Science.gov

Sample records for extended phenotypes structure

  1. Host Niches and Defensive Extended Phenotypes Structure Parasitoid Wasp Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard; Schönrogge, Karsten; Cook, James M.; Melika, George; Csóka, György; Thuróczy, Csaba; Stone, Graham N.

    2009-01-01

    Oak galls are spectacular extended phenotypes of gallwasp genes in host oak tissues and have evolved complex morphologies that serve, in part, to exclude parasitoid natural enemies. Parasitoids and their insect herbivore hosts have coevolved to produce diverse communities comprising about a third of all animal species. The factors structuring these communities, however, remain poorly understood. An emerging theme in community ecology is the need to consider the effects of host traits, shaped by both natural selection and phylogenetic history, on associated communities of natural enemies. Here we examine the impact of host traits and phylogenetic relatedness on 48 ecologically closed and species-rich communities of parasitoids attacking gall-inducing wasps on oaks. Gallwasps induce the development of spectacular and structurally complex galls whose species- and generation-specific morphologies are the extended phenotypes of gallwasp genes. All the associated natural enemies attack their concealed hosts through gall tissues, and several structural gall traits have been shown to enhance defence against parasitoid attack. Here we explore the significance of these and other host traits in predicting variation in parasitoid community structure across gallwasp species. In particular, we test the “Enemy Hypothesis,” which predicts that galls with similar morphology will exclude similar sets of parasitoids and therefore have similar parasitoid communities. Having controlled for phylogenetic patterning in host traits and communities, we found significant correlations between parasitoid community structure and several gall structural traits (toughness, hairiness, stickiness), supporting the Enemy Hypothesis. Parasitoid community structure was also consistently predicted by components of the hosts' spatiotemporal niche, particularly host oak taxonomy and gall location (e.g., leaf versus bud versus seed). The combined explanatory power of structural and spatiotemporal

  2. The Structure of The Extended Psychosis Phenotype in Early Adolescence—A Cross-sample Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wigman, Johanna T. W.; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Iedema, Jurjen; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; van Os, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The extended psychosis phenotype, or the expression of nonclinical positive psychotic experiences, is already prevalent in adolescence and has a dose-response risk relationship with later psychotic disorder. In 2 large adolescent general population samples (n = 5422 and n = 2230), prevalence and structure of the extended psychosis phenotype was investigated. Positive psychotic experiences, broadly defined, were reported by the majority of adolescents. Exploratory analysis with Structural Equation Modelling (Exploratory Factor Analysis followed by Confirmatory Factor Analysis [CFA]) in sample 1 suggested that psychotic experiences were best represented by 5 underlying dimensions; CFA in sample 2 provided a replication of this model. Dimensions were labeled Hallucinations, Delusions, Paranoia, Grandiosity, and Paranormal beliefs. Prevalences differed strongly, Hallucinations having the lowest and Paranoia having the highest rates. Girls reported more experiences on all dimensions, except Grandiosity, and from age 12 to 16 years rates increased. Hallucinations, Delusions, and Paranoia, but not Grandiosity and Paranormal beliefs, were associated with distress and general measures of psychopathology. Thus, only some of the dimensions of the extended psychosis phenotype in young people may represent a continuum with more severe psychopathology and predict later psychiatric disorder. PMID:20044595

  3. Allelic variants of the amylose extender mutation of maize demonstrate phenotypic variation in starch structure resulting from modified protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fushan; Ahmed, Zaheer; Lee, Elizabeth A.; Donner, Elizabeth; Liu, Qiang; Ahmed, Regina; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.; Tetlow, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    amylose extender (ae−) starches characteristically have modified starch granule morphology resulting from amylopectin with reduced branch frequency and longer glucan chains in clusters, caused by the loss of activity of the major starch branching enzyme (SBE), which in maize endosperm is SBEIIb. A recent study with ae− maize lacking the SBEIIb protein (termed ae1.1 herein) showed that novel protein–protein interactions between enzymes of starch biosynthesis in the amyloplast could explain the starch phenotype of the ae1.1 mutant. The present study examined an allelic variant of the ae− mutation, ae1.2, which expresses a catalytically inactive form of SBEIIb. The catalytically inactive SBEIIb in ae1.2 lacks a 28 amino acid peptide (Val272–Pro299) and is unable to bind to amylopectin. Analysis of starch from ae1.2 revealed altered granule morphology and physicochemical characteristics distinct from those of the ae1.1 mutant as well as the wild-type, including altered apparent amylose content and gelatinization properties. Starch from ae1.2 had fewer intermediate length glucan chains (degree of polymerization 16–20) than ae1.1. Biochemical analysis of ae1.2 showed that there were differences in the organization and assembly of protein complexes of starch biosynthetic enzymes in comparison with ae1.1 (and wild-type) amyloplasts, which were also reflected in the composition of starch granule-bound proteins. The formation of stromal protein complexes in the wild-type and ae1.2 was strongly enhanced by ATP, and broken by phosphatase treatment, indicating a role for protein phosphorylation in their assembly. Labelling experiments with [γ-32P]ATP showed that the inactive form of SBEIIb in ae1.2 was phosphorylated, both in the monomeric form and in association with starch synthase isoforms. Although the inactive SBEIIb was unable to bind starch directly, it was strongly associated with the starch granule, reinforcing the conclusion that its presence in the

  4. Could the Extended Phenotype Extend to the Cellular and Subcellular Levels in Insect-Induced Galls?

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves da Silva; Pacheco, Priscilla; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Neo-ontogenesis of plant galls involves redifferentiation of host plant tissues to express new phenotypes, when new cell properties are established via structural-functional remodeling. Herein, Psidium cattleianum leaves and Nothotrioza cattleiani galls are analyzed by developmental anatomy, cytometry and immunocytochemistry of cell walls. We address hypothesis-driven questions concerning the organogenesis of globoid galls in the association of P. cattleianum - N. cattleianum, and P. myrtoides - N. myrtoidis. These double co-generic systems represent good models for comparing final gall shapes and cell lineages functionalities under the perspective of convergent plant-dependent or divergent insect-induced characteristics. Gall induction, and growth and development are similar in both galls, but homologous cell lineages exhibit divergent degrees of cell hypertrophy and directions of elongation. Median cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls hypertrophy the most, while in P. myrtoides galls there is a centrifugal gradient of cell hypertrophy. Cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls tend to anisotropy, while P. myrtoidis galls have isotropically hypertrophied cells. Immunocytochemistry evidences the chemical identity and functional traits of cell lineages: epidermal cells walls have homogalacturonans (HGAs) and galactans, which confer rigidity to sites of enhanced cell division; oil gland cell walls have arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) that help avoiding cell death; and parenchyma cell walls have HGAs, galactans and arabinans, which confer porosity. Variations in such chemical identities are related to specific sites of hypertrophy. Even though the double co-generic models have the same macroscopic phenotype, the globoid morphotype, current analyses indicate that the extended phenotype of N. cattleiani is substantiated by cellular and subcellular specificities. PMID:26053863

  5. Could the Extended Phenotype Extend to the Cellular and Subcellular Levels in Insect-Induced Galls?

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves da Silva; Pacheco, Priscilla; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Neo-ontogenesis of plant galls involves redifferentiation of host plant tissues to express new phenotypes, when new cell properties are established via structural-functional remodeling. Herein, Psidium cattleianum leaves and Nothotrioza cattleiani galls are analyzed by developmental anatomy, cytometry and immunocytochemistry of cell walls. We address hypothesis-driven questions concerning the organogenesis of globoid galls in the association of P. cattleianum-N. cattleianum, and P. myrtoides-N. myrtoidis. These double co-generic systems represent good models for comparing final gall shapes and cell lineages functionalities under the perspective of convergent plant-dependent or divergent insect-induced characteristics. Gall induction, and growth and development are similar in both galls, but homologous cell lineages exhibit divergent degrees of cell hypertrophy and directions of elongation. Median cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls hypertrophy the most, while in P. myrtoides galls there is a centrifugal gradient of cell hypertrophy. Cortical cells in P. cattleianum galls tend to anisotropy, while P. myrtoidis galls have isotropically hypertrophied cells. Immunocytochemistry evidences the chemical identity and functional traits of cell lineages: epidermal cells walls have homogalacturonans (HGAs) and galactans, which confer rigidity to sites of enhanced cell division; oil gland cell walls have arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) that help avoiding cell death; and parenchyma cell walls have HGAs, galactans and arabinans, which confer porosity. Variations in such chemical identities are related to specific sites of hypertrophy. Even though the double co-generic models have the same macroscopic phenotype, the globoid morphotype, current analyses indicate that the extended phenotype of N. cattleiani is substantiated by cellular and subcellular specificities.

