliferation.

  11. Reversed cellular polarity in primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma: A study on tight junction protein expression in sweat gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yusuke; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2017-04-01

    Primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma (PCMC) is a rare sweat gland tumor characterized by the presence of abundant mucin around the tumor islands, but the molecular mechanisms for this structure are not well elucidated. Because mucin is epithelial in nature, it is likely to be produced by epithelial tumor cells, not by surrounding stromal cells. We hypothesized that the abundant mucin is a result of reversed cellular polarity of the tumor. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an immunohistological study to investigate expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin and ZO-1 in PCMC, as well as in normal sweat glands and other sweat gland tumors. Dot-like or linear expression of TJ proteins was observed at ductal structures of sweat glands, and ductal or cystic structures of related tumors. In PCMC, however, TJ protein expression was clearly visible at the edges of tumor cell islands. This study provides evidence to show that the characteristic histological structure of PCMC is caused by inverse polarization of the tumor cells, and that TJ proteins are useful markers of ductal differentiation in sweat gland tumors.

  12. Cytokines, Chaperones and Neuroinflammatory Responses in Heroin-Related Death: What Can We Learn from Different Patterns of Cellular Expression?

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Margherita; Panata, Laura; Bacci, Mauro; Fiore, Carmela; Riezzo, Irene; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Heroin (3,6-diacetylmorphine) has various effects on the central nervous system with several neuropathological alterations including hypoxic-ischemic brain damage from respiratory depressing effects and neuroinflammatory response. Both of these mechanisms induce the release of cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory mediators by the activation of many cell types such as leucocytes and endothelial and glial cells, especially microglia, the predominant immunocompetent cell type within the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to clarify the correlation between intravenous heroin administration in heroin related death and the neuroinflammatory response. We selected 45 cases among autopsies executed for heroin-related death (358 total cases); immunohistochemical studies and Western blotting analyses were used to investigate the expression of brain markers such as tumor necrosis factor-α, oxygen-regulated protein 150, (interleukins) IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, cyclooxygenase-2, heat shock protein 70, and CD68 (MAC387). Findings demonstrated that morphine induces inflammatory response and cytokine release. In particular, oxygen-regulated protein 150, cyclooxygenase-2, heat shock protein 70, IL-6 and IL-15 cytokines were over-expressed with different patterns of cellular expression. PMID:24084728

  13. Broad MICA/B Expression in the Small Bowel Mucosa: A Link between Cellular Stress and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Yessica L.; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Cueto Rua, Eduardo; Chopita, Nestor; Fuertes, Mercedes; Zwirner, Norberto W.; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The MICA/B genes (MHC class I chain related genes A and B) encode for non conventional class I HLA molecules which have no role in antigen presentation. MICA/B are up-regulated by different stress conditions such as heat-shock, oxidative stress, neoplasic transformation and viral infection. Particularly, MICA/B are expressed in enterocytes where they can mediate enterocyte apoptosis when recognised by the activating NKG2D receptor present on intraepithelial lymphocytes. This mechanism was suggested to play a major pathogenic role in active celiac disease (CD). Due to the importance of MICA/B in CD pathogenesis we studied their expression in duodenal tissue from CD patients. By immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and flow cytometry we established that MICA/B was mainly intracellularly located in enterocytes. In addition, we identified MICA/B+ T cells in both the intraepithelial and lamina propria compartments. We also found MICA/B+ B cells, plasma cells and some macrophages in the lamina propria. The pattern of MICA/B staining in mucosal tissue in severe enteropathy was similar to that found in in vitro models of cellular stress. In such models, MICA/B were located in stress granules that are associated to the oxidative and ER stress response observed in active CD enteropathy. Our results suggest that expression of MICA/B in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients is linked to disregulation of mucosa homeostasis in which the stress response plays an active role. PMID:24058482

  14. Achaete-Scute Homolog 1 Expression Controls Cellular Differentiation of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kasim, Mumtaz; Heß, Vicky; Scholz, Holger; Persson, Pontus B.; Fähling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the major cause of infant cancer deaths, results from fast proliferation of undifferentiated neuroblasts. Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma includes differentiation with retinoic acid (RA); however, the resistance of many of these tumors to RA-induced differentiation poses a considerable challenge. Human achaete-scute homolog 1 (hASH1) is a proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor essential for neurogenesis and is often upregulated in neuroblastoma. Here, we identified a novel function for hASH1 in regulating the differentiation phenotype of neuroblastoma cells. Global analysis of 986 human neuroblastoma datasets revealed a negative correlation between hASH1 and neuron differentiation that was independent of the N-myc (MYCN) oncogene. Using RA to induce neuron differentiation in two neuroblastoma cell lines displaying high and low levels of hASH1 expression, we confirmed the link between hASH1 expression and the differentiation defective phenotype, which was reversed by silencing hASH1 or by hypoxic preconditioning. We further show that hASH1 suppresses neuronal differentiation by inhibiting transcription at the RA receptor element. Collectively, our data indicate hASH1 to be key for understanding neuroblastoma resistance to differentiation therapy and pave the way for hASH1-targeted therapies for augmenting the response of neuroblastoma to differentiation therapy. PMID:28066180

  15. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  16. Potential for cellular stress response to hepatic factor VIII expression from AAV vector

    PubMed Central

    Zolotukhin, Irene; Markusic, David M; Palaschak, Brett; Hoffman, Brad E; Srikanthan, Meera A; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are coagulation disorders resulting from the loss of functional coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX proteins, respectively. Gene therapy for hemophilia with adeno-associated virus vectors has shown efficacy in hemophilia B patients. Although hemophilia A patients are more prevalent, the development of therapeutic adeno-associated virus vectors has been impeded by the size of the F8 cDNA and impaired secretion of FVIII protein. Further, it has been reported that over-expression of the FVIII protein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response pathway both in vitro and in hepatocytes in vivo, presumably due to retention of misfolded FVIII protein within the endoplasmic reticulum. Engineering of the F8 transgene, including removal of the B domain (BDD-FVIII) and codon optimization, now allows for the generation of adeno-associated virus vectors capable of expressing therapeutic levels of FVIII. Here we sought to determine if the risks of inducing the unfolded protein response in murine hepatocytes extend to adeno-associated virus gene transfer. Although our data show a mild activation of unfolded protein response markers following F8 gene delivery at a certain vector dose in C57BL/6 mice, it was not augmented upon further elevated dosing, did not induce liver pathology or apoptosis, and did not impact FVIII immunogenicity. PMID:27738644

  17. Dietary Restriction Mitigates Cocaine-Induced Alterations of Olfactory Bulb Cellular Plasticity and Gene Expression, and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangru; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Hall, F. Scott; Perona, Maria T.G.; Pistell, Paul J.; Lathia, Justin D; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Becker, Kevin G; Ladenheim, Bruce; Niklason, Laura E; Uhl, George R.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Because the olfactory system plays a major role in food consumption, and because “food addiction” and associated morbidities have reached epidemic proportions, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy restriction can modify adverse effects of cocaine on behavior and olfactory cellular and molecular plasticity. Mice maintained on an alternate day fasting (ADF) diet exhibited increased baseline locomotion and increased cocaine-sensitized locomotion during cocaine conditioning, despite no change in cocaine conditioned place preference, compared to mice fed ad libitum. Levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the olfactory bulb (OB) were suppressed in mice on the ADF diet compared to mice on the control diet, independent of acute or chronic cocaine treatment. The expression of several enzymes involved in dopamine metabolism including tyrosine hydroxylase, monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOA), and catechol-O-methyltransferase were significantly reduced in OBs of mice on the ADF diet. Both acute and chronic administration of cocaine suppressed the production of new OB cells, and this effect of cocaine was attenuated in mice on the ADF diet. Cocaine administration to mice on the control diet resulted in up-regulation of OB genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism, synaptic plasticity, cellular stress responses, and calcium- and cyclic AMP-mediated signaling, whereas multiple olfactory receptor genes were down-regulated by cocaine treatment. ADF abolished many of the effects of cocaine on OB gene expression. Our findings reveal that dietary energy intake modifies the neural substrates underlying some of the behavioral and physiological responses to repeated cocaine treatment, and also suggest novel roles for the olfactory system in addiction. The data further suggest that modification of dietary energy intake could provide a novel potential approach to addiction treatments. PMID:20456017

  18. Reprogramming the genetic code: the emerging role of ribosomal frameshifting in regulating cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Vivek M.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Reading frame maintenance is a critical property of ribosomes. However, a number of genetic elements have been described that can induce ribosomes to shift on mRNAs, the most well understood of which are a class that directs ribosomal slippage by one base in 5′ (-1) direction. This is referred to as programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF). Recently, a new -1 PRF promoting element was serendipitously discovered in a study examining the effects of stretches of adenosines in the coding sequences of mRNAs. Here, we discuss this finding, recent studies describing how -1 PRF is used to control gene expression in eukaryotes, and how -1 PRF is itself regulated. The implications of dysregulation of -1 PRF on human health are examined, as are possible new areas in which novel -1 PRF promoting elements might be discovered. PMID:26661048

  19. Increased Expression and Cellular Localization of Spermine Oxidase in Ulcerative Colitis and Relationship to Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shih-Kuang S.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Blanca Piazuelo, M.; Coburn, Lori A.; Williams, Christopher S.; Delgado, Alberto G.; Casero, Robert A.; Schwartz, David A.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Polyamines are important in cell growth and wound repair, but have also been implicated in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. Polyamine metabolism includes back-conversion of spermine to spermidine by the enzyme spermine oxidase (SMO), which produces hydrogen peroxide that causes oxidative stress. In ulcerative colitis (UC), levels of spermine are decreased compared to spermidine. Therefore, we sought to determine if SMO is involved in UC. Methods Colon biopsies and clinical information from subjects undergoing colonoscopy for evaluation of UC or colorectal cancer screening were utilized from 16 normal controls and 53 UC cases. Histopathologic disease severity was graded and the Mayo Disease Activity Index (DAI) and endoscopy subscore assessed. SMO mRNA expression was measured in frozen biopsies by Taq-Man-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Formalin-fixed tissues were used for SMO immunohistochemistry. Results There was a 3.1-fold upregulation of SMO mRNA levels in UC patients compared to controls (P = 0.044), and a 3.7-fold increase in involved left colon versus paired uninvolved right colon (P < 0.001). With worsening histologic injury in UC there was a progressive increase in SMO staining of mononuclear inflammatory cells. There was a similar increase in SMO staining with worsening endoscopic disease severity and strong correlation with the DAI (r = 0.653, P < 0.001). Inflammatory cell SMO staining was increased in involved left colon versus uninvolved right colon. Conclusions SMO expression is upregulated in UC tissues, deriving from increased levels in mononuclear inflammatory cells. Dysregulated polyamine homeostasis may contribute to chronic UC by altering immune responses and increasing oxidative stress. PMID:20127992

  20. Investigating the Effects of Statins on Cellular Lipid Metabolism Using a Yeast Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynska, Agata; Burzynska, Beata; Plochocka, Danuta; Kaminska, Joanna; Zimnicka, Magdalena; Kania, Magdalena; Kiliszek, Marek; Wysocka-Kapcinska, Monika; Danikiewicz, Witold; Szkopinska, Anna

    2009-01-01

    In humans, defects in lipid metabolism are associated with a number of severe diseases such as atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes. Hypercholesterolemia is a primary risk factor for coronary artery disease, the major cause of premature deaths in developed countries. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), the key enzyme of the sterol synthesis pathway. Since yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbours many counterparts of mammalian enzymes involved in lipid-synthesizing pathways, conclusions drawn from research with this single cell eukaryotic organism can be readily applied to higher eukaryotes. Using a yeast strain with deletions of both HMG1 and HMG2 genes (i.e. completely devoid of HMGR activity) with introduced wild-type or mutant form of human HMGR (hHMGR) gene we investigated the effects of statins on the lipid metabolism of the cell. The relative quantification of mRNA demonstrated a different effect of simvastatin on the expression of the wild-type and mutated hHMGR gene. GC/MS analyses showed a significant decrease of sterols and enhanced conversion of squalene and sterol precursors into ergosterol. This was accompanied by the mobilization of ergosterol precursors localized in lipid particles in the form of steryl esters visualized by confocal microscopy. Changes in the level of ergosterol and its precursors in cells treated with simvastatin depend on the mutation in the hHMGR gene. HPLC/MS analyses indicated a reduced level of phospholipids not connected with the mevalonic acid pathway. We detected two significant phenomena. First, cells treated with simvastatin develop an adaptive response compensating the lower activity of HMGR. This includes enhanced conversion of sterol precursors into ergosterol, mobilization of steryl esters and increased expression of the hHMGR gene. Second, statins cause a substantial drop in the level of glycerophospholipids. PMID:20041128

  1. Expression and Functional Characterization of Bluetongue Virus VP5 Protein: Role in Cellular Permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, S. H.; Wirblich, C.; Forzan, M.; Roy, P.

    2001-01-01

    Segment 5 of bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 10, which encodes the outer capsid protein VP5, was tagged with glutathione S-transferase and expressed by a recombinant baculovirus. The recombinant protein was subsequently purified to homogeneity, and its possible biological role in virus infection was investigated. Purified VP5 was able to bind mammalian cells but was not internalized, which indicates it is not involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. The purified VP5 protein was shown to be able to permeabilize mammalian and Culicoides insect cells, inducing cytotoxicity. Sequence analysis revealed that VP5 possesses characteristic structural features (including two amino-terminal amphipathic helices) compatible with virus penetration activity. To assess the role of each feature in the observed cytotoxicity, a series of deleted VP5 molecules were generated, and their expression and biological activity was compared with the parental molecule. VP5 derivatives that included the two amphipathic helices exhibited cytotoxicity, while those that omitted these sequences did not. To confirm their role in membrane destabilization two synthetic peptides (amino acids [aa] 1 to 20 and aa 22 to 41) encompassing the two helices and an additional peptide representing the adjacent downstream sequences were also assessed for their effect on the cell membrane. Both helices, but not the downstream VP5 sequence, exhibited cytotoxicity with the most-amino-terminal helix (aa 1 to 20) showing a higher activity than the adjacent peptide (aa 22 to 41). Purified VP5 was shown to readily form trimers in solution, a feature of many proteins involved in membrane penetration. Taken together, these data support a role for VP5 in virus-cell penetration consistent with its revelation in the entry vesicle subsequent to cell binding and endocytosis. PMID:11507181

  2. Quantized generation time in mammalian cells as an expression of the cellular clock.

    PubMed Central

    Klevecz, R R

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of possible generation times in mammalian cells does not appear to be continous within the limits of range for each cell type; rather, generation time is quantized in multiples of 3-4 hr. Synchronous cultures of Chinese hamster V79 cells were prepared using manual and automated methods to select and stage mitotic cells. Using synchronous cultures and time-lapse video tape microscopy, it was possible to show that generation times within a population of mitotically selected cells normally disperse in a quantized fashion, with intervals of 3-4 hr occurring between bursts in division. In addition, at temperatures above 37 degrees, V79 cells have a 7.5-8.5 hr modal cell cycle, while at temperatures from 36.5 degrees to 33.5 degrees the modal cell cycle is 11-12 hr long. A survey of the synchrony literature reveals that the tendency to preferred generation times holds between cell lines. The distribution of modal generation times from a variety of different cell types forms a series with a similar interval but with a greater range of values than that observed here for V79 cells. To satisfy the published data and the work presented here, I propose a subcycle, Gq, which has a traverse time equal to the period of the clock. The period appears to be fixed at close to the same value in all mammalian somatic cells. The timekeeping mechanism appears to be temperature compensated, since the time required to traverse Gq is constant at temperatures between 34 degrees and 39 degrees. It is suggested that cell cycle time increases at lower temperatures, lower serum concentration, and high cell densitite because the number of rounds of traverse through Gq increases. PMID:1069287

  3. Expression and Cellular Immunogenicity of a Transgenic Antigen Driven by Endogenous Poxviral Early Promoters at Their Authentic Loci in MVA

    PubMed Central

    Orubu, Toritse; Alharbi, Naif Khalaf; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Cottingham, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses to vaccinia virus are directed almost exclusively against early gene products. The attenuated strain modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is under evaluation in clinical trials of new vaccines designed to elicit cellular immune responses against pathogens including Plasmodium spp., M. tuberculosis and HIV-1. All of these recombinant MVAs (rMVA) utilize the well-established method of linking the gene of interest to a cloned poxviral promoter prior to insertion into the viral genome at a suitable locus by homologous recombination in infected cells. Using BAC recombineering, we show that potent early promoters that drive expression of non-functional or non-essential MVA open reading frames (ORFs) can be harnessed for immunogenic expression of recombinant antigen. Precise replacement of the MVA orthologs of C11R, F11L, A44L and B8R with a model antigen positioned to use the same translation initiation codon allowed early transgene expression similar to or slightly greater than that achieved by the commonly-used p7.5 or short synthetic promoters. The frequency of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells induced in mice by single shot or adenovirus-prime, rMVA-boost vaccination were similarly equal or marginally enhanced using endogenous promoters at their authentic genomic loci compared to the traditional constructs. The enhancement in immunogenicity observed using the C11R or F11L promoters compared with p7.5 was similar to that obtained with the mH5 promoter compared with p7.5. Furthermore, the growth rates of the viruses were unimpaired and the insertions were genetically stable. Insertion of a transgenic ORF in place of a viral ORF by BAC recombineering can thus provide not only a potent promoter, but also, concomitantly, a suitable insertion site, potentially facilitating development of MVA vaccines expressing multiple recombinant antigens. PMID:22761956

  4. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  5. Postoperative Immunosuppression After Open and Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Assessment of Cellular Immune Function and Monocytic HLA-DR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Schmidt, Sven C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Major abdominal procedures are strongly associated with postoperative immunosuppression and subsequent increased patient morbidity. It is believed that laparoscopic surgery causes less depletion of the systemic immune function because of the reduced tissue trauma. Various cytokines and monocytic HLA-DR expression have been successfully implemented to assess postoperative immune function. The aim of our study was to show the difference in immunologic profiles after minimally invasive versus conventional liver resection. Methods: Ten animals underwent either laparoscopic or conventional open left lateral liver resection. Flow cytometric characteristics of HLA-DR expression on monocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cellular secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were measured and analyzed in ex vivo whole blood samples. Intraoperative and postoperative clinical outcome parameters were also documented and evaluated. Results: All animals survived the procedures. Postoperative complications were fever (n = 3), wound infections (n = 2), and biloma (n = 1). Open surgery showed a morbidity rate of 80% compared with 40% after laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic liver resection showed no postoperative immunoparalysis. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression in this group was elevated, whereas the open surgery group showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class II expression on postoperative day 1. Postoperative secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and interferon γ was lower in the open surgery group. Elevated transaminase levels after laparoscopy might have resulted from an ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by the capnoperitoneum. Conclusion: Major immunoparalysis depression was not observed in either group. Laparoscopic surgery shows a tendency to improve immunologic recovery after liver resection. PMID:24398205

  6. Effects of Selected Egyptian Honeys on the Cellular Ultrastructure and the Gene Expression Profile of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatib, Walid F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (i) evaluate the antibacterial activities of three Egyptian honeys collected from different floral sources (namely, citrus, clover, and marjoram) against Escherichia coli; (ii) investigate the effects of these honeys on bacterial ultrastructure; and (iii) assess the anti-virulence potential of these honeys, by examining their impacts on the expression of eight selected genes (involved in biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and stress survival) in the test organism. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the honey samples against E. coli ATCC 8739 were assessed by the broth microdilution assay in the presence and absence of catalase enzyme. Impacts of the honeys on the cellular ultrastructure and the expression profiles of the selected genes of E. coli were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis, respectively. The susceptibility tests showed promising antibacterial activities of all the tested honeys against E. coli. This was supported by the TEM observations, which revealed “ghost” cells lacking DNA, in addition to cells with increased vacuoles, and/or with irregular shrunken cytoplasm. Among the tested honeys, marjoram exhibited the highest total antibacterial activity and the highest levels of peroxide-dependent activity. The qPCR analysis showed that all honey-treated cells share a similar overall pattern of gene expression, with a trend toward reduced expression of the virulence genes of interest. Our results indicate that some varieties of the Egyptian honey have the potential to be effective inhibitor and virulence modulator of E. coli via multiple molecular targets. PMID:26954570

  7. Both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted cellular uptake and enhanced tumor tissue distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhenqing; Zhan, Chuanming; Jiang, Qiwei; Hu, Quan; Li, Le; Chang, Di; Yang, Xiangrui; Wang, Yixiao; Li, Yang; Ye, Shefang; Xie, Liya; Yi, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qiqing

    2011-10-01

    Both folic acid (FA)- and methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG)-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) had been designed for targeted and prolong anticancer drug delivery system. The chitosan NPs were prepared with combination of ionic gelation and chemical cross-linking method, followed by conjugation with both FA and mPEG, respectively. FA-mPEG-NPs were compared with either NPs or mPEG-/FA-NPs in terms of their size, targeting cellular efficiency and tumor tissue distribution. The specificity of the mPEG-FA-NPs targeting cancerous cells was demonstrated by comparative intracellular uptake of NPs and mPEG-/FA-NPs by human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells. Mitomycin C (MMC), as a model drug, was loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs. Results show that the chitosan NPs presented a narrow-size distribution with an average diameter about 200 nm regardless of the type of functional group. In addition, MMC was easily loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs with drug-loading content of 9.1%, and the drug releases were biphasic with an initial burst release, followed by a subsequent slower release. Laser confocal scanning imaging proved that both mPEG-FA-NPs and FA-NPs could greatly enhance uptake by HeLa cells. In vivo animal experiments, using a nude mice xenograft model, demonstrated that an increased amount of mPEG-FA-NPs or FA-NPs were accumulated in the tumor tissue relative to the mPEG-NPs or NPs alone. These results suggest that both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan NPs are potentially prolonged drug delivery system for tumor cell-selective targeting treatments.

  8. Both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted cellular uptake and enhanced tumor tissue distribution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Both folic acid (FA)- and methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG)-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) had been designed for targeted and prolong anticancer drug delivery system. The chitosan NPs were prepared with combination of ionic gelation and chemical cross-linking method, followed by conjugation with both FA and mPEG, respectively. FA-mPEG-NPs were compared with either NPs or mPEG-/FA-NPs in terms of their size, targeting cellular efficiency and tumor tissue distribution. The specificity of the mPEG-FA-NPs targeting cancerous cells was demonstrated by comparative intracellular uptake of NPs and mPEG-/FA-NPs by human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells. Mitomycin C (MMC), as a model drug, was loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs. Results show that the chitosan NPs presented a narrow-size distribution with an average diameter about 200 nm regardless of the type of functional group. In addition, MMC was easily loaded to the mPEG-FA-NPs with drug-loading content of 9.1%, and the drug releases were biphasic with an initial burst release, followed by a subsequent slower release. Laser confocal scanning imaging proved that both mPEG-FA-NPs and FA-NPs could greatly enhance uptake by HeLa cells. In vivo animal experiments, using a nude mice xenograft model, demonstrated that an increased amount of mPEG-FA-NPs or FA-NPs were accumulated in the tumor tissue relative to the mPEG-NPs or NPs alone. These results suggest that both FA- and mPEG-conjugated chitosan NPs are potentially prolonged drug delivery system for tumor cell-selective targeting treatments. PMID:22027239

  9. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Erica M.; Vijayraghavan, Deepthi; Davidson, Lance A.; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE) movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs. PMID:25596276

  10. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, S.; Chiao, J.; Rossi, J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h/sub 3/ at the end of which time cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, (/sup 3/H)uridine, (/sup 14/C)lysine and (/sup 35/S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins.

  11. Effect of FCCP on tight junction permeability and cellular distribution of ZO-1 protein in epithelial (MDCK) cells.

    PubMed

    Li, C X; Poznansky, M J

    1990-12-14

    The effect of the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, FCCP (carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone), on the tight junction of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was examined. FCCP induced an abrupt decrease in the transepithelial electrical resistance of the confluent monolayers over a period of 20 s. When FCCP was withdrawn from the incubation medium, the monolayer resistance recovered to close to the original level in less than 2 h. Staining of the tight junction-associated protein ZO-1 showed that the changes in transepithelial electrical resistance were accompanied by a diffusing of the protein away from cell peripheries and a reconcentration to the tight junction areas following resistance recovery. Intracellular pH was decreased by FCCP on a similar time-scale with no obvious changes in ATP levels over this time-course. These data suggest that the uncoupler FCCP has a profound effect on tight junction permeability and cellular distribution of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in the epithelial cells and that it probably acts by breaking down proton gradients and altering intracellular pH.

  12. Cellular distribution and molecular heterogeneity of MAC393 antigen (clusterin, beta-chain) on the surface membrane of bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Howes, E A; Hurst, S; Laslop, A; Jones, R

    1998-07-01

    The distribution and size of a surface membrane antigen identified by a monoclonal antibody (MAC9393) have been examined in testicular and epididymal bovine sperm preparations. Western blots indicated a substantial decrease in molecular mass of the antigen during epididymal maturation from approximately 87 kDa in the testis to approximately 35 kDa in the cauda epididymidis. This was accompanied by a change in its cellular localization from the neck and whole head to the acrosomal region. N-terminal microsequencing identified MAC393 antigen as the beta-chain of clusterin. A polyclonal antiserum to the alpha-chain of clusterin recognized both testicular and epididymal forms and revealed that the heterodimer was present on the sperm tail as well as the acrosome. These findings are explained by the co-existence of dimeric and monomeric pools of clusterin on spermatozoa. The polyclonal antiserum recognizes both testicular and epididymal forms of the heterodimer and although the monoclonal antibody binds to the testicular heterodimer, it only recognizes the beta-chain monomer of epididymal clusterin. These findings support previous observations made on human spermatozoa that two forms of clusterin, the beta-chain monomer and the heterodimer, are present on the surface membrane and in seminal plasma.

  13. The cellular phenotype of Roberts syndrome fibroblasts as revealed by ectopic expression of ESCO2.

    PubMed

    van der Lelij, Petra; Godthelp, Barbara C; van Zon, Wouter; van Gosliga, Djoke; Oostra, Anneke B; Steltenpool, Jûrgen; de Groot, Jan; Scheper, Rik J; Wolthuis, Rob M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Darroudi, Firouz; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P

    2009-09-07

    Cohesion between sister chromatids is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, the acetyltransferase Eco1/Ctf7 establishes cohesion during DNA replication in S phase and in response to DNA double strand breaks in G2/M phase. In humans two Eco1 orthologs exist: ESCO1 and ESCO2. Both proteins are required for proper sister chromatid cohesion, but their exact function is unclear at present. Since ESCO2 has been identified as the gene defective in the rare autosomal recessive cohesinopathy Roberts syndrome (RBS), cells from RBS patients can be used to elucidate the role of ESCO2. We investigated for the first time RBS cells in comparison to isogenic controls that stably express V5- or GFP-tagged ESCO2. We show that the sister chromatid cohesion defect in the transfected cell lines is rescued and suggest that ESCO2 is regulated by proteasomal degradation in a cell cycle-dependent manner. In comparison to the corrected cells RBS cells were hypersensitive to the DNA-damaging agents mitomycin C, camptothecin and etoposide, while no particular sensitivity to UV, ionizing radiation, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin was found. The cohesion defect of RBS cells and their hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents were not corrected by a patient-derived ESCO2 acetyltransferase mutant (W539G), indicating that the acetyltransferase activity of ESCO2 is essential for its function. In contrast to a previous study on cells from patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome, another cohesinopathy, RBS cells failed to exhibit excessive chromosome aberrations after irradiation in G2 phase of the cell cycle. Our results point at an S phase-specific role for ESCO2 in the maintenance of genome stability.

  14. The HTLV-1 HBZ protein inhibits cyclin D1 expression through interacting with the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zheng, Shangen; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zang, Wenqiao; Li, Min; Wang, Na; Li, Ping; Jin, Jing; Dong, Ziming; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2013-10-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that can cause adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by an mRNA of the opposite polarity of the viral genomic RNA, interacts with several transcription factors and is involved in T cell proliferation, viral gene transcription and cellular transformation. Cyclin D1 is a pivotal regulatory protein involved in cell cycle progression, and its depressed expression correlates with cell cycle prolongation or arrested at the G1/S transition. In our present study, we observed that HBZ expression suppressed cyclin D1 level. To investigate the role of HBZ on cyclin D1 depression, we transduced HBZ with lentivirus vector into 293T cells, CEM cells and Jurkat cells. The results of Western blot, RT-PCR and luciferase assays showed that transcriptional activity of the cyclin D1 promoter was suppressed by the bZIP domain of HBZ (HBZ-bZIP) through cyclic AMP response element (CRE) site. Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed the binding of HBZ-bZIP to CRE-binding protein (CREB), which confirmed that the cyclin D1 promoter activity inhibition via the CRE-site was mediated by HBZ-bZIP. The results suggested that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 transcription through interactions with CREB and along with other viral protein, HBZ may play a causal role for leukemogenesis.

  15. Increased expression of fatty acid synthase provides a survival advantage to colorectal cancer cells via upregulation of cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Harris, Jennifer W; Mitov, Mihail I; Kim, Ji Tae; Butterfield, D Allan; Lee, Eun Y; Weiss, Heidi L; Gao, Tianyan; Evers, B Mark

    2015-08-07

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a lipogenic enzyme, is upregulated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Increased de novo lipid synthesis is thought to be a metabolic adaptation of cancer cells that promotes survival and metastasis; however, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are not fully understood. We show that FASN plays a role in regulation of energy homeostasis by enhancing cellular respiration in CRC. We demonstrate that endogenously synthesized lipids fuel fatty acid oxidation, particularly during metabolic stress, and maintain energy homeostasis. Increased FASN expression is associated with a decrease in activation of energy-sensing pathways and accumulation of lipid droplets in CRC cells and orthotopic CRCs. Immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated increased expression of FASN and p62, a marker of autophagy inhibition, in primary CRCs and liver metastases compared to matched normal colonic mucosa. Our findings indicate that overexpression of FASN plays a crucial role in maintaining energy homeostasis in CRC via increased oxidation of endogenously synthesized lipids. Importantly, activation of fatty acid oxidation and consequent downregulation of stress-response signaling pathways may be key adaptation mechanisms that mediate the effects of FASN on cancer cell survival and metastasis, providing a strong rationale for targeting this pathway in advanced CRC.

  16. Role of plasma membrane lipid composition on cellular homeostasis: learning from cell line models expressing fatty acid desaturases

    PubMed Central

    Jaureguiberry, María S.; Tricerri, M. Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A.; Finarelli, Gabriela S.; Montanaro, Mauro A.; Prieto, Eduardo D.; Rimoldi, Omar J.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence has suggested that plasma membrane (PM)-associated signaling and hence cell metabolism and viability depend on lipid composition and organization. The aim of the present work is to develop a cell model to study the endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effect on PM properties and analyze its influence on cholesterol (Chol) homeostasis. We have previously shown that by using a cell line over-expressing stearoyl-CoA-desaturase, membrane composition and organization coordinate cellular pathways involved in Chol efflux and cell viability by different mechanisms. Now, we expanded our studies to a cell model over-expressing both Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases, which resulted in a permanently higher PUFA content in PM. Furthermore, this cell line showed increased PM fluidity, Chol storage, and mitochondrial activity. In addition, human apolipoprotein A-I-mediated Chol removal was less efficient in these cells than in the corresponding control. Taken together, our results suggested that the cell functionality is preserved by regulating PM organization and Chol exportation and homeostasis. PMID:24473084

  17. Role of plasma membrane lipid composition on cellular homeostasis: learning from cell line models expressing fatty acid desaturases.

    PubMed

    Jaureguiberry, María S; Tricerri, M Alejandra; Sanchez, Susana A; Finarelli, Gabriela S; Montanaro, Mauro A; Prieto, Eduardo D; Rimoldi, Omar J

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence has suggested that plasma membrane (PM)-associated signaling and hence cell metabolism and viability depend on lipid composition and organization. The aim of the present work is to develop a cell model to study the endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) effect on PM properties and analyze its influence on cholesterol (Chol) homeostasis. We have previously shown that by using a cell line over-expressing stearoyl-CoA-desaturase, membrane composition and organization coordinate cellular pathways involved in Chol efflux and cell viability by different mechanisms. Now, we expanded our studies to a cell model over-expressing both Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases, which resulted in a permanently higher PUFA content in PM. Furthermore, this cell line showed increased PM fluidity, Chol storage, and mitochondrial activity. In addition, human apolipoprotein A-I-mediated Chol removal was less efficient in these cells than in the corresponding control. Taken together, our results suggested that the cell functionality is preserved by regulating PM organization and Chol exportation and homeostasis.

