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Sample records for expression levels contribute

  1. Changes in localization and expression levels of Shroom2 and spectrin contribute to variation in amphibian egg pigmentation patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanjae; Le, Minh-Phuong; Cannatella, David; Wallingford, John B

    2009-06-01

    One contributing factor in the worldwide decline in amphibian populations is thought to be the exposure of eggs to UV light. Enrichment of pigment in the animal hemisphere of eggs laid in the sunlight defends against UV damage, but little is known about the cell biological mechanisms controlling such polarized pigment patterns. Even less is known about how such mechanisms were modified during evolution to achieve the array of amphibian egg pigment patterns. Here, we show that ectopic expression of the gamma-tubulin regulator, Shroom2, is sufficient to induce co-accumulation of pigment granules, spectrin, and dynactin in Xenopus blastomeres. Shroom2 and spectrin are enriched and co-localize specifically in the pigmented animal hemisphere of Xenopus eggs and blastulae. Moreover, Shroom2 messenger RNA (mRNA) is expressed maternally at high levels in Xenopus. In contrast to Xenopus, eggs and blastulae of Physalaemus pustulosus have very little surface pigmentation. Rather, we find that pigment is enriched in the perinuclear region of these embryos, where it co-localizes with spectrin. Moreover, maternal Shroom2 mRNA was barely detectable in Physaleamus, though zygotic levels were comparable to Xenopus. We therefore suggest that a Shroom2/spectrin/dynactin-based mechanism controls pigment localization in amphibian eggs and that variation in maternal Shroom2 mRNA levels accounts in part for variation in amphibian egg pigment patterns during evolution.

  2. Elevated salicylic acid levels conferred by increased expression of ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE 1 contribute to hyperaccumulation of SUMO1 conjugates in the Arabidopsis mutant early in short days 4.

    PubMed

    Villajuana-Bonequi, Mitzi; Elrouby, Nabil; Nordström, Karl; Griebel, Thomas; Bachmair, Andreas; Coupland, George

    2014-07-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is essential for plant growth and development. Mutations in the SUMO protease early in short days 4 (ESD4) cause hyperaccumulation of conjugates formed between SUMO and its substrates, and phenotypically are associated with extreme early flowering and impaired growth. We performed a suppressor mutagenesis screen of esd4 and identified a series of mutants called suppressor of esd4 (sed), which delay flowering, enhance growth and reduce hyperaccumulation of SUMO conjugates. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing indicated that one of these mutations (sed111) is in the gene salicylic acid induction-deficient 2 (SID2), which encodes ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE I, an enzyme required for biosynthesis of salicylic acid (SA). Analyses showed that compared with wild-type plants, esd4 contains higher levels of SID2 mRNA and about threefold more SA, whereas sed111 contains lower SA levels. Other sed mutants also contain lower SA levels but are not mutant for SID2, although most reduce SID2 mRNA levels. Therefore, higher SA levels contribute to the small size, early flowering and elevated SUMO conjugate levels of esd4. Our results support previous data indicating that SUMO homeostasis influences SA biosynthesis in wild-type plants, and also demonstrate that elevated levels of SA strongly increase the abundance of SUMO conjugates.

  3. Glacier Contributions to Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, A. S.; Cogley, J. G.; Moholdt, G.; Wouters, B.; Wiese, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Global mean sea level is rising in response to two primary factors: warming oceans and diminishing glaciers and ice sheets. If melted completely, glaciers would raise sea levels by half a meter, much less than that the 80 meters or so that would result from total melt of the massive Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. That is why glacier contributions to sea level rise have been less studied, allowing estimates of to vary widely. Glacier contributions to sea level change are challenging to quantify as they are broadly distributed, located in remote and poorly accessible high latitude and high altitude regions, and ground observations are sparse. Advances in satellite altimetry (ICESat) and gravimetry (GRACE) have helped, but they also have their own challenges and limitations. Here we present an updated (2003-2014) synthesis of multiple techniques adapted for varying regions to show that rates of glacier loss change little between the 2003-2009 and 2003-2014 periods, accounting for roughly one third of global mean sea level rise. Over the next century and beyond glaciers are expected to continue to contribute substantial volumes of water to the world's oceans, motivating continued study of how glaciers respond to climate change that will improve projections of future sea levels.

  4. Darwin's contributions to our understanding of emotional expressions.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Paul

    2009-12-12

    Darwin charted the field of emotional expressions with five major contributions. Possible explanations of why he was able to make such important and lasting contributions are proposed. A few of the important questions that he did not consider are described. Two of those questions have been answered at least in part; one remains a major gap in our understanding of emotion.

  5. Darwin's contributions to our understanding of emotional expressions

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Darwin charted the field of emotional expressions with five major contributions. Possible explanations of why he was able to make such important and lasting contributions are proposed. A few of the important questions that he did not consider are described. Two of those questions have been answered at least in part; one remains a major gap in our understanding of emotion. PMID:19884139

  6. Ongoing glacial isostatic contributions to observations of sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamisiea, Mark E.

    2011-09-01

    Studies determining the contribution of water fluxes to sea level rise typically remove the ongoing effects of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Unfortunately, use of inconsistent terminology between various disciplines has caused confusion as to how contributions from GIA should be removed from altimetry and GRACE measurements. In this paper, we review the physics of the GIA corrections applicable to these measurements and discuss the differing nomenclature between the GIA literature and other studies of sea level change. We then examine a range of estimates for the GIA contribution derived by varying the Earth and ice models employed in the prediction. We find, similar to early studies, that GIA produces a small (compared to the observed value) but systematic contribution to the altimetry estimates, with a maximum range of -0.15 to -0.5 mm yr-1. Moreover, we also find that the GIA contribution to the mass change measured by GRACE over the ocean is significant. In this regard, we demonstrate that confusion in nomenclature between the terms 'absolute sea level' and 'geoid' has led to an overestimation of this contribution in some previous studies. A component of this overestimation is the incorrect inclusion of the direct effect of the contemporaneous perturbations of the rotation vector, which leads to a factor of ˜two larger value of the degree two, order one spherical harmonic component of the model results. Aside from this confusion, uncertainties in Earth model structure and ice sheet history yield a spread of up to 1.4 mm yr-1 in the estimates of this contribution. However, even if the ice and Earth models were perfectly known, the processing techniques used in GRACE data analysis can introduce variations of up to 0.4 mm yr-1. Thus, we conclude that a single-valued 'GIA correction' is not appropriate for sea level studies based on gravity data; each study must estimate a bound on the GIA correction consistent with the adopted data-analysis scheme.

  7. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  8. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  9. Analysis of baseline gene expression levels from ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The use of gene expression profiling to predict chemical mode of action would be enhanced by better characterization of variance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis of microarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the control arm of toxicogenomics studies has yielded useful information on baseline fluctuations in gene expression. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Technical Committee on the Application of Genomics in Mechanism Based Risk Assessment in order to provide a public resource for assessments of variability in baseline gene expression. Data from over 500 Affymetrix microarrays from control rat liver and kidney were collected from 16 different institutions. Thirty-five biological and technical factors were obtained for each animal, describing a wide range of study characteristics, and a subset were evaluated in detail for their contribution to total variability using multivariate statistical and graphical techniques. The study factors that emerged as key sources of variability included gender, organ section, strain, and fasting state. These and other study factors were identified as key descriptors that should be included in the minimal information about a toxicogenomics study needed for interpretation of results by an independent source. Genes that are the most and least variable, gender-selectiv

  10. Contribution of small glaciers to global sea level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Observed long-term changes in glacier volume and hydrometeorological mass balance models yield data on the transfer of water from glaciers, excluding those in Greenland and Antarctica, to the oceans, The average observed volume change for the period 1900 to 1961 is scaled to a global average by use of the seasonal amplitude of the mass balance. These data are used to calibrate the models to estimate the changing contribution of glaciers to sea level for the period 1884 to 1975. Although the error band is large, these glaciers appear to accountfor a third to half of observed rise in sea level, approximately that fraction not explained by thermal expansion of the ocean.

  11. A Comparison of Artificial Subtle Expressions with Human-like Expressions on Expressing Confidence Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Takanori; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Yamada, Seiji; Funakoshi, Kotaro; Nakano, Mikio

    Expressing the confidence level of a system's suggestions by using speech sounds is an important cue to users of the system for perceiving how likely it is for the suggestions to be correct. We assume that expressing confidence levels by using human-like expressions would cause users to have a poorer impression of the systems than if artificial subtle expressions (ASEs) were used when the quality of the presented information does not match the expressed confidence level. We confirmed that this assumption was correct by conducting a psychological experiment.

  12. Contribution of Iceland's Ice Caps to Sea Level Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjornsson, H.; Gudmundsson, S.; Pálsson, F.; Magnusson, E.; Sigurdsson, O.; Johannesson, T.; Thorsteinsson, T.; Berthier, E.

    2011-12-01

    We report on the volume change of Icelandic ice caps during several time intervals from the 1980s until present. Changes in ice volume have been monitored by both annual mass balance measurements on the glaciers and by comparison of multi-temporal digital surface elevation models derived from various satellite and airborne remote observations. The glaciers' mass budgets have declined significantly, from being close to zero in the 1980s and early 1990s, to becoming on average negative by -0.7 to -1.8 m w.e. per year since the mid 1990s. This reduction in mass balance is related to rapid climate warming in Iceland, approx. 1.5 °C since the early 1980s. High mass balance sensitivities of -1 to -2 m w. e. per °C are identified. The current contribution of Icelandic ice caps to sea level change is estimated to be ~0.03 mm SLE per year. Icelandic ice caps contain in total approx. 3,600 cubic km of ice, which if melted would raise sea level by approx. 1 cm.

  13. Kidney fibroblast growth factor 23 does not contribute to elevation of its circulating levels in uremia.

    PubMed

    Mace, Maria L; Gravesen, Eva; Nordholm, Anders; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Secher, Thomas; Olgaard, Klaus; Lewin, Ewa

    2017-03-21

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) secreted by osteocytes is a circulating factor essential for phosphate homeostasis. High plasma FGF23 levels are associated with cardiovascular complications and mortality. Increases of plasma FGF23 in uremia antedate high levels of phosphate, suggesting a disrupted feedback regulatory loop or an extra-skeletal source of this phosphatonin. Since induction of FGF23 expression in injured organs has been reported we decided to examine the regulation of FGF23 gene and protein expressions in the kidney and whether kidney-derived FGF23 contributes to the high plasma levels of FGF23 in uremia. FGF23 mRNA was not detected in normal kidneys, but was clearly demonstrated in injured kidneys, already after four hours in obstructive nephropathy and at 8 weeks in the remnant kidney of 5/6 nephrectomized rats. No renal extraction was found in uremic rats in contrast to normal rats. Removal of the remnant kidney had no effect on plasma FGF23 levels. Well-known regulators of FGF23 expression in bone, such as parathyroid hormone, calcitriol, and inhibition of the FGF receptor by PD173074, had no impact on kidney expression of FGF23. Thus, the only direct contribution of the injured kidney to circulating FGF23 levels in uremia appears to be reduced renal extraction of bone-derived FGF23. Kidney-derived FGF23 does not generate high plasma FGF23 levels in uremia and is regulated differently than the corresponding regulation of FGF23 gene expression in bone.

  14. Contribution of network connectivity in determining the relationship between gene expression and metabolite concentration changes.

    PubMed

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Sheridan, Steven; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-04-01

    One of the primary mechanisms through which a cell exerts control over its metabolic state is by modulating expression levels of its enzyme-coding genes. However, the changes at the level of enzyme expression allow only indirect control over metabolite levels, for two main reasons. First, at the level of individual reactions, metabolite levels are non-linearly dependent on enzyme abundances as per the reaction kinetics mechanisms. Secondly, specific metabolite pools are tightly interlinked with the rest of the metabolic network through their production and consumption reactions. While the role of reaction kinetics in metabolite concentration control is well studied at the level of individual reactions, the contribution of network connectivity has remained relatively unclear. Here we report a modeling framework that integrates both reaction kinetics and network connectivity constraints for describing the interplay between metabolite concentrations and mRNA levels. We used this framework to investigate correlations between the gene expression and the metabolite concentration changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during its metabolic cycle, as well as in response to three fundamentally different biological perturbations, namely gene knockout, nutrient shock and nutrient change. While the kinetic constraints applied at the level of individual reactions were found to be poor descriptors of the mRNA-metabolite relationship, their use in the context of the network enabled us to correlate changes in the expression of enzyme-coding genes to the alterations in metabolite levels. Our results highlight the key contribution of metabolic network connectivity in mediating cellular control over metabolite levels, and have implications towards bridging the gap between genotype and metabolic phenotype.

  15. 5' and 3' untranslated regions contribute to the differential expression of specific HLA-A alleles.

    PubMed

    René, Céline; Lozano, Claire; Villalba, Martin; Eliaou, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), when no HLA full-matched donor is available, alternative donors could include one HLA-mismatched donor. Recently, the low expressed HLA-C alleles have been identified as permissive mismatches for the best donor choice. Concerning HLA-A, the degree of variability of expression is poorly understood. Here, we evaluated HLA-A expression in healthy individuals carrying HLA-A*02 allele in different genotypes using flow cytometry and allele-specific quantitative RT-PCR. While an interindividual variability of HLA-A*02 cell surface expression, not due to the allele associated, was observed, no difference of the mRNA expression level was shown, suggesting the involvement of the posttranscriptional regulation. The results of qRT-PCR analyses exhibit a differential expression of HLA-A alleles with HLA-A*02 as the strongest expressed allele independently of the second allele. The associated non-HLA-A*02 alleles were differentially expressed, particularly the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles (strong expression) and the HLA-A*29 (low expression). The presence of specific polymorphisms in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the HLA-A*31 and HLA-A*33 alleles could contribute to this high level of expression. As previously described for HLA-C, low-expressed HLA-A alleles, such as HLA-A*29, could be considered as a permissive mismatch, although this needs to be confirmed by clinical studies.

  16. Anomalies Thermosteric and Halosteric Contributions to Sea Level Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, C. E.; Polito, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level anomaly (SLA) is an important indicator of changes in the Earth's climate system because the oceans have great heat storage capacity. The sea level variation is due to combination of thermosteric and halosteric effects. These two effects play significant roles in the annual cycle of the SLA and maintain the thermohaline circulation. Previous studies only considered the thermosteric effect. The main goal of this study was to determine the regions of the global ocean where the variability induced by halosteric effect is equal or higher than that induced by thermosteric effect. We used temperature and salinity data from World Ocean Atlas 2013 (WOA13) with spatial resolution of 1°x1° during the period of 1955 to 2012 to calculate the coefficient of thermal expansion (α), haline contraction (β) and to estimate their contributions to the SLA variation in the global ocean. Our results showed that the thermosteric effect is dominant in the tropical and subtropical regions due to high insolation throughout the year. However, in polar regions, North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans the halosteric effect was the main contributor to SLA variation. In polar regions, the effect occurs because of the lack in temperature variation and the fact that in this region the precipitation rate exceeds evaporation increasing the freshwater input. In the others, the mechanism is still unknown. The linear trend of thermosteric and halosteric components for 1955-2012 is 0.35mm/yr and 0.07mm/yr, respectively. This results shows that halosteric effect should be considered in the heat storage estimation from satellite data, in situ data and numerical modelling contrasting the previous approaches to SLA.

  17. Sea level rise Contribution from High Mountain Asia by 20150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyun; Moore, John; Ding, Ran

    2015-04-01

    We estimate individual area and volume change by 2050 of all 83,460 glaciers of high mountain Asia (HMA), with a total area of 118,263 km2, delineated in the Randolph Glacier Inventory version 4.0 which separates glacier complexes in its previous version into individual glaciers. We used the 25 km resolution regional climate model RegCM 3.0 temperature and precipitation change projections forced by the IPCC A1B scenario. Glacier simulations were based on a novel surface mass balance-altitude parameterization fitted to observational data, and various volume-area scaling approaches using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission surface topography of each individual glacier. We generate mass balance-altitude relations for all the glaciers by region using nearest available glacier measurements. Two method are used to model the Equilibrium line altitude (ELA) variation. One is to use ELA sensitivities to temperature and precipitation change vary by region based on the relative importance of sublimation and melting processes. The other is solved ELA implicitly for every year using the temperature at ELA and Degree Day model. We project total glacier area loss in high mountain Asia in 2050 to be 22% of their extent in 2000, and they will contribute 5-8 mm to global sea level rise.

  18. Maternal mortality in rural Gambia: levels, causes and contributing factors.

    PubMed Central

    Walraven, G.; Telfer, M.; Rowley, J.; Ronsmans, C.

    2000-01-01

    A demographic study carried out in a rural area of the Gambia between January 1993 and December 1998 recorded 74 deaths among women aged 15-49 years. Reported here is an estimation of maternal mortality among these 74 deaths based on a survey of reproductive age mortality, which identified 18 maternal deaths by verbal autopsy. Over the same period there were 4245 live births in the study area, giving a maternal mortality ratio of 424 per 100,000 live births. This maternal mortality estimate is substantially lower than estimates made in the 1980s, which ranged from 1005 to 2362 per 100,000 live births, in the same area. A total of 9 of the 18 deaths had a direct obstetric cause--haemorrhage (6 deaths), early pregnancy (2), and obstructed labour (1). Indirect causes of obstetric deaths were anaemia (4 deaths), hepatitis (1), and undetermined (4). Low standards of health care for obstetric referrals, failure to recognize the severity of the problem at the community level, delays in starting the decision-making process to seek health care, lack of transport, and substandard primary health care were identified more than once as probable or possible contributing factors to these maternal deaths. PMID:10859854

  19. Constraining the Antarctic contribution to interglacial sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, T.; Mckay, R. M.; Barrett, P. J.; Levy, R. H.; Golledge, N. R.; Deconto, R. M.; Horgan, H. J.; Dunbar, G. B.

    2015-12-01

    Observations, models and paleoclimate reconstructions suggest that Antarctica's marine-based ice sheets behave in an unstable manner with episodes of rapid retreat in response to warming climate. Understanding the processes involved in this "marine ice sheet instability" is key for improving estimates of Antarctic ice sheet contribution to future sea-level rise. Another motivating factor is that far-field sea-level reconstructions and ice sheet models imply global mean sea level (GMSL) was up to 20m and 10m higher, respectively, compared with present day, during the interglacials of the warm Pliocene (~4-3Ma) and Late Pleistocene (at ~400ka and 125ka). This was when atmospheric CO2 was between 280 and 400ppm and global average surface temperatures were 1- 3°C warmer, suggesting polar ice sheets are highly sensitive to relatively modest increases in climate forcing. Such magnitudes of GMSL rise not only require near complete melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but a substantial retreat of marine-based sectors of East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Recent geological drilling initiatives on the continental margin of Antarctica from both ship- (e.g. IODP; International Ocean Discovery Program) and ice-based (e.g. ANDRILL/Antarctic Geological Drilling) platforms have provided evidence supporting retreat of marine-based ice. However, without direct access through the ice sheet to archives preserved within sub-glacial sedimentary basins, the volume and extent of ice sheet retreat during past interglacials cannot be directly constrained. Sediment cores have been successfully recovered from beneath ice shelves by the ANDRILL Program and ice streams by the WISSARD (Whillans Ice Stream Sub-glacial Access Research Drilling) Project. Together with the potential of the new RAID (Rapid Access Ice Drill) initiative, these demonstrate the technological feasibility of accessing the subglacial bed and deeper sedimentary archives. In this talk I will outline the

  20. Contribution of vascular pathology to the clinical expression of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Strozyk, Dorothea; Dickson, Dennis W.; Lipton, Richard B.; Katz, Mindy; Derby, Carol A.; Lee, Sunhee; Wang, Cuiling; Verghese, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Vascular lesions in the brain are common with advancing age; however, the independent and cumulative contributions of postmortem vascular lesions to antemortem cognitive status are not well established. We examined association of six vascular lesions (large infarcts, lacunar infarcts, leukoencephalopathy, microinfarcts, cribriform changes, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) with antemortem diagnoses of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) in 190 older adults from an autopsy series. We also developed a summary score based on three macroscopic vascular lesions: large infarcts (0, 1, and≥2), lacunar infarcts (0, 1, and≥2), and leukoencephalopathy (none, mild, and moderate-to-severe). Sixty-eight percent of cases had vascular lesions. Only leukoencephalopathy was associated with dementia (odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% CI 1.0–12.4), and only large infarcts were associated with VaD (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.2–15.4). The vascular score was associated with dementia (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.3), AD (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0–2.1) and VaD (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4–3.0). Leukoencephalopathy, large infarcts, and higher vascular burden is associated with the clinical expression of dementia and subtypes. PMID:18996621

  1. Aquaporin-4 expression contributes to decreases in brain water content during mouse postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumiao; Gao, Junying; Ding, Jiong; Hu, Gang; Xiao, Ming

    2013-05-01

    The water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is implicated to facilitate water efflux from the brain parenchyma into the blood and CSF, playing a critical role in maintaining brain water homeostasis. Nevertheless, its contribution to decreases in brain water content during postnatal development remains unknown. A quantitative Western blot analysis was performed to investigate developmental expression of AQP4 in the whole mouse brain and showed that AQP4 expression level in 1 week-old brain was only 21.3% of that in the adult brain, but significantly increased to 67.4% of the adult level by 2 weeks after birth. Statistical analysis demonstrated that increased AQP4 expression partially relates to decreased brain water content in postnatal mice (r(2)=0.92 and P=0.002). Moreover, AQP4 null mice had greater brain water content than littermate controls from 2 weeks up to adult age. Consistently, mature pattern of AQP4 localization at the brain-blood and brain-CSF interfaces were completed at approximately at 2 weeks after birth. In addition, AQP4 expression in the brain stem and hypothalamus was earlier than that in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, suggesting a brain regional variation in developmental expression of AQP4. These results characterize the developmental feature of AQP4 expression in the postnatal brain and provide direct evidence for a role of AQP4 in postnatal brain water uptake.

  2. Fashioning the Face: Sensorimotor Simulation Contributes to Facial Expression Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wood, Adrienne; Rychlowska, Magdalena; Korb, Sebastian; Niedenthal, Paula

    2016-03-01

    When we observe a facial expression of emotion, we often mimic it. This automatic mimicry reflects underlying sensorimotor simulation that supports accurate emotion recognition. Why this is so is becoming more obvious: emotions are patterns of expressive, behavioral, physiological, and subjective feeling responses. Activation of one component can therefore automatically activate other components. When people simulate a perceived facial expression, they partially activate the corresponding emotional state in themselves, which provides a basis for inferring the underlying emotion of the expresser. We integrate recent evidence in favor of a role for sensorimotor simulation in emotion recognition. We then connect this account to a domain-general understanding of how sensory information from multiple modalities is integrated to generate perceptual predictions in the brain.

  3. Ice loss and sea level rise contribution from Alaskan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, E.; Schiefer, E.; Clarke, G. K.; Menounos, B.; Rémy, F.; Cazenave, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Over the last 50 years, retreating glaciers and ice caps (GIC) contributed 0.5 mm/yr to SLR, and one third is believed to originate from ice masses bordering the Gulf of Alaska. However, these estimates of ice wastage in Alaska are based on methods that directly measure mass changes from a limited number of glaciers and extrapolate the results to estimate ice loss for the many thousands of others. Here, using a new glacier inventory with elevation changes derived from sequential digital elevation models (DEMs), we found that, between 1962 and 2006, Alaskan glaciers lost 41.9 ± 8.6 km**3/yr water equivalent (w.e.) and contributed 0.12 ± 0.02 mm/yr to SLR. Our ice loss is 34% lower than previous estimates. Reasons for our lower values include the higher spatial resolution of the glacier inventory used in our study and the complex pattern of ice elevation changes at the scale of individual glaciers and mountain ranges which was not resolved in earlier work. Our ice elevation changes reveal that glacier dynamics (surges, phase of the tidewater cycle, etc...) have a profound effect on the wastage of Alaska glaciers. 3D satellite view of Columbia glacier, Chugach Mountains, Alaska. (Copyright CNES 2007, Distribution Spot Image, processing E. Berthier CNRS)

  4. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  5. Math Anxiety--Contributing School and Individual Level Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radišic, Jelena; Videnovic, Marina; Baucal, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    PISA 2003 survey data indicate high levels of mathematics anxiety among students in Serbia. More than a half of Serbian students are concerned with whether they will have difficulties in a mathematics class or earn poor marks. At the same time, the achievement on the mathematical literacy scale is very poor. Building on control-value theory, the…

  6. CD36 expression contributes to age induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiac remodeling and impaired cardiac performance in the elderly significantly increase the risk of developing heart disease. Although vascular abnormalities associated with aging contribute to the age-related decline in cardiac function, myocardium-specific events may also be involved. We show th...

  7. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly ‘housekeeping’, whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research. PMID:24670764

  8. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J; Meehan, Terrence F; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A; Ishizu, Yuri; Young, Robert S; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M; Arakawa, Takahiro; Archer, John A C; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Rennie, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S B; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Favorov, Alexander V; Fisher, Malcolm E; Frith, Martin C; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furino, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Gibson, Andrew P; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Hofmann, Oliver M; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Furni; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S; Kenna, Tony J; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S Peter; Knox, Alan J; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; de Lima Morais, David A; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Noma, Shohei; Noazaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohimiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G D; Rackham, Owen J L; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaai; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Naoko; Swoboda, Rolf K; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyodo, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Elvind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M; Verado, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A; Winteringham, Louise N; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Susan E; Zhang, Peter G; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B; Taylor, Martin S; Makeev, Vsevolod J; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-03-27

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly 'housekeeping', whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research.

  9. Chronic inflammation contributes to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma by decreasing miR-122 levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changfei; Deng, Mengmeng; Hu, Jun; Li, Xin; Chen, Lizhao; Ju, Ying; Hao, Junli; Meng, Songdong

    2016-01-01

    Persistent inflammation in chronic hepatitis plays a major role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, the major inflammatory cytokines expressed in chronic hepatitis, IL-6 and TNF-α, induced a marked decrease in microRNA-122 (miR-122) levels, and miR-122 expression was downregulated in the livers of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. The decrease of miR-122 caused upregulation of the proinflammatory chemokine CCL2. IL-6 and TNF-α suppressed miR-122 both by directly downregulating the transcription factor C/EBPα and indirectly upregulating c-myc, which blocks C/EBPα-mediated miR-122 transcription. In addition, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were elevated and miR-122 levels were decreased in mouse and rat models of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. Restoration of miR-122 levels through delivery of agomir-122 suppressed DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. Our results show that inflammation-induced miR-122 downregulation in hepatitis contributes to carcinogenesis and suggest that increasing miR-122 may be an effective strategy for preventing HCC development in CHB patients. PMID:26933995

  10. Changes in 24-nt siRNA levels in Arabidopsis hybrids suggest an epigenetic contribution to hybrid vigor.

    PubMed

    Groszmann, Michael; Greaves, Ian K; Albertyn, Zayed I; Scofield, Graham N; Peacock, William J; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2011-02-08

    Intraspecific hybrids between the Arabidopsis thaliana accessions C24 and Landsberg erecta have strong heterosis. The reciprocal hybrids show a decreased level of 24-nt small RNA (sRNA) relative to the parents with the decrease greatest for those loci where the parents had markedly different 24-nt sRNA levels. The genomic regions with reduced 24-nt sRNA levels were largely associated with genes and their flanking regions indicating a potential effect on gene expression. We identified several examples of genes with altered 24-nt sRNA levels that showed correlated changes in DNA methylation and expression levels. We suggest that such epigenetically generated differences in gene activity may contribute to hybrid vigor and that the epigenetic diversity between ecotypes provides increased allelic (epi-allelic) variability that could contribute to heterosis.

  11. Separating Mechanical and Chemical Contributions to Molecular-Level Friction

    SciTech Connect

    KIM,HYUN I.; HOUSTON,JACK E.

    2000-08-14

    The authors use force-probe microscopy to study the friction force and the adhesive interaction for molecular monolayer self-assembled on both Au probe tips and substrate surfaces. By systematically varying the chemical nature of the end groups on these monolayers the authors have, for the first time, delineated the mechanical and chemical origins of molecular-level friction. They use chemically inert {double_bond}CH{sub 3} groups on both interracial surfaces to establish the purely mechanical component of the friction and contrast the results with the findings for chemically active {double_bond}COOH end-groups. In addition, by using odd or even numbers of methylene groups in the alkyl backbones of the molecules they are able to determine the levels of inter-film and intra-film hydrogen bonding.

  12. Groundwater depletion's contribution to sea level rise increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-11-01

    Since the turn of the twentieth century, industrial-scale redistribution of water from landlocked aquifers to the ocean has driven up the global average sea level by more than 12 centimeters. Between 1900 and 2008, roughly 4500 cubic kilometers of water was drawn from the ground, largely to feed an agricultural system increasingly reliant on irrigation. Of that 4500-cubic-kilometer total (nearly the volume of Lake Michigan), 1100 cubic kilometers were pumped out between 2000 and 2008 alone. This early-21st-century groundwater depletion was responsible for raising global sea level at a rate of 0.4 millimeter per year, an eighth of the observed total. These updated values, falling near the middle of the range of previous estimates, are the product of an investigation by Konikow that drew together a variety of volumetric measurements of groundwater storage.

  13. Facial Expressions in Context: Contributions to Infant Emotion Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camras, Linda A.

    To make the point that infant emotions are more dynamic than suggested by Differential Emotions Theory, which maintains that infants show the same prototypical facial expressions for emotions as adults do, this paper explores two questions: (1) when infants experience an emotion, do they always show the corresponding prototypical facial…

  14. Downregulation of MicroRNA-152 contributes to high expression of DKK1 in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinyin; Chen, Bingda; George, Suraj K; Liu, Beizhong

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) induced bone lesion is one of the most crippling characteristics, and the MM secreted Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) has been reported to play important role in this pathologic process. However, the underlying regulation mechanisms involved in DKK1 expression are still unclear. In this study, we validated the expression patterns of microRNA (miR) 15a, 34a, 152, and 223 in MM cells and identified that miR-152 was significantly downregulated in the MM group compared with the non-MM group, and that miR-152 level was negatively correlated with the expression of DKK1 in the MM cells. Mechanistic studies showed that manipulating miR-152 artificially in MM cells led to changes in DKK-1 expression, and miR-152 blocked DKK1 transcriptional activity by binding to the 3'UTR of DKK1 mRNA. Importantly, we revealed that MM cells stably expressing miR-152 improved the chemotherapy sensitivity, and counteracted the bone disruption in an intrabone-MM mouse model. Our study contributes better understanding of the regulation mechanism of DKK-1 in MM, and opens up the potential for developing newer therapeutic strategies in the MM treatment.

  15. Hypoxia upregulates HIG2 expression and contributes to bevacizumab resistance in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Liang; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Li, Zi-chao; Mi, Chen; Tian, Jing-yang; Hou, Guang-dong; Miao, Si-yu; Song, Zi-xuan; Li, Jin-cheng; Xue, Xiao-yan

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia contributes to the maintenance of stem-like cells in glioblastoma (GBM), and activates vascular mimicry and tumor resistance to anti-angiogenesis treatments. The present study examined the expression patterns and biological significance of hypoxia-inducible protein 2 (HIG2, also known as HILPDA) in GBM. HIG2 was highly expressed in gliomas and was correlated with tumor grade, and high HIG2 expression independently predicted poor GBM patient prognosis. HIG2 was upregulated during hypoxia and by hypoxia mimics, and HIG2 knockdown in GBM cells inhibited cell proliferation and invasion. HIF1α bound to the HIG2 promoter and increased its expression in GBM cells, and HIG2 upregulated HIF1α expression. Reconstruction of a HIG2-related molecular network using bioinformatics methods revealed that HIG2 is closely correlated with angiogenesis genes, such as VEGFA, in GBM. HIG2 levels positively correlated with VEGFA in GBM samples. In addition, treatment of transplanted xenograft nude mice with bevacizumab (anti-angiogenesis therapy) resulted in HIG2 upregulation at late stages. We conclude that HIG2 is overexpressed in GBM and upregulated by hypoxia, and is a potential novel therapeutic target. HIG2 overexpression is an independent prognostic indicator and may promote tumor resistance to anti-angiogenesis treatments. PMID:27329597

  16. Vestibular contributions to high-level sensorimotor functions.

    PubMed

    Medendorp, W Pieter; Selen, Luc J P

    2017-02-02

    The vestibular system, which detects motion and orientation of the head in space, is known to be important in controlling gaze to stabilize vision, to ensure postural stability and to provide our sense of self-motion. While the brain's computations underlying these functions are extensively studied, the role of the vestibular system in higher level sensorimotor functions is less clear. This review covers new research on the vestibular influence on perceptual judgments, motor decisions, and the ability to learn multiple motor actions. Guided by concepts such as optimization, inference, estimation and control, we focus on how the brain determines causal relationships between memorized and visual representations in the updating of visual space, and how vestibular, visual and efferent motor information are integrated in the estimation of body motion. We also discuss evidence that these computations involve multiple coordinate representations, some of which can be probed in parietal cortex using neuronal oscillations derived from EEG. In addition, we describe work on decision making during self-motion, showing a clear modulation of bottom-up acceleration signals on decisions in the saccadic system. Finally, we consider the importance of vestibular signals as contextual cues in motor learning and recall. Taken together, these results emphasize the impact of vestibular information on high-level sensorimotor functions, and identify future directions for theoretical, behavioral, and neurophysiological investigations.

  17. Soy protein isolate molecular level contributions to bulk adhesive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Jeanne Norton

    Increasing environmental awareness and the recognized health hazards of formaldehyde-based resins has prompted a strong demand for environmentally-responsible adhesives for wood composites. Soy protein-based adhesives have been shown to be commercially viable with 90-day shelf stability and composite physical properties comparable to those of commercial formaldehyde-based particleboards. The main research focus is to isolate and characterize the molecular level features in soy protein isolate responsible for providing mechanical properties, storage stability, and water resistance during adhesive formulation, processing, and wood composite fabrication. Commercial composite board will be reviewed to enhance our understanding of the individual components and processes required for particleboard production. The levels of protein structure will be defined and an overview of current bio-based technology will be presented. In the process, the logic for utilizing soy protein as a sole binder in the adhesive will be reinforced. Variables such as adhesive components, pH, divalent ions, blend aging, protein molecular weight, formulation solids content, and soy protein functionalization will relate the bulk properties of soy protein adhesives to the molecular configuration of the soybean protein. This work has demonstrated that when intermolecular beta-sheet interactions and protein long-range order is disrupted, viscosity and mechanical properties decrease. Storage stability can be maintained through the stabilization of intermolecular beta-sheet interactions. When molecular weight is reduced through enzymatic digestion, long-range order is disrupted and viscosity and mechanical properties decrease accordingly. Processibility and physical properties must be balanced to increase solids while maintaining low viscosity, desirable mechanical properties, and adequate storage stability. The structure of the soybean protein must be related to the particleboard bulk mechanical

  18. Emotional expression in music: contribution, linearity, and additivity of primary musical cues.

    PubMed

    Eerola, Tuomas; Friberg, Anders; Bresin, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to manipulate musical cues systematically to determine the aspects of music that contribute to emotional expression, and whether these cues operate in additive or interactive fashion, and whether the cue levels can be characterized as linear or non-linear. An optimized factorial design was used with six primary musical cues (mode, tempo, dynamics, articulation, timbre, and register) across four different music examples. Listeners rated 200 musical examples according to four perceived emotional characters (happy, sad, peaceful, and scary). The results exhibited robust effects for all cues and the ranked importance of these was established by multiple regression. The most important cue was mode followed by tempo, register, dynamics, articulation, and timbre, although the ranking varied across the emotions. The second main result suggested that most cue levels contributed to the emotions in a linear fashion, explaining 77-89% of variance in ratings. Quadratic encoding of cues did lead to minor but significant increases of the models (0-8%). Finally, the interactions between the cues were non-existent suggesting that the cues operate mostly in an additive fashion, corroborating recent findings on emotional expression in music (Juslin and Lindström, 2010).

  19. Emotional expression in music: contribution, linearity, and additivity of primary musical cues

    PubMed Central

    Eerola, Tuomas; Friberg, Anders; Bresin, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to manipulate musical cues systematically to determine the aspects of music that contribute to emotional expression, and whether these cues operate in additive or interactive fashion, and whether the cue levels can be characterized as linear or non-linear. An optimized factorial design was used with six primary musical cues (mode, tempo, dynamics, articulation, timbre, and register) across four different music examples. Listeners rated 200 musical examples according to four perceived emotional characters (happy, sad, peaceful, and scary). The results exhibited robust effects for all cues and the ranked importance of these was established by multiple regression. The most important cue was mode followed by tempo, register, dynamics, articulation, and timbre, although the ranking varied across the emotions. The second main result suggested that most cue levels contributed to the emotions in a linear fashion, explaining 77–89% of variance in ratings. Quadratic encoding of cues did lead to minor but significant increases of the models (0–8%). Finally, the interactions between the cues were non-existent suggesting that the cues operate mostly in an additive fashion, corroborating recent findings on emotional expression in music (Juslin and Lindström, 2010). PMID:23908642

  20. Tissue factor contributes to neutrophil CD11b expression in alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Luyendyk, James P.; Flanagan, Kevin C.; Williams, C. David; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Slusser, Joyce G.; Mackman, Nigel

    2011-02-01

    Cholestatic liver injury induced by alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) is provoked by injury to intrahepatic bile ducts and the progression of hepatic necrosis requires the procoagulant protein tissue factor (TF) and extrahepatic cells including neutrophils. Recent studies have shown that myeloid cell TF contributes to neutrophil activation. We tested the hypothesis that myeloid cell TF contributes to neutrophil activation in ANIT-treated mice. TF activity in liver homogenates increased significantly in TF{sup flox/flox} mice treated with ANIT, but not in TF{sup flox/flox}/LysMCre mice (TF{sup {Delta}Myeloid} mice), which have reduced TF expression in monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils. Myeloid cell-specific TF deficiency did not alter expression of the chemokines KC or MIP-2 but reduced hepatic neutrophil accumulation in ANIT-treated mice at 48 h as indicated by tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Myeloid cell TF deficiency significantly reduced CD11b expression by blood neutrophils in ANIT-treated mice, and this was associated with reduced plasma MPO protein levels, an index of neutrophil degranulation. However, myeloid cell-specific TF deficiency had no effect on ANIT-induced coagulation cascade activation. The increase in serum ALT and ALP activities in ANIT-treated mice was reduced by myeloid cell TF deficiency (p < 0.05), but the myeloid cell TF deficiency did not reduce hepatic necrosis at 48 h, as determined by histopathology and morphometry. The results suggest that myeloid cell TF contributes to neutrophil CD11b expression during cholestasis by a coagulation-independent pathway. However, the resultant reduction in neutrophil accumulation/activation is insufficient to substantially reduce ANIT hepatotoxicity, suggesting that myeloid cell TF is only one of many factors modulating hepatic necrosis during cholestasis. - Research Highlights: > Myeloid cell tissue factor contributes to liver procoagulant activity during acute cholestasis. > ANIT

  1. Nuclear Compartmentalization Contributes to Stage-Specific Gene Expression Control in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pastro, Lucía; Smircich, Pablo; Di Paolo, Andrés; Becco, Lorena; Duhagon, María A.; Sotelo-Silveira, José; Garat, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, as in other trypanosomatids, transcription of protein coding genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, producing large polycistronic transcription units. These units are composed of non-functionally related genes which are pervasively processed to yield each mRNA. Therefore, post-transcriptional processes are crucial to regulate gene expression. Considering that nuclear compartmentalization could contribute to gene expression regulation, we comparatively studied the nuclear, cytoplasmic and whole cell transcriptomes of the non-infective epimastigote stage of T. cruzi, using RNA-Seq. We found that the cytoplasmic transcriptome tightly correlates with the whole cell transcriptome and both equally correlate with the proteome. Nonetheless, 1,200 transcripts showed differential abundance between the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. For the genes with transcript content augmented in the nucleus, significant structural and compositional differences were found. The analysis of the reported epimastigote translatome and proteome, revealed scarce ribosome footprints and encoded proteins for them. Ontology analyses unveiled that many of these genes are distinctive of other parasite life-cycle stages. Finally, the relocalization of transcript abundance in the metacyclic trypomastigote infective stage was confirmed for specific genes. While gene expression is strongly dependent on transcript steady-state level, we here highlight the importance of the distribution of transcripts abundance between compartments in T. cruzi. Particularly, we show that nuclear compartmentation is playing an active role in the developmental stage determination preventing off-stage expression. PMID:28243589

  2. Decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3 levels and activity contribute to Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Hernández, Félix; Miguez, Andrés; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Lucas, José J

    2015-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain atrophy particularly in striatum leading to personality changes, chorea and dementia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase in the crossroad of many signaling pathways that is highly pleiotropic as it phosphorylates more than hundred substrates including structural, metabolic, and signaling proteins. Increased GSK-3 activity is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and GSK-3 inhibitors have been postulated as therapeutic agents for neurodegeneration. Regarding HD, GSK-3 inhibitors have shown beneficial effects in cell and invertebrate animal models but no evident efficacy in mouse models. Intriguingly, those studies were performed without interrogating GSK-3 level and activity in HD brain. Here we aim to explore the level and also the enzymatic activity of GSK-3 in the striatum and other less affected brain regions of HD patients and of the R6/1 mouse model to then elucidate the possible contribution of its alteration to HD pathogenesis by genetic manipulation in mice. We report a dramatic decrease in GSK-3 levels and activity in striatum and cortex of HD patients with similar results in the mouse model. Correction of the GSK-3 deficit in HD mice, by combining with transgenic mice with conditional GSK-3 expression, resulted in amelioration of their brain atrophy and behavioral motor and learning deficits. Thus, our results demonstrate that decreased brain GSK-3 contributes to HD neurological phenotype and open new therapeutic opportunities based on increasing GSK-3 activity or attenuating the harmful consequences of its decrease.

  3. Influence of HLA-C Expression Level on HIV Control

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Richard; Qi, Ying; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Chen, Haoyan; Gao, Xiaojiang; Thomas, Rasmi; Yuki, Yuko; Del Prete, Greg Q.; Goulder, Philip; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brumme, Chanson J.; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Nelson, George; Bosch, Ronald; Heckerman, David; Stein, Judy L.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Moody, M. Anthony; Denny, Thomas N.; Zeng, Xue; Fang, Jingyuan; Moffett, Ashley; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Goedert, James J.; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Fellay, Jacques; McLaren, Paul; Deeks, Steven G.; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce; Michael, Nelson L.; Weintrob, Amy; Wolinsky, Steven; Liao, Wilson; Carrington, Mary

    2013-01-01

    A variant upstream of human leukocyte antigen C (HLA-C) shows the most significant genome-wide effect on HIV control in European Americans and is also associated with the level of HLA-C expression. We characterized the differential cell surface expression levels of all common HLA-C allotypes and tested directly for effects of HLA-C expression on outcomes of HIV infection in 5243 individuals. Increasing HLA-C expression was associated with protection against multiple outcomes independently of individual HLA allelic effects in both African and European Americans, regardless of their distinct HLA-C frequencies and linkage relationships with HLA-B and HLA-A. Higher HLA-C expression was correlated with increased likelihood of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and frequency of viral escape mutation. In contrast, high HLA-C expression had a deleterious effect in Crohn’s disease, suggesting a broader influence of HLA expression levels in human disease. PMID:23559252

  4. Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene, CHFR, Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0332 TITLE: Decreased Expression of the Early... Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene, CHFR, Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0332 5c... decreased CHFR expression compared to normal cells and tissues and the loss of CHFR expression by RNAi in cell culture models leads to the acquisition of

  5. Venus Express Contributions to the Study of Planetary Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Hart, R. A.; Zhang, T. L.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter, and Saturn are expected to generate the electrical potential differences in their clouds sufficient to cause a breakdown in the atmosphere,creating a conducting path for the electric potential to discharge. This high-energy phenomenon creates a hot, high-pressure channel that enables chemical reactions not possible under usual local thermodynamic conditions. Thus it is of some interest to determine if lightning occurs in an atmosphere. While Venus is not usually considered one of the wet planets, lightning has been an object of interest since the Venera landers. It was observed with electromagnetic coils on Venera 11, 12, 13, 14 landers [2]. It was observed with a visible spectrometer on the Venera 9 orbits [1]. It was mapped during solar occultations by the electric antenna on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter [4]. These measurements revealed extensive lightning activity with an electromagnetic energy flux similar to that on Earth. However, the observations were limited in number in the atmosphere and to the nightside from orbit. In order to improve the understanding of Venus lightning, the Venus Express magnetometer was given a 128-Hz sampling rate that could cover much of the ELF frequencies at which lightning could be observed in the weak magnetic fields of the Venus ionosphere [5]. This investigation was immediately successful [3], but mastering the cleaning of the broadband data took several years to accomplish. Furthermore, the high polar latitudes of VEX periapsis were not the ideal locations to conduct the more global survey that was desired. Fortunately, after precessing poleward over the first few years the latitude of periapsis has returned to lower latitudes(Figures 1 and 2) and active electrical storms are now being studied. The charged constituent of the Venus atmosphere need not be water. In fact, we believe it is H2SO4 which polarizes much as water does and which freezes and melts at similar temperatures. If it is H2SO4, we would expect the

  6. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression. PMID:28083102

  7. Effects of cell-cycle-dependent expression on random fluctuations in protein levels.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-12-01

    Expression of many genes varies as a cell transitions through different cell-cycle stages. How coupling between stochastic expression and cell cycle impacts cell-to-cell variability (noise) in the level of protein is not well understood. We analyse a model where a stable protein is synthesized in random bursts, and the frequency with which bursts occur varies within the cell cycle. Formulae quantifying the extent of fluctuations in the protein copy number are derived and decomposed into components arising from the cell cycle and stochastic processes. The latter stochastic component represents contributions from bursty expression and errors incurred during partitioning of molecules between daughter cells. These formulae reveal an interesting trade-off: cell-cycle dependencies that amplify the noise contribution from bursty expression also attenuate the contribution from partitioning errors. We investigate the existence of optimum strategies for coupling expression to the cell cycle that minimize the stochastic component. Intriguingly, results show that a zero production rate throughout the cell cycle, with expression only occurring just before cell division, minimizes noise from bursty expression for a fixed mean protein level. By contrast, the optimal strategy in the case of partitioning errors is to make the protein just after cell division. We provide examples of regulatory proteins that are expressed only towards the end of the cell cycle, and argue that such strategies enhance robustness of cell-cycle decisions to the intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression.

  8. Acid-sensing ion channels are expressed in the ventrolateral medulla and contribute to central chemoreception

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nana; Guan, Ruijuan; Jiang, Qian; Hassanzadeh, Comron J.; Chu, Yuyang; Zhao, Xiaomei; Wang, Xia; Yang, Dawei; Du, Qijun; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Shen, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    The role of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in the ventrolateral medulla (VLM) remains uncertain. Here, we found that ASIC1a and ASIC2 are widely expressed in rat medulla, and the expression level is higher at neonatal stage as compared to adult stage. The two ASIC subunits co-localized in medualla neurons. Furthermore, pH reduction triggered typical ASIC-type currents in the medulla, including the VLM. These currents showed a pH50 value of 6.6 and were blocked by amiloride. Based on their sensitivity to psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) and zinc, homomeric ASIC1a and heteromeric ASIC1a/2 channels were likely responsible for acid-mediated currents in the mouse medulla. ASIC currents triggered by pH 5 disappeared in the VLM neurons from ASIC1−/−, but not ASIC2−/− mice. Activation of ASICs in the medulla also triggered neuronal excitation. Moreover, microinjection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid at a pH of 6.5 into the VLM increased integrated phrenic nerve discharge, inspiratory time and respiratory drive in rats. Both amiloride and PcTx1 inhibited the acid-induced stimulating effect on respiration. Collectively, our data suggest that ASICs are highly expressed in the medulla including the VLM, and activation of ASICs in the VLM contributes to central chemoreception. PMID:27934921

  9. Contributions of feature shapes and surface cues to the recognition of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sormaz, Mladen; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical accounts of face processing often emphasise feature shapes as the primary visual cue to the recognition of facial expressions. However, changes in facial expression also affect the surface properties of the face. In this study, we investigated whether this surface information can also be used in the recognition of facial expression. First, participants identified facial expressions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, happiness) from images that were manipulated such that they varied mainly in shape or mainly in surface properties. We found that the categorization of facial expression is possible in either type of image, but that different expressions are relatively dependent on surface or shape properties. Next, we investigated the relative contributions of shape and surface information to the categorization of facial expressions. This employed a complementary method that involved combining the surface properties of one expression with the shape properties from a different expression. Our results showed that the categorization of facial expressions in these hybrid images was equally dependent on the surface and shape properties of the image. Together, these findings provide a direct demonstration that both feature shape and surface information make significant contributions to the recognition of facial expressions.

  10. The Level of Expressed Emotion Scale: A Useful Measure of Expressed Emotion in Adolescents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelis, Sharon M.; Rae, Gordon; Liddell, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Research has suggested that self-report measures of expressed emotion (EE) may be employed as a proxy measure of environmental stress in the home. The appropriateness of the Level of Expressed Emotion scale as a measure of perceived expressed emotion was examined in a sample of adolescents. Participants were 239 male and 422 female adolescents…

  11. Sequence determinants of prokaryotic gene expression level under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Heng; Yang, Yi; Hu, Xiao-Pan; He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2014-11-01

    Prokaryotic gene expression is environment-dependent and temperature plays an important role in shaping the gene expression profile. Revealing the regulation mechanisms of gene expression pertaining to temperature has attracted tremendous efforts in recent years particularly owning to the yielding of transcriptome and proteome data by high-throughput techniques. However, most of the previous works concentrated on the characterization of the gene expression profile of individual organism and little effort has been made to disclose the commonality among organisms, especially for the gene sequence features. In this report, we collected the transcriptome and proteome data measured under heat stress condition from recently published literature and studied the sequence determinants for the expression level of heat-responsive genes on multiple layers. Our results showed that there indeed exist commonness and consistent patterns of the sequence features among organisms for the differentially expressed genes under heat stress condition. Some features are attributed to the requirement of thermostability while some are dominated by gene function. The revealed sequence determinants of bacterial gene expression level under heat stress complement the knowledge about the regulation factors of prokaryotic gene expression responding to the change of environmental conditions. Furthermore, comparisons to thermophilic adaption have been performed to reveal the similarity and dissimilarity of the sequence determinants for the response to heat stress and for the adaption to high habitat temperature, which elucidates the complex landscape of gene expression related to the same physical factor of temperature.

  12. BMI1 Is Expressed in Canine Osteosarcoma and Contributes to Cell Growth and Chemotherapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Withers, Sita S.; Holt, Roseline; Rebhun, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BMI1, a stem cell factor and member of the polycomb group of genes, has been shown to contribute to growth and chemoresistance of several human malignancies including primary osteosarcoma (OSA). Naturally occurring OSA in the dog represents a large animal model of human OSA, however the potential role of BMI1 in canine primary and metastatic OSA has not been examined. Immunohistochemical staining of canine primary and metastatic OSA tumors revealed strong nuclear expression of BMI1. An identical staining pattern was found in both primary and metastatic human OSA tissues. Canine OSA cell lines (Abrams, Moresco, and D17) expressed high levels of BMI1 compared with canine osteoblasts and knockdown or inhibition of BMI1 by siRNA or by small molecule BMI1-inhibitor PTC-209 demonstrated a role for BMI1 in canine OSA cell growth and resistance to carboplatin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. These findings suggest that inhibition of BMI1 in primary or metastatic OSA may improve response to chemotherapy and that the dog may serve as a large animal model to evaluate such therapy. PMID:26110620

  13. Elevated Aurora B expression contributes to chemoresistance and poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqian; Jiang, Chunling; Li, Huilan; Lv, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Qian, Xiaolong; Fu, Li; Xu, Bo; Guo, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Aurora-B is a major kinase responsible for appropriate mitotic progression. Elevated expression of Aurora-B has been frequently associated with several types of cancer, including breast cancer. However, it is not clear whether the alteration contributes to tumor responses to therapies and prognosis. In this study, we conducted immunohistochemistry using antibodies against Aurora-B, S1981p-ATM, Ki67, and p53 in paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from 312 invasive breast cancer patients. The correlation between disease-free-survival (DFS) and Aurora-B expression was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine whether Aurora-B was an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer. We found that Aurora-B expression was correlated with the proliferation index (P < 0.001) and p53 expression (P = 0.014) in breast cancer tissues. Further we found that Aurora-B expression was associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.002) and histological grade (P = 0.001). Multivariate analyses indicated that elevated Aurora-B expression predicted a poor survival. In a subgroup of patients that received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we found that elevated Aurora-B contributed to chemoresistance (P = 0.011). In conclusion, elevated Aurora-B expression in breast cancer patients contributes to chemoresistance and predicts poor prognosis.

  14. Examining the contribution of handwriting and spelling to written expression in kindergarten children.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Cynthia S; Alotaiba, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the development of beginning writing skills in kindergarten children and the contribution of spelling and handwriting to these writing skills after accounting for early language, literacy, cognitive skills, and student characteristics. Two hundred and forty two children were given a battery of cognitive, oral language, reading, and writing measures. They exhibited a range of competency in spelling, handwriting, written expression, and in their ability to express ideas. Handwriting and spelling made statistically significant contributions to written expression, demonstrating the importance of these lower-order transcription skills to higher order text-generation skills from a very early age. The contributions of oral language and reading skills were not significant. Implications of these findings for writing development and instruction are addressed.

  15. High NKG2A expression contributes to NK cell exhaustion and predicts a poor prognosis of patients with liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Xu, Jing; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Mei; Wen, Hao; Zhang, Chuanshan; Wang, Jinyu; Song, Jiaxi; Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Haoyu; Wei, Haiming; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: As the predominant lymphocyte subset in the liver, natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to be highly associated with the outcomes of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Previously, we reported that NKG2A, a checkpoint candidate, mediates human and murine NK cell dysfunction in CHB. However, NK cell exhaustion and, particularly, the level of NKG2A expression within liver tumors have not been reported. Methods: In this study, we analyzed NKG2A expression and the related dysfunction of NK cells located in intra- or peritumor regions of liver tissue samples from 207 HCC patients, in addition to analyzing disease outcomes. Results: The expression of NKG2A in NK cells and the NKG2A ligand, HLA-E, in intratumor HCC tissues was observed to be increased. These NK cells, and particularly CD56(dim) NK cells, with higher NKG2A expression showed features of functional exhaustion and were associated with a poor prognosis. The increase in NKG2A expression might be induced by IL-10, which was present at a high level in the plasma of HCC patients. Blocking IL-10 could specifically inhibit NKG2A expression in NK cells. Conclusions: These findings indicate that NKG2A expression is influenced by factors from cancer nests and contributes to NK cell exhaustion, suggesting that NKG2A blockade has the potential to restore immunity against liver tumors by reversing NK cell exhaustion.

  16. Dietary fat and corticosterone levels are contributing factors to meal anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Gyte, Amy; Denn, Mark; Leighton, Brendan; Piggins, Hugh D.

    2016-01-01

    Daily restricted access to food leads to the development of food anticipatory activity and metabolism, which depends upon an as yet unidentified food-entrainable oscillator(s). A premeal anticipatory peak in circulating hormones, including corticosterone is also elicited by daily restricted feeding. High-fat feeding is associated with elevated levels of corticosterone with disrupted circadian rhythms and a failure to develop robust meal anticipation. It is not clear whether the disrupted corticosterone rhythm, resulting from high-fat feeding contributes to attenuated meal anticipation in high-fat fed rats. Our aim was to better characterize meal anticipation in rats fed a low- or high-fat diet, and to better understand the role of corticosterone in this process. To this end, we utilized behavioral observations, hypothalamic c-Fos expression, and indirect calorimetry to assess meal entrainment. We also used the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, to dissect out the role of corticosterone in meal anticipation in rats given daily access to a meal with different fat content. Restricted access to a low-fat diet led to robust meal anticipation, as well as entrainment of hypothalamic c-Fos expression, metabolism, and circulating corticosterone. These measures were significantly attenuated in response to a high-fat diet, and animals on this diet exhibited a postanticipatory rise in corticosterone. Interestingly, antagonism of glucocorticoid activity using RU486 attenuated meal anticipation in low-fat fed rats, but promoted meal anticipation in high-fat-fed rats. These findings suggest an important role for corticosterone in the regulation of meal anticipation in a manner dependent upon dietary fat content. PMID:26818054

  17. Sodium–calcium exchangers contribute to the regulation of cytosolic calcium levels in mouse taste cells

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Agnieszka I; Medler, Kathryn F

    2009-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signalling mechanisms to generate unique calcium responses to distinct taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). We recently demonstrated that a constitutive calcium influx exists in taste cells that is regulated by mitochondrial calcium transport and that the magnitude of this calcium influx correlates with the signalling mechanisms used by the taste cells. In this study, we used calcium imaging to determine that sodium–calcium exchangers (NCXs) also routinely contribute to the regulation of basal cytosolic calcium and that their relative role correlates with the signalling mechanisms used by the taste cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed that multiple NCXs and sodium–calcium–potassium exchangers (NCKXs) are expressed in taste cells. Thus, a dynamic relationship exists between calcium leak channels and calcium regulatory mechanisms in taste cells that functions to keep cytosolic calcium levels in the appropriate range for cell function. PMID:19581381

  18. Hypoxia disrupts the expression levels of circadian rhythm genes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Yang, Sheng-Li; Fang, Xiefan; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Sun, Cheng-Yi; Huang, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Disturbance in the expression of circadian rhythm genes is a common feature in certain types of cancer, however the mechanisms mediating this disturbance remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the expression of circadian rhythm genes in liver cancer cells and to identify the mechanisms underlying this effect in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HCC cell line, PLC/PRF/5. was treated with either a vehicle control or CoCl2 at 50, 100 or 200 µΜ for 24 h. Following treatment, the protein expression levels of hypoxia‑inducible factor (HIF)‑1α and HIF‑2α were detected by western blotting and the mRNA expression levels of circadian rhythm genes, including circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock), brain and muscle Arnt‑like 1 (Bmal1), period (Per)1, Per2, Per3, cryptochrome (Cry)1, Cry2 and casein kinase Iε (CKIε), were detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR). Expression plasmids containing HIF‑1α or HIF‑2α were transfected into the PLC/PRF/5 cells using liposomes and RT‑qPCR was used to determine the effects of the transfections on the expression levels of circadian rhythm genes. Following treatment with CoCl2, the protein expression levels of HIF‑1α and HIF‑2α were upregulated in a CoCl2 concentration‑dependent manner. The mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1 and Cry2 were increased, and the mRNA expression levels of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and CKIε were decreased following CoCl2 treatment (P<0.05). In the PLC/PRF/5 cells transfected with the plasmid containing HIF‑1α, the mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1 and Cry2 were increased, and the mRNA expression levels of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and CKIε were decreased. In the PLC/PRF/5 cells transfected with the plasmid containing HIF‑2α, the mRNA expression levels of Clock, Bmal1, Per1, Cry1, Cry2 and CKIε were upregulated, and the mRNA expression levels of Per2 and Per3 were

  19. Mitochondrial STAT3 contributes to transformation of Barrett's epithelial cells that express oncogenic Ras in a p53-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhua; Huo, Xiaofang; Agoston, Agoston T; Zhang, Xi; Theiss, Arianne L; Cheng, Edaire; Zhang, Qiuyang; Zaika, Alexander; Pham, Thai H; Wang, David H; Lobie, Peter E; Odze, Robert D; Spechler, Stuart J; Souza, Rhonda F

    2015-08-01

    Metaplastic epithelial cells of Barrett's esophagus transformed by the combination of p53-knockdown and oncogenic Ras expression are known to activate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). When phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 (Tyr705), STAT3 functions as a nuclear transcription factor that can contribute to oncogenesis. STAT3 phosphorylated at serine 727 (Ser727) localizes in mitochondria, but little is known about mitochondrial STAT3's contribution to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus, which is the focus of this study. We introduced a constitutively active variant of human STAT3 (STAT3CA) into the following: 1) non-neoplastic Barrett's (BAR-T) cells; 2) BAR-T cells with p53 knockdown; and 3) BAR-T cells that express oncogenic H-Ras(G12V). STAT3CA transformed only the H-Ras(G12V)-expressing BAR-T cells (evidenced by loss of contact inhibition, formation of colonies in soft agar, and generation of tumors in immunodeficient mice), and did so in a p53-independent fashion. The transformed cells had elevated levels of both mitochondrial (Ser727) and nuclear (Tyr705) phospho-STAT3. Introduction of a STAT3CA construct with a mutated tyrosine phosphorylation site into H-Ras(G12V)-expressing Barrett's cells resulted in high levels of mitochondrial phospho-STAT3 (Ser727) with little or no nuclear phospho-STAT3 (Tyr705), and the cells still formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. Thus tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is not required for tumor formation in Ras-expressing Barrett's cells. We conclude that mitochondrial STAT3 (Ser727) can contribute to oncogenesis in Barrett's cells that express oncogenic Ras. These findings suggest that agents targeting STAT3 might be useful for chemoprevention in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

  20. Expression of the lncRNA Maternally Expressed Gene 3 (MEG3) Contributes to the Control of Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation by the Rb Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kruer, Traci L.; Dougherty, Susan M.; Reynolds, Lindsey; Long, Elizabeth; de Silva, Tanya; Lockwood, William W.; Clem, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3, mouse homolog Gtl2) encodes a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is expressed in many normal tissues, but is suppressed in various cancer cell lines and tumors, suggesting it plays a functional role as a tumor suppressor. Hypermethylation has been shown to contribute to this loss of expression. We now demonstrate that MEG3 expression is regulated by the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) pathway and correlates with a change in cell proliferation. Microarray analysis of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from mice with genetic deletion of all three Rb family members (TKO) revealed a significant silencing of Gtl2/MEG3 expression compared to WT MEFs, and re-expression of Gtl2/MEG3 caused decrease in cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. MEG3 levels also were suppressed in A549 lung cancer cells compared with normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, and, similar to the TKO cells, re-constitution of MEG3 led to a decrease in cell proliferation and elevated apoptosis. Activation of pRb by treatment of A549 and SK-MES-1 cells with palbociclib, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, increased the expression of MEG3 in a dose-dependent manner, while knockdown of pRb/p107 attenuated this effect. In addition, expression of phosphorylation-deficient mutant of pRb increased MEG3 levels in both lung cancer cell types. Treatment of these cells with palbociclib also decreased the expression of pRb-regulated DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), while conversely, knockdown of DNMT1 resulted in increased expression of MEG3. As gene methylation has been suggested for MEG3 regulation, we found that palbociclib resulted in decreased methylation of the MEG3 locus similar to that observed with 5-aza-deoxycytidine. Anti-sense oligonucleotide silencing of drug-induced MEG3 expression in A549 and SK-MES-1 cells partially rescued the palbociclib-mediated decrease in cell proliferation, while analysis of the TCGA database revealed decreased MEG3 expression in human

  1. Fate of water pumped from underground and contributions to sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Lo, Min-Hui; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.; Wu, Ren-Jie; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2016-08-01

    The contributions from terrestrial water sources to sea-level rise, other than ice caps and glaciers, are highly uncertain and heavily debated. Recent assessments indicate that groundwater depletion (GWD) may become the most important positive terrestrial contribution over the next 50 years, probably equal in magnitude to the current contributions from glaciers and ice caps. However, the existing estimates assume that nearly 100% of groundwater extracted eventually ends up in the oceans. Owing to limited knowledge of the pathways and mechanisms governing the ultimate fate of pumped groundwater, the relative fraction of global GWD that contributes to sea-level rise remains unknown. Here, using a coupled climate-hydrological model simulation, we show that only 80% of GWD ends up in the ocean. An increase in runoff to the ocean accounts for roughly two-thirds, whereas the remainder results from the enhanced net flux of precipitation minus evaporation over the ocean, due to increased atmospheric vapour transport from the land to the ocean. The contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise amounted to 0.02 (+/-0.004) mm yr-1 in 1900 and increased to 0.27 (+/-0.04) mm yr-1 in 2000. This indicates that existing studies have substantially overestimated the contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise by a cumulative amount of at least 10 mm during the twentieth century and early twenty-first century. With other terrestrial water contributions included, we estimate the net terrestrial water contribution during the period 1993-2010 to be +0.12 (+/-0.04) mm yr-1, suggesting that the net terrestrial water contribution reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report report is probably overestimated by a factor of three.