  6. Profiling the extended phenotype of plant pathogens: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    PubMed

    Preston, Gail M

    2017-04-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in plant pathology is what determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? This question is frequently studied in terms of the role of elicitors and pathogenicity factors in the triggering or overcoming of host defences. However, this focus fails to address the basic question of how the environment in host tissues acts to support or restrict pathogen growth. Efforts to understand this aspect of host-pathogen interactions are commonly confounded by several issues, including the complexity of the plant environment, the artificial nature of many experimental infection systems and the fact that the physiological properties of a pathogen growing in association with a plant can be very different from the properties of the pathogen in culture. It is also important to recognize that the phenotype and evolution of pathogen and host are inextricably linked through their interactions, such that the environment experienced by a pathogen within a host, and its phenotype within the host, is a product of both its interaction with its host and its evolutionary history, including its co-evolution with host plants. As the phenotypic properties of a pathogen within a host cannot be defined in isolation from the host, it may be appropriate to think of pathogens as having an 'extended phenotype' that is the product of their genotype, host interactions and population structure within the host environment. This article reflects on the challenge of defining and studying this extended phenotype, in relation to the questions posed below, and considers how knowledge of the phenotype of pathogens in the host environment could be used to improve disease control. What determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? What aspects of pathogen biology should be considered in describing the extended phenotype of a pathogen within a host? How can we study the extended phenotype in ways that provide insights into the phenotypic properties of pathogens

  7. The social and ecological costs of an ‘over-extended' phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sean M.; Hofmann, Hans A.; Kohda, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Extended phenotypes offer a unique opportunity to experimentally manipulate and identify sources of selection acting on traits under natural conditions. The social cichlid fish Neolamprologus multifasciatus builds nests by digging up aquatic snail shells, creating an extended sexual phenotype that is highly amenable to experimental manipulation through addition of extra shells. Here, we find sources of both positive sexual selection and opposing natural selection acting on this trait; augmenting shell nests increases access to mates, but also increases social aggression and predation risk. Increasing the attractiveness of one male also changed social interactions throughout the social network and altered the entire community structure. Manipulated males produced and received more displays from neighbouring females, who also joined augmented male territories at higher rates than unmanipulated groups. However, males in more attractive territories received more aggression from neighbouring males, potentially as a form of social policing. We also detected a significant ecological cost of the ‘over-extended' phenotype; heterospecific predators usurped augmented nests at higher rates, using them as breeding sites and displacing residents. Using these natural experiments, we find that both social and ecological interactions generate clear sources of selection mediating the expression of an extended phenotype in the wild. PMID:26740619

  8. The social and ecological costs of an 'over-extended' phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Lyndon Alexander; Maguire, Sean M; Hofmann, Hans A; Kohda, Masanori

    2016-01-13

    Extended phenotypes offer a unique opportunity to experimentally manipulate and identify sources of selection acting on traits under natural conditions. The social cichlid fish Neolamprologus multifasciatus builds nests by digging up aquatic snail shells, creating an extended sexual phenotype that is highly amenable to experimental manipulation through addition of extra shells. Here, we find sources of both positive sexual selection and opposing natural selection acting on this trait; augmenting shell nests increases access to mates, but also increases social aggression and predation risk. Increasing the attractiveness of one male also changed social interactions throughout the social network and altered the entire community structure. Manipulated males produced and received more displays from neighbouring females, who also joined augmented male territories at higher rates than unmanipulated groups. However, males in more attractive territories received more aggression from neighbouring males, potentially as a form of social policing. We also detected a significant ecological cost of the 'over-extended' phenotype; heterospecific predators usurped augmented nests at higher rates, using them as breeding sites and displacing residents. Using these natural experiments, we find that both social and ecological interactions generate clear sources of selection mediating the expression of an extended phenotype in the wild.

  9. Environmental change mediates mate choice for an extended phenotype, but not for mate quality.

    PubMed

    Head, Megan L; Fox, Rebecca J; Barber, Iain

    2017-01-01

    Sexual cues, including extended phenotypes, are expected to be reliable indicators of male genetic quality and/or provide information on parental quality. However, the reliability of these cues may be dependent on stability of the environment, with heterogeneity affecting how selection acts on such traits. Here, we test how environmental change mediates mate choice for multiple sexual traits, including an extended phenotype--the structure of male-built nests - in stickleback fish. First, we manipulated the dissolved oxygen (DO) content of water to create high or low DO environments in which male fish built nests. Then we recorded the mate choice of females encountering these males (and their nests), under either the same or reversed DO conditions. Males in high DO environments built more compact nests than those in low DO conditions and males adjusted their nest structure in response to changing conditions. Female mate choice for extended phenotype (male nests) was environmentally dependent (females chose more compact nests in high DO conditions), while female choice for male phenotype was not (females chose large, vigorous males regardless of DO level). Examining mate choice in this dynamic context suggests that females evaluate the reliability of multiple sexual cues, taking into account environmental heterogeneity. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  11. Environmental change mediates mate choice for an extended phenotype, but not for mate quality

    PubMed Central

    Head, Megan L.; Fox, Rebecca J.; Barber, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Sexual cues, including extended phenotypes, are expected to be reliable indicators of male genetic quality and/or provide information on parental quality. However, the reliability of these cues may be dependent on stability of the environment, with heterogeneity affecting how selection acts on such traits. Here, we test how environmental change mediates mate choice for multiple sexual traits, including an extended phenotype–‐the structure of male‐built nests – in stickleback fish. First, we manipulated the dissolved oxygen (DO) content of water to create high or low DO environments in which male fish built nests. Then we recorded the mate choice of females encountering these males (and their nests), under either the same or reversed DO conditions. Males in high DO environments built more compact nests than those in low DO conditions and males adjusted their nest structure in response to changing conditions. Female mate choice for extended phenotype (male nests) was environmentally dependent (females chose more compact nests in high DO conditions), while female choice for male phenotype was not (females chose large, vigorous males regardless of DO level). Examining mate choice in this dynamic context suggests that females evaluate the reliability of multiple sexual cues, taking into account environmental heterogeneity. PMID:27748950

  12. Pathophysiology of protein aggregation and extended phenotyping in filaminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Leber, Yvonne; Odgerel, Zagaa; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Olivé, Montse; Ferrer, Isidro; Onipe, Adekunle; Mihaylov, Mariya; Bilbao, Juan M.; Lee, Hee S.; Höhfeld, Jörg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Kong, Kester; Tegenthoff, Martin; Peters, Sören A.; Stenzel, Werner; Vorgerd, Matthias; Goldfarb, Lev G.; Fürst, Dieter O.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in FLNC cause two distinct types of myopathy. Disease associated with mutations in filamin C rod domain leading to expression of a toxic protein presents with progressive proximal muscle weakness and shows focal destructive lesions of polymorphous aggregates containing desmin, myotilin and other proteins in the affected myofibres; these features correspond to the profile of myofibrillar myopathy. The second variant associated with mutations in the actin-binding domain of filamin C is characterized by weakness of distal muscles and morphologically by non-specific myopathic features. A frameshift mutation in the filamin C rod domain causing haploinsufficiency was also found responsible for distal myopathy with some myofibrillar changes but no protein aggregation typical of myofibrillar myopathies. Controversial data accumulating in the literature require re-evaluation and comparative analysis of phenotypes associated with the position of the FLNC mutation and investigation of the underlying disease mechanisms. This is relevant and necessary for the refinement of diagnostic criteria and developing therapeutic approaches. We identified a p.W2710X mutation in families originating from ethnically diverse populations and re-evaluated a family with a p.V930_T933del mutation. Analysis of the expanded database allows us to refine clinical and myopathological characteristics of myofibrillar myopathy caused by mutations in the rod domain of filamin C. Biophysical and biochemical studies indicate that certain pathogenic mutations in FLNC cause protein misfolding, which triggers aggregation of the mutant filamin C protein and subsequently involves several other proteins. Immunofluorescence analyses using markers for the ubiquitin–proteasome system and autophagy reveal that the affected muscle fibres react to protein aggregate formation with a highly increased expression of chaperones and proteins involved in proteasomal protein degradation and autophagy. However

  13. Morphogenesis of an extended phenotype: four-dimensional ant nest architecture

    PubMed Central

    Minter, Nicholas J.; Franks, Nigel R.; Robson Brown, Katharine A.

    2012-01-01

    Animals produce a variety of structures to modify their environments adaptively. Such structures represent extended phenotypes whose development is rarely studied. To begin to rectify this, we used micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and time-series experiments to obtain the first high-resolution dataset on the four-dimensional growth of ant nests. We show that extrinsic features within the environment, such as the presence of planes between layers of sediment, influence the architecture of Lasius flavus nests, with ants excavating horizontal tunnels along such planes. Intrinsically, the dimensions of the tunnels are associated with individual colonies, the dynamics of excavation can be explained by negative feedback and the angular distribution of tunnels is probably a result of local competition among tunnels for miners. The architecture and dynamics of ant nest excavation therefore result from local interactions of ants with one another and templates inherent in the environment. The influence of the environment on the form of structures has been documented across both biotic and abiotic domains. Our study opens up the utility of CT scanning as a technique for observing the morphogenesis of such structures. PMID:21849386

  14. Identifying Heritable Brain Phenotypes in an Extended Pedigree of Vervet Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Melega, William P.; Service, Susan K.; Lee, Chris; Chen, Kelly; Tu, Zhuowen; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Fairbanks, Lynn A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Woods, Roger P.