  18. Dysregulated MicroRNA Expression Profiles and Potential Cellular, Circulating and Polymorphic Biomarkers in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Heidi G.; Haupt, Larisa M.; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of studies have focused on identifying molecular biomarkers, including microRNAs (miRNAs) to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of the most common subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma and Follicular Lymphoma. NHL is difficult to diagnose and treat with many cases becoming resistant to chemotherapy, hence the need to identify improved biomarkers to aid in both diagnosis and treatment modalities. This review summarises more recent research on the dysregulated miRNA expression profiles found in NHL, as well as the regulatory role and biomarker potential of cellular and circulating miRNAs found in tissue and serum, respectively. In addition, the emerging field of research focusing on miRNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) in genes of the miRNA biogenesis pathway, in miRNA genes themselves, and in their target sites may provide new insights on gene expression changes in these genes. These miRSNPs may impact miRNA networks and have been shown to play a role in a host of different cancer types including haematological malignancies. With respect to NHL, a number of SNPs in miRNA-binding sites in target genes have been shown to be associated with overall survival. PMID:27999330

  19. Expression of α(1)-adrenergic receptors in rat prefrontal cortex: cellular co-localization with 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Santana, Noemí; Mengod, Guadalupe; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in behavioural control and cognitive processes that are altered in schizophrenia. The brainstem monoaminergic systems control PFC function, yet the cells/networks involved are not fully known. Serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) increase PFC neuronal activity through the activation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (α(1)ARs) and 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT(2A)Rs), respectively. Neurochemical and behavioural interactions between these receptors have been reported. Further, classical and atypical antipsychotic drugs share nm in vitro affinity for α(1)ARs while having preferential affinity for D(2) and 5-HT(2A)Rs, respectively. Using double in situ hybridization we examined the cellular expression of α(1)ARs in pyramidal (vGluT1-positive) and GABAergic (GAD(65/67)-positive) neurons in rat PFC and their co-localization with 5-HT(2A)Rs. α(1)ARs are expressed by a high proportion of pyramidal (59-85%) and GABAergic (52-79%) neurons. The expression in pyramidal neurons exhibited a dorsoventral gradient, with a lower percentage of α(1)AR-positive neurons in infralimbic cortex compared to anterior cingulate and prelimbic cortex. The expression of α(1A), α(1B) and α(1D) adrenergic receptors was segregated in different layers and subdivisions. In all them there is a high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs (∼80%). These observations indicate that NE controls the activity of most PFC pyramidal neurons via α(1)ARs, either directly or indirectly, via GABAergic interneurons. Antipsychotic drugs can thus modulate the activity of PFC via α(1)AR blockade. The high co-expression with 5-HT(2A)Rs indicates a convergence of excitatory serotonergic and noradrenergic inputs onto the same neuronal populations. Moreover, atypical antipsychotics may exert a more powerful control of PFC function through the simultaneous blockade of α(1)ARs and 5-HT(2A)Rs.

  20. Prediction of metabolic flux distribution from gene expression data based on the flux minimization principle.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of possible flux distributions in a metabolic network provides detailed phenotypic information that links metabolism to cellular physiology. To estimate metabolic steady-state fluxes, the most common approach is to solve a set of macroscopic mass balance equations subjected to stoichiometric constraints while attempting to optimize an assumed optimal objective function. This assumption is justifiable in specific cases but may be invalid when tested across different conditions, cell populations, or other organisms. With an aim to providing a more consistent and reliable prediction of flux distributions over a wide range of conditions, in this article we propose a framework that uses the flux minimization principle to predict active metabolic pathways from mRNA expression data. The proposed algorithm minimizes a weighted sum of flux magnitudes, while biomass production can be bounded to fit an ample range from very low to very high values according to the analyzed context. We have formulated the flux weights as a function of the corresponding enzyme reaction's gene expression value, enabling the creation of context-specific fluxes based on a generic metabolic network. In case studies of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and wild-type and mutant Escherichia coli strains, our method achieved high prediction accuracy, as gauged by correlation coefficients and sums of squared error, with respect to the experimentally measured values. In contrast to other approaches, our method was able to provide quantitative predictions for both model organisms under a variety of conditions. Our approach requires no prior knowledge or assumption of a context-specific metabolic functionality and does not require trial-and-error parameter adjustments. Thus, our framework is of general applicability for modeling the transcription-dependent metabolism of bacteria and yeasts.

  1. Novel cellular determinants for reversal of multidrug resistance in cells expressing P170-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yin, M B; Guo, B; Voigt, W; Vanhoefer, U; Gibbs, J F; Skenderis, B S; Frank, C; Wrzosek, C; Rustum, Y M

    1998-03-05

    The newly synthesized calcium channel blocker, Ro44-5912, significantly potentiates doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cytotoxicity at non-cytotoxic concentrations in Dox-resistant human ovarian cell line, A2780/DX5, overexpressing P170-glycoprotein (Pgp). Induction of DNA single- and double-strand breaks (ssbs and dsbs) was measured using alkaline elution and constant-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) assays. The results indicate that potentiation of the cytotoxicity of Dox by Ro44-5912 was accompanied by significant increases in both, Dox-induced DNA ssbs and dsbs in the resistant cells. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that Dox induced DNA fragments in the 50-800 kilobase (kb) and 0.8-5.7 megabase (Mb) ranges. The majority of the newly synthesized DNA fragments were in the 50-800 kb range. Ro44-5912 treatment resulted in significant potentiation of DNA fragmentation in the 50-800 kb range with a minor increase in 0.8-5.7 Mb DNA fragments, suggesting that the modulator functions by potentiating nascent DNA fragmentation in the resistant cells. Exposure to Dox with Ro44-5912 was associated with a prolonged blockage of cells in the S-phase. In contrast, exposure to Dox alone resulted in temporary blockage of cells in G2/M phase (approximately 24 h) followed by restoration of cell proliferation and normal DNA histograms at 48 h after 2 h drug exposure. Incorporation of BrdUrd by flow cytometric analysis was inhibited by Dox in the presence of Ro44-5912, showing that there is a block of DNA replication. An increased damage in newly synthesized DNA could concur with a blocked DNA replication. Moreover, slowing progression through the S-phase in cells exposed to Dox in combination with Ro44-5912 is accompanied by increased sensitivity of Dox poisons, indicating a correlation of specific S-phase perturbation with the reversal of Dox resistance by Ro44-5912 in cells expressing Pgp. The results suggest that drug-induced augmentation of nascent DNA

  2. Immunohistochemical cellular distribution of proteins related to M phase regulation in early proliferative lesions induced by tumor promotion in rat two-stage carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Yafune, Atsunori; Taniai, Eriko; Morita, Reiko; Akane, Hirotoshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that 28-day treatment with hepatocarcinogens increases liver cells expressing p21(Cip1), a G1/S checkpoint protein, and M phase proteins, i.e., nuclear Cdc2, Aurora B, phosphorylated-Histone H3 (p-Histone H3) and heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α), in rats. To examine the roles of these markers in the early stages of carcinogenesis, we investigated their cellular distribution in several carcinogenic target organs using rat two-stage carcinogenesis models. Promoting agents targeting the liver (piperonyl butoxide and methapyrilene hydrochloride), thyroid (sulfadimethoxine), urinary bladder (phenylethyl isothiocyanate), and forestomach and glandular stomach (catechol) were administered to rats after initiation treatment for the liver with N-diethylnitrosamine, thyroid with N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine, urinary bladder with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine, and forestomach and glandular stomach with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Numbers of cells positive for nuclear Cdc2, Aurora B, p-Histone H3 and HP1α increased within preneoplastic lesions as determined by glutathione S-transferase placental form in the liver or phosphorylated p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase in the thyroid, and hyperplastic lesions having no known preneoplastic markers in the urinary bladder, forestomach and glandular stomach. Immunoreactive cells for p21(Cip1) were decreased within thyroid preneoplastic lesions; however, they were increased within liver preneoplastic lesions and hyperplastic lesions in other organs. These results suggest that M phase disruption commonly occur during the formation of preneoplastic lesions and hyperplastic lesions. Differences in the expression patterns of p21(Cip1) between thyroid preneoplastic and proliferative lesions in other organs may reflect differences in cell cycle regulation involving G1/S checkpoint function between proliferative lesions in each organ.

  3. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-05

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  4. Expression, characterization, and cellular localization of knowpains, papain-like cysteine proteases of the Plasmodium knowlesi malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajesh; Atul; Soni, Awakash; Puri, Sunil Kumar; Sijwali, Puran Singh

    2012-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases of malaria parasites degrade haemoglobin in an acidic food vacuole to provide amino acids for intraerythrocytic parasites. These proteases are potential drug targets because their inhibitors block parasite development, and efforts are underway to develop chemotherapeutic inhibitors of these proteases as the treatments for malaria. Plasmodium knowlesi has recently been shown to be an important human pathogen in parts of Asia. We report expression and characterization of three P. knowlesi papain-like proteases, termed knowpains (KP2-4). Recombinant knowpains were produced using a bacterial expression system, and tested for various biochemical properties. Antibodies against recombinant knowpains were generated and used to determine their cellular localization in parasites. Inhibitory effects of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64 were assessed on P. knowlesi culture to validate drug target potential of knowpains. All three knowpains were present in the food vacuole, active in acidic pH, and capable of degrading haemoglobin at the food vacuolar pH (≈5.5), suggesting roles in haemoglobin degradation. The proteases showed absolute (KP2 and KP3) to moderate (KP4) preference for peptide substrates containing leucine at the P2 position; KP4 preferred arginine at the P2 position. While the three knowpains appear to have redundant roles in haemoglobin degradation, KP4 may also have a role in degradation of erythrocyte cytoskeleton during merozoite egress, as it displayed broad substrate specificity and was primarily localized at the parasite periphery. Importantly, E64 blocked erythrocytic development of P. knowlesi, with enlargement of food vacuoles, indicating inhibition of haemoglobin hydrolysis and supporting the potential for inhibition of knowpains as a strategy for the treatment of malaria. Functional expression and characterization of knowpains should enable simultaneous screening of available cysteine protease inhibitor libraries

  5. A retroviral promoter and a cellular enhancer define a bipartite element which controls env ERVWE1 placental expression.

    PubMed

    Prudhomme, Sarah; Oriol, Guy; Mallet, François

    2004-11-01

    The HERV-W family contains hundreds of loci diversely expressed in several physiological and pathological contexts. A unique locus termed ERVWE1 encodes an envelope glycoprotein (syncytin) involved in hominoid placental physiology. Here we show that syncytin expression is regulated by a bipartite element consisting of a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-inducible long terminal repeat (LTR) retroviral promoter adjacent to a cellular enhancer conferring a high level of expression and placental tropism. Deletion mutant analysis showed that the ERVWE1 5' LTR contains binding sites essential for basal placental activity in the region from positions +1 to +125. The region from positions +125 to +310 represents a cAMP-responsive core HERV-W promoter active in all cell types. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis highlighted the complexity of U3 regulation. ERVWE1 placenta-specific positive (e.g., T240) and negative (e.g., G71) regulatory sites were identified, as were essential sites required for basic activity (e.g., A247). The flanking sequences of the ERVWE1 provirus contain several putative regulatory elements. The upstream HERV-H and HERV-P LTRs were found to be inactive. Conversely, the 436-bp region located between the HERV-P LTR and ERVWE1 was shown to be an upstream regulatory element (URE) which is significantly active in placenta cells. This URE acts as a tissue-specific enhancer. Genetic and functional analyses of hominoid UREs revealed large differences between UREs of members of the Hominidae and the Hylobatidae. These data allowed the identification of a positive regulatory region from positions -436 to -128, a mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposon negative regulatory region from positions -128 to -67, and a trophoblast-specific enhancer (TSE) from positions -67 to -35. Putative AP-2, Sp-1, and GCMa binding sites are essential constituents of the 33-bp TSE.

  6. Expression and cellular localization of the transcription factor NeuroD1 in the developing and adult rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Castro, Analía E; Benitez, Sergio G; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Savastano, Luis E; Patterson, Sean I; Muñoz, Estela M

    2015-05-01

    Circadian rhythms govern many aspects of mammalian physiology. The daily pattern of melatonin synthesis and secretion is one of the classic examples of circadian oscillations. It is mediated by a class of neuroendocrine cells known as pinealocytes which are not yet fully defined. An established method to evaluate functional and cytological characters is through the expression of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators. NeuroD1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in the specification and maintenance of both endocrine and neuronal phenotypes. We have previously described developmental and adult regulation of NeuroD1 mRNA in the rodent pineal gland. However, the transcript levels were not influenced by the elimination of sympathetic input, suggesting that any rhythmicity of NeuroD1 might be found downstream of transcription. Here, we describe NeuroD1 protein expression and cellular localization in the rat pineal gland during development and the daily cycle. In embryonic and perinatal stages, protein expression follows the mRNA pattern and is predominantly nuclear. Thereafter, NeuroD1 is mostly found in pinealocyte nuclei in the early part of the night and in cytoplasm during the day, a rhythm maintained into adulthood. Additionally, nocturnal nuclear NeuroD1 levels are reduced after sympathetic disruption, an effect mimicked by the in vivo administration of α- and β-adrenoceptor blockers. NeuroD1 phosphorylation at two sites, Ser(274) and Ser(336) , associates with nuclear localization in pinealocytes. These data suggest that NeuroD1 influences pineal phenotype both during development and adulthood, in an autonomic and phosphorylation-dependent manner.

  7. CX3CL1 (fractalkine) and CX3CR1 expression in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: kinetics and cellular origin

    PubMed Central

    Sunnemark, Dan; Eltayeb, Sana; Nilsson, Maria; Wallström, Erik; Lassmann, Hans; Olsson, Tomas; Berg, Anna-Lena; Ericsson-Dahlstrand, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). It is associated with local activation of microglia and astroglia, infiltration of activated macrophages and T cells, active degradation of myelin and damage to axons and neurons. The proposed role for CX3CL1 (fractalkine) in the control of microglia activation and leukocyte infiltration places this chemokine and its receptor CX3CR1 in a potentially strategic position to control key aspects in the pathological events that are associated with development of brain lesions in MS. In this study, we examine this hypothesis by analyzing the distribution, kinetics, regulation and cellular origin of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 mRNA expression in the CNS of rats with an experimentally induced MS-like disease, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Methods The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied with in situ hybridization histochemical detection of their mRNA with radio labeled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining of phenotypic cell markers. Both healthy rat brains and brains from rats with MOG EAE were analyzed. In defined lesional stages of MOG EAE, the number of CX3CR1 mRNA-expressing cells and the intensity of the in situ hybridization signal were determined by image analysis. Data were statistically evaluated by ANOVA, followed by Tukey\\primes multiple comparison test. Results Expression of CX3CL1 mRNA was present within neuronal-like cells located throughout the neuraxis of the healthy rat. Expression of CX3CL1 remained unaltered in the CNS of rats with MOG-induced EAE, with the exception of an induced expression in astrocytes within inflammatory lesions. Notably, the brain vasculature of healthy and encephalitic animals did not exhibit signs of CX3CL1 mRNA expression. The receptor, CX3CR1, was expressed by microglial cells in all regions of the healthy brain. Induction of MOG

  8. Persistent Morbillivirus Infection Leads to Altered Cortactin Distribution in Histiocytic Sarcoma Cells with Decreased Cellular Migration Capacity.

    PubMed

    Pfankuche, Vanessa Maria; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed; Contioso, Vanessa Bono; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Rohn, Karl; Ulrich, Reiner; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Puff, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcomas represent rare but fatal neoplasms in humans. Based on the absence of a commercially available human histiocytic sarcoma cell line the frequently affected dog displays a suitable translational model. Canine distemper virus, closely related to measles virus, is a highly promising candidate for oncolytic virotherapy. Therapeutic failures in patients are mostly associated with tumour invasion and metastasis often induced by misdirected cytoskeletal protein activities. Thus, the impact of persistent canine distemper virus infection on the cytoskeletal protein cortactin, which is frequently overexpressed in human cancers with poor prognosis, was investigated in vitro in a canine histiocytic sarcoma cell line (DH82). Though phagocytic activity, proliferation and apoptotic rate were unaltered, a significantly reduced migration activity compared to controls (6 hours and 1 day after seeding) accompanied by a decreased number of cortactin mRNA transcripts (1 day) was detected. Furthermore, persistently canine distemper virus infected DH82 cells showed a predominant diffuse intracytoplasmic cortactin distribution at 6 hours and 1 day compared to controls with a prominent membranous expression pattern (p ≤ 0.05). Summarized, persistent canine distemper virus infection induces reduced tumour cell migration associated with an altered intracellular cortactin distribution, indicating cytoskeletal changes as one of the major pathways of virus-associated inhibition of tumour spread.

  9. Persistent Morbillivirus Infection Leads to Altered Cortactin Distribution in Histiocytic Sarcoma Cells with Decreased Cellular Migration Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Pfankuche, Vanessa Maria; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed; Contioso, Vanessa Bono; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Rohn, Karl; Ulrich, Reiner; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Puff, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcomas represent rare but fatal neoplasms in humans. Based on the absence of a commercially available human histiocytic sarcoma cell line the frequently affected dog displays a suitable translational model. Canine distemper virus, closely related to measles virus, is a highly promising candidate for oncolytic virotherapy. Therapeutic failures in patients are mostly associated with tumour invasion and metastasis often induced by misdirected cytoskeletal protein activities. Thus, the impact of persistent canine distemper virus infection on the cytoskeletal protein cortactin, which is frequently overexpressed in human cancers with poor prognosis, was investigated in vitro in a canine histiocytic sarcoma cell line (DH82). Though phagocytic activity, proliferation and apoptotic rate were unaltered, a significantly reduced migration activity compared to controls (6 hours and 1 day after seeding) accompanied by a decreased number of cortactin mRNA transcripts (1 day) was detected. Furthermore, persistently canine distemper virus infected DH82 cells showed a predominant diffuse intracytoplasmic cortactin distribution at 6 hours and 1 day compared to controls with a prominent membranous expression pattern (p ≤ 0.05). Summarized, persistent canine distemper virus infection induces reduced tumour cell migration associated with an altered intracellular cortactin distribution, indicating cytoskeletal changes as one of the major pathways of virus-associated inhibition of tumour spread. PMID:27911942

  10. No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth; Bonin, Michael; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Raabe, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

  11. Genetic Labeling Reveals Novel Cellular Targets of Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene: Distribution of GABA and Non-GABA ErbB4-Positive Cells in Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Jonathan C.; Lin, Thiri W.; Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Liu, Fang; Yin, Dong-Min; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 are schizophrenia risk genes. NRG1-ErbB4 signaling plays a critical role in neural development and regulates neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Nevertheless, its cellular targets remain controversial. ErbB4 was thought to express in excitatory neurons, although recent studies disputed this view. Using mice that express a fluorescent protein under the promoter of the ErbB4 gene, we determined in what cells ErbB4 is expressed and their identity. ErbB4 was widely expressed in the mouse brain, being highest in amygdala and cortex. Almost all ErbB4-positive cells were GABAergic in cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and most of amygdala in neonatal and adult mice, suggesting GABAergic transmission as a major target of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in these regions. Non-GABAergic, ErbB4-positive cells were present in thalamus, hypothalamus, midbrain, and hindbrain. In particular, ErbB4 is expressed in serotoninergic neurons of raphe nuclei but not in norepinephrinergic neurons of the locus ceruleus. In hypothalamus, ErbB4 is present in neurons that express oxytocin. Finally, ErbB4 is expressed in a group of cells in the subcortical areas that are positive for S100 calcium binding protein β. These results identify novel cellular targets of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling. PMID:25274830

  12. Murine Hyperglycemic Vasculopathy and Cardiomyopathy: Whole-Genome Gene Expression Analysis Predicts Cellular Targets and Regulatory Networks Influenced by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chenhui; La Bonte, Laura R.; Pavlov, Vasile I.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL)-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole-genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure, and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies. PMID:22375142

  13. Expression and subcellular distribution of gephyrin in non-neuronal tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Nawrotzki, Ralph; Islinger, Markus; Vogel, Ingeborg; Völkl, Alfred; Kirsch, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    Gephyrin is a scaffolding protein required for the accumulation of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors at neuronal postsynaptic membranes. In non-neuronal tissues, gephyrin is indispensible for the biosynthesis of molybdenum cofactor, the prosthetic group of oxidoreductases including sulfite oxidase and xanthine oxidase. However, the molecular and cellular basis of gephyrin's non-neuronal function is poorly understood; in particular, the roles of its splice variants remain enigmatic. Here, we used cDNA screening as well as Northern and immunoblot analyses to show that mammalian liver contains only a limited number of gephyrin splice variants, with the C3-containing variant being the predominant isoform. Using new and established anti-gephyrin antibodies in immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation studies, we report that gephyrin localizes to the cytoplasm of both tissue hepatocytes and cultured immortalized cells. These findings were corroborated by RNA interference studies in which the cytosolic distribution was found to be abolished. Finally, by blue-native PAGE we show that cytoplasmic gephyrin is part of a ~600 kDa protein complex of yet unknown composition. Our data suggest that the expression pattern of non-neuronal gephyrin is simpler than indicated by previous evidence. In addition, gephyrin's presence in a cytosolic 600 kDa protein complex suggests that its metabolic and/or other non-neuronal functions are exerted in the cytoplasm and are not confined to a particular subcellular compartment.

  14. Myocardial Gene Expression Profiling to Predict and Identify Cardiac Allograft Acute Cellular Rejection: The GET-Study

    PubMed Central

    Bodez, Diane; Hocini, Hakim; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Tisserand, Pascaline; Benhaiem, Nicole; Barau, Caroline; Kharoubi, Mounira; Guellich, Aziz; Guendouz, Soulef; Radu, Costin; Couetil, Jean-Paul; Ghaleh, Bijan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Hittinger, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Aims Serial invasive endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) remain the gold standard for acute cellular rejection (ACR) diagnosis. However histological grading has several limitations. We aimed to explore the value of myocardial Gene Expression Profiling (GEP) for diagnosing and identifying predictive biomarkers of ACR. Methods A case-control study nested within a retrospective heart transplant patients cohort included 126 patients with median (IQR) age 50 (41–57) years and 111 (88%) males. Among 1157 EMB performed, 467 were eligible (i.e, corresponding to either ISHLT grade 0 or ≥3A), among which 36 were selected for GEP according to the grading: 0 (CISHLT, n = 13); rejection ≥3A (RISHLT, n = 13); 0 one month before ACR (BRISHLT, n = 10). Results We found 294 genes differentially expressed between CISHLT and RISHLT, mainly involved in immune activation, and inflammation. Hierarchical clustering showed a clear segregation of CISHLT and RISHLT groups and heterogeneity of GEP within RISHLT. All EMB presented immune activation, but some RISHLT EMB were strongly subject to inflammation, whereas others, closer to CISHLT, were characterized by structural modifications with lower inflammation level. We identified 15 probes significantly different between BRISHLT and CISHLT, including the gene of the muscular protein TTN. This result suggests that structural alterations precede inflammation in ACR. Linear Discriminant Analysis based on these 15 probes was able to identify the histological status of every 36 samples. Conclusion Myocardial GEP is a helpful method to accurately diagnose ACR, and predicts rejection one month before its histological occurrence. These results should be considered in cardiac allograft recipients’ care. PMID:27898719

  15. Tissue factor expression in human arterial smooth muscle cells. TF is present in three cellular pools after growth factor stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, A D; Giesen, P L; Taby, O; Rosenfield, C L; Rossikhina, M; Fyfe, B S; Kohtz, D S; Fallon, J T; Nemerson, Y; Taubman, M B

    1997-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that initiates the coagulation cascade. Because of the potential role of TF in mediating arterial thrombosis, we have examined its expression in human aortic and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC). TF mRNA and protein were induced in SMC by a variety of growth agonists. Exposure to PDGF AA or BB for 30 min provided all of the necessary signals for induction of TF mRNA and protein. This result was consistent with nuclear runoff analyses, demonstrating that PDGF-induced TF transcription occurred within 30 min. A newly developed assay involving binding of digoxigenin-labeled FVIIa (DigVIIa) and digoxigenin-labeled Factor X (DigX) was used to localize cellular TF. By light and confocal microscopy, prominent TF staining was seen in the perinuclear cytoplasm beginning 2 h after agonist treatment and persisting for 10-12 h. Surface TF activity, measured on SMC monolayers under flow conditions, increased transiently, peaking 4-6 h after agonist stimulation and returning to baseline within 16 h. Peak surface TF activity was only approximately 20% of total TF activity measured in cell lysates. Surface TF-blocking experiments demonstrated that the remaining TF was found as encrypted surface TF, and also in an intracellular pool. The relatively short-lived surface expression of TF may be critical for limiting the thrombotic potential of intact SMC exposed to growth factor stimulation. In contrast, the encrypted surface and intracellular pools may provide a rich source of TF under conditions associated with SMC damage, such as during atherosclerotic plaque rupture or balloon arterial injury. PMID:9410905

  16. A stable HeLa cell line that inducibly expresses poliovirus 2A(pro): effects on cellular and viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-03-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro)) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2A(pro) induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2A(pro) cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2A(pro), prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2A(pro) still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2A(pro). Moreover, synthesis of 2A(pro) in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2A(pro)-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2A(pro) expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2A(pro) functions, to complement poliovirus 2A(pro) mutants, and to test antiviral compounds.

  17. The use of cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) to study Crizotinib resistance in ALK-expressing human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Huang, Yung-Hsing; Wu, Chengsheng; Zhang, Jing Dong; Wang, Peng; El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Fares, Mohamed; Lai, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Various forms of oncogenic ALK proteins have been identified in various types of human cancers. While Crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, has been found to be therapeutically useful against a subset of ALK+ tumours, clinical resistance to this drug has been well recognized and the mechanism of this phenomenon is incompletely understood. Using the cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA), we measured the Crizotinib—ALK binding in a panel of ALK+ cell lines, and correlated the findings with the ALK structure and its interactions with specific binding proteins. The Crizotinib IC50 significantly correlated with Crizotinib—ALK binding. The suboptimal Crizotinib—ALK binding in Crizotinib-resistant cells is not due to the cell-specific environment, since transfection of NPM-ALK into these cells revealed substantial Crizotinib—NPM-ALK binding. Interestingly, we found that the resistant cells expressed higher protein level of β-catenin and siRNA knockdown restored Crizotinib—ALK binding (correlated with a significant lowering of IC50). Computational analysis of the crystal structures suggests that β-catenin exerts steric hindrance to the Crizotinib—ALK binding. In conclusion, the Crizotinib—ALK binding measurable by CETSA is useful in predicting Crizotinib sensitivity, and Crizotinib—ALK binding is in turn dictated by the structure of ALK and some of its binding partners. PMID:27641368

  18. Cellular expression and crystal structure of the murine cytomegalovirus major histocompatibility complex class I-like glycoprotein, m153.

    PubMed

    Mans, Janet; Natarajan, Kannan; Balbo, Andrea; Schuck, Peter; Eikel, Daniel; Hess, Sonja; Robinson, Howard; Simic, Hrvoje; Jonjic, Stipan; Tiemessen, Caroline T; Margulies, David H

    2007-11-30

    Mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV), a beta-herpesvirus that establishes latent and persistent infections in mice, is a valuable model for studying complex virus-host interactions. MCMV encodes the m145 family of putative immunoevasins with predicted major histocompatibility complex, class I (MHC-I) structure. Functions attributed to some family members include down-regulation of host MHC-I (m152) and NKG2D ligands (m145, m152, and m155) and interaction with inhibitory or activating NK receptors (m157). We present the cellular, biochemical, and structural characterization of m153, which is a heavily glycosylated homodimer, that does not require beta2m or peptide and is expressed at the surface of MCMV-infected cells. Its 2.4-A crystal structure confirms that this compact molecule preserves an MHC-I-like fold and reveals a novel mode of dimerization, confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, and a distinctive disulfide-stabilized extended N terminus. The structure provides a useful framework for comparative analysis of the divergent members of the m145 family.

  19. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  20. Relating Chemical Structure to Cellular Response: An Integrative Analysis of Gene Expression, Bioactivity, and Structural Data Across 11,000 Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Greenside, P; Paik, H; Sirota, M; Hadley, D; Butte, A J

    2015-10-01

    A central premise in systems pharmacology is that structurally similar compounds have similar cellular responses; however, this principle often does not hold. One of the most widely used measures of cellular response is gene expression. By integrating gene expression data from Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) with chemical structure and bioactivity data from PubChem, we performed a large-scale correlation analysis of chemical structures and gene expression profiles of over 11,000 compounds taking into account confounding factors such as biological conditions (e.g., cell line, dose) and bioactivities. We found that structurally similar compounds do indeed yield similar gene expression profiles. There is an ∼20% chance that two structurally similar compounds (Tanimoto Coefficient ≥ 0.85) share significantly similar gene expression profiles. Regardless of structural similarity, two compounds tend to share similar gene expression profiles in a cell line when they are administrated at a higher dose or when the cell line is sensitive to both compounds.

  1. Real-time proliferation of porcine cumulus cells is related to the protein levels and cellular distribution of Cdk4 and Cx43.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Hanna; Zawierucha, Piotr; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-09-01

    The proper maturation of cumulus somatic cells depends on bidirectional communication between the oocyte and the surrounding cumulus cells (CCs). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate maturation markers, such as Cx43 and Cdk4 protein levels, and (ii) to analyze the distribution of these two proteins in CCs cultured for 44, 88, 132, and 164 hours in both separated and cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures. CCs were isolated from porcine ovarian follicles after the treatment of the recovered COCs with collagenase. Then, the separated CCs were cultured in TCM-199 for 0 to 164 hours, using a real-time cellular analyzer; however, the immunostaining was performed only after 44, 88, and 132 hours. The protein levels and distribution were analyzed using confocal microscopy. After the CCs underwent in vitro cultivation (IVC) for 25 hours, a logarithmically increasing normalized proliferation index was found throughout the entire 164 hours cultivation time. The Cx43 and Cdk4 proteins were observed at higher levels after 44 hours of culture than before IVC. After 88 and 132 hours of IVC, no significant alterations in either mRNA or protein levels of Cx43 and Cdk4 were found. Cx43 and Cdk4 were localized in the cell nucleus before IVC, whereas after 44, 88, and 132 hours of IVC, both proteins translocated to the cytoplasm. In cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures, Cdk4 was localized both in the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas Cx43 was only in the cytoplasm. Additionally, only low levels of the cumulus expansion markers MIS and SNAT3 were observed. In summary, we could demonstrate that the in vitro cultivation of CCs was associated with cell proliferation and that Cx43 and Cdk4 gene expression was upregulated after IVC, resulting in significantly higher protein levels. Moreover, the two proteins translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the CCs during IVC. The protein distribution is presumably related to different protein functions during bidirectional communication via

  2. Correlation of cellular expression with function of NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase in the murine lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Lies, Barbara; Groneberg, Dieter; Friebe, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The action of nitric oxide (NO) to stimulate NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC), followed by production of cGMP, and eventually to cause smooth muscle relaxation is well known. In the lower urinary tract (LUT), in contrast to the cardiovascular system and the gastrointestinal tract, specific localization in combination with function of NO-GC has not been investigated to date. Consequently, little is known about the mechanisms regulating relaxation of the lower urinary tract in general and the role of NO-GC-expressing cells in particular. To study the distribution and function of NO-GC in the murine lower urinary tract, we used internal urethral sphincter and bladder detrusor from global (GCKO) and smooth muscle cell-specific (SM-GCKO) NO-GC knock-out mice for immunohistochemical analyses and organ bath experiments. In urethral sphincter, NO-GC-positive immunofluorescence was confined to smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Deletion of NO-GC in SMCs abolished NO-induced relaxation. In bladder detrusor, exposure to NO did not cause relaxation although immunohistochemistry uncovered the existence of NO-GC in the tissue. In contrast to the urethral sphincter, expression of NO-GC in bladder detrusor was limited to platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα)-positive interstitial cells. In conclusion, NO-GC found in SMCs of the urethral sphincter mediates NO-induced relaxation; bladder detrusor is unique as NO-GC is not expressed in SMCs and, thus, NO does not induce relaxation. Nevertheless, NO-GC expression was found in PDGFRα-positive interstitial cells of the murine bladder with an as yet unknown function. Further investigation is needed to clarify the role of NO-GC in the detrusor.

  3. Widening Spectrum of Cellular and Subcellular Expression of Human GLUD1 and GLUD2 Glutamate Dehydrogenases Suggests Novel Functions.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    in the cytoplasm of gray and white matter astrocytes within coarse structures resembling mitochondria. Additionally, hGDH1 localized to the nuclear membrane of a subpopulation of astrocytes and of the vast majority of oligodendrocytes and their precursors. Remarkably, hGDH2-specific staining was detected in human cortical neurons, with different expression patterns having emerged. One pattern, observed in large cortical neurons (some with pyramidal morphology), was a hGDH2-specific labeling of cytoplasmic structures resembling mitochondria. These were distributed either in the cell body-axon or on the cell surface in close proximity to astrocytic end-feet that encircle glutamatergic synapses. Another pattern was observed in small cortical neurons with round dense nuclei in which the hGDH2-specific staining was found in the nuclear membrane. A detailed description of these observations and their functional implications, suggesting that the GDH flux is used by different cells to serve some of their unique functions, is presented below.