  2. Fate of Water Pumped from Underground and Contributions to Sea Level Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Lo, Min-Hui; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.; Wu, Ren-Jie; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2016-01-01

    The contributions from terrestrial water sources to sea-level rise, other than ice caps and glaciers, are highly uncertain and heavily debated1-5. Recent assessments indicate that groundwater depletion (GWD) may become the most important positive terrestrial contribution6-10 over the next 50 years, probably equal in magnitude to the current contributions from glaciers and ice caps6. However, the existing estimates assume that nearly 100% of groundwater extracted eventually ends up in the oceans. Owing to limited knowledge of the pathways and mechanisms governing the ultimate fate of pumped groundwater, the relative fraction of global GWD that contributes to sea-level rise remains unknown. Here, using a coupled climate-hydrological model11,12 simulation, we show that only 80% of GWDends up in the ocean. An increase in runo to the ocean accounts for roughly two-thirds, whereas the remainder results from the enhanced net flux of precipitation minus evaporation over the ocean, due to increased atmospheric vapour transport from the land to the ocean. The contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise amounted to 0.02 (+/- 0.004)mm yr(sup-1) in 1900 and increased to 0.27 (+/- 0.04)mm yr(sup-1) in 2000. This indicates that existing studies have substantially overestimated the contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise by a cumulative amount of at least 10 mm during the twentieth century and early twenty-first century. With other terrestrial water contributions included, we estimate the net terrestrial water contribution during the period 1993-2010 to be +0.12 +/-0.04)mm yr(sup-1), suggesting that the net terrestrialwater contribution reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report report is probably overestimated by a factor of three.

  3. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  4. Expression of α-DIOXYGENASE 1 in tomato and Arabidopsis contributes to plant defenses against aphids.

    PubMed

    Avila, Carlos Augusto; Arevalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka; Lorence, Argelia; Goggin, Fiona L

    2013-08-01

    Plant α-dioxygenases (α-DOX) are fatty acid-hydroperoxidases that contribute to the synthesis of oxylipins, a diverse group of compounds primarily generated through oxidation of linoleic (LA) and linolenic acid (LNA). Oxylipins are implicated in plant signaling against biotic and abiotic stresses. We report here that the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae) induces Slα-DOX1 but not Slα-DOX2 expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Slα-DOX1 upregulation by aphids does not require either jasmonic acid (JA) or salicylic acid (SA) accumulation, since tomato mutants deficient in JA (spr2, acx1) or SA accumulation (NahG) still show Slα-DOX1 induction. Virus-induced gene silencing of Slα-DOX1 enhanced aphid population growth in wild-type (WT) plants, revealing that Slα-DOX1 contributes to basal resistance to aphids. Moreover, an even higher percent increase in aphid numbers occurred when Slα-DOX1 was silenced in spr2, a mutant line characterized by elevated LA levels, decreased LNA, and enhanced aphid resistance as compared with WT. These results suggest that aphid reproduction is influenced by oxylipins synthesized from LA by Slα-DOX1. In agreement with our experiments in tomato, two independent α-dox1 T-DNA insertion mutant lines in Arabidopsis thaliana also showed increased susceptibility to the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), indicating that the role α-DOX is conserved in other plant-aphid interactions.

  5. Contributions to the sea level seasonal cycle within the Gulf of Cadiz (Southwestern Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiz, Irene; Tejedor, Begoña; Gómez-Enri, Jesús; Aboitiz, Alazne; Villares, Pilar

    2016-07-01

    The spatial distribution of the sea level seasonal cycle within the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC) has been analysed using monthly maps of sea level anomalies from gridded multi-mission altimeter data, along with monthly means of sea level heights from three tide gauge stations. Moreover, the contribution to the sea level seasonal cycle of atmospheric pressure and wind and the steric effect were evaluated using maps of sea level residuals from the VANI2-ERA hindcast, and a combination of satellite Sea Surface Temperature maps with a very high resolution Temperature and Salinity climatology for the region. The atmospheric contribution accounted for 55-58% of the sea level variance offshore, with this percentage diminishing toward the coast, where the effect of wind stress might be underestimated, especially over regions of complex bathymetry. The steric contribution was addressed by considering local, open ocean, basin-wide and continental shelf steric effects. Results obtained highlighted the oceanographic complexity of the GoC at regional scales. In this sense, the open ocean steric contribution explained the largest percentage of atmospheric-corrected sea level variance at the offshore part of the basin (50-67%) and over the eastern shelf (42-48%), suggesting that the sea level seasonal cycle within the eastern shelf is connected to the large scale circulation system. West of Cape Santa Maria, both over the continental shelf and offshore, the best results were obtained with the local steric contribution, suggesting a decoupling of deep and shallow water sea level variations at the seasonal scale in that region.

  6. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  7. De Novo Characterization of Genes That Contribute to High-Level Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thu; Ran, Qinghong; Ostrer, Lev

    2016-01-01

    Sensitization of resistant bacteria to existing antibiotics depends on the identification of candidate targets whose activities contribute to resistance. Using a transposon insertion library in an Escherichia coli mutant that was 2,000 times less susceptible to ciprofloxacin than its parent and the relative fitness scores, we identified 19 genes that contributed to the acquired ciprofloxacin resistance and mapped the shortest genetic path that increased the antibiotic susceptibility of the resistant bacteria back to a near wild-type level. PMID:27431218

  8. Abundant contribution of short tandem repeats to gene expression variation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gymrek, Melissa; Willems, Thomas; Guilmatre, Audrey; Zeng, Haoyang; Markus, Barak; Georgiev, Stoyan; Daly, Mark J.; Price, Alkes L.; Pritchard, Jonathan; Sharp, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of repetitive elements to quantitative human traits is largely unknown. Here, we report a genome-wide survey of the contribution of Short Tandem Repeats (STRs), one of the most polymorphic and abundant repeat classes, to gene expression in humans. Our survey identified 2,060 significant expression STRs (eSTRs). These eSTRs were replicable in orthogonal populations and expression assays. We used variance partitioning to disentangle the contribution of eSTRs from linked SNPs and indels and found that eSTRs contribute 10%–15% of the cis-heritability mediated by all common variants. Further functional genomic analyses showed that eSTRs are enriched in conserved regions, co-localize with regulatory elements, and can modulate certain histone modifications. By analyzing known GWAS hits and searching for new associations in 1,685 deeply-phenotyped whole-genomes, we found that eSTRs are enriched in various clinically-relevant conditions. These results highlight the contribution of short tandem repeats to the genetic architecture of quantitative human traits. PMID:26642241

  9. The efficiency of 3'-end formation contributes to the relative levels of different histone mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T J; Levine, B J; Skoultchi, A I; Marzluff, W F

    1989-01-01

    Sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends of mouse histone genes contribute to the expression of individual genes. The 3' sequences required for high expression of the mouse H2a-614 gene are the same as the sequences required for 3'-end formation. When these sequences were substituted for the 3' end of the poorly expressed H2a-291 gene, expression of the H2a-291 gene was increased fivefold. A 65-nucleotide fragment containing the H2a-614 3' processing signal increased expression of the H2a-291 gene when it was placed in the proper orientation downstream of the H2a-291 3' end. The only mRNAs that accumulated from this gene ended at the H2a-291 3' end, which suggests that the transcript is sequentially processed. In an in vitro processing system, the different histone 3' ends showed different processing efficiencies, which correlated with their expression in cells. These results suggest that the efficiency of processing is important in determining the steady-state levels of individual mouse histone mRNAs. Images PMID:2796992

  10. Phenotypic plasticity in gene expression contributes to divergence of locally adapted populations of Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Dayan, David I; Crawford, Douglas L; Oleksiak, Marjorie F

    2015-07-01

    We examine the interaction between phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation using muscle gene expression levels among populations of the fish Fundulus heteroclitus acclimated to three temperatures. Our analysis reveals shared patterns of phenotypic plasticity due to thermal acclimation as well as non-neutral patterns of variation among populations adapted to different thermal environments. For the majority of significant differences in gene expression levels, phenotypic plasticity and adaptation operate on different suites of genes. The subset of genes that demonstrate both adaptive differences and phenotypic plasticity, however, exhibit countergradient variation of expression. Thus, expression differences among populations counteract environmental effects, reducing the phenotypic differentiation between populations. Finally, gene-by-environment interactions among genes with non-neutral patterns of expression suggest that the penetrance of adaptive variation depends on the environmental conditions experienced by the individual.

  11. Neuromodulation independently determines correlated channel expression and conductance levels in motor neurons of the stomatogastric ganglion.

    PubMed

    Temporal, Simone; Desai, Mohati; Khorkova, Olga; Varghese, Gladis; Dai, Aihua; Schulz, David J; Golowasch, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal identity depends on the regulated expression of numerous molecular components, especially ionic channels, which determine the electrical signature of a neuron. Such regulation depends on at least two key factors, activity itself and neuromodulatory input. Neuronal electrical activity can modify the expression of ionic currents in homeostatic or nonhomeostatic fashion. Neuromodulators typically modify activity by regulating the properties or expression levels of subsets of ionic channels. In the stomatogastric system of crustaceans, both types of regulation have been demonstrated. Furthermore, the regulation of the coordinated expression of ionic currents and the channels that carry these currents has been recently reported in diverse neuronal systems, with neuromodulators not only controlling the absolute levels of ionic current expression but also, over long periods of time, appearing to modify their correlated expression. We hypothesize that neuromodulators may regulate the correlated expression of ion channels at multiple levels and in a cell-type-dependent fashion. We report that in two identified neuronal types, three ionic currents are linearly correlated in a pairwise manner, suggesting their coexpression or direct interactions, under normal neuromodulatory conditions. In each cell, some currents remain correlated after neuromodulatory input is removed, whereas the correlations between the other pairs are either lost or altered. Interestingly, in each cell, a different suite of currents change their correlation. At the transcript level we observe distinct alterations in correlations between channel mRNA amounts, including one of the cell types lacking a correlation under normal neuromodulatory conditions and then gaining the correlation when neuromodulators are removed. Synaptic activity does not appear to contribute, with one possible exception, to the correlated expression of either ionic currents or of the transcripts that code for the respective

  12. Recent Changes in Land Water Storage and its Contribution to Sea Level Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Reager, John T.; Chao, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jida; Lo, Min-Hui; Song, Chunqiao; Li, Yuwen; Gardner, Alex S.

    2016-11-01

    Sea level rise is generally attributed to increased ocean heat content and increased rates glacier and ice melt. However, human transformations of Earth's surface have impacted water exchange between land, atmosphere, and ocean, ultimately affecting global sea level variations. Impoundment of water in reservoirs and artificial lakes has reduced the outflow of water to the sea, while river runoff has increased due to groundwater mining, wetland and endorheic lake storage losses, and deforestation. In addition, climate-driven changes in land water stores can have a large impact on global sea level variations over decadal timescales. Here, we review each component of negative and positive land water contribution separately in order to highlight and understand recent changes in land water contribution to sea level variations.

  13. Recent Changes in Land Water Storage and its Contribution to Sea Level Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Reager, John T.; Chao, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jida; Lo, Min-Hui; Song, Chunqiao; Li, Yuwen; Gardner, Alex S.

    2017-01-01

    Sea level rise is generally attributed to increased ocean heat content and increased rates glacier and ice melt. However, human transformations of Earth's surface have impacted water exchange between land, atmosphere, and ocean, ultimately affecting global sea level variations. Impoundment of water in reservoirs and artificial lakes has reduced the outflow of water to the sea, while river runoff has increased due to groundwater mining, wetland and endorheic lake storage losses, and deforestation. In addition, climate-driven changes in land water stores can have a large impact on global sea level variations over decadal timescales. Here, we review each component of negative and positive land water contribution separately in order to highlight and understand recent changes in land water contribution to sea level variations.

  14. Recent Changes in Land Water Storage and Its Contribution to Sea Level Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Reager, John T.; Chao, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jida; Lo, Min-Hui; Song, Chunqiao; Li, Yuwen; Gardner, Alex S.

    2016-01-01

    Sea level rise is generally attributed to increased ocean heat content and increased rates glacier and ice melt. However, human transformations of Earth's surface have impacted water exchange between land, atmosphere, and ocean, ultimately affecting global sea level variations. Impoundment of water in reservoirs and artificial lakes has reduced the outflow of water to the sea, while river runoff has increased due to groundwater mining, wetland and endorheic lake storage losses, and deforestation. In addition, climate-driven changes in land water stores can have a large impact on global sea level variations over decadal timescales. Here, we review each component of negative and positive land water contribution separately in order to highlight and understand recent changes in land water contribution to sea level variations.

  15. Quantifying the Effect of DNA Packaging on Gene Expression Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Harold

    2010-10-01

    Gene expression, the process by which the genetic code comes alive in the form of proteins, is one of the most important biological processes in living cells, and begins when transcription factors bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region upstream of a gene. The relationship between gene expression output and transcription factor input which is termed the gene regulation function is specific to each promoter, and predicting this gene regulation function from the locations of transcription factor binding sites is one of the challenges in biology. In eukaryotic organisms (for example, animals, plants, fungi etc), DNA is highly compacted into nucleosomes, 147-bp segments of DNA tightly wrapped around histone protein core, and therefore, the accessibility of transcription factor binding sites depends on their locations with respect to nucleosomes - sites inside nucleosomes are less accessible than those outside nucleosomes. To understand how transcription factor binding sites contribute to gene expression in a quantitative manner, we obtain gene regulation functions of promoters with various configurations of transcription factor binding sites by using fluorescent protein reporters to measure transcription factor input and gene expression output in single yeast cells. In this talk, I will show that the affinity of a transcription factor binding site inside and outside the nucleosome controls different aspects of the gene regulation function, and explain this finding based on a mass-action kinetic model that includes competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors.

  16. miR-222 contributes to sex-dimorphic cardiac eNOS expression via ets-1.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Alicia M; Deschamps, Anne M; Liu, Delong; Raghavachari, Nalini; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2013-06-17

    It is well recognized that there is sex-dimorphic expression of mRNA and protein in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important regulator of cardiac function, and the expression levels of eNOS differ between male and female hearts. The aim of this study was to examine whether expression of specific microRNA (miRNA, miR) in males and females contributes to changes in the expression of eNOS. miRNA was extracted from the myocardium of male and female C57BL/6 mice and subjected to an Affymetrix miRNA array. Decreased expression of miR-222 was discovered in females and confirmed by qRT-PCR from whole heart or isolated cardiomyocytes. The transcription factor V-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog-1 (ets-1) was identified as a potential target of miR-222 using TargetScan, and fivefold increased ets-1 protein expression in females was confirmed by Western blot. Targeting of ets-1 by miR-222 was determined in HEK293 cells overexpressing luciferase under regulation of either the ets-1 3'-UTR, a null 3'-UTR control, or a scrambled ets-1 3'-UTR and treated with a small molecule miR-222 mimic or inhibitor. Additionally qRT-PCR confirmed that mRNA levels of the ets-1 transcriptional target, eNOS, were 25% higher in females. Compared with untreated myocyte controls, 50% inhibition of eNOS expression was achieved by treatment with a miR-222 mimic, compared with a 25% increase due to miR-222 inhibitor. Our findings indicate that sex-dependent miR-222 regulation alters the expression of the cardiac regulatory protein eNOS.

  17. Processes contributing to resilience of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stagg, Camille L.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Cormier, Nicole; Conner, William H.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify processes that contribute to resilience of coastal wetlands subject to rising sea levels and to determine whether the relative contribution of these processes varies across different wetland community types. We assessed the resilience of wetlands to sea-level rise along a transitional gradient from tidal freshwater forested wetland (TFFW) to marsh by measuring processes controlling wetland elevation. We found that, over 5 years of measurement, TFFWs were resilient, although some marginally, and oligohaline marshes exhibited robust resilience to sea-level rise. We identified fundamental differences in how resilience is maintained across wetland community types, which have important implications for management activities that aim to restore or conserve resilient systems. We showed that the relative importance of surface and subsurface processes in controlling wetland surface elevation change differed between TFFWs and oligohaline marshes. The marshes had significantly higher rates of surface accretion than the TFFWs, and in the marshes, surface accretion was the primary contributor to elevation change. In contrast, elevation change in TFFWs was more heavily influenced by subsurface processes, such as root zone expansion or compaction, which played an important role in determining resilience of TFFWs to rising sea level. When root zone contributions were removed statistically from comparisons between relative sea-level rise and surface elevation change, sites that previously had elevation rate deficits showed a surplus. Therefore, assessments of wetland resilience that do not include subsurface processes will likely misjudge vulnerability to sea-level rise.

  18. The Contribution of Ego Development Level to Burnout in School Counselors: Implications for Professional School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambie, Glenn W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a national survey study of school counseling professionals to determine if higher ego development contributed to a lower degree of burnout. Although the primary path analysis model tested did not fit the data observed, a significant positive relationship indicated that participants scoring at higher levels of…

  19. The Contribution of CALL to Advanced-Level Foreign/Second Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack; Arispe, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the contribution of instructional technology to advanced-level foreign/second language learning (AL2) over the past thirty years. It is shown that the most salient feature of AL2 practice and associated Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) research are their rarity and restricted nature. Based on an analysis of four…

  20. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-09-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal's sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function.

  1. Polar ice-sheet contributions to sea level during past warm periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent sea-level rise has been dominated by thermal expansion and glacier loss, but the contribution from mass loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is expected to exceed other contributions under future sustained warming. Due to limitations of existing ice sheet models and the lack of relevant analogues in the historical record, projecting the timing and magnitude of polar ice sheet mass loss in the future remains challenging. One approach to improving our understanding of how polar ice-sheet retreat will unfold is to integrate observations and models of sea level, ice sheets, and climate during past intervals of warmth when the polar ice sheets contributed to higher sea levels. A recent review evaluated the evidence of polar ice sheet mass loss during several warm periods, including interglacials during the mid-Pliocene warm period, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11, 5e (Last Interglacial), and 1 (Holocene). Sea-level benchmarks of ice-sheet retreat during the first of these three periods, when global mean climate was ~1 to 3 deg. C warmer than preindustrial, are useful for understanding the long-term potential for future sea-level rise. Despite existing uncertainties in these reconstructions, it is clear that our present climate is warming to a level associated with significant polar ice-sheet loss in the past, resulting in a conservative estimate for a global mean sea-level rise of 6 meters above present (or more). This presentation will focus on identifying the approaches that have yielded significant advances in terms of past sea level and ice sheet reconstruction as well as outstanding challenges. A key element of recent advances in sea-level reconstructions is the ability to recognize and quantify the imprint of geophysical processes, such as glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and dynamic topography, that lead to significant spatial variability in sea level reconstructions. Identifying specific ice-sheet sources that contributed to higher sea levels

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) CD8+ T-Cells That Express Interferon-Gamma Contribute to HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Rachel D.; Hong, Suzi; Crescini, Melanie; Ellis, Ronald; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Spina, Celsa; Letendre, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continue to affect cognition and everyday functioning despite anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Previous studies focused on mechanisms related to monocyte/macrophage mediated inflammation. However, in the ART era, there is increasing evidence for the involvement of CD8+ T-cells in CNS pathogenesis. Methods To investigate the relationship between T-cell responses and neurocognitive impairment (NCI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell intracellular cytokine (IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα) and lytic marker (CD107a) expression were assessed in HIV infected subjects who underwent comprehensive neurocognitive (NC) evaluation and either initiated or changed ART. Results Data were collected from 31 participants at 70 visits. The frequency of cytokine expressing T-cells in CSF was significantly higher than in peripheral blood for CD4+T-cells: TNFα, IL-2, IFNγ and CD8+T-cells: IL-2 and IFNγ. Analysis of T-cell activity and NCI as a function of CSF HIV RNA levels suggested a general association between NCI, high CSF CD8+ (but not CD4+T-cell) cytokine expression and CSF HIV RNA <103 copies/ml (p<0.0001). Specifically, CSF CD8+ T-cell IFNγ expression correlated with severity of NCI (r = 0.57, p = 0.004). Multivariable analyses indicated that CSF CD8+T-cell IFNγ and myeloid activation (CD163) contributed equally and independently to cognitive status and a composite variable produced the strongest correlation with NCI (r = 0.83, p = 0.0001). In contrast, CD8+ cytolytic activity (CD107a expression) was negatively correlated with NCI (p = 0.05) but was dependent on CD4 levels >400/μl and low CSF HIV RNA levels (<103 copies/ml). In our longitudinal analysis of 16 subjects, higher CSF CD8+IFNγ expression at baseline predicted NC decline at follow-up (p = 0.02). Severity of NCI at follow-up correlated with level of residual HIV RNA in CSF. Conclusions Presence of IFNγ expressing CD8+ T

  3. Flicker adaptation of low-level cortical visual neurons contributes to temporal dilation

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Laura; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    Several seconds of adaptation to a flickered stimulus causes a subsequent brief static stimulus to appear longer in duration. Non-sensory factors such as increased arousal and attention have been thought to mediate this flicker-based temporal-dilation aftereffect. Here we provide evidence that adaptation of low-level cortical visual neurons contributes to this aftereffect. The aftereffect was significantly reduced by a 45° change in Gabor orientation between adaptation and test. Because orientation-tuning bandwidths are smaller in lower-level cortical visual areas and are approximately 45° in human V1, the result suggests that flicker adaptation of orientation-tuned V1 neurons contributes to the temporal-dilation aftereffect. The aftereffect was abolished when the adaptor and test stimuli were presented to different eyes. Because eye preferences are strong in V1 but diminish in higher-level visual areas, the eye specificity of the aftereffect corroborates the involvement of low-level cortical visual neurons. Our results thus suggest that flicker adaptation of low-level cortical visual neurons contributes to expanding visual duration. Furthermore, this temporal-dilation aftereffect dissociates from the previously reported temporal-constriction aftereffect on the basis of the differences in their orientation and flicker-frequency selectivity, suggesting that the visual system possesses at least two distinct and potentially complementary mechanisms for adaptively coding perceived duration. PMID:22866761

  4. Nox4 Is Expressed In Pulmonary Artery Adventitia And Contributes To Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Scott A.; Chen, Feng; Su, Yunchao; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Wang, Yusi; Catravas, John D.; Han, Weihong; Orfi, Laszlo; Szantai-Kis, Csaba; Keri, Gyorgy; Szabadkai, Istvan; Barabutis, Nektarios; Rafikova, Olga; Rafikov, Ruslan; Black, Stephen M.; Jonigk, Danny; Giannis, Athanassios; Asmis, Reto; Stepp, David W.; Ramesh, Ganesan; Fulton, David J.R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease arising from remodeling and narrowing of pulmonary arteries (PA) resulting in high pulmonary blood pressure and ultimately right ventricular failure. Elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is associated with increased pressure in PH. However, the cellular location of Nox4 and its contribution to aberrant vascular remodeling in PH remains poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to identify the vascular cells expressing Nox4 in PA and determine the functional relevance of Nox4 in PH. APPROACH AND RESULTS Elevated expression of Nox4 was detected in hypertensive PA from 3 rat PH models and human PH using qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. In the vascular wall, Nox4 was detected in both endothelium and adventitia and perivascular staining was prominently increased in hypertensive lung sections, colocalizing with cells expressing fibroblast and monocyte markers and matching the adventitial location of ROS production. Small molecule inhibitors of Nox4 reduced adventitial ROS generation and vascular remodeling as well as ameliorating right ventricular hypertrophy and non-invasive indices of PA stiffness in monocrotaline (MCT)-treated rats as determined by morphometric analysis and high resolution digital ultrasound. Nox4 inhibitors improved PH in both prevention and reversal protocols and reduced the expression of fibroblast markers in isolated PA. In fibroblasts, Nox4 over-expression stimulated migration and proliferation and was necessary for matrix gene expression. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that Nox4 is prominently expressed in the adventitia and contributes to altered fibroblast behavior, hypertensive vascular remodeling and the development of PH. PMID:24947524

  5. Updating the results of glacier contribution to the sea level change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyurgerov, Mark B.; Abdalati, Waleed Dr. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    I have completed an update of global glacier volume change. All data of glacier annual mass balances, surface area over the period 1945/46 till 2004, outside the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets were included in this update. As the result global glacier volume change have been calculated, also in terms of glacier contribution to sea level change. These results were sent to Working Group 1 and 2 of IPCC-4 as the basis for modeling of sea level towards the end of 2100. In this study I have concentrated on studying glacier systems of different scales, from primary (e.g. Devon ice cap) to regional (e.g. Canadian Arctic), continental scale (e,g., entire Arctic), and global (e.g., change in glacier volume and contribution to sea level rise).

  6. Similar meltwater contributions to glacial sea level changes from Antarctic and northern ice sheets.

    PubMed

    Rohling, Eelco J; Marsh, Robert; Wells, Neil C; Siddall, Mark; Edwards, Neil R

    2004-08-26

    The period between 75,000 and 20,000 years ago was characterized by high variability in climate and sea level. Southern Ocean records of ice-rafted debris suggest a significant contribution to the sea level changes from melt water of Antarctic origin, in addition to likely contributions from northern ice sheets, but the relative volumes of melt water from northern and southern sources have yet to be established. Here we simulate the first-order impact of a range of relative meltwater releases from the two polar regions on the distribution of marine oxygen isotopes, using an intermediate complexity model. By comparing our simulations with oxygen isotope data from sediment cores, we infer that the contributions from Antarctica and the northern ice sheets to the documented sea level rises between 65,000 and 35,000 years ago were approximately equal, each accounting for a rise of about 15 m. The reductions in Antarctic ice volume implied by our analysis are comparable to that inferred previously for the Antarctic contribution to meltwater pulse 1A (refs 16, 17), which occurred about 14,200 years ago, during the last deglaciation.

  7. Resolving the Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise: a hierarchical modelling framework.

    PubMed

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Bamber, Jonathan; Schön, Nana

    2014-06-01

    Determining the Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise from observational data is a complex problem. The number of physical processes involved (such as ice dynamics and surface climate) exceeds the number of observables, some of which have very poor spatial definition. This has led, in general, to solutions that utilise strong prior assumptions or physically based deterministic models to simplify the problem. Here, we present a new approach for estimating the Antarctic contribution, which only incorporates descriptive aspects of the physically based models in the analysis and in a statistical manner. By combining physical insights with modern spatial statistical modelling techniques, we are able to provide probability distributions on all processes deemed to play a role in both the observed data and the contribution to sea-level rise. Specifically, we use stochastic partial differential equations and their relation to geostatistical fields to capture our physical understanding and employ a Gaussian Markov random field approach for efficient computation. The method, an instantiation of Bayesian hierarchical modelling, naturally incorporates uncertainty in order to reveal credible intervals on all estimated quantities. The estimated sea-level rise contribution using this approach corroborates those found using a statistically independent method. © 2013 The Authors. Environmetrics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Recent contributions of glaciers and ice caps to sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thomas; Wahr, John; Pfeffer, W Tad; Swenson, Sean

    2012-02-08

    Glaciers and ice caps (GICs) are important contributors to present-day global mean sea level rise. Most previous global mass balance estimates for GICs rely on extrapolation of sparse mass balance measurements representing only a small fraction of the GIC area, leaving their overall contribution to sea level rise unclear. Here we show that GICs, excluding the Greenland and Antarctic peripheral GICs, lost mass at a rate of 148 ± 30 Gt yr(-1) from January 2003 to December 2010, contributing 0.41 ± 0.08 mm yr(-1) to sea level rise. Our results are based on a global, simultaneous inversion of monthly GRACE-derived satellite gravity fields, from which we calculate the mass change over all ice-covered regions greater in area than 100 km(2). The GIC rate for 2003-2010 is about 30 per cent smaller than the previous mass balance estimate that most closely matches our study period. The high mountains of Asia, in particular, show a mass loss of only 4 ± 20 Gt yr(-1) for 2003-2010, compared with 47-55 Gt yr(-1) in previously published estimates. For completeness, we also estimate that the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, including their peripheral GICs, contributed 1.06 ± 0.19 mm yr(-1) to sea level rise over the same time period. The total contribution to sea level rise from all ice-covered regions is thus 1.48 ± 0.26 mm (-1), which agrees well with independent estimates of sea level rise originating from land ice loss and other terrestrial sources.

  9. Polyubiquitin gene expression contributes to oxidative stress resistance in respiratory yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Cheng, L; Watt, R; Piper, P W

    1994-05-10

    UBI4, the polyubiquitin gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is expressed at a low level in vegetative cells, yet induced strongly in response to starvation, cadmium, DNA-damaging agents and heat shock. UBI4 is also expressed at a higher basal level in cells growing by respiration as compared to glucose-repressed cells growing by fermentation. This higher UBI4 expression of respiratory cultures probably helps to counteract the greater oxidative stress of respiratory growth. The effects of inactivating UBI4 on high temperature viability are more marked with respiratory cultures. Also loss of UBI4 leads to a considerably increased rate of killing of respiring cells by hydrogen peroxide, whereas the same gene inactivation has relatively little effect on the peroxide sensitivity of cells in which mitochondrial functions are repressed. This is the first study to reveal that ubiquitin levels in cells can influence their ability to withstand oxidative stress.

  10. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-08-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells.

  11. Intercellular Variability in Protein Levels from Stochastic Expression and Noisy Cell Cycle Processes

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar A.; Antunes, Duarte; Singh, Abhyudai

    2016-01-01

    Inside individual cells, expression of genes is inherently stochastic and manifests as cell-to-cell variability or noise in protein copy numbers. Since proteins half-lives can be comparable to the cell-cycle length, randomness in cell-division times generates additional intercellular variability in protein levels. Moreover, as many mRNA/protein species are expressed at low-copy numbers, errors incurred in partitioning of molecules between two daughter cells are significant. We derive analytical formulas for the total noise in protein levels when the cell-cycle duration follows a general class of probability distributions. Using a novel hybrid approach the total noise is decomposed into components arising from i) stochastic expression; ii) partitioning errors at the time of cell division and iii) random cell-division events. These formulas reveal that random cell-division times not only generate additional extrinsic noise, but also critically affect the mean protein copy numbers and intrinsic noise components. Counter intuitively, in some parameter regimes, noise in protein levels can decrease as cell-division times become more stochastic. Computations are extended to consider genome duplication, where transcription rate is increased at a random point in the cell cycle. We systematically investigate how the timing of genome duplication influences different protein noise components. Intriguingly, results show that noise contribution from stochastic expression is minimized at an optimal genome-duplication time. Our theoretical results motivate new experimental methods for decomposing protein noise levels from synchronized and asynchronized single-cell expression data. Characterizing the contributions of individual noise mechanisms will lead to precise estimates of gene expression parameters and techniques for altering stochasticity to change phenotype of individual cells. PMID:27536771

  12. The expression levels of the sirtuins in patients with BCC.

    PubMed

    Temel, Metin; Koç, Mustafa Nihat; Ulutaş, Saffet; Göğebakan, Bülent

    2016-05-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common tumor in humans. Reduced expression of sirtuins interferes with DNA repair, which may cause mutations and genomic instability, and eventually leads to tumor development. In the present study, we investigate the expression levels of SIRT genes in non-tumoral and tumor tissues of patients with BCC. A total of 27 patients (16 males, 11 females) with BCC were included in the study; the mean age was 65.40 ± 10.74 years and mean follow-up was 2.5 ± 0.5 years. There were multiple synchronous lesions in six patients, and the remaining 21 patients had a single lesion. Tumor and non-tumoral tissue samples were collected from all patients, and mRNA expression levels of SIRT1-7 (Sirt1.1, Sirt1.2, Sirt2, Sirt3, Sirt4, Sirt5, Sirt6, and Sirt7) were examined by real-time PCR. The results showed that expressions of SIRT1.1, SIRT1.2, SIRT4, SIRT5, SIRT6, and SIRT7 mRNAs were unchanged in tumor tissues of BCC patients compared with non-tumoral tissue samples. Importantly, the expressions of SIRT2 and SIRT3 mRNAs were significantly reduced in tumor tissue samples from BCC patients compared with non-tumoral tissues (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). In light of the previous reports that have demonstrated a link between SIRT proteins and cancer, our findings suggest that SIRT2 and SIRT3 may plan important roles in BCC pathogenesis and could be candidate prognostic biomarkers for BCC.

  13. Modulation of yellow expression contributes to thermal plasticity of female abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, Jean-Michel; Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle; Peronnet, Frédérique

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity describes the ability of a given genotype to produce distinct phenotypes in different environments. We use the temperature sensitivity of abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster females as a model to analyse the effect of the environment on development. We reported previously that thermal plasticity of abdominal pigmentation in females involves the pigmentation gene tan (t). However, the expression of the pigmentation gene yellow (y) was also modulated by temperature in the abdominal epidermis of pharate females. We investigate here the contribution of y to female abdominal pigmentation plasticity. First, we show that y is required for the production of black Dopamine-melanin. Then, using in situ hybridization, we show that the expression of y is strongly modulated by temperature in the abdominal epidermis of pharate females but not in bristles. Interestingly, these two expression patterns are known to be controlled by distinct enhancers. However, the activity of the y-wing-body epidermal enhancer only partially mediates the effect of temperature suggesting that additional regulatory sequences are involved. In addition, we show that y and t co-expression is needed to induce strong black pigmentation indicating that y contributes to female abdominal pigmentation plasticity. PMID:28230190

  14. Age-Dependent TLR3 Expression of the Intestinal Epithelium Contributes to Rotavirus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Johanna; Stockinger, Silvia; Torow, Natalia; Smoczek, Anna; Lindner, Cornelia; McInerney, Gerald; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Baumann, Ulrich; Pabst, Oliver; Bleich, André; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea worldwide and exhibits a pronounced small intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) tropism. Both human infants and neonatal mice are highly susceptible, whereas adult individuals remain asymptomatic and shed only low numbers of viral particles. Here we investigated age-dependent mechanisms of the intestinal epithelial innate immune response to rotavirus infection in an oral mouse infection model. Expression of the innate immune receptor for viral dsRNA, Toll-like receptor (Tlr) 3 was low in the epithelium of suckling mice but strongly increased during the postnatal period inversely correlating with rotavirus susceptibility, viral shedding and histological damage. Adult mice deficient in Tlr3 (Tlr3−/−) or the adaptor molecule Trif (TrifLps2/Lps2) exerted significantly higher viral shedding and decreased epithelial expression of proinflammatory and antiviral genes as compared to wild-type animals. In contrast, neonatal mice deficient in Tlr3 or Trif did not display impaired cell stimulation or enhanced rotavirus susceptibility. Using chimeric mice, a major contribution of the non-hematopoietic cell compartment in the Trif-mediated antiviral host response was detected in adult animals. Finally, a significant age-dependent increase of TLR3 expression was also detected in human small intestinal biopsies. Thus, upregulation of epithelial TLR3 expression during infancy might contribute to the age-dependent susceptibility to rotavirus infection. PMID:22570612

  15. Regionally differentiated contribution of mountain glaciers and ice caps to future sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radić, Valentina; Hock, Regine

    2011-02-01

    The contribution to sea-level rise from mountain glaciers and ice caps has grown over the past decades. They are expected to remain an important component of eustatic sea-level rise for at least another century, despite indications of accelerated wastage of the ice sheets. However, it is difficult to project the future contribution of these small-scale glaciers to sea-level rise on a global scale. Here, we project their volume changes due to melt in response to transient, spatially differentiated twenty-first century projections of temperature and precipitation from ten global climate models. We conduct the simulations directly on the more than 120,000 glaciers now available in the World Glacier Inventory, and upscale the changes to 19 regions that contain all mountain glaciers and ice caps in the world (excluding the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets). According to our multi-model mean, sea-level rise from glacier wastage by 2100 will amount to 0.124+/-0.037m, with the largest contribution from glaciers in Arctic Canada, Alaska and Antarctica. Total glacier volume will be reduced by 21+/-6%, but some regions are projected to lose up to 75% of their present ice volume. Ice losses on such a scale may have substantial impacts on regional hydrology and water availability.

  16. Genome-Wide Dosage-Dependent and -Independent Regulation Contributes to Gene Expression and Evolutionary Novelty in Plant Polyploids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changqing; Ko, Dae Kwan; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidy provides evolutionary and morphological novelties in many plants and some animals. However, the role of genome dosage and composition in gene expression changes remains poorly understood. Here, we generated a series of resynthesized Arabidopsis tetraploids that contain 0-4 copies of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa genomes and investigated ploidy and hybridity effects on gene expression. Allelic expression can be defined as dosage dependent (expression levels correlate with genome dosages) or otherwise as dosage independent. Here, we show that many dosage-dependent genes contribute to cell cycle, photosynthesis, and metabolism, whereas dosage-independent genes are enriched in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Interestingly, dosage-dependent genes tend to be preserved in ancient biochemical pathways present in both plant and nonplant species, whereas many dosage-independent genes belong to plant-specific pathways. This is confirmed by an independent analysis using Arabidopsis phylostratigraphic map. For A. thaliana loci, the dosage-dependent alleles are devoid of TEs and tend to correlate with H3K9ac, H3K4me3, and CG methylation, whereas the majority of dosage-independent alleles are enriched with TEs and correspond to H3K27me1, H3K27me3, and CHG (H = A, T, or C) methylation. Furthermore, there is a parent-of-origin effect on nonadditively expressed genes in the reciprocal allotetraploids especially when A. arenosa is used as the pollen donor, leading to metabolic and morphological changes. Thus, ploidy, epigenetic modifications, and cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions shape gene expression diversity in polyploids. Dosage-dependent expression can maintain growth and developmental stability, whereas dosage-independent expression can facilitate functional divergence between homeologs (subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization) during polyploid evolution.

  17. Loss of RUNX3 expression may contribute to poor prognosis in patients with chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhe; Han, Ya-Xin; Han, Xiao-Rui

    2013-12-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common type of bone cancer. Loss of RUNX3 expression has been demonstrated in many other cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between RUNX3 expression and chondrosarcoma. In this study, we detected RUNX3 expression in the progression of chondrosarcoma. In patient samples, the levels of RUNX3 mRNA and protein were lower in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. Down-regulation of RUNX3 mRNA in tumor tissues was associated with an increase in RUNX3 promoter methylation. Loss of RUNX3 expression was significantly associated with more aggressive chondrosarcoma types and decreased survival time of patients. To examine the effects of exogenous expression of RUNX3 in vitro, chondrosarcoma cells were transfected with the pcDNA3.1-RUNX3 expression vector. Relative to control cells, RUNX3-expressing cells exhibited lower proliferation and higher apoptosis rates as assessed by colony formation and Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that RUNX3 acts a tumor suppressor in chondrosarcoma and that RUNX3 promoter methylation may be the molecular mechanism for its decreased expression.

  18. Suppression of cortisol levels in subordinate female marmosets: reproductive and social contributions.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, W; Schultz-Darken, N J; Wegner, F H; Wittwer, D J; Abbott, D H

    1998-02-01

    Socially subordinate female common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) have markedly lower plasma cortisol levels than dominant females. Subordinate females also undergo hypoestrogenemic anovulation, and estrogen can elevate glucocorticoid levels. Therefore, we previously hypothesized that this cortisol difference is mediated by rank-related differences in reproductive hormones, probably estradiol. To test this possibility, we characterized the effects of the ovarian cycle and ovariectomy on plasma cortisol concentrations. Beginning in the early follicular phase, basal blood samples were collected from seven cycling female marmosets daily for 16 days and at 2- to 3-day intervals for another 16 days. Samples were collected identically from seven anovulatory subordinate females and seven long-term ovariectomized females. Cortisol levels changed reliably across the ovarian cycle, with levels in the mid- to late follicular, peri-ovulatory, and early luteal phases higher than those in the remainder of the cycle. Cortisol levels of cycling females were significantly higher than those of subordinates at all parts of the cycle, but were significantly higher than those of ovariectomized females only during the midcycle elevation. Unexpectedly, subordinates had significantly lower cortisol levels than ovariectomized females, as well as higher estradiol and estrone levels and lower progesterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. These results confirm that circulating cortisol concentrations are modulated by reproductive function in female marmosets but also indicate that low cortisol levels in subordinate females cannot be attributed simply to hypoestrogenemia. Instead, other factors, such as direct effects of social subordination or suppression of LH levels, contribute to suppression of cortisol in subordinates.

  19. Substantial contribution to sea-level rise during the last interglacial from the Greenland ice sheet

    PubMed

    Cuffey; Marshall

    2000-04-06

    During the last interglacial period (the Eemian), global sea level was at least three metres, and probably more than five metres, higher than at present. Complete melting of either the West Antarctic ice sheet or the Greenland ice sheet would today raise sea levels by 6-7 metres. But the high sea levels during the last interglacial period have been proposed to result mainly from disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, with model studies attributing only 1-2 m of sea-level rise to meltwater from Greenland. This result was considered consistent with ice core evidence, although earlier work had suggested a much reduced Greenland ice sheet during the last interglacial period. Here we reconsider the Eemian evolution of the Greenland ice sheet by combining numerical modelling with insights obtained from recent central Greenland ice-core analyses. Our results suggest that the Greenland ice sheet was considerably smaller and steeper during the Eemian, and plausibly contributed 4-5.5 m to the sea-level highstand during that period. We conclude that the high sea level during the last interglacial period most probably included a large contribution from Greenland meltwater and therefore should not be interpreted as evidence for a significant reduction of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

  20. Glyoxalase I is differentially expressed in cutaneous neoplasms and contributes to the progression of squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiao-Yan; Ding, Dong; Zhan, Na; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Pan, Cheng; Xia, Yu-Min

    2015-02-01

    Glyoxalase I (GLO1) is a methylglyoxal detoxification enzyme being implicated in the progression of multiple malignancies. However, currently, the role of GLO1 in human nonmelanoma skin tumors remains unclear. To explore the expression of GLO1 in cutaneous neoplasms and its role in the pathogenesis of skin cancers, we determined the GLO1 expression in multiple subtypes of cutaneous neoplasms and cell lines harboring different tumorigenicity. Also, the GLO1 siRNA transfection was performed in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)-13 cells or SCC in the xenograft model. The results show that GLO1 was overexpressed by SCC, basal cell carcinoma, and verrucous carcinoma but weakly expressed by several benign neoplasms. Human papilloma virus 16 E6/E7-transfected keratinocytes expressed more GLO1 than did normal keratinocytes, although both of them had lower levels of GLO1 than SCC-13 cells. Moreover, the knockdown of GLO1 by siRNA was related to enhanced apoptosis of SCC-13 cells in the presence of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and inhibited cell invasion and migration, which was mirrored by the suppressed growth of SCC xenografts in mice. Finally, the GLO1 regulation of SCC-13 cells might be relevant to methylglyoxal-induced p53 translocation. Therefore, GLO1 is prevailingly expressed in cutaneous neoplasms of higher malignancy and contributes to the progression of SCC.

  1. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Contributes to Transformation of v-Rel-Expressing Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hrdličková, Radmila; Nehyba, Jiří; Bose, Henry R.

    2001-01-01

    The avian homologue of the interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4) and a novel splice variant lacking exon 6, IRF-4ΔE6, were isolated and characterized. Chicken IRF-4 is expressed in lymphoid organs, less in small intestine, and lungs. IRF-4ΔE6 mRNA, though less abundant than full-length IRF-4, was detected in lymphoid tissues, with the highest levels observed in thymic cells. IRF-4 is highly expressed in v-Rel-transformed lymphocytes, and the expression of IRF-4 is increased in v-Rel- and c-Rel-transformed fibroblasts relative to control cells. The expression of IRF-4 from retrovirus vectors morphologically transformed primary fibroblasts, increased their saturation density, proliferation, and life span, and promoted their growth in soft agar. IRF-4 and v-Rel cooperated synergistically to transform fibroblasts. The expression of IRF-4 antisense RNA eliminated formation of soft agar colonies by v-Rel and reduced the proliferation of v-Rel-transformed cells. v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts produced interferon 1 (IFN1), which inhibits fibroblast proliferation. Infection of fibroblasts with retroviruses expressing v-Rel resulted in an increase in the mRNA levels of IFN1, the IFN receptor, STAT1, JAK1, and 2′,5′-oligo(A) synthetase. The exogenous expression of IRF-4 in v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts decreased the production of IFN1 and suppressed the expression of several genes in the IFN transduction pathway. These results suggest that induction of IRF-4 expression by v-Rel likely facilitates transformation of fibroblasts by decreasing the induction of this antiproliferative pathway. PMID:11533227

  2. Probabilistic framework for assessing the ice sheet contribution to sea level change.

    PubMed

    Little, Christopher M; Urban, Nathan M; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2013-02-26

    Previous sea level rise (SLR) assessments have excluded the potential for dynamic ice loss over much of Greenland and Antarctica, and recently proposed "upper bounds" on Antarctica's 21st-century SLR contribution are derived principally from regions where present-day mass loss is concentrated (basin 15, or B15, drained largely by Pine Island, Thwaites, and Smith glaciers). Here, we present a probabilistic framework for assessing the ice sheet contribution to sea level change that explicitly accounts for mass balance uncertainty over an entire ice sheet. Applying this framework to Antarctica, we find that ongoing mass imbalances in non-B15 basins give an SLR contribution by 2100 that: (i) is comparable to projected changes in B15 discharge and Antarctica's surface mass balance, and (ii) varies widely depending on the subset of basins and observational dataset used in projections. Increases in discharge uncertainty, or decreases in the exceedance probability used to define an upper bound, increase the fractional contribution of non-B15 basins; even weak spatial correlations in future discharge growth rates markedly enhance this sensitivity. Although these projections rely on poorly constrained statistical parameters, they may be updated with observations and/or models at many spatial scales, facilitating a more comprehensive account of uncertainty that, if implemented, will improve future assessments.

  3. Localizing PRL-2 expression and determining the effects of dietary Mg(2+) on expression levels.

    PubMed

    Gungabeesoon, Jeremy; Tremblay, Michel L; Uetani, Noriko

    2016-07-01

    The phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) is a group of protein tyrosine phosphatases that play a key role in cancer progression and metastasis. We previously showed that PRL-2 modulates intracellular Mg(2+) levels and sustains cancer phenotypes by binding to the Mg(2+) transporter CNNM3. However, the physiological functions of PRL-2 in animals remain largely unknown. To better understand which cell types are associated with PRL-2 function, we characterized its expression in mouse tissues using a PRL-2 β-galactosidase reporter mouse model. Our results demonstrated that PRL-2 was ubiquitously expressed, with the highest expression levels observed in the hippocampal pyramidal neurons, ependymal cells, cone and rod photoreceptor cells, endocardium, vascular and bronchial smooth muscle, and collecting ducts in the kidney. On the other hand, PRL-2 expression was undetectable or very low in the parenchymal cells of the liver and pancreas. Our results also indicated that PRL-2 is involved in cell-type-specific Mg(2+) homeostasis and that PRL-2 expression is potentially inversely regulated by dietary Mg(2+) levels.

  4. Ectopic expressed miR-203 contributes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease via targeting TAK1 and PIK3CA.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Xin, Qinghong; Chai, Ruonan; Liu, Lei; Ma, Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    MiRNA is a group of powerful short non-coding RNAs that suppress the expression of protein coding genes by targeting to the 3'UTRs of mRNAs. Some researchers have detected the miRNAs expression profile in tissue and blood samples of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients recently. Several disturbed miRNAs were found to be related to COPD; however, the mechanisms were still well understood. In this study, we first detected the expression of 11 candidate miRNAs in the lung samples of COPD patients, non-COPD smokers and non-smock controls. We found that the expression of miR-181a, miR-203, miR-338, miR-1 and miR-199a was altered compared with control. Subsequently, we detected these five miRNAs expression in the blood samples of the participants. A significant higher expression of miR-203 was found in the blood samples of smokers and COPD patients. Predicted by bioinformatics tools and confirmed by luciferase assay and western blot, we demonstrated that TAK1 and PIK3CA are two direct targets of miR-203. Furthermore, we detected a lower p-IκBα and p-p65 level in the bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells from COPD patients compared with the cells from healthy controls, when stimulated by LPS. The concentration of TNF-α and IL-6 in the medium from bronchial/tracheal epithelial cells from COPD patients is also lower. Meanwhile, the miR-203 level was down-regulated significantly in the control cells, but non-significant change in the cells from COPD patients. miR-203 represses NF-κB signaling via targeting TAK1 and PI3KCA and miR-203 overexpression may contribute to the COPD initiation.

  5. Mountain glaciers and ice caps around Antarctica make a large sea-level rise contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Regine; de Woul, Mattias; Radić, Valentina; Dyurgerov, Mark

    2009-04-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that the sum of all contributions to sea-level rise for the period 1961-2004 was 1.1 ± 0.5 mm a-1, leaving 0.7 ± 0.7 of the 1.8 ± 0.5 mm a-1 observed sea-level rise unexplained. Here, we compute the global surface mass balance of all mountain glaciers and ice caps (MG&IC), and find that part of this much-discussed gap can be attributed to a larger contribution than previously assumed from mass loss of MG&IC, especially those around the Antarctic Peninsula. We estimate global surface mass loss of all MG&IC as 0.79 ± 0.34 mm a-1 sea-level equivalent (SLE) compared to IPCC's 0.50 ± 0.18 mm a-1. The Antarctic MG&IC contributed 28% of the global estimate due to exceptional warming around the Antarctic Peninsula and high sensitivities to temperature similar to those we find in Iceland, Patagonia and Alaska.

  6. Selenoprotein expression is regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Rebsch, Cheryl M; Penna, Frank J; Copeland, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    Selenium supplementation in a population with low basal blood selenium levels has been reported to decrease the incidence of several cancers including prostate cancer. Based on the clinical findings, it is likely that the antioxidant function of one or more selenoproteins is responsible for the chemopreventive effect, although low molecular weight seleno-compounds have also been posited to selectively induce apoptosis in transformed cells. To address the effects of selenium supplementation on selenoprotein expression in prostate cells, we have undertaken an analysis of antioxidant selenoprotein expression as well as selenium toxicity in non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC-3). Our results show that two of the glutathione peroxidase family members (GPX1 and GPX4) are highly induced by supplemental selenium in prostate cancer cells but only slightly induced in RWPE-1 cells. In addition, GPX1 levels are dramatically lower in PC-3 cells as compared to RWPE-1 or LNCaP cells. GPX2 protein and mRNA, however, are only detectable in RWPE-1 cells. Of the three selenium compounds tested (sodium selenite, sodium selenate and selenomethionine), only sodium selenite shows toxicity in a physiological range of selenium concentrations. Notably and in contrast to previous studies, RWPE-1 cells were significantly more sensitive to selenite than either of the prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that selenoproteins and selenium metabolism are regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

  7. Language Use Contributes to Expressive Language Growth: Evidence From Bilingual Children.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Krystal M; Hoff, Erika; Burridge, Andrea

    2017-02-28

    The unique relation of language use (i.e., output) to language growth was investigated for forty-seven 30-month-old Spanish-English bilingual children (27 girls, 20 boys) whose choices of which language to speak resulted in their levels of English output differing from their levels of English input. English expressive vocabularies and receptive language skills were assessed at 30, 36, and 42 months. Longitudinal multilevel modeling indicated an effect of output on expressive vocabulary growth only. The finding that output specifically benefits the development of expressive language skill has implications for understanding effects of language use on language skill in monolingual and bilingual development, and potentially, for understanding consequences of cultural differences in how much children are expected to talk in conversation with adults.

  8. Numb Expression Contributes to the Maintenance of an Undifferentiated State in Human Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Iannolo, Gioacchin; Sciuto, Maria Rita; Buccheri, Simona; Colarossi, Cristina; De Maria, Ruggero; Memeo, Lorenzo; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium with a stem cell subpopulation in the basal layer that constantly replicates and periodically detaches from the base, undergoing a differentiation process that involves various developmental signals and regulatory pathways. During the last 10 years, a number of studies tried to elucidate the intricate scenario that maintains the epithelial shield during the entire life span. In our study, we investigated the role of Numb in the skin compartment and, in particular, its involvement in stem cell maintenance. Numb expression in the skin compartment was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analysis. We evaluated Numb expression in primary epithelial cells at various differentiative stages. Moreover, we overexpressed Numb in the isolated population enriched for undifferentiated progenitors to establish its involvement in in vitro differentiation. We demonstrated that Numb in high-proliferating epithelial undifferentiated progenitors contributes to the maintenance of an undifferentiated state. This regulation involves the E3 ligases Itch binding. Moreover, the analysis of a cohort of cutaneous carcinomas showed that Numb is highly expressed in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), where we observed a direct correlation between the expression of Numb and Ki-67. Our data indicate for the first time that Numb is involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated proliferating stem cell pool in the epithelial basal layer and its expression could become a new marker in skin cancer.

  9. Both noncoding and protein-coding RNAs contribute to gene expression evolution in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Fedrigo, Olivier; Pfefferle, Adam D; Boyle, Alan P; Horvath, Julie E; Furey, Terrence S; Wray, Gregory A

    2010-01-18

    Despite striking differences in cognition and behavior between humans and our closest primate relatives, several studies have found little evidence for adaptive change in protein-coding regions of genes expressed primarily in the brain. Instead, changes in gene expression may underlie many cognitive and behavioral differences. Here, we used digital gene expression: tag profiling (here called Tag-Seq, also called DGE:tag profiling) to assess changes in global transcript abundance in the frontal cortex of the brains of 3 humans, 3 chimpanzees, and 3 rhesus macaques. A substantial fraction of transcripts we identified as differentially transcribed among species were not assayed in previous studies based on microarrays. Differentially expressed tags within coding regions are enriched for gene functions involved in synaptic transmission, transport, oxidative phosphorylation, and lipid metabolism. Importantly, because Tag-Seq technology provides strand-specific information about all polyadenlyated transcripts, we were able to assay expression in noncoding intragenic regions, including both sense and antisense noncoding transcripts (relative to nearby genes). We find that many noncoding transcripts are conserved in both location and expression level between species, suggesting a possible functional role. Lastly, we examined the overlap between differential gene expression and signatures of positive selection within putative promoter regions, a sign that these differences represent adaptations during human evolution. Comparative approaches may provide important insights into genes responsible for differences in cognitive functions between humans and nonhuman primates, as well as highlighting new candidate genes for studies investigating neurological disorders.

  10. Mapping the dynamic expression of Wnt11 and the lineage contribution of Wnt11-expressing cells during early mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Tanvi; Lin, Lizhu; Li, Ding; Davis, Jennifer; Evans, Sylvia; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that coordinates polarized cell behavior to regulate tissue morphogenesis during vertebrate gastrulation, neurulation and organogenesis. In Xenopus and zebrafish, PCP signaling is activated by non-canonical Wnts such as Wnt11, and detailed understanding of Wnt11 expression has provided important clues on when, where and how PCP may be activated to regulate tissue morphogenesis. To explore the role of Wnt11 in mammalian development, we established a Wnt11 expression and lineage map with high spatial and temporal resolution by creating and analyzing a tamoxifen-inducible Wnt11-CreER BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line. Our short- and long-term lineage tracing experiments indicated that Wnt11-CreER could faithfully recapitulate endogenous Wnt11 expression, and revealed for the first time that cells transiently expressing Wnt11 at early gastrulation were fated to become specifically the progenitors of the entire endoderm. During mid-gastrulation, Wnt11-CreER expressing cells also contribute extensively to the endothelium in both embryonic and extraembryonic compartments, and the endocardium in all chambers of the developing heart. In contrast, Wnt11-CreER expression in the myocardium starts from late-gastrulation, and occurs in three transient, sequential waves: first in the precursors of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium from E7.0 to 8.0; subsequently in the right ventricular (RV) myocardium from E8.0 to 9.0; and finally in the superior wall of the outflow tract (OFT) myocardium from E8.5 to 10.5. These results provide formal genetic proof that the majority of the endocardium and myocardium diverge by mid-gastrulation in the mouse, and suggest a tight spatial and temporal control of Wnt11 expression in the myocardial lineage to coordinate with myocardial differentiation in the first and second heart field progenitors to form the LV, RV and OFT. The insights gained

  11. Separating regional and global sea level contributions with an inverse multi-sensor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Jensen, L.; Rietbroek, R.

    2012-12-01

    We quantify the effect of mass flux (ice sheets, glaciers, land water storage) and steric changes on long-term and seasonal regional and global sea level variability. We perform a joint inversion with GRACE time-variable gravity and Jason-1/2 altimetric data and compare our results with those obtained with other methods. In this way, we are able to explain 1,45 mm/a of the 1,93 mm/a total sea level rise observed for 8/2002-7/2009. An inverse method to separate the temporal evolution of about 100 'fingerprints' of glacier and ice-sheet melting, thermal expansion, changes in catchment water storage and glacial isostatic adjustment from spaceborne gravity and altimetry data has been developed. Our method takes into account the effects of self-gravitation, elastic loading of the ocean bottom, and the response of Earth rotation to mass redistribution. For comparison, we also calculate the contributions of the individual catchments to sea level change from GRACE directly using a standard basin averaging method. While we find considerable differences between methods for catchment mass flux, GRACE-only results are quite robust in terms of global and regional sea level change. However, it turns out that adding Jason altimetry does provide valuable information in an inverse multi-sensor approach. In terms of global sea level rise, our results indicate, for example, a steric contribution of 0,35 mm/a in the considered time frame. Regionally, however, the contribution of ice sheets, glaciers, land water and steric changes displays strong variations. We will show results including error estimates for various regions.

  12. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days) or 29 days later (35 days) attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on denervated muscle. Marked

  13. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-08-12

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5(+) TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses.

  14. Elevated matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, FAN-CHANG; CEN, SONG; TANG, ZHENG-YAN; KANG, XIN-LI

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential association between matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and the pathogenesis of bladder cancer. The present study reviewed previous studies published in Chinese and English using predefined selection criteria, which identified high-quality studies concerning MMP-9 and bladder cancer. Statistical analyses of the data were conducted using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software version 2.0. In total, 23 case-control studies were selected, which consisted of 1,040 bladder cancer patients and 244 healthy controls. The expression rates and protein levels of MMP-9 were significantly increased in bladder cancer patients compared with the healthy controls, which was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based methods. Furthermore, the expression rate of MMP-9 in histological G1/G2 grade bladder cancer tumors was significantly decreased compared with G3 tumors. Subgroup analysis based on ethnicity demonstrated that the rate of MMP-9 protein expression between bladder cancer patients and healthy controls was significantly different in African, Asian and Caucasian patients, which was identified using IHC. The MMP-9 protein levels in bladder cancer patients and healthy controls were significantly different between Asian and Caucasian patients, but not African patients. The differences between MMP-9 expression in ethnic groups were also evident in the expression rate of MMP-9 identified in histological G1/G2 grade tumors in Asian and Caucasian patients compared with G3 grade tumors, which was not evident in African patients. In conclusion, the present meta-analysis results markedly indicate that MMP-9 expression is associated with clinicopathological features of bladder cancer, suggesting that MMP-9 may be a useful biomarker in the diagnosis and clinical management of bladder cancer, and may be a valuable therapeutic target. PMID:26998151

  15. Increased expressions of ADAMTS-13 and apoptosis contribute to neuropathology during Toxoplasma gondii encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dincel, Gungor Cagdas; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a protozoan parasite with the potential of causing severe encephalitis among immunocompromised humans and animals. Our previous study showed that T. gondii induces high nitric oxide (NO) production, high glial activation (GFAP) and neurofilament expressions, leading to severe neurodegeneration in toxoplasma encephalitis (TE) in the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this experimental study was to investigate ADAMTS-13 expression and apoptosis in CNS and to identify whether they have any correlation with toxoplasmosis neuropathology and neurodegeneration. Mice were infected with ME49 strain T. gondii and the levels of ADAMTS-13, caspase 3, caspase 8, caspase 9, TNFR1 and Bcl-xL expressions were examined in brain tissues by immunohistochemistry, during the development and establishment of chronic infections at 10, 30 and 60 days post-infection. Results of the study revealed that the levels of ADAMTS-13 (P < 0.005), caspase 3 (P < 0.05), caspase 8 (P < 0.05), caspase 9 (P < 0.005) and TNFR1 (P < 0.05) expressions in the brain markedly increased while Bcl-xL expression decreased (P < 0.005). The most prominent finding from our study was that 10, 30 and 60 days post-infection ADAMTS-13 increased significantly and this may play an important role in the regulation and protection of the blood-brain barrier integrity and CNS microenvironment in TE. These results also suggest that T. gondii-mediated apoptosis might play a pivotal role and a different type of role in the mechanism of neurodegeneration and neuropathology in the process of TE. Furthermore, expression of ADAMTS-13 might give an idea of the progress and is critical for diagnosis of this disease. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on ADAMTS-13 expression in the CNS of T. gondii-infected mice.