    2009-01-01

    The area and volume of brain structural features, as assessed by high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are among the most heritable measures relating to the human central nervous system. We have conducted MRI scanning of all available monkeys over 2 years of age (n=357) from the extended multigenerational pedigree of the Vervet Research Colony (VRC). Using a combination of automated and manual segmentation we have quantified several correlated but distinct brain structural phenotypes. The estimated heritabilities (h2) for these measures in the VRC are higher than those reported previously for such features in humans or in other non human primates (NHP): total brain volume (h2=0.99, standard error (se)=0.06), cerebral volume (h2=0.98, se=0.06), cerebellar volume (h2=0.86, se=0.09), hippocampal volume (h2=0.95, se=0.07) and corpus callosum cross-sectional areas (h2=0.87, se=0.07). These findings indicate that, in the controlled environment and with the inbreeding structure of the VRC, additive genetic factors account for almost all of the observed variance in brain structure, and suggest the potential of the VRC for genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying such variance. PMID:19261882

  15. Nanodosimetric track structure in homogeneous extended beams.

    PubMed

    Conte, V; Moro, D; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2015-09-01

    Physical aspects of particle track structure are important in determining the induction of clustered damage in relevant subcellular structures like the DNA and higher-order genomic structures. The direct measurement of track-structure properties of ionising radiation is feasible today by counting the number of ionisations produced inside a small gas volume. In particular, the so-called track-nanodosimeter, installed at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator complex of LNL, measures ionisation cluster-size distributions in a simulated subcellular structure of dimensions 20 nm, corresponding approximately to the diameter of the chromatin fibre. The target volume is irradiated by pencil beams of primary particles passing at specified impact parameter. To directly relate these measured track-structure data to radiobiological measurements performed in broad homogeneous particle beams, these data can be integrated over the impact parameter. This procedure was successfully applied to 240 MeV carbon ions and compared with Monte Carlo simulations for extended fields.

  16. Altering an extended phenotype reduces intraspecific male aggression and can maintain diversity in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Guy E.; Joyce, Domino A.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced male aggression towards different phenotypes generating negative frequency-dependent intrasexual selection has been suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the invasion and maintenance of novel phenotypes in a population. To date, the best empirical evidence for the phenomenon has been provided by laboratory studies on cichlid fish with different colour polymorphisms. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis in a natural population of Lake Malawi cichlid fish, in which males build sand-castles (bowers) to attract females during seasonal leks. We predicted that if bower shape plays an important role in male aggressive interactions, aggression among conspecific males should decrease when their bower shape is altered. Accordingly, we allocated randomly chosen bowers in a Nyassachromis cf. microcephalus lek into three treatments: control, manipulated to a different shape, and simulated manipulation. We then measured male behaviours and bower shape before and after these treatments. We found that once bower shape was altered, males were involved in significantly fewer aggressive interactions with conspecific males than before manipulation. Mating success was not affected. Our results support the idea that an extended phenotype, such as bower shape, can be important in maintaining polymorphic populations. Specifically, reduced male conspecific aggression towards males with different extended phenotypes (here, bower shapes) may cause negative frequency-dependent selection, allowing the invasion and establishment of a new phenotype (bower builder). This could help our understanding of mechanisms of diversification within populations, and in particular, the overall diversification of bower shapes within Lake Malawi cichlids. PMID:24349896

  17. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  18. Phenotypic variation explains food web structural patterns.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Jean P; DeLong, John P

    2017-10-02

    Food webs (i.e., networks of species and their feeding interactions) share multiple structural features across ecosystems. The factors explaining such similarities are still debated, and the role played by most organismal traits and their intraspecific variation is unknown. Here, we assess how variation in traits controlling predator-prey interactions (e.g., body size) affects food web structure. We show that larger phenotypic variation increases connectivity among predators and their prey as well as total food intake rate. For predators able to eat only a few species (i.e., specialists), low phenotypic variation maximizes intake rates, while the opposite is true for consumers with broader diets (i.e., generalists). We also show that variation sets predator trophic level by determining interaction strengths with prey at different trophic levels. Merging these results, we make two general predictions about the structure of food webs: (i) trophic level should increase with predator connectivity, and (ii) interaction strengths should decrease with prey trophic level. We confirm these predictions empirically using a global dataset of well-resolved food webs. Our results provide understanding of the processes structuring food webs that include functional traits and their naturally occurring variation. Published under the PNAS license.

  19. Social phenotype extended to communities: expanded multilevel social selection analysis reveals fitness consequences of interspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Campobello, Daniela; Hare, James F; Sarà, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    In social species, fitness consequences are associated with both individual and social phenotypes. Social selection analysis has quantified the contribution of conspecific social traits to individual fitness. There has been no attempt, however, to apply a social selection approach to quantify the fitness implications of heterospecific social phenotypes. Here, we propose a novel social selection based approach integrating the role of all social interactions at the community level. We extended multilevel selection analysis by including a term accounting for the group phenotype of heterospecifics. We analyzed nest activity as a model social trait common to two species, the lesser kestrel (Falco naumanni) and jackdaw (Corvus monedula), nesting in either single- or mixed-species colonies. By recording reproductive outcome as a measure of relative fitness, our results reveal an asymmetric system wherein only jackdaw breeding performance was affected by the activity phenotypes of both conspecific and heterospecific neighbors. Our model incorporating heterospecific social phenotypes is applicable to animal communities where interacting species share a common social trait, thus allowing an assessment of the selection pressure imposed by interspecific interactions in nature. Finally, we discuss the potential role of ecological limitations accounting for random or preferential assortments among interspecific social phenotypes, and the implications of such processes to community evolution. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. A molecular genetic study of autism and related phenotypes in extended pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Efforts to uncover the risk genotypes associated with the familial nature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have had limited success. The study of extended pedigrees, incorporating additional ASD-related phenotypes into linkage analysis, offers an alternative approach to the search for inherited ASD susceptibility variants that complements traditional methods used to study the genetics of ASD. Methods We examined evidence for linkage in 19 extended pedigrees ascertained through ASD cases spread across at least two (and in most cases three) nuclear families. Both compound phenotypes (i.e., ASD and, in non-ASD individuals, the broad autism phenotype) and more narrowly defined components of these phenotypes, e.g., social and repetitive behavior, pragmatic language, and anxiety, were examined. The overarching goal was to maximize the aggregate information available on the maximum number of individuals and to disaggregate syndromic phenotypes in order to examine the genetic underpinnings of more narrowly defined aspects of ASD behavior. Results Results reveal substantial between-family locus heterogeneity and support the importance of previously reported ASD loci in inherited, familial, forms of ASD. Additional loci, not seen in the ASD analyses, show evidence for linkage to the broad autism phenotype (BAP). BAP peaks are well supported by multiple subphenotypes (including anxiety, pragmatic language, and social behavior) showing linkage to regions overlapping with the compound BAP phenotype. Whereas 'repetitive behavior’, showing the strongest evidence for linkage (Posterior Probability of Linkage = 62% at 6p25.2-24.3, and 69% at 19p13.3), appears to be linked to novel regions not detected with other compound or narrow phenotypes examined in this study. Conclusions These results provide support for the presence of key features underlying the complexity of the genetic architecture of ASD: substantial between-family locus heterogeneity, that the BAP appears

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nasolabial fold discontinuity during speech as a possible extended cleft phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Karen L; Neiswanger, Katherine; Cohn, Ellen; Desensi, Rebecca; Brandon, Carla; Bardi, Kathleen; Marazita, Mary L

    2013-03-01

    Objective : This exploratory research sought to extend the cleft phenotype by identifying movement-related soft tissue appearance changes in the midfacial region in individuals with cleft lip/palate or those with genetic susceptibility to cleft lip/palate (unaffected relatives). The cleft phenotype (clinically identified orofacial cleft or subclinical orbicularis oris defect) was hypothesized to be associated with movement related appearance changes in the midfacial region, e.g., with furrowing and dimpling during speech. Design : Changes in the appearance of skin in the midfacial region, including a newly identified phenotypic feature, nasolabial fold (NLF) discontinuity, were described and compared across groups. Participants : Individuals with cleft lip (n  =  42), unaffected relatives of persons with a cleft (n  =  57) and healthy controls (n  =  41) were compared. Results : Frequencies of NLF discontinuity differed across cleft, relative, and control groups. NLF discontinuities were observed more frequently in individuals with a cleft phenotype (overt cleft or previously identified orbicularis oris muscle defect) than in those with no underlying muscular defect (Fisher exact test, P  =  .014). Conclusion : Results suggest that the appearance of facial soft tissue during movement of the midface is moderated at least in part by underlying cleft risk factors, indicating certain facial movements as candidate physical markers for extension of the cleft phenotype.