  4. Inflammatory chemokines and their receptors in human visceral leishmaniasis: Gene expression profile in peripheral blood, splenic cellular sources and their impact on trafficking of inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Sundar, Shyam

    2017-02-18

    Chemokines play an important role in determining cellular composition at inflammatory sites, and as such, influence disease outcome. In this study, we investigated the expression profile and splenic cellular source of various inflammatory chemokines and their receptors in human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The expression of chemokines or their receptors was measured at the gene and protein level by employing real time qPCR and a cytometric bead array assay, respectively. In addition, the cellular source of chemokines and their receptors in the spleen was identified employing gene expression analyses in sequentially selected cell subsets. We identified elevated expression of CXCL10, CXCL9, CXCL8, and decreased CCL2 from VL patients. Further, we found reduced expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR3 and CCR2, but increased expression of CCR7 on VL PBMC, compared to endemic healthy controls. Additionally, splenic monocytes were found to be the major source of CXCL10, CXCL9 and CCR2, whereas T cells were the main source of CXCR3 and CCR7. We also report a strong association between plasma IFN-γ and CXCL-10, CXCL-9 levels. Enhanced parasite burden positively correlates with increased expression of CXCL10, CXCL9, IFN-γ and IL-10. Overall our result indicates that VL patients have an elevated inflammatory chemokine milieu which correlated with disease severity. However, expression of their chemokine receptors was significantly impaired, which may have contributed to reduced frequencies of blood monocytes and neutrophils in peripheral blood. In contrast, enhanced expression of CCR7 was associated with increased numbers of activated T cells in circulation. These findings highlight the importance of chemokines for recruitment of various cell populations in VL, and the knowledge gained may help in global understandings of the complex interaction between chemokines and pathological processes, and therefore will contribute towards the design of novel

  5. Ectopic AP4 expression induces cellular senescence via activation of p53 in long-term confluent retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiping; Wong, Matthew Man-Kin; Zhang, Xiaojian; Chiu, Sung-Kay

    2015-11-15

    When cells are grown to confluence, cell-cell contact inhibition occurs and drives the cells to enter reversible quiescence rather than senescence. Confluent retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells exhibiting contact inhibition was used as a model in this study to examine the role of overexpression of transcription factor AP4, a highly expressed transcription factor in many types of cancer, in these cells during long-term culture. We generated stable inducible RPE cell clones expressing AP4 or AP4 without the DNA binding domain (DN-AP4) and observed that, when cultured for 24 days, RPE cells with a high level of AP4 exhibit a large, flattened morphology and even cease proliferating; these changes were not observed in DN-AP4-expressing cells or non-induced cells. In addition, AP4-expressing cells exhibited senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. We demonstrated that the induced cellular senescence was mediated by enhanced p53 expression and that AP4 regulates the p53 gene by binding directly to two of the three E-boxes present on the promoter of the p53 gene. Moreover, we showed that serum is essential for AP4 in inducing p53-associated cellular senescence. Collectively, we showed that overexpression of AP4 mediates cellular senescence involving in activation of p53 in long-term post-confluent RPE cells.

  6. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin‐converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen‐Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J.; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R.; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E.; Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole‐body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3‐55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P < 0·01) whilst increasing ACE expression within a physiological range (<1·8‐fold at 48 h; P < 0·01). Our findings suggest novel hypotheses. Firstly, cellular feedback regulation may occur between UCPs and ACE. Secondly, cellular UCP regulation of sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. PMID:27347560

  7. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  8. Meta-analysis of expression of hepatic organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) transporters in cellular systems relative to human liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Badée, Justine; Achour, Brahim; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1 transporters play an important role in hepatic drug disposition. Recently, an increasing number of studies have reported proteomic expression data for OATP transporters. However, systematic analysis and understanding of the actual differences in OATP expression between liver tissue and commonly used cellular systems is lacking. In the current study, meta-analysis was performed to assess the protein expression of OATP transporters reported in hepatocytes relative to liver tissue and to identify any potential correlations in transporter expression levels in the same individual. OATP1B1 was identified as the most abundant uptake transporter at 5.9 ± 8.3, 5.8 ± 3.3, and 4.2 ± 1.7 fmol/μg protein in liver tissue, sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH), and cryopreserved suspended hepatocytes, respectively. The rank order in average expression in liver tissue and cellular systems was OATP1B1 > OATP1B3 ≈ OATP2B1. Abundance levels of the OATP transporters investigated were not significantly different between liver and cellular systems, with the exception of OATP2B1 expression in SCHH relative to liver tissue. Analysis of OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1 liver expression data in the same individuals (n = 86) identified weak (OATP1B1-OATP2B1) to moderately (OATP1B3-OATP2B1) significant correlations. A significant weak correlation was noted between OATP1B1 abundance and age of human donors, whereas expression of the OATPs investigated was independent of sex. Implications of the current analysis on the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of transporter-mediated drug disposition using physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are discussed.

  9. Subcellular distribution and cellular self-repair ability of fluorescent quantum dots emitting in the visible to near-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; He, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor II-VI quantum dots (QDs), as high-performance fluorescent biological probes, have garnered significant attention due to their superior optical properties. To enable QDs for wide-ranging bioapplications, concerns about their in vitro behavior need to be fully addressed. Herein, for the first time, cellular behaviors of aqueous synthesized-QDs (aqQDs), whose maximum emission wavelength (λ emission) covers the visible to near-infrared spectral window, are systematically investigated. Our results demonstrate that three different sized aqQDs feature distinct cellular distributions, i.e. aqQD530 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 530 nm) and aqQD620 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 620 nm) mainly distribute in the cytoplasm and nucleus, while aqQD730 (aqQDs whose λ emission is 730 nm) mainly accumulates in the cytoplasm. Most significantly, the phenomenon that cellular self-repair ability is dependent on diameters of aqQDs is revealed for the first time. In particular, small-sized QDs (e.g. aqQD530 and aqQD620) severely deteriorate cellular self-repair ability, leading to an irreversible decrease in cell viability. In striking contrast, large-sized QDs (e.g. aqQD730) have little effect on cellular self-repair ability, and the cell viability is restored after removal of aqQD730 from the culture medium. Our results provide invaluable information for QD-relevant biosafety analysis, as well as suggest available guidance for the design of biocompatible QDs for wide utilization in biological and biomedical studies.

  10. The CD markers of camel (Camelus dromedarius) milk cells during mastitis: the LPAM-1 expression is an indication of possible mucosal nature of the cellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashqar, Roqaya A; Al-Mohammad Salem, Khadim M; Al Herz, Abdul Kareem M; Al-Haroon, Amal I; Alluwaimi, Ahmed M

    2015-04-01

    Studying the cellular populations of the camel mammary glands through the expression pattern of the CD markers and adhesion molecules is a mean to define whether the cellular trafficking pathway is peripheral or mucosal nature. Camel milk cells from 8 Gram-positive and 5 Gram-negative infected camels were examined with flow cytometry using cross-reacting antibodies like, anti-CD4(+), CD8(+), WC+1(+)γδ, CD62L, CD11a(+)/CD18, LPAM-1, CXCR2. The overall results indicated high flow cytometry output of most of the CD makers. The statistical analysis of the mean percentage of the expressed CD markers has shown that CD62L, CXCR-2, LPAM-1, CD11a/CD18, CD8(+), IL-6R and CD20(+) were expressed in significant differences in either type of the infection. The LPAM-1 expression has provided further support to the notion that the lymphocyte trafficking is of the mucosal nature. The mucosal origin of cellular trafficking has important implications on the vaccine design and therapeutical approaches to mastitis.

  11. Expression and distribution of aggrecanases in human larynx: ADAMTS-5/aggrecanase-2 is the main aggrecanase in laryngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Filou, S; Stylianou, M; Triantaphyllidou, I E; Papadas, T; Mastronikolis, N S; Goumas, P D; Papachristou, D J; Ravazoula, P; Skandalis, S S; Vynios, D H

    2013-04-01

    Members of the ADAMTS family of proteases degrade proteoglycans and thereby have the potential to alter tissue architecture and regulate cellular functions. Aggrecanases are the main enzymes responsible for aggrecan degradation, due to their specific cleavage pattern. In this study, the expression status, the macromolecular organization and localization of ADAMTS-1, ADAMTS-4/aggrecanase-1 and ADAMTS-5/aggrecanase-2 in human normal larynx and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) were investigated. On mRNA level, the results showed that ADAMTS-4 was the highest expressed enzyme in normal larynx, whereas ADAMTS-5 was the main aggrecanase in LSCC presenting a stage-related increase up to stage III (8-fold higher expression compared to normal), and thereafter decreased in stage IV. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analysis showed that ADAMTS-5, but not ADAMTS-4, was highly expressed by carcinoma cells. Sequential extraction revealed an altered distribution and organization of multiple molecular forms (latent, activated and fragmented forms) of the enzymes within the cancerous and their corresponding macroscopically normal laryngeal tissues, compared to the normal ones. Importantly, these analyses indicated that critical macromolecular changes occurred from the earliest LSCC stages not only in malignant parts of the tissue but also in areas that were not in proximity to carcinoma cells and appeared otherwise normal. Overall, the results of the present study show that ADAMTS-5/aggrecanase-2 is the main aggrecanase present in laryngeal carcinoma suggesting a critical role for the enzyme in aggrecan degradation and laryngeal tissue destruction during tumor progression.

  12. Deciphering an underlying mechanism of differential cellular effects of nanoparticles: an example of Bach-1 dependent induction of HO-1 expression by gold nanorod.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenlin; Yang, Xiao; Li, Yiye; Li, Suping; Niu, Shiwen; Wu, Xiaochun; Wei, Jingyan; Nie, Guangjun

    2012-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles are extensively investigated for their potential biomedical applications. Therefore, it is pertinent to thoroughly evaluate their biological effects at different levels and their underlying molecular mechanism. Frequently, there are discrepancies about the biological effects of various gold nanoparticles among the reports dealing with different models. Most of the studies focused on the different biological effects of various nano-properties of the nanomaterials. We hypothesize that the biological models with different metabolic processes would be taken into account to explain the observed discrepancies of biological effects of nanomaterials. Herein, by using mouse embryo fibroblast cell line (MEF-1) and human embryonal lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5) as in vitro models, we studied the cellular effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs) coated with poly (diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDAC), polyethylene glycol and polystyrene sulfonae (PSS). We found that all three AuNRs had no effects on cellular viability at the concentration of 1 nM; however, AuNRs that coated with PDDAC and PSS induced significant up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which was believed to be involved in cellular defense activities in MEF-1 but not in MRC-5 cells. Further study showed that the low fundamental expression of transcription factor Bach-1, the major regulator of HO-1 expression, in MEF-1 was responsible for the up-regulation of HO-1 induced by the AuNRs. Our results indicate that although AuNRs we used are non-cytotoxic, they cell-specifically induce change of gene expression, such as HO-1. Our current study provides a good example to explain the molecular mechanisms of differential biological effects of nanomaterials in different cellular models. This finding raises a concern on evaluation of cellular effects of nanoparticles where the cell models should be critically considered.

  13. p53 promotes cellular survival in a context-dependent manner by directly inducing the expression of haeme-oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Nam, S Y; Sabapathy, K

    2011-11-03

    A variety of cellular insults activate the tumour suppressor p53, leading generally to cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis. However, it is not inconceivable that cellular protective mechanisms may be required to keep cells alive while cell-fate decisions are made. In this respect, p53 has been suggested to perform functions that allow cells to survive, by halting of the cell-cycle, and thus preventing immediate cell death. Nonetheless, the existence of direct pro-survival p53 target genes regulating cellular survival is lacking. We show here evidence for p53-dependent cellular survival in a context-dependent manner. Both mouse and human cells lacking p53 are hypersensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced cell death compared with their isogenic wild-type counterparts. By contrast, p53(-/-) cells are expectedly resistant to cell death upon exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as cisplatin (CDDP) and etoposide. Although p53 and its classical targets such as p21 and Mdm2 are activated by both H(2)O(2) and CDDP, we found that the expression of haeme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-an antioxidant and antiapoptotic protein-was directly induced only upon H(2)O(2) treatment in a p53-dependent manner. Consistently, p53, but not its homologue p73, activated HO-1 expression and was bound to the HO-1 promoter specifically only upon H(2)O(2) treatment. Moreover, silencing HO-1 expression enhanced cell death upon H(2)O(2) treatment only in p53-proficient cells. Finally, H(2)O(2)-mediated cell death was rescued significantly in p53-deficient cells by antioxidant treatment, as well as by bilirubin, a by-product of HO-1 metabolism. Taken together, these data demonstrate a direct role for p53 in promoting cellular survival in a context-specific manner through the activation of a direct transcriptional target, HO-1.

  14. Cellular microRNA let-7c inhibits M1 protein expression of the H1N1 influenza A virus in infected human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Jie; Yang, Jing; Fan, Xing-Liang; Zhao, Hai-Bao; Hu, Wei; Li, Zhen-Peng; Yu, Guang-Chuang; Ding, Xiao-Ran; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Bo, Xiao-Chen; Zheng, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Zhe; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2012-10-01

    The influenza virus (IV) triggers a series of signalling events inside host cells and induces complex cellular responses. Studies have suggested that host factors play an essential role in IV replication. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that target mRNAs, triggering either translation repression or RNA degradation. Emerging research suggests that host-derived cellular miRNAs are involved in mediating the host-IV interaction. Using miRNA microarrays, we identified several miRNAs aberrantly expressed in IV-infected human lung epithelial cells (A549). Specifically, miR-let-7c was highly up-regulated in IV-infected A549 cells. PITA and miRanda database screening indicated that the let-7c seed sequence is a perfect complementary sequence match to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of viral gene M1 (+) cRNA, but not to PB2 and PA. As detected by a luciferase reporter system, let-7c directly targeted the 3'-UTR of M1 (+) cRNA, but not PB2 and PA. To experimentally identify the function of cellular let-7c, precursor let-7c was transfected into A549 cells. Let-7c down-regulated IV M1 expression at both the (+) cRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, transfection with a let-7c inhibitor enhanced the expression of M1. Therefore, let-7c may reduce IV replication by degrading M1 (+) cRNA. This is the first report indicating that cellular miRNA regulates IV replication through the degradation of viral gene (+) cRNA by matching the 3'-UTR of the viral cRNA. These findings suggest that let-7c plays a role in protecting host cells from the virus in addition to its known cellular functions.

  15. The Neurona at Home project: Simulating a large-scale cellular automata brain in a distributed computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acedo, L.; Villanueva-Oller, J.; Moraño, J. A.; Villanueva, R.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) has become the standard open source solution for grid computing in the Internet. Volunteers use their computers to complete an small part of the task assigned by a dedicated server. We have developed a BOINC project called Neurona@Home whose objective is to simulate a cellular automata random network with, at least, one million neurons. We consider a cellular automata version of the integrate-and-fire model in which excitatory and inhibitory nodes can activate or deactivate neighbor nodes according to a set of probabilistic rules. Our aim is to determine the phase diagram of the model and its behaviour and to compare it with the electroencephalographic signals measured in real brains.

  16. The influence of metal speciation on the bioavailability and sub-cellular distribution of cadmium to the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio dilatatus.

    PubMed

    Calhôa, Carla Filipa; Monteiro, Marta S; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Mann, Reinier M

    2011-04-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential toxic metal that is able to bioaccumulate in both flora fauna and has the potential to biomagnify in some food chains. However, the form in which cadmium is presented to consumers can alter the bioavailability and possibly the internal distribution of assimilated Cd. Previous studies in our laboratory highlighted differences in Cd assimilation among isopods when they were provided with a plant-based food with either Cd biologically incorporated into plant tissue or superficially amended with ionic Cd(2+). Cd is known for its high affinity for sulphur ligands in cysteine residues which form the basis for metal-binding proteins such as metallothionein. This study compares Cd assimilation efficiency (AE) in Porcellio dilatatus fed with food amended with either cadmium cysteinate or cadmium nitrate in an examination of the influence of Cd speciation on metal bioavailability followed by an examination of the sub-cellular distribution using a centrifugal fractionation protocol. As hypothesized the AE of Cd among isopods fed with Cd(NO(3))(2) (64%, SE=5%) was higher than AE for isopods fed with Cd(Cys)(2) (20%, SE=3%). The sub-cellular distribution also depended on the Cd species provided. Those isopods fed Cd(Cys)(2) allocated significantly more Cd to the cell debris and organelles fractions at the expense of allocation to metal-rich granules (MRG). The significance of the difference in sub-cellular distribution with regard to toxicity is discussed. This paper demonstrates that the assimilation and internal detoxification of Cd is dependent on the chemical form of Cd presented to the isopod.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis accompanies enhanced expression of multiple inositol polyphosphate phosphatase 1 (Minpp1): a possible role for Minpp1 in cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Kilaparty, Surya P; Agarwal, Rakhee; Singh, Pooja; Kannan, Krishnaswamy; Ali, Nawab

    2016-07-01

    Inositol polyphosphates represent a group of differentially phosphorylated inositol metabolites, many of which are implicated to regulate diverse cellular processes such as calcium mobilization, vesicular trafficking, differentiation, apoptosis, etc. The metabolic network of these compounds is complex and tightly regulated by various kinases and phosphatases present predominantly in the cytosol. Multiple inositol polyphosphate phosphatase 1 (Minpp1) is the only known endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal enzyme that hydrolyzes various inositol polyphosphates in vitro as well as in vivo conditions. However, access of the Minpp1 to cytosolic substrates has not yet been demonstrated clearly and hence its physiological function. In this study, we examined a potential role for Minpp1 in ER stress-induced apoptosis. We generated a custom antibody and characterized its specificity to study the expression of Minpp1 protein in multiple mammalian cells under experimentally induced cellular stress conditions. Our results demonstrate a significant increase in the expression of Minpp1 in response to a variety of cellular stress conditions. The protein expression was corroborated with the expression of its mRNA and enzymatic activity. Further, in an attempt to link the role of Minpp1 to apoptotic stress, we studied the effect of Minpp1 expression on apoptosis following silencing of the Minpp1 gene by its specific siRNA. Our results suggest an attenuation of apoptotic parameters following knockdown of Minpp1. Thus, in addition to its known role in inositol polyphosphate metabolism, we have identified a novel role for Minpp1 as a stress-responsive protein. In summary, our results provide, for the first time, a probable link between ER stress-induced apoptosis and Minpp1 expression.

  18. Effects of 5-fluorouracil in nuclear and cellular morphology, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeletal and caveolar distribution in primary cultures of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Marcelo de Carvalho; Morrot, Alexandre; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer.

  19. A new cellular model of pathological TDP-43: The neurotoxicity of stably expressed CTF25 of TDP-43 depends on the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Duan, W; Guo, Y; Li, Z; Han, H; Zhang, S; Yuan, P; Li, C

    2014-12-05

    The C-terminal fragments-25(CTF25) of TDP-43 is a fragment of TAR DNA-binding protein 43kDa (TDP-43), which is involved in RNA metabolism, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal development and stress granules. Not until recently did evidence suggest that CTF25 might play an important role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. However, mechanical details on CTF25 causing motor neuron degeneration still remain unknown. To study the toxicity of CTF25 of TDP-43, we established a cellular model stably expressing CTF25 of TDP-43. Herein, we found that stably expressed CTF25 could induce significant oxidative stress and was mainly degraded by the proteasome pathway in cells. Furthermore, the neurotoxicity of CTF25 of TDP-43 was dependent on proteasome activity. In addition, electron microscopy showed mitochondrial swelling and cristae dilation in cells expressing CTF25 and that CTF25 aggregates were characterized by filamentous bundles and electron dense granular material. In conclusion, the new cellular model mimics classical toxic TDP-43 cellular model and interestingly the toxicity of CTF25 is dependent on the proteasome.

  20. Functional expression and cellular localization of cercosporin-resistance proteins fused with the GFP in Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuang-Ren; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Daub, Margaret E

    2002-06-01

    The Cercospora nicotianae pdx1 and crg1 genes were previously identified as genes required for resistance to the singlet oxygen ((1)O(2))-generating toxin cercosporin. The pdx1 gene has subsequently been shown to be required for pyridoxine biosynthesis, but both the precise biochemical function of the PDX1 protein and the function of the CRG1 protein remain undefined, as both sequences lack defined enzymatic domains or cofactor-binding sites. The gfp gene encoding green fluorescent protein was translationally fused with pdx1 and crg1. Transformation of these constructs into strains mutant in these respective genes resulted in green-fluorescent transformants complemented for the mutant phenotype. Microscopic studies revealed that in transformants transformed with gfp alone, fluorescence was distributed evenly throughout the cytoplasm and excluded from the vacuoles. Expression of PDX1::GFP either under the constitutive Aspergillus nidulans gpdA promoter or its own native promoter was visualized as distinct fluorescent circular structures in the cytoplasm, suggesting that PDX1::GFP was probably localized in the intracellular vesicles. Expression of CRG1 fused with GFP at either its N- or C-terminus resulted in low green fluorescence, compared with that of GFP alone or PDX1::GFP. The green fluorescence of either of the CRG1::GFP fusion proteins was barely observable in transformants and was generally seen as a few scattered regions of fluorescence in the hyphae. Southern blot analysis indicated multiple copies of the constructs were integrated into the fungal genome. Northern analysis revealed that pdx1:: gfp and crg1:: gfp were each expressed as an intact transcriptional unit. Cell fractionation followed by immunoblotting against a GFP antibody showed that GFP alone and PDX1::GFP were detected exclusively in the cytoplasmic fraction. The two CRG1::GFP proteins were barely detected in the cytoplasmic fraction and not at all from the membrane fraction, a result

  1. Human pyridoxal phosphatase. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Baek, Nam-In; Moon, Byung Jo; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2003-12-12

    Pyridoxal phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate. A human brain cDNA clone was identified to the PLP phosphatase on the basis of peptide sequences obtained previously. The cDNA predicts a 296-amino acid protein with a calculated Mr of 31698. The open reading frame is encoded by two exons located on human chromosome 22q12.3, and the exon-intron junction contains the GT/AG consensus splice site. In addition, a full-length mouse PLP phosphatase cDNA of 1978 bp was also isolated. Mouse enzyme encodes a protein of 292 amino acids with Mr of 31512, and it is localized on chromosome 15.E1. Human and mouse PLP phosphatase share 93% identity in protein sequence. A BLAST search revealed the existence of putative proteins in organism ranging from bacteria to mammals. Catalytically active human PLP phosphatase was expressed in Escherichia coli, and characteristics of the recombinant enzyme were similar to those of erythrocyte enzyme. The recombinant enzyme displayed Km and kcat values for pyridoxal of 2.5 microM and 1.52 s(-1), respectively. Human PLP phosphatase mRNA is differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A single mRNA transcript of 2.1 kb was detected in all human tissues examined and was highly abundant in the brain. Obtaining the molecular properties for the human PLP phosphatase may provide new direction for investigating metabolic pathway involving vitamin B6.

  2. Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae infection affects the expression of genes involved in cellular signal transduction and iron metabolism in the kidney of the brown trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Sarker, Subhodeep; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is an enigmatic endoparasite which causes proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. The life cycle of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae generally completes in an invertebrate host freshwater bryozoan and vertebrate host brown trout (Salmo trutta) Linnaeus, 1758. Little is known about the gene expression in the kidney of brown trout during the developmental stages of T. bryosalmonae. In the present study, quantitative real-time PCR was applied to quantify the target genes of interest in the kidney of brown trout at different time points of T. bryosalmonae development. PCR primers specific for target genes were designed and optimized, and their gene expression levels were quantified in the cDNA kidney samples using SYBR Green Supermix. Expression of Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta, integral membrane protein 2B, NADH dehydrogenase 1 beta subcomplex subunit 6, and 26S protease regulatory subunit S10B were upregulated significantly in infected brown trout, while the expression of the ferritin M middle subunit was downregulated significantly. These results suggest that host genes involved in cellular signal transduction, proteasomal activities, including membrane transporters and cellular iron storage, are differentially upregulated or downregulated in the kidney of brown trout during parasite development. The gene expression pattern of infected renal tissue may support the development of intraluminal sporogonic stages of T. bryosalmonae in the renal tubular lumen of brown trout which may facilitate the release of viable parasite spores to transmit to the invertebrate host bryozoan.

  3. Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Related Gene Expression Changes in a Cellular and Animal Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In-Su; Koppula, Sushruta; Park, Shin-Young; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2017-01-01

    We employed transcriptome analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor related gene expression changes in cellular and animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). We used a well-known Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+) to induce neuronal apoptosis in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. The MPP+-treatment of SH-SY5Y cells was capable of inducing neuro-apoptosis, but it remains unclear what kinds of transcriptional genes are affected by MPP+ toxicity. Therefore the pathways that were significantly perturbed in MPP+ treated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were identified based on genome-wide gene expression data at two time points (24 and 48 h). We found that the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) pathway-related genes showed significantly differential expression at all time points. The EGFR pathway has been linked to diverse cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Further, to evaluate the functional significance of the altered EGFR related gene expression observed in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells, the EGFR related GJB2 (Cx26) gene expression was analyzed in an MPP+-intoxicated animal PD model. Our findings identify that the EGFR signaling pathway and its related genes, such as Cx26, might play a significant role in dopaminergic (DAergic) neuronal cell death during the process of neuro-apoptosis and therefore can be focused on as potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28212331

  4. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Prevents TNF-α-Induced Gene Expression by Blocking Amino Acid Transport and Cellular Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomichi, Tomonobu; Morimoto, Kyoko; Oshima, Nana; Yamada, Yuriko; Fu, Liwei; Taketani, Shigeru; Ando, Masayoshi; Kataoka, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, induce the expression of a wide variety of genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Ursolic acid (3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) was identified to inhibit the cell-surface ICAM-1 expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Ursolic acid was found to inhibit the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 protein expression almost completely, whereas the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and NF-κB signaling pathway were decreased only partially by ursolic acid. In line with these findings, ursolic acid prevented cellular protein synthesis as well as amino acid uptake, but did not obviously affect nucleoside uptake and the subsequent DNA/RNA syntheses. This inhibitory profile of ursolic acid was similar to that of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain, but not the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide. Consistent with this notion, ursolic acid was found to inhibit the catalytic activity of Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, our present study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which ursolic acid inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase activity and prevents the TNF-α-induced gene expression by blocking amino acid transport and cellular protein synthesis. PMID:24970122

  5. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  6. The expression of S100P increases and promotes cellular proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Luyan; Chen, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongye; Huang, Jiaming; Jin, Wenyan; Yao, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that S100P has a significant role in cancer, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer and normal endometrium tissues was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we reduced the expression of S100P in HEC-1A and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines by siRNA transfection. Based on the reduced S100P mRNA expression, we measured the effects of S100P on cellular proliferation by the cell-counting kit-8. Nuclear β-catenin protein level was detected by western blotting. Cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA expression regulated by β-catenin was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We found that the expression of S100P mRNA and protein increased in endometrial cancer tissues compared with the normal endometrium. Local S100P expression progressively increased from pathologic differenciation grade 1 to 3. After reducing the S100P expression, the cellular proliferation ability, nuclear β-catenin protein level, cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA levels reduced. It indicated that S100P could promote cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer significantly increased and is associated with pathologic differenciation grade. S100P may promote endometrial cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin.

  7. Increased cellular expression of matrix proteins that regulate mineralization is associated with calcification of native human and porcine xenograft bioprosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsa, S S; Harrity, P J; Maercklein, P B; Kleppe, L; Veinot, J; Edwards, W D; Johnson, C M; Fitzpatrick, L A

    1997-01-01

    Dystrophic mineralization remains the leading cause of stenotic or regurgitant failure in native human and porcine bioprosthetic heart valves. We hypothesized that cellular expression of noncollagenous matrix proteins (osteopontin, osteocalcin, and osteonectin) that regulate skeletal mineralization may orchestrate valvular calcification. Porcine bioprosthetic heart valves and native human heart valves obtained during replacement surgery were analyzed for cells, matrix proteins that regulate mineralization, and vessels. Cell accumulation and calcification were correlated for both valve types (rho = 0.75, P = 0.01, native; rho = 0.42, P = 0.08, bioprosthetic). Osteopontin expression correlated with cell accumulation (rho = 0.58, P = 0.04) and calcification (rho = 0.52, P = 0.06) for bioprosthetic valves. Osteocalcin expression correlated with calcification (rho = 0.77, P = 0.04) and cell accumulation (rho = 0.69, P = 0.07) in native valves. Comparisons of calcified versus noncalcified native and bioprosthetic valves for averaged total matrix protein mRNA signal score revealed increased noncollagenous proteins mRNA levels in calcified valves (P = 0.07, group I vs. group II; P = 0.02, group III vs. group IV). When stratified according to positive versus negative mRNA signal status, both calcified bioprosthetic valves (P = 0.03) and calcified native valves (P = 0.01) were significantly more positive for noncollagenous proteins mRNA than their noncalcified counterparts. Local cell-associated expression of proteins regulating mineralization suggests a highly coordinated mechanism of bioprosthetic and native valve calcification analogous to physiologic bone mineralization. Modulation of cellular infiltration or cellular expression of matrix proteins that regulate mineralization, may offer an effective therapeutic approach to the prevention of valve failure secondary to calcification. PMID:9062358

  8. Expression of Caveolin-1 reduces cellular responses to TGF-{beta}1 through down-regulating the expression of TGF-{beta} type II receptor gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Youn Sook; Han, In-Oc; Park, Seok Hee . E-mail: parks@skku.edu

    2007-07-27

    Transcriptional repression of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} type II receptor (T{beta}RII) gene has been proposed to be one of the major mechanisms leading to TGF-{beta} resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) gene in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells down-regulates the expression of T{beta}RII gene in the transcriptional level, eventually resulting in the decreased responses to TGF-{beta}. The reduced expression of T{beta}RII gene by Cav-1 appeared to be due to the changes of the sequence-specific DNA binding proteins to either Positive Regulatory Element 1 (PRE1) or PRE2 of the T{beta}RII promoter. In addition, Cav-1 expression inhibited TGF-{beta}-mediated cellular proliferation and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor (PAI)-1 gene expression as well as TGF-{beta}-induced luciferase activity. Furthermore, the inhibition of endogeneous Cav-1 by small interfering RNA increased the expression of T{beta}RII gene. These findings strongly suggest that expression of Cav-1 leads to the decreased cellular responsiveness to TGF-{beta} through down-regulating T{beta}RII gene expression.

  9. Perfringolysin O Theta Toxin as a Tool to Monitor the Distribution and Inhomogeneity of Cholesterol in Cellular Membranes.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Masashi; Yang, Yanbo; Fairn, Gregory D

    2016-03-08

    Cholesterol is an essential structural component of cellular membranes in eukaryotes. Cholesterol in the exofacial leaflet of the plasma membrane is thought to form membrane nanodomains with sphingolipids and specific proteins. Additionally, cholesterol is found in the intracellular membranes of endosomes and has crucial functions in membrane trafficking. Furthermore, cellular cholesterol homeostasis and regulation of de novo synthesis rely on transport via both vesicular and non-vesicular pathways. Thus, the ability to visualize and detect intracellular cholesterol, especially in the plasma membrane, is critical to understanding the complex biology associated with cholesterol and the nanodomains. Perfringolysin O (PFO) theta toxin is one of the toxins secreted by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium perfringens and this toxin forms pores in the plasma membrane that causes cell lysis. It is well understood that PFO recognizes and binds to cholesterol in the exofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane, and domain 4 of PFO (D4) is sufficient for the binding of cholesterol. Recent studies have taken advantage of this high-affinity cholesterol-binding domain to create a variety of cholesterol biosensors by using a non-toxic PFO or the D4 in isolation. This review highlights the characteristics and usefulness of, and the principal findings related to, these PFO-derived cholesterol biosensors.

  10. The effect of oil-water partition coefficient on the distribution and cellular uptake of liposome-encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bao, Quan-Ying; Liu, Ai-Yun; Ma, Yu; Chen, Huan; Hong, Jin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Can; Ding, Ya

    2016-10-01

    The shape, size, and surface features of nanoparticles greatly influence the structure and properties of resulting hybrid nanosystems. In this work, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were modified via S-Au covalent bonding by glycol monomethyl ether thioctate with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether of different molecular weights (i.e., 350, 550, and 750Da). These modified GNPs (i.e., GNP350, GNP550, and GNP750) showed different oil-water partition coefficients (Kp), as detected using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The different Kp values of the gold conjugates (i.e., 13.98, 2.11, and 0.036 for GNP350, GNP550, and GNP750, respectively) resulted in different conjugate localization within liposomes, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the cellular uptake of hybrid liposomes co-encapsulating gold conjugates and Nile red was evaluated using intracellular fluorescence intensity. The results indicated that precise GNP localization in the hydrophilic or hydrophobic liposome cavity could be achieved by regulating the GNP oil-water partition coefficient via surface modification; such localization could further affect the properties and functions of hybrid liposomes, including their cellular uptake profiles. This study furthers the understanding not only of the interaction between liposomes and inorganic nanoparticles but also of adjusting liposome-gold hybrid nanostructure properties via the surface chemistry of gold materials.