  16. Contribution of Alaskan glaciers to sea-level rise derived from satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, E.; Schiefer, E.; Clarke, G. K. C.; Menounos, B.; Rémy, F.

    2010-02-01

    Over the past 50 years, retreating glaciers and ice caps contributed 0.5mmyr-1 to sea-level rise, and one third of this contribution is believed to come from ice masses bordering the Gulf of Alaska. However, these estimates of ice loss in Alaska are based on measurements of a limited number of glaciers that are extrapolated to constrain ice wastage in the many thousands of others. Uncertainties in these estimates arise, for example, from the complex pattern of decadal elevation changes at the scale of individual glaciers and mountain ranges. Here we combine a comprehensive glacier inventory with elevation changes derived from sequential digital elevation models. We find that between 1962 and 2006, Alaskan glaciers lost 41.9+/-8.6km3yr-1 of water, and contributed 0.12+/-0.02mm yr-1 to sea-level rise, 34% less than estimated earlier. Reasons for our lower values include the higher spatial resolution of our glacier inventory as well as the reduction of ice thinning underneath debris and at the glacier margins, which were not resolved in earlier work. We suggest that estimates of mass loss from glaciers and ice caps in other mountain regions could be subject to similar revisions.

  17. Contribution of mountain glaciers and ice caps to sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, R. M.; de Woul, M.; Radic, V.; Dyurgerov, M.

    2009-12-01

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps (MG&IC) have been identified as primary source of eustatic sea level rise, ahead of the ice sheets, during recent decades. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimates that the sum of all contributions to sea-level rise for the period 1961-2004 was 1.1± 0.5 mm a-1, leaving 0.7±0.7 of the 1.8±0.5 mm a-1 observed sea-level rise unexplained. Here, we compute the global surface mass balance of all mountain glaciers and ice caps and find that part of this much-discussed gap can be attributed to a larger contribution than previously assumed from mass loss of MG&IC, especially those around the Antarctic Peninsula. We find a global surface mass loss of all MG&IC of 0.79±0.34 mm a-1 sea-level equivalent compared to IPCC’s 0.50±0.18 mm a-1. The Antarctic MG&IC contributed 28% of the global estimate due to exceptional warming around the Antarctic Peninsula and high mass-balance sensitivities to temperature similar to those we find in maritime Iceland, Patagonia and Alaska. Our results highlight the role of the MG&IC around the Antarctic Peninsula where climate is distinctly different from the cold conditions of the ice sheet, and large mass balance sensitivities to temperature, exceptional warming and large area combine to yield large potential for glacier mass loss. We emphasize an urgent need for improved glacier inventory and in-situ mass balance data from this region especially in light of recently accelerated mass loss from MG&IC.

  18. Contribution of Reduced Interleukin-10 Levels to the Pathogenesis of Osteomyelitis in Children with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Sarray, Sameh; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2015-09-01

    Osteomyelitis is a significant complication of sickle cell disease (SCD), and several factors contribute to its pathogenesis, including altered expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In view of the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, we tested the notion that SCD osteomyelitis is associated with a reduction in IL-10 secretion and, hence, precipitation of a proinflammatory state. Study subjects comprised 52 SCD patients with confirmed diagnosis of osteomyelitis and 165 age- and gender-matched SCD patients with negative histories of osteomyelitis. Results obtained showed that IL-10 serum levels in SCD osteomyelitis patients were significantly lower than those of control SCD patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated that altered IL-10 serum levels predicted the development of osteomyelitis, and the mean area under ROC curves of IL-10 was 0.810 among SCD patients with osteomyelitis. A systematic shift in IL-10 serum levels toward lower values was seen in osteomyelitis cases, with an increased osteomyelitis risk associated with decreased IL-10 levels. Multivariate logistic regression analyses confirmed the independent association of reduced IL-10 with osteomyelitis after controlling for sickle hemoglobin (HbS), fetal hemoglobin (HbF), platelet count, and white blood cell (WBC) count. These data support the strong association of decreased IL-10 levels with osteomyelitis, thereby supporting a role for IL-10 in osteomyelitis follow-up.

  19. Contribution of global groundwater depletion since 1900 to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Removal of water from terrestrial subsurface storage is a natural consequence of groundwater withdrawals, but global depletion is not well characterized. Cumulative groundwater depletion represents a transfer of mass from land to the oceans that contributes to sea-level rise. Depletion is directly calculated using calibrated groundwater models, analytical approaches, or volumetric budget analyses for multiple aquifer systems. Estimated global groundwater depletion during 1900–2008 totals ~4,500 km3, equivalent to a sea-level rise of 12.6 mm (>6% of the total). Furthermore, the rate of groundwater depletion has increased markedly since about 1950, with maximum rates occurring during the most recent period (2000–2008), when it averaged ~145 km3/yr (equivalent to 0.40 mm/yr of sea-level rise, or 13% of the reported rate of 3.1 mm/yr during this recent period).

  20. Contribution of the Patagonia Icefields of South America to sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Rignot, Eric; Rivera, Andrés; Casassa, Gino

    2003-10-17

    Digital elevation models of the Northern and Southern Patagonia Icefields of South America generated from the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission were compared with earlier cartography to estimate the volume change of the largest 63 glaciers. During the period 1968/1975-2000, these glaciers lost ice at a rate equivalent to a sea level rise of 0.042 +/- 0.002 millimeters per year. In the more recent years 1995-2000, average ice thinning rates have more than doubled to an equivalent sea level rise of 0.105 +/- 0.011 millimeters per year. The glaciers are thinning more quickly than can be explained by warmer air temperatures and decreased precipitation, and their contribution to sea level per unit area is larger than that of Alaska glaciers.

  1. PML nuclear bodies contribute to the basal expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4

    PubMed Central

    Salsman, Jayme; Stathakis, Alex; Parker, Ellen; Chung, Dudley; Anthes, Livia E.; Koskowich, Kara L.; Lahsaee, Sara; Gaston, Daniel; Kukurba, Kimberly R.; Smith, Kevin S.; Chute, Ian C.; Léger, Daniel; Frost, Laura D.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Lewis, Stephen M.; Eskiw, Christopher; Dellaire, Graham

    2017-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is an essential component of PML nuclear bodies (PML NBs) frequently lost in cancer. PML NBs coordinate chromosomal regions via modification of nuclear proteins that in turn may regulate genes in the vicinity of these bodies. However, few PML NB-associated genes have been identified. PML and PML NBs can also regulate mTOR and cell fate decisions in response to cellular stresses. We now demonstrate that PML depletion in U2OS cells or TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts results in decreased expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4 (REDD1). DNA and RNA immuno-FISH reveal that PML NBs are closely associated with actively transcribed DDIT4 loci, implicating these bodies in regulation of basal DDIT4 expression. Although PML silencing did reduce the sensitivity of U2OS cells to metabolic stress induced by metformin, PML loss did not inhibit the upregulation of DDIT4 in response to metformin, hypoxia-like (CoCl2) or genotoxic stress. Analysis of publicly available cancer data also revealed a significant correlation between PML and DDIT4 expression in several cancer types (e.g. lung, breast, prostate). Thus, these findings uncover a novel mechanism by which PML loss may contribute to mTOR activation and cancer progression via dysregulation of basal DDIT4 gene expression. PMID:28332630

  2. NFAT5 Contributes to Osmolality-Induced MCP-1 Expression in Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-X.; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Increased expression of the C-C chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in mesothelial cells in response to high glucose concentrations and/or high osmolality plays a crucial role in the development of peritoneal fibrosis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Recent studies suggest that in kidney cells osmolality-induced MCP-1 upregulation is mediated by the osmosensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5). The present study addressed the question of whether activation of NFAT5 by hyperosmolality, as present in PD fluids, contributes to MCP-1 expression in the mesothelial cell line Met5A. Hyperosmolality, induced by addition of glucose, NaCl, or mannitol to the growth medium, increased NFAT5 activity and stimulated MCP-1 expression in Met5A cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFAT5 attenuated osmolality-induced MCP-1 upregulation substantially. Hyperosmolality also induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB significantly decreased osmolality-induced MCP-1 expression. Taken together, these results indicate that high osmolalities activate the transcription factor NFAT5 in mesothelial cells. NFAT5 in turn upregulates MCP-1, likely in combination with NF-κB, and thus may participate in the development of peritoneal fibrosis during CAPD. PMID:22619484

  3. PML nuclear bodies contribute to the basal expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4.

    PubMed

    Salsman, Jayme; Stathakis, Alex; Parker, Ellen; Chung, Dudley; Anthes, Livia E; Koskowich, Kara L; Lahsaee, Sara; Gaston, Daniel; Kukurba, Kimberly R; Smith, Kevin S; Chute, Ian C; Léger, Daniel; Frost, Laura D; Montgomery, Stephen B; Lewis, Stephen M; Eskiw, Christopher; Dellaire, Graham

    2017-03-23

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is an essential component of PML nuclear bodies (PML NBs) frequently lost in cancer. PML NBs coordinate chromosomal regions via modification of nuclear proteins that in turn may regulate genes in the vicinity of these bodies. However, few PML NB-associated genes have been identified. PML and PML NBs can also regulate mTOR and cell fate decisions in response to cellular stresses. We now demonstrate that PML depletion in U2OS cells or TERT-immortalized normal human diploid fibroblasts results in decreased expression of the mTOR inhibitor DDIT4 (REDD1). DNA and RNA immuno-FISH reveal that PML NBs are closely associated with actively transcribed DDIT4 loci, implicating these bodies in regulation of basal DDIT4 expression. Although PML silencing did reduce the sensitivity of U2OS cells to metabolic stress induced by metformin, PML loss did not inhibit the upregulation of DDIT4 in response to metformin, hypoxia-like (CoCl2) or genotoxic stress. Analysis of publicly available cancer data also revealed a significant correlation between PML and DDIT4 expression in several cancer types (e.g. lung, breast, prostate). Thus, these findings uncover a novel mechanism by which PML loss may contribute to mTOR activation and cancer progression via dysregulation of basal DDIT4 gene expression.

  4. Hyperglycemia-Suppressed Expression of Serpine1 Contributes to Delayed Epithelial Wound Healing in Diabetic Mouse Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haijing; Mi, Xiaofan; Gao, Nan; Yan, Chenxi; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are at an increased risk for developing corneal complications, including delayed wound healing. The purpose of this study was to characterize the expression and the function of Serpine1 and other components of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)–proteolytic system in delayed epithelial wound healing in diabetic mouse corneas. Methods. Mice of the strain C57BL/6 were induced to develop diabetes by streptozotocin, and wound-healing assays were performed 10 weeks afterward. Gene expression and/or distribution were assessed by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and/or immunohistochemistry. The role of Serpine1 in mediating epithelial wound closure was determined by subconjunctival injections of neutralizing antibodies in either normal or recombinant protein in diabetic corneas. Enzyme assay for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 was also performed. Results. The expressions of Serpine1 (PAI-1), Plau (uPA), and Plaur (uPA receptor) were upregulated in response to wounding, and these upregulations were significantly suppressed by hyperglycemia. In healing epithelia, Plau and Serpine1 were abundantly expressed at the leading edge of the healing epithelia of normal and, to a lesser extent, diabetic corneas. Inhibition of Serpine1 delayed epithelial wound closure in normal corneas, whereas recombinant Serpine1 accelerated it in diabetic corneas. The Plau and MMP-3 mRNA levels and MMP-3 enzymatic activities were correlated to Serpine1 levels and/or the rates of epithelial wound closure. Conclusions. Serpine1 plays a role in mediating epithelial wound healing and its impaired expression may contribute to delayed wound healing in DM corneas. Hence, modulating uPA proteolytic pathway may represent a new approach for treating diabetic keratopathy. PMID:26024123

  5. River discharge contribution to sea-level rise in the Yangtze River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Cuiping; Chen, Wei; Gu, Jie; Su, Tsung-Chow; Song, Hongling; Ma, Yue; Dong, Zhichao

    2017-02-01

    Sea level changes in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) as a result of river discharge are investigated based on the monthly averaged river discharge from 1950 to 2011 at the Datong station. Quantification of the sea level contribution is made by model computed results and the sea level rates reported by the China Sea Level Bulletin (CSLB). The coastal modeling tool, MIKE21, is used to establish a depth-averaged hydrodynamic model covering the YRE and Hangzhou Bay. The model is validated with the measured data. Multi-year monthly river discharges are statistically calculated based on the monthly river discharges at Datong station from 1950 to 2011. The four characteristic discharges (frequency of 75%, 50% and 25%, and multi-year monthly) and month-averaged river discharge from 1950 to 2011 are used to study the seasonal and long-term changes of sea level. The computed sea level at the Dajishan and Lvsi stations are used to study the multi-time scale structure of periodic variation in different time scale of river discharge series. The results reveal that (1) the sea level rises as the river discharge increases, and its amplification decreases from upstream to the offshore. (2) The sea level amplification on the south coast is greater than that on the north coast. When river discharge increases by 20,000 m3/s, the sea level will increase by 0.005-0.010 m in most of Hangzhou Bay. (3) The sea level at the Dajishan station, influenced by river discharge, increased 0.178 mm/y from 1980 to 2011. Correspondingly, the sea level rose at a rate of 2.6-3.0 mm/y during the same period. These values were provided by the CSLB. The increase in sea level (1980-2011) at the Dajishan station caused by river discharge is 6.8-8.9% of the total increase in sea level. (4) The 19-20 year dominant nodal cycle of sea level at the Dajishan and Lvsi stations is in accord with 18.6 year nodal cycle of main tidal constituents on Chinese coasts. It implies that the sea-level change period on the

  6. Multi-level Expression Design Language: Requirement level (MEDL-R) system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the Multi-Level Expression Design Language Requirements Level (MEDL-R) system was conducted to determine whether it would be of use in the Goddard Space Flight Center Code 580 software development environment. The evaluation is based upon a study of the MEDL-R concept of requirement languages, the functions performed by MEDL-R, and the MEDL-R language syntax. Recommendations are made for changes to MEDL-R that would make it useful in the Code 580 environment.

  7. Fosb gene products contribute to excitotoxic microglial activation by regulating the expression of complement C5a receptors in microglia

    PubMed Central

    Nomaru, Hiroko; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Katogi, Atsuhisa; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N; Kajitani, Kosuke; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nestler, Eric J.; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    The Fosb gene encodes subunits of the activator protein-1 transcription factor complex. Two mature mRNAs, Fosb and ΔFosb, encoding full-length FOSB and ΔFOSB proteins respectively, are formed by alternative splicing of Fosb mRNA. Fosb products are expressed in several brain regions. Moreover, Fosb-null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and adult-onset spontaneous epilepsy, demonstrating important roles in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Study of Fosb products has focused almost exclusively on neurons; their function in glial cells remains to be explored. In this study, we found that microglia express equivalent levels of Fosb and ΔFosb mRNAs to hippocampal neurons and, using microarray analysis, we identified six microglial genes whose expression is dependent on Fosb products. Of these genes, we focused on C5ar1 and C5ar2, which encode receptors for complement C5a. In isolated Fosb-null microglia, chemotactic responsiveness toward the truncated form of C5a was significantly lower than that in wild-type cells. Fosb-null mice were significantly resistant to kainate-induced seizures compared with wild-type mice. C5ar1 mRNA levels and C5aR1 immunoreactivity were increased in wild-type hippocampus 24 hours after kainate administration; however, such induction was significantly reduced in Fosb-null hippocampus. Furthermore, microglial activation after kainate administration was significantly diminished in Fosb-null hippocampus, as shown by significant reductions in CD68 immunoreactivity, morphological change and reduced levels of Il6 and Tnf mRNAs, although no change in the number of Iba-1-positive cells was observed. These findings demonstrate that, under excitotoxicity, Fosb products contribute to a neuroinflammatory response in the hippocampus through regulation of microglial C5ar1 and C5ar2 expression. PMID:24771617

  8. Computer models of possible physiological contributions to low-level auditory scene analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddis, Ray

    2004-05-01

    Auditory selective attention is a general term for a wide range of phenomena including grouping and streaming of sound sources. While we know a great deal about the circumstances in which these phenomena occur, we have little understanding of the physiological mechanisms that give rise to these effects. Because attention is sometimes under conscious control, it is tempting to conclude that attention is a high-level/cortical function and beyond our current understanding of brain physiology. However, a number of mechanisms operating at the level of the brainstem may well make an important contribution to auditory scene analysis. Because we know much more about the response of the brainstem to auditory stimulation, we can begin some speculative modeling concerning their possible involvement. Two mechanisms will be discussed in terms of their possible relevance: lateral and recurrent inhibition at the level of the cochlear nucleus. These are likely to contribute to the selection of auditory channels. A new approach to within-channel selection on the basis of pitch will also be discussed. These approaches will be illustrated using computer models of the underlying physiology and their response to stimuli used in psychophysical experiments.

  9. Modeling ice dynamic contributions to sea level rise from the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schannwell, C.; Barrand, N. E.; Radić, V.

    2015-11-01

    The future ice dynamical contribution to sea level rise (SLR) from 199 ice shelf nourishing drainage basins of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet is simulated, using the British Antarctic Survey Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Model. Simulations of the grounded ice sheet include response to ice shelf collapse, estimated by tracking thermal ice shelf viability limits in 14 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change global climate models ensemble temperature projections. Grounding line retreat in response to ice shelf collapse is parameterized with a new multivariate linear regression model utilizing a range of glaciological and geometric predictor variables. Multimodel means project SLR up to 9.4 mm sea level equivalent (SLE) by 2200, and up to 19 mm SLE by 2300. Rates of SLR from individual drainage basins throughout the peninsula are similar to 2100, yet diverge between 2100 and 2300 due to individual basin characteristics. Major contributors to SLR are the outlet glaciers feeding southern George VI Ice Shelf, accounting for >75% of total SLR in some model runs. Ice sheet thinning induced by ice-shelf removal is large (up to ˜500 m), especially in Palmer Land in the southern Antarctic Peninsula, and may propagate as far as 135 km inland. These results emphasize the importance of the ice dynamical contribution to future sea level of the APIS on decadal to centennial timescales.

  10. Assessment of Epigenetic Contributions to Sexually-Dimorphic Kiss1 Expression in the Anteroventral Periventricular Nucleus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Semaan, Sheila J.; Dhamija, Sangeeta; Kim, Joshua; Ku, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    The Kiss1 gene, which encodes kisspeptin and is critical for reproduction, is sexually differentiated in the hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular (AVPV)/rostral periventricular (PeN) nuclei. Specifically, female rodents have higher AVPV/PeN Kiss1 expression than males, but how this Kiss1 sex difference is induced in early development is poorly understood. Here, we explored the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to the establishment of the AVPV/PeN Kiss1 sex difference, focusing on histone deacetylation and DNA methylation. First, we utilized postnatal pharmacological blockade of histone deacetylation and analyzed Kiss1 expression in the AVPV/PeN. Postnatal disruption of histone deacetylase modestly increased AVPV Kiss1 cell number in both sexes but did not alter the Kiss1 sex difference. Next, we assessed whether the level of CpG methylation, which can influence transcription factor binding and gene expression, in the murine Kiss1 gene differs between males and females. We found significant sex differences in methylation at several CpG sites in the putative promoter and first intron of the Kiss1 gene in the AVPV/PeN, but not in the arcuate (which lacks adult Kiss1 sex differences), suggesting that differential methylation of the Kiss1 gene may influence sexually-dimorphic Kiss1 expression in the AVPV/PeN. Transgenic impairment of methyl CpG-binding protein-2 function did not eliminate the Kiss1 sex difference, indicating that other methylation factors are involved. Interestingly, CpG methylation in the AVPV/PeN was lower in males than females, suggesting that transcriptional repressors may contribute to the AVPV/PeN Kiss1 sex difference, a possibility supported by in silico identification of putative repressor binding sites near some of the sexually-dimorphic CpG. PMID:22374971

  11. Saharan dust contribution to PM levels: The EC LIFE+ DIAPASON project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, G. P.; Wille, H.; Sozzi, R.; Angelini, F.; Barnaba, F.; Costabile, F.; Frey, S.; Bolignano, A.; Di Giosa, A.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of Saharan-dust advections to both daily and annual PM average values can be significant all over Southern Europe. The most important effects of dust on the number of PM exceedances are mostly observed in polluted areas and large cities. While a wide literature exists documenting episodes of Saharan dust transport towards the Euro-Mediterranean region and Europe in general, a limited number of studies are still available providing statistically significant results on the impact of Saharan dust on the particulate matter loads over the continent. A four-year (2001-2004) study performed in Rome (Italy) found these events to contribute to the average ground PM10 with about 15±10 µg/m3 on about 17% of the days in a year. Since the PM10 yearly average of many traffic stations in Rome is close to 40 μg/m3, these events can cause the PM10 concentration to exceed air quality limit values (50 μg/m3 as daily average) set by the EU Air Quality Directive 2008/50/EC. Although the European legislation allows Member States to subtract the contribution of natural sources before counting PM10 exceedances, definition of an optimal methodology to quantitatively assess such contribution is still in progress. On the basis of the current European Guidelines on the assessment of natural contributions to PM, the DIAPASON project ("Desert-dust Impact on Air quality through model-Predictions and Advanced Sensors ObservatioNs", recently funded under the EC LIFE+ program) has been formulated to provide a robust, user-oriented methodology to assess the presence of desert dust and its contribution to PM levels. To this end, in addition to satellite-based data and model forecasts, the DIAPASON methodology will employ innovative and affordable technologies, partly prototyped within the project itself, as an operational Polarization Lidar-Ceilometer (laser radar) capable of detecting and profiling dust clouds from the ground up to 10 km altitude. The DIAPASON Project (2011

  12. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Keesha E.; Otoupal, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment

  13. Transcriptome-Level Signatures in Gene Expression and Gene Expression Variability during Bacterial Adaptive Evolution.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Keesha E; Otoupal, Peter B; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly serious public health concern, as strains emerge that demonstrate resistance to almost all available treatments. One factor that contributes to the crisis is the adaptive ability of bacteria, which exhibit remarkable phenotypic and gene expression heterogeneity in order to gain a survival advantage in damaging environments. This high degree of variability in gene expression across biological populations makes it a challenging task to identify key regulators of bacterial adaptation. Here, we research the regulation of adaptive resistance by investigating transcriptome profiles of Escherichia coli upon adaptation to disparate toxins, including antibiotics and biofuels. We locate potential target genes via conventional gene expression analysis as well as using a new analysis technique examining differential gene expression variability. By investigating trends across the diverse adaptation conditions, we identify a focused set of genes with conserved behavior, including those involved in cell motility, metabolism, membrane structure, and transport, and several genes of unknown function. To validate the biological relevance of the observed changes, we synthetically perturb gene expression using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-dCas9. Manipulation of select genes in combination with antibiotic treatment promotes adaptive resistance as demonstrated by an increased degree of antibiotic tolerance and heterogeneity in MICs. We study the mechanisms by which identified genes influence adaptation and find that select differentially variable genes have the potential to impact metabolic rates, mutation rates, and motility. Overall, this work provides evidence for a complex nongenetic response, encompassing shifts in gene expression and gene expression variability, which underlies adaptive resistance. IMPORTANCE Even initially sensitive bacteria can rapidly thwart antibiotic treatment through stress

  14. Host JDP2 expression in the bone marrow contributes to metastatic spread

    PubMed Central

    Barbarov, Yelena; Timaner, Michael; Alishekevitz, Dror; Hai, Tsonwin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun Dimerization Protein 2, JDP2, is a basic leucine zipper protein member of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors. JDP2 typically suppresses gene transcription through multiple mechanisms and plays a dual role in multiple cellular processes, including cell differentiation and proliferation which is dependent on AP-1 function. Whereas the role of JDP2 expression within cancer cells has been studied, its role in stromal cells at the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Here we show that mice lacking JDP2 (JDP2−/−) display a reduced rate of metastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT) breast carcinoma mouse models. The replacement of wild-type bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) with JDP2-deficient BMDCs recapitulates the metastatic phenotype of JDP2−/− tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, conditioned medium of wild-type BMDCs significantly potentiates the migration and invasion capacity of LLC cells as compared to that of JDP2−/− BMDCs. Furthermore, wild-type BMDCs secrete CCL5, a chemokine known to contribute to metastasis, to a greater extent than JDP2−/− BMDCs. The supplementation of CCL5 in JDP2−/− BMDC conditioned medium was sufficient to potentiate the invasion capacity of LLC. Overall, this study suggests that JDP2-expressing BMDCs within the tumor microenvironment contribute to metastatic spread. PMID:26497998

  15. G3BP1 contributes to tumor metastasis via upregulation of Slug expression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ning; Chen, Jingde; Yu, Shijun; Gao, Yong; Li, Yandong

    2016-01-01

    RasGAP SH3-domain-Binding Protein 1 (G3BP1) has been implicated in cell growth, migration, and metastasis of some cancers, yet its function in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be explored. In the present study, we reported that G3BP1 was upregulated in HCC tissues compared with adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues both in mRNA and protein levels, and its high expression was significantly correlated with poor prognosis of HCC patients. Functional analyses demonstrated that forced expression of G3BP1 in HCC cells promoted cell migration, and silenced expression of G3BP1 by RNA interference caused opposite effects. Moreover, G3BP1 knockdown attenuated the distant metastasis capacity of HCC cells through tail vein injection approach in nude mice model. At molecular mechanism, we found G3BP1 knockdown decreased Slug expression, and increased the expression of the epithelial cell marker E-cadherin. Overexpression of Slug could restore the phenotype of G3BP1 silencing induced cell migration inhibition. Together, our data establish G3BP1 as an oncogenic factor involved in the metastasis of HCC and suggest that G3BP1 might serve as a novel predictor for patients’ outcome. PMID:27904777

  16. What it costs to implement a plan: plan-level and task-level contributions to switch costs.

    PubMed

    Logan, Gordon D

    2007-06-01

    Four experiments were conducted to identify the costs of implementing a plan in the task span procedure, which requires subjects to retrieve the task to perform on the current target from a list of planned tasks in memory. Experiment 1 compared switch costs in the task span procedure with switch costs in the explicit task-cuing procedure, which presented cues indicating the task to perform on each target. Switch costs were greater in the task span procedure. Experiments 2-4 were designed to identify the sources of this difference. Experiment 2 showed that the requirement of establishing a correspondence between the list of task names and the list of targets contributed to switch costs. Experiment 3 showed that retaining lists of similar task names produced greater switch costs than did retaining lists of dissimilar task names. Experiment 4 showed that memory load had no effect on switch costs. The results are discussed in terms of the interaction between plan-level and task-level processing in the implementation of plans.

  17. A reconciled estimate of glacier contributions to sea level rise: 2003 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Alex S; Moholdt, Geir; Cogley, J Graham; Wouters, Bert; Arendt, Anthony A; Wahr, John; Berthier, Etienne; Hock, Regine; Pfeffer, W Tad; Kaser, Georg; Ligtenberg, Stefan R M; Bolch, Tobias; Sharp, Martin J; Hagen, Jon Ove; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Paul, Frank

    2013-05-17

    Glaciers distinct from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets are losing large amounts of water to the world's oceans. However, estimates of their contribution to sea level rise disagree. We provide a consensus estimate by standardizing existing, and creating new, mass-budget estimates from satellite gravimetry and altimetry and from local glaciological records. In many regions, local measurements are more negative than satellite-based estimates. All regions lost mass during 2003-2009, with the largest losses from Arctic Canada, Alaska, coastal Greenland, the southern Andes, and high-mountain Asia, but there was little loss from glaciers in Antarctica. Over this period, the global mass budget was -259 ± 28 gigatons per year, equivalent to the combined loss from both ice sheets and accounting for 29 ± 13% of the observed sea level rise.

  18. Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise during the Last Interglacial and future centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeConto, Robert; Pollard, David

    2014-05-01

    Substantial retreat of the Antarctic Ice Sheet during past warm periods including the Pliocene and some Pleistocene interglacials has been difficult to reconcile in most ice sheet models. This includes the Last Interglacial (LIG; ~130 to 115 ka), when Antarctica is now thought to have contributed +4 to +7m of equivalent sea-level rise. Here we use a continental ice sheet-shelf model with new physics accounting for structural failure of large tidewater ice cliffs and the influence of surface meltwater on ice-shelf calving. Coupled with high-resolution atmosphere and ocean components, the model is used to simulate the Antarctic Ice Sheet under Pliocene, LIG, and future conditions. The new model simulates an Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise of ~15m during peak mid-Pliocene warmth and ~4.25m during the LIG, in approximate agreement with (albeit uncertain) geological sea-level indicators. When applied to long-term future simulations assuming extended RCP greenhouse gas emission scenarios and using high resolution atmosphere and ocean components, the same model physics show a dramatic retreat of Antarctic marine-based ice over the next 500 years, beginning within a few decades in the Pine Island Bay sector of West Antarctica. In the most extreme RCP scenarios, subsequent retreat of the Siple Coast margin results in the near-total collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) within a few centuries, followed by retreat into the deep subglacial basins underlying the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). Antarctica is shown to contribute up to 9m of sea level rise within the next five centuries. Under such high greenhouse gas conditions, atmospheric warming alone is sufficient to cause substantial ice retreat, without any influence from ocean warming and sub-ice melt. Conversely, in the absence of increasing atmospheric temperatures, very little ocean warming (<0.5 C) is required to trigger substantial WAIS retreat, even if present-day atmospheric temperatures are held

  19. Induction of renal senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) expression by testosterone and its contribution to urinary calcium absorption in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Po-Han; Jian, Cai-Yun; Chou, Jou-Chun; Chen, Chien-Wei; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Soong, Christina; Hu, Sindy; Lieu, Fu-Kong; Wang, Paulus S.; Wang, Shyi-Wu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of androgen, mainly testosterone, in the expression of renal senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) in male rats. We found that the renal SMP30 expression was up-regulated by endogenous testosterone stimulation during puberty. Interestingly, androgen-deficient orchidectomized (ORX) rats exhibited lower SMP30 mRNA and protein expression in the kidney, and that was restored by testosterone propionate (TP) replacement. Abrogation of androgen receptor (AR) activity by co-treatment with flutamide abolished testosterone-induced SMP30 expression in the kidney as well as in the NRK52E cells. However, SMP30 expression was unaltered in the liver of ORX rats. We also showed a positive correlation between renal SMP30 expression and plasma testosterone level during the aging process. TP-induced SMP30 expression in ovariectomized (OVX) rats was observed and was an evidence to explain the gender difference of SMP30 levels. Immunofluorescence assay showed that renal SMP30 was specifically expressed in the proximal tubular segments of the kidney. The urinary Ca2+ level was increased in both ORX and male aging rats. Taken together, our results indicate a novel role of testosterone in regulating SMP30 expression specifically in the kidney to contribute to urinary calcium absorption. PMID:27553527

  20. Serum uric acid levels contribute to new renal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Reátegui-Sokolova, C; Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Gamboa-Cárdenas, Rocío V; Zevallos, Francisco; Cucho-Venegas, Jorge M; Alfaro-Lozano, José L; Medina, Mariela; Rodriguez-Bellido, Zoila; Pastor-Asurza, Cesar A; Alarcón, Graciela S; Perich-Campos, Risto A

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to determine whether uric acid levels contribute to new renal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. This prospective study was conducted in consecutive patients seen since 2012. Patients had a baseline visit and follow-up visits every 6 months. Patients with ≥2 visits were included; those with end-stage renal disease (regardless of dialysis or transplantation) were excluded. Renal damage was ascertained using the SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI). Univariable and multivariable Cox-regression models were performed to determine the risk of new renal damage. Uric acid was included as a continuous and dichotomous (per receiving operating characteristic curve) variable. Multivariable models were adjusted for age at diagnosis, disease duration, socioeconomic status, SLEDAI, SDI, serum creatinine, baseline use of prednisone, antimalarials, and immunosuppressive drugs. One hundred and eighty-six patients were evaluated; their mean (SD) age at diagnosis was 36.8 (13.7) years; nearly all patients were mestizo. Disease duration was 7.7 (6.8) years. Follow-up time was 2.3 (1.1) years. The SLEDAI was 5.2 (4.3) and the SDI 0.8 (1.1). Uric acid levels were 4.5 (1.3) mg/dl. During follow-up, 16 (8.6%) patients developed at least one new point in the renal domain of the SDI. In multivariable analyses, uric acid levels (continuous and dichotomous) at baseline predicted the development of new renal damage (HR 3.21 (1.39-7.42), p 0.006; HR 18.28 (2.80-119.48), p 0.002; respectively). Higher uric acid levels contribute to the development of new renal damage in SLE patients independent of other well-known risk factors for such occurrence.

  1. Deteriorated housing contributes to high cockroach allergen levels in inner-city households.

    PubMed Central

    Rauh, Virginia A; Chew, Ginger R; Garfinkel, Robin S

    2002-01-01

    The high prevalence of childhood asthma in low-income, inner-city populations is not fully understood but has been at least partly attributed to the disproportionate exposures associated with socioeconomic disadvantage. The contribution of indoor allergens to asthma is well documented, but links between socioeconomic disadvantage and indoor allergen levels are not clear. We investigated levels of cockroach allergens (Bla g 2) in a sample of 132 Dominican or African American low-income households with young children in northern Manhattan in New York City (40% were receiving public assistance) to determine whether the distribution of allergens is a function of housing deterioration. Deterioration was measured by the presence and number of physical housing problems (holes in the ceilings and walls, water damage, etc.). More than 50% of the sample had two or more types of housing dilapidation, and 67% of the sample reported cockroach sightings in their homes. Samples of dust were collected from kitchen and bedroom surfaces. We hypothesized that the greater the dilapidation, the higher the allergen levels, independent of income, sociocultural factors, and pest-control methods. In addition, we hypothesized that the homes of families characterized by frequent moves (23.5%) would have higher allergen levels than more stable families. Results showed significant positive associations between housing deterioration and allergen levels in kitchens, after adjusting for income and ethnicity, with independent effects of residential stability (p< 0.05). Bedroom allergen levels were associated with housing instability (p < 0.01) and ethnicity (p< 0.01). Findings demonstrated that indoor household allergen levels are related to degree of household disrepair, after adjusting for individual family attributes, suggesting that social-structural aspects of housing may be appropriate targets for public health interventions designed to reduce allergen exposure. PMID:11929744

  2. The contribution of Saharan dust in PM(10) concentration levels in Anatolian Peninsula of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kabatas, B; Unal, A; Pierce, R B; Kindap, T; Pozzoli, L

    2014-08-01

    Sahara-originated dust is the most significant natural source of particulate matter; however, this contribution is still unclear in the Eastern Mediterranean especially in Western Turkey, where significant industrial sources and metropolitan areas are located. The Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) is utilized to explore the possible effects of Saharan dust on high levels of PM10 measured in Turkey. RAQMS model is compared with 118-air quality stations distributed throughout Turkey (81 cities) for April 2008. MODIS aerosol product (MOD04 for Terra and MYD04 for Aqua) is used to see columnar aerosol loading of the atmosphere at 550 nm (Aerosol optical depth (AOD) values found to be between 0.6 and 0.8 during the episode). High-resolution vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols are provided from CALIOP, on board of CALISPO satellite. The results suggest a significant contribution of Sahara dust to high levels of PM10 in Turkey with RAQMS and in situ time series showing similar patterns. The two data sets are found to be in agreement with a correlation of 0.87.

  3. Contributions to cities' ambient particulate matter (PM): A systematic review of local source contributions at global level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagulian, Federico; Belis, Claudio A.; Dora, Carlos Francisco C.; Prüss-Ustün, Annette M.; Bonjour, Sophie; Adair-Rohani, Heather; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    For reducing health impacts from air pollution, it is important to know the sources contributing to human exposure. This study systematically reviewed and analysed available source apportionment studies on particulate matter (of diameter of 10 and 2.5 microns, PM10 and PM2.5) performed in cities to estimate typical shares of the sources of pollution by country and by region. A database with city source apportionment records, estimated with the use of receptor models, was also developed and available at the website of the World Health Organization. Systematic Scopus and Google searches were performed to retrieve city studies of source apportionment for particulate matter. Six source categories were defined. Country and regional averages of source apportionment were estimated based on city population weighting. A total of 419 source apportionment records from studies conducted in cities of 51 countries were used to calculate regional averages of sources of ambient particulate matter. Based on the available information, globally 25% of urban ambient air pollution from PM2.5 is contributed by traffic, 15% by industrial activities, 20% by domestic fuel burning, 22% from unspecified sources of human origin, and 18% from natural dust and salt. The available source apportionment records exhibit, however, important heterogeneities in assessed source categories and incompleteness in certain countries/regions. Traffic is one important contributor to ambient PM in cities. To reduce air pollution in cities and the substantial disease burden it causes, solutions to sustainably reduce ambient PM from traffic, industrial activities and biomass burning should urgently be sought. However, further efforts are required to improve data availability and evaluation, and possibly to combine with other types of information in view of increasing usefulness for policy making.

  4. DNA methylation and histone H3-K9 modifications contribute to MUC17 expression.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Sho; Yamada, Norishige; Yokoyama, Seiya; Houjou, Izumi; Higashi, Michiyo; Goto, Masamichi; Batra, Surinder K; Yonezawa, Suguru

    2011-02-01

    MUC17 glycoprotein is a membrane-associated mucin that is mainly expressed in the digestive tract. It has been suggested that MUC17 expression is correlated with the malignancy potential of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). In the present study, we provided the first report of the MUC17 gene expression through epigenetic regulation such as promoter methylation, histone modification and microRNA (miRNA) expression. Near the transcriptional start site, the DNA methylation level of MUC17-negative cancer cell lines (e.g. PANC1) was high, whereas that of MUC17-positive cells (e.g. AsPC-1) was low. Histone H3-K9 (H3-K9) modification status was also closely related to MUC17 expression. Our results indicate that DNA methylation and histone H3-K9 modification in the 5' flanking region play a critical role in MUC17 expression. Furthermore, the hypomethylation status was observed in patients with PDAC. This indicates that the hypomethylation status in the MUC17 promoter could be a novel epigenetic marker for the diagnosis of PDAC. In addition, the result of miRNA microarray analysis showed that five potential miRNA candidates existed. It is also possible that the MUC17 might be post-transcriptionally regulated by miRNA targeting to the 3'-untranslated region of its mRNA. These understandings of the epigenetic changes of MUC17 may be of importance for the diagnosis of carcinogenic risk and the prediction of outcomes for cancer patients.

  5. miR-29 regulates Tet1 expression and contributes to early differentiation of mouse ESCs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dehua; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The ten-eleven translocation-1 (Tet1), which converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethycytosine (5hmC), plays important roles in many important biological processes, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) maintenance. However, the mechanisms for Tet-1 regulation remain largely unknown. Here we showed that miR-29 family (miR-29a, miR-29b and miR-29c) can directly repress Tet1 expression. We found that Tet1 was highly expressed and 5hmC was presented at relatively high levels in mouse ESCs, but the levels of both Tet1 and 5hmC were reduced during the early differentiation of ESCs. On the contrary, miR-29 level was increased in this process. ESCs stably transfecting with miR-29 precursors showed lower levels of Tet1 protein and 5hmC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-29 overexpression selectively affected cell lineage markers and skewed ESC differentiation, which was similar in Tet1 knockdown ESCs. Our results indicate that miR-29 is a direct regulator of Tet1 in mouse ESCs. PMID:27449105

  6. Elevated Hapln2 Expression Contributes to Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinqin; Zhou, Qinbo; Zhang, Shuzhen; Shao, Wei; Yin, Yanqing; Li, Yandong; Hou, Jincan; Zhang, Xinhua; Guo, Yongshun; Wang, Xiaomin; Gu, Xiaosong; Zhou, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). The pathogenesis of PD and the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of DA neurons are still not fully understood. Our previous quantitative proteomics study revealed that hyaluronan and proteoglycan binding link protein 2 (Hapln2) is one of differentially expressed proteins in the substantia nigra tissues from PD patients and healthy control subjects. However, the potential role of Hapln2 in PD pathogenesis remains elusive. In the present study, we characterized the expression pattern of Hapln2. In situ hybridization revealed that Hapln2 mRNA was widely expressed in adult rat brain with high abundance in the substantia nigra. Immunoblotting showed that expression levels of Hapln2 were markedly upregulated in the substantia nigra of either human subjects with Parkinson's disease compared with healthy control. Likewise, there were profound increases in Hapln2 expression in neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rat. Overexpression of Hapln2 in vitro increased vulnerability of MES23.5 cells, a dopaminergic cell line, to 6-hydroxydopamine. Moreover, Hapln2 overexpression led to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates which were co-localized with ubiquitin and E3 ligases including Parkin, Gp78, and Hrd1 in vitro. Endogenous α-synuclein was also localized in Hapln2-containing aggregates and ablation of Hapln2 led to a marked decrease of α-synuclein in insoluble fraction compared with control. Thus, Hapln2 is identified as a novel factor contributing to neurodegeneration in PD. Our data provides new insights into the cellular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis in PD. PMID:27601993

  7. On the recent contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Enderlin, Ellyn M.; Howat, Ian M.; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Noël, Brice P. Y.; van de Berg, Willem Jan; van Meijgaard, Erik; Wouters, Bert

    2016-09-01

    We assess the recent contribution of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) to sea level change. We use the mass budget method, which quantifies ice sheet mass balance (MB) as the difference between surface mass balance (SMB) and solid ice discharge across the grounding line (D). A comparison with independent gravity change observations from GRACE shows good agreement for the overlapping period 2002-2015, giving confidence in the partitioning of recent GrIS mass changes. The estimated 1995 value of D and the 1958-1995 average value of SMB are similar at 411 and 418 Gt yr-1, respectively, suggesting that ice flow in the mid-1990s was well adjusted to the average annual mass input, reminiscent of an ice sheet in approximate balance. Starting in the early to mid-1990s, SMB decreased while D increased, leading to quasi-persistent negative MB. About 60 % of the associated mass loss since 1991 is caused by changes in SMB and the remainder by D. The decrease in SMB is fully driven by an increase in surface melt and subsequent meltwater runoff, which is slightly compensated by a small ( < 3 %) increase in snowfall. The excess runoff originates from low-lying ( < 2000 m a.s.l.) parts of the ice sheet; higher up, increased refreezing prevents runoff of meltwater from occurring, at the expense of increased firn temperatures and depleted pore space. With a 1991-2015 average annual mass loss of ˜ 0.47 ± 0.23 mm sea level equivalent (SLE) and a peak contribution of 1.2 mm SLE in 2012, the GrIS has recently become a major source of global mean sea level rise.

  8. Lower satellite-gravimetry estimates of Antarctic sea-level contribution.

    PubMed

    King, Matt A; Bingham, Rory J; Moore, Phil; Whitehouse, Pippa L; Bentley, Michael J; Milne, Glenn A

    2012-11-22

    Recent estimates of Antarctica's present-day rate of ice-mass contribution to changes in sea level range from 31 gigatonnes a year (Gt yr(-1); ref. 1) to 246 Gt yr(-1) (ref. 2), a range that cannot be reconciled within formal errors. Time-varying rates of mass loss contribute to this, but substantial technique-specific systematic errors also exist. In particular, estimates of secular ice-mass change derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite data are dominated by significant uncertainty in the accuracy of models of mass change due to glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Here we adopt a new model of GIA, developed from geological constraints, which produces GIA rates systematically lower than those of previous models, and an improved fit to independent uplift data. After applying the model to 99 months (from August 2002 to December 2010) of GRACE data, we estimate a continent-wide ice-mass change of -69 ± 18 Gt yr(-1) (+0.19 ± 0.05 mm yr(-1) sea-level equivalent). This is about a third to a half of the most recently published GRACE estimates, which cover a similar time period but are based on older GIA models. Plausible GIA model uncertainties, and errors relating to removing longitudinal GRACE artefacts ('destriping'), confine our estimate to the range -126 Gt yr(-1) to -29 Gt yr(-1) (0.08-0.35 mm yr(-1) sea-level equivalent). We resolve 26 independent drainage basins and find that Antarctic mass loss, and its acceleration, is concentrated in basins along the Amundsen Sea coast. Outside this region, we find that West Antarctica is nearly in balance and that East Antarctica is gaining substantial mass.

  9. Greenland ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise buffered by meltwater storage in firn.

    PubMed

    Harper, J; Humphrey, N; Pfeffer, W T; Brown, J; Fettweis, X

    2012-11-08

    Surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet has shown increasing trends in areal extent and duration since the beginning of the satellite era. Records for melt were broken in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Much of the increased surface melt is occurring in the percolation zone, a region of the accumulation area that is perennially covered by snow and firn (partly compacted snow). The fate of melt water in the percolation zone is poorly constrained: some may travel away from its point of origin and eventually influence the ice sheet's flow dynamics and mass balance and the global sea level, whereas some may simply infiltrate into cold snow or firn and refreeze with none of these effects. Here we quantify the existing water storage capacity of the percolation zone of the Greenland ice sheet and show the potential for hundreds of gigatonnes of meltwater storage. We collected in situ observations of firn structure and meltwater retention along a roughly 85-kilometre-long transect of the melting accumulation area. Our data show that repeated infiltration events in which melt water penetrates deeply (more than 10 metres) eventually fill all pore space with water. As future surface melt intensifies under Arctic warming, a fraction of melt water that would otherwise contribute to sea-level rise will fill existing pore space of the percolation zone. We estimate the lower and upper bounds of this storage sink to be 322 ± 44 gigatonnes and  1,289(+388)(-252) gigatonnes, respectively. Furthermore, we find that decades are required to fill this pore space under a range of plausible future climate conditions. Hence, routing of surface melt water into filling the pore space of the firn column will delay expansion of the area contributing to sea-level rise, although once the pore space is filled it cannot quickly be regenerated.

  10. Neuroblastoma patient outcomes, tumor differentiation, and ERK activation are correlated with expression levels of the ubiquitin ligase UBE4B

    PubMed Central

    Woodfield, Sarah E.; Guo, Rong Jun; Liu, Yin; Major, Angela M.; Hollingsworth, Emporia Faith; Indiviglio, Sandra; Whittle, Sarah B.; Mo, Qianxing; Bean, Andrew J.; Ittmann, Michael; Lopez-Terrada, Dolores; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background UBE4B is an E3/E4 ubiquitin ligase whose gene is located in chromosome 1p36.22. We analyzed the associations of UBE4B gene and protein expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes and with tumor prognostic features and histology. Methods We evaluated the association of UBE4B gene expression with neuroblastoma patient outcomes using the R2 Platform. We screened neuroblastoma tumor samples for UBE4B protein expression using immunohistochemistry. FISH for UBE4B and 1p36 deletion was performed on tumor samples. We then evaluated UBE4B expression for associations with prognostic factors and with levels of phosphorylated ERK in neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. Results Low UBE4B gene expression is associated with poor outcomes in patients with neuroblastoma and with worse outcomes in all patient subgroups. UBE4B protein expression was associated with neuroblastoma tumor differentiation, and decreased UBE4B protein levels were associated with high-risk features. UBE4B protein levels were also associated with levels of phosphorylated ERK. Conclusions We have demonstrated associations between UBE4B gene expression and neuroblastoma patient outcomes and prognostic features. Reduced UBE4B protein expression in neuroblastoma tumors was associated with high-risk features, a lack of differentiation, and with ERK activation. These results suggest UBE4B may contribute to the poor prognosis of neuroblastoma tumors with 1p36 deletions and that UBE4B expression may mediate neuroblastoma differentiation. PMID:27014418

  11. Tandemly Duplicated Safener-Induced Glutathione S-Transferase Genes from Triticum tauschii Contribute to Genome- and Organ-Specific Expression in Hexaploid Wheat1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fangxiu; Lagudah, Evans S.; Moose, Stephen P.; Riechers, Dean E.

    2002-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene expression was examined in several Triticum species, differing in genome constitution and ploidy level, to determine genome contribution to GST expression in cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). Two tandemly duplicated tau class GST genes (TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2) were isolated from a single bacterial artificial chromosome clone in a library constructed from the diploid wheat and D genome progenitor to cultivated wheat, Triticum tauschii. The genes are very similar in genomic structure and their encoded proteins are 95% identical. Gene-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed differential transcript accumulation of TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2 in roots and shoots. Expression of both genes was induced by herbicide safeners, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and abscisic acid, in the shoots of T. tauschii; however, expression of TtGSTU1 was always higher than TtGSTU2. In untreated seedlings, TtGSTU1 was expressed in both shoots and roots, whereas TtGSTU2 expression was only detected in roots. RNA gel-blot analysis of ditelosomic, aneuploid lines that are deficient for 6AS, 6BS, or 6DS chromosome arms of cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat showed differential genome contribution to safener-induced GST expression in shoots compared with roots. The GST genes from the D genome of hexaploid wheat contribute most to safener-induced expression in the shoots, whereas GSTs from the B and D genomes contribute to safener-induced expression in the roots. PMID:12226515

  12. Tandemly duplicated Safener-induced glutathione S-transferase genes from Triticum tauschii contribute to genome- and organ-specific expression in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangxiu; Lagudah, Evans S; Moose, Stephen P; Riechers, Dean E

    2002-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene expression was examined in several Triticum species, differing in genome constitution and ploidy level, to determine genome contribution to GST expression in cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). Two tandemly duplicated tau class GST genes (TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2) were isolated from a single bacterial artificial chromosome clone in a library constructed from the diploid wheat and D genome progenitor to cultivated wheat, Triticum tauschii. The genes are very similar in genomic structure and their encoded proteins are 95% identical. Gene-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed differential transcript accumulation of TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2 in roots and shoots. Expression of both genes was induced by herbicide safeners, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and abscisic acid, in the shoots of T. tauschii; however, expression of TtGSTU1 was always higher than TtGSTU2. In untreated seedlings, TtGSTU1 was expressed in both shoots and roots, whereas TtGSTU2 expression was only detected in roots. RNA gel-blot analysis of ditelosomic, aneuploid lines that are deficient for 6AS, 6BS, or 6DS chromosome arms of cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat showed differential genome contribution to safener-induced GST expression in shoots compared with roots. The GST genes from the D genome of hexaploid wheat contribute most to safener-induced expression in the shoots, whereas GSTs from the B and D genomes contribute to safener-induced expression in the roots.

  13. Suppression of Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70 by Gefitinib and Its Contribution to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Takushi; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Azuma, Arata; Mizushima, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD), particularly pulmonary fibrosis, is of serious clinical concern. Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is beneficial as a drug for treating non-small cell lung cancer; however, this drug induces ILD and the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition remain unclear. We recently reported that expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) protects against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we have examined the effects of drugs known to induce ILD clinically on the expression of HSP70 in cultured lung epithelial cells and have found that gefitinib has a suppressive effect. Results of a luciferase reporter assay, pulse-labelling analysis of protein and experiments using an inhibitor of translation or transcription suggest that gefitinib suppresses the expression of HSP70 at the level of translation. Furthermore, the results of experiments with siRNA for Dicer1, an enzyme responsible for synthesis of microRNA, and real-time RT-PCR analysis suggest that some microRNAs are involved in the gefitinib-induced translational inhibition of HSP70. Mutations in the EGFR affect the concentration of gefitinib required for suppressing the expression of HSP70. These results suggest that gefitinib suppresses the translation of HSP70 through an EGFR- and microRNA-mediated mechanism. In vivo, while oral administration of gefitinib suppressed the pulmonary expression of HSP70 and exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in wild-type mice, these effects were not as distinct in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. Furthermore, oral co-administration of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an inducer of HSP70, suppressed gefitinib-induced exacerbation of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that gefitinib-induced exacerbation of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is mediated by suppression of

  14. Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    DeConto, Robert M; Pollard, David

    2016-03-31

    Polar temperatures over the last several million years have, at times, been slightly warmer than today, yet global mean sea level has been 6-9 metres higher as recently as the Last Interglacial (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) and possibly higher during the Pliocene epoch (about three million years ago). In both cases the Antarctic ice sheet has been implicated as the primary contributor, hinting at its future vulnerability. Here we use a model coupling ice sheet and climate dynamics-including previously underappreciated processes linking atmospheric warming with hydrofracturing of buttressing ice shelves and structural collapse of marine-terminating ice cliffs-that is calibrated against Pliocene and Last Interglacial sea-level estimates and applied to future greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Antarctica has the potential to contribute more than a metre of sea-level rise by 2100 and more than 15 metres by 2500, if emissions continue unabated. In this case atmospheric warming will soon become the dominant driver of ice loss, but prolonged ocean warming will delay its recovery for thousands of years.

  15. Contribution of climate-driven change in continental water storage to recent sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.; Cazenave, A.; Gennero, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Using a global model of continental water balance, forced by interannual variations in precipitation and near-surface atmospheric temperature for the period 1981-1998, we estimate the sea-level changes associated with climate-driven changes in storage of water as snowpack, soil water, and ground water; storage in ice sheets and large lakes is not considered. The 1981-1998 trend is estimated to be 0.12 mm/yr, and substantial interannual fluctuations are inferred; for 1993-1998, the trend is 0.25 mm/yr. At the decadal time scale, the terrestrial contribution to eustatic (i.e., induced by mass exchange) sea-level rise is significantly smaller than the estimated steric (i.e., induced by density changes) trend for the same period, but is not negligibly small. In the model the sea-level rise is driven mainly by a downtrend in continental precipitation during the study period, which we believe was generated by natural variability in the climate system.

  16. Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconto, Robert M.; Pollard, David

    2016-03-01

    Polar temperatures over the last several million years have, at times, been slightly warmer than today, yet global mean sea level has been 6-9 metres higher as recently as the Last Interglacial (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) and possibly higher during the Pliocene epoch (about three million years ago). In both cases the Antarctic ice sheet has been implicated as the primary contributor, hinting at its future vulnerability. Here we use a model coupling ice sheet and climate dynamics—including previously underappreciated processes linking atmospheric warming with hydrofracturing of buttressing ice shelves and structural collapse of marine-terminating ice cliffs—that is calibrated against Pliocene and Last Interglacial sea-level estimates and applied to future greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Antarctica has the potential to contribute more than a metre of sea-level rise by 2100 and more than 15 metres by 2500, if emissions continue unabated. In this case atmospheric warming will soon become the dominant driver of ice loss, but prolonged ocean warming will delay its recovery for thousands of years.

  17. Can exergaming contribute to improving physical activity levels and health outcomes in children?

    PubMed

    Daley, Amanda J

    2009-08-01

    Physical inactivity among children is a serious public health problem. It has been suggested that high levels of screen time are contributory factors that encourage sedentary lifestyles in young people. As physical inactivity and obesity levels continue to rise in young people, it has been proposed that new-generation active computer- and video-console games (otherwise known as "exergaming") may offer the opportunity to contribute to young people's energy expenditure during their free time. Although studies have produced some encouraging results regarding the energy costs involved in playing active video-console games, the energy costs of playing the authentic versions of activity-based video games are substantially larger, highlighting that active gaming is no substitute for real sports and activities. A small number of exergaming activities engage children in moderate-intensity activity, but most do not. Only 3 very small trials have considered the effects of exergaming on physical activity levels and/or other health outcomes in children. Evidence from these trials has been mixed; positive trends for improvements in some health outcomes in the intervention groups were noted in 2 trials. No adequately powered randomized, controlled trial has been published to date, and no trial has assessed the long-term impact of exergaming on children's health. We now need high-quality randomized, controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of exergaming, as well as its clinical relevance; until such studies take place, we should remain cautious about its ability to positively affect children's health.

  18. Deimination level and peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 expression are elevated in astrocytes with increased incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Serra, Horacio M

    2015-09-01

    Astrocytes respond to environmental cues, including changes in temperatures. Increased deimination, observed in many progressive neurological diseases, is thought to be contributed by astrocytes. We determined the level of deimination and expression of peptidyl arginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in isolated primary astrocytes in response to changes on either side (31°C and 41°C) of the optimal temperature (37°C). We investigated changes in the astrocytes by using a number of established markers and accounted for cell death with the CellTiter-Blue assay. We found increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, ALDH1L1, and J1-31, resulting from increased incubation temperature and increased expression of TSP1, S100β, and AQP4, resulting from decreased incubation temperature vs. optimal temperature, suggesting activation of different biochemical pathways in astrocytes associated with different incubation temperatures. Mass spectrometric analyses support such trends. The PAD2 level was increased only as a result of increased incubation temperature with a commensurate increased level of deimination. Actin cytoskeleton and iso[4]LGE, a lipid peroxidase modification, also showed an increase with higher incubation temperature. Altogether, these results suggest that temperature, as an environmental cue, activates astrocytes in a different manner on either side of the optimal temperature and that increase in deimination is associated only with the higher temperature side of the spectrum.

  19. Local cultural animal food contributes high levels of nutrients for Arctic Canadian Indigenous adults and children.

    PubMed

    Kuhnlein, Harriet V; Receveur, Olivier

    2007-04-01

    Food systems of Canadian Arctic Indigenous Peoples contain many species of traditional animal and plant food, but the extent of use today is limited because purchased food displaces much of the traditional species from the diet. Frequency and 24-h dietary interviews of Arctic adults and children were used to investigate these trends. The most frequently consumed Arctic foods were derived from animals and fish. In adults these foods contributed 6-40% of daily energy of adults. Children ate much less, 0.4-15% of energy, and >40% of their total energy was contributed by "sweet" and "fat" food sources. Nevertheless, for adults and children, even a single portion of local animal or fish food resulted in increased (P < 0.05) levels of energy, protein, vitamin D, vitamin E, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, iron, zinc, copper, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and potassium; although children had similar results for these nutrients, they did not reach significance for energy, vitamin D, or manganese. Because market foods are the major source of energy in the Arctic, traditional animal-source foods are extremely important to ensure high dietary quality of both adults and children.

  20. Determining the contribution of Antarctica to sea-level rise using data assimilation methods.

    PubMed

    Arthern, Robert J; Hindmarsh, Richard C A

    2006-07-15

    The problem of forecasting the future behaviour of the Antarctic ice sheet is considered. We describe a method for optimizing this forecast by combining a model of ice sheet flow with observations. Under certain assumptions, a linearized model of glacial flow can be combined with observations of the thickness change, snow accumulation, and ice-flow, to forecast the Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise. Numerical simulations show that this approach can potentially be used to test whether changes observed in Antarctica are consistent with the natural forcing of a stable ice sheet by snowfall fluctuations. To make predictions under less restrictive assumptions, improvements in models of ice flow are needed. Some of the challenges that this prediction problem poses are highlighted, and potentially useful approaches drawn from numerical weather prediction are discussed.

  1. Cell- and molecular-level mechanisms contributing to diastolic dysfunction in HFpEF.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S; Sorrell, Vincent L

    2015-11-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the default diagnosis for patients who have symptoms of heart failure, an ejection fraction >0.5, and evidence of diastolic dysfunction. The clinical condition, which was largely unrecognized 30 years ago, is now a major health problem and currently accounts for 50% of all patients with heart failure. Clinical studies show that patients with HFpEF exhibit increased passive stiffness of the ventricles and a slower rate of pressure decline during diastole. This review discusses some of the cell- and molecular-level mechanisms that contribute to these effects and focuses on data obtained using human samples. Collagen cross linking, modulation of protein kinase G-related pathways, Ca(2+) handling, and strain-dependent detachment of cross bridges are highlighted as potential factors that could be modulated to improve ventricular function in patients with HFpEF.

  2. Fermi level pinning and the charge transfer contribution to the energy of adsorption at semiconducting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, Stanisław; Kempisty, Paweł; Strak, Paweł; Sakowski, Konrad

    2014-01-28

    It is shown that charge transfer, the process analogous to formation of semiconductor p-n junction, contributes significantly to adsorption energy at semiconductor surfaces. For the processes without the charge transfer, such as molecular adsorption of closed shell systems, the adsorption energy is determined by the bonding only. In the case involving charge transfer, such as open shell systems like metal atoms or the dissociating molecules, the energy attains different value for the Fermi level differently pinned. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulation of species adsorption at different surfaces, such as SiC(0001) or GaN(0001) confirms these predictions: the molecular adsorption is independent on the coverage, while the dissociative process adsorption energy varies by several electronvolts.

  3. Histone deacetylase mediated silencing of AMWAP expression contributes to cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Hamad, Rania; Mohamed, Riyaz; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Muthusamy, Thangaraju; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury is a serious problem in cancer patients during treatment of solid tumors. Currently, there are no therapies available to treat or prevent cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Since histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition augments cisplatin anti-tumor activity, we tested whether HDAC inhibitors can prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and determined the underlying mechanism. Cisplatin up-regulated the expression of several HDACs in the kidney. Inhibition of HDAC with clinically used trichostatin A suppressed cisplatin-induced kidney injury, inflammation and epithelial cell apoptosis. Moreover, trichostatin A upregulated the novel anti-inflammatory protein, activated microglia/macrophage WAP domain protein (AMWAP), in epithelial cells which was enhanced with cisplatin treatment. Interestingly, HDAC1 and -2 specific inhibitors are sufficient to potently up-regulate AMWAP in epithelial cells. Administration of recombinant AMWAP or its epithelial cell-specific overexpression reduced cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction. Moreover, AMWAP treatment suppressed epithelial cell apoptosis, and siRNA-based knockdown of AMWAP expression abolished trichostatin A-mediated suppression of epithelial cell apoptosis in vitro. Thus, HDAC-mediated silencing of AMWAP may contribute to cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Hence, HDAC1 and -2 specific inhibitors or AMWAP could be useful therapeutic agents for the prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:26509586

  4. Increased CaVbeta1A expression with aging contributes to skeletal muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jackson R; Zheng, Zhenlin; Wang, Zhong-Min; Payne, Anthony M; Messi, María L; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2009-09-01

    Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into the cytosol is a crucial part of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Excitation-contraction uncoupling, a deficit in Ca2+ release from the SR, is thought to be responsible for at least some of the loss in specific force observed in aging skeletal muscle. Excitation-contraction uncoupling may be caused by alterations in expression of the voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha1s (CaV1.1) and beta1a (CaVbeta1a) subunits, both of which are necessary for E-C coupling to occur. While previous studies have found CaV1.1 expression declines in old rodents, CaVbeta1a expression has not been previously examined in aging models. Western blot analysis shows a substantial increase of CaVbeta1a expression over the full lifespan of Friend Virus B (FVB) mice. To examine the specific effects of CaVbeta1a overexpression, a CaVbeta1a-YFP plasmid was electroporated in vivo into young animals. The resulting increase in expression of CaVbeta1a corresponded to decline of CaV1.1 over the same time period. YFP fluorescence, used as a measure of CaVbeta1a-YFP expression in individual fibers, also showed an inverse relationship with charge movement, measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Specific force was significantly reduced in young CaVbeta1a-YFP electroporated muscle fibers compared with sham-electroporated, age-matched controls. siRNA interference of CaVbeta1a in young muscles reduced charge movement, while charge movement in old was restored to young control levels. These studies imply CaVbeta1a serves as both a positive and negative regulator CaV1.1 expression, and that endogenous overexpression of CaVbeta1a during old age may play a role in the loss of specific force.