  3. Extended Solar System Structures Observed by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Masci, Frank; Cutri, Roc; Walker, Russell; Mainzer, Amy; Bauer, James; Stevenson, Rachel; Tricarico, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Extended structures associated with recent asteroid collisions and comets were detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, which conducted the first survey of the thermal emission of the sky in 1983. Twenty-seven years later, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), conducted a more sensitive survey of the sky at wavelengths spanning the shorter IRAS bandpasses and detected many of these same structures. Initial identifications include asteroid dust bands associated with collisions giving rise to the Karin and Beagle clusters within the Koronis and Themis asteroid families, respectively. An additional pair of bands is associated with the collision giving rise to the Veritas asteroid family. Comet trails associated with short-period comets have also been observed. Type 2 trails, detected by IRAS and possibly associated with asteroid collisions within the past few thousand years, have yet to be identified. Because WISE is significantly more sensitive than IRAS in the mid-infrared, it has detected some trails extending much further over their orbits and will greatly expand the catalog of trails detected in addition to those observed by IRAS and Spitzer (the latter by targeted observations). WISE and the yet more sensitive NEOCAM survey telescope will provide important insights into the recent collisional history of the asteroid belt and the nature and evolution of comets.

  4. Multi-system Component Phenotypes of Bipolar Disorder for Genetic Investigations of Extended Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Fears, Scott C.; Service, Susan K.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Ramirez, Margarita; Castrillón, Gabriel; Gomez-Franco, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C.; Montoya, Gabriel; Montoya, Patricia; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M.; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B.; Ericson, Marissa; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Luykx, Jurjen J.; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A.; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier; Glahn, David C.; Ospina-Duque, Jorge; Risch, Neil; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Thompson, Paul M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I.; Sabatti, Chiara; Freimer, Nelson B.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Genetic factors contribute to risk for bipolar disorder (BP), yet its pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A focus on measuring multi-system quantitative traits that may be components of BP psychopathology may enable genetic dissection of this complex disorder, and investigation of extended pedigrees from genetically isolated populations may facilitate the detection of specific genetic variants that impact on BP as well as its component phenotypes. OBJECTIVE To identify quantitative neurocognitive, temperament-related, and neuroanatomic phenotypes that appear heritable and associated with severe bipolar disorder (BP-I), and therefore suitable for genetic linkage and association studies aimed at identifying variants contributing to BP-I risk. DESIGN Multi-generational pedigree study in two closely related, genetically isolated populations: the Central Valley of Costa Rica (CVCR) and Antioquia, Colombia (ANT). PARTICIPANTS 738 individuals, all from CVCR and ANT pedigrees, of whom 181 are affected with BP-I. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Familial aggregation (heritability) and association with BP-I of 169 quantitative neurocognitive, temperament, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) phenotypes. RESULTS Seventy-five percent (126) of the phenotypes investigated were significantly heritable, and 31% (53) were associated with BP-I. About 1/4 of the phenotypes, including measures from each phenotype domain, were both heritable and associated with BP-I. Neuroimaging phenotypes, particularly cortical thickness in prefrontal and temporal regions, and volume and microstructural integrity of the corpus callosum, represented the most promising candidate traits for genetic mapping related to BP based on strong heritability and association with disease. Analyses of phenotypic and genetic covariation identified substantial correlations among the traits, at least some of which share a common underlying genetic architecture. CONCLUSIONS AND

  5. Extending Injury- and Disease-Resistant CNS Phenotypes by Repetitive Epigenetic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gidday, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist – in effect, expanding conditioning’s “therapeutic window” – would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1–3 days) protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances post-ischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious but also practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease. PMID:25784897

  6. Diet-induced co-variation between architectural and physicochemical plasticity in an extended phenotype.

    PubMed

    Blamires, Sean J; Hasemore, Matthew; Martens, Penny J; Kasumovic, Michael M

    2017-03-01

    The adaptive benefits of extended phenotypic plasticity are imprecisely defined due to a paucity of experiments examining traits that are manipulable and measurable across environments. Spider webs are often used as models to explore the adaptive benefits of variations in extended phenotypes across environments. Nonetheless, our understanding of the adaptive nature of the plastic responses of spider webs is impeded when web architectures and silk physicochemical properties appear to co-vary. An opportunity to examine this co-variation is presented by modifying prey items while measuring web architectures and silk physiochemical properties. Here, we performed two experiments to assess the nature of the association between web architectures and gluey silk properties when the orb web spider Argiope keyserlingi was fed a diet that varied in either mass and energy or prey size and feeding frequency. We found web architectures and gluey silk physicochemical properties to co-vary across treatments in both experiments. Specifically, web capture area co-varied with gluey droplet morphometrics, thread stickiness and salt concentrations when prey mass and energy were manipulated, and spiral spacing co-varied with gluey silk salt concentrations when prey size and feeding frequency were manipulated. We explained our results as A. keyserlingi plastically shifting its foraging strategy as multiple prey parameters simultaneously varied. We confirmed and extended previous work by showing that spiders use a variety of prey cues to concurrently adjust web and silk traits across different feeding regimes.

  7. Advantages and pitfalls of an extended gene panel for investigating complex neurometabolic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Emma S.; Papandreou, Apostolos; Drury, Suzanne; Boustred, Christopher; Yue, Wyatt W.; Wedatilake, Yehani; Beesley, Clare; Jacques, Thomas S.; Anderson, Glenn; Abulhoul, Lara; Broomfield, Alex; Cleary, Maureen; Grunewald, Stephanie; Varadkar, Sophia M.; Lench, Nick; Rahman, Shamima; Gissen, Paul; Clayton, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Neurometabolic disorders are markedly heterogeneous, both clinically and genetically, and are characterized by variable neurological dysfunction accompanied by suggestive neuroimaging or biochemical abnormalities. Despite early specialist input, delays in diagnosis and appropriate treatment initiation are common. Next-generation sequencing approaches still have limitations but are already enabling earlier and more efficient diagnoses in these patients. We designed a gene panel targeting 614 genes causing inborn errors of metabolism and tested its diagnostic efficacy in a paediatric cohort of 30 undiagnosed patients presenting with variable neurometabolic phenotypes. Genetic defects that could, at least partially, explain observed phenotypes were identified in 53% of cases. Where biochemical abnormalities pointing towards a particular gene defect were present, our panel identified diagnoses in 89% of patients. Phenotypes attributable to defects in more than one gene were seen in 13% of cases. The ability of in silico tools, including structure-guided prediction programmes to characterize novel missense variants were also interrogated. Our study expands the genetic, clinical and biochemical phenotypes of well-characterized (POMGNT1, TPP1) and recently identified disorders (PGAP2, ACSF3, SERAC1, AFG3L2, DPYS). Overall, our panel was accurate and efficient, demonstrating good potential for applying similar approaches to clinically and biochemically diverse neurometabolic disease cohorts. PMID:27604308

  8. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Khajanchi, Bijay K.; Azmi, Ishrat J.; Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Mahmood, Belal; Akter, Mahmuda; Banik, Atanu; Alim, Rumana; Navarro, Armando; Perez, Gabriel; Cravioto, Alejandro; Talukder, Kaisar A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to cephalosporins in Enterobacteriaceae is mainly due to the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Little is known about ESBL-producing bacteria in Bangladesh. Therefore, the study presents results of phenotypic and molecular characterization of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from hospitals in Bangladesh. Methods A total of 339 E. coli isolated from patients with urinary tract and wound infections attending three different medical hospitals in urban and rural areas of Bangladesh between 2003–2007 were screened for ESBL-production by the double disk diffusion test. Isolates with ESBL-phenotype were further characterized by antibiotic susceptibility testing, PCR and sequencing of different β-lactamase and virulence genes, serotyping, and XbaI-macrorestriction followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results We identified 40 E. coli with ESBL phenotype. These isolates were resistant to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, aztreonam, cefepime, and nalidixic acid but remained susceptible to imipenem. All but one isolate were additionally resistant to ciprofloxacin, and 3 isolates were resistant to cefoxitin. ESBL genes of blaCTX-M-1-group were detected in all isolates; blaTEM-type and blaOXA-1-type genes were detected in 33 (82.5%) and 19 (47.5%) isolates, respectively. Virulence genes that are present in diarrhoeagenic E. coli were not found. Class-1 integron was present in 20 (50%) isolates. All the ESBL-producing E. coli isolates harbored plasmids ranging between 1.1 and 120 MDa. PFGE-typing revealed 26 different pulsotypes, but identical pulsotype showed 6 isolates of serotype O25:H4. Conclusion The prevalence of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing E. coli isolates appears to be high and the majority of the isolates were positive for blaCTX-M. Although there was genetic heterogeneity among isolates, presence of a cluster of isolates belonging to serotype O25:H4 indicates dissemination of the pandemic

  9. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. I. Phenotypes of Tn5 insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.A.; Tu, J.K.; Ogawa, J.; Sanga, R.; Fisher, R.F.; Long, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutant WL131, a derivative of wild-type strain 102F51, was complemented by a clone bank of wild-type R. meliloti 1021 DNA, and clone pRmJT5 was recovered. Transfer of pRmJT5 conferred alfalfa nodulation on other Rhizobium species, indicating a role in host range determination for pRmJT5. Mutagenesis of pRmJT5 revealed several segments in which transposon insertion causes delay in nodulation, and/or marked reduction of the number of nodules formed on host alfalfa plants. The set of mutants indicated five regions in which nod genes are located; one mutant, nod-216, is located in a region not previously reported to encode a nodulation gene. Other mutant phenotypes correlated with the positions of open reading frames for nodH, nodF and nodE, and with a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. A mutant in nodG had no altered phenotype in this strain. One nodulation mutant was shown to be a large deletion of the common nod gene region. The authors present a discussion comparing the various studies made on this extended nod gene region.