  11. Mechanical models of the cellular cytoskeletal network for the analysis of intracellular mechanical properties and force distributions: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-12-01

    The cytoskeleton, which is the major mechanical component of cells, supports the cell body and regulates the cellular motility to assist the cell in performing its biological functions. Several cytoskeletal network models have been proposed to investigate the mechanical properties of cells. This review paper summarizes these models with a focus on the prestressed cable network, the semi-flexible chain network, the open-cell foam, the tensegrity, and the granular models. The components, material parameters, types of connection joints, tension conditions, and the advantages and disadvantages of each model are evaluated from a structural and biological point of view. The underlying mechanisms that are associated with the morphological changes of spreading cells are expected to be simulated using a cytoskeletal model; however, it is still paid less attention most likely due to the lack of a suitable cytoskeletal model that can accurately model the spreading process. In this review article, the established cytoskeletal models are hoped to provide useful information for the development of future cytoskeletal models with different degrees of cell attachment for the study of the mechanical mechanisms underlying the cellular behaviors in response to external stimulations.

  12. Global Exponential Stability of Almost Periodic Solution for Neutral-Type Cohen-Grossberg Shunting Inhibitory Cellular Neural Networks with Distributed Delays and Impulses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Jiang, Qi; Gu, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    A kind of neutral-type Cohen-Grossberg shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with distributed delays and impulses is considered. Firstly, by using the theory of impulsive differential equations and the contracting mapping principle, the existence and uniqueness of the almost periodic solution for the above system are obtained. Secondly, by constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, the global exponential stability of the unique almost periodic solution is also investigated. The work in this paper improves and extends some results in recent years. As an application, an example and numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the main results. PMID:27190502

  13. Global Exponential Stability of Almost Periodic Solution for Neutral-Type Cohen-Grossberg Shunting Inhibitory Cellular Neural Networks with Distributed Delays and Impulses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Jiang, Qi; Gu, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    A kind of neutral-type Cohen-Grossberg shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with distributed delays and impulses is considered. Firstly, by using the theory of impulsive differential equations and the contracting mapping principle, the existence and uniqueness of the almost periodic solution for the above system are obtained. Secondly, by constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, the global exponential stability of the unique almost periodic solution is also investigated. The work in this paper improves and extends some results in recent years. As an application, an example and numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the main results.

  14. Differential distribution of cubilin and megalin expression in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Drake, Christopher J; Fleming, Paul A; Larue, Amanda C; Barth, Jeremy L; Chintalapudi, Mastan R; Argraves, W Scott

    2004-03-01

    Cubilin and megalin are cell surface proteins that work cooperatively in many absorptive epithelia to mediate endocytosis of lipoproteins, vitamin carriers, and other proteins. Here we have investigated the coordinate expression of these receptors during mouse development. Our findings indicate that while there are sites where the receptors are co-expressed, there are other tissues where expression is not overlapping. Apical cubilin expression is pronounced in the extraembryonic visceral endoderm (VE) of 6-9.5 days postcoitum (dpc) embryos. By contrast, little megalin expression is evident in the VE at 6 dpc. However, megalin expression in the VE increases as development progresses (7.5-9.5 dpc), although it is not as uniformly distributed as cubilin. Punctate expression of megalin is also apparent in the region of the ectoplacental cone associated with decidual cells, whereas cubilin expression is not seen in association with the ectoplacenta. Strong expression of megalin is observed in the neural ectoderm, neural plate and neural tube (6-8.5 dpc), but cubilin expression is not apparent in any of these tissues. At 8.5 dpc, megalin is expressed in the developing endothelial cells of blood islands, whereas cubilin is absent from these cells. Finally, cubilin, but not megalin, is expressed by a subpopulation of cells dispersed within the 7.5 dpc embryonic endoderm and having a migratory morphology. In summary, the co-expression of cubilin and megalin in the VE is consistent with the two proteins functioning jointly in this tissue. However, the differential distribution pattern indicates that the proteins also function independent of one another. Furthermore, the finding of megalin expression in blood island endothelial cells and cubilin expression in embryonic endoderm highlight potential new developmental roles for these proteins.

  15. Decreased Fc-Receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-01-01

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody dependent cellular-cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection. PMID:21565376

  16. Decreased Fc receptor expression on innate immune cells is associated with impaired antibody-mediated cellular phagocytic activity in chronically HIV-1 infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Tonelli, Andrew; Berger, Christoph T; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sciaranghella, Gaia; Liu, Qingquan; Sips, Magdalena; Toth, Ildiko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Ghebremichael, Musie; Alter, Galit

    2011-07-05

    In addition to neutralization, antibodies mediate other antiviral activities including antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as well as complement deposition. While it is established that progressive HIV infection is associated with reduced ADCC and ADCP, the underlying mechanism for this loss of function is unknown. Here we report considerable changes in FcR expression over the course of HIV infection on both mDCs and monocytes, including elevated FcγRI expression in acute HIV infection and reduced expression of FcγRII and FcγRIIIa in chronic HIV infection. Furthermore, selective blockade of FcγRII alone was associated with a loss in ADCP activity, suggesting that FcγRII plays a central role in modulating ADCP. Overall, HIV infection is associated with a number of changes in FcR expression on phagocytic cells that are associated with changes in their ability to respond to antibody-opsonized targets, potentially contributing to a failure in viral clearance in progressive HIV-1 infection.

  17. Loss of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel leads to alterations in light response modulating system and cellular stress response pathways: a gene expression profiling study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwei; Thapa, Arjun; Morris, Lynsie M.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Frank, Mark Barton; Bebak, Melissa; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2013-01-01

    The cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in the channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophy. We investigated the gene expression profiles in mouse retina with CNG channel deficiency using whole genome expression microarrays. As cones comprise only 2 to 3% of the total photoreceptor population in the wild-type mouse retina, the mouse lines with CNG channel deficiency on a cone-dominant background, i.e. Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− mice, were used in our study. Comparative data analysis revealed a total of 105 genes altered in Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and 92 in Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− retinas, relative to Nrl−/− retinas, with 27 genes changed in both genotypes. The differentially expressed genes primarily encode proteins associated with cell signaling, cellular function maintenance and gene expression. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) identified 26 and 9 canonical pathways in Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− and Cngb3−/−/Nrl−/− retinas, respectively, with 6 pathways being shared. The shared pathways include phototransduction, cAMP/PKA-mediated signaling, endothelin signaling, and EIF2/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, whereas the IL-1, CREB, and purine metabolism signaling were found to specifically associate with Cnga3 deficiency. Thus, CNG channel deficiency differentially regulates genes that affect cell processes such as phototransduction, cellular survival and gene expression, and such regulations play a crucial role(s) in the retinal adaptation to impaired cone phototransduction. Though lack of Cnga3 and Cngb3 shares many common pathways, deficiency of Cnga3 causes more significant alterations in gene expression. This work provides insights into how cones respond to impaired phototransduction at the gene expression levels. PMID:23740940

  18. Cholesteryl ester loading of mouse peritoneal macrophages is associated with changes in the expression or modification of specific cellular proteins, including increase in an alpha-enolase isoform.

    PubMed

    Bottalico, L A; Kendrick, N C; Keller, A; Li, Y; Tabas, I

    1993-02-01

    This report explores the hypothesis that massive cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in macrophages, such as that occurring in atheroma foam cells, results in changes in the expression or modification of specific cellular proteins. Two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoretic patterns of metabolically labeled cellular proteins from mouse peritoneal macrophages that were loaded with CE (through incubation with acetylated low density lipoprotein [acetyl-LDL] for 4 days) were compared with those of control macrophages. Densitometric analysis of 2-D gel autoradiograms from the cell lysates revealed statistically significant changes in seven cellular proteins (five decreases and two increases). The changes in protein expression (foam cell versus control) ranged from a 458 +/- 164% (p < 0.001) increase to a 35 +/- 34% (p < 0.001) decrease (n = 11). Incubation of macrophages with beta-very low density lipoprotein, which also increased the CE content of macrophages (albeit to a lesser extent than acetyl-LDL), resulted in changes in five of the seven proteins. In contrast, incubation of cells with LDL, fucoidan, or latex beads, none of which caused CE accumulation, did not lead to significant changes in four of these five proteins. One of these four proteins, which increased fourfold to fivefold in foam cells (M(r) = 49,000; isoelectric point of 6.8), was purified by preparative 2-D gel electrophoresis. Internal amino acid sequence of cyanogen bromide fragments of this protein as well as Western blot analysis identified this protein as an isoform of alpha-enolase. The increased expression of this alpha-enolase isoform, which was seen as early as day 2 of acetyl-LDL incubation of the macrophages, was diminished by including an inhibitor of cholesterol esterification during the acetyl-LDL incubation period. In conclusion, macrophage foam cell formation is associated with distinct changes in protein expression, including a marked increase in an isoform of alpha

  19. Explicit expressions of the Pietra index for the generalized function for the size distribution of income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabia, José María; Jordá, Vanesa

    2014-12-01

    The importance of the Pietra index in socioeconomic systems and econophysics has been highlighted by Eliazar and Sokolov (2010). In this paper, we obtain closed expressions for the Pietra index for the generalized function for the size of income proposed by McDonald (1984). This family is composed of three classes of distributions: the generalized gamma distribution (GG), the generalized beta of the first kind (GB1) and the generalized beta of the second kind (GB2). For the different distributions, we obtain closed and simple expressions of the Pietra index, which can be easily computed. We also obtain the Pietra index for other relevant income models including finite mixtures of distributions and the κ-generalized distribution (Clementi et al., 2008). Finally, two empirical applications with real income data are given.

  20. The effect of inhaled sodium cromoglycate on cellular infiltration into the bronchial mucosa and the expression of adhesion molecules in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, M; Nakamura, Y

    1997-04-01

    There is no direct evidence of the anti-inflammatory effect of inhaled sodium cromoglycate (SCG). To investigate whether inhaled SCG has any effect on cellular infiltration into the bronchial mucosa and the expression of adhesion molecules in patients with asthma, biopsies of the bronchial mucosa were taken from nine patients with atopic bronchial asthma before and after treatment with inhaled SCG (8 mg x day(-1)) from a metered-dose inhaler (MDI). Eosinophils were stained with anti-EG2, neutrophils with anti-NP57, mast cells with anti-AA1, T-lymphocytes with anti-CD4, CD8 and CD3, and macrophages with anti-CD68. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) and P-selectin were stained at the same time as adhesion molecules expressed in vascular endothelium. The intensity of ICAM-1 expression in the bronchial epithelium was also evaluated. The numbers of eosinophils, mast cells, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were significantly reduced as a result of SCG administration, and the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was also significantly inhibited. A significant correlation was found between ICAM-1 expression and T-lymphocytes and between VCAM-1 expression and eosinophils. It was concluded that sodium cromoglycate does have an effect on the infiltration of the bronchial mucosa by inflammatory cells and also on the expression of adhesion molecules.

  1. Phosphorylation controls a dual-function polybasic nuclear localization sequence in the adapter protein SH2B1β to regulate its cellular function and distribution.

    PubMed

    Maures, Travis J; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Argetsinger, Lawrence S; Grinstein, Sergio; Carter-Su, Christin

    2011-05-01

    An intriguing question in cell biology is what targets proteins to, and regulates their translocation between, specific cellular locations. Here we report that the polybasic nuclear localization sequence (NLS) required for nuclear entry of the adapter protein and candidate human obesity gene product SH2B1β, also localizes SH2B1β to the plasma membrane (PM), most probably via electrostatic interactions. Binding of SH2B1β to the PM also requires its dimerization domain. Phosphorylation of serine residues near this polybasic region, potentially by protein kinase C, releases SH2B1β from the PM and enhances nuclear entry. Release of SH2B1β from the PM and/or nuclear entry appear to be required for SH2B1β enhancement of nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced expression of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor gene and neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Taken together, our results provide strong evidence that the polybasic NLS region of SH2B1 serves the dual function of localizing SH2B1 to both the nucleus and the PM, the latter most probably through electrostatic interactions that are enhanced by SH2B1β dimerization. Cycling between the different cellular compartments is a consequence of the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of serine residues near the NLS and is important for physiological effects of SH2B1, including NGF-induced gene expression and neurite outgrowth.

  2. Adaptation to acetaminophen exposure elicits major changes in expression and distribution of the hepatic proteome.

    PubMed

    Eakins, R; Walsh, J; Randle, L; Jenkins, R E; Schuppe-Koistinen, I; Rowe, C; Starkey Lewis, P; Vasieva, O; Prats, N; Brillant, N; Auli, M; Bayliss, M; Webb, S; Rees, J A; Kitteringham, N R; Goldring, C E; Park, B K

    2015-11-26

    Acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure. One dose of 10-15 g causes severe liver damage in humans, whereas repeated exposure to acetaminophen in humans and animal models results in autoprotection. Insight of this process is limited to select proteins implicated in acetaminophen toxicity and cellular defence. Here we investigate hepatic adaptation to acetaminophen toxicity from a whole proteome perspective, using quantitative mass spectrometry. In a rat model, we show the response to acetaminophen involves the expression of 30% of all proteins detected in the liver. Genetic ablation of a master regulator of cellular defence, NFE2L2, has little effect, suggesting redundancy in the regulation of adaptation. We show that adaptation to acetaminophen has a spatial component, involving a shift in regionalisation of CYP2E1, which may prevent toxicity thresholds being reached. These data reveal unexpected complexity and dynamic behaviour in the biological response to drug-induced liver injury.

  3. Adaptation to acetaminophen exposure elicits major changes in expression and distribution of the hepatic proteome

    PubMed Central

    Eakins, R.; Walsh, J.; Randle, L.; Jenkins, R. E.; Schuppe-Koistinen, I.; Rowe, C.; Starkey Lewis, P.; Vasieva, O.; Prats, N.; Brillant, N.; Auli, M.; Bayliss, M.; Webb, S.; Rees, J. A.; Kitteringham, N. R.; Goldring, C. E.; Park, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the leading cause of acute liver failure. One dose of 10–15 g causes severe liver damage in humans, whereas repeated exposure to acetaminophen in humans and animal models results in autoprotection. Insight of this process is limited to select proteins implicated in acetaminophen toxicity and cellular defence. Here we investigate hepatic adaptation to acetaminophen toxicity from a whole proteome perspective, using quantitative mass spectrometry. In a rat model, we show the response to acetaminophen involves the expression of 30% of all proteins detected in the liver. Genetic ablation of a master regulator of cellular defence, NFE2L2, has little effect, suggesting redundancy in the regulation of adaptation. We show that adaptation to acetaminophen has a spatial component, involving a shift in regionalisation of CYP2E1, which may prevent toxicity thresholds being reached. These data reveal unexpected complexity and dynamic behaviour in the biological response to drug-induced liver injury. PMID:26607827

  4. Expression Profile of Human Fc Receptors in Mucosal Tissue: Implications for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Effector Functions Targeting HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Hannah M.; Carias, Ann M.; Evans, Abbey B.; Olejniczak, Natalia J.; Ziprin, Paul; King, Deborah F. L.; Hope, Thomas J.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of new Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 infections are acquired via sexual transmission at mucosal surfaces. Partial efficacy (31.2%) of the Thai RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial has been correlated with Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by non-neutralizing antibodies targeting the V1V2 region of the HIV-1 envelope. This has led to speculation that ADCC and other antibody-dependent cellular effector functions might provide an important defense against mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection. However, the ability of antibody-dependent cellular effector mechanisms to impact on early mucosal transmission events will depend on a variety of parameters including effector cell type, frequency, the class of Fc-Receptor (FcR) expressed, the number of FcR per cell and the glycoslyation pattern of the induced antibodies. In this study, we characterize and compare the frequency and phenotype of IgG (CD16 [FcγRIII], CD32 [FcγRII] and CD64 [FcγRI]) and IgA (CD89 [FcαR]) receptor expression on effector cells within male and female genital mucosal tissue, colorectal tissue and red blood cell-lysed whole blood. The frequency of FcR expression on CD14+ monocytic cells, myeloid dendritic cells and natural killer cells were similar across the three mucosal tissue compartments, but significantly lower when compared to the FcR expression profile of effector cells isolated from whole blood, with many cells negative for all FcRs. Of the three tissues tested, penile tissue had the highest percentage of FcR positive effector cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to determine the location of CD14+, CD11c+ and CD56+ cells within the three mucosal tissues. We show that the majority of effector cells across the different mucosal locations reside within the subepithelial lamina propria. The potential implication of the observed FcR expression patterns on the effectiveness of FcR-dependent cellular effector functions to impact on the initial events in

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors modulate cellular retinol-binding protein 1 and adiponectin expression in adipocytes via the ACE-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Karin; Gershome, Cynthia; Trouvain, Caroline; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Fleming, Ingrid

    2009-03-01

    Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) decrease angiotensin II production and activate an intracellular signaling cascade that affects gene expression in endothelial cells. Because ACE inhibitors have been reported to delay the onset of type 2 diabetes, we determined ACE signaling-modulated gene expression in endothelial cells and adipocytes. Using differential gene expression analysis, several genes were identified that were 3-fold up- or down-regulated by ramiprilat in cells expressing wild-type ACE versus cells expressing a signaling-dead ACE mutant. One up-regulated gene was the cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1). In adipocytes, the overexpression of CRBP1 enhanced (4- to 5-fold) the activity of promoters containing response elements for retinol-dependent nuclear receptors [retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR)] or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR). CRBP1 overexpression also enhanced the promoter activity (by 470 +/- 40%) and expression/release of the anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic adipokine adiponectin (cellular adiponectin by 196 +/- 24%, soluble adiponectin by 228 +/- 74%). Significantly increased adiponectin secretion was also observed after ACE inhibitor treatment of human preadipocytes, an effect prevented by small interfering RNA against CRBP1. Furthermore, in ob/ob mice, ramipril markedly potentiated both the basal (approximately 2-fold) and rosiglitazonestimulated circulating levels of adiponectin. In patients with coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes, ACE inhibition also significantly increased plasma adiponectin levels (1.6- or 2.1-fold, respectively). In summary, ACE inhibitors affect adipocyte homeostasis via CRBP1 through the activation of RAR/RXR-PPAR signaling and up-regulation of adiponectin. The latter may contribute to the beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors on the development of type 2 diabetes in patients with an activated renin-angiotensin system.

  6. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Won Jin; Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  7. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Foppoli, Cesira; Blarzino, Carla; Perluigi, Marzia; Paolini, Francesca; Morici, Salvatrice; Coccia, Raffaella; Cini, Chiara; De Marco, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14) by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these effects can modulate the

  8. Expression and redistribution of cellular Bad, Bax, and Bcl-X(L) protein is associated with VCD-induced ovotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Christian, P; Sipes, I G; Hoyer, P B

    2001-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD)-induced ovotoxicity in rats is likely caused by acceleration of the normal rate of atresia (apoptosis). VCD-induced ovotoxicity is specific for small preantral follicles and is associated with increased activity of caspase cascades. The present study was designed to investigate the alteration of expression and distribution of several Bcl-2 family member proteins induced by dosing of VCD in rat small ovarian follicles. Female F344 rats were given a single dose of VCD (80 mg/kg, i.p., 1 day; a time when ovotoxicity is not initiated), or dosed daily for 15 days (80 mg/kg, i.p., 15 days; a time when significant ovotoxicity is underway). Four hours following the final dose, livers and ovaries were collected. Ovarian small (25-100 microm) and large (100-250 microm) preantral follicles were isolated, and subcellular fractions (cytosolic and mitochondrial) were prepared. Compared with controls, levels of the proapoptotic protein, Bad, were greater in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of small preantral follicles collected from 15-day VCD-treated rats (cytosol, 1.97 +/- 0.16; mitochondria, 2.20 +/- 0.24, VCD/control, P < 0.05). After 15 days of daily VCD dosing, total cellular antiapoptotic Bcl-x(L) protein levels were unaffected in small preantral follicles, but its distribution in mitochondrial and cytosolic components was altered (mitochondria, 0.635 +/- 0.08; cytosol, 1.39 +/- 0.14, VCD/control, P < 0.05). Likewise, VCD did not affect protein levels of proapoptotic Bax in small follicles on Day 15. However, consistent with a Bax-mediated mechanism of apoptosis, the relative ratio of Bax/Bcl-x(L) in the mitochondrial fraction of small preantral follicles was significantly increased by VCD dosing (1.62 +/- 0.21, VCD/control, P < 0.05). Immunofluorescence staining intensity evaluated by confocal microscopy visualized cytochrome c protein in the cytosolic compartment in granulosa cells of preantral

  9. Association of high HLA-E expression during acute cellular rejection and numbers of HLA class I leader peptide mismatches with reduced renal allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Guberina, Hana; Rebmann, Vera; Wagner, Bettina; da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Dziallas, Phillip; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heinemann, Falko M; Witzke, Oliver; Zoet, Yvonne M; Claas, Frans H J; Horn, Peter A; Kribben, Andreas; Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2017-03-01

    Non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E preferentially presents leader peptides derived from classical HLA-class I molecules. HLA-E can trigger opposed immune responses by interacting with inhibitory NKG2A or by activating NKG2C receptors on NK and T-cells. We studied the impact of HLA-E on renal allograft survival during acute cellular rejection. HLA-E expression was up-regulated in acute cellular rejection (ACR) biopsies (n=12) compared to biopsies from 13 renal allografts with no rejection-signs. HLA-E up-regulation was correlated with numbers of HLA-class I leader peptide mismatches (p=0.04). CD8+ and CD56+ infiltrating cells correlated with HLA-E expression (p<0.0001 and p=0.0009, respectively). Activating NKG2C receptor dominated on effector cells in biopsies and peripheral blood during ACR potentially allowing HLA-E-mediated immune activation. Moreover, HLA-E expression correlated with deterioration in renal allograft function (p<0.008) and reduced allograft survival (p=0.002). Our findings provide evidence that during renal allograft rejection HLA-E along with high numbers of mismatched HLA-class I leader peptides might represent additional targets for immune-activating responses.

  10. An array of Escherichia coli clones over-expressing essential proteins: A new strategy of identifying cellular targets of potent antibacterial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H. Howard . E-mail: hxu3@calstatela.edu; Real, Lilian; Bailey, Melissa Wu

    2006-11-03

    With the advancement of high throughput screening, it has become easier and faster to discover hit compounds that inhibit proliferation of bacterial cells. However, development in technologies used to identify cellular targets of potent antibacterial inhibitors has lagged behind. Here, we describe a novel strategy of target identification for antibacterial inhibitors using an array of Escherichia coli clones each over-expressing one essential protein. In a proof-of-concept study, eight essential genes were cloned into pLex5BA vector under the control of an inducible promoter. Over-expression of target proteins was confirmed. For two clones, one over-expressing FabI and the other over-expressing MurA enzymes, the host cells became 17- and 139-fold more resistant to the specific inhibitors triclosan and phosphomycin, respectively, while the susceptibility of other clones towards these inhibitors remained unchanged after induction of gene expression. Target identification via target protein over-expression was demonstrated using both mixed clone and individual clone assay formats.

  11. Preparation of Biodegradable Gelatin Nanospheres with a Narrow Size Distribution for Carrier of Cellular Internalization of Plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Doi, Norio; Jo, Jun-Ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design biodegradable nanospheres of cationized gelatin as a carrier of cellular internalization of plasmid DNA. Ethylenediamine was chemically introduced into the carboxyl groups of gelatin to obtain cationized gelatin. The gelatin solution was filtered through a glass membrane under high pressure and dropped into 2-butanol, acetone or a mixture of the two to form nanospheres of cationized gelatin. The microspheres of cationized gelatin were prepared by the conventional water-in-oil emulsion method. The resulting nano- and microspheres of cationized gelatin were dehydrothermally treated at 160°C for different time periods to allow them to cross-link chemically. The size of nanospheres, prepared by the filtration method and changed by the type of solvents, was 1.86, 0.83 or 0.24 μm. The in vitro degradation of spheres became faster as the time period of dehydrothermal treatment was shorter. The degradation time of spheres in HCl solution linearly increased with an increase in the cross-linking time, irrespective of the sphere size. However, in the collagenase solution, when compared at the similar cross-linking density, the smaller spheres were degraded more slowly than the larger ones. The plasmid DNA incorporated in the nanospheres was released from the nanospheres with their degradation. The nanospheres incorporating plasmid DNA were internalized into cells, and intracellularly degraded with time to release plasmid DNA. The time period of plasmid DNA release was prolonged by increasing the nanosphere degradation time.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of berberine subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer cells by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been demonstrated to be a safe anti-cancer agent with multiple effects on mitochondria. Intracellular concentration and distribution around the targeting sites are determinants of efficacy, but subcellular distribution of berberine has not been fully elucidated yet, which relies on the sensitive and robustness assay. In this study, a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated with optimized extraction solvents and detection conditions. Key factors such as the purity and integrity of isolated organelle fractions, and the effects of isolation procedures on the subcellular concentration of berberine were systemically evaluated. With the developed assay, we found that the intracellular accumulations of berberine in two gefitinib resistant NSCLC cell lines H1650 and H1975 were 2-3 folds higher than that of normal epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Moreover, significantly different subcellular distribution profiles in NSCLC cancer cells from that of BEAS-2B cells with a striking increase in content in most organelles may contribute to its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Furthermore, a predominant accumulation of berberine was observed for the first time in microsomal fraction for all three cell lines. Therefore, this method could be used for quantitative evaluation of subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation of berberine and for further evaluation of the concentration-effects relationship.

  13. A microautoradiographic method for fresh-frozen sections to reveal the distribution of radionuclides at the cellular level in plants.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2014-06-01

    Microautoradiography (MAR) is a conventional imaging method based on the daguerreotype. The technique is used to visualize the distribution of radionuclide-labeled compounds within a tissue section. However, application of the classical MAR method to plant tissue sections is associated with several difficulties. In this study, we report an MAR method applicable to fresh-frozen plant sections. Our method had two features: (i) the sample was kept frozen from plant tissue collection to radioisotope detection, making it possible to fix solutes without solvent exchange; and (ii) 1.2 µm thick polyphenylene sulfide film was inserted between the fresh-frozen plant section and the photosensitive nuclear emulsion to separate the section from the emulsion before autoradiography was conducted, which significantly improved the quality of the section until microscopic detection, the quality of the MAR image and the success rate. Then, the passage of cadmium (Cd) through vegetative rice stem tissue after 24 h of (109)Cd absorption was described for the first time using the MAR method. MAR clearly revealed the distribution of (109)Cd at the tissue level with high resolution. The (109)Cd concentration in phloem cells was found to be particularly high, whereas the xylem cells contained only small amounts of (109)Cd. The MAR method was also applicable for detecting (109)Cd and [(33)P]phosphate in roots. The MAR method developed here is expected to provide distribution images for a variety of compounds and ions in plant tissue.

  14. Molecular and cellular changes in skin and muscle during metamorphosis of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) are accompanied by changes in deiodinases expression.

    PubMed

    Campinho, M A; Galay-Burgos, M; Silva, N; Costa, R A; Alves, R N; Sweeney, G E; Power, D M

    2012-11-01

    Flatfish metamorphosis is the most dramatic post-natal developmental event in teleosts. Thyroid hormones (TH), thyroxine (T4) and 3,3'-5'-triiodothyronine (T3) are the necessary and sufficient factors that induce and regulate flatfish metamorphosis. Most of the cellular and molecular action of TH is directed through the binding of T3 to thyroid nuclear receptors bound to promoters with consequent changes in the expression of target genes. The conversion of T4 to T3 and nuclear availability of T3 depends on the expression and activity of a family of 3 selenocysteine deiodinases that activate T4 into T3 or degrade T4 and T3. We have investigated the role of deiodinases in skin and muscle metamorphic changes in halibut. We show that, both at the whole body level and at the cellular level in muscle and skin of the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) during metamorphosis, the coordination between activating (D2) and deactivating (D3) deiodinases expression is strongly correlated with the developmental TH-driven changes. The expression pattern of D2 and D3 in cells of both skin and muscle indicate that TH are necessary for the maintenance of larval metamorphic development and juvenile cell types in these tissues. No break in symmetry occurs in the expression of deiodinases and in metamorphic developmental changes occurring both in trunk skin and muscle. The findings that two of the major tissues in both larvae and juveniles maintain their symmetry throughout metamorphosis suggest that the asymmetric changes occurring during flatfish metamorphosis are restricted to the eye and head region.

  15. Temporal regulation of global gene expression and cellular morphology in Xenopus kidney cells in response to clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamoto, Junko; Fukui, Akimasa; Asashima, Makoto

    Here, we report changes gene expression and morphology of the renal epithelial cell line, A6, which was derived from Xenopus laevis adult kidney that had been induced by long-term culturing with a three-dimensional clinostat. An oligo microarray analysis on the A6 cells showed that mRNA levels for 52 out of 8091 genes were significantly altered in response to clinorotation. On day 5, there was no dramatic change in expression level, but by day 8 and day 10, either upregulation or downregulation of gene expression became evident. By day 15, the expression levels of 18 out of 52 genes had returned to the original levels, while the remaining 34 genes maintained the altered levels of expression. Quantitative analyses of gene expression by real-time PCR confirmed that changes in the mRNA levels of selected genes were found only under clinorotation and not under hypergravity (7 g) or ground control. Morphological changes including loss of dome-like structures and disorganization of both E-cadherin adherence junctions and cortical actin were also observed after 10 days of culturing with clinorotation. These results revealed that the expression of selected genes was altered specifically in A6 cells cultured under clinorotation.

  16. High-efficiency type II cell-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression facilitates cellular identification, tracking, and isolation.

    PubMed

    Vanderbilt, Jeff N; Gonzalez, Robert F; Allen, Lennell; Gillespie, AnneMarie; Leaffer, David; Dean, Willow B; Chapin, Cheryl; Dobbs, Leland G

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in virtually all type II (TII) alveolar epithelial cells. The CBG mouse (SPC-BAC-EGFP) contains a bacterial artificial chromosome modified to express EGFP within the mouse surfactant protein (SP)-C gene 3' untranslated region. EGFP mRNA expression is limited to the lung. EGFP fluorescence is both limited to and exhibited by all cells expressing pro-SP-C; fluorescence is uniform throughout all lobes of the lung and does not change as mice age. EGFP(+) cells also express SP-B but do not express podoplanin, a type I (TI) cell marker. CBG mice show no evidence of lung disease with aging. In 3 hours, TII cells can be isolated in >99% purity from CBG mice by FACS; the yield of 3.7 ± 0.6 × 10(6) cells represents approximately 25 to 60% of the TII cells in the lung. By FACS analysis, approximately 0.9% of TII cells are in mitosis in uninjured lungs; after bleomycin injury, 4.1% are in mitosis. Because EGFP fluorescence can be detected for >14 days in culture, at a time that SP-C mRNA expression is essentially nil, this line may be useful for tracking TII cells in culture and in vivo. When CBG mice are crossed to transgenic mice expressing rat podoplanin, TI and TII cells can be easily simultaneously identified and isolated. When bred to other strains of mice, EGFP expression can be used to identify TII cells without the need for immunostaining for SP-C. These mice should be useful in models of mouse pulmonary disease and in studies of TII cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics.

  17. Direct interaction of cellular hnRNP-F and NS1 of influenza A virus accelerates viral replication by modulation of viral transcriptional activity and host gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jun Han; Kim, Sung-Hak; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q.; Song, Min-Suk; Baek, Yun Hee; Jin, Xun; Choi, Joong-Kook; Kim, Chul-Joong; Kim, Hyunggee; Choi, Young Ki

    2010-02-05

    To investigate novel NS1-interacting proteins, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid analysis, followed by co-immunoprecipitation assays. We identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP-F) as a cellular protein interacting with NS1 during influenza A virus infection. Co-precipitation assays suggest that interaction between hnRNP-F and NS1 is a common and direct event among human or avian influenza viruses. NS1 and hnRNP-F co-localize in the nucleus of host cells, and the RNA-binding domain of NS1 directly interacts with the GY-rich region of hnRNP-F determined by GST pull-down assays with truncated proteins. Importantly, hnRNP-F expression levels in host cells indicate regulatory role on virus replication. hnRNP-F depletion by small interfering RNA (siRNA) shows 10- to 100-fold increases in virus titers corresponding to enhanced viral RNA polymerase activity. Our results delineate novel mechanism of action by which NS1 accelerates influenza virus replication by modulating normal cellular mRNA processes through direct interaction with cellular hnRNP-F protein.