  5. The contribution of biomass burning to PAH levels in PM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belis, Claudio; Larsen, Bo; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Vecchi, Roberta; Colombi, Cristina; Gianelle, Vorne

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to identify the contribution of wood burning and biomass burning to the levels of toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the atmospheric particulate matter. Benzo(a)pyrene has been selected as a marker of PAHs since it is predominantly present in the solid phase and is the only isomer having a target value for its atmospheric concentrations in the European Union. The levels of BaP have been evaluated both as ambient air concentration (ng/m3) as required by directive 2007/104/EC and as mass fraction of PM10 (mg/g). The levels of BaP were estimated by computing multiple linear regression and non linear factorial regression. The model parameters were fitted using two independent datasets of PM10 samples collected between 2005 and 2007 in 3 urban sites located in the Po Valley and in the southern Alps. The explanatory variables used for estimating BaP were selected using forward selection based on F test from a pool of variables representing: biomass burning (levoglucosan), emissions from unspecified combustion processes (CO, NOx, EC, OC and trace elements) and atmospheric properties (wind speed, temperature, and height of the mixing layer). The uncertainty of the model was estimated by propagating the standard uncertainties of the corresponding variables. An analysis of sensitivity was conducted by evaluating the influence of the variation of the measured variables along a range comparable to their standard deviations on the model outputs. In the background sites levoglucosan explained between 55% (s.e. 16%) and 87% (s.e. 8 %) of the BaP contribution to the PM10 mass and between 53% (s.e.16%) and 84% (s.e.10%) of the BaP concentration. Levoglucosan was the most important single variable to explain BaP levels. Other variables explaning significant part of BaP variance were NOx, CO , OC, wind speed, and air temperature. In a kerbside site, the influence of levoglucosan on BaP variance decreased but was still relevant (44

  6. Photosynthetic properties of boreal bog plant species and their contribution to ecosystem level carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korrensalo, Aino; Hájek, Tomas; Alekseychik, Pavel; Rinne, Janne; Vesala, Timo; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    Boreal bogs have a low number of plant species, but a large diversity of growth forms. This heterogeneity might explain the seasonally less varying photosynthetic productivity of these ecosystems compared to peatlands with vegetation consisting of fewer growth forms. The differences in photosynthetic properties within bog species and phases of growing season has not been comprehensively studied. Also the role of different plant species for the ecosystem level carbon (C) sink function is insufficiently known. We quantified the seasonal variation of photosynthetic properties in bog plant species and assessed how this variation accounts for the temporal variation in the ecosystem C sink. Photosynthetic light response of 11 vascular plant and 8 Sphagnum moss species was measured monthly over the growing season of 2013. Based on the species' light response parameters, leaf area development and areal coverage, we estimated the ecosystem level gross photosynthesis rate (PG) over the growing season. The level of upscaled PG was verified by comparing it to the ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) estimate calculated based on eddy covariance (EC) measurements. Although photosynthetic parameters differed within plant species and months, these differences were of less importance than expected for the variation in ecosystem level C sink. The most productive plant species at the ecosystem scale were not those with the highest maximum potential photosynthesis per unit of leaf area (Pmax), but those having the largest areal coverage. Sphagnum mosses had 35% smaller Pmax than vascular plants, but had higher photosynthesis at the ecosystem scale throughout the growing season. The contribution of the bog plant species to the ecosystem level PG differed over the growing season. The seasonal variation in ecosystem C sink was mainly controlled by phenology. Sedge PG had a sharp mid-summer peak, but the PG of evergreen shrubs and Sphagna remained rather stable over the growing season

  7. On a stochastic gene expression with pre-mRNA, mRNA and protein contribution.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Ryszard; Tomski, Andrzej

    2015-12-21

    In this paper we develop a model of stochastic gene expression, which is an extension of the model investigated in the paper [T. Lipniacki, P. Paszek, A. Marciniak-Czochra, A.R. Brasier, M. Kimmel, Transcriptional stochasticity in gene expression, J. Theor. Biol. 238 (2006) 348-367]. In our model, stochastic effects still originate from random fluctuations in gene activity status, but we precede mRNA production by the formation of pre-mRNA, which enriches classical transcription phase. We obtain a stochastically regulated system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing evolution of pre-mRNA, mRNA and protein levels. We perform mathematical analysis of a long-time behavior of this stochastic process, identified as a piece-wise deterministic Markov process (PDMP). We check exact results using numerical simulations for the distributions of all three types of particles. Moreover, we investigate the deterministic (adiabatic) limit state of the process, when depending on parameters it can exhibit two specific types of behavior: bistability and the existence of the limit cycle. The latter one is not present when only two kinds of gene expression products are considered.

  8. Endotoxin levels and contribution factors of endotoxins in resident, school, and office environments - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salonen, Heidi; Duchaine, Caroline; Létourneau, Valérie; Mazaheri, Mandana; Laitinen, Sirpa; Clifford, Sam; Mikkola, Raimo; Lappalainen, Sanna; Reijula, Kari; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-10-01

    As endotoxin exposure has known effects on human health, it is important to know the generally existing levels of endotoxins as well as their contributing factors. This work reviews current knowledge on the endotoxin loads in settled floor dust, concentrations of endotoxins in indoor air, and different environmental factors potentially affecting endotoxin levels. The literature review consists of peer-reviewed manuscripts located using Google and PubMed, with search terms based on individual words and combinations. References from relevant articles have also been searched. Analysis of the data showed that in residential, school, and office environments, the mean endotoxin loads in settled floor dust varied between 660 and 107,000 EU/m2, 2180 and 48,000 EU/m2, and 2700 and 12,890 EU/m2, respectively. Correspondingly, the mean endotoxin concentrations in indoor air varied between 0.04 and 1610 EU/m3 in residences, and 0.07 and 9.30 EU/m3 in schools and offices. There is strong scientific evidence indicating that age of houses (or housing unit year category), cleaning, farm or rural living, flooring materials (the presence of carpets), number of occupants, the presence of dogs or cats indoors, and relative humidity affect endotoxin loads in settled floor dust. The presence of pets (especially dogs) was extremely strongly associated with endotoxin concentrations in indoor air. However, as reviewed articles show inconsistency, additional studies on these and other possible predicting factors are needed.

  9. Rapid wastage of Alaska glaciers and their contribution to rising sea level.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Anthony A; Echelmeyer, Keith A; Harrison, William D; Lingle, Craig S; Valentine, Virginia B

    2002-07-19

    We have used airborne laser altimetry to estimate volume changes of 67 glaciers in Alaska from the mid-1950s to the mid-1990s. The average rate of thickness change of these glaciers was -0.52 m/year. Extrapolation to all glaciers in Alaska yields an estimated total annual volume change of -52 +/- 15 km3/year (water equivalent), equivalent to a rise in sea level (SLE) of 0.14 +/- 0.04 mm/year. Repeat measurements of 28 glaciers from the mid-1990s to 2000-2001 suggest an increased average rate of thinning, -1.8 m/year. This leads to an extrapolated annual volume loss from Alaska glaciers equal to -96 +/- 35 km3/year, or 0.27 +/- 0.10 mm/year SLE, during the past decade. These recent losses are nearly double the estimated annual loss from the entire Greenland Ice Sheet during the same time period and are much higher than previously published loss estimates for Alaska glaciers. They form the largest glaciological contribution to rising sea level yet measured.

  10. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments.

  11. Overexpression of Dicer as a Result of Reduced let-7 microRNA Levels Contributes to Increased Cell Proliferation of Oral Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jakymiw, Andrew; Patel, Rushi S.; Deming, Natasha; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Shah, Priya; Lamont, Richard J.; Stewart, Carol M.; Cohen, Donald M.; Chan, Edward K.L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent reports have demonstrated that Dicer, an RNase III endonuclease required for microRNA (miRNA) maturation, is aberrantly expressed in different types of cancer. Furthermore, Dicer has been reported to be regulated by the let-7 family of miRNA genes. We hypothesize that Dicer is aberrantly expressed in oral cancer cells due to altered expressions of let-7, and that Dicer contributes to the development and progression of the disease. Western blot examination of Dicer protein levels in four head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines, including two oral cancer cell lines, demonstrated that Dicer had between 4 to 24 fold higher expression levels when compared to normal human primary gingival epithelial cells. Furthermore, five of six oral cancer tissues analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence had increased Dicer protein expression, compared to normal gingival epithelial tissue. The Dicer mRNA levels were not found to correlate well with protein expression in the HNSCC cell lines, suggesting that Dicer protein expression was post-transcriptionally regulated. Analysis of let-7a and let-7b levels in HNSCC cell lines by real-time PCR demonstrated that let-7b, but not let-7a, was significantly reduced in the HNSCC cell lines compared to control cells. Lastly, transfection of oral cancer cells with chemically synthesized let-7b and small interfering RNAs targeting Dicer significantly inhibited cell proliferation up to 83% and >100%, respectively, as early as three days post-transfection. Together, these data demonstrate that elevated expression levels of Dicer in oral cancer cells correlate with down-regulation of let-7b and increased cell proliferation. PMID:20232482

  12. Decreased cruzipain and gp85/trans-sialidase family protein expression contributes to loss of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote virulence.

    PubMed

    San Francisco, Juan; Barría, Iván; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Neira, Iván; Muñoz, Christian; Sagua, Hernán; Araya, Jorge E; Andrade, Juan Carlos; Zailberger, Anibal; Catalán, Alejandro; Remonsellez, Francisco; Vega, José Luis; González, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Two cell lines derived from a single Trypanosoma cruzi clone by long-term passaging generated a highly virulent (C8C3hvir) and a low virulent (C8C3lvir) cell line. The C8C3hvir cell line was highly infective and lethal to Balb/c mice, and the C8C3lvir cell line was three- to five-fold less infective to mouse cardiomyocytes than C8C3hvir. The highly virulent T. cruzi cell line abundantly expressed the major cysteine proteinase cruzipain (Czp), complement regulatory protein (CRP) and trans-sialidase (TS), all of which are known to act as virulence factors in this parasite. The in vitro invasion capacity and in vivo Balb/c mouse infectiveness of the highly virulent strain was strongly reduced by pre-treatment with antisense oligonucleotides targeting TS or CRP or with E64d. Based on these results, we conclude that decreased levels of TS, CRP and Czp expression could contribute to loss of T. cruzi trypomastigote virulence.

  13. ATF7 is stabilized during mitosis in a CDK1-dependent manner and contributes to cyclin D1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Etienne; Vigneron, Marc; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Chatton, Bruno; Donzeau, Mariel

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor ATF7 undergoes multiple post-translational modifications, each of which has distinct effects upon ATF7 function. Here, we show that ATF7 phosphorylation on residue Thr112 exclusively occurs during mitosis, and that ATF7 is excluded from the condensed chromatin. Both processes are CDK1/cyclin B dependent. Using a transduced neutralizing monoclonal antibody directed against the Thr112 epitope in living cells, we could demonstrate that Thr112 phosphorylation protects endogenous ATF7 protein from degradation, while it has no effect on the displacement of ATF7 from the condensed chromatin. The crucial role of Thr112 phosphorylation in stabilizing ATF7 protein during mitosis was confirmed using phospho-mimetic and phospho-deficient mutants. Finally, silencing ATF7 by CRISPR/Cas9 technology leads to a decrease of cyclin D1 protein expression levels. We propose that mitotic stabilized ATF7 protein re-localizes onto chromatin at the end of telophase and contributes to induce the cyclin D1 gene expression. PMID:26101806

  14. ATF7 is stabilized during mitosis in a CDK1-dependent manner and contributes to cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Etienne; Vigneron, Marc; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Chatton, Bruno; Donzeau, Mariel

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor ATF7 undergoes multiple post-translational modifications, each of which has distinct effects upon ATF7 function. Here, we show that ATF7 phosphorylation on residue Thr112 exclusively occurs during mitosis, and that ATF7 is excluded from the condensed chromatin. Both processes are CDK1/cyclin B dependent. Using a transduced neutralizing monoclonal antibody directed against the Thr112 epitope in living cells, we could demonstrate that Thr112 phosphorylation protects endogenous ATF7 protein from degradation, while it has no effect on the displacement of ATF7 from the condensed chromatin. The crucial role of Thr112 phosphorylation in stabilizing ATF7 protein during mitosis was confirmed using phospho-mimetic and phospho-deficient mutants. Finally, silencing ATF7 by CRISPR/Cas9 technology leads to a decrease of cyclin D1 protein expression levels. We propose that mitotic stabilized ATF7 protein re-localizes onto chromatin at the end of telophase and contributes to induce the cyclin D1 gene expression.

  15. Expression Level of Genes Coding for Cell Adhesion Molecules of Cadherin Group in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Zbigniew; Opiłka, Mieszko Norbert; Kruszniewska-Rajs, Celina; Rajs, Antoni; Waniczek, Dariusz; Starzewska, Małgorzata; Lorenc, Justyna; Mazurek, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Background Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and also one of the main death causes. Cell adhesion molecules are taking part in specific junctions, contributing to tissue integrality. Lower expression of the cadherins may be correlated with poorer differentiation of the CRC, and its more aggressive phenotype. The aim of the study is to designate the cadherin genes potentially useful for the diagnostics, prognostics, and the treatment of CRC. Material/Method Specimens were collected from 28 persons (14 female and 14 male), who were operated for CRC. The molecular analysis was performed using oligonucleotide microarrays, mRNA used was collected from adenocarcinoma, and macroscopically healthy tissue. The results were validated using qRT-PCR technique. Results Agglomerative hierarchical clustering of normalized mRNA levels has shown 4 groups with statistically different gene expression. The control group was divided into 2 groups, the one was appropriate control (C1), the second (C2) had the genetic properties of the CRC, without pathological changes histologically and macroscopically. The other 2 groups were: LSC (Low stage cancer) and HSC (High stage cancer). Consolidated results of the fluorescency of all of the differential genes, designated two coding E-cadherin (CDH1) with the lower expression, and P-cadherin (CDH3) with higher expression in CRC tissue. Conclusions The levels of genes expression are different for several groups of cadherins, and are related with the stage of CRC, therefore could be potentially the useful marker of the stage of the disease, also applicable in treatment and diagnostics of CRC. PMID:26167814

  16. Latency-associated nuclear antigen of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) upregulates survivin expression in KSHV-Associated B-lymphoma cells and contributes to their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Verma, Subhash C; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; Kumar, Pankaj; Xiao, Bingyi; Robertson, Erle S

    2009-07-01

    Survivin is a master regulator of cell proliferation and cell viability and is highly expressed in most human tumors. The molecular network linked to survivin expression in tumors has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we show that latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), a multifunctional protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) that is found in Kaposi's sarcoma tumors, upregulates survivin expression and increases the proliferation of KSHV-infected B cells. Analysis of pathway-specific gene arrays showed that survivin expression was highly upregulated in BJAB cells expressing LANA. The mRNA levels of survivin were also upregulated in HEK 293 and BJAB cells expressing LANA. Similarly, protein levels of survivin were significantly higher in LANA-expressing, as well as KSHV-infected, cells. Survivin promoter activity assays identified GC/Sp1 and p53 cis-acting elements within the core promoter region as being important for LANA activity. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that LANA forms a complex with Sp1 or Sp1-like proteins bound to the GC/Sp1 box of the survivin promoter. In addition, a LANA/p53 complex bound to the p53 cis-acting element within the survivin promoter, indicating that upregulation of survivin expression can also occur through suppression of p53 function. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that survivin expression was upregulated in KSHV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma tissue, suggesting that LANA plays an important role in the upregulation of survivin expression in KSHV-infected endothelial cells. Knockdown of survivin expression by lentivirus-delivered small hairpin RNA resulted in loss of cell proliferation in KSHV-infected cells. Therefore, upregulation of survivin expression in KSHV-associated human cells contributes to their proliferation.

  17. The genetic basis of evolutionary change in gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, J. J.; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is an important determinant of organismal phenotype and evolution. However, the widespread recognition of this fact occurred long after the synthesis of evolution and genetics. Here, we give a brief sketch of thoughts regarding gene regulation in the history of evolution and genetics. We then review the development of genome-wide studies of gene regulatory variation in the context of the location and mode of action of the causative genetic changes. In particular, we review mapping of the genetic basis of expression variation through expression quantitative trait locus studies and measuring the cis/trans component of expression variation in allele-specific expression studies. We conclude by proposing a systematic integration of ideas that combines global mapping studies, cis/trans tests and modern population genetics methodologies, in order to directly estimate the forces acting on regulatory variation within and between species. PMID:20643748

  18. Perforin-expressing cytotoxic cells contribute to chronic cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Silverio, Jaline Coutinho; de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; da Silva, Andréa Alice; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dual participation of the immune response in controlling the invader and at the same time causing tissue damage might contribute to the design of effective new vaccines and therapies for Chagas disease. Perforin, a cytolytic protein product of killer cells, is involved in resistance to acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. However, the contribution of perforin in parasite control and chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is unclear. Perforin-positive cells were detected in the heart tissue during the acute and chronic phases of infection of C57BL/6 mice inoculated with low dose (102 parasites) of the Colombian T. cruzi strain. This protocol led to acute phase survival in both wild-type and perforin null (pfp−/−) mice lineages. During the chronic infection, parasitism and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as interleukin (IL)-4+ and, mainly, interferon (IFN)-γ+ cells were more elevated in the heart tissue of pfp−/− mice. Higher levels of circulating NO and anti-parasite immunoglobulin (Ig)G2c and IgG3, paralleled by a prominent frequency of IFN-γ+ and IL-10+ splenocytes, were present in pfp−/−-infected mice. Therefore, although the perforin-dependent pathway plays a role, it is not crucial for anti-T. cruzi immunity and acute phase survival of mice infected with a low inoculum. Further, perforin deficiency resulted in lower activity of creatine kinase-muscle brain isoform (CK-MB) isoenzyme in serum and a more restricted connexin 43 loss, both of which are markers of the cardiomyocyte lesion. Moreover, perforin deficiency hampered the development of severe electrocardiographic abnormalities. Hence, our results corroborate that perforin-bearing cytotoxic cells might contribute to cardiomyocyte lesion and heart dysfunction during chronic T. cruzi infection, shedding light on immunopathogenesis of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:19878357

  19. Circulating irisin levels and muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression are independent of IL-15 levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Quinn, LeBris S; Anderson, Barbara G; Conner, Jennifer D; Wolden-Hanson, Tami

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and irisin are exercise-induced myokines that exert favorable effects on energy expenditure and metabolism. IL-15 can induce PGC-1α expression, which in turn induces expression of irisin and its precursor, FNDC5. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that increases in circulating irisin levels and muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression are dependent on IL-15. Circulating irisin levels and gastrocnemius muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression were examined following acute exercise in control and IL-15-deleted (IL-15 KO) mice, following injection of IL-15 into IL-15 KO mice, and in transgenic mice with elevated circulating IL-15 levels (IL-15 Tg mice). Circulating IL-15 levels and muscle PGC-1α and PPARδ mRNA expressions were determined as positive controls. No effect of IL-15 deletion on post-exercise serum irisin levels or muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression was detected. While serum IL-15 levels and muscle PGC-1α expression were elevated post-exercise in control mice, both serum irisin levels and muscle FNDC5 expression decreased shortly after exercise in both control and IL-15 KO mice. A single injection of recombinant IL-15 into IL-15 KO mice that significantly increased muscle PPARδ and PGC-1α mRNA expressions had no effect on circulating irisin release, but modestly induced muscle FNDC5 expression. Additionally, serum irisin and gastrocnemius muscle FNDC5 expression in IL-15 Tg mice were similar to those of control mice. Muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression and irisin release are not IL-15-dependent in mice.

  20. Activating KIR2DS4 Is Expressed by Uterine NK Cells and Contributes to Successful Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chazara, Olympe; Gardner, Lucy; Ivarsson, Martin A.; Farrell, Lydia E.; Xiong, Shiqiu; Hiby, Susan E.; Colucci, Francesco; Sharkey, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific NK cells are abundant in the pregnant uterus and interact with invading placental trophoblast cells that transform the maternal arteries to increase the fetoplacental blood supply. Genetic case-control studies have implicated killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes and their HLA ligands in pregnancy disorders characterized by failure of trophoblast arterial transformation. Activating KIR2DS1 or KIR2DS5 (when located in the centromeric region as in Africans) lower the risk of disorders when there is a fetal HLA-C allele carrying a C2 epitope. In this study, we investigated another activating KIR, KIR2DS4, and provide genetic evidence for a similar effect when carried with KIR2DS1. KIR2DS4 is expressed by ∼45% of uterine NK (uNK) cells. Similarly to KIR2DS1, triggering of KIR2DS4 on uNK cells led to secretion of GM-CSF and other chemokines, known to promote placental trophoblast invasion. Additionally, XCL1 and CCL1, identified in a screen of 120 different cytokines, were consistently secreted upon activation of KIR2DS4 on uNK cells. Inhibitory KIR2DL5A, carried in linkage disequilibrium with KIR2DS1, is expressed by peripheral blood NK cells but not by uNK cells, highlighting the unique phenotype of uNK cells compared with peripheral blood NK cells. That KIR2DS4, KIR2DS1, and some alleles of KIR2DS5 contribute to successful pregnancy suggests that activation of uNK cells by KIR binding to HLA-C is a generic mechanism promoting trophoblast invasion into the decidua. PMID:27815424

  1. Contribution of Disulfide Bridging to Epitope Expression of the Dengue Type 2 Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Roehrig, John T.; Volpe, Katharine E.; Squires, Jennifer; Hunt, Ann R.; Davis, Brent S.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.

    2004-01-01

    The individual contributions of each of the six conserved disulfide (SS) bonds in the dengue 2 virus envelope (E) glycoprotein (strain 16681) to epitope expression was determined by measuring the reactivities of a panel of well-defined monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with LLC-MK2 cells that had been transiently transformed with plasmid vectors expressing E proteins that were mutant in their SS bonds. Three domain I (DI) epitopes (C1, C3, and C4) were affected by elimination of any SS bond and were essentially the only epitopes affected by elimination of the amino-proximal SS1 formed between Cys 3 and Cys 30. The remaining DI epitope (C2) was sensitive to only SS3-bond (Cys 74-Cys 105) and SS6-bond (Cys 302-Cys 333) elimination. Of the four DII epitopes examined, reactivities of three anti-epitope MAbs (A1, A2, and A5) were reduced by elimination of SS2 (Cys 61-Cys 121), SS3, SS4 (Cys 94-Cys 116), SS5 (Cys 185-Cys 285), or SS6. The other DII epitope examined (A3) was sensitive only to SS2- and SS3-bond elimination. The three DIII epitopes tested (B2, B3, and B4) were most sensitive to elimination of SS6. The flavivirus group epitope (A1) was less sensitive to elimination of SS3 and SS6. This result may indicate that the region proximal to the E-protein fusion motif (amino acids 98 to 110) may have important linear components. If this observation can be confirmed, peptide mimics from this region of E protein might be able to interfere with flavivirus replication. PMID:14963174

  2. Two Acyltransferases Contribute Differently to Linolenic Acid Levels in Seed Oil1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stymne, Sten

    2017-01-01

    Acyltransferases are key contributors to triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and, thus, are of great importance for seed oil quality. The effects of increased or decreased expression of ACYL-COENZYME A:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (DGAT1) or PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE (PDAT) on seed lipid composition were assessed in several Camelina sativa lines. Furthermore, in vitro assays of acyltransferases in microsomal fractions prepared from developing seeds of some of these lines were performed. Decreased expression of DGAT1 led to an increased percentage of 18:3n-3 without any change in total lipid content of the seed. The tri-18:3 TAG increase occurred predominantly in the cotyledon, as determined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry, whereas species with two 18:3n-3 acyl groups were elevated in both cotyledon and embryonal axis. PDAT overexpression led to a relative increase of 18:2n-6 at the expense of 18:3n-3, also without affecting the total lipid content. Differential distributions of TAG species also were observed in different parts of the seed. The microsomal assays revealed that C. sativa seeds have very high activity of diacylglycerol-phosphatidylcholine interconversion. The combination of analytical and biochemical data suggests that the higher 18:2n-6 content in the seed oil of the PDAT overexpressors is due to the channeling of fatty acids from phosphatidylcholine into TAG before being desaturated to 18:3n-3, caused by the high activity of PDAT in general and by PDAT specificity for 18:2n-6. The higher levels of 18:3n-3 in DGAT1-silencing lines are likely due to the compensatory activity of a TAG-synthesizing enzyme with specificity for this acyl group and more desaturation of acyl groups occurring on phosphatidylcholine. PMID:28235891

  3. Contribution of long-range transport to the ozone levels recorded in the Northeast of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, C.; Nunes, T.; Marques, M. C.; Ferreira, F.

    2009-04-01

    levels were calculated for each cluster and the differences between the groups were validated using the Kruskal-Wallis statistical test. The results have shown a significant influence of the transport path on ozone concentrations, which is more noticeable when the probability of occurring photochemical pollution phenomena is higher. Air masses from Europe (Spain, France, United Kingdom, etc.) generally originate higher ozone levels than the ones arriving from the Atlantic Ocean. This feature shows the role of photochemical production along long-range transport phenomena, and the input of pollutants into air masses, along their path. A more detailed analysis at local/regional scale, supported mainly by an intensive field campaign performed during spring/summer of 2006 in the vicinity of Alvão Natural Park (FOTONET Project), at different altitudes, together with pollutant measurements from rural air quality stations in the north of Portugal and one from Spain (Peñausende) was carried out in order to evaluate the extension of photochemical pollution in the Northeast of Portugal. Ozone concentrations measurements in the region showed a noticeable decrease with altitude, mainly at night. In resume back trajectories based analysis has demonstrated that other countries, mainly Spain, contribute decisively to the ozone levels registered in the station used for this study. Backed on this knowledge we point out towards the need of considering common international policies when dealing with controlling ozone levels in the environment. References: Monks, P. (2000): A review of the observations and origins of the spring ozone maximum. Atmospheric Environment 34, 3545-3561. Vingarzan, R., Taylor, B. (2003): Trend analysis of ground level ozone in the greater Vancouver / Fraser Valley area of British Columbia. Atmospheric Environment 37, 2159-2171. EMPA (2008): Air mass trajectory clustering. Retrieved 01 November 2008 from: http://www.empa.ch/plugin/template/empa/*/63288/—/l=1

  4. Contribution of science to farm-level aquatic animal health management.

    PubMed

    Corsin, F; Giorgetti, G; Mohan, C V

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of science to farm level disease management is a story of two worlds. The development of effective vaccines has allowed for the control of important salmonid diseases such as furunculosis, yersiniosis and vibriosis and has significantly reduced farmers' reliance on antibiotics. Control of diseases for which cost-effective vaccines have yet to be developed has been achieved through the development of increasingly targeted antibiotics and chemotherapeutants. Increasingly, accurate and rapid diagnostic and water quality tests have allowed farmers to improve farm-level aquatic animal health management. In developed countries, these achievements have been possible thanks to the strong link between science and farm management. This link has been assisted by the presence of strong farmer organizations capable of coordinating research projects and hosting meetings at which scientific information is discussed and disseminated. Although Asia is responsible for the production of about 90% of aquaculture products, it presents a rather different picture from the above. Science has indeed made significant progress in health management but the links with farm management are still weak. Management practices capable of preventing important health problems in shrimp and fish farming are still poorly adopted by farmers. This is largely due to constraints in the dissemination of information to the large number of producers involved, the limited resources of both producers and their countries and the lack of effective farmer organizations capable of liaising with the scientific world. Recently, the Asian region has witnessed some successful examples of aquatic animal health management through the adoption of simple Better Management Practices. Efforts so far have been largely focused on shrimp farming, although activities have been initiated to adopt a similar approach to other commodities. The need for both observational and experimental epidemiological studies to

  5. miR-1297 mediates PTEN expression and contributes to cell progression in LSCC

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Wang, Hong-liang; Peng, Xin; Zhou, Hui-fang; Wang, Xin

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-1297 was found to be overexpressed in LSCC and contribute to the cell progression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was confirmed to be a target gene of miR-1297. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of PTEN can rescue the proliferation and invasion ability of miR-1297 downregulated Hep-2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of miR-1297 inhibits tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression after transcription, and are involved in cancer development. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms with increasing incidence in recent years. In this paper, we report the overexpression of miR-1297 in LSCC and Hep-2 cells. In addition, PTEN was identified to be directly regulated by miR-1297 through western blot and luciferase activity assay. Furthermore, downregulation of miR-1297 in Hep-2 cells was shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, migration, and tumor genesis. Our results document a new epigenetic mechanism for PTEN regulation in LSCC, which is crucial for the development of these tumors.

  6. Nitric oxide production and NO synthase gene expression contribute to vascular regulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Zhang, X; Zhao, G; Wolin, M S; Sessa, W; Hintze, T H

    1995-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator produced under normal physiologic conditions primarily by the vascular endothelium lining all blood vessels. The primary stimulus for the production of nitric oxide by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ECNOS, Type II) found in blood vessels is most likely the shear stress, the frictional force, caused by blood flowing through blood vessels. During exercise there is an increase in cardiac output and redistribution of blood flow to increase blood flow in skeletal muscle and in the coronary circulation. These adjustments provide increased oxygen delivery to support aerobic energy production and to sustain the exercise response. NO may be involved in the regulation of vascular tone in exercising skeletal and cardiac muscle by promoting, enhancing the metabolic vasodilation. In addition, the production of NO by capillary endothelium may regulate oxygen consumption by mitochondria through chemical interactions between NO and the iron-sulfur center of these enzymes. Finally, brief exercise training may alter the gene expression for the enzyme, the constitutive endothelial NO synthase, which forms NO and may be part of the vascular adaptation seen after aerobic exercise training. Furthermore, if there is a genetic predisposition to produce NO, as in world class athletes or animals bred to race, NO may contribute to spectacular exercise performance. These three potential roles of NO will be discussed and data presented to support each of these in our review.

  7. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J.; Geddes, Donna T.; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-01-01

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287). No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding. PMID:27834797

  8. Leptin Levels Are Higher in Whole Compared to Skim Human Milk, Supporting a Cellular Contribution.

    PubMed

    Kugananthan, Sambavi; Lai, Ching Tat; Gridneva, Zoya; Mark, Peter J; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-11-08

    Human milk (HM) contains a plethora of metabolic hormones, including leptin, which is thought to participate in the regulation of the appetite of the developing infant. Leptin in HM is derived from a combination of de novo mammary synthesis and transfer from the maternal serum. Moreover, leptin is partially lipophilic and is also present in HM cells. However, leptin has predominately been measured in skim HM, which contains neither fat nor cells. We optimised an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for leptin measurement in both whole and skim HM and compared leptin levels between both HM preparations collected from 61 lactating mothers. Whole HM leptin ranged from 0.2 to 1.47 ng/mL, whilst skim HM leptin ranged from 0.19 to 0.9 ng/mL. Whole HM contained, on average, 0.24 ± 0.01 ng/mL more leptin than skim HM (p < 0.0001, n = 287). No association was found between whole HM leptin and fat content (p = 0.17, n = 287), supporting a cellular contribution to HM leptin. No difference was found between pre- and post-feed samples (whole HM: p = 0.29, skim HM: p = 0.89). These findings highlight the importance of optimising HM leptin measurement and assaying it in whole HM to accurately examine the amount of leptin received by the infant during breastfeeding.

  9. Inhibition of NF-κB activity and cFLIP expression contribute to viral-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, P.; DeBiasi, R. L.; Meintzer, S. M.; Robinson, B. A.; Tyler, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is required for Type 3 (T3) reovirus-induced apoptosis. We now show that NF-κB is also activated by the prototypic Type 1 reovirus strain Lang (T1L), which induces significantly less apoptosis than T3 viruses, indicating that NF-κB activation alone is not sufficient for apoptosis in reovirus-infected cells. A second phase of virus-induced NF-κB regulation, where NF-κB activation is inhibited at later times following infection with T3 Abney (T3A), is absent in T1L-infected cells. This suggests that inhibition of NF-κB activation at later times post infection also contributes to reovirus-induced apoptosis. Reovirus-induced inhibition of stimulus-induced activation of NF-κB is significantly associated with apoptosis following infection of HEK293 cells with reassortant reoviruses and is determined by the T3 S1 gene segment, which is also the primary determinant of reovirus-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of stimulus-induced activation of NF-κB also occurs following infection of primary cardiac myocytes with apoptotic (8B) but not non-apoptotic (T1L) reoviruses. Expression levels of the NF-κB-regulated cellular FLICE inhibitory protein (cFLIP) reflect NF-κB activation in reovirus-infected cells. Further, inhibition of NF-κB activity and cFLIP expression promote T1L-induced apoptosis. These results demonstrate that inhibition of stimulus-induced activation of NF-κB and the resulting decrease in cFLIP expression promote reovirus-induced apoptosis. PMID:15909114

  10. Decreased Level of Klotho Contributes to Drug Resistance in Lung Cancer Cells: Involving in Klotho-Mediated Cell Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chen, TianJun; Ren, Hui; Thakur, Asmitanand; Yang, Tian; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting; Chen, MingWei

    2016-12-01

    Klotho is originally discovered as an anti-aging gene and recently identified as a tumor suppressor in various human cancers. Drug resistance is a major obstacle to affect the treatment of chemotherapy. In the present study, we explore the role of klotho on drug resistance in human lung cancers and investigate the mechanism of klotho on drug resistance in lung cancer cells. First, we detected a panel of six human lung cancer cell lines, including H460, SK-MES-1, cisplatin (DDP)-resistant A549/DDP, its parental subline A549, docetaxel (DTX)-resistant SPC-A-1/DTX, and SPC-A-1 by western blotting analysis. The results showed that klotho level was significantly decreased in chemotherapeutic drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Next, klotho was overexpressed in drug-resistant cancer cell lines and the results showed that overexpression of klotho significantly inhibited cell proliferation of A549/DDP and SPC-A-1/DTX. Conversely, knockdown of the expression of klotho significantly promoted cell growth of lung cancer cells. Furthermore, overexpression of klotho had synergistic effects with cisplatin to inhibit the proliferation of drug-resistant lung cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The molecular mechanism was explored by western blotting analysis and the results revealed that the levels of beclin 1 and LC3-II were obviously increased, suggesting cell autophagy enhanced in drug-resistant cancer cells. Importantly, overexpression of klotho would inhibit cell autophagy in A549/DDP cells. All the results demonstrated that the levels of klotho were significantly decreased, which was accompanied by the increased cell autophagy in drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Overexpression of klotho would inhibit cell autophagy in drug-resistant lung cancers, which may probably contribute to reverse drug resistance in lung cancer cells.

  11. The contribution of housing renovation to children’s blood lead levels: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Routine renovation of older housing is a risk factor for childhood lead poisoning, but the contribution to children’s blood lead levels is poorly defined for children with lower exposure levels. Methods We examined a prospective cohort of 276 children followed from 6 to 24 months of age. We conducted surveys of renovation activities and residential lead hazards and obtained blood lead level (B-Pb) every six months. We analyzed B-Pb in a repeated measures design using a mixed effects linear model. Results Parent reported interior renovation ranged from 11 to 25% of housing units at the four, 6-month periods. In multivariable analysis, children whose housing underwent interior renovation had a 12% higher mean B-Pb by two years of age compared with children whose housing units were not renovated (p < 0.01). The time between renovation and the child blood lead sample was associated with higher B-Pb (p-value for trend <0.01); compared to children in non-renovated housing, children whose housing units underwent renovation in the prior month had a 17% higher mean B-Pb at two years of age, whereas children whose housing renovation occurred in the prior 2–6 months had an 8% higher mean B-Pb. We also found an association between higher paint lead loading, measured using an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) based paint lead index, and child B-Pb (p = 0.02); for every 10 mg/cm2 increase in paint lead loading index there was a 7.5% higher mean childhood B-Pb. Conclusions In an analysis of data collected before the recent changes to Environmental Protection Agency’s Lead, Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule, routine interior housing renovation was associated with a modest increase in children’s B-Pb. These results are important for the provision of clinical advice, for housing and public health professionals, and for policymakers. PMID:23981571

  12. Constraining the Antarctic contribution to global sea-level change: ANDRILL and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Observations, models and paleoclimate reconstructions suggest that Antarctica's marine-based ice sheets behave in an unstable manner with episodes of rapid retreat in response to warming climate. Understanding the processes involved in this "marine ice sheet instability" is key for improving estimates of Antarctic ice sheet contribution to future sea-level rise. Another motivating factor is that far-field sea-level reconstructions and ice sheet models imply global mean sea level (GMSL) was up to 20m and 10m higher, respectively, compared with present day, during the interglacials of the warm Pliocene (~4-3Ma) and Late Pleistocene (at ~400ka and 125ka). This was when atmospheric CO2 was between 280 and 400ppm and global average surface temperatures were 1 to 3°C warmer, suggesting polar ice sheets are highly sensitive to relatively modest increases in climate forcing. Such magnitudes of GMSL rise not only require near complete melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but a substantial retreat of marine-based sectors of East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Recent geological drilling initiatives on the continental margin of Antarctica from both ship- (e.g. IODP; International Ocean Discovery Program) and ice-based (e.g. ANDRILL/Antarctic Geological Drilling) platforms have provided evidence supporting retreat of marine-based ice. However, without direct access through the ice sheet to archives preserved within sub-glacial sedimentary basins, the volume and extent of ice sheet retreat during past interglacials cannot be directly constrained. Sediment cores have been successfully recovered from beneath ice shelves by the ANDRILL Program and ice streams by the WISSARD (Whillans Ice Stream Sub-glacial Access Research Drilling) Project. Together with the potential of the new RAID (Rapid Access Ice Drill) initiative, these demonstrate the technological feasibility of accessing the subglacial bed and deeper sedimentary archives. In this talk I will outline the

  13. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF.

  14. Long-term future contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calov, Reinhard; Robinson, Alex; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the impact of future cumulative anthropogenic emissions on the fate of the Greenland ice sheet. For this study, we use the polythermal ice sheet model SICOPOLIS, which is bi-directionally coupled with the regional climate model of intermediate complexity REMBO. We constrain our model parameters with simulations over two glacial cycles employing anomalies from the global CLIMBER-2 model. CLIMBER-2 treats the major components or the Earth system, including atmosphere, ocean, terrestrial vegetation and carbon cycle. As constraints we include the cumulative error in ice thickness, the surface mass balance partition (ratio between precipitation and ice discharge) and the ice elevation drop between Eemian and present-day at the NEEM ice core location. Our model includes a new ice discharge parameterization, which describes the ice loss via small-scale outlet glaciers in a heuristic statistical approach. Using the large-ensemble of model versions consistent with our constraints, we estimate the range of the long-term future contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to sea-level rise under global warming. On the 100,000-year time scale, there is a visible modulation over the CO2 signal in the simulated Greenland ice volume caused by the 20,000 years precessional cycle of insolation. In nearly all of our scenarios (500 to 5000 Gt carbon cumulative emissions), the Greenland is sheet fully decays in the future after at least 40,000 years. For the extreme scenario (5000 Gt), the Greenland ice sheet decays much faster - after about 5000 years, while there is still 80% of the ice sheet left after 40,000 years only for the model versions with a low temperature sensitivity and the low cumulative carbon emission scenario (500 Gt). Our results underline that without future negative CO2 emissions, irreversible loss of Greenland ice sheet is essentially unavoidable.

  15. Studies on the Contribution of Cox-2 Expression in the Progression of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and H-Ras Activation.

    PubMed

    Moazeni-Roodi, Abdolkarim; Allameh, Abdolamir; Harirchi, Iraj; Motiee-Langroudi, Maziar; Garajei, Ata

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the H-ras and Cox-2 gene expression in tumors from Iranian Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) patients. Fresh tumor biopsies removed from oral cavity were collected from 67 new cases. Total RNA was extracted from biopsies and processed for quantification of H-ras and Cox-2 specific RNA expression using real-time PCR (QPCR). In addition, 59 gingival biopsies from apparently normal individuals were processed for QPCR assays. The results showed that Cox-2 expression at mRNA levels was at minimal levels in normal gingival biopsies. However, there was a surge in Cox-2 expression in tumor tissues (11.5 fold, p < 0.0001). Cox-2 expression was elevated depending on the tumor grade and there was a 1.7 fold increase (p = 0.003) in tumors diagnosed as MD/PD compared to that pathologically diagnosed as WD. This inflammatory marker was increased more significantly in smoker patients compared to non-smoker matching group. The H-ras expression at mRNA levels was significantly higher in OSCC samples compared to normal gingival (3 fold; p = 0.044). This expression was significantly higher in tumors diagnosed as MD/PD compared to WD (1.59 fold, p = 0.033). In conclusion, we found a correlation between H-ras expression and Cox-2 induction in OSCC tissue, suggesting that together these genes are contributing to cancer progression. Cox-2 is an early event in cancers of mucosal epithelial cells and a surge in Cox-2 expression in OSCC could be partly due to pro-inflammatory factors such as smoking.

  16. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Milly N.; Rodermel, Steven R.; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls. PMID:23785377

  17. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene.

    PubMed

    Kanobe, Milly N; Rodermel, Steven R; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls.

  18. Reduced paxillin expression contributes to the antimetastatic effect of 4-hydroxycoumarin on B16-F10 melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A; Salinas-Jazmín, Nohemí; Mendoza-Patiño, Nicandro; Mandoki, Juan J

    2008-01-01

    Background 4-Hydroxycoumarin (4-HC) is a coumarin that lacks anticoagulant activity. 4-HC affects the cytoskeletal stability and decreases cell adhesion and motility of the melanoma cell line B16-F10. Together with integrins and other cytoskeletal proteins, paxillin participates in the regulation of cell adhesion and motility, acting as an adapter protein at focal adhesions. The present study determined the participation of paxillin in the reported effects of 4-HC and analyzed the role of paxillin in the formation of melanoma metastases. Results 4-HC decreased protein and mRNA levels of α- and β-paxillin isoforms in B16-F10 cells. Paxillin downregulation correlated with an inadequate translocation of paxillin to focal adhesions and a reduced phosphotyr118-paxillin pool. Consequently, 4-HC altered paxillin-mediated signaling, decreasing the phosphorylation of FAK and the level of GTP-bound Rac-1. These results partially explain the mechanism of the previously reported effects of 4-HC. Additionally, we studied the effect of 4-HC on metastatic potential of B16-F10 cells through experimental metastasis assays. In vitro treatment of cells with 4-HC inhibited their capability to originate pulmonary metastases. 4-HC did not affect cell proliferation or survival, demonstrating that its antimetastatic effect is unrelated to changes on cell viability. We also studied the importance of paxillin in metastasis by transfecting melanoma cells with paxillin-siRNA. Transfection produced a modest reduction on metastatic potential, indicating that: i) paxillin plays a role as inducer of melanoma metastasis; and ii) paxillin downregulation is not sufficient to explain the antimetastatic effect of 4-HC. Therefore, we evaluated other changes in gene expression by differential display RT-PCR analysis. Treatment with 4-HC produced a downregulation of Adhesion Regulating Molecule-1 (ARM-1), which correlated with a decreased adhesion of melanoma cells to lung slides. Conclusion This study

  19. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    PubMed

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p < 0.0001). These changes in GTPCH and BH4 had no effect on GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Neither GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression.

  20. The contribution of Islet1-expressing splanchnic mesoderm cells to distinct branchiomeric muscles reveals significant heterogeneity in head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Elisha; Monovich, Amir; Tirosh-Finkel, Libbat; Harrelson, Zachary; Rousso, Tal; Rinon, Ariel; Harel, Itamar; Evans, Sylvia M; Tzahor, Eldad

    2008-02-01

    During embryogenesis, paraxial mesoderm cells contribute skeletal muscle progenitors, whereas cardiac progenitors originate in the lateral splanchnic mesoderm (SpM). Here we focus on a subset of the SpM that contributes to the anterior or secondary heart field (AHF/SHF), and lies adjacent to the cranial paraxial mesoderm (CPM), the precursors for the head musculature. Molecular analyses in chick embryos delineated the boundaries between the CPM, undifferentiated SpM progenitors of the AHF/SHF, and differentiating cardiac cells. We then revealed the regionalization of branchial arch mesoderm: CPM cells contribute to the proximal region of the myogenic core, which gives rise to the mandibular adductor muscle. SpM cells contribute to the myogenic cells in the distal region of the branchial arch that later form the intermandibular muscle. Gene expression analyses of these branchiomeric muscles in chick uncovered a distinct molecular signature for both CPM- and SpM-derived muscles. Islet1 (Isl1) is expressed in the SpM/AHF and branchial arch in both chick and mouse embryos. Lineage studies using Isl1-Cre mice revealed the significant contribution of Isl1(+) cells to ventral/distal branchiomeric (stylohyoid, mylohyoid and digastric) and laryngeal muscles. By contrast, the Isl1 lineage contributes to mastication muscles (masseter, pterygoid and temporalis) to a lesser extent, with virtually no contribution to intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles or extraocular muscles. In addition, in vivo activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in chick embryos resulted in marked inhibition of Isl1, whereas inhibition of this pathway increased Isl1 expression. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the contribution of Isl1(+) SpM cells to a subset of branchiomeric skeletal muscles.

  1. Tumor endothelial cells express high pentraxin 3 levels.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Kenji; Hojo, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Masumi; Torii, Chisaho; Shinohara, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2016-12-01

    It has been described that tumor progression has many similarities to inflammation and wound healing in terms of the signaling processes involved. Among biological responses, angiogenesis, which is necessary for tumor progression and metastasis, is a common hallmark; therefore, tumor blood vessels have been considered as important therapeutic targets in anticancer therapy. We focused on pentraxin 3 (PTX3), which is a marker of cancer-related inflammation, but we found no reports on its expression and function in tumor blood vessels. Here we showed that PTX3 is expressed in mouse and human tumor blood vessels based on immunohistochemical analysis. We found that PTX3 is upregulated in primary mouse and human tumor endothelial cells compared to normal endothelial cells. We also showed that PTX3 plays an important role in the proliferation of the tumor endothelial cells. These results suggest that PTX3 is an important target for antiangiogenic therapy.

  2. PI3K/Akt contributes to increased expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages exposed to hypoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Young; Jeong, Eunshil; Joung, Sun Myung; Lee, Joo Young

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxic stress-induced TLR4 expression is mediated by PI3K/Akt in macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/Akt regulated HIF-1 activation leading to TLR4 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not involved in TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia-mediated TLR4 expression by inhibiting PI3K/Akt. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play critical roles in triggering immune and inflammatory responses by detecting invading microbial pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Increased expression of TLR4 is implicated in aggravated inflammatory symptoms in ischemic tissue injury and chronic diseases. Results from our previous study showed that TLR4 expression was upregulated by hypoxic stress mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) at a transcriptional level in macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the upstream signaling pathway that contributed to the increase of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress. Either treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K and Akt or knockdown of Akt expression by siRNA blocked the increase of TLR4 mRNA and protein levels in macrophages exposed to hypoxia and CoCl{sub 2}. Phosphorylation of Akt by hypoxic stress preceded nuclear accumulation of HIF-1{alpha}. A PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) attenuated CoCl{sub 2}-induced nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. In addition, HIF-1{alpha}-mediated upregulation of TLR4 expression was blocked by LY294002. Furthermore, sulforaphane suppressed hypoxia- and CoCl{sub 2}-induced upregulation of TLR4 mRNA and protein by inhibiting PI3K/Akt activation and the subsequent nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF-1{alpha}. However, p38 was not involved in HIF-1{alpha} activation and TLR4 expression induced by hypoxic stress in macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PI3K

  3. Weaknesses in semantic, syntactic and oral language expression contribute to reading difficulties in Chinese dyslexic children.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao-Yun; Ho, Connie Suk-Han

    2014-02-01

    The present study examined the role of weaknesses in some language skills for the reading difficulties among Chinese dyslexic children. Thirty Chinese dyslexic children were compared with 30 chronological age (CA) controls and 30 reading-level (RL) controls on a number of language and reading measures. The results showed that Chinese dyslexic children performed significantly worse than the CA controls but similarly to the RL controls in many of the linguistic measures except that the dyslexic group also performed significantly less well than the RL group in semantic skills and syntactic skills on multiple modifiers. The dyslexic children were found to have difficulties in semantic processing, syntactic skills and oral language expression as compared with the CA controls, which were also found to predict their performance in word recognition and/or sentence comprehension. In addition, measures of semantic discrimination, advanced syntactic word order, and oral narrative also significantly predicted the group membership of having or not having dyslexia. These findings suggest that weaknesses in some semantic and advanced syntactic skills are the potential source of poor word and sentence reading in Chinese developmental dyslexia. Implications of the present findings for the identification of dyslexia were discussed.

  4. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jung Ar; Chung, Jin Sil; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Young Do

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  5. The contribution of neighbouring countries to pesticide levels in Dutch surface waters.

    PubMed

    Van 'T Zelfde, M; Tamis, W L M; Vijver, M G; De Snoo, G R

    2011-01-01

    Compared with other European countries, Dutch consumption of pesticides is high, particularly in agriculture, with many of the compounds found in surface waters in high concentrations and various standards being exceeded. Surface water quality is routinely monitored and the data obtained are published in the Dutch Pesticides Atlas. One important mechanism for reducing pesticide levels in surface waters is authorisation policy, which proceeds on the assumption that the pollution concerned has taken place in the Netherlands. The country straddles the delta of several major European rivers, however, and as river basins do not respect national borders some of the water quality problems will derive from neighbouring countries. Against this background the general question addressed in this article is the following: To what extent do countries neighbouring on the Netherlands contribute to pesticide pollution of Dutch surface waters? To answer this question, data from the Pesticides Atlas for the period 2005-2009 were used. Border zones with Belgium and Germany were defined and the data for these zones compared with Dutch data. In the analyses, due allowance was also made for authorised and non-authorised compounds and for differences between flowing and stagnant waters. Monitoring efforts in the border zones and in the Netherlands were also characterised, showing that efforts in the former are similar to those in the rest of the country. In the border zone with Belgium the relative number of non-authorised pesticides exceeding the standards is clearly higher than in the rest of the Netherlands. These exceedances are observed mainly in flowing waters. In contrast, there is no difference in the relative number of standard-exceeding measurements between the border zones and the rest of the Netherlands. In the boundary zones the array of standard-exceeding compounds clearly deviates from that in the rest of the Netherlands, with compounds authorised in the neighbouring

  6. Expression Profiling of Liposarcoma Yields a Multigene Predictor of Patient Outcome and Identifies Genes that Contribute to Liposarcomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gobble, Ryan M.; Qin, Li-Xuan; Brill, Elliott R.; Angeles, Christina V.; Ugras, Stacy; O’Connor, Rachael B.; Moraco, Nicole H.; DeCarolis, Penelope L.; Antonescu, Christina; Singer, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Liposarcomas are the second most common type of soft tissue sarcoma but its genetics are poorly defined. To identify genes that contribute to liposarcomagenesis and serve as prognostic candidates, we undertook expression profiling of 140 primary liposarcoma samples, which were randomly split into training set (n=95) and test set (n=45). A multi-gene predictor for DRFS was developed using the supervised principal component method. Expression levels of the 588 genes in the predictor were used to calculate a risk score for each patient. In validation of the predictor in the test set, patients with low risk score had a 3-year DRFS of 83% vs. 45% for high risk score patients (P=0.001). The hazard ratio for high vs. low score, adjusted for histologic subtype, was 4.42 (95% confidence interval 1.26–15.55; P=0.021). The concordance probability for risk score was 0.732. In contrast, the concordance probability for histologic subtype, which had been considered the best predictor of outcome in liposarcoma, was 0.669. Genes related to adipogenesis, DNA replication, mitosis, and spindle assembly checkpoint control were all highly represented in the multi-gene predictor. Three genes from the predictor, TOP2A, PTK7, and CHEK1, were found to be overexpressed in liposarcoma samples of all five subtypes and in liposarcoma cell lines. RNAi-mediated knockdown of these genes in liposarcoma cell lines reduced proliferation and invasiveness and increased apoptosis. Taken together, our findings identify genes that appear to be involved liposarcomagenesis and have promise as therapeutic targets, and support the use of this multi-gene predictor to improve risk stratification for individual patients with liposarcoma. PMID:21335544

  7. Gene expression profiles in testis of pigs with extreme high and low levels of androstenone

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Maren; Meuwissen, Theo; Lien, Sigbjørn; Bendixen, Christian; Wang, Xuefei; Conley, Lene Nagstrup; Berget, Ingunn; Tajet, Håvard; Grindflek, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Background: Boar taint is a major obstacle when using uncastrated male pigs for swine production. One of the main compounds causing this taint is androstenone, a pheromone produced in porcine testis. Here we use microarrays to study the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in testis of high and low androstenone boars. The study allows identification of genes and pathways associated with elevated androstenone levels, which is essential for recognising potential molecular markers for breeding purposes. Results: Testicular tissue was collected from 60 boars, 30 with extreme high and 30 with extreme low levels of androstenone, from each of the two breeds Duroc and Norwegian Landrace. The samples were hybridised to porcine arrays containing 26,877 cDNA clones, detecting 563 and 160 genes that were differentially expressed (p < 0.01) in Duroc and Norwegian Landrace, respectively. Of these significantly up- and down-regulated clones, 72 were found to be common for the two breeds, suggesting the possibility of both general and breed specific mechanisms in regulation of, or response to androstenone levels in boars. Ten genes were chosen for verification of expression patterns by quantitative real competitive PCR and real-time PCR. As expected, our results point towards steroid hormone metabolism and biosynthesis as important biological processes for the androstenone levels, but other potential pathways were identified as well. Among these were oxidoreductase activity, ferric iron binding, iron ion binding and electron transport activities. Genes belonging to the cytochrome P450 and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase families were highly up-regulated, in addition to several genes encoding different families of conjugation enzymes. Furthermore, a number of genes encoding transcription factors were found both up- and down-regulated. The high number of clones belonging to ferric iron and iron ion binding suggests an importance of these genes, and the association between

  8. Reduced Expression of Galectin-9 Contributes to a Poor Outcome in Colon Cancer by Inhibiting NK Cell Chemotaxis Partially through the Rho/ROCK1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Song, Bingfeng; Xue, Hao; Chen, Weiliang; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Qianqian; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Huayang; Zhang, Yun; Yang, Meixiang; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-9 is a widely expressed protein that is involved in immune regulation and tumorpathogenesis and serves as a marker of a poor prognosis in various types of cancers. However, the clinical impact and the precise mechanism by which this protein contributes to colon tumor progression are unclear. In the present study, we detected the expression of galectin-9 and CD56 cells using immunohistochemistry. Spearman's rank correlation was used to clarify the association between galectin-9 expression and natural killer (NK) cell infiltration. The influence of galectin-9 on NK-92 cell migration was evaluated in vitro using transwell chemotaxis assays. The role of rh-galectin-9 in F-actin polarization in NK-92 cells was investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy. We showed that galectin-9 was expressed in 101 (78.91%) colon tumor tissues and that was expressed at lower levels in these tissues than in para-tumor tissues. Low levels of galectin-9 expression were positively correlated with a poor histological grade and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). A Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that overall survival was longer in patients with high galectin-9 expression in an 8-year follow-up (P<0.05). Spearman's rank correlation indicated that there was a linear correlation between galectin-9 expression and CD56+ NK cell infiltration (R2 = 0.658; P<0.0001). Galectin-9 stimulated migration in human NK-92 cells by affecting F-actin polarization through the Rho/ROCK1 signaling pathway. These results suggest that galectin-9 expression potentially represents a novel mechanism for tumors to escape immune surveillance in colon tumors. PMID:27028892

  9. Nickel may contribute to EGFR mutation and synergistically promotes tumor invasion in EGFR-mutated lung cancer via nickel-induced microRNA-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Lee, Huei

    2015-08-19

    We recently reported that nickel accumulation in lung tissues may be associated with an increased in p53 mutation risk via reduced DNA repair activity. Here, we hypothesized that nickel accumulation in lung tissues could contribute to EGFR mutations in never-smokers with lung cancer. We enrolled 76 never-smoking patients to evaluate nickel level in adjacent normal lung tissues by ICP-MS. The prevalence of EGFR mutations was significantly higher in the high-nickel subgroup than in the low-nickel subgroup. Intriguingly, the OR for the occurrence of EGFR mutations in female, adenocarcinoma, and female adenocarcinoma patients was higher than that of all patients. Mechanistically, SPRY2 and RECK expressions were decreased by nickel-induced miR-21 via activation of the EGFR/NF-κB signaling pathway, which promoted invasiveness in lung cancer cells, and particularly in the cells with EGFR L858R expression vector transfection. The patients' nickel levels were associated with miR-21 expression levels. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed poorer overall survival (OS) and shorter relapse free survival (RFS) in the high-nickel subgroup than in low-nickel subgroup. The high-nickel/high-miR-21 subgroup had shorter OS and RFS periods when compared to the low-nickel/low-miR-21 subgroup. Our findings support previous epidemiological studies indicating that nickel exposure may not only contribute to cancer incidence but also promote tumor invasion in lung cancer.

  10. Overt expression of AP-1 reduces alpha myosin heavy chain expression and contributes to heart failure from chronic volume overload.

    PubMed

    Freire, Grace; Ocampo, Catherina; Ilbawi, Nadim; Griffin, Andrew J; Gupta, Madhu

    2007-10-01

    Reduced expression of alpha-MHC plays a significant role in cardiac contractile dysfunction from hemodynamic overload. Previously, Pur proteins and YY1 have been shown to play a role in alpha-MHC repression during heart failure induced by pressure overload and by spontaneous hypertension, respectively. This was not observed in volume-overload-induced heart failure, suggesting additional regulatory mechanisms for alpha-MHC repression. The present study was performed to identify volume overload responsive transcription factors involved in alpha-MHC gene regulation. DNA binding activity of several transcription factors was evaluated in a functionally characterized rat model of heart failure induced by aorto-caval shunt. After 10 weeks of shunt, severe LV dilatation and reduced LV function were accompanied by increased expression of ANF and beta-MHC, and decreased expression of alpha-MHC. This was associated with dramatic (10-fold) activation of AP-1 together with increased expression of c-fos and c-jun. AP-1 activation was not observed following 4 weeks of shunt when cardiac function was preserved. In cultured cardiomyocytes, induction of AP-1 by PMA attenuated alpha-MHC mRNA by 60%. Transient transfection assays mapped PMA responsive sequence to -582 to -588 bp of alpha-MHC promoter. Deletion or mutation of these nucleotides had minimal effect on basal promoter activity but played a dominant role in PMA-mediated repression of alpha-MHC promoter activity. Over-expression of c-fos and c-jun in cardiomyocytes inhibited alpha-MHC promoter activity in a concentration dependent manner. Data suggest a repressive role of AP-1 in alpha-MHC expression and its possible involvement in the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to heart failure in chronic volume overload.

  11. Silencing of LINE-1 retrotransposons contributes to variation in small noncoding RNA expression in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Stephen; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs are key players in the maintenance of genomic integrity, particularly in silencing the expression of repetitive elements, some of which are retrotransposable and capable of causing genomic instability. Recent computational studies suggest an association between L1 expression and the generation of small RNAs. However, whether L1 expression has a role in the activation of small RNA expression has yet to be determined experimentally.; Here we report a global analysis of small RNAs in deep sequencing from L1-active and L1-silenced breast cancer cells. We found that cells in which L1 expression was silenced exhibited greatly increased expression of a number of miRNAs and in particular, members of the let-7 family. In addition, we found differential expression of a few piRNAs that might potentially regulate gene expression. We also report the identification of several repeat RNAs against LTRs, LINEs and SINE elements. Although most of the repeat RNAs mapped to L1 elements, in general we found no significant differences in the expression levels of repeat RNAs in the presence or absence of L1 expression except for a few RNAs targeting subclasses of L1 elements. These differentially expressed small RNAs may function in human genome defence responses. PMID:24980824

  12. Diverse Kir Expression Contributes to Distinct Bimodal Distribution of Resting Potentials and Vasotone Responses of Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuqin; Chen, Fangyi; Karasawa, Takatoshi; Ma, Ke-Tao; Guan, Bing-Cai; Shi, Xiao-Rui; Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S.; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Jiang, Zhi-Gen

    2015-01-01

    The resting membrane potential (RP) of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a major determinant of cytosolic calcium concentration and vascular tone. The heterogeneity of RPs and its underlying mechanism among different vascular beds remain poorly understood. We compared the RPs and vasomotion properties between the guinea pig spiral modiolar artery (SMA), brain arterioles (BA) and mesenteric arteries (MA). We found: 1) RPs showed a robust bimodal distribution peaked at -76 and -40 mV evenly in the SMA, unevenly at -77 and -51 mV in the BA and ~-71 and -52 mV in the MA. Ba2+ 0.1 mM eliminated their high RP peaks ~-75 mV. 2) Cells with low RP (~-45 mV) hyperpolarized in response to 10 mM extracellular K+, while cells with a high RP depolarized, and cells with intermediate RP (~-58 mV) displayed an initial hyperpolarization followed by prolonged depolarization. Moderate high K+ typically induced dilation, constriction and a dilation followed by constriction in the SMA, MA and BA, respectively. 3) Boltzmann-fit analysis of the Ba2+-sensitive inward rectifier K+ (Kir) whole-cell current showed that the maximum Kir conductance density significantly differed among the vessels, and the half-activation voltage was significantly more negative in the MA. 4) Corresponding to the whole-cell data, computational modeling simulated the three RP distribution patterns and the dynamics of RP changes obtained experimentally, including the regenerative swift shifts between the two RP levels after reaching a threshold. 5) Molecular works revealed strong Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 transcripts and Kir2.1 immunolabeling in all 3 vessels, while Kir2.3 and Kir2.4 transcript levels varied. We conclude that a dense expression of functional Kir2.X channels underlies the more negative RPs in endothelial cells and a subset of VSMC in these arterioles, and the heterogeneous Kir function is primarily responsible for the distinct bimodal RPs among these arterioles. The fast Kir-based regenerative shifts

  13. Analysis of gelsolin expression pattern in developing chicken embryo reveals high GSN expression level in tissues of neural crest origin.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Antonina Joanna; Morosan-Puopolo, Gabriela; Makowiecka, Aleksandra; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria; Nowak, Dorota; Brand-Saberi, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Gelsolin is one of the most intensively studied actin-binding proteins. However, in the literature comprehensive studies of GSN expression during development have not been performed yet in all model organisms. In zebrafish, gelsolin is a dorsalizing factor that modulates bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathways, whereas knockout of the gelsolin coding gene, GSN is not lethal in murine model. To study the role of gelsolin in development of higher vertebrates, it is crucial to estimate GSN expression pattern during development. Here, we examined GSN expression in the developing chicken embryo. We applied numerous methods to track GSN expression in developing embryos at mRNA and protein level. We noted a characteristic GSN expression pattern. Although GSN transcripts were present in several cell types starting from early developmental stages, a relatively high GSN expression was observed in eye, brain vesicles, midbrain, neural tube, heart tube, and splanchnic mesoderm. In older embryos, we observed a high GSN expression in the cranial ganglia and dorsal root ganglia. A detailed analysis of 10-day-old chicken embryos revealed high amounts of gelsolin especially within the head region: in the olfactory and optic systems, meninges, nerves, muscles, presumptive pituitary gland, and pericytes, but not oligodendrocytes in the brain. Obtained results suggest that GSN is expressed at high levels in some tissues of ectodermal origin including all neural crest derivatives. Additionally, we describe that silencing of GSN expression in brain vesicles leads to altered morphology of the mesencephalon. This implies gelsolin is crucial for chicken brain development.