  10. Next-generation Sequencing Extends the Phenotypic Spectrum for LCA5 Mutations: Novel LCA5 Mutations in Cone Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Sheng, Xunlun; Sun, Xiantao; Zhang, Yuxin; Jiang, Chao; Li, Huiping; Ding, Sijia; Liu, Yani; Liu, Wenzhou; Li, Zili; Zhao, Chen

    2016-04-12

    We aim to characterize the clinical features and genetic causes for two affected siblings from a Chinese family with cone dystrophy (CD). Two patients and four unaffected family members were recruited and received complete ophthalmic examinations. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood samples from all patients. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach followed by intrafamilal cosegregation and in silico analyses were employed to determine the genetic defects. Ophthalmic evaluations finalized the clinical diagnosis of CD for the two patients in this family, both of whom presented macular atrophy with no remarkable changes in the peripheral retina. Comprehensive genetic screening approach revealed biallelic missense mutations in the Leber congenital amaurosis 5 (LCA5) gene, p.[Ala212Pro];[Tyr441Cys], as disease causative for this family. Both mutations were novel. The first substitution was predicted to eliminate a hydrogen bond and alter the tertiary structure of lebercilin, protein encoded by LCA5. We for the first time report novel biallelic LCA5 mutations in causing CD. Our study extends the phenotypic and genotypic spectrums for LCA5-associated retinopathies and better illustrates its genotype-phenotype correlations, which would help with better genetic diagnosis, prognosis, and personalized treatment for CD patients.

  11. IRAS observations of extended zodiacal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.

    1988-01-01

    In 1983, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite discovered two pairs of dust bands, straddling the ecliptic plane and located in the asteroid belt. New analysis of the IRAS data has resulted in the detection of as many as eight additional bands, spread over more than 40 deg of ecliptic latitude. Dust band morphology is found to vary between different band pairs, having a typical apparent width of a few degrees. This limits the total number of bands which can be distinguished to near the number observed. The Tempel 2 and Encke dust trails are observed to extend over much more of their orbits than had been previously reported, and a new type of dust trail is found which has a relatively large angular width and no imbedded cometary source.

  12. Introduction: Dissipative localized structures in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Taki, Majid; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2007-09-01

    Localized structures belong to the class of dissipative structures found far from equilibrium. Contributions from the most representative groups working on a various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, mathematics, optics, and laser physics are presented. The aim of this issue is to gather specialists from these fields towards a cross-fertilization among these active areas of research and thereby to present an overview of the state of art in the formation and the characterization of dissipative localized structures. Nonlinear optics and laser physics have an important part in this issue because of potential applications in information technology. In particular, localized structures could be used as "bits" for parallel information storage and processing.

  13. Think laterally: horizontal gene transfer from symbiotic microbes may extend the phenotype of marine sessile hosts

    PubMed Central

    Degnan, Sandie M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the origin of the animal kingdom, marine animals have lived in association with viruses, prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, often as symbionts. This long and continuous interaction has provided ample opportunity not only for the evolution of intimate interactions such as sharing of metabolic pathways, but also for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of non-metazoan genes into metazoan genomes. The number of demonstrated cases of inter-kingdom HGT is currently small, such that it is not yet widely appreciated as a significant player in animal evolution. Sessile marine invertebrates that vertically inherit bacterial symbionts, that have no dedicated germ line, or that bud or excise pluripotent somatic cells during their life history may be particularly receptive to HGT from their symbionts. Closer scrutiny of the growing number of genomes being accrued for these animals may thus reveal HGT as a regular source of novel variation that can function to extend the host phenotype metabolically, morphologically, or even behaviorally. Taxonomic identification of symbionts will help to address the intriguing question of whether past HGT events may constrain contemporary symbioses. PMID:25477875

  14. Plasticity in extended phenotypes: orb web architectural responses to variations in prey parameters.

    PubMed

    Blamires, Sean J

    2010-09-15

    A spider orb web is an extended phenotype; it modifies and interacts with the environment, influencing spider physiology. Orb webs are plastic, responding to variations in prey parameters. Studies attempting to understand how nutrients influence spider orb-web plasticity have been hampered by the inability to decouple prey nutrients from other, highly correlated, prey factors and the intrinsic link between prey protein and prey energy concentration. I analyzed the nutrient concentrations of cockroaches, and adult and juvenile crickets to devise experiments that controlled prey protein concentration while varying prey size, ingested mass, energy concentration and feeding frequency of the orb web spider Argiope keyserlingi. I found that A. keyserlingi alters overall architecture according to feeding frequency. Decoration length was inversely related to ingested prey mass and/or energy density in one experiment but directly related to ingested prey mass in another. These contradictory results suggest that factors not examined in this study have a confounding influence on decoration plasticity. As decorations attract prey as well as predators decreasing decoration investment may, in some instances, be attributable to benefits no longer outweighing the risks. Web area was altered according to feeding frequency, and mesh size altered according to feeding frequency and prey length. The number of radii in orb webs was unaffected by prey parameters. A finite amount of silk can be invested in the orb web, so spiders trade-off smaller mesh size with larger web capture area, explaining why feeding frequency influenced both web area and mesh size. Mesh size is additionally responsive to prey size via sensory cues, with spiders constructing webs suitable for catching the most common or most profitable prey.

  15. The structure of phenotypic personality traits.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, L R

    1993-01-01

    This personal historical article traces the development of the Big-Five factor structure, whose growing acceptance by personality researchers has profoundly influenced the scientific study of individual differences. The roots of this taxonomy lie in the lexical hypothesis and the insights of Sir Francis Galton, the prescience of L. L. Thurstone, the legacy of Raymond B. Cattell, and the seminal analyses of Tupes and Christal. Paradoxically, the present popularity of this model owes much to its many critics, each of whom tried to replace it, but failed. In reaction, there have been a number of attempts to assimilate other models into the five-factor structure. Lately, some practical implications of the emerging consensus can be seen in such contexts as personnel selection and classification.

  16. Extended phenotypes in a boy and his mother with oto-palato-digital-syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Kraschl, Raimund; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    We describe additional phenotypic features in a boy and his mother. Both manifested the phenotypic/genotypic correlation of oto-palato-digital syndrome type II. The mother's radiographs showed wormian bones of the skull, and paranasal bossing, her feet showed bilateral fusion of the cuboid with the lateral cuneiform bone with subsequent development of metatarsus varus associated with dysplastic distal phalanges.

  17. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy: Electrical and Structural Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Deniz; Brunckhorst, Corinna; Duru, Firat

    2016-01-01

    This overview gives an update on the molecular mechanisms, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). ACM is mostly hereditary and associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins of the intercalated disc. Three subtypes have been proposed: the classical right-dominant subtype generally referred to as ARVC/D, biventricular forms with early biventricular involvement and left-dominant subtypes with predominant LV involvement. Typical symptoms include palpitations, arrhythmic (pre)syncope and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias, which typically occur in athletes. At later stages, heart failure may occur. Diagnosis is established with the 2010 Task Force Criteria (TFC). Modern imaging tools are crucial for ACM diagnosis, including both echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detecting functional and structural alternations. Of note, structural findings often become visible after electrical alterations, such as premature ventricular beats, ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT). 12-lead ECG is important to assess for depolarisation and repolarisation abnormalities, including T-wave inversions as the most common ECG abnormality. Family history and the detection of causative mutations, mostly affecting the desmosome, have been incorporated in the TFC, and stress the importance of cascade family screening. Differential diagnoses include idiopathic right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) VT, sarcoidosis, congenital heart disease, myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, athlete’s heart, Brugada syndrome and RV infarction. Therapeutic strategies include restriction from endurance and competitive sports, β-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs, heart failure medication, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and endocardial/epicardial catheter ablation. PMID:27617087

  18. Structural Phenotyping of Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Sheehy, Sean Paul; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-01-01

    Summary Structural phenotyping based on classical image feature detection has been adopted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind genetically or pharmacologically induced changes in cell morphology. Here, we developed a set of 11 metrics to capture the increasing sarcomere organization that occurs intracellularly during striated muscle cell development. To test our metrics, we analyzed the localization of the contractile protein α-actinin in a variety of primary and stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes. Further, we combined these metrics with data mining algorithms to unbiasedly score the phenotypic maturity of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:25733020

  19. HMG Nuclear Proteins: Linking Chromatin Structure to Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    I. Summary Although the three families of mammalian HMG proteins (HMGA, HMGB and HMGN) participate in many of the same nuclear processes, each family plays its own unique role in modulating chromatin structure and regulating genomic function. This review focuses on the similarities and differences in the mechanisms by which the different HMG families impact chromatin structure and influence cellular phenotype. The biological implications of having three architectural transcription factor families with complementary, but partially overlapping, nuclear functions are discussed. PMID:19748605