  18. Induction of exportin-5 expression during melanoma development supports the cellular behavior of human malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Corinna Anna; Linck, Lisa; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression via microRNAs is known to promote the development of many types of cancer. In melanoma, miRNAs are globally up-regulated, and alterations of miRNA-processing enzymes have already been identified. However, mis-regulation of miRNA transport has not been analyzed in melanoma yet. We hypothesized that alterations in miRNA transport disrupt miRNA processing. Therefore, we investigated whether the pre-miRNA transporter Exportin-5 (XPO5) was involved in altered miRNA maturation and functional consequences in melanoma. We found that XPO5 is significantly over-expressed in melanoma compared with melanocytes. We showed enhanced XPO5 mRNA stability in melanoma cell lines which likely contributes to up-regulated XPO5 protein expression. In addition, we identified MEK signaling as a regulator of XPO5 expression in melanoma. Knockdown of XPO5 expression in melanoma cells led to decreased mature miRNA levels and drastic functional changes. Our data revealed that aberrant XPO5 expression is important for the maturation of miRNAs and the malignant behavior of melanoma cells. We suggest that the high abundance of XPO5 in melanoma leads to enhanced survival, proliferation and metastasis and thereby supports the aggressiveness of melanoma. PMID:27556702

  19. Differentially expressed nuclear proteins in human CCRF-CEM, HL-60, MEC-1 and Raji cells correlate with cellular properties.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Silke; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-10-01

    The human cell lines CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia), HL-60 (acute myeloid leukemia), MEC-1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and Raji (Burkitt's B-cell lymphoma) have been analysed for differences in their nuclear proteomes. Using 2-D DIGE, 55 nuclear proteins have been identified that are differentially expressed (p<0.025) between the four cell lines, including proteins associated with transcription, proliferation, DNA repair and apoptosis. Of these 55 proteins, 22 were over-expressed in just one cell line, and four were down-regulated in one cell line. Proteins uniquely over-expressed between myeloid and lymphoid cell lines include those that may have use as markers for diagnosis, disease progression and B-cell maturation and differentiation. Expression of various proliferation-associated nuclear proteins correlated with relative growth rates of the cell lines, giving these proteins potential diagnostic applications for distinction of chronic versus acute subtypes of haematological malignancies. Identification of these differentially expressed nuclear proteins should facilitate elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying leukocyte differentiation and transformation to leukemias and lymphomas. The nuclear expression profiles should enable classification of subtypes of leukemia, and identify potential nuclear protein targets for development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  20. Integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA paired expression profiling of primary fibroblast derived from diabetic foot ulcers reveals multiple impaired cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Stone, Rivka C; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Ramirez, Horacio; Pastar, Irena; Maione, Anna G; Smith, Avi; Yanez, Vanessa; Veves, Aristides; Kirsner, Robert S; Garlick, Jonathan A; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are one of the major complications of diabetes. Its molecular pathology remains poorly understood, impeding the development of effective treatments. Although it has been established that multiple cell types, including fibroblasts, keratinocytes, macrophages, and endothelial cells, all contribute to inhibition of healing, less is known regarding contributions of individual cell type. Thus, we generated primary fibroblasts from nonhealing DFUs and evaluated their cellular and molecular properties in comparison to nondiabetic foot fibroblasts (NFFs). Specifically, we analyzed both micro-RNA and mRNA expression profiles of primary DFU fibroblasts. Paired genomic analyses identified a total of 331 reciprocal miRNA-mRNA pairs including 21 miRNAs (FC > 2.0) along with 239 predicted target genes (FC > 1.5) that are significantly and differentially expressed. Of these, we focused on three miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-145-5p) that were induced in DFU fibroblasts as most differentially regulated. The involvement of these microRNAs in wound healing was investigated by testing the expression of their downstream targets as well as by quantifying cellular behaviors in prospectively collected and generated cell lines from 15 patients (seven DFUF and eight NFF samples). We found large number of downstream targets of miR-21-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-145-5p to be coordinately regulated in mRNA profiles, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Pathway analysis on paired miRNA-mRNA profiles predicted inhibition of cell movement and cell proliferation, as well as activation of cell differentiation and senescence in DFU fibroblasts, which was confirmed by cellular assays. We concluded that induction of miR-21-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-145-5p in DFU dermal fibroblasts plays an important role in impairing multiple cellular functions, thus contributing to overall inhibition of healing in DFUs.

  1. Expression of R132H mutational IDH1 in human U87 glioblastoma cells affects the SREBP1a pathway and induces cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Cui, Gang; Chen, Ming; Xu, Qinian; Wang, Xiuyun; Zhou, Dai; Lv, Shengxiang; Fu, Linshan; Wang, Zhong; Zuo, Jianling

    2013-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a (SREBP1a) is a member of the SREBP family of transcription factors, which mainly controls homeostasis of lipids. SREBP1a can also activate the transcription of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) by binding to its promoter region. IDH1 mutations, especially R132H mutation of IDH1, are a common feature of a major subset of human gliomas. There are few data available on the relationship between mutational IDH1 expression and SREBP1a pathway. In this study, we investigated cellular effects and SREBP1a pathway alterations caused by R132H mutational IDH1 expression in U87 cells. Two glioma cell lines, stably expressing mutational (U87/R132H) or wild type (U87/wt) IDH1, were established. A cell line, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1(+) (U87/vector), was generated as a control. Click-iT EdU assay, sulforhodamine B assay, and wound healing assay respectively showed that the expression of R132H induced cellular proliferation, cell growth, and cell migration. Western blot revealed that SREBP1 was increased in U87/R132H compared with that in U87/wt. Elevated SREBP1a and several its target genes, but not SREBP1c, were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in U87/R132H. All these findings indicated that R132H mutational IDH1 is involved in the regulation of proliferation, growth, and migration of glioma cells. These effects may partially be mediated by SREBP1a pathway.

  2. The interleukin-2 receptor α chain (CD25) plays an important role in regulating monocyte-derived CD40 expression during anti-porcine cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z-G; Wang, Z; Zhu, L-M; Fang, Y-S; Yu, L-Z; Xu, H

    2012-05-01

    Long-term xenograft survival is limited by delayed xenograft rejection, and monocytes are thought to play an important role in this process. Although typically considered a T cell surface marker, interleukin 2 the receptor chain CD25 is also functional on monocytes. We hypothesized that CD25 expression on monocytes functions to augment monocyte activation in xeno-specific cellular responses. Xenogeneic mixed lymphocyte-endothelial cell reactions were used to study the role of CD25 in facilitating xenogeneic cell-mediated immune responses an in vitro. We also tested the effect of the anti-CD25 antibody daclizumab on monocyte-mediated T cell activation during xeno-specific cellular responses. Co-culture with porcine endothelial cells (PEC) elicited a pronounced proliferative response by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that was accompanied by upregulation of CD25 and CD40 on CD14(+) monocytes. CD4(+) cells proliferated in response to PEC-conditioned monocytes, while blockade of CD25 with daclizumab reduced CD4(+) cell proliferation in the presence of PEC-conditioned monocytes. In addition, daclizumab inhibited proliferation of PBMC in responses to PEC. Analysis of monocytes from PBMC-PEC cocultures by flow cytometry indicated that daclizumab inhibited CD40 upregulation on PEC-activated monocytes. These data demonstrate that CD25 blockade prevents xenogeneic cellular responses by directly blocking CD25 expression on both activated T cells and monocytes. CD25 blockade on T cells or monocytes may indirectly affect upregulation of CD40 on xenoreactive monocytes. Our data strengthen the rationale for incorporating CD25 directed therapy in discordant xenotransplantation.

  3. Fetal Exposure of Rhesus Macaques to Bisphenol A Alters Cellular Development of the Conducting Airway by Changing Epithelial Secretory Product Expression

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Boetticher, Miriam V.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure early in life results in organizational changes in reproductive organs, but the effect of BPA on conducting airway cellular maturation has not been studied. Late gestation is characterized by active differentiation of secretory cells in the lung epithelium. Objective: We evaluated the hypothesis that BPA exposure disrupts epithelial secretory cell development in the fetal conducting airway of the rhesus macaque. Methods: We exposed animals to BPA during either the second (early term) or the third (late term) trimester. There were four treatment groups: a) sham control early term, b) sham control late term, c) BPA early term (BPA-early), and d) BPA late term (BPA-late). Because cellular maturation occurs nonuniformly in the lung, we defined mRNA and protein expression by airway level using microdissection. Results: BPA exposure of the dam during late term significantly accelerated secretory cell maturation in the proximal airways of the fetus; both Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) and MUC5AC/5B mRNA and protein expression increased. Conclusions: BPA exposure during late gestation accelerates secretory cell maturation in the proximal conducting airways. We identified a critical window of fetal susceptibility for BPA effects on lung epithelial cell maturation in the third trimester. This is of environmental health importance because increases in airway mucins are hallmarks of a number of childhood lung diseases that may be affected by BPA exposure. PMID:23757601

  4. CD40-activated B cells express full lymph node homing triad and induce T-cell chemotaxis: potential as cellular adjuvants.

    PubMed

    von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Popov, Alexey; Klein-Gonzalez, Nela; Fiore, Francesca; Debey, Svenja; Draube, Andreas; Maecker, Britta; Menezes, Isaura; Nadler, Lee M; Schultze, Joachim L

    2006-04-01

    CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B cells) have previously been introduced as an alternative source of antigen-presenting cells for immunotherapy. CD40-B cells can prime naive and expand memory T cells, and they can be generated in large numbers from very small amounts of peripheral blood derived from healthy individuals or cancer patients alike. Administration of CD40-B cells as a cellular adjuvant would require these cells to migrate toward secondary lymphoid organs and attract T cells in situ, processes guided by specific chemokines and chemokine receptors. Here, we demonstrate that primary, human CD40-B cells express a pattern of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors necessary for homing to secondary lymphoid organs and have the capacity to migrate to cognate ligands. Furthermore, we show that CD40-B cells express important T-cell attractants and induce strong T-cell chemotaxis. These findings further support the use of CD40-B cells as cellular adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy.

  5. The effects of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) on the cellular events associated with Alzheimer's disease in a stably expressed HFE neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line.

    PubMed

    Mairuae, Nootchanat; Connor, James R; Lee, Sang Y; Cheepsunthorn, Poonlarp; Tongjaroenbuangam, Walaiporn

    2015-08-31

    It has been reported that persons carrying the H63D variant in their hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the possibility that okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) and quercetin could mitigate this risk factor by examining its effect on AD-associated cellular events in HFE stably expressing SH-SY5Y cells. Treatment of H63D HFE cells either with okra or quercetin significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and protein oxidation compared to untreated cells. The levels of tau phosphorylation at serine-199, serine-202, and serine-396 sites were also significantly decreased when cells were treated with okra. Exposure of the H63D and wild type (WT) cells to iron increased tau phosphorylation, but this response was decreased significantly when cells were treated with okra. The mechanism responsible for these changes appears to be related to decreased glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β activity, an upstream signaling kinase of tau phosphorylation. We also established that okra treatment dramatically decreases intracellular iron levels in H63D cells compared to untreated cells. Our results provide important in vitro data on the effects of okra on various AD-associated cellular processes in H63D variant HFE cells. These results suggest okra may be beneficial in people expressing the H63D variant to reduce the risk of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases related to oxidative stress. Further in vivo studies would help confirm this.

  6. Impaired antioxidant gene expression by pesticide residues and its relation with other cellular biomarkers in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) from Lake Burullus.

    PubMed

    El Nahas, Abeer F; Abdel-Razek, Mohamed A S; Helmy, Nashwa M; Mahmoud, Shawky; Ghazy, Haneen A

    2017-03-01

    Organochlorines and Organophosphorus are the most commonly used pesticides. These pesticides constitute a considerable contaminating threat due to their excessive agricultural usage which in turn contaminates the aquatic system through agricultural drainage. The aim of this study was to evaluate water and tissue residues of both pesticides in O. niloticus obtained from three different sections in Lake Burullus, Egypt. Assessment of relative change in mRNA levels of GST and Vtg (oxidative stress indicator) was done and its relation with other cellular biomarkers including apoptosis, which is assessed by Cellular apoptosis susceptibility transcript level (CAS), comet assay and micronucleus assays (genotoxicity indicator). Pesticide residue levels in water are fluctuating. In fish tissues, most residues were higher than those found in water and were associated with down regulation of hepatic GST gene and Vtg expression. CAS gene involved in apoptosis, its transcript is down regulated in middle and western sections of the lake with higher pesticide residues. Different degrees of DNA damages in O. niloticus' liver cells were demonstrated by comet assay. Significant increase in the micronucleated cells in the three sections of the lake was observed; the western section fish showed the highest number. Persistent exposures of fish to pesticide caused impairment of antioxidant gene expression. This negatively affects apoptosis associated with damaging DNA and chromosome fragments.

  7. Metabolomic changes during cellular transformation monitored by metabolite-metabolite correlation analysis and correlated with gene expression.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Basetti; Narita, Masako; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Menon, Suraj; Stubbs, Marion; Tavaré, Simon; Narita, Masashi; Griffiths, John R

    To investigate metabolic changes during cellular transformation, we used a (1)H NMR based metabolite-metabolite correlation analysis (MMCA) method, which permits analysis of homeostatic mechanisms in cells at the steady state, in an inducible cell transformation model. Transcriptomic data were used to further explain the results. Transformed cells showed many more metabolite-metabolite correlations than control cells. Some had intuitively plausible explanations: a shift from glycolysis to amino acid oxidation after transformation was accompanied by a strongly positive correlation between glucose and glutamine and a strongly negative one between lactate and glutamate; there were also many correlations between the branched chain amino acids and the aromatic amino acids. Others remain puzzling: after transformation strong positive correlations developed between choline and a group of five amino acids, whereas the same amino acids showed negative correlations with phosphocholine, a membrane phospholipid precursor. MMCA in conjunction with transcriptome analysis has opened a new window into the metabolome.

  8. Alteration in the capacities as well as in the zonal and cellular distributions of pyruvate kinase L and M2 in regenerating rat liver.

    PubMed

    Chatzipanagiotou, S; Nath, A; Vogt, B; Jungermann, K

    1985-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase L (PKL), the glucoregulatory isoenzyme of adult parenchymal cells, and M2 (PKM2), the isoenzyme of proliferating and non-parenchymal cells, were measured, using a specific anti-PKL antibody for differentiation, in total liver homogenates, in isolated parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells as well as in microdissected periportal and perivenous liver tissue from regenerating rat liver after two-thirds partial hepatectomy. Moreover, the zonal distribution of PKL was studied using immunohistochemical techniques. In total liver homogenates PKL activity per g liver decreased after partial hepatectomy, while PKM2 increased. Total PKL activity per 100 g body weight was restored to preoperational levels much more slowly than liver weight. During liver regeneration parenchymal cells acquired high PKM2 besides PKL activity. The isoenzyme outfit of non-parenchymal cells remained unchanged. Microdissection studies showed that PKL lost its normal perivenous to periportal gradient after partial hepatectomy and became evenly distributed within the liver acinus. PKM2 did not retain its even distribution, it became predominant in the periportal zone. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that after partial hepatectomy PKL was present in all parenchymal cells in an atypical non-zonal heterogeneous distribution. Normal specific activities as well as zonal and cellular distributions of both pyruvate kinase isoenzymes were restored 14-21 d after partial hepatectomy. During regeneration after 2/3 partial hepatectomy the liver loses its glucostat function as corroborated in this study by the decrease of the glycolytic capacity via the glucoregulatory PKL; this change of function is accompanied by a loss of PKL-zonation. This finding corroborates the view that zonation of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes is required only when the liver functions as a glucostat. The increase of PKM2 and the appearance of a zonal PKM2 heterogeneity are in line with the pattern of hepatocyte

  9. Collectivity, Distributivity, and the Interpretation of Plural Numerical Expressions in Child and Adult Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syrett, Kristen; Musolino, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Sentences containing plural numerical expressions (e.g., "two boys") can give rise to two interpretations (collective and distributive), arising from the fact that their representation admits of a part-whole structure. We present the results of a series of experiments designed to explore children's understanding of this distinction…

  10. TITER AND PRODUCT AFFECTS THE DISTRIBUTION OF GENE EXPRESSION AFTER INTRAPUTAMINAL CONVECTION-ENHANCED DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Emborg, Marina E.; Hurley, Samuel A.; Joers, Valerie; Tromp, Do P.M.; Swanson, Christine R.; Ohshima-Hosoyama, Sachiko; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Cummisford, Kyle; Sonnemans, Marc; Hermening, Stephan; Blits, Bas; Alexander, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficacy and safety of intracerebral gene therapy for brain disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, depends on appropriate distribution of gene expression. Objectives To assess if the distribution of gene expression is affected by vector titer and protein type. Methods Four adult macaque monkeys seronegative for adeno-associated virus 5 (AAV5) received in the right and left ventral postcommisural putamen 30μl inoculation of a high or low titer suspension of AAV5 encoding glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Inoculations were performed using convection enhanced delivery and intraoperative MRI (IMRI). Results IMRI confirmed targeting and infusion cloud irradiating from the catheter tip into surrounding area. Postmortem analysis six weeks after surgery revealed GFP and GDNF expression ipsilateral to the injection side that had a titer-dependent distribution. GFP and GDNF expression was also observed in fibers in the Substantia Nigra (SN) pars reticulata (pr), demonstrating anterograde transport. Few GFP-positive neurons were present in the SN pars compacta (pc), possibly by direct retrograde transport of the vector. GDNF was present in many SNpc and SNpr neurons. Conclusions After controlling for target and infusate volume, intracerebral distribution of gene product is affected by vector titer and product biology. PMID:24943657

  11. Age-related changes in cellular protection, purification, and inflammation-related gene expression: role of dietary phytonutrients.

    PubMed

    Mastaloudis, Angela; Wood, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Oxidative injury and inflammation are intimately involved in the aging process and the development of age-related diseases. To date, most nutritional antiaging strategies have focused solely on the delivery of exogenous antioxidants to combat the negative effects of aging. A promising new strategy is to identify nutrients and phytochemicals that can directly target intrinsic cytoprotective mechanisms, including modulation of the expression of (1) genes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics, (2) genes involved in the synthesis and regulation of intrinsic antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes, (3) genes involved in the regulation of inflammation, and (4) vitagenes. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the age-related changes in gene expression related to oxidative stress, detoxification, and inflammatory processes, and to discuss natural compounds with the potential to oppose age-related changes in gene expression related to these processes, which therefore may be suitable for use in human antiaging research.

  12. Expression and immunohistochemical distribution of duck plague virus glycoprotein gE in infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xiang, Jun; Xie, Wei; Shen, Fuxiao; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2011-03-01

    To determine the distribution of duck plague virus (DPV) gE protein in paraformaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of experimentally DPV-infected ducks, an indirect immunoperoxidase assay was established to detect glycoprotein E (gE) protein for the first time. The rabbit anti-His-gE serum, raised against the recombinant His-gE fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), was prepared and purified. Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence analysis showed that the anti-His-gE serum had a high level of reactivity and specificity and could be used as the first antibody for further experiments to study the distribution of DPV gE protein in DPV-infected tissues. A number of DPV gE proteins were distributed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, liver, esophagus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and kidney of DPV-infected ducks and a few DPV gE were distributed in the Harders glands, myocardium, cerebrum, and lung, whereas the gE was not seen in the skin, muscle, and pancreas. Moreover, DPV gE was expressed abundantly in the cytoplasm of lymphocytes, reticulum cells, macrophages, epithelial cells, and hepatocytes. The present study may be useful not only for describing the characteristics of gE expression and distribution in infected ducks but also for understanding the pathogenesis of DPV.

  13. Distributional fold change test – a statistical approach for detecting differential expression in microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because of the large volume of data and the intrinsic variation of data intensity observed in microarray experiments, different statistical methods have been used to systematically extract biological information and to quantify the associated uncertainty. The simplest method to identify differentially expressed genes is to evaluate the ratio of average intensities in two different conditions and consider all genes that differ by more than an arbitrary cut-off value to be differentially expressed. This filtering approach is not a statistical test and there is no associated value that can indicate the level of confidence in the designation of genes as differentially expressed or not differentially expressed. At the same time the fold change by itself provide valuable information and it is important to find unambiguous ways of using this information in expression data treatment. Results A new method of finding differentially expressed genes, called distributional fold change (DFC) test is introduced. The method is based on an analysis of the intensity distribution of all microarray probe sets mapped to a three dimensional feature space composed of average expression level, average difference of gene expression and total variance. The proposed method allows one to rank each feature based on the signal-to-noise ratio and to ascertain for each feature the confidence level and power for being differentially expressed. The performance of the new method was evaluated using the total and partial area under receiver operating curves and tested on 11 data sets from Gene Omnibus Database with independently verified differentially expressed genes and compared with the t-test and shrinkage t-test. Overall the DFC test performed the best – on average it had higher sensitivity and partial AUC and its elevation was most prominent in the low range of differentially expressed features, typical for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sample sets. Conclusions The

  14. Cellular distribution of uranium after acute exposure of renal epithelial cells: SEM, TEM and nuclear microscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrière, Marie; Gouget, Barbara; Gallien, Jean-Paul; Avoscan, Laure; Gobin, Renée; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Khodja, Hicham

    2005-04-01

    The major health effect of uranium exposure has been reported to be chemical kidney toxicity, functional and histological damages being mainly observed in proximal tubule cells. Uranium enters the proximal tubule as uranyl-bicarbonate or uranyl-citrate complexes. The aim of our research is to investigate the mechanisms of uranium toxicity, intracellular accumulation and repartition after acute intoxication of rat renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, as a function of its chemical form. Microscopic observations of renal epithelial cells after acute exposure to uranyl-bicarbonate showing the presence of intracellular precipitates as thin needles of uranyl-phosphate localized in cell lysosomes have been published. However the initial site of precipitates formation has not been identified yet: they could either be formed outside the cells before internalization, or directly inside the cells. Uranium solubility as a function and initial concentration was specified by ICP-MS analysis of culture media. In parallel, uranium uptake and distribution in cell monolayers exposed to U-bicarbonate was investigated by nuclear microprobe analyses. Finally, the presence of uranium precipitates was tested out by scanning electron microscopic observations (SEM), while extracellular and/or intracellular precipitates were observed on thin sections of cells by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  15. Gene expression profiling of bovine ovarian follicular and luteal cells provides insight into cellular identities and functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After ovulation, somatic cells of the ovarian follicle (theca and granulosa cells) become the small and large luteal cells of the corpus luteum. Aside from known cell type-specific receptors and steroidogenic enzymes, little is known about the differences in the gene expression profiles of these fou...

  16. A comparison of ovarian follicular and luteal cell gene expression profiles provides insight into cellular identities and functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After ovulation, somatic cells of the ovarian follicle (theca and granulosa cells) become the small and large luteal cells of the corpus luteum. Aside from known cell type-specific receptors and steroidogenic enzymes, little is known about the differences in the gene expression profiles of these fou...

  17. Differential expression and cellular localization of ERKs during organogenic nodule formation from internodes of Humulus lupulus var. Nugget.

    PubMed

    Sousa Silva, Marta; Margarida Fortes, Ana; Sanchéz Testillanob, Pilar; Risueño, Maria del Carmen; Salom'e Pais, Maria

    2004-08-01

    The expression and subcellular localization of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 or 2 (ERK1/2) homologues (HLERK1/2) during the process of organogenic nodule formation in Humulus lupulus var. Nugget was studied using antibodies specific for ERK1 and ERK2, and for phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The increase in HLERK levels, detected by Western blotting 12 hours after wounding suggests their involvement in response to the wounding treatment applied for morphogenesis induction. In dividing cambial cells, occurring in between 4 and 7 days after morphogenesis induction, as well as in dividing prenodular cells (15 days after induction) HLERK1 and/or 2 were localized in the nucleus. However, as soon as nodular cells start proliferating to form shoot meristems, HLERK1 and 2 were detected in the cytoplasm and not in the nucleus. The data reported account for a differential expression and activation of HLERK1 and HLERK2 throughout the process of nodule formation and plantlet regeneration. HLERK1 appears to be expressed in the stages of nodule formation and plantlet regeneration, playing a possible role in controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. HLERK2 may be induced as a response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by wounding of internodes as its expression is reduced in liquid medium with less oxygen availability compared to solid medium. However, addition of a ROS inhibitor to the liquid medium does not result in a further decrease in the HLERK2 level.

  18. Cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the hepatic erythropoietin expression during acute-phase response: a role for IL-6.

    PubMed

    Ramadori, Pierluigi; Ahmad, Ghayyor; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2010-09-01

    The source of circulating erythropoietin (EPO), the mediators and the mechanisms involved in the upregulation of EPO gene expression during acute-phase reaction are still poorly understood. Acute-phase reaction was induced by either intramuscular turpentine oil (TO) or intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration into wild-type and interleukin (IL)-6 knockout (KO) mice. Animals were killed at different time points and blood, liver and muscle tissue were collected. Serum levels of EPO were measured by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay; liver and injured muscle samples were processed for RNA isolation and for protein analysis. EPO, hypoxia-inducible factors 1alpha and 2alpha (HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha) mRNA were analyzed by RT-PCR and the protein levels were analyzed by western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha localization was performed through immunofluorescence staining. EPO, HIF-1 and HIF-2 gene and protein expression levels were also analyzed in isolated mouse hepatocytes after stimulation with IL-6. In the wild-type animals, EPO serum levels increased dramatically at 12 h after the insults together with the hepatic gene expression. In TO-treated animals, the EPO gene expression reached an 8.2-fold increase at 12 h, and in LPS-treated mice a similar induction was recorded at 6 h (about 4.5-fold increase). In the IL-6KO strain, the upregulation after the inflammatory stimuli was much lower (only 2.0-fold increase). A progressive upregulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha was detectable until 6 h after the insults, but only HIF-1alpha upregulation was reduced in IL-6KO mice. In isolated hepatocytes, stimulation with a single dose of IL-6 induced a nuclear accumulation of HIF-1alpha, in parallel with an increase of EPO mRNA. No effect on HIF-2alpha expression was found. IL-6 appears to be the main regulator of EPO gene expression and a major contributor for HIF-1alpha induction in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells

  19. Increased cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein expression promotes protrusion extension and enhances migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Liao, Ching-Fong; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-15

    Microtubules are part of cell structures that play a role in regulating the migration of cancer cells. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly expressed in cancer. We report here that CSE1L regulates the association of {alpha}-tubulin with {beta}-tubulin and promotes the migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. CSE1L was associated with {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin in GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. CSE1L-GFP (green fluorescence protein) fusion protein experiments showed that the N-terminal of CSE1L interacted with microtubules. Increased CSE1L expression resulted in decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin, increased {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin association, and enhanced assembly of microtubules. Cell protrusions or pseudopodia are temporary extensions of the plasma membrane and are implicated in cancer cell migration and invasion. Increased CSE1L expression increased the extension of MCF-7 cell protrusions. In vitro migration assay showed that enhanced CSE1L expression increased the migration of MCF-7 cells. Our results indicate that CSE1L plays a role in regulating the extension of cell protrusions and promotes the migration of cancer cells.

  20. Functional characterization of calliphorid cell death genes and cellularization gene promoters for controlling gene expression and cell viability in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Edman, R M; Linger, R J; Belikoff, E J; Li, F; Sze, S-H; Tarone, A M; Scott, M J

    2015-02-01

    The New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, and the Australian sheep blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, are major pests of livestock. The sterile insect technique was used to eradicate C. hominivorax from North and Central America. This involved area-wide releases of male and female flies that had been sterilized by radiation. Genetic systems have been developed for making 'male-only' strains that would improve the efficiency of genetic control of insect pests. One system involves induction of female lethality in embryos through activation of a pro-apoptotic gene by the tetracycline-dependent transactivator. Sex-specific expression is achieved using an intron from the transformer gene, which we previously isolated from several calliphorids. In the present study, we report the isolation of the promoters from the C. hominivorax slam and Lucilia sericata bnk cellularization genes and show that these promoters can drive expression of a GFP reporter gene in early embryos of transgenic L. cuprina. Additionally, we report the isolation of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic hid and rpr genes, identify conserved motifs in the encoded proteins and determine the relative expression of these genes at different stages of development. We show that widespread expression of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic genes was lethal in Drosophila melanogaster. The isolated gene promoters and pro-apoptotic genes could potentially be used to build transgenic embryonic sexing strains of calliphorid livestock pests.

  1. High-level intra- and extra-cellular production of D-psicose 3-epimerase via a modified xylose-inducible expression system in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingqi; Zhu, Yueming; Fu, Gang; Song, Yafeng; Jin, Zhaoxia; Sun, Yuanxia; Zhang, Dawei

    2016-11-01

    D-Psicose 3-epimerase (DPEase) converts D-fructose into D-psicose which exists in nature in limited quantities and has key physiological functions. In this study, RDPE (DPEase from Ruminococcus sp. 5_1_39BFAA) was successfully constitutively expressed in Bacillus subtilis, which is the first report of its kind. Three sugar-inducible promoters were compared, and the xylose-inducible promoter P xylA was proved to be the most efficient for RDPE production. Based on the analysis of the inducer concentration and RDPE expression, we surmised that there was an extremely close correlation between the intracellular RDPE expression and xylose accumulation level. Subsequently, after the metabolic pathway of xylose was blocked by deletion of xylAB, the intra- and extra-cellular RDPE expression was significantly enhanced. Meanwhile, the optimal xylose induction concentration was reduced from 4.0 to 0.5 %. Eventually, the secretion level of RDPE reached 95 U/mL and 2.6 g/L in a 7.5-L fermentor with the fed-batch fermentation, which is the highest production of DPEase by a microbe to date.

  2. Imbalanced Expression of Vcan mRNA Splice Form Proteins Alters Heart Morphology and Cellular Protein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Tara A.; Dours-Zimmermann, Maria T.; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Krug, Edward L.; Comte-Walters, Susana; Reyes, Leticia; Davis, Monica A.; Schey, Kevin L.; Schwacke, John H.; Kern, Christine B.; Mjaatvedt, Corey H.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental importance of the proteoglycan versican to early heart formation was clearly demonstrated by the Vcan null mouse called heart defect (hdf). Total absence of the Vcan gene halts heart development at a stage prior to the heart’s pulmonary/aortic outlet segment growth. This creates a problem for determining the significance of versican’s expression in the forming valve precursors and vascular wall of the pulmonary and aortic roots. This study presents data from a mouse model, Vcan(tm1Zim), of heart defects that results from deletion of exon 7 in the Vcan gene. Loss of exon 7 prevents expression of two of the four alternative splice forms of the Vcan gene. Mice homozygous for the exon 7 deletion survive into adulthood, however, the inability to express the V2 or V0 forms of versican results in ventricular septal defects, smaller cushions/valve leaflets with diminished myocardialization and altered pulmonary and aortic outflow tracts. We correlate these phenotypic findings with a large-scale differential protein expression profiling to identify compensatory alterations in cardiac protein expression at E13.5 post coitus that result from the absence of Vcan exon 7. The Vcan(tm1Zim) hearts show significant changes in the relative abundance of several cytoskeletal and muscle contraction proteins including some previously associated with heart disease. These alterations define a protein fingerprint that provides insight to the observed deficiencies in pre-valvular/septal cushion mesenchyme and the stability of the myocardial phenotype required for alignment of the outflow tract with the heart ventricles. PMID:24586547

  3. Spatial distribution of osteocyte lacunae in equine radii and third metacarpals: considerations for cellular communication, microdamage detection and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Grunander, Todd R; Hamrick, Mark W

    2005-01-01

    Osteocytes, which are embedded in bone matrix, are the most abundant cells in bone. Despite the ideal location of osteocytes to sense the local environment and influence bone remodeling, their functions, and the relative importance of these functions, remain controversial. In this study, we tested several hypotheses that address the possibilities that population densities of osteocyte lacunae (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar) correlate with strain-, remodeling- or metabolism-related aspects of the local biomechanical environments of mid-third diaphyseal equine radii and third metacarpals from skeletally mature animals. Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar data, quantified in multiple cortical locations, were analyzed for possible correlations with (1) structural and material characteristics (e.g., cortical thickness, percent ash, secondary osteon population density, mean osteon cross-sectional area, and predominant collagen fiber orientation), (2) strain characteristics, including prevalent/predominant strain magnitude and mode (tension, compression, shear), (3) hypothesized strain-mode-related microdamage characteristics, which might be perceived by osteocyte 'operational' networks, and (4) variations in remodeling dynamics and/or metabolism (i.e. presumably higher in endocortical regions than in other transcortical locations). Results showed relatively uniform Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar between regions with highly non-uniform strain and strain-related environments and markedly heterogeneous structural and material organization. These results suggest that population densities of these cells are poorly correlated with mechanobiological characteristics, including local variations in metabolic rate and strain magnitude/mode. Although osteocytes hypothetically evolved both as strain sensors and fatigue damage sensors able to direct the removal of damage as needed, the mechanisms that govern the distribution of these cells remain unclear. The results of this study provide little or no evidence that the number of osteocyte

  4. Expression and Distribution of Mesencephalic Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Retina and Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Sheng-Hai; Li, Ting-Ting; Wu, Ji-Hong; Wu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), otherwise named Arginine-Rich, Mutated in Early-stage Tumors (ARMET), is a secretory endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) protein that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. To date, little is known about the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and optic nerve (ON). Therefore, we studied the expression and distribution of MANF in the ON and retina by real-time PCR, immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. Results from rat and mouse were highly consistent in the retina. MANF was detected in both tissues in rat, wherein it was principally localized to the ganglion cell layer (GCL), followed by the inner nuclear layer (INL). The MANF protein levels in the rat retina were 3.33-fold higher than in the rat ON. Additionally, MANF was robustly expressed by retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the human retina. In human ON, MANF was partially co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting that it was not restricted to astrocytes. In vitro studies confirmed that MANF could be robustly expressed in RGCs and was found principally within the cytoplasm. Hypoxia can stimulate up-regulation by of MANF expression over time, suggesting that MANF may play a vital role in the functional regulation of RGCs both in health and disease. We believe that the present study improves our understanding of the distribution and expression of MANF in the retina and ON and could help in further analysis of its interact and correlate with the relevant ophthalmic diseases. PMID:28154531

  5. Differential expression and cytoplasm/membrane distribution of endoglin (CD105) in human tumour cell lines: Implications in the modulation of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Postiglione, L; Di Domenico, G; Caraglia, M; Marra, M; Giuberti, G; Del Vecchio, L; Montagnani, S; Macri, M; Bruno, E M; Abbruzzese, A; Rossi, G

    2005-05-01

    Endoglin (CD105, an accessory component of the TGF-beta receptor complex) expression and distribution on different human tumour cells and its role in cellular proliferation were evaluated. We examined: 1) sixteen human carcinoma cell lines, 2) eight human sarcoma cell lines, 3) five miscellaneous tumour cell lines. HECV (endothelial cells) were employed as a positive control for endoglin expression. Normal Human Dermal Fibroblasts (NHDF) and 293 cells (epithelial kidney cells) were used as normal controls for connective and epithelial tissues, respectively. The results showed that CD105 was poorly expressed in the majority of human carcinoma cells (10/16), whereas it was highly expressed in most human sarcoma cells (7/8), and differently expressed by miscellaneous tumour cell lines. These data reflect endoglin expression by the normal counterparts of tumour cell lines, i.e. NHDF and 293 cells. However, CD105 levels in sarcoma cell lines, even though consistently lower than in NHDF, were significantly higher than those observed in carcinoma cells. Interestingly, CD105 presented a strong expression in the cytoplasm of MDA-MB-453 (breast carcinoma), NPA (papillary thyroid carcinoma), COLO-853 (melanoma) and SaOS-2 (osteosarcoma), but was weakly expressed on their cell membrane. This differential expression in the cytoplasm and on the membrane of some tumour cells, suggests a complex mechanism of translocation for this protein. The analysis of clonal growth in soft agar of some cell lines, characterized by high CD105 expression, showed an increased colony formation potential that was antagonized by the addition of anti-CD105 blocking mAb. The results indicated that endoglin is differentially expressed in human carcinoma and sarcoma cells and its overexpression modulates the proliferative rate of human solid tumour cells. Moreover, these data suggest that CD105 is involved in the regulation of TGF-beta effects in human solid malignancies, and therefore it could play an

  6. Linking ATM Promoter Methylation to Cell Cycle Protein Expression in Brain Tumor Patients: Cellular Molecular Triangle Correlation in ATM Territory.