  14. Chronic stress alters the expression levels of longevity-related genes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Ana C; Muñoz, Mario F; Herrera, Antonio J; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Stowell, Rianne; Ayala, Antonio; Machado, Alberto; Venero, José L; de Pablos, Rocío M

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of psychological stress on cellular stress during aging and neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of chronic psychological stress, and the consequent increase of circulating glucocorticoids, on several hippocampal genes involved in longevity. Sirtuin-1, p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein, and heat shock protein 70 were studied at the mRNA and protein levels in stressed and non-stressed animals. Stress treatment for 10 days decreased sirtuin-1 and heat shock protein 70 levels, but increased levels of p53, thioredoxin-interacting protein and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. Examination of protein expression following two months of stress treatment indicated that sirtuin-1 remained depressed. In contrast, an increase was observed for thioredoxin-interacting protein, heat shock protein 70, p53 and the NADPH oxidase enzyme. The effect of stress was reversed by mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These data suggest that chronic stress could contribute to aging in the hippocampus.

  15. UNEP's Work to Implement Good Practice at a Regional Level: Contribution to the UNDESD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogbuigwe, Akpezi

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the contribution made by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) towards enhancing the integration of sustainable development concerns in Africa through its initiative, the Mainstreaming Environment and Sustainability in Africa (MESA) Universities Partnership, during the United Nations Decade of Education for…

  16. Correlation between liver cancer pain and the HIF-1 and VEGF expression levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Geng; Feng, Gui-Yin; Guo, Yan-Ru; Liang, Dong-Qi; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Hai-Lun

    2017-01-01

    A possible correlation between liver cancer pain and the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression levels was examined. From January, 2015 to January, 2016, 30 patients suffering from liver cancer with pain, 30 patients with liver cancer without pain and 30 hepatitis patients with pain were enrolled in the study. Pain level was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA were determined by RT-PCR and the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF proteins were examined by ELISA. Before intervention, the VAS in the hepatitis group was significantly higher than that of the liver cancer pain group. However, after intervention the VAS in the two groups was reduced. HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA expression levels in the liver cancer pain group were significantly higher than those in the liver cancer group before and after intervention. The expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA in the hepatitis group were the lowest. The expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA in the liver cancer pain group considerably increased after intervention. The expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF mRNA in the other two groups showed no changes before or after intervention. Before and after the intervention, VAS in the liver cancer pain group was positively correlated to the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF. Thus, pain occurrence and the pain level in liver cancer patients were correlated with the expression levels of HIF-1 and VEGF. As the regular three-step medicine analgesic ladder is ineffective in these cases, verification of HIF-1 and VEGF expression levels may be considered the new target for pain release. PMID:28123525

  17. A modest glucokinase overexpression in the liver promotes fed expression levels of glycolytic and lipogenic enzyme genes in the fasted state without altering SREBP-1c expression.

    PubMed

    Scott, D K; Collier, J J; Doan, T T T; Bunnell, A S; Daniels, M C; Eckert, D T; O'Doherty, R M

    2003-12-01

    Hepatic genes crucial for carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis are regulated by insulin and glucose metabolism. However, the relative contributions of insulin and glucose to the regulation of metabolic gene expression are poorly defined in vivo. To address this issue, adenovirus-mediated hepatic overexpression of glucokinase was used to determine the effects of increased hepatic glucose metabolism on gene expression in fasted or ad libitum fed rats. In the fasted state, a 3 fold glucokinase overexpression was sufficient to mimic feeding-induced increases in pyruvate kinase and acetyl CoA carboxylase mRNA levels, demonstrating a primary role for glucose metabolism in the regulation of these genes in vivo. Conversely, glucokinase overexpression was unable to mimic feeding-induced alterations of fatty acid synthase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyl transferase I or PEPCK mRNAs, indicating insulin as the primary regulator of these genes. Interestingly, glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA was increased by glucokinase overexpression in both the fasted and fed states, providing evidence, under these conditions, for the dominance of glucose over insulin signaling for this gene in vivo. Importantly, glucokinase overexpression did not alter sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-c mRNA levels in vivo and glucose signaling did not alter the expression of this gene in primary hepatocytes. We conclude that a modest hepatic overexpression of glucokinase is sufficient to alter expression of metabolic genes without changing the expression of SREBP-1c.

  18. Expression levels of insulin receptor substrate-1 modulate the osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Contaldo, Clara; Myers, Timothy J; Zucchini, Cinzia; Manara, Maria Cristina; Chiodoni, Claudia; Colombo, Mario P; Nicoletti, Giordano; Lollini, Pier Luigi; Li, Tieshi; Longobardi, Lara; Scotlandi, Katia; Spagnoli, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 system, including its critical mediator insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), is involved in regulating osteosarcoma (OS) cell proliferation or differentiation. The aim of this study is to define the role of IRS-1 in OS cells by assessing the contribution of IRS-1 in the differentiation of human and murine OS cell lines and mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and found that the basal level of IRS-1 is important for the initiation of differentiation. Both down-regulation and over-expression of IRS-1 inhibited osteoblastic differentiation. In vivo studies showed that OS cells over-expressing IRS-1 have increased metastatic potential and tumor growth. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 led to an increase in IRS-1 protein level that inhibited osteoblastic differentiation, suggesting a role for proteasomal regulation in maintaining the appropriate expression level of IRS-1. Thus, precise regulation of IRS-1 expression level is critical for determining the differentiating capacity of MSCs and OS cells, and that derangement of IRS-1 levels can be a critical step in OS transformation.

  19. The myostatin gene of Mytilus chilensis evidences a high level of polymorphism and ubiquitous transcript expression.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2014-02-15

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a protein of the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and plays a crucial role in muscular development for higher vertebrates. However, its biological function in marine invertebrates remains undiscovered. This study characterizes the full-length sequence of the Mytilus chilensis myostatin gene (Mc-MSTN). Furthermore, tissue transcription patterns and putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were also identified. The Mc-MSTN cDNA sequence showed 3528 base pairs (bp), consisting of 161 bp of 5' UTR, 2,110 bp of 3' UTR, and an open reading frame of 1,257 bp encoding for 418 amino acids and with an RXXR proteolytic site and nine cysteine-conserved residues. Gene transcription analysis revealed that the Mc-MSTN has ubiquitous expression among several tissues, with higher expression in the gonads and mantle than in the digestive gland, gills, and hemolymph. Furthermore, high levels of polymorphisms were detected (28 SNPs in 3'-UTR and 9 SNPs in the coding region). Two SNPs were non-synonymous and involved amino acid changes between Glu/Asp and Thr/Ile. Until now, the MSTN gene has been mainly related to muscle growth in marine bivalves. However, the present study suggests a putative biological function not entirely associated to muscle tissue and contributes molecular evidence to the current debate about the function of the MSTN gene in marine invertebrates.

  20. High level expression of an acid-stable phytase from Citrobacter freundii in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xiong, Aisheng; Fu, Xiaoyan; Gao, Feng; Tian, Yongsheng; Peng, Rihe

    2010-12-01

    To obtain a high level expression of phytase with favorable characteristics, a codon-optimized phytase gene from Citrobacter freundii was synthesized and transferred into Pichia pastoris. Small-scale expression experiments and activity assays were used to screen positive colonies. After purified by Ni²+-NTA agarose affinity column, the characterizations of the recombinant phytase were determined. The recombinant phytase (r-phyC) had two distinct pH optima at 2.5 and 4.5 and an optimal temperature at 50 °C. It retained more than 80% activity after being incubated under various buffer (pH 1.5-8.0) at 37 °C for 1 h. The specific activity, Km, and Vmax values of r-phyC for sodium phytate were 2,072 ± 18 U mg⁻¹, 0.52 ± 0.04 mM, and 2,380 ± 84 U mg⁻¹ min⁻¹, respectively. The enzyme activity was significantly improved by 1 mM of K+, Ca²+, and Mg²+. These characteristics contribute to its potential application in feed industry.

  1. Low-level laser therapy promotes dendrite growth via upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; He, Zhiyong; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal survival and dendrite growth, BDNF upregulation may contribute to rescue dendrite atrophy and cell loss in AD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to regulate neuronal function both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that LLLT rescued neurons loss and dendritic atrophy via the increase of both BDNF mRNA and protein expression. In addition, dendrite growth was improved after LLLT, characterized by upregulation of PSD95 expression, and the increase in length, branching, and spine density of dendrites in hippocampal neurons. Together, these studies suggest that upregulation of BDNF with LLLT can ameliorate Aβ-induced neurons loss and dendritic atrophy, thus identifying a novel pathway by which LLLT protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Accurate Estimation of Expression Levels of Homologous Genes in RNA-seq Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paşaniuc, Bogdan; Zaitlen, Noah; Halperin, Eran

    Next generation high throughput sequencing (NGS) is poised to replace array based technologies as the experiment of choice for measuring RNA expression levels. Several groups have demonstrated the power of this new approach (RNA-seq), making significant and novel contributions and simultaneously proposing methodologies for the analysis of RNA-seq data. In a typical experiment, millions of short sequences (reads) are sampled from RNA extracts and mapped back to a reference genome. The number of reads mapping to each gene is used as proxy for its corresponding RNA concentration. A significant challenge in analyzing RNA expression of homologous genes is the large fraction of the reads that map to multiple locations in the reference genome. Currently, these reads are either dropped from the analysis, or a naïve algorithm is used to estimate their underlying distribution. In this work, we present a rigorous alternative for handling the reads generated in an RNA-seq experiment within a probabilistic model for RNA-seq data; we develop maximum likelihood based methods for estimating the model parameters. In contrast to previous methods, our model takes into account the fact that the DNA of the sequenced individual is not a perfect copy of the reference sequence. We show with both simulated and real RNA-seq data that our new method improves the accuracy and power of RNA-seq experiments.

  3. Accurate estimation of expression levels of homologous genes in RNA-seq experiments.

    PubMed

    Paşaniuc, Bogdan; Zaitlen, Noah; Halperin, Eran

    2011-03-01

    Abstract Next generation high-throughput sequencing (NGS) is poised to replace array-based technologies as the experiment of choice for measuring RNA expression levels. Several groups have demonstrated the power of this new approach (RNA-seq), making significant and novel contributions and simultaneously proposing methodologies for the analysis of RNA-seq data. In a typical experiment, millions of short sequences (reads) are sampled from RNA extracts and mapped back to a reference genome. The number of reads mapping to each gene is used as proxy for its corresponding RNA concentration. A significant challenge in analyzing RNA expression of homologous genes is the large fraction of the reads that map to multiple locations in the reference genome. Currently, these reads are either dropped from the analysis, or a naive algorithm is used to estimate their underlying distribution. In this work, we present a rigorous alternative for handling the reads generated in an RNA-seq experiment within a probabilistic model for RNA-seq data; we develop maximum likelihood-based methods for estimating the model parameters. In contrast to previous methods, our model takes into account the fact that the DNA of the sequenced individual is not a perfect copy of the reference sequence. We show with both simulated and real RNA-seq data that our new method improves the accuracy and power of RNA-seq experiments.

  4. Posttranscriptional mechanisms involving microRNA-27a and b contribute to fast-specific and glucocorticoid-mediated myostatin expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Allen, David L; Loh, Amanda S

    2011-01-01

    Expression of the antigrowth factor myostatin (MSTN) differs between fast and slow skeletal muscles and is increased in nearly every form of muscle atrophy, but the contribution of transcriptional vs. posttranscriptional mechanisms to its differing expression in these states has not been defined. We show here that levels of mature MSTN mRNA were sixfold greater in fast vs. slow muscle and were increased twofold in fast muscle in response to dexamethasone (Dex) injection in vivo and in C₂C₁₂ myotubes following Dex treatment in vitro, but that levels of MSTN pre-mRNA, a readout of transcription, only minimally and nonsignificantly differed in these states. Moreover, Dex treatment with or without cotransfection with a glucocorticoid receptor expression construct had only modest effects on mouse MSTN promoter activity in C₂C₁₂ myotubes. We therefore explored the potential contribution of posttranscriptional mechanisms, and the role of the microRNAs miR-27a and b in particular, on MSTN expression. The MSTN 3'-untranslated region (UTR) contains a putative recognition sequence for miR-27a and b that is conserved across a wide range of vertebrate species. Cotransfection of a MSTN 3'-UTR-luciferase construct with a miR-27b expression construct significantly attenuated by approximately half while mutation of the miR-27 recognition sequence significantly increased by approximately twofold the activity of a MSTN 3'-UTR construct and decreased mRNA degradation of a luciferase reporter construct in C₂C₁₂ myotubes. Expression of miR-27a and b was almost sixfold greater in slow-twitch than in fast-twitch muscle in vivo, and miR-27a expression was significantly decreased by nearly half by glucocorticoid treatment in vitro. Finally, the miR-27a and b promoters were activated by cotransfection with the slow-specific signaling molecules calcineurin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α. The present data represent the first demonstration

  5. Relationship between Legible Handwriting and Level of Success of Third Grade Students in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Seher; Küçükayar, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify third-grade students' performance levels for written expression and handwriting and to find the relationship between these performances. The study is based on relational screening model. It is carried out with 110 third grade students. Students' levels of success in handwriting and in written expression are evaluated…

  6. Serum Resistin Levels May Contribute to an Increased Risk of Acute Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Liu; Xu, Shi-Jun; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xiu-Qing; Liu, Ting; Gao, Qiu-Yan; Qian, Qing-Qiang; Sun, Bao-Liang; Yang, Ming-Feng

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between serum resistin levels and acute cerebral infarction (ACI). PubMed, SpringerLink, Wiley, EBSCO, Ovid, Web of Science, Wanfang, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and VIP databases (last updated search in October 2014) were exhaustively searched, and data from the eligible studies were extracted and analyzed to assess the association between serum resistin levels and ACI. STATA software (version 12.0, Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA) was utilized for data analysis. Ten studies including 1829 ACI patients and 1557 healthy controls were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Our major result revealed that ACI patients exhibited higher serum resistin levels compared with healthy controls. Asubgroup analysis based on ethnicity showed a significant association between serum resistin levels and ACI in Asians, but surprisingly not in Caucasians. The results of our meta-analysis suggest that serum resistin levels are associated with an increased risk of ACI.

  7. Endogenous galectin-3 expression levels modulate immune responses in galectin-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aparna D; Gude, Rajiv P; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2015-12-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding mammalian lectin, is involved in cancer progression and metastasis. However, there is an unmet need to identify the underlying mechanisms of cancer metastasis mediated by endogenous host galectin-3. Galectin-3 is also known to be an important regulator of immune responses. The present study was aimed at analysing how expression of endogenous galectin-3 regulates host immunity and lung metastasis in B16F10 murine melanoma model. Transgenic Gal-3(+/-) (hemizygous) and Gal-3(-/-) (null) mice exhibited decreased levels of Natural Killer (NK) cells and lower NK mediated cytotoxicity against YAC-1 tumor targets, compared to Gal-3(+/+) (wild-type) mice. On stimulation, Gal-3(+/-) and Gal-3(-/-) mice splenocytes showed increased T cell proliferation than Gal-3(+/+) mice. Intracellular calcium flux was found to be lower in activated T cells of Gal-3(-/-) mice as compared to T cells from Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, serum Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine levels were found to be lowest, exhibiting dysregulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines balance. Marked decrease in serum IFN-γ levels and splenic IFN-γR1 (IFN-γ Receptor 1) expressing T and NK cell percentages were observed in Gal-3(-/-) mice. On recombinant IFN-γ treatment of splenocytes in vitro, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 protein expression was higher in Gal-3(-/-) mice compared to that in Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(+/-) mice; suggesting possible attenuation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) 1 mediated IFN-γ signaling in Gal-3(-/-) mice. The ability of B16F10 melanoma cells to form metastatic colonies in the lungs of Gal-3(+/+) and Gal-3(-/-) mice remained comparable, whereas it was found to be reduced in Gal-3(+/-) mice. Our data indicates that complete absence of endogenous host galectin-3 facilitates lung metastasis of B16F10 cells in mice, which may be contributed by dysregulated immune

  8. PAIRED-CITY STUDY TO DETERMINE THE CONTRIBUTION OF SOURCE WATER TYPE TO THE ENDEMIC LEVEL OF MICROBIAL DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paired-City Study to Determine the Contribution of Source Water Type to the Endemic Level of Microbial Disease

    F Frost PhD, T Kunde MPH, L Harter PhD, T Muller MS, GF Craun PE MPH, RL Calderon MPH PhD

    ABSTRACT

    Context: The effectiveness of current drinking...

  9. In What Ways Does Studying at M-Level Contribute to Teachers' Professional Learning? Research Set in an English University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Karen; Simon, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    In a climate where government funding to support a master's-level teaching profession is in jeopardy, it is timely to explore the contribution of research and scholarship to the practice of teaching. This paper reports on an interview study in which the graduates of a professional master's course articulated their learning through reflection on…

  10. How Does Skype, as an Online Communication Software Tool, Contribute to K-12 Administrators' Level of Self-Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiriakidis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    How does Skype, as an online communication tool, contribute to school and district administrators' reported level of self-efficacy? A sample of n = 39 participants of which 22 were school administrators and 17 were district administrators was purposefully selected to use Skype in their offices with a webcam and microphone to communicate with other…

  11. TIGIT expression levels on human NK cells correlate with functional heterogeneity among healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hou, Hongyan; Wu, Shiji; Tang, Qing; Liu, Weiyong; Huang, Min; Yin, Botao; Huang, Jing; Mao, Lie; Lu, Yanfang; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-10-01

    Human NK cells display extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among healthy individuals, but the mechanism responsible for this variation is still largely unknown. Here, we show that a novel immune receptor, T-cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), is expressed preferentially on human NK cells but shows wide variation in its expression levels among healthy individuals. We found that the TIGIT expression level is related to the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of NK cells, and that NK cells from healthy individuals can be divided into three categories according to TIGIT expression. NK cells with low levels of TIGIT expression show higher cytokine secretion capability, degranulation activity, and cytotoxic potential than NK cells with high levels of TIGIT expression. Blockade of the TIGIT pathway significantly increased NK-cell function, particularly in NK cells with high levels of TIGIT expression. We further observed that the TIGIT expression level was inversely correlated with the IFN-γ secretion capability of NK cells in patients with cancers and autoimmune diseases. Importantly, we propose a novel mechanism that links TIGIT expression with NK-cell functional heterogeneity, and this mechanism might partially explain why individuals have different susceptibilities to infection, autoimmune disease, and cancer.

  12. Neuron-specific expression of p48 Ebp1 during murine brain development and its contribution to CNS axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyo Rim; Hwang, Inwoo; Ahn, So Yoon; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2017-03-01

    P48 Ebp1 is expressed in rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells and accelerates cell growth and survival. However, its expression pattern and role in central nervous system development have not been studied. Here, we demonstrated the spatiotemporal expression pattern of p48 Ebp1 during embryonic development and the postnatal period. During embryonic development, p48 Ebp1 was highly expressed in the brain. Expression gradually decreased after birth but was still more abundant than p42 expression after birth. Strikingly, we found that p48 Ebp1 was expressed in a cell type specific manner in neurons but not astrocytes. Moreover, p48 Ebp1 physically interacted with beta tubulin but not alpha tubulin. This fits with its accumulation in distal microtubule growth cone regions. Furthermore, in injured hippocampal slices, p48 Ebp1 introduction promoted axon regeneration. Thus, we speculate that p48 Ebp1 might contribute to microtubule dynamics acting as an MAP and promotes CNS axon regeneration. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 126-131].

  13. JNK contributes to temozolomide resistance of stem-like glioblastoma cells via regulation of MGMT expression.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masashi; Sato, Atsushi; Shibuya, Keita; Watanabe, Eriko; Seino, Shizuka; Suzuki, Shuhei; Seino, Manabu; Narita, Yoshitaka; Shibui, Soichiro; Kayama, Takamasa; Kitanaka, Chifumi

    2014-02-01

    While elimination of the cancer stem cell population is increasingly recognized as a key to successful treatment of cancer, the high resistance of cancer stem cells to conventional chemoradiotherapy remains a therapeutic challenge. O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which is frequently expressed in cancer stem cells of glioblastoma, has been implicated in their resistance to temozolomide, the first-line chemotherapeutic agent against newly diagnosed glioblastoma. However, much remains unknown about the molecular regulation that underlies MGMT expression and temozolomide resistance of glioblastoma cancer stem cells. Here, we identified JNK as a novel player in the control of MGMT expression and temozolomide resistance of glioblastoma cancer stem cells. We showed that inhibition of JNK, either pharmacologically or by RNA interference, in stem-like glioblastoma cells derived directly from glioblastoma tissues reduces their MGMT expression and temozolomide resistance. Importantly, sensitization of stem-like glioblastoma cells to temozolomide by JNK inhibition was dependent on MGMT expression, implying that JNK controls temozolomide resistance of stem-like glioblastoma cells through MGMT expression. Our findings suggest that concurrent use of JNK inhibitors with temozolomide may be a rational therapeutic approach to effectively target the cancer stem cell population in the treatment of glioblastoma.

  14. Mechanical stress contributes to the expression of the STM homeobox gene in Arabidopsis shoot meristems

    PubMed Central

    Landrein, Benoît; Kiss, Annamaria; Sassi, Massimiliano; Chauvet, Aurélie; Das, Pradeep; Cortizo, Millan; Laufs, Patrick; Takeda, Seiji; Aida, Mitsuhiro; Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The role of mechanical signals in cell identity determination remains poorly explored in tissues. Furthermore, because mechanical stress is widespread, mechanical signals are difficult to uncouple from biochemical-based transduction pathways. Here we focus on the homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM), a master regulator and marker of meristematic identity in Arabidopsis. We found that STM expression is quantitatively correlated to curvature in the saddle-shaped boundary domain of the shoot apical meristem. As tissue folding reflects the presence of mechanical stress, we test and demonstrate that STM expression is induced after micromechanical perturbations. We also show that STM expression in the boundary domain is required for organ separation. While STM expression correlates with auxin depletion in this domain, auxin distribution and STM expression can also be uncoupled. STM expression and boundary identity are thus strengthened through a synergy between auxin depletion and an auxin-independent mechanotransduction pathway at the shoot apical meristem. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07811.001 PMID:26623515

  15. Contribution of Drosophila TRPA1-expressing neurons to circadian locomotor activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngseok

    2013-01-01

    In both vertebrates and invertebrates, Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are expressed in sensory neurons and mediate environmental stimuli such as light, sound, temperature, and taste. Some of these channels, however, are expressed only in the brain and their functions remain incompletely understood. Using the GAL4/UAS binary system with a line in which the GAL4 had been knocked into the trpA1 locus in Drosophila, we recently reported new insights into TRPA1 localization and function, including its expression in approximately 15% of all circadian neurons. TRPA1 is expressed in lateral posterior neurons (LPNs), which are known to be highly sensitive to entrainment by temperature cycles. Here, I used the bacterial sodium channel, NaChBac, to examine the effects of altering the electrical properties of trpA1 neurons on circadian rhythms. My results indicate that circadian activity of the flies in the morning, daytime, and evening was affected in a temperature-dependent manner following TRPA1 neuronal activation. Remarkably, TRPA1 neuron activation in flies kept at 18°C impacted the morning peak of circadian activity even though TRPA1 is not expressed in morning cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the activation of TRPA1-expressing neurons may differentially coordinate light/dark circadian entrainment, depending on the temperature.

  16. TISSUE FACTOR EXPRESSION BY MYELOID CELLS CONTRIBUTES TO PROTECTIVE IMMUNE RESPONSE AGAINST Mycobacterium tuberculosis INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Tripathi, Deepak; Tucker, Torry; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana; Welch, Elwyn; Raghunath, Anjana; Jeffers, Ann; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Schechter, Melissa E; Andrade, Bruno B; Mackman, Nizel; Idell, Steven; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an essential role in hemostasis by activating coagulation. TF is also expressed by monocytes/macrophages as part of the innate immune response to infections. In the current study, we determined the role of TF expressed by myeloid cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection by using mice lacking the TF gene in myeloid cells (TFΔ) and human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs). We found that during M. tb infection, a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells was associated with reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression, enhanced IL-10 production and reduced apoptosis in infected macrophages, which augmented M. tb growth. Our results demonstrate that a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells promotes M2 like phenotype in M .tb infected macrophages. A deficiency in TF expression by myeloid cells was also associated with reduced fibrin deposition and increased matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mediated inflammation in M. tb infected lungs. Our studies demonstrate that TF expressed by myeloid cells has newly recognized abilities to polarize macrophages and to regulate M. tb growth. PMID:26471500

  17. Gene expression levels in normal human lymphoblasts with variable sensitivities to arsenite: Identification of GGT1 and NFKBIE expression levels as possible biomarkers of susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarova, Elena V.; Li Ping; Uddin, Ahmed N.; Chen, Xuyan; Nadas, Arthur; Rossman, Toby G.

    2008-01-15

    Drinking arsenic-contaminated water is associated with increased risk of neoplasias of the skin, lung, bladder and possibly other sites, as well as other diseases. Earlier, we showed that human lymphoblast lines from different normal unexposed donors showed variable sensitivities to the toxic effects of arsenite. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to compare the basal gene expression profiles between two arsenite-resistant (GM02707, GM00893) and two arsenite-sensitive lymphoblast lines (GM00546, GM00607). A number of genes were differentially expressed in arsenite-sensitive and arsenite-resistant cells. Among these, {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase 1 (GGT1) and NF{kappa}B inhibitor-epsilon (NFKBIE) showed higher expression levels in arsenite-resistant cells. RT-PCR analysis with gene-specific primers confirmed these results. Reduction of GGT1 expression level in arsenite-resistant lymphoblasts with GGT1-specific siRNA resulted in increased cell sensitivity to arsenite. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that expression levels of GGT1 and possibly NFKBIE might be useful as biomarkers of genetic susceptibility to arsenite. Expression microarrays can thus be exploited for identifying additional biomarkers of susceptibility to arsenite and to other toxicants.

  18. Expression of neurexin and neuroligin in the enteric nervous system and their down-regulated expression levels in Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangye; Wang, Jian; Li, Aiwu; Liu, Hongzhen; Zhang, Wentong; Cui, Xinhai; Wang, Kelai

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the expression levels of neurexins and neuroligins in the enteric nervous system (ENS) in Hirschsprung Disease (HSCR). Longitudinal muscles with adherent mesenteric plexus were obtained by dissection of the fresh gut wall of mice, guinea pigs, and humans. Double labeling of neurexin I and Hu (a neuron marker), neuroligin 1 and Hu, neurexin I and synaptophysin (a presynaptic marker), and neuroligin 1 and PSD95 (a postsynaptic marker) was performed by immunofluorescence staining. Images were merged to determine the relative localizations of the proteins. Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin in different segments of the ENS in HSCR were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Neurexin and neuroligin were detected in the mesenteric plexus of mice, guinea pigs, and humans with HSCR. Neurexin was located in the presynapse, whereas neuroligin was located in the postsynapse. Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin were significant in the ganglionic colonic segment of HSCR, moderate in the transitional segment, and negative in the aganglionic colonic segment. The expressions of neurexin and neuroligin in the transitional segments were significantly down-regulated compared with the levels in the normal segments (P < 0.05). Expression levels of neurexin and neuroligin in ENS are significantly down-regulated in HSCR, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of HSCR.

  19. Inheritance of gene expression level and selective constraints on trans- and cis-regulatory changes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Emerson, J J; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Hsieh, Li-Ching; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2013-09-01

    Gene expression evolution can be caused by changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. As cis and trans regulation operate through different molecular mechanisms, cis and trans mutations may show different inheritance patterns and may be subjected to different selective constraints. To investigate these issues, we obtained and analyzed gene expression data from two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and their hybrid, using high-throughput sequencing. Our data indicate that compared with other types of genes, those with antagonistic cis-trans interactions are more likely to exhibit over- or underdominant inheritance of expression level. Moreover, in accordance with previous studies, genes with trans variants tend to have a dominant inheritance pattern, whereas cis variants are enriched for additive inheritance. In addition, cis regulatory differences contribute more to expression differences between species than within species, whereas trans regulatory differences show a stronger association between divergence and polymorphism. Our data indicate that in the trans component of gene expression differences genes subjected to weaker selective constraints tend to have an excess of polymorphism over divergence compared with those subjected to stronger selective constraints. In contrast, in the cis component, this difference between genes under stronger and weaker selective constraint is mostly absent. To explain these observations, we propose that purifying selection more strongly shapes trans changes than cis changes and that positive selection may have significantly contributed to cis regulatory divergence.

  20. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  1. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  2. Luman contributes to brefeldin A-induced prion protein gene expression by interacting with the ERSE26 element

    PubMed Central

    Déry, Marc-André; LeBlanc, Andréa C.

    2017-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrP) is essential for transmissible prion diseases, but its exact physiological function remains unclear. Better understanding the regulation of the human prion protein gene (PRNP) expression can provide insight into this elusive function. Spliced XBP1 (sXBP1) was recently shown to mediate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced PRNP expression. In this manuscript, we identify Luman, a ubiquitous, non-canonical unfolded protein response (UPR), as a novel regulator of ER stress-induced PRNP expression. Luman activity was transcriptionally and proteolytically activated by the ER stressing drug brefeldin A (BFA) in human neurons, astrocytes, and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Over-expression of active cleaved Luman (ΔLuman) increased PrP levels, while siRNA-mediated Luman silencing decreased BFA-induced PRNP expression. Site-directed mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that ΔLuman regulates PRNP expression by interacting with the ER stress response element 26 (ERSE26). Co-over-expression and siRNA-mediated silencing experiments showed that sXBP1 and ΔLuman both up-regulate ER stress-induced PRNP expression. Attempts to understand the function of PRNP up-regulation by Luman excluded a role in atorvastatin-induced neuritogenesis, ER-associated degradation, or proteasomal inhibition-induced cell death. Overall, these results refine our understanding of ER stress-induced PRNP expression and function. PMID:28205568

  3. Do sound levels and space contribute to agitation in nursing home residents with dementia?

    PubMed

    Joosse, Laura L

    2012-07-01

    Individuals with dementia living in nursing homes may be exposed to non-therapeutic levels of sound. There is insufficient research examining the relationship between sound levels, personal space, and agitation in people with dementia. Using an observational designed study, 53 participants from four southeastern Wisconsin nursing homes were observed; data on sound levels, space, and agitation levels were obtained. Sound was a significant predictor of agitation. The accumulation of sound predicted agitated behavior and explained 16% of the variance, F(5, 47) = 4.520, p < 0.002, and adjusted R(2) = 0.253. The findings suggest agitation may be a clue that sound in the environment is causing stress for residents with dementia.

  4. Biomass burning contribution to ambient air particulate levels at Navrongo in the Savannah zone of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ofosu, Francis G; Hopke, Philip K; Aboh, Innocent J K; Bamford, Samuel A

    2013-09-01

    The concentrations of airborne particulate matter (PM) in Navrongo, a town in the Sahel Savannah Zone of Ghana, have been measured and the major sources have been identified. This area is prone to frequent particulate pollution episodes due to Harmattan dust and biomass burning, mostly from annual bushfires. The contribution of combustion emissions, particularly from biomass and fossil fuel, to ambient air particulate loadings was assessed. Sampling was conducted from February 2009 to February 2010 in Navrongo. Two Gent samplers were equipped to collect PM10 in two size fractions, coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5). Coarse particles are collected on a coated, 8-microm-pore Nuclepore filter. Fine particle samples were sampled with 47-mm-diameter Nuclepore and quartz filters. Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations were determined from the quartz filters using thermal optical reflectance (IMPROVE/TOR) methods. Elements were measured on the fine-particle Nuclepore filters using energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence. The average PM2.5 mass concentration obtained at Navrongo was 32.3 microg/m. High carbonaceous concentrations were obtained from November to March, the period of Harmattan dust and severe bush fires. Total carbon was found to contribute approximately 40% of the PM2.5 particulate mass. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) suggested six major sources contributing to the PM2.5 mass. They are two stroke engines, gasoline emissions, soil dust, diesel emissions, biomass burning, and resuspended soil dust. Biomass combustion (16.0%) was identified as second most important source next to soil dust at Navrongo.

  5. Oxidative stress contributes to the enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and hypertrophy of VSMC from SHR: role of growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Atef, Mohammed Emehdi; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2016-03-01

    We showed previously that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibit overexpression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins, which contribute to increased protein synthesis through the activation of MAP kinase signaling. Because oxidative stress has been shown to be increased in hypertension, the present study was undertaken to examine the role of oxidative stress and underlying mechanisms in enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and VSMC hypertrophy. Protein expression was determined by Western blotting, whereas protein synthesis and cell volume, markers for VSMC hypertrophy, were determined by [(3)H]-leucine incorporation and three-dimensional confocal imaging, respectively. The increased expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins, increased protein synthesis, and augmented cell volume exhibited by VSMCs from SHRs were significantly attenuated by antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of superoxide anion, DPI, an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase. In addition, PP2, AG1024, AG1478, and AG1295, inhibitors of c-Src, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), respectively, also attenuated the enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and enhanced protein synthesis in VSMCs from SHRs toward control levels. Furthermore, the levels of IGF-1R and EGFR proteins and not of PDGFR were also enhanced in VSMCs from SHRs, which were attenuated significantly by NAC, DPI, and PP2. In addition, NAC, DPI, and PP2 also attenuated the enhanced phosphorylation of IGF-1R, PDGFR, EGFR, c-Src, and EKR1/2 in VSMCs from SHRs. These data suggest that enhanced oxidative stress in VSMCs from SHRs activates c-Src, which through the transactivation of growth factor receptors and MAPK signaling contributes to enhanced expression of Gqα/PLCβ1 proteins and resultant VSMC hypertrophy.

  6. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  7. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network.

  8. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Petra A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Anderson, Christine B.; Seifried, Harold E.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Howard, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake. PMID:26258789

  9. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Anderson, Christine B; Seifried, Harold E; Hatfield, Dolph L; Howard, Michael T

    2015-08-06

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake.

  10. The contribution of sea-level rise to flooding in large river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele-Eich, I.; Hopson, T. M.; Gilleland, E.; Lamarque, J.; Hu, A.; Simmer, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is expected to both impact sea level rise as well as flooding. Our study focuses on the combined effect of climate change on upper catchment precipitation as well as on sea-level rise at the river mouths and the impact this will have on river flooding both at the coast and further upstream. We concentrate on the eight catchments of the Amazonas, Congo, Orinoco, Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna, Mississippi, St. Lawrence, Danube and Niger rivers. To assess the impact of climate change, upper catchment precipitation as well as monthly mean thermosteric sea-level rise at the river mouth outflow are taken from the four CCSM4 1° 20th Century ensemble members as well as from six CCSM4 1° ensemble members for the RCP scenarios RCP8.5, 6.0, 4.5 and 2.6. Continuous daily time series for average catchment precipitation and discharge are available for each of the catchments. To arrive at a future discharge time series, we used these observations to develop a simple statistical hydrological model which can be applied to the modelled future upper catchment precipitation values. The analysis of this surrogate discharge time series alone already yields significant changes in flood return levels as well as flood duration. Using the geometry of the river channel, the backwater effect of sea-level rise is incorporated in our analysis of both flood frequencies and magnitudes by calculating the effective additional discharge due to the increase in water level at the river mouth outflow, as well as its tapering impact upstream. By combining these effects, our results focus on the merged impact of changes in extreme precipitation with increases in river height due to sea-level rise at the river mouths. Judging from our preliminary results, the increase in effective discharge due to sea-level rise cannot be neglected when discussing late 21st century flooding in the respective river basins. In particular, we find that especially in countries with low elevation gradient, flood

  11. Disentangling the contribution of Saharan dust and marine aerosol to PM10 levels in the Central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerri, Mark M.; Kandler, Konrad; Weinbruch, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    The Għarb rural background station located on the northernmost island in the Maltese archipelago has been used to gather PM10 data since 2008. 224 samples from a monitoring campaign carried out from March 2012 to May 2013, were characterized for various metals and ions by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography. This speciation data was used in conjunction with the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model in order to determine the contribution of Saharan dust and marine aerosol to PM10 levels at the receptor. PMF managed to isolate two different crustal source contributions: a local crustal component and a trans-boundary component of North African origin. Marine aerosol, secondary nitrate/aged aerosol, and ammonium sulphate were other source contributions, which were isolated by the model. The trans-boundary crustal component (Saharan aerosol) and the marine aerosol are considered to be of natural origin and their joint contribution to PM10 levels at the site was estimated to be 39%. This value is in the upper part of the range derived from previous studies, for natural contributions to PM10 in Europe (0.5%-58%).

  12. Charles Darwin's emotional expression "experiment" and his contribution to modern neuropharmacology.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Peter J; Kaufman, Rebecca; Harrison, John; Maruff, Paul

    2010-04-08

    In the late 1860s and early 1870s, Darwin had corresponded with the French physician and physiologist, G. B. A. Duchenne, regarding Duchenne's experimental manipulation of human facial expression of emotion, by applying Galvanic electrical stimulation directly to facial muscles. Duchenne had produced a set of over 60 photographic plates to illustrate his view that there are different muscles in the human face that are separately responsible for each individual emotion. Darwin studied this material very carefully and he received permission from Duchenne in 1871 to reproduce several of these images in The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872). Darwin had doubted Duchenne's view that there were individual muscle groups that mediate the expression of dozens of separable emotions, and he wondered whether there might instead be a fewer set of core emotions that are expressed with great stability worldwide and across cultures. Prompted by his doubts regarding the veracity of Duchenne's model, Darwin conducted what may have been the first-ever single-blind study of the recognition of human facial expression of emotion. This single experiment was a little-known forerunner for an entire modern field of study with contemporary clinical relevance. Moreover, his specific question about cross-cultural recognition of the cardinal emotions in faces is a topic that is being actively studied (in the twenty-first century) with the hope of developing novel biomarkers to aid the discovery of new therapies for the treatment of schizophrenia, autism, and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  13. PKCeta expression contributes to the resistance of Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Oberkovitz, Galia; Benharroch, Daniel; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2007-09-01

    The Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (HRS) malignant cells in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) originate from germinal center B lymphocytes that did not undergo apoptosis. Protein Kinase C (PKC), a family of serine/threonine kinases, plays a crucial role in signal transduction modulating cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we report the expression of PKC isoforms in two HL-derived cell lines, L428 and KMH2 and their correlation with drug resistance to CPT and doxorubicin. Among the PKC isoforms examined, only PKCeta and PKCbetaII were preferentially expressed in the drug resistant L428 cells. We have shown correlation between the response to apoptosis of L428 and KMH2 cells and PKCeta expression in these cell lines. In order to directly demonstrate a role for PKCeta in apoptosis, its expression was knocked-down by siRNA in the resistant L428 cells. Downregulation of PKCeta rendered L428 cells more sensitive to doxorubicin and CPT. Furthermore, PKCeta knocked-down cells showed increased PARP-1 cleavage, cytochrome c release and caspase 7 activation. It appears that PKCeta functions as an anti-apoptotic protein in HL-derived cell lines, and as we show here that it is also expressed in HRS of HL biopsies, it may have therapeutic relevance in HL. Thus, PKCeta could provide a new target aimed to reduce resistance to anti-cancer treatments of HL and other cancer patients.

  14. CCN1 expression in hepatocytes contributes to macrophage infiltration in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhaolian; Peng, Yanshen; You, Zhengrui; Wang, Qixia; Miao, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Han, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Dekai; Li, Zhiping; Ma, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the potential roles of CCN1 in the inflammation and macrophage infiltration of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The regulation of hepatic CCN1 expression was investigated in vitro with murine primary hepatocytes treated with free fatty acids or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and in vivo with high-fat (HF) diet-fed mice or ob/ob mice. CCN1 protein and a liver-specific CCN1 expression plasmid were administered to mice fed a normal diet (ND) or HF diet. Myeloid-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells were also treated with CCN1 in vitro to determine the chemotactic effects of CCN1 on macrophages. LPS treatment significantly increased hepatic CCN1 expression in HF diet-fed mice and ob/ob mice. LPS and FFAs induced CCN1 expression in primary murine hepatocytes in vitro through the TLR4/MyD88/AP-1 pathway. CCN1 protein and overexpression of CCN1 in the liver induced more severe hepatic inflammation and macrophage infiltrates in HF mice than in ND mice. CCN1 recruited macrophages through activation of the Mek/Erk signaling pathway in myeloid-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Endotoxin and FFA-induced CCN1 expression in hepatocytes is involved in the hepatic proinflammatory response and macrophage infiltration in murine NAFLD.

  15. Ice loss and sea level rise contribution from Alaskan glaciers derived from satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Etienne; Schiefer, Erik; Clarke, Garry; Menounos, Brian; Rémy, Frédérique

    2010-05-01

    Over the last 50 years, retreating glaciers and ice caps (GIC) contributed 0.5 mm/yr to SLR, and one third is believed to originate from ice masses bordering the Gulf of Alaska. However, these estimates of ice wastage in Alaska are based on methods that directly measure mass changes from a limited number of glaciers and extrapolate the results to estimate ice loss for the many thousands of others. Here, using a new glacier inventory with elevation changes derived from sequential digital elevation models, we found that, between 1962 and 2006, Alaskan glaciers lost 41.9 ± 8.6 km**3/yr water equivalent (w.e.) and contributed 0.12 ± 0.02 mm/yr to SLR. Our ice loss is 34% lower than previous estimates. Reasons for our lower values include the higher spatial resolution of the glacier inventory used in our study and the complex pattern of ice elevation changes at the scale of individual glaciers and mountain ranges which was not resolved in earlier work. Estimates of mass loss from GIC in other mountain regions could be subject to similar revisions.

  16. Contribution of piezometric measurement on knowledge and management of low water levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessiere, Hélène; Stollsteiner, Philippe; Allier, Delphine; Nicolas, Jérôme; Gourcy, Laurence

    2014-05-01

    This article is based on a BRGM study on piezometric indicators, threshold values of discharges and groundwater levels for the assessment of potentially pumpable volumes of chalky watersheds. A method for estimating low water levels from groundwater levels is presented from three examples of chalk aquifer; the first one is located in Picardy and the two other in the Champagne Ardennes region. Piezometers with "annual" cycles, used in these examples, are supposed to be representative of the aquifer hydrodynamics. The analysis leads to relatively precise and satisfactory relationships between groundwater levels and observed discharges for this chalky context. These relationships may be useful for monitoring, validation, extension or reconstruction of the low water flow. On the one hand, they allow defining the piezometric levels corresponding to the different alert thresholds of river discharges. On the other hand, they clarify the distribution of low water flow from runoff or the draining of the aquifer. Finally, these correlations give an assessment of the minimum flow for the coming weeks using of the rate of draining of the aquifer. Nevertheless the use of these correlations does not allow to optimize the value of pumpable volumes because it seems to be difficult to integrate the amount of the effective rainfall that may occur during the draining period. In addition, these relationships cannot be exploited for multi-annual cycle systems. In these cases, the solution seems to lie on the realization of a rainfall-runoff-piezometric level model. Therefore, two possibilities are possible. The first one is to achieve each year, on a given date, a forecast for the days or months to come with various frequential distributions rainfalls. However, the forecast must be reiterated each year depending on climatic conditions. The principle of the second method is to simulate forecasts for different rainfall intensities and following different initial conditions. The results

  17. HPV-16 E2 contributes to induction of HPV-16 late gene expression by inhibiting early polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cecilia; Somberg, Monika; Li, Xiaoze; Backström Winquist, Ellenor; Fay, Joanna; Ryan, Fergus; Pim, David; Banks, Lawrence; Schwartz, Stefan

    2012-05-22

    We provide evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein regulates HPV late gene expression. High levels of E2 caused a read-through at the early polyadenylation signal pAE into the late region of the HPV genome, thereby inducing expression of L1 and L2 mRNAs. This is a conserved property of E2 of both mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Induction could be reversed by high levels of HPV-16 E1 protein, or by the polyadenylation factor CPSF30. HPV-16 E2 inhibited polyadenylation in vitro by preventing the assembly of the CPSF complex. Both the N-terminal and hinge domains of E2 were required for induction of HPV late gene expression in transfected cells as well as for inhibition of polyadenylation in vitro. Finally, overexpression of HPV-16 E2 induced late gene expression from a full-length genomic clone of HPV-16. We speculate that the accumulation of high levels of E2 during the viral life cycle, not only turns off the expression of the pro-mitotic viral E6 and E7 genes, but also induces the expression of the late HPV genes L1 and L2.

  18. HPV-16 E2 contributes to induction of HPV-16 late gene expression by inhibiting early polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Cecilia; Somberg, Monika; Li, Xiaoze; Backström Winquist, Ellenor; Fay, Joanna; Ryan, Fergus; Pim, David; Banks, Lawrence; Schwartz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We provide evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein regulates HPV late gene expression. High levels of E2 caused a read-through at the early polyadenylation signal pAE into the late region of the HPV genome, thereby inducing expression of L1 and L2 mRNAs. This is a conserved property of E2 of both mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Induction could be reversed by high levels of HPV-16 E1 protein, or by the polyadenylation factor CPSF30. HPV-16 E2 inhibited polyadenylation in vitro by preventing the assembly of the CPSF complex. Both the N-terminal and hinge domains of E2 were required for induction of HPV late gene expression in transfected cells as well as for inhibition of polyadenylation in vitro. Finally, overexpression of HPV-16 E2 induced late gene expression from a full-length genomic clone of HPV-16. We speculate that the accumulation of high levels of E2 during the viral life cycle, not only turns off the expression of the pro-mitotic viral E6 and E7 genes, but also induces the expression of the late HPV genes L1 and L2. PMID:22617423

  19. Multiple circadian-regulated elements contribute to cycling period gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Stanewsky, R; Jamison, C F; Plautz, J D; Kay, S A; Hall, J C

    1997-01-01

    A new regulatory element necessary for the correct temporal expression of the period (per) gene was identified by monitoring real-time per expression in living individual flies carrying two different period-luciferase transgenes. luciferase RNA driven from only the per promoter was not sufficient to replicate the normal pattern of per RNA cycling; however, a per-luc fusion RNA driven from a transgene containing additional per sequences cycled identically to endogenous per. The results indicate the existence of at least two circadian-regulated elements--one within the promoter and one within the transcribed portion of the per gene. Phase and amplitude analysis of both per-luc transgenes revealed that normal per expression requires the regulation of these elements at distinct phases and suggests a mechanism by which biological clocks sustain high-amplitude feedback oscillations. PMID:9305642

  20. Mass and volume contributions to twentieth-century global sea level rise.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laury; Douglas, Bruce C

    2004-03-25

    The rate of twentieth-century global sea level rise and its causes are the subjects of intense controversy. Most direct estimates from tide gauges give 1.5-2.0 mm yr(-1), whereas indirect estimates based on the two processes responsible for global sea level rise, namely mass and volume change, fall far below this range. Estimates of the volume increase due to ocean warming give a rate of about 0.5 mm yr(-1) (ref. 8) and the rate due to mass increase, primarily from the melting of continental ice, is thought to be even smaller. Therefore, either the tide gauge estimates are too high, as has been suggested recently, or one (or both) of the mass and volume estimates is too low. Here we present an analysis of sea level measurements at tide gauges combined with observations of temperature and salinity in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans close to the gauges. We find that gauge-determined rates of sea level rise, which encompass both mass and volume changes, are two to three times higher than the rates due to volume change derived from temperature and salinity data. Our analysis supports earlier studies that put the twentieth-century rate in the 1.5-2.0 mm yr(-1) range, but more importantly it suggests that mass increase plays a larger role than ocean warming in twentieth-century global sea level rise.

  1. Decreased expression of vitamin D receptor may contribute to the hyperimmune status of patients with acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Ge, Meili; Lu, Shihong; Shi, Jun; Feng, Sizhou; Li, Xingxin; Zhang, Jizhou; Wang, Min; Huang, Jinbo; Shao, Yingqi; Huang, Zhendong; Zhang, Jing; Nie, Neng; Zheng, Yizhou

    2016-05-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is an immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2 D3 ], the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D, is a critical modulator of immune response via binding with vitamin D receptor (VDR). Previous studies have established that 1,25(OH)2 D3 and VDR were involved in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the involvement of 1,25(OH)2 D3 and VDR on T-cell responses in AA. Plasma 25(OH)D3 levels were comparable between patients with AA and healthy controls. Surprisingly, VDR mRNA was significantly lower in untreated patients with AA than in healthy controls. Subsequent in vitro experiments revealed that 1,25(OH)2 D3 treatment suppressed the proliferation of lymphocytes and inhibited the secretion of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17A, meanwhile promoting the production of transforming growth factor-β1 in patients with AA. Moreover, 1,25(OH)2 D3 inhibited the differentiation of type 1 and Th17 cells but induced the differentiation of type 2 and regulatory T cells. Interestingly, VDR mRNA was elevated in healthy controls after 1,25(OH)2 D3 treatment, but not in patients with AA. In conclusion, decreased expression of VDR might contribute to the hyperimmune status of AA and appropriate vitamin D supplementation could partly correct the immune dysfunction by strengthening signal transduction through VDR in patients with AA.

  2. Posttranscriptional regulation of adrenal TH gene expression contributes to the maladaptive responses triggered by insulin-induced recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kudrick, Necla; Chan, Owen; La Gamma, Edmund F; Kim, Juhye Lena; Tank, Arnold William; Sterling, Carol; Nankova, Bistra B

    2015-02-01

    Acute metabolic stress such as insulin-induced hypoglycemia triggers a counterregulatory response during which the release of catecholamines (epinephrine), the activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) enzyme and subsequent compensatory catecholamine biosynthesis occur in the adrenal medulla. However, recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia (RH), a consequence of tight glycemic control in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes compromises this physiological response. The molecular mechanisms underlying the maladaptive response to repeated glucose deprivation are incompletely understood. We hypothesize that impaired epinephrine release following RH reflects altered regulation of adrenal catecholamine biosynthesis. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of single daily (RH) and twice-daily episodes of insulin-induced hypoglycemia (2RH) on adrenal epinephrine release and production in normal rats. Control animals received saline injections under similar conditions (RS and 2RS, respectively). Following 3 days of treatment, we assessed the counterregulatory hormonal responses during a hypoglycemic clamp. Changes in adrenal TH gene expression were also analyzed. The counterregulatory responses, relative TH transcription and TH mRNA levels and Ser40-TH phosphorylation (marker for enzyme activation) were induced to a similar extent in RS, 2RS, and RH groups. In contrast, epinephrine and glucagon responses were attenuated in the 2RH group and this was associated with a limited elevation of adrenal TH mRNA, rapid inactivation of TH enzyme and no significant changes in TH protein. Our results suggest that novel posttranscriptional mechanisms controlling TH mRNA and activated TH enzyme turnover contribute to the impaired epinephrine responses and may provide new therapeutic targets to prevent HAAF.

  3. Examining the Contribution of Handwriting and Spelling to Written Expression in Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; AlOtaiba, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the development of beginning writing skills in kindergarten children and the contribution of spelling and handwriting to these writing skills after accounting for early language, literacy, cognitive skills, and student characteristics. Two hundred and forty two children were given a battery of cognitive, oral language,…

  4. Understanding Writing Problems in Young Children: Contributions of Cognitive Skills to the Development of Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Amy

    2011-01-01

    While several models of adult writing have been proposed and studied, the development of writing skills in young children has only recently garnered attention. Using measures of fine-motor, language, working memory, and attention/executive functions, the current study explored motor and cognitive skills that may contribute to writing skill in…

  5. Fusion-derived epithelial cancer cells express hematopoietic markers and contribute to stem cell and migratory phenotype in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Mallika; Mathur, Sandeep R; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2013-09-01

    For a long time, the external milieu of cancer cells was considered to be of secondary importance when compared with its intrinsic properties. That has changed now as the microenvironment is considered to be a major contributing factor toward the progression of tumor. In this study, we show that in human and mouse epithelial ovarian carcinoma and mouse lung carcinoma, the interaction between tumor-infiltrating hematopoietic cells and epithelial cancer cells results in their fusion. Intriguingly, even after the fusion event, cancer cells retain the expression of the pan-hematopoietic marker (CD45) and various markers of hematopoietic lineage, including those of hematopoietic stem cells, indicating that the hematopoietic genome is not completely reprogrammed. This observation may have implications on the bone marrow contribution to the cancer stem cell population. Interestingly, it was seen that in both cancer models, the expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 was largely contributed to by the fused compartment of cancer cells. We hypothesize that the superior migratory potential gained by the cancer cells due to the fusion helps in its dissemination to various secondary organs upon activation of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis. We are the first to report the presence of a hemato-epithelial cancer compartment, which contributes to stem cell markers and CXCR4 in epithelial carcinoma. This finding has repercussions on CXCR4-based therapeutics and opens new avenues in discovering novel molecular targets against fusion and metastasis.

  6. Genetic analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression levels in whole blood of healthy human subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The predominant model for regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation is an inverse association in which increased methylation results in decreased gene expression levels. However, recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic variation, DNA methylation and expression is more complex. Results Systems genetic approaches for examining relationships between gene expression and methylation array data were used to find both negative and positive associations between these levels. A weighted correlation network analysis revealed that i) both transcriptome and methylome are organized in modules, ii) co-expression modules are generally not preserved in the methylation data and vice-versa, and iii) highly significant correlations exist between co-expression and co-methylation modules, suggesting the existence of factors that affect expression and methylation of different modules (i.e., trans effects at the level of modules). We observed that methylation probes associated with expression in cis were more likely to be located outside CpG islands, whereas specificity for CpG island shores was present when methylation, associated with expression, was under local genetic control. A structural equation model based analysis found strong support in particular for a traditional causal model in which gene expression is regulated by genetic variation via DNA methylation instead of gene expression affecting DNA methylation levels. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms between genetic markers, epigenetic mechanisms and gene expression. We find strong support for the classical model of genetic variants regulating methylation, which in turn regulates gene expression. Moreover we show that, although the methylation and expression modules differ, they are highly correlated. PMID:23157493

  7. Positronium energy levels at order m α7 : Product contributions in the two-photon-annihilation channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Gregory S.; Tran, Lam M.; Wang, Ruihan

    2016-05-01

    Ongoing improvements in the measurement of positronium transition intervals motivate the calculation of the O (m α7) corrections to these intervals. In this work we focus on corrections to the spin-singlet parapositronium energies involving virtual annihilation to two photons in an intermediate state. We have evaluated all contributions to the positronium S -state energy levels that can be written as the product of a one-loop correction on one side of the annihilation event and another one-loop correction on the other side. These effects contribute Δ E =-0.561971 (25 ) m α7/π3 to the parapositronium ground-state energy.

  8. Contribution of climate forcing to sea level variations in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsiopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Vergos, Georgios S.; Tziavos, Ilias N.

    2016-04-01

    With the availability of an abundance of earth observation data from satellite altimetry missions as well as those from the ENVISAT and CRYOSAT-2 satellites, monitoring of the sea level variations is gaining increased importance. In this work, altimetric data sets from the satellite remote sensing missions of ENVISAT and CRYOSAT-2 have been used to study the variations of the Mediterranean sea level. Alongside, a correlation analysis of Sea Level Anomalies (SLAs) with global and regional climatic indexes that influence the ocean state, has been carried out as well. The raw data used were SLAs from the respective altimetric missions, acquired by the on-board altimeters from the ENVISAT satellite for seven consecutive years (2003-2009) and from the CRYOSAT-2 satellite for six consecutive years (2010-2015). Three oscillation indexes have been investigated, as representative of climate-change and seasonal forcing on the sea level. The first one was the well-known Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), the next one the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the third, being primarily more representative of the Mediterranean sea state, was the Mediterranean Oscillation Index (MOI). The possible correlation is investigated in both monthly and annual scales, while a regional multiple regression and a principal component analysis (PCA) between the SLAs and oscillation indexes is carried out. Multiple regression and PCA have been used as tools in order to deduce possible correlations between the Mediterranean sea level variations and the aforementioned oscillation indexes, under the assumption that SLA variations are driven by steric forcing. Finally, evidence of the sea level cyclo-stationarity in the Mediterranean Sea is deduced from the analysis of empirically derived covariance functions at monthly intervals from the available SLA data.

  9. Multiple levels of linguistic and paralinguistic features contribute to voice recognition

    PubMed Central

    Mary Zarate, Jean; Tian, Xing; Woods, Kevin J. P.; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Voice or speaker recognition is critical in a wide variety of social contexts. In this study, we investigated the contributions of acoustic, phonological, lexical, and semantic information toward voice recognition. Native English speaking participants were trained to recognize five speakers in five conditions: non-speech, Mandarin, German, pseudo-English, and English. We showed that voice recognition significantly improved as more information became available, from purely acoustic features in non-speech to additional phonological information varying in familiarity. Moreover, we found that the recognition performance is transferable between training and testing in phonologically familiar conditions (German, pseudo-English, and English), but not in unfamiliar (Mandarin) or non-speech conditions. These results provide evidence suggesting that bottom-up acoustic analysis and top-down influence from phonological processing collaboratively govern voice recognition. PMID:26088739

  10. Expression partitioning of homeologs and tandem duplications contribute to salt tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Liu, Zhenshan; Khan, Abul Awlad; Lin, Qi; Han, Yao; Mu, Ping; Liu, Yiguo; Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Lingyan; Meng, Xianghao; Ni, Zhongfu; Xin, Mingming

    2016-02-19

    Salt stress dramatically reduces crop yield and quality, but the molecular mechanisms underlying salt tolerance remain largely unknown. To explore the wheat transcriptional response to salt stress, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of 10-day old wheat roots under normal condition and 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after salt stress (HASS) in both a salt-tolerant cultivar and salt-sensitive cultivar. The results demonstrated global gene expression reprogramming with 36,804 genes that were up- or down-regulated in wheat roots under at least one stress condition compared with the controls and revealed the specificity and complexity of the functional pathways between the two cultivars. Further analysis showed that substantial expression partitioning of homeologous wheat genes occurs when the plants are subjected to salt stress, accounting for approximately 63.9% (2,537) and 66.1% (2,624) of the homeologous genes in 'Chinese Spring' (CS) and 'Qing Mai 6' (QM). Interestingly, 143 salt-responsive genes have been duplicated and tandemly arrayed on chromosomes during wheat evolution and polyploidization events, and the expression patterns of 122 (122/143, 85.3%) tandem duplications diverged dynamically over the time-course of salinity exposure. In addition, constitutive expression or silencing of target genes in Arabidopsis and wheat further confirmed our high-confidence salt stress-responsive candidates.

  11. Hippocampus and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Trace and Contextual Fear Memory Expression over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeman, Christopher L.; Bauer, Philip S.; Pierson, Jamie L.; Quinn, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that damage to the dorsal hippocampus (DH) occurring at recent, but not remote, timepoints following acquisition produces a deficit in trace conditioned fear memory expression. The opposite pattern has been observed with lesions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present studies address: (1) whether these lesion…

  12. The contribution of science locus of control orientation to expressions of attitude toward science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haury, David L.

    Science locus of control (SciLOC) orientation is examined as a predictor of attitudes toward science teaching among 104 preservice elementary school teachers. SciLOC orientation refers to beliefs people hold regarding their personal efficacy, or ability to influence the outcome of events, in situations where decisions or actions require either the application of scientific knowledge or the use of reasoning skills associated with scientific thinking. A causal model that links such beliefs to attitudes toward science teaching was formulated and tested in this study. Multiple regression analysis demonstrates that 46% of the variance in attitudes toward science teaching expressed by subjects in the sample studied can be explained by SciLOC orientation. Path analysis of the proposed causal model accounts for 57% of the variance in expressed attitudes and 11% of the variance in SciLOC orientation. These results are interpreted as evidence that SciLOC orientation is a major contributor to attitudes expressed toward science teaching among preservice elementary teachers, with the major contributors to SciLOC orientation remaining to be identified. A troublesome relationship between expressed attitudes and academic performance in college science is also noted.