  20. Nasolabial Fold Discontinuity During Speech as a Possible Extended Cleft Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Karen; Cohn, Ellen; Neiswanger, Katherine; Bardi, Kathleen; DeSensi, Rebecca; Brandon, Carla; Marazita, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Objective This exploratory research sought to identify movement related soft tissue changes in the midfacial region in individuals with a cleft lip/palate and unaffected relatives compared to controls. The cleft phenotype (clinically identified cleft or occult Orbicularis oris muscle defect) was hypothesized to affect movement in the midfacial region, leading to furrowing and dimpling during speech. Design Changes in the appearance of skin in the midfacial region, including a newly identified feature, nasolabial fold discontinuity (NLF discontinuity), were described and compared across groups. Participants Individuals with cleft lip (n= 42) and unaffected relatives of persons with a cleft (n = 57) were compared to healthy controls (n= 41). Results NLF discontinuities were observed more frequently in individuals with a cleft phenotype (overt cleft or OOM defect) than in those with no underlying muscular defect (Fisher Exact test, p = .014). Conclusion Results suggest that movement of the muscles of facial expression is moderated at least in part by underlying cleft risk factors, indicating certain facial movements as candidate physical marker for extension of the cleft phenotype. PMID:22273627

  1. Novel TTC37 Mutations in a Patient with Immunodeficiency without Diarrhea: Extending the Phenotype of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rider, Nicholas L; Boisson, Bertrand; Jyonouchi, Soma; Hanson, Eric P; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Cassanova, Jean-Laurent; Orange, Jordan S

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased genetic diagnosis has increasingly associated seemingly unrelated somatic and immunological phenotypes. We report a male infant who presented within the first year of life with physical growth impairment, feeding difficulties, hyperemesis without diarrhea, and abnormal hair findings suggestive of trichorrhexis nodosa. With advancing age, moderate global developmental delay, susceptibility to frequent viral illnesses, otitis media, and purulent conjunctivitis were identified. Because of the repeated infections, an immunological evaluation was pursued and identified impaired antibody memory responses following pneumococcal vaccine administration. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy and nutritional support were employed as mainstays of therapy. The child is now aged 12 years and still without diarrhea. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the TTC37 gene, a known cause of the trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES). This case extends the known phenotype of THES and defines a potential subset for inclusion as an immune overlap syndrome.

  2. Novel TTC37 Mutations in a Patient with Immunodeficiency without Diarrhea: Extending the Phenotype of Trichohepatoenteric Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Nicholas L.; Boisson, Bertrand; Jyonouchi, Soma; Hanson, Eric P.; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Orange, Jordan S.

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased genetic diagnosis has increasingly associated seemingly unrelated somatic and immunological phenotypes. We report a male infant who presented within the first year of life with physical growth impairment, feeding difficulties, hyperemesis without diarrhea, and abnormal hair findings suggestive of trichorrhexis nodosa. With advancing age, moderate global developmental delay, susceptibility to frequent viral illnesses, otitis media, and purulent conjunctivitis were identified. Because of the repeated infections, an immunological evaluation was pursued and identified impaired antibody memory responses following pneumococcal vaccine administration. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy and nutritional support were employed as mainstays of therapy. The child is now aged 12 years and still without diarrhea. Whole exome sequencing identified compound heterozygous mutations in the TTC37 gene, a known cause of the trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES). This case extends the known phenotype of THES and defines a potential subset for inclusion as an immune overlap syndrome. PMID:25688341

  3. Evolution of sexual dimorphism in phenotypic covariance structure in Phymata.

    PubMed

    Punzalan, David; Rowe, Locke

    2015-06-01

    Sexual dimorphism is a consequence of both sex-specific selection and potential constraints imposed by a shared genetic architecture underlying sexually homologous traits. However, genetic architecture is expected to evolve to mitigate these constraints, allowing the sexes to approach their respective optimal mean phenotype. In addition, sex-specific selection is expected to generate sexual dimorphism of trait covariance structure (e.g., the phenotypic covariance matrix, P), but previous empirical work has not fully addressed this prediction. We compared patterns of phenotypic divergence, for three traits in seven taxa in the insect genus Phymata (Reduviidae), to ask whether sexual dimorphism in P is common and whether its magnitude relates to the extent of sexual dimorphism in trait means. We found that sexual dimorphism in both mean and covariance structure was pervasive but also that the multivariate distance between sex-specific means was correlated with sex differences in the leading eigenvector of P, while accounting for uncertainty in phylogenetic relationships. Collectively, our findings suggest that sexual dimorphism in covariance structure may be a common but underappreciated feature of dioecious populations.

  4. A cubic extended interior penalty function for structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an optimization procedure for the minimum weight design of complex structures. The procedure is based on a new cubic extended interior penalty function (CEIPF) used with the sequence of unconstrained minimization technique (SUMT) and Newton's method. The Hessian matrix of the penalty function is approximated using only constraints and their derivatives. The CEIPF is designed to minimize the error in the approximation of the Hessian matrix, and as a result the number of structural analyses required is small and independent of the number of design variables. Three example problems are reported. The number of structural analyses is reduced by as much as 50 per cent below previously reported results.

  5. A cubic extended interior penalty function for structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an optimization procedure for the minimum weight design of complex structures. The procedure is based on a new cubic extended interior penalty function (CEIPF) used with the sequence of unconstrained minimization technique (SUMT) and Newton's method. The Hessian matrix of the penalty function is approximated using only constraints and their derivatives. The CEIPF is designed to minimize the error in the approximation of the Hessian matrix, and as a result the number of structural analyses required is small and independent of the number of design variables. Three example problems are reported. The number of structural analyses is reduced by as much as 50 per cent below previously reported results.

  6. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of bimetallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Electronic and magnetic properties strongly depend on the structure of the material, especially on the crystal symmetry and chemical environment. In nanoparticles, the break of symmetry at the surface may yield different physical properties with respect to the corresponding bulk material. A useful tool to investigate the electronic structure, magnetic behaviour and local crystallographic structure is X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this review, recent developments in the field of extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements and in the analysis methods for structural investigations of bimetallic nanoparticles are highlighted. The standard analysis based on Fourier transforms is compared to the relatively new field of wavelet transforms that have the potential to outperform traditional analysis, especially in bimetallic alloys. As an example, the lattice expansion and inhomogeneous alloying found in FePt nanoparticles is presented, and this is discussed below in terms of the influence of employed density functional theory calculations on the magnetic properties. PMID:21977436

  7. Accurate NMR structures through minimization of an extended hybrid energy.

    PubMed

    Nilges, Michael; Bernard, Aymeric; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Malliavin, Thérèse; Habeck, Michael; Rieping, Wolfgang

    2008-09-10

    The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X-ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications-for example, in homology modeling.

  8. Sexual and natural selection in the evolution of extended phenotypes: the use of green nesting material in starlings.

    PubMed

    Rubalcaba, J G; Polo, V; Maia, R; Rubenstein, D R; Veiga, J P

    2016-08-01

    Although sexual selection is typically considered the predominant force driving the evolution of ritualized sexual behaviours, natural selection may also play an important and often underappreciated role. The use of green aromatic plants among nesting birds has been interpreted as a component of extended phenotype that evolved either via natural selection due to potential sanitary functions or via sexual selection as a signal of male attractiveness. Here, we compared both hypotheses using comparative methods in starlings, a group where this behaviour is widespread. We found that the use of green plants was positively related to male-biased size dimorphism and that it was most likely to occur among cavity-nesting species. These results suggest that this behaviour is likely favoured by sexual selection, but also related to its sanitary use in response to higher parasite loads in cavities. We speculate that the use of green plants in starlings may be facilitated by cavity nesting and was subsequently co-opted as a sexual signal by males. Our results represent an example of how an extended phenotypic component of males becomes sexually selected by females. Thus, both natural selection and sexual selection are necessary to fully understand the evolution of ritualized behaviours involved in courtship.

  9. Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2011-07-19

    The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U═O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis

  10. Cosmetics as a Feature of the Extended Human Phenotype: Modulation of the Perception of Biologically Important Facial Signals

    PubMed Central

    Etcoff, Nancy L.; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E.; Vickery, Sarah A.; House, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  11. Cosmetics as a feature of the extended human phenotype: modulation of the perception of biologically important facial signals.