    PubMed

    Mehdipour, P; Karami, F; Javan, Firouzeh; Mehrazin, M

    2015-08-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a key gene in DNA double-strand break (DSB), and therefore, most of its disabling genetic alterations play an important initiative role in many types of cancer. However, the exact role of ATM gene and its epigenetic alterations, especially promoter methylation in different grades of brain tumors, remains elusive. The current study was conducted to query possible correlations among methylation statue of ATM gene, ATM/ retinoblastoma (RB) protein expression, D1853N ATM polymorphism, telomere length (TL), and clinicopathological characteristics of various types of brain tumors. Isolated DNA from 30 fresh tissues was extracted from different types of brain tumors and two brain tissues from deceased normal healthy individuals. DNAs were treated with bisulfate sodium using DNA modification kit (Qiagen). Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) was implicated to determine the methylation status of treated DNA templates confirmed by promoter sequencing. Besides, the ATM and RB protein levels were determined by immunofluorescence (IF) assay using monoclonal mouse antihuman against ATM, P53, and RB proteins. To achieve an interactive correlation, the methylation data were statistically analyzed by considering TL and D1853N ATM polymorphism. More than 73% of the brain tumors were methylated in ATM gene promoter. There was strong correlation between ATM promoter methylation and its protein expression (p < 0.001). As a triangle, meaningful correlation was also found between methylated ATM promoter and ATM protein expression with D1853N ATM polymorphism (p = 0.01). ATM protein expression was not in line with RB protein expression while it was found to be significantly correlated with ATM promoter methylation (p = 0.01). There was significant correlation between TL neither with ATM promoter methylation nor with ATM protein expression nor with D1853N polymorphism. However, TL has shown strong correlation with patient's age and

  7. Effect of passage number on cellular response to DNA-damaging agents: Cell survival and gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Liu, C.M.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    The effect of different passage numbers on plating efficiency, doubling time, cell growth, and radiation sensitivity was assessed in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Changes in gene expression after UV or {gamma}-ray irradiation at different passage numbers were also examined. The SHE cells were maintained in culture medium for up to 64 passages. Cells were exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 254-nm UV radiation. Differential display of cDNAs and northern blots were used for the study of gene expression. With increasing passage number, SHE cells demonstrated decreased doubling time, increased plating efficiency, and a decreased yield in the number of cells per plate. Between passages 41 and 48 a crisis period was evident during which time cell growth in high serum was no longer optimal, and serum concentrations were reduced to maintain cell growth. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was no different between early- and intermediate-passage cells. However, after UV exposure at low passages (passage 3), confluent cells were more sensitive to the killing effects of UV than were log-phase cells. At intermediate passages (passages 43, 48), confluent cells were slightly more radioresistant than were log-phase cells. By passage 64, however, both confluent and log-phase cells showed similar patterns of UV sensitivity. Expression of {gamma}-actin, PCNA, and p53 transcripts did not change following UV exposure. p53 mRNA was induced following {gamma}-ray exposure of the intermediate (passage 45) epithelial cells. The observed differences in radiation sensitivity associated with increasing passage number may be influenced by radiation-induced gene expression. The authors are conducted experiments to identify these genes.

  8. Ki-1/57 and CGI-55 ectopic expression impact cellular pathways involved in proliferation and stress response regulation.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fernanda C; Saito, Angela; Gonçalves, Kaliandra A; Vidigal, Pedro M; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Bressan, Gustavo C; Kobarg, Jörg

    2014-12-01

    Ki-1/57 (HABP4) and CGI-55 (SERBP1) are regulatory proteins and paralogs with 40.7% amino acid sequence identity and 67.4% similarity. Functionally, they have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression on both the transcriptional and mRNA metabolism levels. A link with tumorigenesis is suggested, since both paralogs show altered expression levels in tumor cells and the Ki-1/57 gene is found in a region of chromosome 9q that represents a haplotype for familiar colon cancer. However, the target genes regulated by Ki-1/57 and CGI-55 are unknown. Here, we analyzed the alterations of the global transcriptome profile after Ki-1/57 or CGI-55 overexpression in HEK293T cells by DNA microchip technology. We were able to identify 363 or 190 down-regulated and 50 or 27 up-regulated genes for Ki-1/57 and CGI-55, respectively, of which 20 were shared between both proteins. Expression levels of selected genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR both after protein overexpression and siRNA knockdown. The majority of the genes with altered expression were associated to proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle control processes, prompting us to further explore these contexts experimentally. We observed that overexpression of Ki-1/57 or CGI-55 results in reduced cell proliferation, mainly due to a G1 phase arrest, whereas siRNA knockdown of CGI-55 caused an increase in proliferation. In the case of Ki-1/57 overexpression, we found protection from apoptosis after treatment with the ER-stress inducer thapsigargin. Together, our data give important new insights that may help to explain these proteins putative involvement in tumorigenic events.

  9. Type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins from Phytolacca dioica L. leaves: differential seasonal and age expression, and cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Parente, Augusto; Conforto, Barbara; Di Maro, Antimo; Chambery, Angela; De Luca, Paolo; Bolognesi, Andrea; Iriti, Marcello; Faoro, Franco

    2008-11-01

    The expression of type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) in Phytolacca dioica L. leaves was investigated. Fully expanded leaves of young P. dioica plants (up to 3 years old) expressed two novel RIPs, dioicin 1 and dioicin 2. The former was also found in developing leaves from adult P. dioica within about two and a half weeks after leaf development, and the latter continuously synthesized, with no seasonal or ontogenetic constraint. Fully expanded leaves from adult P. dioica expressed four RIPs (PD-Ls1-4) exhibiting seasonal variation. RIPs were localized in the extracellular space, in the vacuole and in the Golgi apparatus of mesophyll cells. Dioicin 1 and dioicin 2 showed rRNA N-beta-glycosidase activity and displayed the following properties, respectively: (1) Mr values of 30,047.00 and 29,910.00, (2) pIs of 8.74 and 9.37, and (3) IC(50) values of 19.74 (0.658 nM) and 6.85 ng/mL (0.229 nM). Furthermore, they showed adenine polynucleotide glycosylase activity and nicked pBR322 dsDNA. The amino acid sequence of dioicin 2 had 266 amino acid residues, and the highest percentage identity (81.6%) and similarity (84.6%) with PAP-II from Phytolacca americana, while its identity with other RIPs from Phytolaccaceae was around 40%.

  10. Modified-Chitosan/siRNA Nanoparticles Downregulate Cellular CDX2 Expression and Cross the Gastric Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Sadio, Ana; Gustafsson, Jenny K.; Pereira, Bruno; Gomes, Carla Pereira; Hansson, Gunnar C.; David, Leonor; Pêgo, Ana Paula; Almeida, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective non-viral vectors is of crucial importance in the implementation of RNA interference in clinical routine. The localized delivery of siRNAs to the gastrointestinal mucosa is highly desired but faces specific problems such as the stability in gastric acidity conditions and the presence of the mucus barrier. CDX2 is a transcription factor critical for intestinal differentiation being involved in the initiation and maintenance of gastrointestinal diseases. Specifically, it is the trigger of gastric intestinal metaplasia which is a precursor lesion of gastric cancer. Its expression is also altered in colorectal cancer, where it may constitute a lineage-survival oncogene. Our main objective was to develop a nanoparticle-delivery system of siRNA targeting CDX2 using modified chitosan as a vector. CDX2 expression was assessed in gastric carcinoma cell lines and nanoparticles behaviour in gastrointestinal mucus was tested in mouse explants. We show that imidazole-modified chitosan and trimethylchitosan/siRNA nanoparticles are able to downregulate CDX2 expression and overpass the gastric mucus layer but not colonic mucus. This system might constitute a potential therapeutic approach to treat CDX2-dependent gastric lesions. PMID:24925340

  11. Different patterns of 5{alpha}-reductase expression, cellular distribution, and testosterone metabolism in human follicular dermal papilla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shicheng Yamauchi, Hitoshi

    2008-04-18

    Androgens regulate hair growth, and 5{alpha}-reductase (5{alpha}R) plays a pivotal role in the action of androgens on target organs. To clarify the molecular mechanisms responsible for controlling hair growth, the present study presents evidence that the human follicular dermal papilla cells (DPCs) from either beard (bDPCs) or scalp hair (sDPCs) possess endogenous 5{alpha}R activity. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that the highest level of 5{alpha}R1 mRNA was found in bDPCs, followed by sDPCs, and a low but detectable level of 5{alpha}R1 mRNA was observed in fibroblasts. Minimally detectable levels of 5{alpha}R2 mRNA were found in all three cell types. A weak band at 26 kDa corresponding to the human 5{alpha}R1 protein was detected by Western blot in both DPCs, but not in fibroblasts. Immuonofluorescence analysis confirmed that 5{alpha}R1 was localized to the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei in both DPCs Furthermore, a 5{alpha}R assay using [{sup 14}C]testosterone labeling in intact cells revealed that testosterone was transformed primarily into androstenedione, and in small amounts, into DHT. Our results demonstrate that the 5{alpha}R activities of either bDPCs or sDPCs are stronger than that of dermal fibroblasts, despite the fact that the major steroidogenic activity is attributed to 17{beta}-HSD rather than 5{alpha}R among the three cell types. The 5{alpha}R1 inhibitor MK386 exhibited a more potent inhibitory effect on 5{alpha}R activity than finasteride (5{alpha}R2 inhibitor) in bDPCs.

  12. Cullin 5 Expression in the Rat: Cellular and Tissue Distribution, and Changes in Response to Water Deprivation and Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    rehydration Table 2. cul-5 mRNA ( geometric mean + SEM) of rat tissue 86 following water deprivation and rehydration Chapter 5 Table 1...the arithmetic average was computed as the geometric mean for each tissue sample. The standard error of the geometric mean was computed by...multiplying the geometric mean values for each tissue by the ln of the standard error of the mean [see Casella and Berger, 1990, p. 330, for additional

  13. Expression of early and late cellular damage markers by ARPE-19 cells following prolonged treatment with UV-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Giuseppe; Sampaolese, Beatrice; Clementi, Maria Elisabetta

    2016-10-01

    Pathological alterations to the retinal pigment epithelium underlie several eye diseases, which lead to visual impairment and even blindness. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is associated with some skin and ocular pathologies; UV radiation may induce DNA breakdown and cause cellular damage through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus leading to programmed cell death. The present study aimed to investigate the production of ROS and the gene expression levels of anti‑ and proapoptotic proteins [B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and caspase‑3] in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE‑19) treated with UV‑A for 5 h consecutively. The results demonstrated that prolonged exposure to UV‑A induced: i) Cell death, the decrease in cell viability was time‑dependent and reached statistical significance after 3 h; ii) a significant and substantial increase in ROS levels that remained constant for the duration of the experiment, the levels were significantly increased after 1 h of exposure; iii) an activation of apoptotic genes (Bax and caspase‑3) after 1 h of treatment, which was accompanied by a decrease in the anti‑apoptotic gene Bcl‑2; and iv) a loss of apoptotic signals and a rapid decrease in cellular viability after 3 h of consecutive treatment. These processes may trigger necrosis, which was observed in the cells following treatment with UV‑A for 5 consecutive hours. In conclusion, the present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to provide in vitro evidence regarding the sequence of events that underlie the cellular damage induced by prolonged UV‑A radiation, starting from the first 30 min of treatment. UV‑A radiation resulted in the activation of apoptotic events, and subsequently led to irreversible cell necrosis.

  14. In vitro mimicking of estrous cycle stages in porcine oviduct epithelium cells: estradiol and progesterone regulate differentiation, gene expression, and cellular function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Einspanier, Ralf; Schoen, Jennifer

    2013-09-01

    Throughout the estrous cycle the oviduct epithelium undergoes dramatic morphological and functional changes. To elucidate cyclic cellular events and associated regulation mechanisms of 17beta estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4), we mimicked estrous cycle stages in vitro using a culture system of primary porcine oviduct epithelium cells (POEC). Cells were polarized in an air/liquid interface and then treated with E2 and P4 for physiological time periods: In experiment 1, high concentration of P4 with low concentration of E2 for 10 days resembled diestrus; in experiment 2, following the previous diestrus, sequential high E2 with low P4 for 2.5 days represented estrus. Histomorphometry and electron microscopy showed cyclic changes in cellular height, cell population, and cilia density under the influence of hormone stimulation. Transepithelial electrical resistance was high in simulated diestrus but reduced in estrus. Thus, E2 and P4 affect cellular polarity, transformation of ciliated and secretory cells, as well as electrical conductivity of oviduct epithelium. Simulation of diestrus led to significant decrease in expression of hormone receptors (PGR and ESR1) and other epithelial markers (MUC16, OVGP1, and HSP90B1), while sequential simulated estrus caused an increase in these markers. The hormonal regulation of some marker genes was clearly time-dependent. Furthermore, POEC showed increased sperm-binding capacity in simulated estrus. In this study, we also present a novel approach based on the AndroVision software, which can be routinely utilized as a parameter for ciliary activity, and for the first time, we showed fluid movement patterns along the epithelium lining in vitro.

  15. Assessment of Cellular Estrogenic Activity Based on Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Reduction of Soluble-Form Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Expression in an ELISA-Based System

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Liu, Hui-Fang; Lu, Song; Ho, Jessica Wing-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Ramsden, David Boyer; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2013-01-01

    Xenoestrogens are either natural or synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of endogenous estrogen. These compounds, such as bisphenol-A (BPA), and phthalates, are commonly found in plastic wares. Exposure to these compounds poses major risk to human health because of the potential to cause endocrine disruption. There is huge demand for a wide range of chemicals to be assessed for such potential for the sake of public health. Classical in vivo assays for endocrine disruption are comprehensive but time-consuming and require sacrifice of experimental animals. Simple preliminary in vitro screening assays can reduce the time and expense involved. We previously demonstrated that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER). Therefore, detecting corresponding changes of COMT expression in estrogen-responsive cells may be a useful method to estimate estrogenic effects of various compounds. We developed a novel cell-based ELISA to evaluate cellular response to estrogenicity by reduction of soluble-COMT expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells exposed to estrogenic compounds. In contrast to various existing methods that only detect bioactivity, this method elucidates direct physiological effect in a living cell in response to a compound. We validated our assay using three well-characterized estrogenic plasticizers - BPA, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP). Cells were exposed to either these plasticizers or 17β-estradiol (E2) in estrogen-depleted medium with or without an ER-antagonist, ICI 182,780, and COMT expression assayed. Exposure to each of these plasticizers (10-9-10-7M) dose-dependently reduced COMT expression (p<0.05), which was blocked by ICI 182,780. Reduction of COMT expression was readily detectable in cells exposed to picomolar level of E2, comparable to other in vitro assays of similar sensitivity. To satisfy the demand for in vitro assays targeting different cellular

  16. Assessment of cellular estrogenic activity based on estrogen receptor-mediated reduction of soluble-form catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) expression in an ELISA-based system.

    PubMed

    Ho, Philip Wing-Lok; Tse, Zero Ho-Man; Liu, Hui-Fang; Lu, Song; Ho, Jessica Wing-Man; Kung, Michelle Hiu-Wai; Ramsden, David Boyer; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2013-01-01

    Xenoestrogens are either natural or synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of endogenous estrogen. These compounds, such as bisphenol-A (BPA), and phthalates, are commonly found in plastic wares. Exposure to these compounds poses major risk to human health because of the potential to cause endocrine disruption. There is huge demand for a wide range of chemicals to be assessed for such potential for the sake of public health. Classical in vivo assays for endocrine disruption are comprehensive but time-consuming and require sacrifice of experimental animals. Simple preliminary in vitro screening assays can reduce the time and expense involved. We previously demonstrated that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen via estrogen receptor (ER). Therefore, detecting corresponding changes of COMT expression in estrogen-responsive cells may be a useful method to estimate estrogenic effects of various compounds. We developed a novel cell-based ELISA to evaluate cellular response to estrogenicity by reduction of soluble-COMT expression in ER-positive MCF-7 cells exposed to estrogenic compounds. In contrast to various existing methods that only detect bioactivity, this method elucidates direct physiological effect in a living cell in response to a compound. We validated our assay using three well-characterized estrogenic plasticizers - BPA, benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP). Cells were exposed to either these plasticizers or 17β-estradiol (E2) in estrogen-depleted medium with or without an ER-antagonist, ICI 182,780, and COMT expression assayed. Exposure to each of these plasticizers (10(-9)-10(-7)M) dose-dependently reduced COMT expression (p<0.05), which was blocked by ICI 182,780. Reduction of COMT expression was readily detectable in cells exposed to picomolar level of E2, comparable to other in vitro assays of similar sensitivity. To satisfy the demand for in vitro assays targeting different cellular

  17. Calculating Formulas of Coefficient and Mean Neutron Exposure in the Exponential Expression of Neutron Exposure Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. H.; Zhou, G. D.; Ma, K.; Ma, W. J.; Cui, W. Y.; Zhang, B.

    2015-11-01

    Present studies have shown that, in the main stages of the development and evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star s-process models, the distributions of neutron exposures in the nucleosynthesis regions can all be expressed by an exponential function ({ρ_{AGB}}(τ) = C/{τ_0}exp ( - τ/{τ_0})) in the effective range of values. However, the specific expressions of the proportional coefficient C and the mean neutron exposure ({τ_0}) in the formula for different models are not completely determined in the related literatures. Through dissecting the basic solving method of the exponential distribution of neutron exposures, and systematically combing the solution procedure of exposure distribution for different stellar models, the general calculating formulas as well as their auxiliary equations for calculating C and ({τ_0}) are reduced. Given the discrete distribution of neutron exposures ({P_k}), i.e. the mass ratio of the materials which have exposed to neutrons for (k) ((k = 0, 1, 2 \\cdots )) times when reaching the final distribution with respect to the materials of the He intershell, (C = - {P_1}/ln R), and ({τ_0} = - Δ τ /ln R) can be obtained. Here, (R) expresses the probability that the materials can successively experience neutron irradiation for two times in the He intershell. For the convective nucleosynthesis model (including the Ulrich model and the ({}^{13}{C})-pocket convective burning model), (R) is just the overlap factor r, namely the mass ratio of the materials which can undergo two successive thermal pulses in the He intershell. And for the (^{13}{C})-pocket radiative burning model, (R = sumlimits_{k = 1}^∞ {{P_k}} ). This set of formulas practically give the corresponding relationship between C or ({τ_0}) and the model parameters. The results of this study effectively solve the problem of analytically calculating the distribution of neutron exposures in the low-mass AGB star s-process nucleosynthesis model of (^{13}{C

  18. The cellular distribution of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 is determined by the PDZ-I domain and regulates the malignant progression of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guifang; Gu, Yanan; Hao, Chengcheng; Yuan, Zhu; He, Junqi; Jiang, Wen G.; Cheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of ectopic expression of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) was recently suggested. Here, we show that NHERF1 was upregulated in high grades compared with low grades. Increased NHERF1 expression was correlated with poor prognosis and poor survival. NHERF1 expression was higher in the nucleus of cancer cells than in contiguous non- mammary epithelial cells. A novel mutation, namely NHERF1 Y24S, was identified in human breast cancer tissues and shown to correspond to a conserved residue in the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1. Truncation and mutation of the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1 increased the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, and this redistribution was associated with the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells, including growth, migration, and adhesion. The present results suggest a role for NHERF1 in the progression of breast cancer mediated by the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, as determined by the truncation or key site mutation of the PDZ-I domain. PMID:27097111

  19. WAVE1 in neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor regulates cellular and behavioral actions of cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Ceglia, Ilaria; Lee, Ko-Woon; Cahill, Michael E.; Graves, Steven M.; Dietz, David; Surmeier, Dalton J.; Nestler, Eric J.; Nairn, Angus C.; Kim, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family verprolin homologous protein 1 (WAVE1) regulates actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex-mediated actin polymerization. Our previous studies have found WAVE1 to be inhibited by Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation in brain and to play a role in the regulation of dendritic spine morphology. Here we report that mice in which WAVE1 was knocked out (KO) in neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor (D1-KO), but not mice where WAVE1 was knocked out in neurons expressing the D2 dopamine receptor (D2-KO), exhibited a significant decrease in place preference associated with cocaine. In contrast to wild-type (WT) and WAVE1 D2-KO mice, cocaine-induced sensitized locomotor behavior was not maintained in WAVE1 D1-KO mice. After chronic cocaine administration and following withdrawal, an acute cocaine challenge induced WAVE1 activation in striatum, which was assessed by dephosphorylation. The cocaine-induced WAVE1 dephosphorylation was attenuated by coadministration of either a D1 dopamine receptor or NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist. Upon an acute challenge of cocaine following chronic cocaine exposure and withdrawal, we also observed in WT, but not in WAVE1 D1-KO mice, a decrease in dendritic spine density and a decrease in the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic AMPA receptor currents in medium spiny projection neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor (D1-MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that WAVE1 is involved selectively in D1-MSNs in cocaine-evoked neuronal activity-mediated feedback regulation of glutamatergic synapses. PMID:28115704

  20. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-08-29

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1-11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines.

  1. Expression, Distribution and Role of Aquaporin Water Channels in Human and Animal Stomach and Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cui; Chen, Zhuang; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-01-01

    Stomach and intestines are involved in the secretion of gastrointestinal fluids and the absorption of nutrients and fluids, which ensure normal gut functions. Aquaporin water channels (AQPs) represent a major transcellular route for water transport in the gastrointestinal tract. Until now, at least 11 AQPs (AQP1–11) have been found to be present in the stomach, small and large intestines. These AQPs are distributed in different cell types in the stomach and intestines, including gastric epithelial cells, gastric glands cells, absorptive epithelial cells (enterocytes), goblet cells and Paneth cells. AQP1 is abundantly distributed in the endothelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract. AQP3 and AQP4 are mainly distributed in the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells in the stomach and intestines. AQP7, AQP8, AQP10 and AQP11 are distributed in the apical of enterocytes in the small and large intestines. Although AQP-null mice displayed almost no phenotypes in gastrointestinal tracts, the alterations of the expression and localization of these AQPs have been shown to be associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders, which suggests that AQPs play important roles serving as potential therapeutic targets. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the expression, localization and distribution of AQPs in the stomach, small and large intestine of human and animals. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the potential roles of AQPs in the physiology and pathophysiology of stomach and intestines. PMID:27589719

  2. Hydrogen sulfide donor NaHS induces death of alveolar epithelial L2 cells that is associated with cellular shrinkage, transgelin expression and myosin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yusuke; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Uemura, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a highly toxic gaseous molecule that causes death to humans exposed to high concentrations. H2S is absorbed into the body through the alveolar epithelium and other tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the molecular mechanism underling acute lung injury caused by the inhalation of high concentrations of H2S. Rat lung epithelium-derived L2 cells were exposed to a H2S donor, NaHS, at concentrations of 2-4 mM for 1-6 hr. NaHS caused shrinkage and death of the cells without caspase activation. An actin-binding protein, transgelin, was identified as one of the NaHS-inducible proteins in the cells. NaHS increased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, indicating that actomyosin-mediated cellular contractility and/or motility could be increased after NaHS exposure. The administration of ML-7, a myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor, accelerated cell death after NaHS exposure. Based on these data, we conclude that the increase in MLC phosphorylation in response to NaHS exposure is a cellular protective reaction against NaHS toxicity. Enhancements in smooth muscle cell properties such as transgelin expression and actomyosin-mediated contractility/motility might be involved in cell survival after NaHS exposure.

  3. Cellular localization and effects of ectopically expressed hepatitis A virus proteins 2B, 2C, 3A and their intermediates 2BC, 3AB and 3ABC.

    PubMed

    Seggewiß, Nicole; Kruse, Hedi Verena; Weilandt, Rebecca; Domsgen, Erna; Dotzauer, Andreas; Paulmann, Dajana

    2016-04-01

    In the course of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections, the seven nonstructural proteins and their intermediates are barely detectable. Therefore, little is known about their functions and mechanisms of action. Ectopic expression of the presumably membrane-associated proteins 2B, 2C, 3A and their intermediates 2BC, 3AB and 3ABC allowed the intracellular localization of these proteins and their possible function during the replication cycle of HAV to be investigated. In this study, we used rhesus monkey kidney cells, which are commonly used for cell culture experiments, and human liver cells, which are the natural target cells. We detected specific associations of these proteins with distinct membrane compartments and the cytoskeleton, different morphological alterations of the respective structures, and specific effects on cellular functions. Besides comparable findings in both cell lines used with regard to localization and effects of the proteins examined, we also found distinct differences. The data obtained identify so far undocumented interactions with and effects of the HAV proteins investigated on cellular components, which may reflect unknown aspects of the interaction of HAV with the host cell, for example the modification of the ERGIC (ER-Golgi intermediate compartment) structure, an interaction with lipid droplets and lysosomes, and inhibition of the classical secretory pathway.

  4. Evaluating long-term cellular effects of the arsenic species thio-DMA(V): qPCR-based gene expression as screening tool.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Franziska; Thomann, Marlies; Witt, Barbara; Müller, Sandra M; Meyer, Sören; Weber, Till; Christmann, Markus; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    Thio-dimethylarsinic acid (thio-DMA(V)) is a human urinary metabolite of the class 1 human carcinogen inorganic arsenic as well as of arsenosugars. Thio-DMA(V) exerts strong cellular toxicity, whereas its toxic modes of action are not fully understood. For the first time, this study characterises the impact of a long-term (21days) in vitro incubation of thio-DMA(V) on the expression of selected genes related to cell death, stress response, epigenetics and DNA repair. The observed upregulation of DNMT1 might be a cellular compensation to counterregulate the in a very recent study observed massive global DNA hypomethylation after chronic thio-DMA(V) incubation. Moreover, our data suggest that chronic exposure towards subcytotoxic, pico- to nanomolar concentrations of thio-DMA(V) causes a stress response in human urothelial cells. The upregulation of genes encoding for proteins of DNA repair (Apex1, Lig1, XRCC1, DDB2, XPG, ATR) as well as damage response (GADD45A, GADD45G, Trp53) indicate a potential genotoxic risk emanating from thio-DMA(V) after long-term incubation.

  5. Metal-specific control of gene expression mediated by Bradyrhizobium japonicum Mur and Escherichia coli Fur is determined by the cellular context.

    PubMed

    Hohle, Thomas H; O'Brian, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum Mur and Escherichia coli Fur are manganese- and iron-responsive transcriptional regulators, respectively, that belong to the same protein family. Here, we show that neither Mur nor Fur discriminate between Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in vitro nor is there a metal preference for conferral of DNA-binding activity on the purified proteins. When expressed in E. coli, B. japonicum Mur responded to iron, but not manganese, as determined by in vivo promoter occupancy and transcriptional repression activity. Moreover, E. coli Fur activity was manganese-dependent in B. japonicum. Total and chelatable iron levels were higher in E. coli than in B. japonicum under identical growth conditions, and Mur responded to iron in a B. japonicum iron export mutant that accumulated high levels of the metal. However, elevated manganese content in E. coli did not confer activity on Fur or Mur, suggesting a regulatory pool of manganese in B. japonicum that is absent in E. coli. We conclude that the metal selectivity of Mur and Fur depends on the cellular context in which they function, not on intrinsic properties of the proteins. Also, the novel iron sensing mechanism found in the rhizobia may be an evolutionary adaptation to the cellular manganese status.

  6. Cellular senescence or EGFR signaling induces Interleukin 6 (IL-6) receptor expression controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, Christoph; Kuck, Fabian; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Konzak, Kirstin; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Sommerfeld, Annika; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Philipp A; Brenner, Dirk; Mak, Tak W.; Rose-John, Stefan; Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Piekorz, Roland P; Scheller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) signaling plays a role in inflammation, cancer, and senescence. Here, we identified soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) as a member of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Senescence-associated sIL-6R upregulation was mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). sIL-6R was mainly generated by a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10)-dependent ectodomain shedding to enable IL-6 trans-signaling. In vivo, heterozygous PTEN-knockout mice exhibited higher mTOR activity and increased sIL-6R levels. Moreover, aberrant EGF receptor (EGFR) activation triggered IL-6 synthesis. In analogy to senescence, EGFR-induced activation of mTOR also induced IL-6R expression and sIL-6R generation. Hence, mTOR activation reprograms IL-6 non-responder cells into IL-6 responder cells. Our data suggest that mTOR serves as a central molecular switch to facilitate cellular IL-6 classic and trans-signaling via IL-6R upregulation with direct implications for cellular senescence and tumor development. PMID:24047696

  7. Analysis of Epstein-Barr virus and cellular gene expression during the early phases of Epstein-Barr virus lytic induction.

    PubMed

    Auburn, Helen; Zuckerman, Mark; Smith, Melvyn

    2016-11-01

    In order to develop novel host/pathogen real-time PCR assays for routine diagnostic use, early gene expression patterns from both Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Raji cells were examined after inducing the lytic life cycle using 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol ester and sodium butyrate. Real-time PCR identified several highly induced (>90-fold) EBV lytic genes over a 48 h time course during the lytic induction phase. Latent genes were induced at low levels during this phase. The cellular response to lytic viral replication is poorly understood. Whole human genome microarray analysis identified 113 cellular genes regulated twofold or more by EBV, including 63 upregulated and 46 downregulated genes, over a 24 h time course post-induction. The most upregulated gene was CHI3L1, a chitinase-3-like 1 protein (18.1-fold; P<0.0084), and the most downregulated gene was TYMS, a thymidylate synthetase (-7.6-fold). Gene Ontology enrichment analysis using MetaCore software revealed cell cycle (core), cell cycle (role of anaphase-promoting complex) in cell cycle regulation) and lymphatic diseases as the most significantly represented biological network processes, canonical pathways and disease biomarkers, respectively. Chemotaxis, DNA damage and inflammation (IL-4 signalling) together with lymphoproliferative disorders and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were significantly represented biological processes and disease biomarkers.

  8. Fc-optimized NKG2D-Fc constructs induce NK cell antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells independently of HER2/neu expression status.

    PubMed

    Raab, Stefanie; Steinbacher, Julia; Schmiedel, Benjamin J; Kousis, Philaretos C; Steinle, Alexander; Jung, Gundram; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Salih, Helmut R

    2014-10-15

    The ability of NK cells to mediate Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) largely contributes to the clinical success of antitumor Abs, including trastuzumab, which is approved for the treatment of breast cancer with HER2/neu overexpression. Notably, only ∼25% of breast cancer patients overexpress HER2/neu. Moreover, HER2/neu is expressed on healthy cells, and trastuzumab application is associated with side effects. In contrast, the ligands of the activating immunoreceptor NKG2D (NKG2DL) are selectively expressed on malignant cells. In this study, we took advantage of the tumor-associated expression of NKG2DL by using them as target Ags for NKG2D-IgG1 fusion proteins optimized by amino acid exchange S239D/I332E in their Fc part. Compared to constructs with wild-type Fc parts, fusion proteins carrying the S239D/I332E modification (NKG2D-Fc-ADCC) mediated highly enhanced degranulation, ADCC, and IFN-γ production of NK cells in response to breast cancer cells. NKG2D-Fc-ADCC substantially enhanced NK reactivity also against HER2/neu-low targets that were unaffected by trastuzumab, as both compounds mediated their immunostimulatory effects in strict dependence of target Ag expression levels. Thus, in line with the hierarchically organized potential of the various activating receptors governing NK reactivity and due to its highly increased affinity to CD16, NKG2D-Fc-ADCC potently enhances NK cell reactivity despite the inevitable reduction of activating signals upon binding to NKG2DL. Due to the tumor-restricted expression of NKG2DL, NKG2D-Fc-ADCC may constitute an attractive means for immunotherapy especially of HER2/neu-low or -negative breast cancer.