  13. VARIABLE BOUND-SITE CHARGING CONTRIBUTIONS TO SURFACE COMPLEXATION MASS ACTION EXPRESSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One and two pK models of surface complexation reactions between reactive surface sites (>SOH) and the proton (H+) use mass action expressions of the form: Ka={[>SOHn-1z-1]g>SOH(0-1)aH+EXP(-xeY/kT)}/{[>SOHnz]g>SOH(n)} where Ka=the acidity constant, [ ]=reactive species concentrati...

  14. Long noncoding RNA expression in dermal papilla cells contributes to hairy gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chang-Min; Liu, Yang; Huang, Keng; Chen, Xian-Cai; Cai, Bo-Zhi; Li, Hai-Hong; Yuan, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Huan; Li, Yu

    2014-10-24

    Dermal papilla (DP) cells may be the source of dermal-derived signaling molecules involved in hair-follicle development and postnatal hair cycling. Early-passage DP cells can induce hair growth in vivo, but, on further culture, this ability is lost. The cellular mechanisms underlying the hair-follicle induction property of early-passage DP cells are unclear. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are an important class of genes involved in various biological functions. They are aberrantly expressed and play roles in the regulation of the Wnt signaling pathway, a critical point in maintaining hair-induction activity. LncRNA microarray revealed 1683 upregulated and 1773 downregulated lncRNAs in passage-4 DP cells compare with passage-10 DP cells. To investigate the relation between lncRNAs and coding genes in WNT signaling, we constructed a coding-noncoding gene co-expression network using lncRNAs and coding genes that were differentially expressed between the passage-4 and -10 DP cells. RP11-766N7.3, H19 and HOTAIR are specific lncRNAs that were aberrantly expressed in DP cells and played an important role in regulating Wnt signaling. This study may provide potential targets for discovering the hair-follicle induction mechanism of early-passage DP cells.

  15. Persistent Prelimbic Cortex Activity Contributes to Enhanced Learned Fear Expression in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Georgina E.; Pollard, Amelia K.; Halliday, David M.; Mason, Rob; Bredy, Timothy W.; Stevenson, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress, are more prevalent in women and are characterized by impaired inhibition of learned fear and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dysfunction. Here we examined sex differences in fear extinction and mPFC activity in rats. Females showed more learned fear expression during extinction and its recall, but…

  16. Flicker Adaptation of Low-Level Cortical Visual Neurons Contributes to Temporal Dilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Laura; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Several seconds of adaptation to a flickered stimulus causes a subsequent brief static stimulus to appear longer in duration. Nonsensory factors, such as increased arousal and attention, have been thought to mediate this flicker-based temporal-dilation aftereffect. In this study, we provide evidence that adaptation of low-level cortical visual…

  17. Background for Community Level Work on Educational Adjustment in Adolescence: Reviewing the Literature on Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Zakia; Brooks, Jennifer; McGarvey, Ayelish M.

    Given the importance of adolescents' educational adjustment, a key question for those concerned with improving adolescent functioning is what can be done to increase adolescents' levels of educational functioning. This review addresses a number of broad facets of adolescents' educational functioning, including those in the psychological…

  18. Tax contributes apoptosis resistance to HTLV-1-infected T cells via suppression of Bid and Bim expression.

    PubMed

    Mühleisen, A; Giaisi, M; Köhler, R; Krammer, P H; Li-Weber, M

    2014-12-18

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 Tax has been shown to have a prosurvival role in infected T cells by enhancing expression of the Bcl-2 family of antiapoptotic proteins. In this study, we show that the expression of proapoptotic BH3-only proteins Bim (Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death) and Bid (BH3-interacting domain death agonist) is diminished in HTLV-1-infected leukemic cells. Using a Tax-inducible system and a transient overexpression approach, we demonstrate that Tax downregulates Bid and Bim expression at the transcriptional level. We show that reinforced expression of Bim and Bid in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines sensitizes CD95/TRAIL- and anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we show that Tax suppresses Bid and Bim expression by enhancing hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein expression. siRNA knockdown of HIF-1α or chemical inhibition of the transactivation activity of HIF-1α resulted in an increase in Bid and Bim expression and, consequently, in an increase in CD95/TRAIL- and anticancer drug-induced apoptosis in HTLV-1-infected leukemic T-cell lines. Our study provides evidence that besides upregulation of prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins, Tax may also confer apoptosis resistance to HTLV-1-infected T cells by suppressing the expression of the proapoptotic BH3-only proteins Bim and Bid.

  19. HER2 over-expressing high grade endometrial cancer expresses high levels of p95HER2 variant

    PubMed Central

    Growdon, Whitfield B.; Groeneweg, Jolijn; Byron, Virginia; DiGloria, Celeste; Borger, Darrell R.; Tambouret, Rosemary; Foster, Rosemary; Chenna, Ahmed; Sperinde, Jeff; Winslow, John; Rueda, Bo R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subsets of high grade endometrial cancer (EnCa) over-express HER2 (ERBB2), yet clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any anti-tumor activity utilizing trastuzumab, an approved platform for HER2 positive breast cancer (BrCa). A truncated p95HER2 variant lacking the trastuzumab binding site may confer resistance. The objective of this investigation was to characterize the expression of the p95HER2 truncated variant in EnCa. Materials and Methods With institutional approval, 86 high grade EnCa tumors were identified with tumor specimens from surgeries performed between 2000-2011. Clinical data were collected and all specimens underwent tumor genotyping, HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC, HercepTest®), HER2 fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), along with total HER2 (H2T) and p95HER2 assessment with VeraTag® testing. Regression models were used to compare a cohort of 86 breast tumors selected for equivalent HER2 protein expression. Results We identified 44 high grade endometrioid and 42 uterine serous carcinomas (USC). IHC identified high HER2 expression (2+ or 3+) in 59% of the tumors. HER2 gene amplification was observed in 16 tumors (12 USC, 4 endometrioid). Both HER2 gene amplification and protein expression correlated with H2T values. High p95HER2 expression above 2.8 RF/mm2 was observed in 53% (n = 54) with significant correlation with H2T levels. When matched to a cohort of 107 breast tumors based on HercepTest HER2 expression, high grade EnCa presented with higher p95 levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that compared to BrCa, high grade EnCa expresses higher levels of p95HER2 possibly providing rationale for the trastuzumab resistance observed in EnCa. PMID:25602714

  20. β2-agonist clenbuterol suppresses bacterial phagocytosis of splenic macrophages expressing high levels of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Ken; Sato, Shogo; Sato, Madoka; Hashizume, Yoko; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Splenic marginal zone macrophages expressing macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) contribute to the clearance of blood-borne pathogens. We determined a splenic adherent cell fraction abundantly containing cells expressing a higher level of MARCO by flow cytometry, and examined the effects of daily administration of an anabolic dose of β2-agonist clenbuterol on the phagocytic capacity of the cells in mice. After 6 weeks of clenbuterol (1.0 mg/kg body weight/d) or vehicle administration to the mice, splenic adherent cells were isolated. These cells were separated into three cell-size subpopulations. Among them, the small-cell subpopulation contained abundantly the cells with markedly higher levels of MARCO and exhibited more intense phagocytic capacity against Escherichia coli, as compared with the other subpopulations. The phagocytic capacity of the small cells was significantly reduced after clenbuterol administration. These results suggest that the utilization of clenbuterol as doping drug impairs bacterial clearance in the spleen.

  1. Establishing the contribution of lawn mowing to atmospheric aerosol levels in American suburbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. M.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a class of wound-induced volatile organic compounds emitted by several plant species. Turf grasses emit a complex profile of GLVs upon mowing, as evidenced by the "freshly cut grass" smell, some of which are readily oxidized in the atmosphere to contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The contribution of lawn-mowing-induced SOA production may be especially impactful at the urban-suburban interface, where urban hubs provide a source of anthropogenic oxidants and SOA while suburban neighborhoods have the potential to emit large quantities of reactive, mow-induced GLVs. This interface provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation in a multicomponent system and at a regionally relevant scale. Freshly cut grass was collected from a study site in Essex Junction, Vermont, and was placed inside a 775 L Teflon experimental chamber. Thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) was used to characterize the emitted GLV profile. Ozone was introduced to the experimental chamber and TD-GC/MS was used to monitor the consumption of these GLVs and the subsequent evolution of gas-phase products, while a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to continuously measure aerosol size distributions and mass loadings as a result of grass clipping ozonolysis. Freshly cut grass was found to emit a complex mixture of GLVs, dominated by {cis}-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA) and {cis}-3-hexenol (HXL), which were released at an initial rate of 1.8 (± 0.5) μg and 0.07 (± 0.03) μg per square meter of lawn mowed with each mowing. Chamber studies using pure standards of CHA and HXL were found to have aerosol yields of 1.2 (± 1.1)% and 3.3 (± 3.1)%, respectively. Using these aerosol yields and the emission rate of CHA and HXL by grass, SOA evolution by ozonolysis of grass clippings was predicted. However, the measured SOA mass produced from the ozonolysis of grass clippings exceeded the predicted amount, by upwards of 150%. The

  2. Establishing the contribution of lawn mowing to atmospheric aerosol levels in American suburbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. M.; Zahardis, J.; Petrucci, G. A.

    2013-09-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a class of wound-induced volatile organic compounds emitted by several plant species. Turfgrasses emit a complex profile of GLVs upon mowing, as evidenced by the "freshly cut grass" smell, some of which are readily oxidized in the atmosphere to contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The contribution of lawn mowing-induced SOA production may be especially impactful at the urban/suburban interface, where urban hubs provide a source of anthropogenic oxidants and SOA while suburban neighborhoods have the potential to emit large quantities of reactive, mow-induced GLVs. This interface provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation in a multi-component system and at a regionally relevant scale. Freshly cut grass was collected from a study site in Essex Junction, Vermont and was placed inside a 775 L Teflon experimental chamber. Thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) was used to characterize the emitted GLV profile. Ozone was introduced to the experimental chamber and TD-GC/MS was used to monitor the consumption of these GLVs and the subsequent evolution of gas phase products while a scanning mobility particle sizer was used to continuously measure aerosol size distributions and mass loadings as a result of grass clipping ozonolysis. Freshly cut grass found to emit a complex mixture of GLVs, dominated by cis-3-hexenyl acetate and cis-3-hexenol, which were released at an initial rate of 1.8 (±0.5) μg and 0.07 (±0.03) μg per square meter of lawn mowed with each mowing. Chamber studies using pure standards of cis-3-hexenyl acetate (CHA) and cis-3-hexenol (HXL) were found to have aerosol yields of 1.2 (±1.1)% and 3.3 (±3.1)%, respectively. Using these aerosol yields and the emission rate of these CHA and HXL by grass, SOA evolution by ozonolysis of grass clippings was predicted. However, the measured SOA mass produced from the ozonolysis of grass clippings exceeded the predicted amount, by

  3. Contribution to indoor ozone levels of an ozone generator. Final report, April 1990-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Steiber, R.S.

    1993-09-01

    The report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. Experiments were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. The generated ozone and the in-room ozone concentrations were measured. The results showed that, when the unit was operated at the manufacturer's recommended setting, it generated little if any ozone. The indoor concentrations in the case were not significantly above natural background. When operated at the maximum setting, the generator produced large amounts of ozone: over 100 ppb in well ventilated spaces, and nearly 1 ppm in poorly ventilated spaces. When the ozone generator was turned off, ozone levels quickly returned to background. No measurements were made to determine the effect of the device on other aspects of indoor air quality, such as the elimination of volatile organic compounds.

  4. Erk5 contributes to maintaining the balance of cellular nucleotide levels and erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Ibáñez, Maria; Rovira-Clavé, Xavier; Granados-Jaén, Alba; Downs, Bradley; Kim, Yeong C; Wang, San Ming; Reina, Manuel; Espel, Enric

    2015-01-01

    An adequate supply of nucleotides is essential for accurate DNA replication, and inappropriate deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) concentrations can lead to replication stress, a common source of DNA damage, genomic instability and tumourigenesis. Here, we provide evidence that Erk5 is necessary for correct nucleotide supply during erythroid development. Mice with Erk5 knockout in the haematopoietic lineage showed impaired erythroid development in bone marrow, accompanied by altered dNTP levels and increased DNA mutagenesis in erythroid progenitors as detected by exome sequencing. Moreover, Erk5-depleted leukemic Jurkat cells presented a marked sensitivity to thymidine-induced S phase stalling, as evidenced by increased H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis. The increase in thymidine sensitivity correlated with a higher dTTP/dCTP ratio. These results indicate that Erk5 is necessary to maintain the balance of nucleotide levels, thus preventing dNTP misincorporation and DNA damage in proliferative erythroid progenitors and leukemic Jurkat T cells. PMID:26697837

  5. Peripheral blood gene expression profiles linked to monoamine metabolite levels in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Luykx, J J; Olde Loohuis, L M; Neeleman, M; Strengman, E; Bakker, S C; Lentjes, E; Borgdorff, P; van Dongen, E P A; Bruins, P; Kahn, R S; Horvath, S; de Jong, S; Ophoff, R A

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier separates circulating blood from the central nervous system (CNS). The scope of this barrier is not fully understood which limits our ability to relate biological measurements from peripheral to central phenotypes. For example, it is unknown to what extent gene expression levels in peripheral blood are reflective of CNS metabolism. In this study, we examine links between central monoamine metabolite levels and whole-blood gene expression to better understand the connection between peripheral systems and the CNS. To that end, we correlated the prime monoamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with whole-genome gene expression microarray data from blood (N=240 human subjects). We additionally applied gene-enrichment analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA) to identify modules of co-expressed genes in blood that may be involved with monoamine metabolite levels in CSF. Transcript levels of two genes were significantly associated with CSF serotonin metabolite levels after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing: THAP7 (P=2.8 × 10−8, β=0.08) and DDX6 (P=2.9 × 10−7, β=0.07). Differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for genes expressed in the brain tissue (P=6.0 × 10−52). WGCNA revealed significant correlations between serotonin metabolism and hub genes with known functions in serotonin metabolism, for example, HTR2A and COMT. We conclude that gene expression levels in whole blood are associated with monoamine metabolite levels in the human CSF. Our results, including the strong enrichment of brain-expressed genes, illustrate that gene expression profiles in peripheral blood can be relevant for quantitative metabolic phenotypes in the CNS. PMID:27959337

  6. Contribution of Transcriptomics to Systems-Level Understanding of Methanogenic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Patrick D.; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby

    2013-01-01

    Methane-producing Archaea are of interest due to their contribution to atmospheric change and for their roles in technological applications including waste treatment and biofuel production. Although restricted to anaerobic environments, methanogens are found in a wide variety of habitats, where they commonly live in syntrophic relationships with bacterial partners. Owing to tight thermodynamic constraints of methanogenesis alone or in syntrophic metabolism, methanogens must carefully regulate their catabolic pathways including the regulation of RNA transcripts. The transcriptome is a dynamic and important control point in microbial systems. This paper assesses the impact of mRNA (transcriptome) studies on the understanding of methanogenesis with special consideration given to how methanogenesis is regulated to cope with nutrient limitation, environmental variability, and interactions with syntrophic partners. In comparison with traditional microarray-based transcriptome analyses, next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing is greatly advantageous in assessing transcription start sites, the extent of 5′ untranslated regions, operonic structure, and the presence of small RNAs. We are still in the early stages of understanding RNA regulation but it is already clear that determinants beyond transcript abundance are highly relevant to the lifestyles of methanogens, requiring further study. PMID:23533330

  7. Contribution of transcriptomics to systems-level understanding of methanogenic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Browne, Patrick D; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby

    2013-01-01

    Methane-producing Archaea are of interest due to their contribution to atmospheric change and for their roles in technological applications including waste treatment and biofuel production. Although restricted to anaerobic environments, methanogens are found in a wide variety of habitats, where they commonly live in syntrophic relationships with bacterial partners. Owing to tight thermodynamic constraints of methanogenesis alone or in syntrophic metabolism, methanogens must carefully regulate their catabolic pathways including the regulation of RNA transcripts. The transcriptome is a dynamic and important control point in microbial systems. This paper assesses the impact of mRNA (transcriptome) studies on the understanding of methanogenesis with special consideration given to how methanogenesis is regulated to cope with nutrient limitation, environmental variability, and interactions with syntrophic partners. In comparison with traditional microarray-based transcriptome analyses, next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing is greatly advantageous in assessing transcription start sites, the extent of 5' untranslated regions, operonic structure, and the presence of small RNAs. We are still in the early stages of understanding RNA regulation but it is already clear that determinants beyond transcript abundance are highly relevant to the lifestyles of methanogens, requiring further study.

  8. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis RCI2A gene contributes to cold tolerance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Geetha, Mahalingam; Subramanyam, Kondeti; Girija, Shanmugam

    2015-04-01

    Cold is a major stress that limits the quality and productivity of economically important crops such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Generating a cold-stress-tolerant tomato by expressing cold-inducible genes would increase agricultural strategies. Rare cold-inducible 2a (RCI2A) is expressed in Arabidopsis, but its molecular function during cold stress is not fully understood. Here we ectopically expressed Arabidopsis RCI2A in transgenic tomato to evaluate tolerance to cold stress without altering agronomic traits. Biochemical and physiological study demonstrated that expression of RCI2A in transgenic tomato enhanced the activity of peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and reduced the accumulation of H2O2, alleviated lipid peroxidation, increased the accumulation of chlorophyll, reduced chilling-induced membrane damage, retained relative water content and enhanced cold tolerance. A motif search revealed that the motifs of photosystem II (PSII) phosphoproteins PsbJ and PsbH and reaction-center proteins PsbL and PsbK were common to cold-inducible RCI2A and peroxidase proteins RCI3A, tomato peroxidase (TPX1), TPX2, tomato ascorbate peroxidase (APX1), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP-c). In addition to membrane protection, RCI2A may cross talk with PSII-associated proteins or peroxidase family enzymes in response to cold stress. Our findings may strengthen the understanding of the molecular function of RCI2A in cold-stress tolerance. RCI2A could be used to improve abiotic stress tolerance in agronomic crops.

  9. Periostin expression induced by oxidative stress contributes to myocardial fibrosis in a rat model of high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAN; CHEN, LIANG; XIE, JUN; LI, RAN; LI, GUAN-NAN; CHEN, QIN-HUA; ZHANG, XIN-LIN; KANG, LI-NA; XU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein involved in fibrosis. The present study investigated the importance of periostin in hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis. Rats were randomly divided into either the normal group (0.4% NaCl diet; n=8) or hypertension group (8% NaCl diet; n=8). For 36 weeks, the blood pressure and heart rate of the rats were monitored. At week 36, the hearts were extracted for further analysis. Masson's staining and western blotting were performed to determine the levels of periostin protein expression, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In addition, fibroblasts were isolated from adult rats and cultured in vitro, and following treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), western blotting, immunofluorescence and 2′,7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescin staining were performed to examine reactive oxygen species production, and periostin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression levels. The results demonstrated that periostin expression and oxidative stress were increased in hypertensive hearts compared with normal hearts. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that Ang II upregulated the expression levels of periostin and α-SMA compared with the control, whereas, pretreatment with NAC inhibited oxidative stress, periostin and α-SMA expression in fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggested that oxidative stress-induced periostin is involved in myocardial fibrosis and hypertension. The present study demonstrated that periostin inhibition may be a promising approach for the inhibition of hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:27220372

  10. The α1 adrenoceptors in ventrolateral orbital cortex contribute to the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lai; Zhu, Yuan-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Liang, Feng; Li, Teng; Gao, Hong-Yu; Huo, Fu-Quan; Yan, Chun-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of microinjection of benoxathian, selective α1 adrenoceptor antagonist, into the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLO) on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and its underlying molecular mechanism in rats. A single morphine treatment protocol was used in establishing the behavioral sensitization model. The effect of bilateral intra-VLO benoxathian injection on locomotor activity was examined and the protein expression levels of α1 adrenoceptors and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the VLO were detected after locomotor test. The results showed that a single injection of morphine could induce behavioral sensitization by a low challenge dosage of morphine after a 7-days drug free period. Benoxathian significantly suppressed the expression but not the development of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Morphine treatment significantly elicited ERK phosphorylation and downregulated the expression level of α1 adrenoceptors in the VLO. In addition, intra-VLO benoxathian injection enhanced the expression levels of α1 adrenoceptors and phosphorylated ERK. These results suggest that α1 adrenoceptors in the VLO are involved in regulating the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. The effect of decreased locomotor activity by blocking α1 adrenoceptors might be associated with activation of ERK in the VLO.

  11. Lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma contributes tumor progression by reducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hengliang; Du, Jin; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Bao; Gong, Hui; Wu, Yuxuan; Tang, Yuan; Gao, Yong; Yu, Rutong

    2014-10-01

    Ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 (neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1) plays important roles in multiple physiological process because it can ubiquitinate various substrates such as ErbB3, BRUCE, MyD88, C/EBPβ, and Parkin, and so forth. In addition to the physiological function, it was also found to be involved in tumor progression. It has been shown that loss of Nrdp1 enhances breast cancer cell growth. Up to now, the role of Nrdp1 in glioma has not been elucidated. Here, we reported that Nrdp1 as well as cleaved caspase 3 was lower expressed in human glioma tissues comparing with the nontumorous. And then we found that the expression of Nrdp1 and cleaved caspase 3 was increased in the treatment of Temozolomide (TMZ), a drug for glioma chemotherapy. Further investigation indicated that transient transfection of Nrdp1 significantly promoted cell apoptosis by aggravating the degradation of BRUCE and activation of caspase 3. In addition, overexpression of Nrdp1 augmented TMZ induced apoptosis by evaluating the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3, while silencing of Nrdp1 reduced the sensitivity to the TMZ by inhibiting the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3 in human glioma cells. These observations show that Nrdp1 is a pro-apoptotic protein in human glioma and lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma may promote tumor progression by reducing apoptosis, suggesting that Nrdp1 may be an important regulator in the development of human glioma.

  12. Contribution of gene expression to metabolic fluxes in hypermetabolic livers induced through burn injury and cecal ligation and puncture in rats.

    PubMed

    Banta, Scott; Vemula, Murali; Yokoyama, Tadaaki; Jayaraman, Arul; Berthiaume, François; Yarmush, Martin L

    2007-05-01

    Severe injury activates many stress-related and inflammatory pathways that can lead to a systemic hypermetabolic state. Prior studies using perfused hypermetabolic rat livers have identified intrinsic metabolic flux changes that were not dependent upon the continual presence of elevated stress hormones and substrate loads. We investigated the hypothesis that such changes may be due to persistent alterations in gene expression. A systemic hypermetabolic response was induced in rats by applying a moderate burn injury followed 2 days later by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP) to produce sepsis. Control animals received a sham-burn followed by CLP, or a sham-burn followed by sham-CLP. Two days after CLP, livers were analyzed for gene expression changes using DNA microarrays and for metabolism alterations by ex vivo perfusion coupled with Metabolic Flux Analysis. Burn injury prior to CLP increased fluxes while decreases in gene expression levels were observed. Conversely, CLP alone significantly increased metabolic gene expression, but decreased many of the corresponding metabolic fluxes. Burn injury combined with CLP led to the most dramatic changes, where concurrent changes in fluxes and gene expression levels occurred in about 1/3 of the reactions. The data are consistent with the notion that in this model, burn injury prior to CLP increased fluxes through post-translational mechanisms with little contribution of gene expression, while CLP treatment up-regulated the metabolic machinery by transcriptional mechanisms. Overall, these data show that mRNA changes measured at a single time point by DNA microarray analysis do not reliably predict metabolic flux changes in perfused livers.

  13. Monaural and binaural contributions to interaural-level-difference sensitivity in human auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, Christopher G.; McLaughlin, Susan A.; Higgins, Nathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses in human auditory cortex (AC) to sounds with intensity varying independently in the left and right ears. Echoplanar images were acquired at 3 Tesla with sparse image acquisition once per 12-second block of sound stimulation. Combinations of binaural intensity and stimulus presentation rate were varied between blocks, and selected to allow measurement of response-intensity functions in three configurations: monaural 55–85 dB SPL, binaural 55–85 dB SPL with intensity equal in both ears, and binaural with average binaural level of 70 dB SPL and interaural level differences (ILD) ranging ±30 dB (i.e., favoring the left or right ear). Comparison of response functions equated for contralateral intensity revealed that BOLD-response magnitudes (1) generally increased with contralateral intensity, consistent with positive drive of the BOLD response by the contralateral ear, (2) were larger for contralateral monaural stimulation than for binaural stimulation, consistent with negative effects (e.g., inhibition) of ipsilateral input, which were strongest in the left hemisphere, and (3) also increased with ipsilateral intensity when contralateral input was weak, consistent with additional, positive, effects of ipsilateral stimulation. Hemispheric asymmetries in the spatial extent and overall magnitude of BOLD responses were generally consistent with previous studies demonstrating greater bilaterality of responses in the right hemisphere and stricter contralaterality in the left hemisphere. Finally, comparison of responses to fast (40/s) and slow (5/s) stimulus presentation rates revealed significant rate-dependent adaptation of the BOLD response that varied across ILD values. PMID:26163805

  14. H19 serves as a diagnostic biomarker and up-regulation of H19 expression contributes to poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, J S; Wang, Y F; Zhang, X Q; Lv, J M; Li, Y; Liu, X X; Xu, T P

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidences indicate that dysregulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in cancer tumorigenesis and progression and might be used as diagnosis and prognosis biomarker, or potential therapeutic targets. LncRNA H19 has been reported to be upregulated in diverse human cancers; however, its clinical significance in gastric cancer (GC) remains elusive. Expression levels of H19 in 128 pairs of GC and adjacent normal tissues, GC cell lines and GC juices compared to their corresponding controls were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Kaplan-Meier analysis were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic values. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using the Cox proportional hazard analysis. H19 expression was remarkably increased in GC tissues and cell lines compared with that in the normal control, and its up-regulation was significantly correlated to invasion depth (P < 0.001), advanced TNM stage (P = 0.002) and regional lymph nodes metastasis (P < 0.001) in GC. H19 levels were robust in differentiating GC tissues from controls [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.697; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.636-0.752, p<0.01]. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that increased H19 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P = 0.017) and disease-free survival (P = 0.024) of patients. A multivariate survival analysis also indicated that H19 could be an independent prognostic marker. The levels of H19 in gastric juice from gastric patients were significantly higher than those from normal subjects (P = 0.034). Furthermore, knockdown of H19 expression by siRNA could inhibit cell migration and invasion in GC cells partly via regulating E-cadherin protein expression. H19 might serve as a promising biomarker for early detection and prognosis prediction of GC.

  15. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L.; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Kosak, Steven T.; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms. CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for the locus. We showed previously that intronic and extragenic enhancers, when occupied by specific transcription factors, are recruited to the CFTR promoter by a looping mechanism to drive gene expression. Here we use a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 editing of cis-regulatory elements and siRNA-mediated depletion of architectural proteins to determine the relative contribution of structural elements and enhancers to the higher order structure and expression of the CFTR locus. We found the boundaries of the CFTR TAD are conserved among diverse cell types and are dependent on CTCF and cohesin complex. Removal of an upstream CTCF-binding insulator alters the interaction profile, but has little effect on CFTR expression. Within the TAD, intronic enhancers recruit cell-type selective transcription factors and deletion of a pivotal enhancer element dramatically decreases CFTR expression, but has minor effect on its 3D structure. PMID:26673704

  16. The curli biogenesis genes expression level is unassociated with Enterobacter cloacae hsp60 clusters and PFGE genotypes.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Majid; Bakhshi, Bita; Najar-Peerayeh, Shahin; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between Enterobacter cloacae complex subspecies and clusters involved in UTI infections and specific pulsotypes, and to assess the contribution of major curli biogenesis genes (csgD, csgA) expression level to pathogenesis of clusters and genotypes. Based on the PFGE analysis, 37 different profiles were observed among which 8 profiles were common types. Real time PCR of csgD and csgA genes of 50 E. cloacae complex in relation to PFGE and hsp60 genotypes showed that all the genetic clusters are not equally involved in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. It was elucidated in this study that isolates with common PFGE genotypes belonged to identical hsp60 clusters, and the foremost clusters (VI, III, and V) mainly comprised within PFGE common types. In our study, no significant correlation was detected between the specific hsp60 clusters or PFGE genotypes and the expression level of csgD and csgA genes (P-value > 0.05). This is the first study describing that unequivalent contribution of E. cloacae genotypes and clusters in pathogenesis of UTI, is not owing to varied curli biogenesis expression potential. The PFGE genotyping showed more discriminatory power than hsp60 genotyping for epidemiological studies and source tracking purpose.

  17. Remodeling of ion channel expression may contribute to electrophysiological consequences caused by methamphetamine in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yi-Hong; Leung, Ka-Pui; Qiao, Dong-Fang; Li, Dong-Ri; Liu, Chao; Yue, Xia; Wang, Hui-Jun

    2014-01-10

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a psychostimulant. MA may induce numerous cardiotoxic effects, leading to cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, eventually leading to sudden cardiac death. The deleterious effects of methamphetamine work in tandem to disrupt the coordinated electrical activity of the heart and have been associated with life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Remodeling of ion channels is an important mechanism of arrhythmia. Although arrhythmogenic remodeling involves alterations in ion channel expression, it is yet unknown whether MA induced electrical remodeling by affecting gene expression, and whether the changes in protein expression are paralleled by alterations in mRNA expression. Our study focused on the expression of ion channels which were correlated to the electrical remodeling caused by MA. We used RT-PCR and western blot to assess of the transcript and translate levels of ion channel subunits, including Ito: kv1.4, kv1.7, kv3.4, kv4.2; IK1: kir2.1, kir2.2, kir2.3, kir2.4; and ICa-l: Ca(2+)α1, Ca(2+)β, respectively. The reversible effect of these changes after MA withdrawal was also evaluated. MA caused decrease in mRNA and protein levels in all ion channel subunits in vitro and also in vivo, is at this work. The kv3.4 and all 4 subunits of Kir2.0 family showed significant decrease than the other genes. Most of the channel subunit expression started to reverse after MA withdrawal for 4 weeks and significantly reverse in all of the channel subunits after MA withdrawal for 8 weeks. We found that CACNA1C and Kir2.0 family showed lower recoverability than the others after MA withdrawal for 8 weeks. The reduction of the ion channel expression levels may be the molecular mechanism that mediates the electrical remodeling caused by methamphetamine.

  18. Contribution of Sp1 to Telomerase Expression and Activity in Skin Keratinocytes Cultured With a Feeder Layer.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Francis; Paquet, Claudie; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Zaniolo, Karine; Rochette, Patrick J; Landreville, Solange; Damour, Odile; Boudreau, François; Auger, François A; Guérin, Sylvain L; Germain, Lucie

    2015-02-01

    The growth of primary keratinocytes is improved by culturing them with a feeder layer. The aim of this study was to assess whether the feeder layer increases the lifespan of cultured epithelial cells by maintaining or improving telomerase activity and expression. The addition of an irradiated fibroblast feeder layer of either human or mouse origin (i3T3) helped maintain telomerase activity as well as expression of the transcription factor Sp1 in cultured keratinocytes. In contrast, senescence occurred earlier, together with a reduction of Sp1 expression and telomerase activity, in keratinocytes cultured without a feeder layer. Telomerase activity was consistently higher in keratinocytes grown on the three different feeder layers tested relative to cells grown without them. Suppression of Sp1 expression by RNA inhibition (RNAi) reduced both telomerase expression and activity in keratinocytes and also abolished their long-term growth capacity suggesting that Sp1 is a key regulator of both telomerase gene expression and cell cycle progression of primary cultured human skin keratinocytes. The results of the present study therefore suggest that the beneficial influence of the feeder layer relies on its ability to preserve telomerase activity in cultured human keratinocytes through the maintenance of stable levels of Sp1 expression.

  19. Circadian Modulation of Dopamine Levels and Dopaminergic Neuron Development Contributes to Attention Deficiency and Hyperactive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder. PMID:25673850

  20. Circadian modulation of dopamine levels and dopaminergic neuron development contributes to attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H; Chen, Wenbiao; Wang, Han

    2015-02-11

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder.

  1. Inheritance of rare functional GCKR variants and their contribution to triglyceride levels in families

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Matthew G.; Raimondo, Anne; Wang, Jian; Ban, Matthew R.; Davis, Mindy I.; Barrett, Amy; Ranft, Jessica; Jagdhuhn, David; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone; Simeonov, Anton; Collins, Francis S.; Hegele, Robert A.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2014-01-01

    Significant resources have been invested in sequencing studies to investigate the role of rare variants in complex disease etiology. However, the diagnostic interpretation of individual rare variants remains a major challenge, and may require accurate variant functional classification and the collection of large numbers of variant carriers. Utilizing sequence data from 458 individuals with hypertriglyceridemia and 333 controls with normal plasma triglyceride levels, we investigated these issues using GCKR, encoding glucokinase regulatory protein. Eighteen rare non-synonymous GCKR variants identified in these 791 individuals were comprehensively characterized by a range of biochemical and cell biological assays, including a novel high-throughput-screening-based approach capable of measuring all variant proteins simultaneously. Functionally deleterious variants were collectively associated with hypertriglyceridemia, but a range of in silico prediction algorithms showed little consistency between algorithms and poor agreement with functional data. We extended our study by obtaining sequence data on family members; however, functional variants did not co-segregate with triglyceride levels. Therefore, despite evidence for their collective functional and clinical relevance, our results emphasize the low predictive value of rare GCKR variants in individuals and the complex heritability of lipid traits. PMID:24879641

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies novel genetic variants contributing to variation in blood metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Pool, René; Kobl, Michael; Jansen, Rick; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; Yet, Idil; Haller, Toomas; Demirkan, Ayşe; Esko, Tõnu; Zhu, Gu; Böhringer, Stefan; Beekman, Marian; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; de Craen, Anton J M; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Dharuri, Harish; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; de Geus, Eco J C; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Henders, Anjali K; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Whitfield, John B; Penninx, Brenda W; Spector, Tim D; Metspalu, Andres; Eline Slagboom, P; van Dijk, Ko Willems; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Strauch, Konstantin; Martin, Nicholas G; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Illig, Thomas; Bell, Jordana T; Mangino, Massimo; Suhre, Karsten; McCarthy, Mark I; Gieger, Christian; Isaacs, Aaron; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-06-12

    Metabolites are small molecules involved in cellular metabolism, which can be detected in biological samples using metabolomic techniques. Here we present the results of genome-wide association and meta-analyses for variation in the blood serum levels of 129 metabolites as measured by the Biocrates metabolomic platform. In a discovery sample of 7,478 individuals of European descent, we find 4,068 genome- and metabolome-wide significant (Z-test, P < 1.09 × 10(-9)) associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and metabolites, involving 59 independent SNPs and 85 metabolites. Five of the fifty-nine independent SNPs are new for serum metabolite levels, and were followed-up for replication in an independent sample (N = 1,182). The novel SNPs are located in or near genes encoding metabolite transporter proteins or enzymes (SLC22A16, ARG1, AGPS and ACSL1) that have demonstrated biomedical or pharmaceutical importance. The further characterization of genetic influences on metabolic phenotypes is important for progress in biological and medical research.

  3. Substrates and inhibitors display different sensitivity to expression level of the dopamine transporter in heterologously expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nianhang; Reith, Maarten E A

    2007-04-01

    The use of heterologous expression systems for studying dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function has provided important information corroborating and complementing in situ obtained knowledge. Preliminary experiments with human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) heterologously expressing varying amounts of DAT suggested fluctuations in the potency of cocaine in inhibiting DA uptake and led to the present systematic assessment of the impact of the density of DAT on its function. Transiently expressing intact HEK293 cells, transfected with increasing amounts of DAT cDNA, displayed increasing levels of surface DAT, binding of the cocaine analog [(3)H]2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane ([(3)H]CFT), and uptake of [(3)H]DA, [(3)H]N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ([(3)H]MPP(+)), [(3)H]norepinephrine, and [(3)H]serotonin. However, the amount of DAT cDNA and the DAT expression level required to produce 50% of maximal activity was threefold higher for CFT binding than for DA uptake. Increased DAT expression was accompanied by weakened potency in inhibiting [(3)H]DA uptake for cocaine, CFT, benztropine, and its analog JHW025, GBR 12909 and mazindol; their potency in inhibiting [(3)H]CFT binding was unaffected. Inhibition of uptake by the substrates DA, m-tyramine, d-amphetamine, or MPP(+) was also unaffected. Increasing DAT in stably expressing HEK293 cells by stimulation of gene expression with sodium butyrate also decreased the uptake inhibitory potency of a number of the above blockers without affecting the interaction between substrates and DAT. The present results prompt discussion of models explaining how factors regulating DAT expression at the plasma membrane can regulate DAT function and pharmacology.

  4. Reduced REDD1 expression contributes to activation of mTORC1 following electrically induced muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Bradley S.; Steiner, Jennifer L.; Lang, Charles H.; Jefferson, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Regulated in DNA damage and development 1 (REDD1) is a repressor of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. In humans, REDD1 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle is repressed following resistance exercise in association with activation of mTORC1. However, whether REDD1 protein expression is also reduced after exercise and if so to what extent the loss contributes to exercise-induced activation of mTORC1 is unknown. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to examine the role of REDD1 in governing the response of mTORC1 and protein synthesis to a single bout of muscle contractions. Eccentric contractions of the tibialis anterior were elicited via electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve in male mice in either the fasted or fed state or in fasted wild-type or REDD1-null mice. Four hours postcontractions, mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis were elevated in fasted mice in association with repressed REDD1 expression relative to nonstimulated controls. Feeding coupled with contractions further elevated mTORC1 signaling, whereas REDD1 protein expression was repressed compared with either feeding or contractions alone. Basal mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis were elevated in REDD1-null compared with wild-type mice. The magnitude of the increase in mTORC1 signaling was similar in both wild-type and REDD1-null mice, but, unlike wild-type mice, muscle contractions did not stimulate protein synthesis in mice deficient for REDD1, presumably because basal rates were already elevated. Overall, the data demonstrate that REDD1 expression contributes to the modulation of mTORC1 signaling following feeding- and contraction-induced activation of the pathway. PMID:25159324

  5. Analysis of VEGFA Variants and Changes in VEGF Levels Underscores the Contribution of VEGF to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Almawi, Wassim Y; Gammoh, Emily; Malalla, Zainab H.; Al-Madhi, Safa A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contributes to the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and genetic variations in VEGFA gene were suggested to contribute to VEGF secretion and PCOS. Aim To evaluate the association of altered VEGF levels, stemming from the presence of specific VEGFA variants, with altered risk of PCOS. Subjects and Methods Retrospective case-control study, performed between 2012–2015. Study subjects comprised 382 women with PCOS, and 393 control subjects. ELISA measured VEGF levels; genotyping of VEGFA variants was done by allelic exclusion. Results Among the 12 tested VEGFA SNPs, minor allele frequency of only rs3025020 was significantly higher in PCOS cases than control women. Increased and reduced PCOS risk was seen with rs3025020 and rs2010963 genotypes, respectively. Increases and reduction in VEGF levels were associated with rs3025020 and rs2010963, respectively. Increased fasting insulin and HOMA-IR, and bioactive testosterone were linked with rs3025020, while carriage of rs2010963 was linked with reduction in fasting insulin, and free and bioactive testosterone. Of the 12 VEGFA variants, 9 were in LD, thus allowing construction of 9-locus haplotypes. Increased frequency of CAACAGCGA haplotype was seen in PCOS cases, after controlling for BMI, free and bioactive testosterone, SHBG, free insulin and HOMA-IR. Conclusion This study confirms the contribution of altered VEGF secretion, resulting from genetic variation in VEGFA gene into the pathogenesis of PCOS. This supports a role for VEGF as PCOS candidate locus. PMID:27846231

  6. Criteria for high-level expression of a fungal laccase gene in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Hood, Elizabeth E; Bailey, Michele R; Beifuss, Katherine; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Horn, Michael E; Callaway, Evelyn; Drees, Carol; Delaney, Donna E; Clough, Richard; Howard, John A

    2003-03-01

    Expression of industrial enzymes in transgenic plants offers an alternative system to fungal fermentation for large-scale production. Very high levels of expression are required to make the enzymes cost-effective. We tested several parameters to determine the best method for achieving high levels of expression for a fungal laccase gene. Transgenic maize plants were generated using an Agrobacterium-mediated system. The molecular parameters that induced the highest expression were the maize embryo-preferred globulin 1 promoter and targeting of the protein to the cell wall. Two independent transgenic events that yielded multiple clonal plants were characterized in detail. Independent transgenic events 01 and 03 contained two or one copies of T-DNA, respectively. Plants derived from a single transgenic event varied in expression level, and the variation in expression levels was heritable. Within the seed, expression in these plants was primarily within the embryo, and was associated with seed browning and limited germination. High oil germplasm was used to increase germination, as well as to assist in increasing expression 20-fold in five generations through breeding and selection.

  7. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  8. A century-long simulation of terrestrial water storage change and its contribution to global sea-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Bosmans, J.; de Graaf, I. E. M.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Schmitz, O.; Wada, Y.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Although limited, the contribution of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change to sea-level change is significant enough to be taken into account in sea-level attribution studies. Thus, after being absent in a previous report, TWS was again one of the components taken into account in IPCC assessment report 5. TWS can be effectively observed by analysing gravity anomalies from the GRACE mission or by observing individual components with lidar (surface water level), geodetic surveys (groundwater) and space borne passive and active microwave sensors (soil moisture, snow water equivalent). However, these observation only yield time series of limited length making it difficult to estimate long term trends in TWS as multi-decadal variations. After a short review of recent modelling efforts, we present the results of a century-long (1900-2010) simulation of TWS change with PCR-GLOBWB 2.0 that is fully coupled with a global two-layer groundwater model. In this simulation we include the effects of land cover change, the building of reservoirs and human water use (abstraction from surface and groundwater, water consumption and return flows). The effects of wetland drainage and siltation of reservoirs is corrected for afterwards. We validate TWS estimates for the period 2003-2010 with GRACE estimates. Trends of TWS and its effects on sea-level change are estimated and the main contributions identified. Similarly, we examine multi-year variability in TWS and sea-level change in relation to climate variability.

  9. Taste cell-expressed α-glucosidase enzymes contribute to gustatory responses to disaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Sunil K; Yee, Karen K; Iwata, Shusuke; Kotha, Ramana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Nichols, Buford L; Mohan, Sankar; Pinto, B Mario; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Margolskee, Robert F

    2016-05-24

    The primary sweet sensor in mammalian taste cells for sugars and noncaloric sweeteners is the heteromeric combination of type 1 taste receptors 2 and 3 (T1R2+T1R3, encoded by Tas1r2 and Tas1r3 genes). However, in the absence of T1R2+T1R3 (e.g., in Tas1r3 KO mice), animals still respond to sugars, arguing for the presence of T1R-independent detection mechanism(s). Our previous findings that several glucose transporters (GLUTs), sodium glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), and the ATP-gated K(+) (KATP) metabolic sensor are preferentially expressed in the same taste cells with T1R3 provides a potential explanation for the T1R-independent detection of sugars: sweet-responsive taste cells that respond to sugars and sweeteners may contain a T1R-dependent (T1R2+T1R3) sweet-sensing pathway for detecting sugars and noncaloric sweeteners, as well as a T1R-independent (GLUTs, SGLT1, KATP) pathway for detecting monosaccharides. However, the T1R-independent pathway would not explain responses to disaccharide and oligomeric sugars, such as sucrose, maltose, and maltotriose, which are not substrates for GLUTs or SGLT1. Using RT-PCR, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, we found that taste cells express multiple α-glycosidases (e.g., amylase and neutral α glucosidase C) and so-called intestinal "brush border" disaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g., maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase). Treating the tongue with inhibitors of disaccharidases specifically decreased gustatory nerve responses to disaccharides, but not to monosaccharides or noncaloric sweeteners, indicating that lingual disaccharidases are functional. These taste cell-expressed enzymes may locally break down dietary disaccharides and starch hydrolysis products into monosaccharides that could serve as substrates for the T1R-independent sugar sensing pathways.

  10. Contributions of Observed Parent Socialization of Coping and Skin Conductance Level Reactivity to Childhood Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Stanger, Sarah; Abaied, Jamie; Wagner, Caitlin; Sanders, Wesley

    2016-12-18

    This research examined the longitudinal association between parent socialization of coping and child adjustment, as well as the moderating role of children's skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR). Participants were a community sample of children (n = 64, M age = 9.02, 54.5% females, 93.2% Caucasian) and their parent(s). Parent coping suggestions were observed while their child engaged in a stressful challenge task, during which the child's SCLR, a measure of children's physiological reactivity to stress, was also measured. Parent(s) completed the Child Behavior Checklist (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) at baseline and a 6-month follow-up to assess internalizing and externalizing problems. Results revealed that secondary control engagement suggestions predicted fewer internalizing problems over time. In addition, disengagement suggestions predicted fewer externalizing problems over time among children with high SCLR. This study provides evidence that parent coping suggestions serve as a resource that protects youth from developing adjustment problems.

  11. Molecular Motor MYO1C, Acetyltransferase KAT6B and Osteogenetic Transcription Factor RUNX2 Expression in Human Masseter Muscle Contributes to Development of Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Desh, Heather; Gray, S Lauren; Horton, Michael J; Raoul, Gwenael; Rowlerson, Anthea M; Ferri, Joel; Vieira, Alexandre R; Sciote, James J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type I myosins are molecular motors necessary for glucose transport in the cytoplasm and initiation of transcription in the nucleus. Two of these, MYO1H and MYO1C, are paralogs which may be important in the development of malocclusion. The objective of this study was to investigate their gene expression in the masseter muscle of malocclusion subjects. Two functionally related proteins known to contribute to malocclusion were also investigated: KAT6B (a chromatin remodeling epigenetic enzyme which is activated by MYO1C) and RUNX2 (a transcription factor regulating osteogenesis which is activated by KAT6B). Design Masseter muscle samples and malocclusion classifications were obtained from orthognathic surgery subjects. Muscle was sectioned and immunostained to determine fiber type properties. RNA was isolated from the remaining sample to determine expression levels for the four genes by TaqMan® RT-PCR. Fiber type properties, gene expression quantities and malocclusion classification were compared. Results There were very significant associations (P<0.0000001) between MYO1C and KAT6B expressions. There were also significant associations (P<0.005) between RUNX2 expression and masseter muscle type II fiber properties. Very few significant associations were identified between MYO1C and masseter muscle fiber type properties. Conclusions The relationship between MYO1C and KAT6B suggests that the two are interacting in chromatin remodeling for gene expression. This is the nuclear myosin1 (NM1) function of MYO1C. A surprising finding is the relationship between RUNX2 and type II masseter muscle fibers, since RUNX2 expression in mature muscle was previously unknown. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in adult masseter muscle. PMID:24698832

  12. Slow intestinal transit contributes to elevate urinary p-cresol level in Italian autistic children.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Stefano; Sacco, Roberto; Altieri, Laura; Neri, Cristina; Urbani, Andrea; Bravaccio, Carmela; Riccio, Maria Pia; Iovene, Maria Rosaria; Bombace, Francesca; De Magistris, Laura; Persico, Antonio M

    2016-07-01

    The uremic toxin p-cresol (4-methylphenol) is either of environmental origin or can be synthetized from tyrosine by cresol-producing bacteria present in the gut lumen. Elevated p-cresol amounts have been previously found in the urines of Italian and French autism spectrum disorder (ASD) children up until 8 years of age, and may be associated with autism severity or with the intensity of abnormal behaviors. This study aims to investigate the mechanism producing elevated urinary p-cresol in ASD. Urinary p-cresol levels were thus measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography in a sample of 53 Italian ASD children assessed for (a) presence of Clostridium spp. strains in the gut by means of an in vitro fecal stool test and of Clostridium difficile-derived toxin A/B in the feces, (b) intestinal permeability using the lactulose/mannitol (LA/MA) test, (c) frequent use of antibiotics due to recurrent infections during the first 2 years of postnatal life, and (d) stool habits with the Bristol Stool Form Scale. Chronic constipation was the only variable significantly associated with total urinary p-cresol concentration (P < 0.05). No association was found with presence of Clostridium spp. in the gut flora (P = 0.92), augmented intestinal permeability (P = 0.18), or frequent use of antibiotics in early infancy (P = 0.47). No ASD child was found to carry C. difficile in the gut or to release toxin A/B in the feces. In conclusion, urinary p-cresol levels are elevated in young ASD children with increased intestinal transit time and chronic constipation. Autism Res 2016, 9: 752-759. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Predicting Gene Expression Level from Relative Codon Usage Bias: An Application to Escherichia coli Genome

    PubMed Central

    Roymondal, Uttam; Das, Shibsankar; Sahoo, Satyabrata

    2009-01-01

    We present an expression measure of a gene, devised to predict the level of gene expression from relative codon bias (RCB). There are a number of measures currently in use that quantify codon usage in genes. Based on the hypothesis that gene expressivity and codon composition is strongly correlated, RCB has been defined to provide an intuitively meaningful measure of an extent of the codon preference in a gene. We outline a simple approach to assess the strength of RCB (RCBS) in genes as a guide to their likely expression levels and illustrate this with an analysis of Escherichia coli (E. coli) genome. Our efforts to quantitatively predict gene expression levels in E. coli met with a high level of success. Surprisingly, we observe a strong correlation between RCBS and protein length indicating natural selection in favour of the shorter genes to be expressed at higher level. The agreement of our result with high protein abundances, microarray data and radioactive data demonstrates that the genomic expression profile available in our method can be applied in a meaningful way to the study of cell physiology and also for more detailed studies of particular genes of interest. PMID:19131380

  14. Comparison of different statistical methods for estimation of extreme sea levels with wave set-up contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kergadallan, Xavier; Bernardara, Pietro; Benoit, Michel; Andreewsky, Marc; Weiss, Jérôme

    2013-04-01

    Estimating the probability of occurrence of extreme sea levels is a central issue for the protection of the coast. Return periods of sea level with wave set-up contribution are estimated here in one site : Cherbourg in France in the English Channel. The methodology follows two steps : the first one is computation of joint probability of simultaneous wave height and still sea level, the second one is interpretation of that joint probabilities to assess a sea level for a given return period. Two different approaches were evaluated to compute joint probability of simultaneous wave height and still sea level : the first one is multivariate extreme values distributions of logistic type in which all components of the variables become large simultaneously, the second one is conditional approach for multivariate extreme values in which only one component of the variables have to be large. Two different methods were applied to estimate sea level with wave set-up contribution for a given return period : Monte-Carlo simulation in which estimation is more accurate but needs higher calculation time and classical ocean engineering design contours of type inverse-FORM in which the method is simpler and allows more complex estimation of wave setup part (wave propagation to the coast for example). We compare results from the two different approaches with the two different methods. To be able to use both Monte-Carlo simulation and design contours methods, wave setup is estimated with an simple empirical formula. We show advantages of the conditional approach compared to the multivariate extreme values approach when extreme sea-level occurs when either surge or wave height is large. We discuss the validity of the ocean engineering design contours method which is an alternative when computation of sea levels is too complex to use Monte-Carlo simulation method.

  15. FMRP Expression Levels in Mouse Central Nervous System Neurons Determine Behavioral Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Jason; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Niibori, Yosuke; Pacey, Laura K; Halder, Sebok K; Koxhioni, Enea; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hampson, David R

    2016-12-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is absent or highly reduced in Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic disorder causing cognitive impairment and autistic behaviors. Previous proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that restoring FMRP in the brain using viral vectors can improve pathological abnormalities in mouse models of fragile X. However, unlike small molecule drugs where the dose can readily be adjusted during treatment, viral vector-based biological therapeutic drugs present challenges in terms of achieving optimal dosing and expression levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of expressing varying levels of FMRP selectively in neurons of Fmr1 knockout and wild-type (WT) mice. A wide range of neuronal FMRP transgene levels was achieved in individual mice after intra-cerebroventricular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors coding for FMRP. In all treated knockout mice, prominent FMRP transgene expression was observed in forebrain structures, whereas lower levels were present in more caudal regions of the brain. Reduced levels of the synaptic protein PSD-95, elevated levels of the transcriptional modulator MeCP2, and abnormal motor activity, anxiety, and acoustic startle responses in Fmr1 knockout mice were fully or partially rescued after expression of FMRP at about 35-115% of WT expression, depending on the brain region examined. In the WT mouse, moderate FMRP over-expression of up to about twofold had little or no effect on PSD-95 and MeCP2 levels or on behavioral endophenotypes. In contrast, excessive over-expression in the Fmr1 knockout mouse forebrain (approximately 2.5-6-fold over WT) induced pathological motor hyperactivity and suppressed the startle response relative to WT mice. These results delineate a range of FMRP expression levels in the central nervous system that confer phenotypic improvement in fragile X mice. Collectively, these findings are pertinent to the development of long-term curative

  16. Multivariate spatio-temporal modelling for assessing Antarctica's present-day contribution to sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Schön, Nana; Lindgren, Finn; Bamber, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Antarctica is the world's largest fresh-water reservoir, with the potential to raise sea levels by about 60 m. An ice sheet contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) when its rate of ice discharge and/or surface melting exceeds accumulation through snowfall. Constraining the contribution of the ice sheets to present-day SLR is vital both for coastal development and planning, and climate projections. Information on various ice sheet processes is available from several remote sensing data sets, as well as in situ data such as global positioning system data. These data have differing coverage, spatial support, temporal sampling and sensing characteristics, and thus, it is advantageous to combine them all in a single framework for estimation of the SLR contribution and the assessment of processes controlling mass exchange with the ocean. In this paper, we predict the rate of height change due to salient geophysical processes in Antarctica and use these to provide estimates of SLR contribution with associated uncertainties. We employ a multivariate spatio-temporal model, approximated as a Gaussian Markov random field, to take advantage of differing spatio-temporal properties of the processes to separate the causes of the observed change. The process parameters are estimated from geophysical models, while the remaining parameters are estimated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, designed to operate in a high-performance computing environment across multiple nodes. We validate our methods against a separate data set and compare the results to those from studies that invariably employ numerical model outputs directly. We conclude that it is possible, and insightful, to assess Antarctica's contribution without explicit use of numerical models. Further, the results obtained here can be used to test the geophysical numerical models for which in situ data are hard to obtain. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25937792

  17. Multivariate spatio-temporal modelling for assessing Antarctica's present-day contribution to sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Schön, Nana; Lindgren, Finn; Bamber, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Antarctica is the world's largest fresh-water reservoir, with the potential to raise sea levels by about 60 m. An ice sheet contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) when its rate of ice discharge and/or surface melting exceeds accumulation through snowfall. Constraining the contribution of the ice sheets to present-day SLR is vital both for coastal development and planning, and climate projections. Information on various ice sheet processes is available from several remote sensing data sets, as well as in situ data such as global positioning system data. These data have differing coverage, spatial support, temporal sampling and sensing characteristics, and thus, it is advantageous to combine them all in a single framework for estimation of the SLR contribution and the assessment of processes controlling mass exchange with the ocean. In this paper, we predict the rate of height change due to salient geophysical processes in Antarctica and use these to provide estimates of SLR contribution with associated uncertainties. We employ a multivariate spatio-temporal model, approximated as a Gaussian Markov random field, to take advantage of differing spatio-temporal properties of the processes to separate the causes of the observed change. The process parameters are estimated from geophysical models, while the remaining parameters are estimated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, designed to operate in a high-performance computing environment across multiple nodes. We validate our methods against a separate data set and compare the results to those from studies that invariably employ numerical model outputs directly. We conclude that it is possible, and insightful, to assess Antarctica's contribution without explicit use of numerical models. Further, the results obtained here can be used to test the geophysical numerical models for which in situ data are hard to obtain. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Can silencing of transposons contribute to variation in effector gene expression in Phytophthora infestans?

    PubMed

    Whisson, Stephen; Vetukuri, Ramesh; Avrova, Anna; Dixelius, Christina

    2012-03-01

    Transposable elements are ubiquitous residents in eukaryotic genomes. Often considered to be genomic parasites, they can lead to dramatic changes in genome organization, gene expression, and gene evolution. The oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has evolved a genome organization where core biology genes are predominantly located in genome regions that have relatively few resident transposons. In contrast, disease effector-encoding genes are most frequently located in rapidly evolving genomic regions that are rich in transposons. P. infestans, as a eukaryote, likely uses RNA silencing to minimize the activity of transposons. We have shown that fusion of a short interspersed element (SINE) to an effector gene in P. infestans leads to the silencing of both the introduced fusion and endogenous homologous sequences. This is also likely to occur naturally in the genome of P. infestans, as transcriptional inactivation of effectors is known to occur, and over half of the translocated "RXLR class" of effectors are located within 2 kb of transposon sequences in the P. infestans genome. In this commentary, we review the diverse transposon inventory of P. infestans, its control by RNA silencing, and consequences for expression modulation of nearby effector genes in this economically important plant pathogen.

  19. Expression and contribution of the HIF-1α/VEGF signaling pathway to luteal development and function in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lixiang; Zhang, Zhenghong; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhengchao

    2015-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is vital in normal and abnormal angiogenesis in the ovary, particularly during the early development of the corpus luteum in the ovary. However, the molecular regulation of the expression VEGF during luteal development in vivo remains to be fully elucidated. As the expression of VEGF is mediated by hypoxia‑inducible factor (HIF)‑1α in luteal cells cultured in vitro, determined in our previous study, the present study was performed to confirm the hypothesis that HIF‑1α is induced and then regulates the expression of VEGF and VEGF‑dependent luteal development/function in vivo. This was investigated using a pregnant rat model treated with a small‑molecule inhibitor of HIF‑1α, echinomycin (Ech). The development of the corpus luteum in the pregnant rat ovary was identified via performing assays of the serum progesterone, testosterone and estradiol concentrations by radioimmunoassay, accompanied with determination of the changes in the expression levels of HIF‑1α and VEGF by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different days of the developmental process. On day 5, serum progesterone levels were markedly increased, whereas serum levels of testosterone and estradiol did not change significantly. On day 17, the highest level of serum progesterone was observed, however, this was not the case for testosterone and estradiol. Further analysis of the expression levels of HIF‑1α and VEGF revealed that their changes were consistent with the changes in serum levels of progesterone, which occurred in the development of the corpus luteum in the ovaries of pregnant rats. Further investigation demonstrated that Ech inhibited luteal development through inhibiting the expression of VEGF, mediated by HIF‑1α, and subsequent luteal function, which was determined by detecting changes in serum progesterone on days 8 and 14. Taken together, these results demonstrated that HIF‑1

  20. Extra-intestinal calcium handling contributes to normal serum calcium levels when intestinal calcium absorption is suboptimal.

    PubMed

    Lieben, Liesbet; Verlinden, Lieve; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Torrekens, Sophie; Moermans, Karen; Schoonjans, Luc; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2015-12-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, is a crucial regulator of calcium homeostasis, especially through stimulation of intestinal calcium transport. Lack of intestinal vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling does however not result in hypocalcemia, because the increased 1,25(OH)2D levels stimulate calcium handling in extra-intestinal tissues. Systemic VDR deficiency, on the other hand, results in hypocalcemia because calcium handling is impaired not only in the intestine, but also in kidney and bone. It remains however unclear whether low intestinal VDR activity, as observed during aging, is sufficient for intestinal calcium transport and for mineral and bone homeostasis. To this end, we generated mice that expressed the Vdr exclusively in the gut, but at reduced levels. We found that ~15% of intestinal VDR expression greatly prevented the Vdr null phenotype in young-adult mice, including the severe hypocalcemia. Serum calcium levels were, however, in the low-normal range, which may be due to the suboptimal intestinal calcium absorption, renal calcium loss, insufficient increase in bone resorption and normal calcium incorporation in the bone matrix. In conclusion, our results indicate that low intestinal VDR levels improve intestinal calcium absorption compared to Vdr null mice, but also show that 1,25(OH)2D-mediated fine-tuning of renal calcium reabsorption and bone mineralization and resorption is required to maintain fully normal serum calcium levels.

  1. MMP-2 Is Mainly Expressed in Arterioles and Contributes to Cerebral Vascular Remodeling Associated with TGF-β1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ye; Zhang, Weifeng; Xie, Zhenying; Xu, Nanfei; Lu, Yunnan

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in vascular remodeling. It has been reported that hypoxia stimulated MMP-9 expression in brain endothelial cells and MMP-9 plays an important role in cerebral vascular remodeling. However, little is known about MMP-2 in the cerebral vessels remodeling. Herein, the aim of this study is to examine the class of vessel and cell type expressing MMP-2 in cerebral vessels and to investigate its potential role in vascular remodeling. In the present study, dual-immunofluorescence assay showed that MMP-2 was mainly expressed in arterioles. In addition, we found that MMP-2 expression in cerebral vessels was derived from endothelial cells, not astrocyte cells. Notably, in the normoxic central nervous system (CNS), there was no effect on vascular development, integrity, or endothelial proliferation when MMP-2 was knocked out, but lack of MMP-2 led to defective arteriolar remodeling and associated with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling in CNS. Moreover, blocking TGF-β with SB431542, a specific TGF-β inhibitor, significantly reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of MMP-2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our findings reveal that the level of MMP-2 is high in arteriolar endothelial cells and demonstrate a novel connection between MMP-2 and TGF-β1 signaling in cerebral vascular remodeling.