    PubMed

    Etcoff, Nancy L; Stock, Shannon; Haley, Lauren E; Vickery, Sarah A; House, David M

    2011-01-01

    Research on the perception of faces has focused on the size, shape, and configuration of inherited features or the biological phenotype, and largely ignored the effects of adornment, or the extended phenotype. Research on the evolution of signaling has shown that animals frequently alter visual features, including color cues, to attract, intimidate or protect themselves from conspecifics. Humans engage in conscious manipulation of visual signals using cultural tools in real time rather than genetic changes over evolutionary time. Here, we investigate one tool, the use of color cosmetics. In two studies, we asked viewers to rate the same female faces with or without color cosmetics, and we varied the style of makeup from minimal (natural), to moderate (professional), to dramatic (glamorous). Each look provided increasing luminance contrast between the facial features and surrounding skin. Faces were shown for 250 ms or for unlimited inspection time, and subjects rated them for attractiveness, competence, likeability and trustworthiness. At 250 ms, cosmetics had significant positive effects on all outcomes. Length of inspection time did not change the effect for competence or attractiveness. However, with longer inspection time, the effect of cosmetics on likability and trust varied by specific makeup looks, indicating that cosmetics could impact automatic and deliberative judgments differently. The results suggest that cosmetics can create supernormal facial stimuli, and that one way they may do so is by exaggerating cues to sexual dimorphism. Our results provide evidence that judgments of facial trustworthiness and attractiveness are at least partially separable, that beauty has a significant positive effect on judgment of competence, a universal dimension of social cognition, but has a more nuanced effect on the other universal dimension of social warmth, and that the extended phenotype significantly influences perception of biologically important signals at first

  12. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure in photoelectron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Rothberg, G.M.; Choudhary, K.M.; denBoer, M.L.; Williams, G.P.; Hecht, M.H.; Lindau, I.

    1984-09-17

    We report the first definitive measurements of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) made by monitoring the direct photoelectron emission as a function of photon energy. We have measured EXAFS associated with the Mn 3p and F 2s core levels in evaporated films of MnF/sub 2/ and found good agreement with bulk transmission EXAFS associated with the Mn 1s level. Photoelectron EXAFS makes possible surface-sensitive structural determinations using vacuum uv radiation on a virtually unlimited range of systems.

  13. Comparison of Nine Phenotypic Methods for Detection of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Production by Enterobacteriaceae▿

    PubMed Central

    Garrec, Hélène; Drieux-Rouzet, Laurence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Jarlier, Vincent; Robert, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    The detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing (ESBL) bacteria is of importance for infection control and epidemiological surveillance. We aimed to compare phenotypic methods available in the routine laboratory and to evaluate two-step strategies using these methods for the detection of ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae. Two methods used for routine susceptibility testing (Vitek2 and disk diffusion methods) and seven methods designed for the detection of ESBL production (ESBL Etests, combination disks, double-disk synergy [DDS] methods on Mueller-Hinton [MH] agar and cloxacillin-containing MH agar, and the Cica-Beta test) were tested against 107 strains of Enterobacteriaceae not susceptible to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. All strains were screened for the presence of acquired ESBL-encoding genes by PCR, and the PCR result was considered the gold standard for evaluation of the other test methods. Among the 107 strains, 52 (49%) were ESBL positive. With Vitek2, sensitivities were the highest when using extended cards (73% to 79%), but 25% to 31% of the strains yielded indeterminate results. For the disk diffusion method, sensitivities were the highest (96%) when testing at least cefotaxime, cefepime, and a third compound (ceftazidime, cefpodoxime, or aztreonam). For the specific methods, specificities ranged from 62% (ceftazidime ESBL Etest) to 100% (DDS using a disk spacing of 20 mm). When a method designed for ESBL detection was used on strains considered ESBL negative or with an indeterminate result by a first routine susceptibility method, sensitivities reached 100% for a majority of combinations. In conclusion, two-step strategies using phenotypic methods available in most clinical laboratories may reach a sensitivity of 100% for ESBL detection among a large panel of species, including AmpC producers, providing a sensible choice of tests. PMID:21248086

  14. Association between brain structure and phenotypic characteristics in pedophilia.

    PubMed

    Poeppl, Timm B; Nitschke, Joachim; Santtila, Pekka; Schecklmann, Martin; Langguth, Berthold; Greenlee, Mark W; Osterheider, Michael; Mokros, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    Studies applying structural neuroimaging to pedophiles are scarce and have shown conflicting results. Although first findings suggested reduced volume of the amygdala, pronounced gray matter decreases in frontal regions were observed in another group of pedophilic offenders. When compared to non-sexual offenders instead of community controls, pedophiles revealed deficiencies in white matter only. The present study sought to test the hypotheses of structurally compromised prefrontal and limbic networks and whether structural brain abnormalities are related to phenotypic characteristics in pedophiles. We compared gray matter volume of male pedophilic offenders and non-sexual offenders from high-security forensic hospitals using voxel-based morphometry in cross-sectional and correlational whole-brain analyses. The significance threshold was set to p < .05, corrected for multiple comparisons. Compared to controls, pedophiles exhibited a volume reduction of the right amygdala (small volume corrected). Within the pedophilic group, pedosexual interest and sexual recidivism were correlated with gray matter decrease in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (r = -.64) and insular cortex (r = -.45). Lower age of victims was strongly associated with gray matter reductions in the orbitofrontal cortex (r = .98) and angular gyri bilaterally (r = .70 and r = .93). Our findings of specifically impaired neural networks being related to certain phenotypic characteristics might account for the heterogeneous results in previous neuroimaging studies of pedophilia. The neuroanatomical abnormalities in pedophilia seem to be of a dimensional rather than a categorical nature, supporting the notion of a multifaceted disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Concomitant Hamiltonian and topological structures of extended magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Miloshevich, George; Morrison, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes the unique geometric properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and demonstrates how such features are inherited by extended MHD, viz. models that incorporate two-fluid effects (the Hall term and electron inertia). The generalized helicities, and other geometric expressions for these models are presented in a topological context, emphasizing their universal facets. Some of the results presented include: the generalized Kelvin circulation theorems; the existence of two Lie-dragged 2-forms; and two concomitant helicities that can be studied via the Jones polynomial, which is widely utilized in Chern-Simons theory. The ensuing commonality is traced to the existence of an underlying Hamiltonian structure for all the extended MHD models, exemplified by the presence of a unique noncanonical Poisson bracket, and its associated energy.

  16. The extended clinical phenotype of 64 patients with DOCK8 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Karin R.; Gertz, E. Michael; Keles, Sevgi; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Sigmund, Elena C.; Glocker, Cristina; Saghafi, Shiva; Pourpak, Zahra; Ceja, Ruben; Sassi, Atfa; Graham, Laura E.; Massaad, Michel J.; Mellouli, Fethi; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Khemiri, Monia; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Etzioni, Amos; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Thiel, Jens; Schulze, Ilka; Al-Herz, Waleed; Metin, Ayse; Sanal, Özden; Tezcan, Ilhan; Yeganeh, Mehdi; Niehues, Tim; Dueckers, Gregor; Weinspach, Sebastian; Patiroglu, Turkan; Unal, Ekrem; Dasouki, Majed; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Genel, Ferah; Aytekin, Caner; Kutukculer, Necil; Somer, Ayper; Kilic, Mehmet; Reisli, Ismail; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Gennery, Andrew R.; Cant, Andrew J.; Jones, Alison; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Arkwright, Peter D.; Pietrogrande, Maria C.; Baz, Zeina; Al-Tamemi, Salem; Lougaris, Vassilios; Lefranc, Gerard; Megarbane, Andre; Boutros, Jeannette; Galal, Nermeen; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha; Geha, Raif S.; Chatila, Talal A.; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in DOCK8 cause a combined immunodeficiency (CID) also classified as autosomal-recessive hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES). Recognizing patients with CID / HIES is of clinical importance due to a difference in prognosis and management. Objectives Define the clinical features that distinguish DOCK8 deficiency from other forms of HIES and CIDs; study the mutational spectrum of DOCK8 deficiency; and report on the frequency of specific clinical findings. Methods Eighty-two patients from 60 families with CID and the phenotype of autosomal-recessive HIES with (64 patients) and without (18 patients) DOCK8 mutations were studied. Support vector machines were used to compare clinical data from 35 patients with DOCK8 deficiency with 10 AR-HIES patients without a DOCK8 mutation and 64 patients with STAT3 mutations. Results DOCK8-deficient patients had a median IgE of 5,201 IU, high eosinophil levels of usually at least 800/µl (92% of patients), and low levels of IgM (62%). About 20% of patients were lymphopenic, mainly due to low CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Fewer than half of the patients tested produced normal specific antibody responses to recall antigens. Bacterial (84%), viral (78%), and fungal (70%) infections were frequently observed. Skin abscesses (60%) and allergies (73%) were common clinical problems. In contrast to STAT3 deficiency, there were few pneumatoceles, bone fractures, and teething problems. Mortality was high (34%). A combination of five clinical features was helpful in distinguishing patients with DOCK8 mutations from those with STAT3 mutations. Conclusions DOCK8 deficiency is likely in patients with severe viral infections, allergies, and/or low IgM levels, who have a diagnosis of HIES plus hypereosinophilia and upper respiratory tract infections in the absence of parenchymal lung abnormalities, retained primary teeth, and minimal trauma fractures. PMID:25724123

  17. Structural genomic variation in childhood epilepsies with complex phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Swinkels, Marielle E M; Aten, Emmelien; Caliebe, Almuth; van 't Slot, Ruben; Boor, Rainer; von Spiczak, Sarah; Muhle, Hiltrud; Jähn, Johanna A; van Binsbergen, Ellen; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Jansen, Floor E; Braun, Kees P J; de Haan, Gerrit-Jan; Tommerup, Niels; Stephani, Ulrich; Hjalgrim, Helle; Poot, Martin; Lindhout, Dick; Brilstra, Eva H; Møller, Rikke S; Koeleman, Bobby PC