  9. Protein kinase A and regulation of neonatal Nav1.5 expression in human breast cancer cells: activity-dependent positive feedback and cellular migration.

    PubMed

    Chioni, Athina-Myrto; Shao, Dongmin; Grose, Richard; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2010-02-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are expressed in excitable cells (e.g. neurons and muscles), as well as in some classically 'non-excitable' cells (e.g. fibroblasts), and in carcinomas. In general, functional expression of VGSCs in plasma membrane (PM) is hierarchical and dynamic. Previously, we have shown that an activity-dependent positive feedback mechanism involving cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) plays a significant role in upregulation of VGSCs in strongly metastatic rat prostate cancer Mat-LyLu cells expressing Nav1.7. Here, we investigated the possible role of PKA in VGSC regulation and its functional consequences in strongly metastatic human breast cancer (BCa) MDA-MB-231 cells, where the neonatal splice form of Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) is the predominant VGSC present. Treatment with the PKA activator forskolin for 24h increased mRNA and PM protein levels of nNav1.5, without changing the total VGSC protein level. Opposite effects were obtained by application of the PKA inhibitor KT5720 or the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), the latter implying activity-dependent upregulation. We tested the possibility, therefore, that the activity dependence of VGSC (nNav1.5) expression involved PKA. Indeed, TTX pretreatment reduced the level of phosphorylated PKA and eliminated basal and PKA-stimulated cellular migration. These data suggested that activity-dependent positive feedback mediated by PKA plays an important role in the functional expression of nNav1.5 in BCa, and in turn, this enhances the cells' metastatic potential.

  10. HSP86 and HSP84 exhibit cellular specificity of expression and co-precipitate with an HSP70 family member in the murine testis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruppi, C. M.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This study extends to the protein level our previous observations, which had established the stage and cellular specificity of expression of hsp86 and hsp84 in the murine testis in the absence of exogenous stress. Immunoblot analysis was used to demonstrate that HSP86 protein was present throughout testicular development and that its levels increased with the appearance of differentiating germ cells. HSP86 was most abundant in the germ cell population and was present at significantly lower levels in the somatic cells. By contrast, the HSP84 protein was detected in the somatic cells of the testis rather than in germ cells. The steady-state levels of HSP86 and HSP84 paralleled the pattern of the expression of their respective mRNAs, suggesting that regulation at the level of translation was not a major mechanism controlling hsp90 gene expression in testicular cells. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that a 70-kDa protein coprecipitated with the HSP86/HSP84 proteins in testicular homogenates. This protein was identified as an HSP70 family member by immunoblot analysis, suggesting that HSP70 and HSP90 family members interact in testicular cells.

  11. Cellular expression of isoforms of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1c, ECE-1b and ECE-1a) and endothelin-converting enzyme-2.

    PubMed

    Davenport, A P; Kuc, R E

    2000-11-01

    Our aim was to compare the cellular expression of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) isoforms and ECE-2 using immunocytochemistry in normal and diseased human tissue. Intense ECE-1b immunoreactivity was present within renal and pulmonary epithelial cells with lower levels of staining displayed by ECE-1c, ECE-1a and ECE-2 antisera. Staining was detected with all antisera (except ECE-1a) within the endothelium of renal and pulmonary vessels having a range of lumen diameters as well as pial arteries and intracerebral vessels penetrating brain. ECE-1b, ECE-1c and ECE-2 immunoreactivity was localized to perivascular astrocytes and neuronal processes in the cerebral cortex. In diseased vessels, ECE-1c, ECE-1b and ECE-2 antisera stained macrophages infiltrating atherosclerotic plaques within coronary arteries. These results suggest ECE-1b and ECE-2 may be widely expressed in normal tissue from humans and inhibition of ECE-1 isoforms and ECE-2 expressed by cells such as macrophages in pathophysiological tissue may be an additional therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease.

  12. Silent but not dumb: how cellular trafficking and pore gating modulate expression of TWIK1 and THIK2.

    PubMed

    Bichet, Delphine; Blin, Sandy; Feliciangeli, Sylvain; Chatelain, Franck C; Bobak, Nicole; Lesage, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Among K2P channels, a few of them turned out to be difficult to express in heterologous systems and were coined "silent subunits". Recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms behind this apparent lack of channel activity at the plasma membrane. For TWIK1 and THIK2 channels, silence is related to a combination of intracellular retention and low intrinsic activity. TWIK1 is constitutively endocytosed from the plasma membrane before being transported to recycling endosomes, whereas THIK2 is restricted to endoplasmic reticulum. These intracellular localizations are related to trafficking signals located in the cytoplasmic parts of the channels. When these motifs are mutated or masked, channels are redistributed at the plasma membrane and produce measurable currents. However, these currents are of modest amplitude. This weak basal activity is due to a hydrophobic barrier in the deep pore that limits water and ions in the conduction pathway. Other silent channels KCNK7, TWIK2, and TASK5 are still under study. Expression and characterization of these K2P channels pave the way for a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling intracellular trafficking of membrane proteins, ion conduction, and channel gating.

  13. Low-temperature atmospheric plasma increases the expression of anti-aging genes of skin cells without causing cellular damages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Jae-Koo; Hong, Jin-woo; Kim, Gyoo-cheon

    2013-03-01

    Efforts to employ various types of plasma in the field of skin care have increased consistently because it can regulate many biochemical reactions that are normally unaffected by light-based therapy. One method for skin rejuvenation adopted a high-temperature plasma generator to remove skin epithelial cells. In this case, the catalyzing effects of the plasma were rarely used due to the high temperature. Hence, the benefits of the plasma were not magnified. Recently, many types of low-temperature plasma devices have been developed for medical applications but their detailed functions and working mechanisms are unclear. The present study examined the effect of low-temperature microwave plasma on skin cells. Treatment with low-temperature plasma increased the expression of anti-aging genes in skin cells, including collagen, fibronectin and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, the plasma treatment did not cause cell death, but only induced slight cell growth arrest at the G2 phase. Although the cells treated with low-temperature plasma showed moderate growth arrest, there were no signs of thermal or genetic damage of skin cells. Overall, this low-temperature microwave plasma device induces the expressions of some anti-aging-related genes in skin cells without causing damage.

  14. The Kunitz-protease inhibitor domain in amyloid precursor protein reduces cellular mitochondrial enzymes expression and function.

    PubMed

    Chua, Li-Min; Lim, Mei-Li; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this can be contributed by aberrant metabolic enzyme function. But, the mechanism causing this enzymatic impairment is unclear. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is known to be alternatively spliced to produce three major isoforms in the brain (APP695, APP751, APP770). Both APP770 and APP751 contain the Kunitz Protease Inhibitory (KPI) domain, but the former also contain an extra OX-2 domain. APP695 on the other hand, lacks both domains. In AD, up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms has been reported. But the functional contribution of this elevation is unclear. In the present study, we have expressed and compared the effect of the non-KPI containing APP695 and the KPI-containing APP751 on mitochondrial function. We found that the KPI-containing APP751 significantly decreased the expression of three major mitochondrial metabolic enzymes; citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase (COX IV). This reduction lowers the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, COX IV activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overall, this study demonstrated that up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms is likely to contribute to the impairment of metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial function in AD.

  15. Oncogenic activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway promotes cellular glucose uptake by downregulating the expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Shin Yee; Yu, Fa-Xing; Luo, Yan; Hagen, Thilo

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is known to play an important role to promote glucose metabolism in cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism through which the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway promotes glucose utilisation in cancer cells is still not well understood. It has recently been shown that the oncogenic activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling in lung adenocarcinoma is important in promoting the localisation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) at the plasma membrane. We thus hypothesised that the effect of constitutive activation of the PI3K/AKT signalling on glucose metabolism is mediated by thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP), a known regulator of the GLUT1 plasma membrane localisation. Consistent with previous studies, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway decreased cellular glucose uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K/Akt signalling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines using clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) resulted in a decrease in GLUT1 membrane localisation. We also observed that inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway in various cell lines, including NSCLC cells, resulted in an increase in TXNIP expression. Importantly, knockdown of TXNIP using siRNA in the NSCLC cells promoted GLUT1 to be localised at the plasma membrane and reversed the effect of PI3K/Akt inhibitors. Together, our results suggest that the oncogenic activation of PI3K/Akt signalling promotes cellular glucose uptake, at least in part, through the regulation of TXNIP expression. This mechanism may contribute to the Warburg effect in cancer cells.

  16. Retina-specific nuclear receptor: A potential regulator of cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium and Müller glial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Figueroa, D J; Marmorstein, A D; Zhang, Q; Petrukhin, K; Caskey, C T; Austin, C P

    1999-12-21

    In an effort to identify nuclear receptors important in retinal disease, we screened a retina cDNA library for nuclear receptors. Here we describe the identification of a retina-specific nuclear receptor (RNR) from both human and mouse. Human RNR is a splice variant of the recently published photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor [Kobayashi, M., Takezawa, S., Hara, K., Yu, R. T., Umesono, Y., Agata, K., Taniwaki, M., Yasuda, K. & Umesono, K. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 4814-4819] whereas the mouse RNR is a mouse ortholog. Northern blot and reverse transcription-PCR analyses of human mRNA samples demonstrate that RNR is expressed exclusively in the retina, with transcripts of approximately 7.5 kb, approximately 3.0 kb, and approximately 2.3 kb by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization with multiple probes on both primate and mouse eye sections demonstrates that RNR is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium and in Müller glial cells. By using the Gal4 chimeric receptor/reporter cotransfection system, the ligand binding domain of RNR was found to repress transcriptional activity in the absence of exogenous ligand. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that RNR can interact with the promoter of the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein gene in the presence of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and/or retinoid X receptor (RXR). These data raise the possibility that RNR acts to regulate the visual cycle through its interaction with cellular retinaldehyde binding protein and therefore may be a target for retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration.

  17. Exercise Decreases Lipogenic Gene Expression in Adipose Tissue and Alters Adipocyte Cellularity during Weight Regain After Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Erin D.; Steig, Amy J.; Jackman, Matthew R.; Higgins, Janine A.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Lindstrom, Rachel C.; MacLean, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is a potent strategy to facilitate long-term weight maintenance. In addition to increasing energy expenditure and reducing appetite, exercise also favors the oxidation of dietary fat, which likely helps prevent weight re-gain. It is unclear whether this exercise-induced metabolic shift is due to changes in energy balance, or whether exercise imparts additional adaptations in the periphery that limit the storage and favor the oxidation of dietary fat. To answer this question, adipose tissue lipid metabolism and related gene expression were studied in obese rats following weight loss and during the first day of relapse to obesity. Mature, obese rats were weight-reduced for 2 weeks with or without daily treadmill exercise (EX). Rats were weight maintained for 6 weeks, followed by relapse on: (a) ad libitum low fat diet (LFD), (b) ad libitum LFD plus EX, or (c) a provision of LFD to match the positive energy imbalance of exercised, relapsing animals. 24 h retention of dietary- and de novo-derived fat were assessed directly using 14C palmitate/oleate and 3H20, respectively. Exercise decreased the size, but increased the number of adipocytes in both retroperitoneal (RP) and subcutaneous (SC) adipose depots, and prevented the relapse-induced increase in adipocyte size. Further, exercise decreased the expression of genes involved in lipid uptake (CD36 and LPL), de novo lipogenesis (FAS, ACC1), and triacylglycerol synthesis (MGAT and DGAT) in RP adipose during relapse following weight loss. This was consistent with the metabolic data, whereby exercise reduced retention of de novo-derived fat even when controlling for the positive energy imbalance. The decreased trafficking of dietary fat to adipose tissue with exercise was explained by reduced energy intake which attenuated energy imbalance during refeeding. Despite having decreased expression of lipogenic genes, the net retention of de novo-derived lipid was higher in both the RP and SC adipose of exercising

  18. Prediction of Metabolic Flux Distribution from Gene Expression Data Based on the Flux Minimization Principle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-14

    expression data. The proposed algorithm minimizes a weighted sum of flux magnitudes, while biomass production can be bounded to fit an ample range from...approach to investigate metabolism and metabolic processes is to analyze the flow of material and energy through a metabolic network. In particular, the...maximizing a certain fitness function (typically, biomass production) and estimates the flux distribution by solving a linear programming (LP

  19. Effect of Carbon Distribution During the Microstructure Evolution of Dual-Phase Steels Studied Using Cellular Automata, Genetic Algorithms, and Experimental Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Chandan; Karmakar, Anish; Hasan, Sk. Md.; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Pietrzyk, Maciej; Chakraborti, Nirupam

    2016-12-01

    The development of ferrite-martensite dual-phase microstructures by cold-rolling and intercritical annealing of 0.06 wt pct carbon steel was systematically studied using a dilatometer for two different heating rates (1 and 10 K/s). A step quenching treatment has been designed to develop dual-phase structures having a similar martensite fraction for two different heating rates. An increase in heating rate seemed to refine the ferrite grain size, but it increased the size and spacing of the martensitic regions. As a result, the strength of the steel increased with heating rate; however, the formability was affected. It has been concluded that the distribution of C during the annealing treatment of cold-rolled steel determines the size, distribution, and morphology of martensite, which ultimately influences the mechanical properties. Experimental detection of carbon distribution in austenite is difficult during annealing of the cold-rolled steel as the phase transformation occurs at a high temperature and C is an interstitial solute, which diffuses fast at that temperature. Therefore, a cellular automata (CA)-based phase transformation model is proposed in the present study for the prediction of C distribution in austenite during annealing of steel as the function of C content and heating rate. The CA model predicts that the carbon distribution in austenite becomes more inhomogeneous when the heating rate increases. In the CA model, the extent of carbon inhomogeneity is measured using a kernel averaging method for different orders of neighbors, which accounts for the different physical space during calculation. The obtained results reveal that the 10th order (covering 10- µm physical spaces around the cell of interest) is showing the maximum inhomogeneity of carbon and the same effect has been investigated and confirmed using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for 0.06 wt pct carbon steel. Furthermore, the optimization of carbon homogeneity with respect to heating

  20. Distribution of doublecortin expressing cells near the lateral ventricles in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Helen K C; Sundholm-Peters, Nikki L; Goings, Gwendolyn E; Walker, Avery S; Hyland, Kenneth; Szele, Francis G

    2004-05-01

    Doublecortin (Dcx) is a microtubule-associated protein expressed by migrating neuroblasts in the embryo and in the adult subventricular zone (SVZ). The adult SVZ contains neuroblasts that migrate in the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulbs. We have examined the distribution and phenotype of Dcx-positive cells in the adult mouse SVZ and surrounding regions. Chains of Dcx-positive cells in the SVZ were distributed in a tight dorsal population contiguous with the RMS, with a separate ventral population comprised of discontinuous chains. Unexpectedly, Dcx-positive cells were also found outside of the SVZ: dorsally in the corpus callosum, and ventrally in the nucleus accumbens, ventromedial striatum, ventrolateral septum, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Dcx-positive cells outside the SVZ had the morphology of migrating cells, occurred as individual cells or in chain-like clusters, and were more numerous anteriorly. Of the Dcx-positive cells found outside of the SVZ, 47% expressed the immature neuronal protein class III beta-tubulin, 8% expressed NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Dcx-positive cells did not express molecules found in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or microglia. Structural and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that cells with the ultrastructural features of neuroblasts in the SVZ were Dcx+, and that clusters of neuroblasts emanated ventrally from the SVZ into the parenchyma. Our results suggest that the distribution of cells comprising the walls of the lateral ventricle are more heterogeneous than was thought previously, that SVZ cells may migrate dorsally and ventrally away from the SVZ, and that some emigrated cells express a neuronal phenotype.

  1. Distributed representations of dynamic facial expressions in the superior temporal sulcus

    PubMed Central

    Said, Christopher P.; Moore, Christopher D.; Engell, Andrew D.; Todorov, Alexander; Haxby, James V.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research on the superior temporal sulcus (STS) has shown that it responds more to facial expressions than to neutral faces. Here, we extend our understanding of the STS in two ways. First, using targeted high-resolution fMRI measurements of the lateral cortex and multivoxel pattern analysis, we show that the response to seven categories of dynamic facial expressions can be decoded in both the posterior STS (pSTS) and anterior STS (aSTS). We were also able to decode patterns corresponding to these expressions in the frontal operculum (FO), a structure that has also been shown to respond to facial expressions. Second, we measured the similarity structure of these representations and found that the similarity structure in the pSTS significantly correlated with the perceptual similarity structure of the expressions. This was the case regardless of whether we used pattern classification or more traditional correlation techniques to extract the neural similarity structure. These results suggest that distributed representations in the pSTS could underlie the perception of facial expressions. PMID:20616141

  2. Distribution of delta opioid receptor expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eric, ERBS; Lauren, FAGET; Gregory, SCHERRER; Pascal, KESSLER; Didier, HENTSCH; Jean-Luc, VONESCH; Audrey, MATIFAS; Brigitte L., KIEFFER; Dominique, MASSOTTE

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. We examined the distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus using fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxyterminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. Colocalization with markers for different neuronal populations was performed by immunohistochemical detection. Fine mapping in the dorsal hippocampus confirmed that delta opioid receptors are mainly present in GABAergic neurons. Indeed, they are mostly expressed in parvalbumin-immunopositive neurons both in the Ammon’s horn and dentate gyrus. These receptors, therefore, most likely participate to the dynamic regulation of hippocampal activity. PMID:22750239

  3. Distribution of delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Scherrer, G; Kessler, P; Hentsch, D; Vonesch, J-L; Matifas, A; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2012-09-27

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. We examined the distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus using fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxyterminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. Colocalization with markers for different neuronal populations was performed by immunohistochemical detection. Fine mapping in the dorsal hippocampus confirmed that delta opioid receptors are mainly present in GABAergic neurons. Indeed, they are mostly expressed in parvalbumin-immunopositive neurons both in the Ammon's horn and dentate gyrus. These receptors, therefore, most likely participate in the dynamic regulation of hippocampal activity.

  4. In vivo monitoring of transfected DNA, gene expression kinetics, and cellular immune responses in mice immunized with a human NIS gene-expressing plasmid.

    PubMed

    Son, Hye-Youn; Jeon, Yong-Hyun; Chung, June-Key; Kim, Chul-Woo

    2016-12-01

    In assessing the effectiveness of DNA vaccines, it is important to monitor: (1) the kinetics of target gene expression in vivo; and (2) the movement of cells that become transfected with the plasmid DNA used in the immunization of a subject. In this study, we used, as a visual imaging marker, expression of the transfected human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene, which enhances intracellular radio-pertechnetate (TcO4-) accumulation. After intradermal (i.d.) and systemic injection of mice with pcDNA-hNIS and radioactive Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), respectively, whole-body images were obtained by nuclear scintigraphy. The migration of mice cells transfected with the hNIS gene was monitored over a 2-week period by gamma-radioactivity counting of isolated cell populations and was demonstrated in peripheral lymphoid tissues, especially in the draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Beginning at 24 h after DNA inoculation and continuing for the 2-week monitoring period, hNIS-expressing cells were observed specifically in the T-cell-rich zones of the paracortical area of the dLNs. Over the same time period, high levels of INF-γ-secreting CD8 T-cells were found in the dLNs of the pcDNA-hNIS immunized mice. Tumor growth was also significantly retarded in the mice that received hNIS DNA immunization followed by inoculation with CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells that had been transfected with the rat NIS gene (rNIS), which is 93% homologous to the hNIS gene. In conclusion, mouse cells transfected with hNIS DNA after i.d. immunization were found to traffic to the dLNs, and hNIS gene expression in these cells continued for at least 2 weeks post immunization. Furthermore, sequential presentation of NIS DNA to T-cells by migratory antigen presenting cells could induce NIS DNA-specific Th1 immune responses and thus retard the growth of NIS-expressing tumors.

  5. Distribution of constitutively expressed MEF-2A in adult rat and human nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Ruffle, Rebecca A; Mapley, Andrew C; Malik, Manmeet K; Labruzzo, Salvatore V; Chabla, Janet M; Jose, Riya; Hallas, Brian H; Yu, Han-Gang; Horowitz, Judith M; Torres, German

    2006-06-15

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF-2A) is a calcium-regulated transcription factor that promotes cell survival during nervous system development. To define and further characterize the distribution pattern of MEF-2A in the adult mammalian brain, we used a specific polyclonal antiserum against human MEF-2A to identify nuclear-localized MEF-2A protein in hippocampal and frontal cortical regions. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses showed that MEF-2A was expressed not only in laminar structures but also in blood vessels of rat and human brains. MEF-2A was colocalized with doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed by migrating neuroblasts, in CA1 and CA2 boundaries of the hippocampus. MEF-2A was expressed heterogeneously in additional structures of the rat brain, including the striatum, thalamus, and cerebellum. Furthermore, we found a strong nuclear and diffuse MEF-2A labeling pattern in spinal cord cells of rat and human material. Finally, the neurovasculature of adult rats and humans not only showed a strong expression of MEF-2A but also labeled positive for hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-regulated (HCN) channels. This study further characterizes the distribution pattern of MEF-2A in the mammalian nervous system, demonstrates that MEF-2A colocalizes with DCX in selected neurons, and finds MEF-2A and HCN1 proteins in the neurovasculature network.

  6. Selected prfA* mutations in recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes strains augment expression of foreign immunogens and enhance vaccine-elicited humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Qiu, Jin; Chen, Jianbo; Ryan-Payseur, Bridgett; Huang, Dan; Wang, Yunqi; Rong, Lijun; Melton-Witt, Jody A; Freitag, Nancy E; Chen, Zheng W

    2008-08-01

    While recombinant Listeria monocytogenes strains can be explored as vaccine candidates, it is important to develop attenuated but highly immunogenic L. monocytogenes vaccine vectors. Here, prfA* mutations selected on the basis of upregulated expression of L. monocytogenes PrfA-dependent genes and proteins were assessed to determine their abilities to augment expression of foreign immunogens in recombinant L. monocytogenes vectors and therefore enhance vaccine-elicited immune responses (a prfA* mutation is a mutation that results in constitutive overexpression of PrfA and PrfA-dependent virulence genes; the asterisk distinguishes the mutation from inactivation or stop mutations). A total of 63 recombinant L. monocytogenes vaccine vectors expressing seven individual viral or bacterial immunogens each in nine different L. monocytogenes strains carrying wild-type prfA or having prfA* mutations were constructed and investigated. Mutations selected on the basis of increased PrfA activation in recombinant L. monocytogenes prfA* vaccine vectors augmented expression of seven individual protein immunogens remarkably. Consistently, prime and boost vaccination studies with mice indicated that the prfA(G155S) mutation in recombinant L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* strains enhanced vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses. Surprisingly, the prfA(G155S) mutation was found to enhance vaccine-elicited humoral immune responses as well. The highly immunogenic recombinant L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* vaccine strains were as attenuated as the recombinant parent L. monocytogenes DeltaactA vaccine vector. Thus, recombinant attenuated L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* vaccine vectors potentially are better antimicrobial and anticancer vaccines.

  7. Production of a Marfan cellular phenotype by expressing a mutant human fibrillin allele on a normal human or murine genetic background

    SciTech Connect

    Eldadah, Z.A.; Dietz, H.C.; Brenn, T.

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by defects in fibrillin (FBN1), a 350 kD glycoprotein and principal component of the extracellular microfibril. Previous correlations of mutant transcript level and disease severity suggested a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis. To address this hypothesis we assembled an expression construct containing the mutant allele from a patient with severe MFS. This mutation causes skipping of FBN1 exon 2 and a frame shift, leading to a premature termination codon in exon 4. The predicted peptide would thus consist of 55 wild type and 45 missense amino acids. The construct was stably transfected into cultured human and mouse fibroblasts, and several clonal cell populations were established. Human and mouse cells expressing the truncated peptide exhibited markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture by immunofluorescence. Pulse-chase analysis of these cells demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially decreased fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant FBN1 allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal fibrillin aggregation and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This provides confirmation of a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis and may offer mutant allele knockout as a strategy for gene therapy. In addition, these data underscore the importance of the FBN1 amino-terminus in normal multimer formation and suggest that expression of the human extreme 5{prime} FBN1 coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Indeed, transgenic mice harboring this mutant allele have been produced, and phenotype analysis is currently in progress.

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 interacts with cellular RNA export cofactors RBM15 and OTT3 to promote expression of viral ORF59.

    PubMed

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Uranishi, Hiroaki; Kruhlak, Michael; Pilkington, Guy R; Massimelli, Maria Julia; Bear, Jenifer; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes ORF57, which promotes the accumulation of specific KSHV mRNA targets, including ORF59 mRNA. We report that the cellular export NXF1 cofactors RBM15 and OTT3 participate in ORF57-enhanced expression of KSHV ORF59. We also found that ectopic expression of RBM15 or OTT3 augments ORF59 production in the absence of ORF57. While RBM15 promotes the accumulation of ORF59 RNA predominantly in the nucleus compared to the levels in the cytoplasm, we found that ORF57 shifted the nucleocytoplasmic balance by increasing ORF59 RNA accumulation in the cytoplasm more than in the nucleus. By promoting the accumulation of cytoplasmic ORF59 RNA, ORF57 offsets the nuclear RNA accumulation mediated by RBM15 by preventing nuclear ORF59 RNA from hyperpolyadenylation. ORF57 interacts directly with the RBM15 C-terminal portion containing the SPOC domain to reduce RBM15 binding to ORF59 RNA. Although ORF57 homologs Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EB2, herpes simplex virus (HSV) ICP27, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IE4/ORF4, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) UL69 also interact with RBM15 and OTT3, EBV EB2, which also promotes ORF59 expression, does not function like KSHV ORF57 to efficiently prevent RBM15-mediated nuclear accumulation of ORF59 RNA and RBM15's association with polyadenylated RNAs. Collectively, our data provide novel insight elucidating a molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes the expression of viral intronless genes.

  9. Bimodal distribution of RNA expression levels in human skeletal muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many human diseases and phenotypes are related to RNA expression, levels of which are influenced by a wide spectrum of genetic and exposure-related factors. In a large genome-wide study of muscle tissue expression, we found that some genes exhibited a bimodal distribution of RNA expression, in contrast to what is usually assumed in studies of a single healthy tissue. As bimodality has classically been considered a hallmark of genetic control, we assessed the genome-wide prevalence, cause, and association of this phenomenon with diabetes-related phenotypes in skeletal muscle tissue from 225 healthy Pima Indians using exon array expression chips. Results Two independent batches of microarrays were used for bimodal assessment and comparison. Of the 17,881 genes analyzed, eight (GSTM1, HLA-DRB1, ERAP2, HLA-DRB5, MAOA, ACTN3, NR4A2, and THNSL2) were found to have bimodal expression replicated in the separate batch groups, while 24 other genes had evidence of bimodality in only one group. Some bimodally expressed genes had modest associations with pre-diabetic phenotypes, of note ACTN3 with insulin resistance. Most of the other bimodal genes have been reported to be involved with various other diseases and characteristics. Association of expression with cis genetic variation in a subset of 149 individuals found all but one of the confirmed bimodal genes and nearly half of all potential ones to be highly significant expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). The rare prevalence of these bimodally expressed genes found after controlling for batch effects was much lower than the prevalence reported in other studies. Additional validation in data from separate muscle expression studies confirmed the low prevalence of bimodality we observed. Conclusions We conclude that the prevalence of bimodal gene expression is quite rare in healthy muscle tissue (<0.2%), and is much lower than limited reports from other studies. The major cause of these clearly bimodal

  10. The cellular mRNA expression of GABA and glutamate receptors in spinal motor neurons of SOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Petri, S; Schmalbach, S; Grosskreutz, J; Krampfl, K; Grothe, C; Dengler, R; Van Den Bosch, L; Robberecht, W; Bufler, J

    2005-11-15

    ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a selective loss of upper motor neurons in the motor cortex and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. About 10% of ALS cases are familial, in 10-20% of these, mutations in the gene coding for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) can be detected. Overexpression of mutated SOD1 in mice created animal models which clinically resemble ALS. Abnormalities in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission presumably contribute to the selective motor neuron damage in ALS. By in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISH), we investigated the spinal mRNA expression of the GABAA and AMPA type glutamate receptor subunits at different disease stages on spinal cord sections of mutant SOD1 mice and control animals overexpressing wild-type SOD1 aged 40, 80, 120 days and at disease end-stage, i.e. around 140 days) (n=5, respectively). We detected a slight but statistically significant decrease of the AMPA receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 only in end stage disease animals.

  11. Diverse Non-genetic, Allele-Specific Expression Effects Shape Genetic Architecture at the Cellular Level in the Mammalian Brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chao; Ferris, Elliott; Cheng, Tong; Hörndli, Cornelia Stacher; Gleason, Kelly; Tamminga, Carol; Wagner, Janice D; Boucher, Kenneth M; Christian, Jan L; Gregg, Christopher

    2017-03-08

    Interactions between genetic and epigenetic effects shape brain function, behavior, and the risk for mental illness. Random X inactivation and genomic imprinting are epigenetic allelic effects that are well known to influence genetic architecture and disease risk. Less is known about the nature, prevalence, and conservation of other potential epigenetic allelic effects in vivo in the mouse and primate brain. Here we devise genomics, in situ hybridization, and mouse genetics strategies to uncover diverse allelic effects in the brain that are not caused by imprinting or genetic variation. We found allelic effects that are developmental stage and cell type specific, that are prevalent in the neonatal brain, and that cause mosaics of monoallelic brain cells that differentially express wild-type and mutant alleles for heterozygous mutations. Finally, we show that diverse non-genetic allelic effects that impact mental illness risk genes exist in the macaque and human brain. Our findings have potential implications for mammalian brain genetics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  12. The cytolytic enzymes granyzme A, granzyme B, and perforin: expression patterns, cell distribution, and their relationship to cell maturity and bright CD57 expression

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Betts, Michael R.; Price, David A.; Gostick, Emma; Horton, Helen; Roederer, Mario; De Rosa, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Cytolytic enzymes (CEs) are critical mediators of anti-viral and -tumor immunity; however, as a number of molecules belong to this enzyme family, our understanding of CEs remains limited. Specifically, it remains unclear what combinations of granzymes and perforin (Perf) are expressed by various immune cells and how CE content relates to cellular differentiation. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we simultaneously measured expression of the most common human CEs [granzyme A (gA), granzyme B (gB), and Perf] alongside markers of αβ and γδ T cell maturation (CD45RO, CCR7, CD27, CD57). Additionally, we measured CE content in NK cell subsets (defined by their expression of CD16 and CD56). We found that among a wide variety of immune cells, CE content was linked to cellular maturity. Moreover, common expression patterns were shared across cell types, such that gB+ cells always contained gA, and Perf+ cells were primarily gA+ gB+. Most importantly, CD57 expression correlated strongly with simultaneous expression of gA, gB, and Perf. Thus, the use of CD57 provides a means to easily isolate viable cells with high cytolytic potential, without the need for lethal fixation/permeabilization techniques. PMID:18820174

  13. Label-Free Raman Microspectral Analysis for Comparison of Cellular Uptake and Distribution between Non-Targeted and EGFR-Targeted Biodegradable Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chernenko, Tatyana; Buyukozturk, Fulden; Miljkovic, Milos; Carrier, Rebecca; Diem, Max; Amiji, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Active targeted delivery of nanoparticle-encapsulated agents to tumor cells in vivo is expected to enhance therapeutic effect with significantly less non-specific toxicity. Active targeting is based on surface modification of nanoparticles with ligands that bind with extracellular targets and enhance payload delivery in the cells. In this study, we have used label-free Raman micro-spectral analysis and kinetic modeling to study cellular interactions and intracellular delivery of C6-ceramide using a non-targeted and an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted biodegradable polymeric nano-delivery systems, in EGFR-expressing human ovarian adenocarcinoma (SKOV3) cells. The results show that EGFR peptide-modified nanoparticles were rapidly internalized in SKOV3 cells leading to significant intracellular accumulation as compared to non-specific uptake by the non-targeted nanoparticles. Raman micro-spectral analysis enables visualization and quantification of the carrier system, drug-load, and responses of the biological systems interrogated, without exogenous staining and labeling procedures. PMID:24298430

  14. Ethanol Upregulates Glucocorticoid-induced Leucine Zipper Expression and Modulates Cellular Inflammatory Responses in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Marla; Raju, Sammeta V.; Viswanathan, Anand; Painter, Richard G.; Bonvillain, Ryan; Byrne, Patrick; Nguyen, Doan H.; Bagby, Gregory J.; Kolls, Jay K.; Nelson, Steve; Wang, Guoshun

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with immunosuppressive and infectious sequelae. Particularly, alcoholics are more susceptible to pulmonary infections. In this report, gene transcriptional profiles of primary human airway epithelial cells, exposed to varying doses of alcohol (0, 50 and 100 mM), were obtained. Comparison of gene transcription levels between 0 mM and 50 mM alcohol treatments resulted in 2 genes being up-regulated and 16 genes down-regulated by at least two-fold. Moreover, 0 mM and 100 mM alcohol exposure led to the up-regulation of 14 genes and down-regulation of 157 genes. Among the up-regulated genes, glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) responded to alcohol in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, GILZ protein levels also correlated with this transcriptional pattern. Lentiviral expression of GILZ siRNA in human airway epithelial cells diminished the alcohol-induced upregulation, confirming that GILZ is indeed an alcohol-responsive gene. Gene-silencing of GILZ in A549 cells resulted in secretion of significantly higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines in response to IL-1β stimulation. The GILZ-silenced cells were more resistant to alcohol-mediated suppression of cytokine secretion. Further data demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor is involved in the regulation of GILZ by alcohol. Because GILZ is a key glucocorticoid-responsive factor mediating the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive actions of steroids, we propose that similar signaling pathways may play a role in the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of alcohol. PMID:20382889

  15. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-01

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection.