  2. Secondary Data Analytics of Aquaporin Expression Levels in Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C; Graham, Barbara E; Pacurari, Maricica; Sims, Jennifer N; Udensi, Udensi K; Ndebele, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults in which recurrence has been attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. On the basis of tumor formation in vivo and growth type in vitro, two published microarray gene expression profiling studies grouped nine glioblastoma stem-like (GS) cell lines into one of two groups: full (GSf) or restricted (GSr) stem-like phenotypes. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are water transport proteins that are highly expressed in primary glial-derived tumors. However, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 have not been previously described in a panel of 92 glioma samples. Therefore, we designed secondary data analytics methods to determine the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in GS cell lines and glioblastoma neurospheres. Our investigation also included a total of 2,566 expression levels from 28 Affymetrix microarray probe sets encoding 13 human aquaporins (AQP0–AQP12); CXCR4 (the receptor for stromal cell derived factor-1 [SDF-1], a potential glioma stem cell therapeutic target]); and PROM1 (gene encoding CD133, the widely used glioma stem cell marker). Interactive visual representation designs for integrating phenotypic features and expression levels revealed that inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 correlate with distinct phenotypes in a set of cell lines grouped into full and restricted stem-like phenotypes. Discriminant function analysis further revealed that AQP1 and AQP4 expression are better predictors for tumor formation and growth types in glioblastoma stem-like cells than are CXCR4 and PROM1. Future investigations are needed to characterize the molecular mechanisms for inverse expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 in the glioblastoma stem-like neurospheres. PMID:26279619

  3. Taste cell-expressed α-glucosidase enzymes contribute to gustatory responses to disaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Sunil K.; Yee, Karen K.; Iwata, Shusuke; Kotha, Ramana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Nichols, Buford L.; Mohan, Sankar; Pinto, B. Mario; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The primary sweet sensor in mammalian taste cells for sugars and noncaloric sweeteners is the heteromeric combination of type 1 taste receptors 2 and 3 (T1R2+T1R3, encoded by Tas1r2 and Tas1r3 genes). However, in the absence of T1R2+T1R3 (e.g., in Tas1r3 KO mice), animals still respond to sugars, arguing for the presence of T1R-independent detection mechanism(s). Our previous findings that several glucose transporters (GLUTs), sodium glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), and the ATP-gated K+ (KATP) metabolic sensor are preferentially expressed in the same taste cells with T1R3 provides a potential explanation for the T1R-independent detection of sugars: sweet-responsive taste cells that respond to sugars and sweeteners may contain a T1R-dependent (T1R2+T1R3) sweet-sensing pathway for detecting sugars and noncaloric sweeteners, as well as a T1R-independent (GLUTs, SGLT1, KATP) pathway for detecting monosaccharides. However, the T1R-independent pathway would not explain responses to disaccharide and oligomeric sugars, such as sucrose, maltose, and maltotriose, which are not substrates for GLUTs or SGLT1. Using RT-PCR, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, we found that taste cells express multiple α-glycosidases (e.g., amylase and neutral α glucosidase C) and so-called intestinal “brush border” disaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g., maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase). Treating the tongue with inhibitors of disaccharidases specifically decreased gustatory nerve responses to disaccharides, but not to monosaccharides or noncaloric sweeteners, indicating that lingual disaccharidases are functional. These taste cell-expressed enzymes may locally break down dietary disaccharides and starch hydrolysis products into monosaccharides that could serve as substrates for the T1R-independent sugar sensing pathways. PMID:27162343

  4. Microglia contribute to circuit defects in Mecp2 null mice independent of microglia-specific loss of Mecp2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Dorothy P; Heller, Christopher T; Gunner, Georgia; Heller, Molly; Gordon, Christopher; Hammond, Timothy; Wolf, Yochai; Jung, Steffen; Stevens, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident CNS macrophages, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Rett Syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder. However, the mechanism by which microglia contribute to the disorder is unclear and recent data suggest that microglia do not play a causative role. Here, we use the retinogeniculate system to determine if and how microglia contribute to pathogenesis in a RTT mouse model, the Mecp2 null mouse (Mecp2tm1.1Bird/y). We demonstrate that microglia contribute to pathogenesis by excessively engulfing, thereby eliminating, presynaptic inputs at end stages of disease (≥P56 Mecp2 null mice) concomitant with synapse loss. Furthermore, loss or gain of Mecp2 expression specifically in microglia (Cx3cr1CreER;Mecp2fl/yor Cx3cr1CreER; Mecp2LSL/y) had little effect on excessive engulfment, synapse loss, or phenotypic abnormalities. Taken together, our data suggest that microglia contribute to end stages of disease by dismantling neural circuits rendered vulnerable by loss of Mecp2 in other CNS cell types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15224.001 PMID:27458802

  5. Histopathological Features of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors and the Contribution of DOG1 Expression to the Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Beril; Özyılmaz, Filiz; Tokuç, Burcu; Can, Nuray; Taştekin, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) have KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) mutations affecting receptor tyrosine kinase activity and do not benefit from classic treatment regimens. Aims: The aim of this study was to review the algorithm that may be followed for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis in GISTs by investigating the histomorphological parameters and expression characteristics of classical immunohistochemical antibodies used in routine tests in addition to DOG1 expression. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: We reevaluated the histological and immunohistochemical parameters of 37 GISTs. The standard immunohistochemical diagnosis and differential diagnosis panel antibodies (CD117, PDGFRα, CD34, vimentin, desmin, SMA, S-100, and Ki67) were studied on the tumor sections. We also used the popular marker DOG1 antibody with accepted sensitivity for GISTs in recent years and the PDGFRα immune marker for which the benefit in routine practice is discussed. Results: Classification according to progressive disease risk groups of the 37 cases revealed that 54% were in the high risk, 19% in the moderate risk, 16% in the low risk, 8% in the very low risk and 8% in the no risk group. Cytological atypia, necrosis, mucosal invasion and the Ki67 index were found to be related to the progressive disease risk groups of the tumors (p<0.05). Positive immunoreaction was observed with CD117 and PDGFRα in all GISTs in the study (100%). Positivity with the DOG1 antibody was found in 33 (89%) cases. CD34 was positive in 62% (23) of the cases. Conclusion: The CD117 antibody still plays a key role in GIST diagnosis. However, the use of DOG1 and PDGFRα antibodies combined with CD117 as sensitive markers can be beneficial. PMID:26740899

  6. Expression of SOFAT by T- and B-lineage cells may contribute to bone loss

    PubMed Central

    JARRY, CHRISTIAN R.; MARTINEZ, ELIZABETH F.; PERUZZO, DAIANE C.; CARREGARO, VANESSA; SACRAMENTO, LAÍS A.; ARAÚJO, VERA C.; WEITZMANN, M. NEALE; NAPIMOGA, MARCELO H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel T cell-secreted cytokine, termed secreted osteoclastogenic factor of activated T cells (SOFAT) that induces osteoclastic bone resorption in a RANKL-independent manner, has been described. Our group have previously reported that SOFAT is highly expressed in gingival tissues of patients with chronic periodontitis suggesting a putative role in the bone loss associated with periodontal disease. The aim of the present study was to identify other potential cellular sources of SOFAT in the bone resorptive lesions of patients with periodontal disease. Gingival tissues were biopsied from systemically healthy subjects without periodontal disease (n=5) and patients with chronic periodontitis (n=5), and the presence of SOFAT was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. The present data demonstrated marked SOFAT staining in diseased periodontal tissues that was predominantly associated with the lymphocytic infiltration of gingival tissues. Notably, in addition to CD3+ T cells, B-lineage cells including plasma cells also exhibited strong staining for SOFAT. As SOFAT has not previously been reported in B-lineage cells, splenic T cells and B cells were further purified from BALB/c mice and activated using CD3/CD28 and lipopolysaccharide, respectively. SOFAT was quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and was shown to be significantly expressed (P<0.05) in both activated T cells and B cells compared with unstimulated cells. These data support a putative role of SOFAT in the bone loss associated with chronic periodontal disease. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time that in addition to T cells, B-lineage cells may also be a significant source of SOFAT in inflammatory states. PMID:27035849

  7. The ryanodine receptor is expressed in human pancreatic acinar cells and contributes to acinar cell injury.

    PubMed

    Lewarchik, Christopher M; Orabi, Abrahim I; Jin, Shunqian; Wang, Dong; Muili, Kamaldeen A; Shah, Ahsan U; Eisses, John F; Malik, Adeel; Bottino, Rita; Jayaraman, Thottala; Husain, Sohail Z

    2014-09-01

    Physiological calcium (Ca(2+)) signals within the pancreatic acinar cell regulate enzyme secretion, whereas aberrant Ca(2+) signals are associated with acinar cell injury. We have previously identified the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a Ca(2+) release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum, as a modulator of these pathological signals. In the present study, we establish that the RyR is expressed in human acinar cells and mediates acinar cell injury. We obtained pancreatic tissue from cadaveric donors and identified isoforms of RyR1 and RyR2 by qPCR. Immunofluorescence staining of the pancreas showed that the RyR is localized to the basal region of the acinar cell. Furthermore, the presence of RyR was confirmed from isolated human acinar cells by tritiated ryanodine binding. To determine whether the RyR is functionally active, mouse or human acinar cells were loaded with the high-affinity Ca(2+) dye (Fluo-4 AM) and stimulated with taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS) (500 μM) or carbachol (1 mM). Ryanodine (100 μM) pretreatment reduced the magnitude of the Ca(2+) signal and the area under the curve. To determine the effect of RyR blockade on injury, human acinar cells were stimulated with pathological stimuli, the bile acid TLCS (500 μM) or the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 mM) in the presence or absence of the RyR inhibitor ryanodine. Ryanodine (100 μM) caused an 81% and 47% reduction in acinar cell injury, respectively, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase leakage (P < 0.05). Taken together, these data establish that the RyR is expressed in human acinar cells and that it modulates acinar Ca(2+) signals and cell injury.

  8. Cloning and expression of Staphylococcus saprophyticus urease gene sequences in Staphylococcus carnosus and contribution of the enzyme to virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Gatermann, S; Marre, R

    1989-01-01

    The urease gene of Staphylococcus saprophyticus CCM883 was cloned and expressed in Staphylococcus carnosus TM300. In vitro translation of the cloned DNA sequences revealed six polypeptides (of 70, 47, 29, 27, 20, and 17 kilodaltons) that were associated with enzyme activity. Introduction of the cloned genes into a urease-negative mutant of S. saprophyticus restored the virulence of this strain, confirming our previous suggestion (S. Gatermann, J. John, and R. Marre, Infect. Immun. 57:110-116, 1989) that this enzyme is a major virulence factor of the organism and contributes mainly to cystopathogenicity. Images PMID:2777370

  9. Histidine tag fusion increases expression levels of active recombinant amelogenin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Andersson, Christer; Reseland, Janne E; Lyngstadaas, Petter; Bülow, Leif

    2006-07-01

    Amelogenin is a dental enamel matrix protein involved in formation of dental enamel. In this study, we have expressed two different recombinant murine amelogenins in Escherichia coli: the untagged rM179, and the histidine tagged rp(H)M180, identical to rM179 except that it carries the additional N-terminal sequence MRGSHHHHHHGS. The effects of the histidine tag on expression levels, and on growth properties of the amelogenin expressing cells were studied. Purification of a crude protein extract containing rp(H)M180 was also carried out using IMAC and reverse-phase HPLC. The results of this study showed clearly that both growth properties and amelogenin expression levels were improved for E. coli cells expressing the histidine tagged amelogenin rp(H)M180, compared to cells expressing the untagged amelogenin rM179. The positive effect of the histidine tag on amelogenin expression is proposed to be due to the hydrophilic nature of the histidine tag, generating a more hydrophilic amelogenin, which is more compatible with the host cell. Human osteoblasts treated with the purified rp(H)M180 showed increased levels of secreted osteocalcin, compared to untreated cells. This response was similar to cells treated with enamel matrix derivate, mainly composed by amelogenin, suggesting that the recombinant protein is biologically active. Thus, the histidine tag favors expression and purification of biologically active recombinant amelogenin.

  10. Aberrant expression of the S1P regulating enzymes, SPHK1 and SGPL1, contributes to a migratory phenotype in OSCC mediated through S1PR2.

    PubMed

    Patmanathan, Sathya Narayanan; Johnson, Steven P; Lai, Sook Ling; Panja Bernam, Suthashini; Lopes, Victor; Wei, Wenbin; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Wenk, Markus R; Herr, Deron R; Murray, Paul G; Yap, Lee Fah; Paterson, Ian C

    2016-05-10

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease with a 5-year mortality rate of around 50%. Molecular targeted therapies are not in routine use and novel therapeutic targets are required. Our previous microarray data indicated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) metabolism and signalling was deregulated in OSCC. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of S1P signalling to the pathogenesis of OSCC. We show that the expression of the two major enzymes that regulate S1P levels were altered in OSCC: SPHK1 was significantly upregulated in OSCC tissues compared to normal oral mucosa and low levels of SGPL1 mRNA correlated with a worse overall survival. In in vitro studies, S1P enhanced the migration/invasion of OSCC cells and attenuated cisplatin-induced death. We also demonstrate that S1P receptor expression is deregulated in primary OSCCs and that S1PR2 is over-expressed in a subset of tumours, which in part mediates S1P-induced migration of OSCC cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that FTY720 induced significantly more apoptosis in OSCC cells compared to non-malignant cells and that FTY720 acted synergistically with cisplatin to induce cell death. Taken together, our data show that S1P signalling promotes tumour aggressiveness in OSCC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target.

  11. Contributions of low- and high-level properties to neural processing of visual scenes in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Groen, Iris I A; Silson, Edward H; Baker, Chris I

    2017-02-19

    Visual scene analysis in humans has been characterized by the presence of regions in extrastriate cortex that are selectively responsive to scenes compared with objects or faces. While these regions have often been interpreted as representing high-level properties of scenes (e.g. category), they also exhibit substantial sensitivity to low-level (e.g. spatial frequency) and mid-level (e.g. spatial layout) properties, and it is unclear how these disparate findings can be united in a single framework. In this opinion piece, we suggest that this problem can be resolved by questioning the utility of the classical low- to high-level framework of visual perception for scene processing, and discuss why low- and mid-level properties may be particularly diagnostic for the behavioural goals specific to scene perception as compared to object recognition. In particular, we highlight the contributions of low-level vision to scene representation by reviewing (i) retinotopic biases and receptive field properties of scene-selective regions and (ii) the temporal dynamics of scene perception that demonstrate overlap of low- and mid-level feature representations with those of scene category. We discuss the relevance of these findings for scene perception and suggest a more expansive framework for visual scene analysis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  12. CCR5 Expression Levels in HIV-Uninfected Women Receiving Hormonal Contraception.

    PubMed

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Wang, Cuiwei; Hu, Haihong; Anastos, Kathryn; Merhi, Zaher; Nowicki, Marek; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T; Watts, D Heather; Alter, Galit; Young, Mary A; Tsibris, Athe M N

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity increases as receptor/coreceptor expression levels increase. We determined peripheral CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 expression levels in HIV-uninfected women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA; n = 32), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; n = 27), oral contraceptive pills (n = 32), or no hormonal contraception (n = 33). The use of LNG-IUD increased the proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that expressed CCR5; increases in the magnitude of T-cell subset CCR5 expression were observed with DMPA and LNG-IUD use (P < .01 for all comparisons). LNG-IUD and, to a lesser extent, DMPA use were associated with increased peripheral T-cell CCR5 expression.

  13. CCR5 Expression Levels in HIV-Uninfected Women Receiving Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Wang, Cuiwei; Hu, Haihong; Anastos, Kathryn; Merhi, Zaher; Nowicki, Marek; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Watts, D. Heather; Alter, Galit; Young, Mary A.; Tsibris, Athe M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity increases as receptor/coreceptor expression levels increase. We determined peripheral CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 expression levels in HIV-uninfected women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA; n = 32), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; n = 27), oral contraceptive pills (n = 32), or no hormonal contraception (n = 33). The use of LNG-IUD increased the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that expressed CCR5; increases in the magnitude of T-cell subset CCR5 expression were observed with DMPA and LNG-IUD use (P < .01 for all comparisons). LNG-IUD and, to a lesser extent, DMPA use were associated with increased peripheral T-cell CCR5 expression. PMID:25895986

  14. Sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles laeta Venom Induces the Expression of MMP7 in Human Keratinocytes: Contribution to Dermonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Mara A.; Okamoto, Cinthya K.; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M.; van den Berg, Carmen W.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider is characterized by the development of dermonecrosis. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that increased expression/secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, induced by Loxosceles intermedia venom Class 2 SMases D (the main toxin in the spider venom), contribute to the development of cutaneous loxoscelism. In the present study we show that the more potent venom containing the Class 1 SMase D from Loxosceles laeta, in addition to increasing the expression/secretion of MMP2 and MMP9, also stimulates the expression of MMP7 (Matrilysin-1), which was associated with keratinocyte cell death. Tetracycline, a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented cell death and reduced MMPs expression. Considering that L. laeta venom is more potent at inducing dermonecrosis than L. intermedia venom, our results suggest that MMP7 may play an important role in the severity of dermonecrosis induced by L. laeta spider venom SMase D. In addition, the inhibition of MMPs by e.g. tetracyclines may be considered for the treatment of the cutaneous loxoscelism. PMID:27078876

  15. Sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles laeta Venom Induces the Expression of MMP7 in Human Keratinocytes: Contribution to Dermonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Mara A; Okamoto, Cinthya K; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M; van den Berg, Carmen W; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation by Loxosceles spider is characterized by the development of dermonecrosis. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that increased expression/secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, induced by Loxosceles intermedia venom Class 2 SMases D (the main toxin in the spider venom), contribute to the development of cutaneous loxoscelism. In the present study we show that the more potent venom containing the Class 1 SMase D from Loxosceles laeta, in addition to increasing the expression/secretion of MMP2 and MMP9, also stimulates the expression of MMP7 (Matrilysin-1), which was associated with keratinocyte cell death. Tetracycline, a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented cell death and reduced MMPs expression. Considering that L. laeta venom is more potent at inducing dermonecrosis than L. intermedia venom, our results suggest that MMP7 may play an important role in the severity of dermonecrosis induced by L. laeta spider venom SMase D. In addition, the inhibition of MMPs by e.g. tetracyclines may be considered for the treatment of the cutaneous loxoscelism.

  16. Uncoupling of PUMA Expression and Apoptosis Contributes to Functional Heterogeneity in Renal Cell Carcinoma - Prognostic and Translational Implications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoguang; Li, Jielin; Marx, Christina; Tolstov, Yanis; Rauch, Geraldine; Herpel, Esther; Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan; Roth, Wilfried; Grüllich, Carsten; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus; Duensing, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is characterized by a profound disruption of proapoptotic signaling networks leading to chemo- and radioresistance. A key mediator of DNA damage-induced apoptosis is the BH3-only protein PUMA. Given its central role in proapoptotic signaling, we analyzed a series of more than 600 precision-annotated primary RCC specimens for PUMA protein expression. We found a reduced expression of PUMA in 22.6% of RCCs analyzed. Unexpectedly, however, PUMA deficiency was not associated with more aggressive tumor characteristic as expected. Instead, a reduced PUMA expression was associated with a lower TNM stage, lower histopathologic grade, and more favorable cancer-specific patient survival. A direct correlation in a separate patient cohort revealed a profound disconnection between PUMA expression and apoptosis as exemplified by the fact that the tumor with the highest level of apoptotic cells was PUMA deficient. In a series of in vitro studies, we corroborated these results and discovered the highest propensity to undergo apoptosis in an RCC cell line with virtually undetectable PUMA expression. At the same time, PUMA expression was not necessarily associated with stronger apoptosis induction, which underscores the striking functional heterogeneity of PUMA expression and apoptosis in RCC. Collectively, our findings suggest that PUMA-independent mechanisms of cell death exist and may play an important role in suppressing malignant progression. They underscore the functional heterogeneity of RCCs and suggest that PUMA expression alone may not be a suitable predictive biomarker. A better understanding of alternative proapoptotic pathways, however, may help to design novel therapeutic strategies for patients with advanced RCC.

  17. Estimating contribution of wildland fires to ambient ozone levels in National Parks in the Sierra Nevada, California.

    PubMed

    Preisler, Haiganoush K; Zhong, Shiyuan Sharon; Esperanza, Annie; Brown, Timothy J; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Tarnay, Leland

    2010-03-01

    Data from four continuous ozone and weather monitoring sites operated by the National Park Service in Sierra Nevada, California, are used to develop an ozone forecasting model and to estimate the contribution of wildland fires on ambient ozone levels. The analyses of weather and ozone data pointed to the transport of ozone precursors from the Central Valley as an important source of pollution in these National Parks. Comparisons of forecasted and observed values demonstrated that accurate forecasts of next-day hourly ozone levels may be achieved by using a time series model with historic averages, expected local weather and modeled PM values as explanatory variables. Results on fire smoke influence indicated occurrence of significant increases in average ozone levels with increasing fire activity. The overall effect on diurnal ozone values, however, was small when compared with the amount of variability attributed to sources other than fire.

  18. Regulatory logic driving stable levels of defective proventriculus expression during terminal photoreceptor specification in flies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jenny; Anderson, Caitlin; Viets, Kayla; Tran, Sang; Goldberg, Gregory; Small, Stephen; Johnston, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    How differential levels of gene expression are controlled in post-mitotic neurons is poorly understood. In the Drosophila retina, expression of the transcription factor Defective Proventriculus (Dve) at distinct cell type-specific levels is required for terminal differentiation of color- and motion-detecting photoreceptors. Here, we find that the activities of two cis-regulatory enhancers are coordinated to drive dve expression in the fly eye. Three transcription factors act on these enhancers to determine cell-type specificity. Negative autoregulation by Dve maintains expression from each enhancer at distinct homeostatic levels. One enhancer acts as an inducible backup ('dark' shadow enhancer) that is normally repressed but becomes active in the absence of the other enhancer. Thus, two enhancers integrate combinatorial transcription factor input, feedback and redundancy to generate cell type-specific levels of dve expression and stable photoreceptor fate. This regulatory logic may represent a general paradigm for how precise levels of gene expression are established and maintained in post-mitotic neurons.

  19. A century-long simulation of terrestrial water storage change and its contribution to global sea-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, Marc F. P.; Bosmans, Joyce; de Graaf, Inge; Sutandjaja, Edwin; Schmitz, Oliver; Wada, Yoshihide; Wanders, Niko; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.

    2016-04-01

    Although limited, the contribution of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change to sea-level change is significant enough to be taken into account in sea-level attribution studies. Thus, after being absent in a previous report, TWS was again one of the components taken into account in IPCC assessment report 5. TWS can be effectively observed by analysing gravity anomalies from the GRACE mission or by observing individual components with lidar (surface water level), geodetic surveys (groundwater) and space borne passive and active microwave sensors (soil moisture, snow water equivalent). However, these observation only yield time series of limited length making it difficult to estimate long term trends in TWS as multi-decadal variations. We present the results of a century-long (1900-2014) simulation of TWS change with PCR-GLOBWB 2.0 that is fully coupled with a global two-layer groundwater model. In this simulation we include the effects of land cover change, the building of reservoirs and human water use (abstraction from surface and groundwater, water consumption and return flows). The effects of wetland drainage and siltation of reservoirs is corrected for afterwards. We validate TWS estimates for the period 2003-2010 with GRACE estimates. Trends of TWS and its effects on sea-level change are estimated and the main contributions (humans and climate)identified. Similarly, we examine multi-year variability in TWS and sea-level change in relation to climate variability. Our results show a significant positive trend in TWS due to a trend in precipitation over the first half of the 20th century. In the second part of the 20th century trends in TWS due to dam impoundment and groundwater depletion are evident. Finally, large anomalies, in the order of 5 cm sea-level equivalent, can be seen as a result of interannual climate variability.

  20. Krüppel expression levels are maintained through compensatory evolution of shadow enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D.J.; Vincent, Ben J.; White, Jonathan A.; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many developmental genes are controlled by shadow enhancers, pairs of enhancers that drive overlapping expression patterns. We hypothesized that compensatory evolution can maintain the total expression of a gene while individual shadow enhancers diverge between species. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression driven by orthologous pairs of shadow enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila yakuba, and Drosophila pseudoobscura that control expression of Krüppel, a transcription factor that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of blastoderm embryos. We find that the expression driven by the pair of enhancers is conserved between these three species, but expression levels driven by the individual enhancers are not. Using sequence analysis and experimental perturbation, we show that each shadow enhancer is activated by different transcription factors. These results support the hypothesis that compensatory evolution can occur between shadow enhancers, which has implications for mechanistic and evolutionary studies of gene regulation. PMID:26344774

  1. Krüppel Expression Levels Are Maintained through Compensatory Evolution of Shadow Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Vincent, Ben J; White, Jonathan A; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-09-22

    Many developmental genes are controlled by shadow enhancers—pairs of enhancers that drive overlapping expression patterns. We hypothesized that compensatory evolution can maintain the total expression of a gene, while individual shadow enhancers diverge between species. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression driven by orthologous pairs of shadow enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila yakuba, and Drosophila pseudoobscura that control expression of Krüppel, a transcription factor that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of blastoderm embryos. We found that the expression driven by the pair of enhancers is conserved between these three species, but expression levels driven by the individual enhancers are not. Using sequence analysis and experimental perturbation, we show that each shadow enhancer is regulated by different transcription factors. These results support the hypothesis that compensatory evolution can occur between shadow enhancers, which has implications for mechanistic and evolutionary studies of gene regulation.

  2. MAP17 and SGLT1 Protein Expression Levels as Prognostic Markers for Cervical Tumor Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Marco; Praena-Fernandez, Juan M.; Felipe-Abrio, Blanca; Lopez-Garcia, Maria A.; Lucena-Cacace, Antonio; Garcia, Angel; Lleonart, Matilde; Roncador, Guiovanna; Marin, Juan J.; Carnero, Amancio

    2013-01-01

    MAP17 is a membrane-associated protein that is overexpressed in human tumors. Because the expression of MAP17 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through SGLT1 in cancer cells, in the present work, we investigated whether MAP17 and/or SGLT1 might be markers for the activity of treatments involving oxidative stress, such as cisplatin or radiotherapy. First, we confirmed transcriptional alterations in genes involved in the oxidative stress induced by MAP17 expression in HeLa cervical tumor cells and found that Hela cells expressing MAP17 were more sensitive to therapies that induce ROS than were parental cells. Furthermore, MAP17 increased glucose uptake through SGLT receptors. We then analyzed MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels in cervical tumors treated with cisplatin plus radiotherapy and correlated the expression levels with patient survival. MAP17 and SGLT1 were expressed in approximately 70% and 50% of cervical tumors of different types, respectively, but they were not expressed in adenoma tumors. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between MAP17 and SGLT1 expression levels. High levels of either MAP17 or SGLT1 correlated with improved patient survival after treatment. However, the patients with high levels of both MAP17 and SGLT1 survived through the end of this study. Therefore, the combination of high MAP17 and SGLT1 levels is a marker for good prognosis in patients with cervical tumors after cisplatin plus radiotherapy treatment. These results also suggest that the use of MAP17 and SGLT1 markers may identify patients who are likely to exhibit a better response to treatments that boost oxidative stress in other cancer types. PMID:23418532

  3. Phase-variable Expression of Lipopolysaccharide Contributes to the Virulence of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Lüneberg, Edeltraud; Zähringer, Ulrich; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Steinmann, Dorothee; Hartmann, Maike; Steinmetz, Ivo; Rohde, Manfred; Köhl, Jörg; Frosch, Matthias

    1998-01-01

    With the aid of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2625, raised against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, subgroup OLDA, we isolated mutant 811 from the virulent wild-type strain RC1. This mutant was not reactive with mAb 2625 and exhibited an unstable phenotype, since we observed an in vitro and in vivo switch of mutant 811 to the mAb 2625–positive phenotype, thus restoring the wild-type LPS. Bactericidal assays revealed that mutant 811 was lysed by serum complement components, whereas the parental strain RC1 was almost serum resistant. Moreover, mutant 811 was not able to replicate intracellularly in macrophage-like cell line HL-60. In the guinea pig animal model, mutant 811 exhibited significantly reduced ability to replicate. Among recovered bacteria, mAb 2625–positive revertants were increased by fourfold. The relevance of LPS phase switch for pathogenesis of Legionella infection was further corroborated by the observation that 5% of the bacteria recovered from the lungs of guinea pigs infected with the wild-type strain RC1 were negative for mAb 2625 binding. These findings strongly indicate that under in vivo conditions switching between two LPS phenotypes occurs and may promote adaptation and replication of L. pneumophila. This is the first description of phase-variable expression of Legionella LPS. PMID:9653083

  4. Chromatophore Activity during Natural Pattern Expression by the Squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana: Contributions of Miniature Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mamiko; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Hiroto; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2011-01-01

    Squid can rapidly change the chromatic patterns on their body. The patterns are created by the expansion and retraction of chromatophores. The chromatophore consists of a central pigment-containing cell surrounded by radial muscles that are controlled by motor neurons located in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study we used semi-intact squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) displaying centrally controlled natural patterns to analyze spatial and temporal activities of chromatophores located on the dorsal mantle skin. We found that chromatophores oscillated with miniature expansions/retractions at various frequencies, even when the chromatic patterns appear macroscopically stable. The frequencies of this miniature oscillation differed between “feature” and “background” areas of chromatic patterns. Higher frequencies occurred in feature areas, whereas lower frequencies were detected in background areas. We also observed synchronization of the oscillation during chromatic pattern expression. The expansion size of chromatophores oscillating at high frequency correlated with the number of synchronized chromatophores but not the oscillation frequency. Miniature oscillations were not observed in denervated chromatophores. These results suggest that miniature oscillations of chromatophores are driven by motor neuronal activities in the CNS and that frequency and synchrony of this oscillation determine the chromatic pattern and the expansion size, respectively. PMID:21483763

  5. The Reduction in Circulating Melatonin Level May Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Wan, Jiayi; Zeng, Ke; Tong, Mancy; Lee, Arier C; Ding, Jinxin; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the third most common gynaecological malignancy. Changes in circadian rhythms such as bright light exposure may affect female reproductive physiology. Night shift work is associated with higher risks of developing gynaecological cancers. In addition, the season of birth is also suggested as an important environmental risk factor for developing gynaecological cancers. Melatonin may play an important role in this association as a marker of circadian rhythms. Serum from 96 women with ovarian cancer and 40 healthy women were collected and the level of melatonin was measured. In addition 277 women with ovarian cancer and 1076 controls were retrospectively collected for season of birth analysis over seven years. The serum levels of melatonin were significantly lower in women with ovarian cancer compared with healthy women (p<0.05). However there was no difference in melatonin levels in perimenopausal and postmenopausal patients. In addition, there is no statistically significant difference in seasonal distribution of birth between ovarian cancer patients and the control group. The melatonin levels in ovarian cancer patients and controls were not associated with the season of birth. Our results demonstrate the lower serum levels of melatonin in ovarian cancer patients which may contribute to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. The incidence of ovarian cancer was not associated with the season of birth. The serum levels of melatonin do not appear to be associated with season of birth in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27162542

  6. Evidence for a substantial West Antarctic ice sheet contribution to meltwater pulses and abrupt global sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Turney, C. S.; Golledge, N. R.; Etheridge, D. M.; Rubino, M.; Thornton, D.; Woodward, J.; Winter, K.; van Ommen, T. D.; Moy, A. D.; Curran, M. A.; Rootes, C.; Rivera, A.; Millman, H.

    2015-12-01

    During the last deglaciation (21,000 to 7,000years ago) global sea level rise was punctuated by several abrupt meltwater spikes triggered by the retreat of ice sheets and glaciers world-wide. However, the debate regarding the relative timing, geographical source and the physical mechanisms driving these rapid increases in sea level has catalyzed debate critical to predicting future sea level rise and climate. Here we present a unique record of West Antarctic Ice Sheet elevation change derived from the Patriot Hills blue ice area, located close to the modern day grounding line of the Institute Ice Stream in the Weddell Sea Embayment. Combined isotopic signatures and gas volume analysis from the ice allows us to develop a record of local ice sheet palaeo-altitude that is assessed against independent regional high-resolution ice sheet modeling studies, allowing us to demonstrate that past ice sheet elevations across this sector of the WSE were considerably higher than those suggested by current terrestrial reconstructions. We argue that ice in the WSE had a significant influence on both pre and post LGM sea level rise including MWP-1A (~14.6 ka) and during MWP-1B (11.7-11.6 ka), reconciling past sea level rise and demonstrating for the first time that this sector of the WAIS made a significant and direct contribution to post LGM sea level rise.

  7. Emotional intelligence and mismatching expressive and verbal messages: a contribution to detection of deception.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Jerzy; Stolarski, Maciej; Matthews, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI). However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test) that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception.

  8. Emotional Intelligence and Mismatching Expressive and Verbal Messages: A Contribution to Detection of Deception

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Jerzy; Stolarski, Maciej; Matthews, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Processing facial emotion, especially mismatches between facial and verbal messages, is believed to be important in the detection of deception. For example, emotional leakage may accompany lying. Individuals with superior emotion perception abilities may then be more adept in detecting deception by identifying mismatch between facial and verbal messages. Two personal factors that may predict such abilities are female gender and high emotional intelligence (EI). However, evidence on the role of gender and EI in detection of deception is mixed. A key issue is that the facial processing skills required to detect deception may not be the same as those required to identify facial emotion. To test this possibility, we developed a novel facial processing task, the FDT (Face Decoding Test) that requires detection of inconsistencies between facial and verbal cues to emotion. We hypothesized that gender and ability EI would be related to performance when cues were inconsistent. We also hypothesized that gender effects would be mediated by EI, because women tend to score as more emotionally intelligent on ability tests. Data were collected from 210 participants. Analyses of the FDT suggested that EI was correlated with superior face decoding in all conditions. We also confirmed the expected gender difference, the superiority of high EI individuals, and the mediation hypothesis. Also, EI was more strongly associated with facial decoding performance in women than in men, implying there may be gender differences in strategies for processing affective cues. It is concluded that integration of emotional and cognitive cues may be a core attribute of EI that contributes to the detection of deception. PMID:24658500

  9. Reduced miR-200b and miR-200c expression contributes to abnormal hepatic lipid accumulation by stimulating JUN expression and activating the transcription of srebp1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Libo; Lu, Yonggang; Dou, Lin; Huang, Xiuqing; Sun, Mingxiao; Pang, Cheng; Qu, Jing; Liu, Guanghui; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that miR-200s participated in IL-6-induced hepatic insulin resistance. However, the role of miR-200s in hepatic lipid accumulation has not been elucidated. Here we found that miR-200b and miR-200c were reduced in the steatotic livers of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. This down-regulation was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic proteins such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). The suppression of miR-200b and miR-200c in Hep1-6 and NCTC1469 hepatocytes enhanced intracellular triglyceride levels, which were associated with increased SREBP-1 and FAS protein levels. In contrast, the over-expression of miR-200b and miR-200c suppressed lipid accumulation and reduced the expression of SREBP1 and FAS in Hep1-6 and NCTC1469 cells transfected with miR-200b or miR-200c mimics. Importantly, the up-regulation of miR-200b and miR-200c could reverse oleic acid/palmitic acid-induced lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. A luciferase reporter assay identified that miR-200b and miR-200c could directly bind the 3′UTR of jun. JUN activated the transcription of srebp1 to increase lipid accumulation. The data also demonstrated that increased miR-200b and miR-200c expression might be associated with sitagliptin-reduced hepatic lipid accumulation in mice fed a HFD. These findings suggest, for the first time, that reduced miR-200b and miR-200c expression contributes to abnormal hepatic lipid accumulation by stimulating JUN expression and activating the transcription of srebp1. PMID:27166182

  10. Expression quantitative trait loci for PAX8 contributes to the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zijun; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Guoxin; Hu, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    Paired-box family member PAX8 encodes a transcription factor that has a role in cell differentiation and cell growth and may participate in the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). By bioinformatics analysis, we identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a newly identified long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) AC016683.6 as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for PAX8. Hence, we hypothesized that PAX8eQTLs in lncRNA AC016683.6 may influence the HCC prognosis. We then performed a case-only study to assess the association between the two SNPs as well as the prognosis of HCC in 331 HBV-positive HCC patients without surgical treatment. Cox proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis with adjustments for the age, gender, smoking status, drinking status, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage, and chemotherapy or TACE (transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization) status. We found that the G allele of rs1110839 and the T allele of rs4848320 in PAX8was significantly associated with a better prognosis compared with the T allele of rs1110839 and the C allele of rs4848320 (adjusted HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.61–0.91, P = 0.004 for rs1110839 and adjusted HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.54–0.94, P = 0.015 for rs4848320 in the additive model). Furthermore, the combined effect of the variant genotypes for these two SNPs was more prominent in patients with the BCLC-C stage orpatients with chemotherapy or TACE. Although the exact biological function remains to be explored, our findings suggest a possible association of PAX8eQTLs in lncRNA AC016683.6 with the HCC prognosis inthe Chinese population. Further large and functional studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:28339471

  11. The contribution of school-level factors to contraceptive use among adolescents in New York city public high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Deborah L.

    Every year approximately 17,000 adolescents ages 15-19 become pregnant in New York City. Most of these pregnancies are unintended and only a small percent of adolescents use effective contraception, with wide disparities by race/ethnicity and poverty level. While many studies have identified factors associated with contraceptive use, most research has focused on individual level factors, with little attention to the contribution of the school environment to sexual risk behavior and contraceptive use. This study investigates the effect of school-level factors on contraceptive use among adolescents in NYC public high schools before and after controlling for individual-level factors, and whether this effect varies with race/ethnicity. Using a cross-sectional design, the NYC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) individual-level datasets for 2007, 2009 and 2011 were linked to a school-level dataset. Variables were selected based on empirical findings on factors associated with sexual behaviors, including contraceptive use, by adolescents. The analytic sample included all YRBS respondents aged 14 or older who reported having sexual intercourse in the past three months and had complete responses to the YRBS questions on contraceptive use at last sex (N=8,054). The chi square test of significance was used to evaluate significant associations between independent variables and contraceptive use in bivariate analyses; variables with a p value < 0.1 were included in the multivariable analyses. Binary and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the strength of the associations of school-level factors with contraceptive use among sexually active adolescents. Findings included that use of any contraception and/or hormonal contraception at last sexual intercourse was associated with attending schools with a higher six-year graduation rate, higher percent of students strongly agreeing they were safe in their classrooms, higher percent of teachers at the

  12. Angiotensin type 1a receptors on corticotropin-releasing factor neurons contribute to the expression of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Hurt, R C; Garrett, J C; Keifer, O P; Linares, A; Couling, L; Speth, R C; Ressler, K J; Marvar, P J

    2015-09-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1a R) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1a R signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1a R gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) ). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) mice exhibit less freezing than wild-type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression-an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1a R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1 R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction.

  13. Effects of porcine oocytes on the expression levels of transcripts encoding glycolytic enzymes in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yuta; Onuma, Asuka; Fujioka, Yoshie A; Emori, Chihiro; Fujii, Wataru; Naito, Kunihiko; Sugiura, Koji

    2016-09-01

    Oocytes play critical roles in regulating the expression of transcripts encoding the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase, platelet (PFKP) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) in granulosa cells in mice, but whether this is the case in pigs or other mammals has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether porcine oocytes regulate the expression levels of these transcripts in granulosa cells in vitro. Porcine cumulus cells expressed higher levels of PFKP and LDHA transcripts than mural granulosa cells (MGCs). However, co-culturing with oocytes had no significant effect on the isolated cumulus cells. While murine oocytes promoted the expression of both Pfkp and Ldha transcripts by murine MGCs, porcine oocytes promoted the expression of only Pfkp, but not Ldha transcripts by murine MGCs. Neither murine nor porcine oocytes affected PFKP and LDHA expression by porcine MGCs. Moreover, in the presence of porcine follicular fluid, porcine oocytes maintained the expression of PFKP, but not LDHA by porcine cumulus cells. Therefore, porcine oocytes are capable of regulating the expression of PFKP but not LDHA in granulosa cells in coordination with unknown factor(s) present in the follicular fluid.

  14. A simple and immediate method for simultaneously evaluating expression level and plasmid maintenance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Jun; Izawa, Keiko; Matsumura, Shizuka; Wakamura, Kanako; Tanino, Takanori; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-06-01

    To allow the comprehensive assessments of yeast expression systems, a simple and immediate method for simultaneously evaluating the expression level and plasmid maintenance in yeast was demonstrated. This method uses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and flow cytometry (FCM) and is characterized by a dual analysis of the average intensity of GFP fluorescence and the population of GFP-expressing cells. The FCM analysis of GFP fluorescence intensity rapidly quantifies the expression level without complex manipulations, such as the enzymatic reaction of a lacZ reporter assay. Moreover, the single-cell analysis revealed that the proportion of cells expressing GFP in the cell cluster reflects the plasmid retention rate; therefore, the FCM analysis of the GFP-expressing population allows the immediate estimation of the plasmid retention rate without the 2- or 3-day incubation required for colony counting. We show that the FCM analysis with GFP reporter is a suitable method to explore the hopeful expression vector and host strain or establish the several expression systems exhibiting the characteristic properties in yeast.

  15. Gene expression and nucleotide composition are associated with genic methylation level in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The methylation of cytosines at CpG dinucleotides, which plays an important role in gene expression regulation, is one of the most studied epigenetic modifications. Thus far, the detection of DNA methylation has been determined mostly by experimental methods, which are not only prone to bench effects and artifacts but are also time-consuming, expensive, and cannot be easily scaled up to many samples. It is therefore useful to develop computational prediction methods for DNA methylation. Our previous studies highlighted the existence of correlations between the GC content of the third codon position (GC3), methylation, and gene expression. We thus designed a model to predict methylation in Oryza sativa based on genomic sequence features and gene expression data. Results We first derive equations to describe the relationship between gene methylation levels, GC3, expression, length, and other gene compositional features. We next assess gene compositional features involving sixmers and their association with methylation levels and other gene level properties. By applying our sixmer-based approach on rice gene expression data we show that it can accurately predict methylation (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = 0.79) for the majority (79%) of the genes. Matlab code with our model is included. Conclusions Gene expression variation can be used as predictors of gene methylation levels. PMID:24447369

  16. DNA Repair Gene Expression Levels as Indicators of Breast Cancer in the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    KAPPIL, MAYA A.; LIAO, YUYAN; TERRY, MARY BETH; SANTELLA, REGINA M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim The expression level of DNA repair-related genes and their association with breast cancer status among participants of the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry was investigated. Materials and Methods RNA from mononuclear cells in 194 sister sets (n=475 women) were assayed for ATM, BRCA1, MSH2, MUTYH and XPC gene expression levels and analyzed using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results Individuals with decreased ATM and MSH2 expression had significantly higher odds for breast cancer compared to individuals with higher levels of expression (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.02, 1.18) and (OR=1.90, 95% CI=1.21, 2.97), respectively. Upon stratifying the GEE model, reductions in ATM and MSH2 expression levels was heightened among women with an extended family history (FH) of breast cancer. Conclusion Reduced expression of ATM and MSH2 compromises DNA repair capacity and, thereby, increases breast cancer prevalence. PMID:27466510

  17. High levels of protein expression using different mammalian CMV promoters in several cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xia, Wei; Bringmann, Peter; McClary, John; Jones, Patrick P; Manzana, Warren; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Soujuan; Liu, Yi; Harvey, Susan; Madlansacay, Mary Rose; McLean, Kirk; Rosser, Mary P; MacRobbie, Jean; Olsen, Catherine L; Cobb, Ronald R

    2006-01-01

    With the recent completion of the human genome sequencing project, scientists are faced with the daunting challenge of deciphering the function of these newly found genes quickly and efficiently. Equally as important is to produce milligram quantities of the therapeutically relevant gene products as quickly as possible. Mammalian expression systems provide many advantages to aid in this task. Mammalian cell lines have the capacity for proper post-translational modifications including proper protein folding and glycosylation. In response to the needs described above, we investigated the protein expression levels driven by the human CMV in the presence or absence of intron A, the mouse and rat CMV promoters with intron A, and the MPSV promoter in plasmid expression vectors. We evaluated the different promoters using an in-house plasmid vector backbone. The protein expression levels of four genes of interest driven by these promoters were evaluated in HEK293EBNA and CHO-K1 cells. Stable and transient transfected cells were utilized. In general, the full-length human CMV, in the presence of intron A, gave the highest levels of protein expression in transient transfections in both cell lines. However, the MPSV promoter resulted in the highest levels of stable protein expression in CHO-K1 cells. Using the CMV driven constitutive promoters in the presence of intron A, we have been able to generate >10 microg/ml of recombinant protein using transient transfections.

  18. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alexander O; DeMaster, Laura K; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Reiss, Peter; O'Doherty, Una; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-11-11

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent genuine HIV RNA but rather chimeric host-HIV readthrough transcripts. Here, we demonstrate that in HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy, such host-derived transcripts do not significantly contribute to the HIV gag RNA level.

  19. Low level of LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction is associated with Th2 polarized differentiation: a contributing factor to the etiology of asthma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaohua; Cui, Zhilei; Gu, Wen; Xu, Weiguo; Guo, Xuejun

    2014-07-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a key adaptor in the T cell receptor (TCR) signaling pathway. The expression of LAT is lower in asthmatic patients than that in healthy people, but there is little knowledge about the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. This study was aimed to determine whether LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction was involved in the development of asthma. It was shown that the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 decreased in the asthmatic mouse model and Th2 cell differentiated CD4(+) T cells. In addition, depleted endogenous PLC-γ1 promoted CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into IL-4-Productor. It was therefore concluded that the low level of LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction was associated with Th2 polarized differentiation, and this may contribute to the etiology of asthma.

  20. Differential Promoter Methylation and Histone Modification Contribute to the Brain Specific Expression of the Mouse Mbu-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byungtak; Kang, Seongeun; Kim, Sun Jung

    2012-01-01

    Mbu-1 (Csrnp-3) is a mouse gene that was identified in our previous study as showing highly restricted expression to the central nervous system. In this study, to elucidate the regulatory mechanism for tissue specificity of the gene, epigenetic approaches that identify the profiles of CpG methylation, as well as histone modifications at the promoter region were conducted. Methylation-specific PCR revealed that the CpG sites in brain tissues from embryo to adult stages showed virtually no methylation (0.052–0.67%). Lung (9.0%) and pancreas (3.0%) also showed lower levels. Other tissues such as liver, kidney, and heart showed much higher methylation levels ranging from approximately 39–93%. Treatment of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC) significantly decreased promoter methylation, reactivating Mbu-1 expression in NG108-15 and Neuro-2a neuronal cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that 5-Aza-dC decreased levels of acetylated H3K9 and methylated H3K4, and increased methylated H3K9. This result indicates that CpG methylation converses with histone modifications in an opposing sense of regulating Mbu-1 expression. PMID:23076708

  1. Plastid-expressed 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase genes provide high level glyphosate tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ye, G N; Hajdukiewicz, P T; Broyles, D; Rodriguez, D; Xu, C W; Nehra, N; Staub, J M

    2001-02-01

    Plastid transformation (transplastomic) technology has several potential advantages for biotechnological applications including the use of unmodified prokaryotic genes for engineering, potential high-level gene expression and gene containment due to maternal inheritance in most crop plants. However, the efficacy of a plastid-encoded trait may change depending on plastid number and tissue type. We report a feasibility study in tobacco plastids to achieve high-level herbicide resistance in both vegetative tissues and reproductive organs. We chose to test glyphosate resistance via over-expression in plastids of tolerant forms of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Immunological, enzymatic and whole-plant assays were used to prove the efficacy of three different prokaryotic (Achromobacter, Agrobacterium and Bacillus) EPSPS genes. Using the Agrobacterium strain CP4 EPSPS as a model we identified translational control sequences that direct a 10,000-fold range of protein accumulation (to >10% total soluble protein in leaves). Plastid-expressed EPSPS could provide very high levels of glyphosate resistance, although levels of resistance in vegetative and reproductive tissues differed depending on EPSPS accumulation levels, and correlated to the plastid abundance in these tissues. Paradoxically, higher levels of plastid-expressed EPSPS protein accumulation were apparently required for efficacy than from a similar nuclear-encoded gene. Nevertheless, the demonstration of high-level glyphosate tolerance in vegetative and reproductive organs using transplastomic technology provides a necessary step for transfer of this technology to other crop species.

  2. Contribution of power and desalination plants to the levels of volatile liquid hydrocarbons in the nearby coastal areas of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, T.; Khordagui, H.; Al-Hashash, H.

    1999-07-01

    The levels and distribution of volatile liquid hydrocarbons (VLHs) were determined in Kuwait`s coastal areas in the vicinity of outlets of power and desalination plants. About 230 samples were collected from the selected sampling locations over the 4 seasons. The VLHs in the samples were analyzed using Grob`s closed-loop stripping technique and GC with FID and confirmed by GC/MS. The results showed that significant levels of VLHs were present. The levels ranged from 307 to 6,500 ng/L and from 2,880 to 7,811 ng/L in Kuwait Bay and Sulaibekhat Bay, respectively. The annual average for VLHs near Al-Zor power plant ranged from 465 to 4,665 ng/L. Benzenoids formed the bulk (about 80%) of the VLHs present. Comparison with the levels in the outlets indicated that Doha West power plant contributed much higher levels of VLHs to the coastal areas than Al-Zor plant.

  3. Low Expression of CAPON in Glioma Contributes to Cell Proliferation via the Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shangfeng; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Guangping; Jin, Lei; Ji, Daofei; Wang, Peng; Meng, Qingming; Zhu, Yufu; Yu, Rutong

    2016-01-01

    CAPON is an adapter protein for nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1). CAPON has two isoforms in the human brain: CAPON-L (long form of CAPON) and CAPON-S (short form of CAPON). Recent studies have indicated the involvement of CAPON in tumorigenesis beyond its classical role in NOS1 activity regulation. In this study, we found that the protein levels of CAPON-S, but not than CAPON-L, were significantly decreased in glioma tissues. Therefore, we established lentivirus-mediated stable cell lines with CAPON-S overexpression or down-regulation, and investigated the role of CAPON-S in the proliferation of glioma cells by using CCK8, EdU, and flow cytometry assays. Overexpression of CAPON-S reduced the cell variability and the percentage of EdU-positive cells, and arrested the cells in the G1 phase in glioma cells. Silencing of CAPON by short-hairpin RNA showed the opposite effects. Furthermore, an intracellular signaling array revealed that overexpression of CAPON-S resulted in a remarkable reduction in the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein in glioma cells, which was further confirmed by Western blot. These findings suggest that CAPON may function as a tumor suppressor in human brain glioma and that the inactivation of the Akt signaling pathway caused by CAPON-S overexpression may provide insight into the underlying mechanism of CAPON in glioma cell proliferation. PMID:27869735

  4. OTX2 expression contributes to proliferation and progression in Myc-amplified medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yining; Labak, Collin M; Jain, Neha; Purvis, Ian J; Guda, Maheedhara R; Bach, Sarah E; Tsung, Andrew J; Asuthkar, Swapna; Velpula, Kiran K

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is one of the most prevalent pediatric brain malignancies, accounting for approximately 20% of all primary CNS tumors in children under the age of 19. OTX2 is the member of a highly conserved family of bicoid-like homeodomain transcription factors responsible for the regulation of cerebellar development and of current investigational interest in the tumorigenesis of medulloblastoma. Recent studies have revealed that Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastomas show marked overexpression of OTX2 with a concurrent amplification of the MYC and MYCN oncogenes, respectively, correlating with anaplasticity and unfavorable patient outcomes. More recent attempts at elucidating the mechanism of OTX2-driven oncogenesis at the cellular level has also revealed that OTX2 may confer stem-cell like properties to tumor cells via epigenetic regulation. The review seeks to define the interaction pathways and binding partners involved in OTX2 function, its usefulness as a molecular marker for risk stratification and prognosis, and the mechanism by which it drives tumor maintenance. Additionally, it will preview unpublished data by our group highlighting the unanticipated involvement of OTX2 in the control of cellular metabolism.

  5. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of NR2B Contributes to Chronic Migraines via Increased Expression of CGRP in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiping; Wang, Sha; Qin, Guangcheng; Xie, Jingmei; Tan, Ge; Zhou, Jiying; McBride, Devin W.

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B (NR2B-pTyr), a subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, has been reported to develop central sensitization and persistent pain in the spine, but its effect in chronic migraines has not been examined. We hypothesized that tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B contributes to chronic migraines (CM) through calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in rats. Ninety-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to seven inflammatory soup (IS) injections. In a subset of animals, the time course and location of NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation were detected by western blot and immunofluorescence double staining. Another set of animals were given either genistein, vehicle, or genistein and recombinant CGRP. The mechanical threshold was measured, the expressions of NR2B-pTyr, NR2B, and CGRP were quantified using western blot, and nitric oxide (NO) was measured with the nitric acid reductase method. NR2B-pTyr expression, in neurons, peaked at 24 hours after CM. Genistein improved the mechanical threshold and reduced migraine attacks 24 and 72 hours after CM. Tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B decreased the mechanical threshold and increased migraine attacks via upregulated CGRP expression in the rat model of CM. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B may be a potential therapeutic target for treatment of CM. PMID:28393079

  6. Parvalbumin-Expressing GABAergic Neurons in Mouse Barrel Cortex Contribute to Gating a Goal-Directed Sensorimotor Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Sachidhanandam, Shankar; Sermet, B. Semihcan; Petersen, Carl C.H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sensory processing in neocortex is primarily driven by glutamatergic excitation, which is counterbalanced by GABAergic inhibition, mediated by a diversity of largely local inhibitory interneurons. Here, we trained mice to lick a reward spout in response to whisker deflection, and we recorded from genetically defined GABAergic inhibitory neurons in layer 2/3 of the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Parvalbumin-expressing (PV), vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing (VIP), and somatostatin-expressing (SST) neurons displayed distinct action potential firing dynamics during task performance. Whereas SST neurons fired at low rates, both PV and VIP neurons fired at high rates both spontaneously and in response to whisker stimulation. After an initial outcome-invariant early sensory response, PV neurons had lower firing rates in hit trials compared to miss trials. Optogenetic inhibition of PV neurons during this time period enhanced behavioral performance. Hence, PV neuron activity might contribute causally to gating the sensorimotor transformation of a whisker sensory stimulus into licking motor output. PMID:27149853

  7. Exercise combined with low-level GABAA receptor inhibition up-regulates the expression of neurotrophins in the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuma; Maejima, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Gaku; Mani, Hiroki; Asaka, Tadayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrophins play a crucial role in neuroplasticity, neurogenesis, and neuroprotection in the central nervous system. Aerobic exercise is known to increase the expression of BDNF in the cerebral cortex. Several animal studies have evaluated the tonic inhibition of GABAergic synapses to enhance hippocampal plasticity as well as learning and memory, whereas the effects of GABAergic inhibition on plasticity in the cerebral cortex related to motor learning are not well characterized. The objective of the present study was to examine the interactive effect of low-level GABAA receptor inhibition and exercise on the expression of neurotrophins including BDNF in the murine motor cortex. ICR mice were randomly distributed among 4 groups based on two factors of GABAA receptor inhibition and exercise, i.e. control group, an exercise group, a bicuculline group, and an exercise plus bicuculline group. We administered GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline intraperitoneally to the mice (bicuculline and exercise plus bicuculline group) at a non-epileptic dose of 0.25mg/kg, whereas the mice (exercise and exercise plus bicuculline group) were exercised on a treadmill for 1h every day. After two week intervention, the expression of mRNA and protein abundance of neurotrophins in the motor cortex was assayed using Real time PCR and ELISA. BDNF gene expression was significantly increased by approximately 3-fold in the bicuculline group relative to the control, exercise, and bicuculline plus exercise groups. Protein abundance of BDNF expression was significantly increased by approximately 3-fold in the bicuculline plus exercise group relative to other groups. Therefore, the present study revealed that combined GABAA receptor inhibition and moderate aerobic exercise up-regulated BDNF protein expression in the motor cortex without producing side effects on motor or cognitive functions. Alterations in BDNF expression could positively contribute to plasticity by regulating the balance

  8. Expression of FGF23 is correlated with serum phosphate level in isolated fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keisuke; Imanishi, Yasuo; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Wakasa, Kenichi; Kawata, Takehisa; Goto, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Koyano, Hajime M; Mochizuki, Ryuichi; Miki, Takami; Inaba, Masaaki; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-04-11

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) patients sometimes suffer from concomitant hypophosphatemic rickets/osteomalacia, resulting from renal phosphate wasting. It was recently reported that FD tissue in the patients with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) expressed fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), which is now known to be as a pathogenic phosphaturic factor in patients with oncogenic osteomalacia and X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Since it remains controversial whether serum phosphate levels are influenced by FGF23 expressions in FD tissue, isolated FD patients without MAS syndrome were examined for the relationship between FGF23 expressions, circulating levels of FGF-23 and phosphate to negate the effects of MAS-associated endocrine abnormalities on serum phosphate. Eighteen paraffin embedded FD tissues and 2 frozen tissues were obtained for the study. Sixteen of 18 isolated FD tissues were successfully analyzed GNAS gene, which exhibited activated mutations observed in MAS. Eight of 16 FD tissues, which exhibited GNAS mutations, revealed positive staining for FGF-23. These evidence indicate that postzygotic activated mutations of GNAS is necessary for the FD tissue formation by mosaic distribution of mutated osteogenic cell lineage, but is not sufficient to elevate FGF23 expression causing generalized osteomalacia with severe renal phosphate wasting. The expression level of FGF23 in isolated FD tissue with hypophosphatemic osteomalacia determined by real-time PCR was abundant close to the levels in OOM tumors. Osteoblasts/osteocytes in woven bone were predominant source of circulating FGF-23 in FD tissues by immunohistochemistry. A negative correlation of the intensity of FGF-23 staining with serum inorganic phosphate levels indicated that the expression of FGF23 in focal FD tissues could be a prominent determinant of serum phosphate levels in isolated FD patient. These data provide novel insights into the regulatory mechanism of serum inorganic phosphate levels in

  9. The human phenolsulphotransferase polymorphism is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A L; Roberts, R C; Coughtrie, M W

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the expression of platelet phenolsulphotransferase (PST) in 60 individuals. Using an antibody which recognizes both forms of PST present in man (P-PST and M-PST), we determined that the polymorphism of platelet P-PST activity is determined by the level of expression of the enzyme protein. The implications for susceptibility to adverse drug reactions and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8257413

  10. Higher-order JWKB expressions for the energy levels and the wavefunction at the origin

    SciTech Connect

    Pasupathy, J.; Singh, V.

    1980-09-01

    An exact quantization condition is derived for the energy levels of a particle in a radial potential assumed finite at the origin. This is used to derive corrections to the semiclassical JWKB quantization condition. The normalization integral of the wavefunction is further related to the energy derivative of wavefunction at origin and use this expression to derive the corrections to the semiclassical JWKB expressions for the wavefunction at origin. An application to upsilon leptonic decay width is also given.

  11. An efficient plasmid vector for constitutive high-level expression of foreign genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-kyung; Rairakhwada, Dina; Seo, Pil-Soo; Choi, Min Ho; Song, Ki-Bang; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Kim, Chul Ho

    2009-06-01

    The levansucrase gene (lsrA) from Rahnella aquatilis was strongly expressed in a constitutive manner in Escherichia coli when cloned into a pBluescript KS-based pRL1CP plasmid vector. The native promoter upstream of lsrA and the lacZ promoter cooperatively enhanced the expression of lsrA to a level that was comparable to that of the T7 promoter, which is used in commercial pET expression vector system. A putative rho-independent transcription termination signal downstream of lsrA was crucial for gene expression. This plasmid vector also proved to be applicable for efficient expression of other foreign genes in E. coli.

  12. Opioid analgesics and P-glycoprotein efflux transporters: a potential systems-level contribution to analgesic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Susan L; Coop, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic clinical pain remains poorly treated. Despite attempts to develop novel analgesic agents, opioids remain the standard analgesics of choice in the clinical management of chronic and severe pain. However, mu opioid analgesics have undesired side effects including, but not limited to, respiratory depression, physical dependence and tolerance. A growing body of evidence suggests that P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter, may contribute a systems-level approach to the development of opioid tolerance. Herein, we describe current in vitro and in vivo methodology available to analyze interactions between opioids and P-gp and critically analyze P-gp data associated with six commonly used mu opioids to include morphine, methadone, loperamide, meperidine, oxycodone, and fentanyl. Recent studies focused on the development of opioids lacking P-gp substrate activity are explored, concentrating on structure-activity relationships to develop an optimal opioid analgesic lacking this systems-level contribution to tolerance development. Continued work in this area will potentially allow for delineation of the mechanism responsible for opioid-related P-gp up-regulation and provide further support for evidence based medicine supporting clinical opioid rotation.

  13. Trends of road dust emissions contributions on ambient PM levels at rural, urban and industrial sites in Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, F.; Alastuey, A.; de la Rosa, J.; González Castanedo, Y.; Sánchez de la Campa, A. M.; Pandolfi, M.; Lozano, A.; Contreras González, J.; Querol, X.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of road dust emissions on PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentrations recorded from 2003 to 2010 at 11 locations (rural, urban and industrial) in Southern Spain was estimated based on the chemical characterization of PM and a the use of a constrained Positive Matrix Factorization, where the chemical profile of local road dust samples is used as a priori knowledge. Results indicate that road dust emissions increased PM10 levels on average by 21-35% at traffic sites, 29-34% at urban background sites, 17-22% at urban-industrial sites and 9-22% at rural sites. Road dust contributions to ambient PM levels show a marked seasonality with maxima in summer and minima in winter, likely due to the rainfall frequency. Decreasing concentrations trends over the sampling years where found at some traffic and urban sites but in most cases less significant than for vehicle exhaust emissions, while concentrations increased at industrial sites, probably due to local peculiarities. Concerning PM2.5, road dust contributions were lower than in PM10 as expected, but still important (21-31%, 11-31%, 6-16% and 7% for traffic, urban background, urban-industrial and rural sites respectively). In addition the three main sources of road dust (carbonaceous particles, brake wear and road wear/mineral) were identified and their contributions to road dust mass loadings estimated, supporting air quality managers to drive measures aimed at preventing the build-up of road dust particles on roads.

  14. Trends of road dust emissions contributions on ambient air particulate levels at rural, urban and industrial sites in southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, F.; Alastuey, A.; de la Rosa, J.; Sánchez de la Campa, A. M.; Pandolfi, M.; Lozano, A.; Contreras González, J.; Querol, X.

    2014-04-01

    The impact of road dust emissions on PM10 and PM2.5 (atmospheric particulate matter with diameteer < 10 μm and 2.5 μm mass concentrations recorded from 2003 to 2010 at 11 locations (rural, urban and industrial) in southern Spain was estimated based on the chemical characterization of PM and the use of a constrained Positive Matrix Factorization, where the chemical profile of local road dust samples is used as a priori knowledge. Results indicate that road dust increased PM10 levels on average by 21-35% at traffic sites, 29-34% at urban background sites heavily affected by road traffic emissions, 17-22% at urban-industrial sites and 9-22% at rural sites. Road dust contributions to ambient PM levels show a marked seasonality with maxima in summer and minima in winter, likely due to the rainfall frequency. Decreasing concentration trends over the sampling years were found at some traffic and urban sites but in most cases the decreases were less significant than for vehicle exhaust emissions, while concentrations increased at industrial sites, probably due to local peculiarities. Concerning PM2.5, road dust contributions were lower than in PM10, as expected but still important (21-31%, 11-31%, 6-16% and 7% for traffic, urban background, urban-industrial and rural sites, respectively). In addition the three main sources of road dust (carbonaceous particles, brake wear and road wear/mineral) were identified and their contributions to road dust mass loadings estimated, supporting the idea that air quality managers should drive measures aimed at preventing the build-up of road dust particles on roads.