  16. Study of the effect of ceramic Ta2O5 nanoparticle distribution on cellular dose enhancement in a kilovoltage photon field.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Sally; Engels, Elette; Tehei, Moeava; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Corde, Stéphanie; Oktaria, Sianne; Incerti, Sebastien; Lerch, Michael; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Guatelli, Susanna

    2016-10-01

    The application of nanoparticles (NPs) in radiotherapy is an increasingly attractive technique to improve clinical outcomes. The internalisation of NPs within the tumour cells enables an increased radiation dose to critical cellular structures. The purpose of this study is to investigate, by means of Geant4 simulations, the dose enhancement within a cell population irradiated with a 150kVp photon field in the presence of a varying concentration of tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) NP aggregates, experimentally observed to form shells within tumour cells. This scenario is compared to the more traditionally simulated homogeneous solution of NP material in water with the same weight fraction of Ta2O5, as well as to a cell population without NPs present. The production of secondary electrons is enhanced by increased photoelectric effect interactions within the high-Z material and this is examined in terms of their kinetic energy spectra and linear energy transfer (LET) with various NP distributions compared to water. Our results indicate that the shell formation scenario limits the dose enhancement at 150kVp. The underlying mechanism for this limit is discussed.

  17. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  18. Age-related behavioural phenotype and cellular characterisation of mice with progressive ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Babovic, Daniela; Jiang, Luning; Gantois, Ilse; Lawrence, Andrew J; Ferreri, Vincenzo; Schütz, Günter; Waddington, John L; Drago, John

    2010-01-05

    In this study we characterize the behavioural and cellular phenotype of mutant (MUT) mice with progressive loss of D1 dopamine receptor (Drd1a)-expressing cells. Adult [14-19 weeks] MUT mice showed intact working memory in the spontaneous alternation test but evidenced anxiety-like behaviour in the elevated plus maze and the light-dark test. The ethogram of mature adult MUT [average age 22 weeks] was compared with that of young adult MUT mice [average age 12 weeks]. While MUT mice evidenced hyperactivity over initial exploration at both time points, the topography of hyperactivity shifted. Moreover, initial hyperactivity was sustained over habituation at 12 weeks, but not at 22 weeks. Thus, by 22 weeks MUT mice evidenced shifts in, and mitigation of, these early phenotypic effects. However, orofacial behaviours of chewing and sifting were reduced similarly at 12 and 22 weeks. These data support the hypothesis that aspects of the mutant phenotype change with time. Quantitative autoradiography at 20 weeks revealed loss of D1-like dopamine receptor binding in the entire basal ganglia, with upregulated D2-like binding. There appear to be topographically specific interactions between normal maturational processes and compensatory mechanisms evoked subsequent to targeted ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells. Understanding the mechanistic bases of mitigation vs persistence of individual phenotypes in relation to neural adaptation consequent to cell loss may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for basal ganglia disorders.

  19. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4–6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome. PMID:28095497

  20. Inhibition of MDR1 gene expression and enhancing cellular uptake for effective colon cancer treatment using dual-surface–functionalized nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Mingzhen; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Yuchen; Wei, Na; Baker, Mark T.; Jung, Yunjin; Merlin, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine options for colon cancer therapy have been limited by the lack of suitable carriers capable of delivering sufficient drug into tumors to cause lethal toxicity. To circumvent this limitation, we fabricated a camptothecin (CPT)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle (NP) with dual-surface functionalization—Pluronic F127 and chitosan—for inhibiting multi-drug resistant gene 1 (MDR1) expression and enhancing tumor uptake. The resultant spherical NPs-P/C had a desirable particle size (~268 nm), slightly positive zeta-potential, and the ability to efficiently down-regulate the expression of MDR1. In vitro cytotoxicity tests revealed that the 24 and 48 h IC50 values of NPs-P/C1 were 2.03 and 0.67 µM, respectively, which were much lower than those for free CPT and other NPs. Interestingly, NPs-P/C1 showed the highest cellular uptake efficiency (approximately 85.5%) among the different drug formulations. Most importantly, treatment of colon tumor-bearing mice with various drug formulations confirmed that the introduction of Pluronic F127 and chitosan to the NP surface significantly enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of CPT, induced tumor cell apoptosis, and reduced systemic toxicity. Collectively, these findings suggest that our one-step–fabricated, dual-surface–functionalized NPs may hold promise as a readily scalable and effective drug carrier with clinical potential in colon cancer therapy. PMID:25701040

  1. La Autoantigen Induces Ribosome Binding Protein 1 (RRBP1) Expression through Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES)-Mediated Translation during Cellular Stress Condition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Li, Qi; Zhu, Ruiyu; Jin, Jian

    2016-07-20

    The function of ribosome binding protein 1 (RRBP1) is regulating the transportation and secretion of some intracellular proteins in mammalian cells. Transcription of RRBP1 is induced by various cytokines. However, few studies focused on the process of RRPB1 mRNA translation. The RRBP1 mRNA has a long 5' untranslated region that potentially formed a stable secondary structure. In this study, we show that the 5' UTR of RRBP1 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Moreover, the RRBP1 expression is induced by chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel or adriamycin in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and accompanied with the increased expression of La autoantigen (La), which binds to RRBP1 IRES element and facilitates translation initiation. Interestingly, we found IRES-mediated RRBP1 translation is also activated during serum-starvation condition which can induce cytoplasmic localization of La. After mapping the entire RRBP1 5' UTR, we determine the core IRES activity is located between nt-237 and -58. Furthermore, two apical GARR loops within the functional RRBP1 IRES elements may be important for La binding. These results strongly suggest an important role for IRES-dependent translation of RRBP1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells during cellular stress conditions.

  2. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Dembowski, Jill A; Dremel, Sarah E; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4-6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome.

  3. Cellular Effect of High Doses of Silica-Coated Quantum Dot Profiled with High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis and High Content Cellomics Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Stilwell, Jackie L.; Gerion, Daniele; Ding, Lianghao; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Cooke, Patrick A.; Gray, Joe W.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots (Qdots) are now used extensively for labeling in biomedical research, and this use is predicted to grow because of their many advantages over alternative labeling methods. Uncoated Qdots made of core/shell CdSe/ZnS are toxic to cells because of the release of Cd2+ ions into the cellular environment. This problem has been partially overcome by coating Qdots with polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), or other inert molecules. The most promising coating to date, for reducing toxicity, appears to be PEG. When PEG-coated silanized Qdots (PEG-silane-Qdots) are used to treat cells, toxicity is not observed, even at dosages above 10–20 nM, a concentration inducing death when cells are treated with polymer or mercaptoacid coated Qdots. Because of the importance of Qdots in current and future biomedical and clinical applications, we believe it is essential to more completely understand and verify this negative global response from cells treated with PEG-silane-Qdots. Consequently, we examined the molecular and cellular response of cells treated with two different dosages of PEG-silane-Qdots. Human fibroblasts were exposed to 8 and 80 nM of these Qdots, and both phenotypic as well as whole genome expression measurements were made. PEG-silane-Qdots did not induce any statistically significant cell cycle changes and minimal apoptosis/necrosis in lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) as measured by high content image analysis, regardless of the treatment dosage. A slight increase in apoptosis/necrosis was observed in treated human skin fibroblasts (HSF-42) at both the low and the high dosages. We performed genome-wide expression array analysis of HSF-42 exposed to doses 8 and 80 nM to link the global cell response to a molecular and genetic phenotype. We used a gene array containing ~22,000 total probe sets, containing 18,400 probe sets from known genes. Only ~50 genes (~0.2% of all the genes tested) exhibited a statistically significant change in expression level of greater

  4. Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Organs of Stramonita haemastoma: Protein Distribution and Gene Expression in Response to Thermal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Toni, Mattia; De Angelis, Federica; Bonaccorsi di Patti, Maria Carmela; Cioni, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is generated via the oxidation of l-arginine by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS) both in vertebrates and invertebrates. Three NOS isoforms, nNOS, iNOS and eNOS, are known in vertebrates, whereas a single NOS isoform is usually expressed in invertebrates, sharing structural and functional characteristics with nNOS or iNOS depending on the species. The present paper is focused on the constitutive Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nNOS recently sequenced by our group in the neogastropod Stramonita haemastoma (ShNOS). In this paper we provide new data on cellular distribution of ShNOS in the CNS (pedal ganglion) and peripheral organs (osphradium, tentacle, eye and foot) obtained by WB, IF, CM and NADPHd. Results demonstrated that NOS-like proteins are widely expressed in sensory receptor elements, neurons and epithelial cells. The detailed study of NOS distribution in peripheral and central neurons suggested that NOS is both intracellular and presynaptically located. Present findings confirm that NO may have a key role in the central neuronal circuits of gastropods and in sensory perception. The physiological relevance of NOS enzymes in the same organs was suggested by thermal stress experiments demonstrating that the constitutive expression of ShNOS is modulated in a time- and organ-dependent manner in response to environmental stressors. PMID:26528988

  5. The immunohistochemical expression profile of osteopontin in normal human tissues using two site-specific antibodies reveals a wide distribution of positive cells and extensive expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Kunii, Yasuto; Niwa, Shin-ichi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Masahiro; Seitoh, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Toshimitsu

    2009-09-01

    To elucidate the cellular distribution of osteopontin (OPN) in normal human tissues, we undertook immunohistochemistry using two site-specific OPN antibodies. The 10A16 monoclonal antibody was raised against the amino acid sequence just downstream of the thrombin cleavage site, while the O-17 polyclonal antibody was raised against the N-terminal peptide. Each antibody has been confirmed previously to react with both whole OPN and its relevant fragments. The expression pattern for these two antibodies was similar in distribution. In addition, we also identified expression in Ebner's gland, type II pneumocytes, Kupffer cells, cells of the endocrine organs, anterior lens capsule and ciliary body, synovial type A cells, mesothelia, adipocytes, and mast cells. Neurons and glia in the central nervous system and spinal cord, cranial and peripheral nerve sheaths, ganglion cells in the sympathetic ganglion, intestinal plexuses, retina, and choroid plexus also regularly exhibited OPN positivity. Testicular germ cells, pancreatic exocrine cells, and follicular dendritic cells reacted with 10A16 only, whereas lutein cells and taste bud cells exhibited O-17 reactivity alone. These minor differences were hypothesized to reflect the state of OPN in the cells; that is, whether OPN was in its whole molecule or fragmented form. In conclusion, we demonstrate that OPN is widely distributed in normal human cells, particularly those comprising the central and peripheral nervous systems.

  6. Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of cellular transcription NFκB (p65), AP-1 (c-Fos and c-Jun), and JAK/STAT in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciana Mota; Hirai, Kelly Emi; de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; de Souza, Juarez; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; Dias, Leonidas Braga; Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira; de Souza Aarão, Tinara Leila; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2015-05-01

    Leprosy is a disease whose clinical spectrum depends on the cytokine patterns produced during the early stages of the immune response. The main objective of this study was to describe the activation pattern of cellular transcription factors and to correlate these factors with the clinical forms of leprosy. Skin samples were obtained from 16 patients with the tuberculoid (TT) form and 14 with the lepromatous (LL) form. The histologic sections were immunostained with anti-c-Fos and anti-c-Jun monoclonal antibodies for investigation of AP-1, anti-NFκB p65 for the study of NFκB, and anti-JAK2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT4 for investigation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Cells expressing STAT1 were more frequent in the TT form than in LL lesions (P = .0096), in agreement with the protective immunity provided by IFN-γ. STAT4 was also more highly expressed in the TT form than in the LL form (P = .0098). This transcription factor is essential for the development of a Th1 response because it is associated with interleukin-12. NFκB (p65) and STAT4 expression in the TT form showed a strong and significant correlation (r = 0.7556 and P = .0007). A moderate and significant correlation was observed between JAK2 and STAT4 in the TT form (r = 0.6637 and P = .0051), with these factors responding to interleukin-12 in Th1 profiles. The results suggest that STAT1, JAK2, and NFκB, together with STAT4, contribute to the development of cell-mediated immunity, which is able to contain the proliferation of Mycobacterium leprae.

  7. The dopamine D2 receptor gene in lamprey, its expression in the striatum and cellular effects of D2 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Brita; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Ericsson, Jesper; Stephenson-Jones, Marcus; Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Bolam, J Paul; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Grillner, Sten

    2012-01-01

    All basal ganglia subnuclei have recently been identified in lampreys, the phylogenetically oldest group of vertebrates. Furthermore, the interconnectivity of these nuclei is similar to mammals and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (dopaminergic) fibers have been detected within the input layer, the striatum. Striatal processing is critically dependent on the interplay with the dopamine system, and we explore here whether D2 receptors are expressed in the lamprey striatum and their potential role. We have identified a cDNA encoding the dopamine D2 receptor from the lamprey brain and the deduced protein sequence showed close phylogenetic relationship with other vertebrate D2 receptors, and an almost 100% identity within the transmembrane domains containing the amino acids essential for dopamine binding. There was a strong and distinct expression of D2 receptor mRNA in a subpopulation of striatal neurons, and in the same region tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive synaptic terminals were identified at the ultrastructural level. The synaptic incidence of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive boutons was highest in a region ventrolateral to the compact layer of striatal neurons, a region where most striatal dendrites arborise. Application of a D2 receptor agonist modulates striatal neurons by causing a reduced spike discharge and a diminished post-inhibitory rebound. We conclude that the D2 receptor gene had already evolved in the earliest group of vertebrates, cyclostomes, when they diverged from the main vertebrate line of evolution (560 mya), and that it is expressed in striatum where it exerts similar cellular effects to that in other vertebrates. These results together with our previous published data (Stephenson-Jones et al. 2011, 2012) further emphasize the high degree of conservation of the basal ganglia, also with regard to the indirect loop, and its role as a basic mechanism for action selection in all vertebrates.

  8. Differential cellular gene expression in duck trachea infected with a highly or low pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Avian influenza A (AI) viruses of subtypes H5 can cause serious disease outbreaks in poultry including panzootic due to H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) viruses. These viruses are a threat not only for animal health but also public health due to their zoonotic potential. The domestic duck plays a major role in the epidemiological cycle of influenza virus subtypes H5 but little is known concerning host/pathogen interactions during influenza infection in duck species. In this study, a subtracted library from duck trachea (a primary site of influenza virus infection) was constructed to analyse and compare the host response after a highly or low pathogenic (LP) H5N1-infection. Results Here, we show that more than 200 different genes were differentially expressed in infected duck trachea to a significant degree. In addition, significant differentially expressed genes between LPAI- and HPAI-infected tracheas were observed. Gene ontology annotation was used and specific signalling pathways were identified. These pathways were different for LPAI and HPAI-infected tracheas, except for the CXCR4 signalling pathway which is implicated in immune response. A different modulation of genes in the CXCR4 signalling pathway and TRIM33 was induced in duck tracheas infected with a HPAI- or a LPAI-H5N1. Conclusion First, this study indicates that Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is an alternative approach to gain insights into the pathogenesis of influenza infection in ducks. Secondly, the results indicate that cellular gene expression in the duck trachea was differently modulated after infection with a LPAI-H5N1 or after infection with a HPAI-H5N1 virus. Such difference found in infected trachea, a primary infection site, could precede continuation of infection and could explain appearance of respiratory symptoms or not. PMID:24015922

  9. Mitigating effects of L-selenomethionine on low-dose iron ion radiation-induced changes in gene expression associated with cellular stress.

    PubMed

    Nuth, Manunya; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-07-01

    Ionizing radiation associated with highly energetic and charged heavy (HZE) particles poses a danger to astronauts during space travel. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the patterns of gene expression associated with cellular exposure to low-dose iron ion irradiation, in the presence and absence of L-selenomethionine (SeM). Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were exposed to low-dose iron ion (1 GeV/n) irradiation at 10 or 20 cGy with or without SeM pretreatment. The cells were harvested 6 and 16 h post-irradiation and analyzed by the Affymetrix U133Av2 gene chip arrays. Genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold expression cut-off and 5% false discovery rate (FDR) were considered statistically significant and subsequently analyzed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) for pathway analysis. Representative genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. Even at low doses of radiation from iron ions, global genome profiling of the irradiated cells revealed the upregulation of genes associated with the activation of stress-related signaling pathways (ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, p53 signaling, cell cycle and apoptosis), which occurred in a dose-dependent manner. A 24-h pretreatment with SeM was shown to reduce the radiation effects by mitigating stress-related signaling pathways and downregulating certain genes associated with cell adhesion. The mechanism by which SeM prevents radiation-induced transformation in vitro may involve the suppression of the expression of genes associated with stress-related signaling and certain cell adhesion events.

  10. Distributed Function Mining for Gene Expression Programming Based on Fast Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Song; Yue, Dong; Yang, Le-chan; Fu, Xiong; Feng, Ya-zhou

    2016-01-01

    For high-dimensional and massive data sets, traditional centralized gene expression programming (GEP) or improved algorithms lead to increased run-time and decreased prediction accuracy. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new improved algorithm called distributed function mining for gene expression programming based on fast reduction (DFMGEP-FR). In DFMGEP-FR, fast attribution reduction in binary search algorithms (FAR-BSA) is proposed to quickly find the optimal attribution set, and the function consistency replacement algorithm is given to solve integration of the local function model. Thorough comparative experiments for DFMGEP-FR, centralized GEP and the parallel gene expression programming algorithm based on simulated annealing (parallel GEPSA) are included in this paper. For the waveform, mushroom, connect-4 and musk datasets, the comparative results show that the average time-consumption of DFMGEP-FR drops by 89.09%%, 88.85%, 85.79% and 93.06%, respectively, in contrast to centralized GEP and by 12.5%, 8.42%, 9.62% and 13.75%, respectively, compared with parallel GEPSA. Six well-studied UCI test data sets demonstrate the efficiency and capability of our proposed DFMGEP-FR algorithm for distributed function mining. PMID:26751200

  11. Distributed Function Mining for Gene Expression Programming Based on Fast Reduction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Song; Yue, Dong; Yang, Le-chan; Fu, Xiong; Feng, Ya-zhou

    2016-01-01

    For high-dimensional and massive data sets, traditional centralized gene expression programming (GEP) or improved algorithms lead to increased run-time and decreased prediction accuracy. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new improved algorithm called distributed function mining for gene expression programming based on fast reduction (DFMGEP-FR). In DFMGEP-FR, fast attribution reduction in binary search algorithms (FAR-BSA) is proposed to quickly find the optimal attribution set, and the function consistency replacement algorithm is given to solve integration of the local function model. Thorough comparative experiments for DFMGEP-FR, centralized GEP and the parallel gene expression programming algorithm based on simulated annealing (parallel GEPSA) are included in this paper. For the waveform, mushroom, connect-4 and musk datasets, the comparative results show that the average time-consumption of DFMGEP-FR drops by 89.09%%, 88.85%, 85.79% and 93.06%, respectively, in contrast to centralized GEP and by 12.5%, 8.42%, 9.62% and 13.75%, respectively, compared with parallel GEPSA. Six well-studied UCI test data sets demonstrate the efficiency and capability of our proposed DFMGEP-FR algorithm for distributed function mining.

  12. Claudin-1, -2, -4, and -5: comparison of expression levels and distribution in equine tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonn; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Dong Oh; Ahn, Changhwan

    2016-01-01

    Claudins, which are known as transmembrane proteins play an essential role in tight junctions (TJs) to form physical barriers and regulate paracellular transportation. To understand equine diseases, it is helpful to measure the tissue-specific expression of TJs in horses. Major equine diseases such as colic and West Nile cause damage to TJs. In this study, the expression level and distribution of claudin-1, -2, -4, and -5 in eight tissues were assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry methods. Claudin-1 was primarily identified in the lung, duodenum, and uterus, claudin-2 was evenly observed in equine tissues, claudin-4 was abundantly detected in the liver, kidney and uterus, and claudin-5 was strongly expressed in the lung, duodenum, ovary, and uterus, as determined by Western blotting method. The localization of equine claudins was observed by immunohistochemistry methods. These findings provide knowledge regarding the expression patterns and localization of equine claudins, as well as valuable information to understand tight junction-related diseases according to tissue specificity and function of claudins in horses. PMID:27030194

  13. The distribution-based p-value for the outlier sum in differential gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin-An; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chan, Wenyaw

    2010-03-01

    Outlier sums were proposed by Tibshirani & Hastie (2007) and Wu (2007) for detecting outlier genes where only a small subset of disease samples shows unusually high gene expression, but they did not develop their distributional properties and formal statistical inference. In this study, a new outlier sum for detection of outlier genes is proposed, its asymptotic distribution theory is developed, and the p-value based on this outlier sum is formulated. Its analytic form is derived on the basis of the large-sample theory. We compare the proposed method with existing outlier sum methods by power comparisons. Our method is applied to DNA microarray data from samples of primary breast tumors examined by Huang et al. (2003). The results show that the proposed method is more efficient in detecting outlier genes.

  14. Expression and distribution of the duck enteritis virus UL51 protein in experimentally infected ducks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chanjuan; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Xu, Chao; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Dekang; Luo, Qihui; Cui, Hengmin; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Yin; Xu, Zhiwen; Chen, Zhengli; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    To determine the expression and distribution of tegument proteins encoded by duck enteritis virus (DEV) UL51 gene in tissues of experimentally infected ducks, for the first time, an immunoperoxidase staining method to detect UL51 protein (UL51p) in paraffin-embedded tissues is reported. A rabbit anti-UL51 polyclonal serum, raised against a recombinant 6-His-UL51 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, was prepared, purified, and used as primary antibodies. Fifty-eight 30-day-old DEV-free ducks were intramuscularly inoculated with the pathogenic DEV CHv strain as infection group, and two ducks were selected as preinfection group. The tissues were collected at sequential time points between 2 and 480 hr postinoculation (PI) and prepared for immunoperoxidase staining. DEV UL51p was first found in the spleen and liver at 8 hr PI; in the bursa of Fabricius and thymus at 12 hr PI; in the Harders glands, esophagus, small intestine (including the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), and large intestine (including the caecum and rectum) at 24 hr PI; in the glandularis ventriculus at 48 hr PI; and in the pancreas, cerebrum, kidney, lung, and myocardium at 72 hr PI. Throughout the infection process, the UL51p was not seen in the muscle. Furthermore, the intensity of positive staining of DEV UL51p antigen in various tissues increased sharply from 8 to 96 hr PI, peaked during 120-144 hr PI, and then decreased steadily from 216 to 480 hr PI, suggesting that the expressional levels of DEV UL51p in systemic organs have a close correlation with the progression of duck virus enteritis (DVE) disease. A number of DEV UL51p was distributed in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus, spleen, liver, esophagus, small intestine, and large intestine of DEV-infected ducks, whereas less DEV UL51p was distributed in the Harders glands, glandularis ventriculus, cerebrum, kidney, lung, pancreas, and myocardium of DEV-infected ducks. Moreover, DEV UL51p can be expressed in the cytoplasm of various types

  15. Tandem E2F Binding Sites in the Promoter of the p107 Cell Cycle Regulator Control p107 Expression and Its Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Deborah L.; Wirt, Stacey E.; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Kareta, Michael S.; Sage, Julien

    2010-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) is a potent and ubiquitously expressed cell cycle regulator, but patients with a germline Rb mutation develop a very specific tumor spectrum. This surprising observation raises the possibility that mechanisms that compensate for loss of Rb function are present or activated in many cell types. In particular, p107, a protein related to Rb, has been shown to functionally overlap for loss of Rb in several cellular contexts. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this functional redundancy between Rb and p107 in vivo, we used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to engineer point mutations in two consensus E2F binding sites in the endogenous p107 promoter. Analysis of normal and mutant cells by gene expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that members of the Rb and E2F families directly bound these two sites. Furthermore, we found that these two E2F sites controlled both the repression of p107 in quiescent cells and also its activation in cycling cells, as well as in Rb mutant cells. Cell cycle assays further indicated that activation of p107 transcription during S phase through the two E2F binding sites was critical for controlled cell cycle progression, uncovering a specific role for p107 to slow proliferation in mammalian cells. Direct transcriptional repression of p107 by Rb and E2F family members provides a molecular mechanism for a critical negative feedback loop during cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. These experiments also suggest novel therapeutic strategies to increase the p107 levels in tumor cells. PMID:20585628

  16. Basal Levels of eIF2α Phosphorylation Determine Cellular Antioxidant Status by Regulating ATF4 and xCT Expression*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lewerenz, Jan; Maher, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    eIF2α is part of a multimeric complex that regulates cap-dependent translation. Phosphorylation of eIF2α (phospho-eIF2α) is induced by various forms of cell stress, resulting in changes to the proteome of the cell with two diametrically opposed consequences, adaptation to stress or initiation of programmed cell death. In contrast to the robust eIF2α phosphorylation seen in response to acute insults, less is known about the functional role of basal levels of eIF2α phosphorylation. Here we show that mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing a nonphosphorylatable eIF2α have enhanced sensitivity to diverse toxic insults, including amyloid β-(1–42) peptide (Aβ), a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. This correlates with impaired glutathione metabolism because of down-regulation of the light chain, xCT, of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system X-c. The mechanistic link between the absence of phospho-eIF2α and xCT expression is nuclear factor ATF4. Consistent with these findings, long term activation of the phospho-eIF2α/ATF4/xCT signaling module by the specific eIF2α phosphatase inhibitor, salubrinal, induces resistance against oxidative glutamate toxicity in the hippocampal cell line HT22 and primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, in PC12 cells selected for resistance against Aβ, increased activity of the phospho-eIF2α/ATF4/xCT module contributes to the resistant phenotype. In wild-type PC12 cells, activation of this module by salubrinal ameliorates the response to Aβ. Furthermore, in human brains, ATF4 and phospho-eIF2α levels are tightly correlated and up-regulated in Alzheimer disease, most probably representing an adaptive response against disease-related cellular stress rather than a correlate of neurodegeneration. PMID:19017641

  17. Identification of cellular genes induced in human cells after activation of the OAS/RNaseL pathway by vaccinia virus recombinants expressing these antiviral enzymes.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Gil, Elena; González, José Manuel; Esteban, Mariano

    2010-03-01

    Interferon (IFN) type I induces the expression of antiviral proteins such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases (OAS). The enzyme OAS is activated by dsRNA to produce 5'-phosphorylated, 2-5-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A) that activate RNaseL which, in turn, triggers RNA breakdown, leading to multiple biological functions. Although RNaseL is required for IFN antiviral function, there are many aspects of the molecular mechanisms that remain obscure. Here, we have used microarray analyses from human HeLa cells infected with vaccinia virus (VACV) recombinants expressing OAS-RNaseL enzymes (referred as 2-5A system) with the aim to identify host genes that are up- or down-regulated in the course of infection by the activation of this antiviral pathway. We found that activation of the 2-5A system from VACV recombinants produces a remarkable stimulation of transcription for genes that regulate many cellular processes, like those that promote cell growth arrest, GADD45B and KCTD11, apoptosis as CUL2, PDCD6, and TNFAIP8L2, IFN-stimulated genes as IFI6, and related to tumor suppression as PLA2G2A. The 2-5A system activation produces down-regulation of transcription of some genes that promote cell growth as RUNX2 and ESR2 and of genes in charge to maintain mitochondria homeostasis as MIPEP and COX5A. These results reveal new genes induced in response to the activation of the 2-5A system with roles in apoptosis, translational control, cell growth arrest, and tumor suppression.

  18. Fluoxetine up-regulates expression of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein and inhibits LPS-induced apoptosis in hippocampus-derived neural stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, S.-H. . E-mail: shchiou@vghtpe.gov.tw; Chen, S.-J. . E-mail: sjchen@vghtpe.gov.tw; Peng, C-H.; Chang, Y.-L.; Ku, H.-H.; Hsu, W.-M.; Ho, Larry L.-T.; Lee, C.-H.

    2006-05-05

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant compound which inhibits the reuptake of serotonin in the central nervous system. Recent studies have shown that fluoxetine can promote neurogenesis and improve the survival rate of neurons. However, whether fluoxetine modulates the proliferation or neuroprotection effects of neural stem cells (NSCs) needs to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that 20 {mu}M fluoxetine can increase the cell proliferation of NSCs derived from the hippocampus of adult rats by MTT test. The up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in fluoxetine-treated NSCs was detected by real-time RT-PCR. Our results further showed that fluoxetine protects the lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in NSCs, in part, by activating the expression of c-FLIP. Moreover, c-FLIP induction by fluoxetine requires the activation of the c-FLIP promoter region spanning nucleotides -414 to -133, including CREB and SP1 sites. This effect appeared to involve the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent pathway. Furthermore, fluoxetine treatment significantly inhibited the induction of proinflammatory factor IL-1{beta}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha} in the culture medium of LPS-treated NSCs (p < 0.01). The results of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection further confirmed that fluoxentine increased the functional production of serotonin in NSCs. Together, these data demonstrate the specific activation of c-FLIP by fluoxetine and indicate the novel role of fluoxetine for neuroprotection in the treatment of depression.

  19. Syndecan-1 Acts as an Important Regulator of CXCL1 Expression and Cellular Interaction of Human Endometrial Stromal and Trophoblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Altergot-Ahmad, Olga; Pour, Sarah Jean; Krüssel, Jan-Steffen; Markert, Udo Rudolf; Fehm, Tanja Natascha; Bielfeld, Alexandra Petra

    2017-01-01

    Successful implantation of the embryo into the human receptive endometrium is substantial for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. This study focusses on the role of Syndecan-1 at the embryo-maternal interface, the multitasking coreceptor influencing ligand concentration, release and receptor presentation, and cellular morphology. CXC motif ligand 1, being involved in chemotaxis and angiogenesis during implantation, is of special interest as a ligand of Syndecan-1. Human endometrial stromal cells with and without Syndecan-1 knock-down were decidualized and treated with specific inhibitors to evaluate signaling pathways regulating CXC ligand 1 expression. Western blot analyses of MAPK and Wnt members were performed, followed by analysis of spheroid interactions between human endometrial cells and extravillous trophoblast cells. By mimicking embryo contact using IL-1β, we showed less ERK and c-Jun activation by depletion of Syndecan-1 and less Frizzled 4 production as part of the canonical Wnt pathway. Additionally, more beta-catenin was phosphorylated and therefore degraded after depletion of Syndecan-1. Secretion of CXC motif ligand 1 depends on MEK-1 with respect to Syndecan-1. Regarding the interaction of endometrial and trophoblast cells, the spheroid center-to-center distances were smaller after depletion of Syndecan-1. Therefore, Syndecan-1 seems to affect signaling processes relevant to signaling and intercellular interaction at the trophoblast-decidual interface. PMID:28293067

  20. Expression of the cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) protects Hodgkin's lymphoma cells from autonomous Fas-mediated death.

    PubMed

    Dutton, A; O'Neil, J D; Milner, A E; Reynolds, G M; Starczynski, J; Crocker, J; Young, L S; Murray, P G

    2004-04-27

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is characterized by the presence of malignant so-called Hodgkin's/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, which display resistance to certain apoptotic stimuli, including a lack of sensitivity to Fas-mediated cell death. However, the mechanisms responsible for their resistance to apoptosis inducers have not been elucidated. Here we confirm that both HL-derived cell lines and the HRS cells of primary HL tissues express Fas ligand (FasL) along with the inhibitory c-FLIP protein. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) through the use of specific small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs) leads to reduced viability of the L428 and L591 HL-derived cell lines. To determine whether endogenous FasL was responsible for the reduction in cell viability observed after down-regulation of c-FLIP, L428 and L591 cells were treated with c-FLIP-specific siRNAs with and without siRNAs directed to FasL. Treatment of these cells with both c-FLIP- and FasL-specific siRNAs in combination restored cell viability to near control levels. Our results provide a mechanism whereby HRS cells are protected from autonomous FasL-mediated cell death while preserving their ability to evade immunosurveillance. Targeting c-FLIP could provide a novel approach to the treatment of HL.