  15. Hedgehog pathway dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of human gastrointestinal stromal tumors via GLI-mediated activation of KIT expression

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Adam M.; Leonard, Stephanie Y.; Gao, Fei; Chan, Jonathan C.; Shi, Eileen; Chmielecki, Juliann; Morosini, Deborah; Wang, Kai; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Kendrick, Michael L.; Bardsley, Michael R.; De Siena, Martina; Mao, Junhao; Harismendy, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) arise within the interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC) lineage due to activating KIT/PDGFRA mutations. Both ICC and GIST possess primary cilia (PC), which coordinate PDGFRA and Hedgehog signaling, regulators of gastrointestinal mesenchymal development. Therefore, we hypothesized that Hedgehog signaling may be altered in human GIST and controls KIT expression. Quantitative RT-PCR, microarrays, and next generation sequencing were used to describe Hedgehog/PC-related genes in purified human ICC and GIST. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches were employed to investigate the effects of GLI manipulation on KIT expression and GIST cell viability. We report that Hedgehog pathway and PC components are expressed in ICC and GIST and subject to dysregulation during GIST oncogenesis, irrespective of KIT/PDGFRA mutation status. Using genomic profiling, 10.2% of 186 GIST studied had potentially deleterious genomic alterations in 5 Hedgehog-related genes analyzed, including in the PTCH1 tumor suppressor (1.6%). Expression of the predominantly repressive GLI isoform, GLI3, was inversely correlated with KIT mRNA levels in GIST cells and non-KIT/non-PDGFRA mutant GIST. Overexpression of the 83-kDa repressive form of GLI3 or small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the activating isoforms GLI1/2 reduced KIT mRNA. Treatment with GLI1/2 inhibitors, including arsenic trioxide, significantly increased GLI3 binding to the KIT promoter, decreased KIT expression, and reduced viability in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST cells. These data offer new evidence that genes necessary for Hedgehog signaling and PC function in ICC are dysregulated in GIST. Hedgehog signaling activates KIT expression irrespective of mutation status, offering a novel approach to treat imatinib-resistant GIST. PMID:27793025

  16. Stable Plastid Transformation for High-Level Recombinant Protein Expression: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Xianfeng; Long, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Plants are a promising expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of whole plant and plant cell bioproduction platform. Plastid genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgenic expression, transgenic containment via maternal inheritance, and multigene expression in a single transformation event. In recent years, the development of optimized expression strategies has given a huge boost to the exploitation of plastids in molecular farming. The driving forces behind the high expression level of plastid bioreactors include codon optimization, promoters and UTRs, genotypic modifications, endogenous enhancer and regulatory elements, posttranslational modification, and proteolysis. Exciting progress of the high expression level has been made with the plastid-based production of two particularly important classes of pharmaceuticals: vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, and antibiotics and enzymes. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include low transformation frequencies, the formation of inclusion bodies, and purification of recombinant proteins will also be discussed. PMID:23093835

  17. Probe-Level Analysis of Expression Microarrays Characterizes Isoform-Specific Degradation during Mouse Oocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Jesse; Hutchison, Keith W.; Wigglesworth, Karen; Eppig, John J.; Graber, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression microarrays have provided many insights into changes in gene expression patterns between different tissue types, developmental stages, and disease states. Analyses of these data focused primarily measuring the relative abundance of transcripts of a gene, while treating most or all transcript isoforms as equivalent. Differences in the selection between transcript isoforms can, however, represent critical changes to either the protein product or the posttranscriptional regulation of the transcript. Novel analyses on existing microarray data provide fresh insights and new interpretations into transcriptome-wide changes in expression. Methodology A probe-level analysis of existing gene expression arrays revealed differences in mRNA processing, primarily affecting the 3′-untranslated region. Working with the example of microarrays drawn from a transcriptionally silent period of mouse oocyte development, probe-level analysis (implemented here as rmodel) identified genes whose transcript isoforms have differing stabilities. Comparison of micorarrays measuring cDNA generated from oligo-dT and random primers revealed further differences in the polyadenylation status of some transcripts. Additional analysis provided evidence for sequence-targeted cleavage, including putative targeting sequences, as one mechanism of degradation for several hundred transcripts in the maturing oocyte. Conclusions The capability of probe-level analysis to elicit novel findings from existing expression microarray data was demonstrated. The characterization of differences in stability between transcript isoforms in maturing mouse oocytes provided some mechanistic details of degradation. Similar analysis of existing archives of expression microarray data will likely provide similar discoveries. PMID:19834616

  18. Effects of dietary roughage levels on the expression of adipogenic transcription factors in Wagyu steers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Kawakami, S-I; Nakanishi, N

    2009-12-01

    We hypothesized that dietary roughage level would alter the expression levels of adipogenic transcription factors in adipose tissue of Japanese black (Wagyu) steers. Steers were fed whole crop rice silage at three levels: (1) high-roughage feeding group, fed 8kg silage and 5kg concentrate (HR); (2) middle roughage feeding group, fed 5kg silage and 6kg concentrate (MR); and (3) low roughage feeding group, fed 2kg silage and 7kg concentrate (LR) from 22 to 30months of age. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, there were no significant differences in the expression of the adipogenic transcription factors and adipocyte size among feeding groups. In mesenteric adipose tissue, the expression of C/EBPα in the LR and MR groups was significantly higher than that in the HR group. Adipocyte size in the mesenteric adipose tissue of the LR group was significantly larger than that of the HR group. In intermuscular adipose tissue, the expression of C/EBPβ-LAP in the LR group was significantly higher than that in the HR group, and the expression of C/EBPβ-LIP in the LR and MR groups was significantly higher than that in the HR group. Adipocyte size in the intermuscular adipose tissue of the LR and MR groups was significantly smaller than that of the HR group. These results suggest that dietary roughage revel affects the adipose tissue depot-specific differences in C/EBP family expression pattern and adipocyte cellularity in Wagyu steers.

  19. Expression of fas protein on CD4+T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on the Expression of Fas protein on CD4+ T cells irradiated by low level He-Ne laser in the cases of psoriasis. Methods:the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was determined in the casee of psoriasis(n=5) pre and post-low level laser irradiation(30 min、60min and 120min)by flow cytometry as compared withthe control(n=5). Results:In the cases of psoriasis,the expression of CD4+T FAS protein 21.4+/-3.1% was increased significantly than that of control group 16.8+/-2.1% pre-irradiation, p<0.05in the control,there is no difference between pre and post- irradiation,p>0.05in the cases , the expression of CD4+T Fas protein wae positively corelated to the irradiation times, when the energy density arrived to 22.92J/cm2(60 minutes)and 45.84J/cm2(120minutes), the expression of CD4+ T Fas protein was increased significantly as compared with pre-irradiation,p<0.05.Conclusion: The expression of CD4+T Fas protein may be increased by low level He-Ne laser irradiation ,the uncontrolled status of apoptosis could be corrected.

  20. Tissue Specific Expression Levels of Apoptosis Involved Genes Have Correlations with Codon and Amino Acid Usage

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Iman; Salavaty, Abbas; Nasiri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Different mechanisms, including transcriptional and post transcriptional processes, regulate tissue specific expression of genes. In this study, we report differences in gene/protein compositional features between apoptosis involved genes selectively expressed in human tissues. We found some correlations between codon/amino acid usage and tissue specific expression level of genes. The findings can be significant for understanding the translational selection on these features. The selection may play an important role in the differentiation of human tissues and can be considered for future studies in diagnosis of some diseases such as cancer. PMID:28154517

  1. Protein pheromone expression levels predict and respond to the formation of social dominance networks

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Adam C.; Cunningham, Christopher B.; Ruff, James S.; Potts, Wayne K.

    2015-01-01

    Communication signals are key regulators of social networks, and are thought to be under selective pressure to honestly reflect social status, including dominance status. The odors of dominants and nondominants differentially influence behavior, and identification of the specific pheromones associated with, and predictive of, dominance status is essential for understanding the mechanisms of network formation and maintenance. In mice, major urinary proteins (MUPs) are excreted in extraordinary large quantities and expression level has been hypothesized to provide an honest signal of dominance status. Here, we evaluate whether MUPs are associated with dominance in wild-derived mice by analyzing expression levels before, during, and after competition for reproductive resources over three days. During competition, dominant males have 24% greater urinary MUP expression than nondominants. The MUP darcin, a pheromone that stimulates female attraction, is predictive of dominance status: dominant males have higher darcin expression before competition. Dominants also have a higher ratio of darcin to other MUPs before and during competition. These differences appear transient, because there are no differences in MUPs or darcin after competition. We also find MUP expression is affected by sire dominance status: socially naive sons of dominant males have lower MUP expression, but this apparent repression is released during competition. A requisite condition for the evolution of communication signals is honesty, and we provide novel insight into pheromones and social networks by showing that MUP and darcin expression is a reliable signal of dominance status, a primary determinant of male fitness in many species. PMID:25867293

  2. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin.

  3. Decreased Expression of MiRNA-204-5p Contributes to Glioma Progression and Promotes Glioma Cell Growth, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults and exhibit a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Although increasing evidence indicated that the deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to tumorigenesis and invasion, little is known about the roles of miR-204-5p in human gliomas. In the present study, the expression of miR-204-5p in clinical glioma tissues was measured by qRT-PCR. The effects of miR-204-5p on glioma cell growth and metastasis were examined by overexpressing or inhibiting miR-204-5p. We found that the expression level of miR-204-5p was significantly reduced in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. Moreover, we revealed that the introduction of miR-204-5p dramatically suppressed glioma cell growth, migration and invasion. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that RAB22A, a member of the RAS oncogene family, is a direct functional target of miR-204-5p in gliomas. In vivo, restoring miR-204-5p expression in glioma cells suppressed tumorigenesis and increased overall host survival. Our findings suggest that miR-204-5p is a cancer suppressor miRNA and overexpression of miR-204-5p is a novel glioma treatment strategy. PMID:26134825

  4. Identification of Inflammatory, Metabolic, and Cell Survival Pathways Contributing to Cerebral Small Vessel Disease by Postmortem Gene Expression Microarray.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Marie-Françoise; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Tolnay, Markus; Fluri, Felix; Bonati, Leo H; Traenka, Christopher; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Peters, Nils; Engelter, Stefan Thomas; Lyrer, Philippe Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD) is characterized by periventricular white matter (WM) changes and general brain atrophy. SVD is prevalent in elderly individuals and is frequently associated with the development of vascular dementia (VaD). Studies of the molecular basis of SVD are sparse. We have to gain further insight into the pathogenic mechanisms of SVD. Therefore, we compared gene expression patterns in the brains of SVD and control patients, in order to identify cellular pathways changed in diseased brains. We compared the expression of mRNA transcripts in postmortem, macroscopically normal-appearing human brain tissues isolated from frontal, temporal and occipital cortical and subcortical regions in 5 SVD and 5 non-SVD control patients. Significant expression changes were determined by fold change F>1.2 in either direction, and p<0.05. We identified 228 genes differentially expressed in cortex (89 up-, 139 down-regulated) and 555 genes in WM (223 up-, 332 down-regulated) in SVD patients. Pathway analyses revealed that upregulated genes were associated with inflammation and apoptosis in WM, suggesting active cell death. Downregulated genes were associated with coagulation and fatty and amino acids metabolisms. In the cortex, down-regulated genes were principally associated with neuronal functions. Our data revealed widespread changes in the transcriptome profiles in the cortex and WM of human SVD brains, with a predominance of changes in WM. We provide for the first time a comprehensive view of the molecular alterations in human SVD brains that seem to contribute to the neuropathogenesis of SVD.

  5. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  6. Effects of phased joint intervention on Rho/ROCK expression levels in patients with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wen-Ying; Wang, Na; Wang, Ting; Wang, Yu-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of phased joint intervention on clinical efficacy and Rho/Rho-associated coil protein kinase (ROCK) expression in patients with portal hypertension complicated by esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) and hypersplenism. Patients with portal hypertension (n=53) caused by liver cirrhosis complicated by EVB and hypersplenism treated with phased joint intervention were assessed, and portal hemodynamics, blood, liver function, complications, and rebleeding incidence were analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells prior to and following phased joint intervention, and western blotting was employed to determine the protein expression levels of Rho, ROCK1, ROCK2, phosphorylated (p) myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) and total-MYPT1. All patients underwent an emergency assessment of hemostasis with a 100% success rate. Varicose veins were alleviated, and portal hemodynamics and liver function improved following intervention. Furthermore, preoperative and postoperative expression levels of Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 mRNA were higher compared with the control group. Notably, the mRNA expression levels of Rho, ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the postoperative group were significantly lower when compared with the preoperative group. Protein expression levels of Rho, ROCK1, ROCK2 and pMYPT1 in the postoperative group were lower, as compared with the preoperative group. Concentration levels of transforming growth factor-β1, connective tissue growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor in peripheral blood were significantly reduced following phased joint intervention. Therefore, the present findings demonstrated that phased joint intervention is able to effectively treat EVB and hypersplenism, and improve liver function. The efficacy of phased joint intervention may be associated with its role in the regulation of the

  7. Elevated Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 not Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Contributes to Progression of Extracranial Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Zhang, Haihong; Cetin, Neslihan; Miller, Emily; Moak, Teri; Suen, James Y.; Richter, Gresham T.

    2016-01-01

    Extracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare but dangerous congenital lesions arising from direct arterial-venous shunts without intervening capillaries. Progressive infiltration, expansion, and soft tissue destruction lead to bleeding, pain, debilitation and disfigurement. The pathophysiology of AVMs is not well understood. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are thought to play an important role in pathologic processes underlying many diseases. This study investigates the expression of MMP-9 and MMP-2 in aggressive extracranial AVMs. The differential expression of MMP-9 and its regulatory factors is also examined. Herein we demonstrate that mRNA and protein expressions of MMP-9, but not MMP-2, are significantly higher in AVM tissues compared to normal tissues. The serum level of MMP-9, but not MMP-2, is also elevated in AVM patients compared to healthy controls. MMP-9/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) complex is also significantly increased in AVM tissues. The MMP-9/ tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) complex presents as a major form detected in normal tissues. The increased and aberrant expression of MMP-9 and specific MMP-9 forms may help explain the constitutive vascular remodeling and infiltrative nature of these lesions. Specific MMP-9 inhibitors would be a promising treatment for AVMs. PMID:27075045

  8. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Narum, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis. PMID:25943341

  9. Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors on Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Neurons Contribute to the Expression of Conditioned Fear

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Robert C.; Garrett, Jacob C.; Keifer, Orion P.; Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena; Speth, Robert C.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Marvar, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1aR) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1aR signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1aR gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1aR(−/−)). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety, and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1aR(−/−) mice exhibit less freezing than wild type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression—an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction. PMID:26257395

  10. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Michael R; Thorgaard, Gary H; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-05-04

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis.

  11. Differences in codon bias and GC content contribute to the balanced expression of TLR7 and TLR9

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Zachary R.; Young, Janet M.; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Barton, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system detects diverse microbial species with a limited repertoire of immune receptors that recognize nucleic acids. The cost of this immune surveillance strategy is the potential for inappropriate recognition of self-derived nucleic acids and subsequent autoimmune disease. The relative expression of two closely related receptors, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 and TLR9, is balanced to allow recognition of microbial nucleic acids while limiting recognition of self-derived nucleic acids. Situations that tilt this balance toward TLR7 promote inappropriate responses, including autoimmunity; therefore, tight control of expression is critical for proper homeostasis. Here we report that differences in codon bias limit TLR7 expression relative to TLR9. Codon optimization of Tlr7 increases protein levels as well as responses to ligands, but, unexpectedly, these changes only modestly affect translation. Instead, we find that much of the benefit attributed to codon optimization is actually the result of enhanced transcription. Our findings, together with other recent examples, challenge the dogma that codon optimization primarily increases translation. We propose that suboptimal codon bias, which correlates with low guanine-cytosine (GC) content, limits transcription of certain genes. This mechanism may establish low levels of proteins whose overexpression leads to particularly deleterious effects, such as TLR7. PMID:26903634

  12. Chronic hypoxia-induced acid-sensitive ion channel expression in chemoafferent neurons contributes to chemoreceptor hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X.; He, L.; Fidone, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that chronic hypoxia (CH) induces an inflammatory condition characterized by immune cell invasion and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines in rat carotid body. It is well established that chronic inflammatory pain induces the expression of acid-sensitive ion channels (ASIC) in primary sensory neurons, where they contribute to hyperalgesia and allodynia. The present study examines the effect of CH on ASIC expression in petrosal ganglion (PG), which contains chemoafferent neurons that innervate oxygen-sensitive type I cells in the carotid body. Five isoforms of ASIC transcript were increased ∼1.5–2.5-fold in PG following exposure of rats to 1, 3, or 7 days of hypobaric hypoxia (380 Torr). ASIC transcript was not increased in the sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG). In the PG, CH also increased the expression of channel-interacting PDZ domain protein, a scaffolding protein known to enhance the surface expression and the low pH-induced current density mediated by ASIC3. Western immunoblot analysis showed that CH elevated ASIC3 protein in PG, but not in SCG or the (sensory) nodose ganglion. ASIC3 transcript was likewise elevated in PG neurons cultured in the presence of inflammatory cytokines. Increased ASIC expression was blocked in CH rats concurrently treated with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen (4 mg·kg−1·day−1). Electrophysiological recording of carotid sinus nerve (CSN) activity in vitro showed that the specific ASIC antagonist A-317567 (100 μM) did not significantly alter hypoxia-evoked activity in normal preparations but blocked ∼50% of the hypoxic response following CH. Likewise, a high concentration of ibuprofen, which is known to block ASIC1a, reduced hypoxia-evoked CSN activity by ∼50% in CH preparations. Our findings indicate that CH induces inflammation-dependent phenotypic adjustments in chemoafferent neurons. Following CH, ASIC are important participants in chemotransmission

  13. High VEGFR1/2 expression levels are predictors of poor survival in patients with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yun-Zhi; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jian-Ping; Hu, Jing; Li, Wei-Wei; Li, Pei; Wei, Li-Chun; Shi, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study to evaluate the prognostic significance of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (VEGFR1/2) expression levels and to correlate these levels with clinicopathological parameters in patients with cervical cancer. Forty-two patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIB–IVB cervical cancer were analyzed between January 2011 and December 2012. RNA expression levels of VEGFR1/2 were assessed by branched DNA-liquidchip technology and immunohistochemistry. Associations between RNA expression levels, important clinicopathological parameters, and patient survival were statistically evaluated. Higher VEGFR1/2 expression levels were predictive of poor overall survival (P = 0.009 and P = 0.024, respectively). Patients with higher VEGFR1 expression levels were associated with poorer progression-free survival than those with lower VEGFR1 expression levels (P = 0.043). In addition, patients with higher VEGFR1 expression levels were more likely to develop distant metastases than those with lower VEGFR1 expression levels (P = 0.049). Higher VEGFR2 expression levels were associated with larger tumor size (P = 0.037). VEGFR1/2 expression levels were prognostic factors for patients with cervical cancer. Higher VEGFR1/2 expression levels were also predictive of poor overall survival. PMID:28072723

  14. FMRP Expression Levels in Mouse Central Nervous System Neurons Determine Behavioral Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Jason; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Niibori, Yosuke; Pacey, Laura K.; Halder, Sebok K.; Koxhioni, Enea; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hampson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is absent or highly reduced in Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic disorder causing cognitive impairment and autistic behaviors. Previous proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that restoring FMRP in the brain using viral vectors can improve pathological abnormalities in mouse models of fragile X. However, unlike small molecule drugs where the dose can readily be adjusted during treatment, viral vector–based biological therapeutic drugs present challenges in terms of achieving optimal dosing and expression levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of expressing varying levels of FMRP selectively in neurons of Fmr1 knockout and wild-type (WT) mice. A wide range of neuronal FMRP transgene levels was achieved in individual mice after intra-cerebroventricular administration of adeno-associated viral vectors coding for FMRP. In all treated knockout mice, prominent FMRP transgene expression was observed in forebrain structures, whereas lower levels were present in more caudal regions of the brain. Reduced levels of the synaptic protein PSD-95, elevated levels of the transcriptional modulator MeCP2, and abnormal motor activity, anxiety, and acoustic startle responses in Fmr1 knockout mice were fully or partially rescued after expression of FMRP at about 35–115% of WT expression, depending on the brain region examined. In the WT mouse, moderate FMRP over-expression of up to about twofold had little or no effect on PSD-95 and MeCP2 levels or on behavioral endophenotypes. In contrast, excessive over-expression in the Fmr1 knockout mouse forebrain (approximately 2.5–6-fold over WT) induced pathological motor hyperactivity and suppressed the startle response relative to WT mice. These results delineate a range of FMRP expression levels in the central nervous system that confer phenotypic improvement in fragile X mice. Collectively, these findings are pertinent to the development of long

  15. Relationship between TLR4 and MCP2 expression levels and habitual abortion.

    PubMed

    Li, X P; Song, L N; Tian, L P; Zhang, Y S

    2016-04-25

    Habitual abortion is associated with the altered expression of multiple genes. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP2 or CCL8) and habitual abortion. This was done by detecting and comparing their relative expression in peripheral blood and placental villi of patients and healthy fertile women. Based on our previous research, 85 subjects with habitual abortion (study group) and 40 healthy fertile women (control group), who were admitted to our hospital between June 2013 and December 2014, were enrolled in this study. After these subjects signed written informed consent, peripheral blood samples and villous tissues were collected, from which the total RNA was extracted. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 was detected with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, using GAPDH as a reference control. The expression of TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood and villous tissues of the study group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the changes in expression levels of TLR4 and MCP2. In conclusion, TLR4 and MCP2 expression correlated with the occurrence of habitual abortion. Detecting expression changes in TLR4 and MCP2 in the peripheral blood is a feasible method for predicting the occurrence of abortion in women of child-bearing age.

  16. A comparison of brain gene expression levels in domesticated and wild animals.

    PubMed

    Albert, Frank W; Somel, Mehmet; Carneiro, Miguel; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Halbwax, Michel; Thalmann, Olaf; Blanco-Aguiar, Jose A; Plyusnina, Irina Z; Trut, Lyudmila; Villafuerte, Rafael; Ferrand, Nuno; Kaiser, Sylvia; Jensen, Per; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-09-01

    Domestication has led to similar changes in morphology and behavior in several animal species, raising the question whether similarities between different domestication events also exist at the molecular level. We used mRNA sequencing to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns in brain frontal cortex in three pairs of domesticated and wild species (dogs and wolves, pigs and wild boars, and domesticated and wild rabbits). We compared the expression differences with those between domesticated guinea pigs and a distant wild relative (Cavia aperea) as well as between two lines of rats selected for tameness or aggression towards humans. There were few gene expression differences between domesticated and wild dogs, pigs, and rabbits (30-75 genes (less than 1%) of expressed genes were differentially expressed), while guinea pigs and C. aperea differed more strongly. Almost no overlap was found between the genes with differential expression in the different domestication events. In addition, joint analyses of all domesticated and wild samples provided only suggestive evidence for the existence of a small group of genes that changed their expression in a similar fashion in different domesticated species. The most extreme of these shared expression changes include up-regulation in domesticates of SOX6 and PROM1, two modulators of brain development. There was almost no overlap between gene expression in domesticated animals and the tame and aggressive rats. However, two of the genes with the strongest expression differences between the rats (DLL3 and DHDH) were located in a genomic region associated with tameness and aggression, suggesting a role in influencing tameness. In summary, the majority of brain gene expression changes in domesticated animals are specific to the given domestication event, suggesting that the causative variants of behavioral domestication traits may likewise be different.

  17. A Comparison of Brain Gene Expression Levels in Domesticated and Wild Animals

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Frank W.; Somel, Mehmet; Carneiro, Miguel; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Halbwax, Michel; Thalmann, Olaf; Blanco-Aguiar, Jose A.; Trut, Lyudmila; Villafuerte, Rafael; Ferrand, Nuno; Kaiser, Sylvia; Jensen, Per; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Domestication has led to similar changes in morphology and behavior in several animal species, raising the question whether similarities between different domestication events also exist at the molecular level. We used mRNA sequencing to analyze genome-wide gene expression patterns in brain frontal cortex in three pairs of domesticated and wild species (dogs and wolves, pigs and wild boars, and domesticated and wild rabbits). We compared the expression differences with those between domesticated guinea pigs and a distant wild relative (Cavia aperea) as well as between two lines of rats selected for tameness or aggression towards humans. There were few gene expression differences between domesticated and wild dogs, pigs, and rabbits (30–75 genes (less than 1%) of expressed genes were differentially expressed), while guinea pigs and C. aperea differed more strongly. Almost no overlap was found between the genes with differential expression in the different domestication events. In addition, joint analyses of all domesticated and wild samples provided only suggestive evidence for the existence of a small group of genes that changed their expression in a similar fashion in different domesticated species. The most extreme of these shared expression changes include up-regulation in domesticates of SOX6 and PROM1, two modulators of brain development. There was almost no overlap between gene expression in domesticated animals and the tame and aggressive rats. However, two of the genes with the strongest expression differences between the rats (DLL3 and DHDH) were located in a genomic region associated with tameness and aggression, suggesting a role in influencing tameness. In summary, the majority of brain gene expression changes in domesticated animals are specific to the given domestication event, suggesting that the causative variants of behavioral domestication traits may likewise be different. PMID:23028369

  18. Short-term sleep deprivation impairs spatial working memory and modulates expression levels of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meilan; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Yang, Li; Tan, Gang; Li, Chao; Hu, Zhian; Wang, Jiali

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning memory is sensitive to sleep deprivation (SD). Although the ionotropic glutamate receptors play a vital role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, however, whether the expression of these receptor subunits is modulated by sleep loss remains unclear. In the present study, western blotting was performed by probing with specific antibodies against the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and against the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B. In hippocampus, down regulation of surface GluA1 and GluN2A surface expression were observed in both SD groups. However, surface expression level of GluA2, GluA3, GluN1 and GluN2B was significantly up-regulated in 8h-SD rats when compared to the 4h-SD rats. In parallel with the complex changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit expressions, we found the 8h-SD impaired rat spatial working memory in 30-s-delay T-maze task, whereas no impairment of spatial learning was observed in 4h-SD rats. These results indicate that sleep loss alters the relative expression levels of the AMPA and NMDA receptors, thus affects the synaptic strength and capacity for plasticity and partially contributes to spatial memory impairment.

  19. Microfluidic continuum sorting of sub-populations of tumor cells via surface antibody expression levels.

    PubMed

    Jack, Rhonda; Hussain, Khadijah; Rodrigues, Danika; Zeinali, Mina; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2017-03-29

    The extent of inter- and intra-tumor cell heterogeneity observed in patient tumors appears to be directly associated with patient prognosis. Moreover, studies indicate that targeting distinct subpopulations of tumor cells may be more relevant to successfully managing cancer metastasis. The ability to distinguish and characterize unique tumor cell subpopulations within a given sample is thus exigent. Existing platforms separate cells binarily, based on some threshold level of phenotypic characteristics without consideration of the continuum levels of biomarker expression and the associated implications. Herein we describe how specific tumor cell groups have been immunomagnetically enriched according to a continuum of EpCAM surface marker expression levels. Even among a relatively homogenous group of cells such as the PANC-1 cell line, cells could be separated according to their EpCAM levels into low, moderate and high expression. To physiologically assess each subpopulation, a wound healing assay was performed which revealed distinct invasive potentials among each subset. Furthermore, the clinical relevance of the approach was demonstrated by isolating pancreatic cancer CTCs from the same patient sample based on their EpCAM levels. We demonstrate a robust method of isolating CTCs according to their varying protein levels, which enables extensive studies on tumor cell heterogeneity. Interestingly, 5 of 6 samples had CTCs that could be recovered at all three levels of EpCAM expression though the majority of CTCs were recovered as low expression events. Preliminary studies that compare tumor cell subpopulations in this continuum manner can potentially increase our understanding of the dynamic nature of cell heterogeneity and how it relates to patient outcomes. Ultimately further investigation may yield therapeutic targets against virulent cell subpopulations.

  20. Surface L-type Ca2+ channel expression levels are increased in aged hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Santana, Félix Luis; Oh, Myongsoo Matthew; Antion, Marcia Diana; Lee, Amy; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Disterhoft, John Francis

    2014-01-01

    Age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons has been hypothesized to underlie the increased Ca2+ influx and subsequent reduced intrinsic neuronal excitability of these neurons that lead to age-related cognitive deficits. Here, using specific antibodies against Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits of LTCCs, we systematically re-examined the expression of these proteins in the hippocampus from young (3 to 4 month old) and aged (30 to 32 month old) F344xBN rats. Western blot analysis of the total expression levels revealed significant reductions in both Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits from all three major hippocampal regions of aged rats. Despite the decreases in total expression levels, surface biotinylation experiments revealed significantly higher proportion of expression on the plasma membrane of Cav1.2 in the CA1 and CA3 regions and of Cav1.3 in the CA3 region from aged rats. Furthermore, the surface biotinylation results were supported by immunohistochemical analysis that revealed significant increases in Cav1.2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA3 regions of aged hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, we found a significant increase in the level of phosphorylated Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane in the dentate gyrus of aged rats. Taken together, our present findings strongly suggest that age-related cognitive deficits cannot be attributed to a global change in L-type channel expression nor to the level of phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane of hippocampal neurons. Rather, increased expression and density of LTCCs on the plasma membrane may underlie the age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:24033980

  1. Carcinoembryonic antigen expression level as a predictive factor for response to 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression has been shown to protect cancer cell lines from apoptosis and anoikis. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the role of CEA expression on resistance to anticancer drugs in human colorectal cancer (CRC). We transfected CEA negative CRC cell line SW742 as well as CHO cells to overexpress CEA and their chemoresistance were assessed by MTT assay. In comparison to the parental cell lines, transfected cells had significantly increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The results also showed a direct correlation between the amount of cellular CEA protein and 5-FU resistance in CEA expressing cells. We found no significant difference in sensitivity to cisplatin and methotrexate between CEA-transfected cells and their counter parental cells. We also compared the association between CEA expression and chemoresistance of 4 CRC cell lines which differed in the levels of CEA production. The CEA expression levels in monolayer cultures of these cell lines did not correlate with the 5-FU resistance. However, 5-FU treatment resulted in the selection of sub-populations of resistant cells that displayed increased CEA expression levels by increasing drug concentration. We analyzed the effect of 5-FU in a 3D multicellular culture generated from the two CRC cell lines, LS180 and HT29/219. Compared with monolayer culture, CEA production and 5-FU resistance in both cell lines were stimulated by 3D growth. In comparison to the 3D spheroids of parental CHO, we observed a significantly elevated 5-FU resistance in 3D culture of the CEA-expressing CHO transfectants. Our findings suggest that the CEA level may be a suitable biomarker for predicting tumor response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in CRC.

  2. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain.

  3. Correlation of Cytohistlogical Expression and Serum Level of Ca125 in Ovarian Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chhanda; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita; Ghosh, Tarun; Saha, Ashis Kumar; Sengupta, Moumita

    2014-01-01

    Context or Background: CA125 is a biomarker that has potential utility across the spectrum: risk assessment, early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and therapy. Aims and Objectives: This study was conducted to establish the validity and reliability of correlation of CA125 serum level with immunochemistry expression in imprint cytology and tissues for diagnostic purpose. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done on 50 cases of clinically and radiologically diagnosed ovarian tumor. Imprint smears were made intraoperatively from fresh samples and stained with M.G.G. stain for air dried smears and Papanicoloau stain for alcohol fixed smears. Stained smear was assessed and compared with subsequent histopathology report. Preoperative blood samples were obtained from all patients and sent for the assay of serum CA125 levels. Analysis of CA125 immunochemistry expression in imprint cytology and tissue was done and correlated with preoperative serum blood CA125 levels. Results: Significant positive correlation was found between elevated serum CA125 levels and cytohistological expression of CA125. Overall sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 86%, positive predictive value was 74% and negative predictive value 100%. Diagnostic accuracy was 90% with high statistical significance (p<0.001). Conclusion: We considered 35 U/mL as the cut-off value when evaluating serum CA125 ovarian cancer. Patients with high serum levels show good cytohistological expression. PMID:24783076

  4. Genome-derived cytosolic DNA contributes to type I interferon expression and immunogenicity of B-cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu J; Ho, Samantha S W; Tan, Nikki Y; Koo, Christine Xing'Er; Khatoo, Muznah; Cheung, Florence S G; Gasser, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    We recently provided evidence that genome-derived DNA is present in the cytosol of many tumor cells. Genomic loci that give rise to cytosolic DNA can potentially form non-B DNA structures including triple-stranded RNA:DNA structures (R-loops). The RNA:DNA-specific endonuclease RNaseh1 reduced the levels of cytosolic DNA and type I interferon-dependent rejection of B-cell lymphoma suggesting that cytosolic DNA may contribute to immune surveillance of B-cell lymphoma.

  5. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  6. BDNF contributes to both rapid and homeostatic alterations in AMPA receptor surface expression in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Jeremy M.; Loweth, Jessica A.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in plasticity at glutamate synapses and the effects of repeated cocaine exposure. We recently showed that intracranial injection of BDNF into the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key region for cocaine addiction, rapidly increases AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression. To further characterize BDNF’s role in both rapid AMPAR trafficking and slower, homeostatic changes in AMPAR surface expression, we investigated the effects of acute (30 min) and long-term (24 h) treatment with BDNF on AMPAR distribution in NAc medium spiny neurons from postnatal rats co-cultured with mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons to restore excitatory inputs. Immunocytochemical studies showed that acute BDNF treatment increased cell surface GluA1 and GluA2 levels, as well as their co-localization, on NAc neurons. This effect of BDNF, confirmed using a protein crosslinking assay, was dependent on ERK but not AKT signaling. In contrast, long-term BDNF treatment decreased AMPAR surface expression on NAc neurons. Based on this latter result, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF plays a role in AMPAR “scaling down” in response to a prolonged increase in neuronal activity produced by bicuculline (24 h). Supporting this hypothesis, decreasing BDNF signaling with the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented the scaling down of GluA1 and GluA2 surface levels in NAc neurons normally produced by bicuculline. In conclusion, BDNF exerts bidirectional effects on NAc AMPAR surface expression, depending on duration of exposure. Furthermore, BDNF’s involvement in synaptic scaling in the NAc differs from its previously described role in the visual cortex. PMID:24712995

  7. Optimizing heterologous protein production in the periplasm of E. coli by regulating gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Escherichia coli many heterologous proteins are produced in the periplasm. To direct these proteins to the periplasm, they are equipped with an N-terminal signal sequence so that they can traverse the cytoplasmic membrane via the protein-conducting Sec-translocon. For poorly understood reasons, the production of heterologous secretory proteins is often toxic to the cell thereby limiting yields. To gain insight into the mechanism(s) that underlie this toxicity we produced two secretory heterologous proteins, super folder green fluorescent protein and a single-chain variable antibody fragment, in the Lemo21(DE3) strain. In this strain, the expression intensity of the gene encoding the target protein can be precisely controlled. Results Both SFGFP and the single-chain variable antibody fragment were equipped with a DsbA-derived signal sequence. Producing these proteins following different gene expression levels in Lemo21(DE3) allowed us to identify the optimal expression level for each target gene. Too high gene expression levels resulted in saturation of the Sec-translocon capacity as shown by hampered translocation of endogenous secretory proteins and a protein misfolding/aggregation problem in the cytoplasm. At the optimal gene expression levels, the negative effects of the production of the heterologous secretory proteins were minimized and yields in the periplasm were optimized. Conclusions Saturating the Sec-translocon capacity can be a major bottleneck hampering heterologous protein production in the periplasm. This bottleneck can be alleviated by harmonizing expression levels of the genes encoding the heterologous secretory proteins with the Sec-translocon capacity. Mechanistic insight into the production of proteins in the periplasm is key to optimizing yields in this compartment. PMID:23497240

  8. The Time Dependance of Dynamic Topography: Mantle Dynamic Contributions to Local and Global Sea-Level Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, C. J.; Shahnas, M.; Peltier, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    Earth's topography plays an important role in many surface processes, particularly through its influence on the water cycle and erosional processes. Our ability to predict weather patterns and surface/subsurface hydrological processes depends upon our knowledge of this field. Similarly, understanding the evolution of topography through time (paleo-topography) is critically important for the accurate modeling of past climate states such as that of the last glacial maximum. Whilst the present day topographic field can be accurately inferred over the entire globe using satellite based sensors and geodetic techniques, no equivalently comprehensive tools exist that enable access to paleo-topography. The rock record allows for limited, local estimations of deposition elevation with respect to sea level using appropriate fossils combined with sedimentological analyses. However, this method is not available in most locations as a consequence of poor-preservation of the requisite sea level indicators and in any event the accuracy of the relative sea level record is often compromised. Furthermore, just as topography itself consists of distinct dynamic and isostatic contributions, relatives sea level also consists of two contributions, respectively that due to the vertical motion of the surface of the solid Earth and that due to the changing volume of water in the global oceans. In this paper we study the time dependence of Earth's dynamic topography that has occurred over the recent past due to the action of the mantle convection process. We use a modern model of mantle mixing, an extension to three dimensions of the recently published control volume based convection model of Shahnas and Peltier (2010, JGR, vol 115, B11408). This is initialized using a mantle temperature field inferred on the basis of modern seismic tomographic imaging analysis, which enables the model to simulate the present day dynamical state of Earth's mantle. The use of this methodology enables the

  9. HER-2 tissue expression correlated with serum levels in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pribylová, O; Springer, D; Vítková, I; Zima, T; Petruzelka, L

    2007-01-01

    We explored the relationship between circulating HER-2 extracellular domain and tissue HER-2 status in a group of 42 postmenopausal breast cancer patients. All patients were examined before adjuvant chemotherapy or other adjuvant treatment. Serum levels were measured by BAYER Advia Centaur System, Golden, CO (the cut-off level was in our conditions considered at 12 ng/ml). Tissue expression was assayed with the DAKO HercepTest, North America, Inc, Carpinteria, CA. Our findings that serum levels are in consonance with tissue expression could be important in metastatic breast cancer, when it is impossible to get a new tumour sample and establish the actual HER-2 status, which may be different from the primary tumour. Although we know that serum HER-2 concentration cannot be substituted for IHC or FISH, we have observed a statistically significant correlation between serum level concentration and tissue HER-2 status.

  10. (Pre-) calibration of a Reduced Complexity Model of the Antarctic Contribution to Sea-level Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckert, K. L.; Guan, Y.; Shaffer, G.; Forest, C. E.; Keller, K.

    2015-12-01

    (Pre-) calibration of a Reduced Complexity Model of the Antarctic Contribution to Sea-level ChangesKelsey L. Ruckert1*, Yawen Guan2, Chris E. Forest1,3,7, Gary Shaffer 4,5,6, and Klaus Keller1,7,81 Department of Geosciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 2 Department of Statistics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 3 Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 4 GAIA_Antarctica, University of Magallanes, Punta Arenas, Chile 5 Center for Advanced Studies in Arid Zones, La Serena, Chile 6 Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 7 Earth and Environmental Systems Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA 8 Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA * Corresponding author. E-mail klr324@psu.eduUnderstanding and projecting future sea-level changes poses nontrivial challenges. Sea-level changes are driven primarily by changes in the density of seawater as well as changes in the size of glaciers and ice sheets. Previous studies have demonstrated that a key source of uncertainties surrounding sea-level projections is the response of the Antarctic ice sheet to warming temperatures. Here we calibrate a previously published and relatively simple model of the Antarctic ice sheet over a hindcast period from the last interglacial period to the present. We apply and compare a range of (pre-) calibration methods, including a Bayesian approach that accounts for heteroskedasticity. We compare the model hindcasts and projections for different levels of model complexity and calibration methods. We compare the projections with the upper bounds from previous studies and find our projections have a narrower range in 2100. Furthermore we discuss the implications for the design of climate risk management strategies.

  11. Levels of Lycopene β-Cyclase 1 Modulate Carotenoid Gene Expression and Accumulation in Daucus carota

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of α-carotene and β-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of α-carotene and β-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and β-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots. PMID:23555569

  12. Levels of lycopene β-cyclase 1 modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan Camilo; Pizarro, Lorena; Fuentes, Paulina; Handford, Michael; Cifuentes, Victor; Stange, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are synthesized and accumulated in plastids through a highly regulated pathway. Lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) is a key enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of α-carotene and β-carotene through the cyclization of lycopene. Carotenoids are produced in both carrot (Daucus carota) leaves and reserve roots, and high amounts of α-carotene and β-carotene accumulate in the latter. In some plant models, the presence of different isoforms of carotenogenic genes is associated with an organ-specific function. D. carota harbors two Lcyb genes, of which DcLcyb1 is expressed in leaves and storage roots during carrot development, correlating with an increase in carotenoid levels. In this work, we show that DcLCYB1 is localized in the plastid and that it is a functional enzyme, as demonstrated by heterologous complementation in Escherichia coli and over expression and post transcriptional gene silencing in carrot. Transgenic plants with higher or reduced levels of DcLcyb1 had incremented or reduced levels of chlorophyll, total carotenoids and β-carotene in leaves and in the storage roots, respectively. In addition, changes in the expression of DcLcyb1 are accompanied by a modulation in the expression of key endogenous carotenogenic genes. Our results indicate that DcLcyb1 does not possess an organ specific function and modulate carotenoid gene expression and accumulation in carrot leaves and storage roots.

  13. Reduced beta 2-microglobulin mRNA levels in transgenic mice expressing a designed hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, S; Hotchkiss, G; Andäng, M; Nyholm, T; Inzunza, J; Jansson, I; Ahrlund-Richter, L

    1994-01-01

    We have generated three artificial hammerhead ribozymes, denoted 'Rz-b', 'Rz-c' and 'Rz-d', with different specificities for exon II of the mouse beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2M) mRNA. In this study we tested for ribozyme mediated reduction of beta 2M mRNA in a cell line and in transgenic mice. Transfections of either of the Rz-b, Rz-c or Rz-d plasmids into a mouse cell-line (NIH/3T3) revealed reductions of beta 2M mRNA substrate in each case. Ribozyme expression in individual transfected clones was accompanied with an up to 80% reduction of beta 2M mRNA levels. Rz-c was selected for a transgenic study. Seven Rz-c transgenic founder animals were identified from which three ribozyme expressing families were established and analysed. Expression of the ribozyme transgene was tested for and detected in lung, kidney and spleen. Expression was accompanied with reduction of the beta 2M mRNA levels of heterozygous (Rz+/-) animals compared to non-transgenic litter mates. The effect was most pronounced in lung with more than 90% beta 2M mRNA reduction in individual mice. In summary, expression of our ribozymes in a cell free system, in a cell-line and in transgenic mice were all accompanied with reductions of beta 2M mRNA levels. Images PMID:8036151

  14. Novel Bifidobacterium promoters selected through microarray analysis lead to constitutive high-level gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Kim, Jin Yong; Park, Myeong Soo; Ji, Geun Eog

    2012-08-01

    For the development of a food-grade expression system for Bifidobacterium, a strong promoter leading to high-level expression of cloned gene is a prerequisite. For this purpose, a promoter screening host-vector system for Bifidobacterium has been established using β-glucosidase from Bifidobacterium lactis as a reporter and Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 as a host, which is β-glucosidase negative strain. Seven putative promoters showing constitutive high-level expression were selected through microarray analysis based on the genome sequence of B. bifidum BGN4. They were cloned into upstream of β-glucosidase gene and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α and B. bifidum BGN4. Promoter activities were analyzed both in E. coli and B. bifidum BGN4 by measuring β-glucosidase activity. β-Glucosidase activities in all of the transformants showed growth-associated characteristics. Among them, P919 was the strongest in B. bifidum BGN4 and showed maximum activity at 18 h, while P895 was the strongest in E. coli DH5α at 7 h. This study shows that novel strong promoters such as P919 can be used for high-level expression of foreign genes in Bifidobacterium and will be useful for the construction of an efficient food-grade expression system.

  15. Importance of Triples Contributions to NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants Computed at the CC3 and CCSDT Levels.

    PubMed

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P A; Gauss, Jürgen

    2017-02-14

    We present the first analytical implementation of CC3 second derivatives using the spin-unrestricted approach. This allows, for the first time, the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) relevant to NMR spectroscopy at the CC3 level of theory in a fully analytical manner. CC3 results for the SSCCs of a number of small molecules and their fluorine substituted derivatives are compared with the corresponding coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) results obtained using specialized basis sets. For one-bond couplings the change when going from CCSD to CC3 is typically 1-3%, but much higher corrections were found for (1)JCN in FCN, 15.7%, and (1)JOF in OF2, 6.4%. The changes vary significantly in the case of multibond couplings, with differences of up to 10%, and even 13.6% for (3)JFH in fluoroacetylene. Calculations at the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and triples (CCSDT) level indicate that the most important contributions arising from connected triple excitations in the coupled cluster expansion are accounted for at the CC3 level. Thus, we believe that the CC3 method will become the standard approach for the calculation of reference values of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

  16. Enhanced expression levels of aquaporin-1 and aquaporin-4 in A549 cells exposed to silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaohui; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Wei; Liu, Shupeng; Peng, Zihe; Sun, Yue; Zhao, Jinyuan; Jiang, Qiujie; Liu, Heliang

    2016-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins in the cell membranes of mammals, have been reported to be important in maintaining the water balance of the respiratory system. However, little is known regarding the role of AQP in occupational pulmonary diseases such as silicosis. The present study investigated the expression of AQP1 and AQP4 in the human A549 alveolar epithelial cell line stimulated by silica (SiO2). A549 cells were cultured and divided into four groups: Control, SiO2‑stimulated, AQP1 inhibitor and AQP4 inhibitor. The cells of the SiO2‑stimulated group were stimulated with SiO2 dispersed suspension (50 mg/ml). The cells of the inhibitor group were pretreated with mercury (II) chloride (HgCl2; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP1) and 2‑(nicotinamide)‑1,3,4‑thiadiazole (TGN‑020; a specific channel inhibitor of AQP4) and stimulated with SiO2. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the protein expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 were detected by western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Compared with the control group, the expression levels of AQP1 and AQP4 mRNA and protein in SiO2‑stimulated groups increased and subsequently decreased (AQP1 peaked at 2 h and AQP4 at 1h; both P<0.001 compared with control group). In the inhibitor group, expression levels were increased compared with controls; however, they were significantly decreased compared with the SiO2‑stimulated group at 2 h (AQP1; P<0.001) and 1 h (AQP4; P<0.001). The expression of AQP1 and AQP4 increased when exposed to SiO2, and this was inhibited by HgCl2 and TGN‑020, suggesting that AQP1 and AQP4 may contribute to A549 cell damage induced by SiO2. AQP1 and AQP4 may thus be involved in the initiation and development of silicosis.

  17. Crocins with High Levels of Sugar Conjugation Contribute to the Yellow Colours of Early-Spring Flowering Crocus Tepals

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Moraga, Angela; Ahrazem, Oussama; Rambla, José Luis; Granell, Antonio; Gómez Gómez, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Crocus sativus is the source of saffron spice, the processed stigma which accumulates glucosylated apocarotenoids known as crocins. Crocins are found in the stigmas of other Crocuses, determining the colourations observed from pale yellow to dark red. By contrast, tepals in Crocus species display a wider diversity of colours which range from purple, blue, yellow to white. In this study, we investigated whether the contribution of crocins to colour extends from stigmas to the tepals of yellow Crocus species. Tepals from seven species were analysed by UPLC-PDA and ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS revealing for the first time the presence of highly glucosylated crocins in this tissue. β-carotene was found to be the precursor of these crocins and some of them were found to contain rhamnose, never before reported. When crocin profiles from tepals were compared with those from stigmas, clear differences were found, including the presence of new apocarotenoids in stigmas. Furthermore, each species showed a characteristic profile which was not correlated with the phylogenetic relationship among species. While gene expression analysis in tepals of genes involved in carotenoid metabolism showed that phytoene synthase was a key enzyme in apocarotenoid biosynthesis in tepals. Expression of a crocetin glucosyltransferase, previously identified in saffron, was detected in all the samples. The presence of crocins in tepals is compatible with the role of chromophores to attract pollinators. The identification of tepals as new sources of crocins is of special interest given their wide range of applications in medicine, cosmetics and colouring industries. PMID:24058441

  18. Glutamate Receptor Antagonist Infusions into the Basolateral and Medial Amygdala Reveal Differential Contributions to Olfactory vs. Context Fear Conditioning and Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Paschall, Gayla Y.; Davis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala's involvement in fear acquisition and expression to visual and auditory stimuli is well known. The involvement of the basolateral and other amygdala areas in fear acquisition and expression to stimuli of other modalities is less certain. We evaluated the contribution of the basolateral and medial amygdala to olfactory and…

  19. Enhanced basal lubrication and the contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to future sea-level rise

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Sarah R.; Payne, Antony J.; Bartholomew, Ian D.; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Edwards, Tamsin L.; Fettweis, Xavier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Goelzer, Heiko; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Huybrechts, Philippe; Mair, Douglas W. F.; Nienow, Peter W.; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen F.; Smeets, C. J. P. Paul; Sole, Andrew J.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Zwinger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We assess the effect of enhanced basal sliding on the flow and mass budget of the Greenland ice sheet, using a newly developed parameterization of the relation between meltwater runoff and ice flow. A wide range of observations suggest that water generated by melt at the surface of the ice sheet reaches its bed by both fracture and drainage through moulins. Once at the bed, this water is likely to affect lubrication, although current observations are insufficient to determine whether changes in subglacial hydraulics will limit the potential for the speedup of flow. An uncertainty analysis based on our best-fit parameterization admits both possibilities: continuously increasing or bounded lubrication. We apply the parameterization to four higher-order ice-sheet models in a series of experiments forced by changes in both lubrication and surface mass budget and determine the additional mass loss brought about by lubrication in comparison with experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance. We use forcing from a regional climate model, itself forced by output from the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM5) global climate model run under scenario A1B. Although changes in lubrication generate widespread effects on the flow and form of the ice sheet, they do not affect substantial net mass loss; increase in the ice sheet’s contribution to sea-level rise from basal lubrication is projected by all models to be no more than 5% of the contribution from surface mass budget forcing alone. PMID:23940337

  20. Enhanced basal lubrication and the contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to future sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Sarah R; Payne, Antony J; Bartholomew, Ian D; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Edwards, Tamsin L; Fettweis, Xavier; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Goelzer, Heiko; Hoffman, Matthew J; Huybrechts, Philippe; Mair, Douglas W F; Nienow, Peter W; Perego, Mauro; Price, Stephen F; Smeets, C J P Paul; Sole, Andrew J; van de Wal, Roderik S W; Zwinger, Thomas

    2013-08-27

    We assess the effect of enhanced basal sliding on the flow and mass budget of the Greenland ice sheet, using a newly developed parameterization of the relation between meltwater runoff and ice flow. A wide range of observations suggest that water generated by melt at the surface of the ice sheet reaches its bed by both fracture and drainage through moulins. Once at the bed, this water is likely to affect lubrication, although current observations are insufficient to determine whether changes in subglacial hydraulics will limit the potential for the speedup of flow. An uncertainty analysis based on our best-fit parameterization admits both possibilities: continuously increasing or bounded lubrication. We apply the parameterization to four higher-order ice-sheet models in a series of experiments forced by changes in both lubrication and surface mass budget and determine the additional mass loss brought about by lubrication in comparison with experiments forced only by changes in surface mass balance. We use forcing from a regional climate model, itself forced by output from the European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM5) global climate model run under scenario A1B. Although changes in lubrication generate widespread effects on the flow and form of the ice sheet, they do not affect substantial net mass loss; increase in the ice sheet's contribution to sea-level rise from basal lubrication is projected by all models to be no more than 5% of the contribution from surface mass budget forcing alone.

  1. 1B/(−)IRE DMT1 Expression during Brain Ischemia Contributes to Cell Death Mediated by NF-κB/RelA Acetylation at Lys310

    PubMed Central

    Ingrassia, Rosaria; Lanzillotta, Annamaria; Sarnico, Ilenia; Benarese, Marina; Blasi, Francesco; Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola; Depero, Laura; Chiarugi, Alberto; Spano, Pier Franco; Pizzi, Marina

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for increasing iron and neurodegeneration in brain ischemia are an interesting area of research which could open new therapeutic approaches. Previous evidence has shown that activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) through RelA acetylation on Lys310 is the prerequisite for p50/RelA-mediated apoptosis in cellular and animal models of brain ischemia. We hypothesized that the increase of iron through a NF-κB-regulated 1B isoform of the divalent metal transporter-1 (1B/DMT1) might contribute to post-ischemic neuronal damage. Both in mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and in neuronally differentiated SK-N-SH cells exposed to oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD), 1A/DMT1 was only barely expressed while the 1B/DMT1 without iron-response-element (−IRE) protein and mRNA were early up-regulated. Either OGD or over-expression of 1B/(−)IRE DMT1 isoform significantly increased iron uptake, as detected by total reflection X-ray fluorescence, and iron-dependent cell death. Iron chelation by deferoxamine treatment or (−)IRE DMT1 RNA silencing displayed significant neuroprotection against OGD which concomitantly decreased intracellular iron levels. We found evidence that 1B/(−)IRE DMT1 was a target gene for RelA activation and acetylation on Lys310 residue during ischemia. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the 1B/DMT1 promoter showed there was increased interaction with RelA and acetylation of H3 histone during OGD exposure of cortical neurons. Over-expression of wild-type RelA increased 1B/DMT1 promoter-luciferase activity, the (−)IRE DMT1 protein, as well as neuronal death. Expression of the acetylation-resistant RelA-K310R construct, which carried a mutation from lysine 310 to arginine, but not the acetyl-mimic mutant RelA-K310Q, down-regulated the 1B/DMT1 promoter, consequently offering neuroprotection. Our data showed that 1B/(−)IRE DMT1 expression and intracellular iron influx are

  2. Quercetin promotes neurite growth through enhancing intracellular cAMP level and GAP-43 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Ming; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Liao, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of quercetin on neurite growth in N1E-115 cells and the underlying mechanisms. Quercetin was evaluated for its effects on cell numbers of neurites, neurite length, intracellular cAMP content, and Gap-43 expression in N1E-115 cells in vitro by use of microscopy, LANCE(tm) cAMP 384 kit, and Western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that quercetin could increase the neurite length in a concentration-dependent manner, but had no effect on the numbers of cells. Quercetin significantly increased the expression of cellular cAMP in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The Gap-43 expression was up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, quercetin could promote neurite growth through increasing the intracellular cAMP level and Gap-43 expression.

  3. Expression levels of B7-H3 and TLT-2 in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SHAN-SHAN; TANG, JING; YU, SHU-YI; MA, LI; WANG, FENG; XIE, SHU-LE; JIN, LONG; YANG, HONG-YU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of immune regulatory molecules B7-H3 [also known as cluster of differentiation 276] and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cell-like transcript-2 (TLT-2) in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Human OSCC samples were obtained from 76 patients (female, 32; male, 44; age range, 23–81 years; median age, 50.9 years) that underwent resection for OSCC at Peking University Shenzhen Hospital (Shenzhen, China) between 2007 and 2010. In addition, control oral mucosal samples were obtained from 76 healthy individuals (female, 36; male, 40; age range, 21–62 years; median age, 45.3 years) during wisdom tooth extraction. Protein and gene expression levels of B7-H3 and TLT-2 were determined by immunohistochemical analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the healthy oral mucosa samples, B7-H3 expression was identified to be weak, while the expression of TLT-2 was only detected sporadically in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. By contrast, the two regulatory molecules were widely expressed in the aforementioned localizations in human OSCC specimens upon immunohistochemical examination. Furthermore, quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the presence of significantly higher B7-H3 and TLT-2 expression levels in OSCC specimens compared with the oral mucosa of healthy individuals. The significantly higher expression levels of B7-H3 and TLT-2 in human OSCC specimens may indicate an inhibitory role of these molecules in the antitumoral immune response. To investigate interactions between these two molecules and individual antitumoral immune response in OSCC patients, prospective clinical studies with an adequate sample size are required. PMID:26622626

  4. Gene expression in diplosporous and sexual Eragrostis curvula genotypes with differing ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Pessino, Silvina; Selva, Juan P; Díaz, Marina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    The molecular nature of gene expression during the initiation and progress of diplosporous apomixis is still unknown. Moreover, the basis of the close correlation between diplospory and polyploidy is not clarified yet. A comparative expression analysis was performed based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing and differential display in an Eragrostis curvula diplosporous tetraploid genotype (T, 4x apo), a sexual diploid derivative obtained from tissue culture (D, 2x sex) and an artificial sexual tetraploid obtained from the diploid seeds after colchicine treatment (C, 4x sex). From a total of 8,884 unigenes sequenced from inflorescence-derived libraries, 112 (1.26%) showed significant differential expression in individuals with different ploidy level and/or variable reproductive mode. Independent comparisons between plants with different reproductive mode (same ploidy) or different ploidy level (same reproductive mode) allowed the identification of genes modulated in response to diplosporous development or polyploidization, respectively. Surprisingly, a group of genes (Group 3) were differentially expressed or silenced only in the 4x sex plant, presenting similar levels of expression in the 4x apo and the 2x sex genotypes. A group of randomly selected differential genes was validated by QR-PCR. Differential display analysis showed that in general the 4x apo and 4x sex expression profiles were more related and different from the 2x sex one, but confirmed the existence of Group 3-type genes, in both inflorescences and leaves. The possible biological significance for the occurrence of this particular group of genes is discussed. In silico mapping onto the rice genome was used to identify candidates mapping to the region syntenic to the diplospory locus.

  5. N-cadherin expression level distinguishes reserved versus primed states of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Haug, Jeffrey S; He, Xi C; Grindley, Justin C; Wunderlich, Joshua P; Gaudenz, Karin; Ross, Jason T; Paulson, Ariel; Wagner, Kathryn P; Xie, Yucai; Zhu, Ruihong; Yin, Tong; Perry, John M; Hembree, Mark J; Redenbaugh, Erin P; Radice, Glenn L; Seidel, Christopher; Li, Linheng

    2008-04-10

    Osteoblasts expressing the homophilic adhesion molecule N-cadherin form a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche. Therefore, we examined how N-cadherin expression in HSCs relates to their function. We found that bone marrow (BM) cells highly expressing N-cadherin (N-cadherin(hi)) are not stem cells, being largely devoid of a Lineage(-)Sca1(+)cKit(+) population and unable to reconstitute hematopoietic lineages in irradiated recipient mice. Instead, long-term HSCs form distinct populations expressing N-cadherin at intermediate (N-cadherin(int)) or low (N-cadherin(lo)) levels. The minority N-cadherin(lo) population can robustly reconstitute the hematopoietic system, express genes that may prime them to mobilize, and predominate among HSCs mobilized from BM to spleen. The larger N-cadherin(int) population performs poorly in reconstitution assays when freshly isolated but improves in response to overnight in vitro culture. Their expression profile and lower cell-cycle entry rate suggest N-cadherin(int) cells are being held in reserve. Thus, differential N-cadherin expression reflects functional distinctions between two HSC subpopulations.

  6. Elevated interleukin-6 expression levels are associated with intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    DENG, XIAO; ZHAO, FENG; KANG, BAOLIN; ZHANG, XIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression levels were associated with the onset and progression of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A comprehensive meta-analysis of the scientific literature from numerous electronic databases was performed, in order to obtain published studies associated with the topic of interest. Relevant case-control studies that had previously assessed a correlation between IL-6 expression levels and IDD were identified using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The STATA version 12.0 software was used for statistical analysis of the extracted data. A total of 112 studies were initially retrieved, with eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These contained a total of 392 subjects, of which 263 were patients with IDD and 129 were healthy controls. A meta-analysis of the eight studies demonstrated that serum IL-6 protein expression levels may be associated with IDD, and this was irrespective of IDD subtype (bulging, protrusion, or sequestration). Notably, serum expression levels of the IL-6 protein were upregulated in intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion tissue, as compared with normal IVD tissue; thus suggesting that IL-6 may have an important role in the pathophysiological process of IDD. PMID:27073460

  7. Examination of Anxiety Levels and Anger Expression Manners of Undergraduate Table Tennis Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karademir, Tamer; Türkçapar, Ünal

    2016-01-01

    This research was done for the determination of how their anxiety levels' and anger expressions' get shaped according to some variances. For this reason there were 76 female 125 male totally 201 sportsmen, who participated to the table tennis championship between universities in 2016 and ages differ from 18 to 28, were included the research group.…

  8. High-level expression and preparation of recombinant human fibrinogen as biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Masaki; Imamura, Takayuki; Yano, Kentaro; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Meta, Akihiro; Tokieda, Yoshiyuki; Nakashima, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Fibrinogen is a large and complex glycoprotein containing two sets of each of three different chains (α, β and γ). There have been no reports of high-level expression of fibrinogen at commercial levels using mammalian cultured cells such as CHO cells because of the difficulty in highly expressing a protein with such a complex structure. We achieved high-level (1.3 g/l or higher) expression of recombinant human fibrinogen using CHO DG44 cells by optimizing the expression system and culture conditions. We also succeeded in establishing a high-recovery preparation method for recombinant fibrinogen that rarely yields degraded products. To characterize the properties of the recombinant human fibrinogen, we performed SDS-PAGE; western blotting of the α, β and γ chains using specific antibodies and scanning electron microscopy observations of fibrin fibres. We also evaluated the functional equivalence between recombinant fibrinogen and plasma fibrinogen with respect to the release of fibrinopeptides initiated by thrombin and its cross-linking properties. The basic properties of recombinant fibrinogen showed no apparent differences from those of plasma fibrinogen. Here, we report the development of methods for the culture and preparation of recombinant human fibrinogen of satisfactory quality that can be scaled up to the commercial level.

  9. Insect cell transformation vectors that support high level expression and promoter assessment in insect cell culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    <