    2014-01-01

    A genetic contribution to a broad range of epilepsies has been postulated, and particularly copy number variations (CNVs) have emerged as significant genetic risk factors. However, the role of CNVs in patients with epilepsies with complex phenotypes is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of CNVs in patients with unclassified epilepsies and complex phenotypes. A total of 222 patients from three European countries, including patients with structural lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dysmorphic features, and multiple congenital anomalies, were clinically evaluated and screened for CNVs. MRI findings including acquired or developmental lesions and patient characteristics were subdivided and analyzed in subgroups. MRI data were available for 88.3% of patients, of whom 41.6% had abnormal MRI findings. Eighty-eight rare CNVs were discovered in 71 out of 222 patients (31.9%). Segregation of all identified variants could be assessed in 42 patients, 11 of which were de novo. The frequency of all structural variants and de novo variants was not statistically different between patients with or without MRI abnormalities or MRI subcategories. Patients with dysmorphic features were more likely to carry a rare CNV. Genome-wide screening methods for rare CNVs may provide clues for the genetic etiology in patients with a broader range of epilepsies than previously anticipated, including in patients with various brain anomalies detectable by MRI. Performing genome-wide screens for rare CNVs can be a valuable contribution to the routine diagnostic workup in patients with a broad range of childhood epilepsies. PMID:24281369

  18. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, R.G.

    1987-02-01

    Results of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of the iron atom in deoxygenated hemoglobin are reviewed. It is shown that the iron-porphinato nitrogen distance has been determined to be 2.06 +/- 0.01 A by two independent investigations. Difficulties experienced in using this distance to calculate the iron's distance above the plane by triangulation are shown to be due to ignoring differences between ferrous and ferric hemes. It is concluded that the iron is 0.2 +/- 0.1/0.2 A above the plane of the nitrogens as originally shown.

  19. Extended phenotype and clinical subgroups in unilateral Meniere disease: A cross-sectional study with cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Frejo, L; Martin-Sanz, E; Teggi, R; Trinidad, G; Soto-Varela, A; Santos-Perez, S; Manrique, R; Perez, N; Aran, I; Almeida-Branco, M S; Batuecas-Caletrio, A; Fraile, J; Espinosa-Sanchez, J M; Perez-Guillen, V; Perez-Garrigues, H; Oliva-Dominguez, M; Aleman, O; Benitez, J; Perez, P; Lopez-Escamez, J A

    2017-02-06

    To define clinical subgroups by cluster analysis in patients with unilateral Meniere disease (MD) and to compare them with the clinical subgroups found in bilateral MD. A cross-sectional study with a two-step cluster analysis. A tertiary referral multicenter study. Nine hundred and eighty-eight adult patients with unilateral MD. best predictors to define clinical subgroups with potential different aetiologies. We established five clusters in unilateral MD. Group 1 is the most frequently found, includes 53% of patients, and it is defined as the sporadic, classic MD without migraine and without autoimmune disorder (AD). Group 2 is found in 8% of patients, and it is defined by hearing loss, which antedates the vertigo episodes by months or years (delayed MD), without migraine or AD in most of cases. Group 3 involves 13% of patients, and it is considered familial MD, while group 4, which includes 15% of patients, is linked to the presence of migraine in all cases. Group 5 is found in 11% of patients and is defined by a comorbid AD. We found significant differences in the distribution of AD in clusters 3, 4 and 5 between patients with uni- and bilateral MD. Cluster analysis defines clinical subgroups in MD, and it extends the phenotype beyond audiovestibular symptoms. This classification will help to improve the phenotyping in MD and facilitate the selection of patients for randomised clinical trials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Structure of the extended emission in the infrared celestial background

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The extended infrared celestial emission is due to three main sources: zodiacal dust, large discrete objects in the galaxy, and interstellar dust. As viewed from earth orbit, the thermal reradiation of sunlight absorbed by dust in the solar system produces a pervasive IR background that peaks roughly along the ecliptic plane, where the density of dust is highest. Much-smaller-scale structure was also observed in both the visual and infrared. Between 7 and 30 micrometers, H II regions are the brightest discrete objects in the galaxy. An additional emission mechanism is needed, however, to account for the shorter-wavelength observations. The galactic sources combine along the line of sight to produce an intense band of emission, centered on the galactic plane. Structure in all of these backgrounds creates a clutter problem for an orbiting IR telescope.

  1. Using systems and structure biology tools to dissect cellular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Floratos, Aris; Honig, Barry; Pe'er, Dana; Califano, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The Center for the Multiscale Analysis of Genetic Networks (MAGNet, http://magnet.c2b2.columbia.edu) was established in 2005, with the mission of providing the biomedical research community with Structural and Systems Biology algorithms and software tools for the dissection of molecular interactions and for the interaction-based elucidation of cellular phenotypes. Over the last 7 years, MAGNet investigators have developed many novel analysis methodologies, which have led to important biological discoveries, including understanding the role of the DNA shape in protein-DNA binding specificity and the discovery of genes causally related to the presentation of malignant phenotypes, including lymphoma, glioma, and melanoma. Software tools implementing these methodologies have been broadly adopted by the research community and are made freely available through geWorkbench, the Center's integrated analysis platform. Additionally, MAGNet has been instrumental in organizing and developing key conferences and meetings focused on the emerging field of systems biology and regulatory genomics, with special focus on cancer-related research.

  2. Latent profile analysis of healthy schizotypy within the extended psychosis phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Naomi Tuchman; de Mamani, Amy Gina Weisman

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that psychosis exists on a continuum, and that even mentally “healthy” individuals may experience subclinical psychotic experiences. However, little research has examined the subjective and psychological well-being of individuals in the putatively healthy end of the continuum. This study explored the latent profile structure of schizotypy in a non-clinical sample and compared subjective and psychological well-being across schizotypy profiles. Latent profile analysis was conducted on participants’ responses (N=420) to the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences. Six latent profiles emerged: Low Schizotypy, Average, High Schizotypy, High Unusual Experiences (UE), High Introvertive Anhedonia, and High Introvertive Anhedonia/Cognitive Disorganization. Individuals in the profile characterized by high UE without negative, disorganized or impulsive features tended to endorse similar levels of well-being as the Average and Low Schizotypy profiles. With some exceptions, all three profiles also demonstrated significantly greater subjective and psychological well-being when compared to negative/disorganized schizotypy profiles. The UE profile most closely aligns with previous conceptualizations of “healthy schizotypy.” Future research should investigate how individuals in this profile make sense of unusual or ambiguous experiences that may lead to distress in clinical populations. PMID:24001585

  3. Baculovirus-induced tree-top disease: how extended is the role of egt as a gene for the extended phenotype?

    PubMed

    Ros, Vera I D; van Houte, Stineke; Hemerik, Lia; van Oers, Monique M

    2015-01-01

    Many parasites alter host behaviour to enhance their chance of transmission. Recently, the ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyl transferase (egt) gene from the baculovirus Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) was identified to induce tree-top disease in L. dispar larvae. Infected gypsy moth larvae died at elevated positions (hence the term tree-top disease), which is thought to promote dissemination of the virus to lower foliage. It is, however, unknown whether egt has a conserved role among baculoviruses in inducing tree-top disease. Here, we studied tree-top disease induced by the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in two different host insects, Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera exigua, and we investigated the role of the viral egt gene therein. AcMNPV induced tree-top disease in both T. ni and S. exigua larvae, although in S. exigua a moulting-dependent effect was seen. Those S. exigua larvae undergoing a larval moult during the infection process died at elevated positions, while larvae that did not moult after infection died at low positions. For both T. ni and S. exigua, infection with a mutant AcMNPV lacking egt did not change the position where the larvae died. We conclude that egt has no highly conserved role in inducing tree-top disease in lepidopteran larvae. The conclusion that egt is a 'gene for an extended phenotype' is therefore not generally applicable for all baculovirus-host interactions. We hypothesize that in some baculovirus-host systems (including LdMNPV in L. dispar), an effect of egt on tree-top disease can be observed through indirect effects of egt on moulting-related climbing behaviour.

  4. Structure and energetics of extended defects in ice Ih

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Junior, Domingos L.; de Koning, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    We consider the molecular structure and energetics of extended defects in proton-disordered hexagonal ice Ih. Using plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we compute the energetics of stacking faults and determine the structure of the 30∘ and 90∘ partial dislocations on the basal plane. Consistent with experimental data, the formation energies of all fully reconstructed stacking faults are found to be very low. This is consistent with the idea that basal-plane glide dislocations in ice Ih are dissociated into partial dislocations separated by an area of stacking fault. For both types of partial dislocation we find a strong tendency toward core reconstruction through pairwise hydrogen-bond reformation. In the case of the 30∘ dislocation, the pairwise hydrogen-bond formation leads to a period-doubling core structure equivalent to that seen in zinc-blende semiconductor crystals. For the 90∘ partial we consider two possible core reconstructions, one in which the periodicity of the structure along the core remains unaltered and another in which it is doubled. The latter is preferred, although the energy difference between both is rather small, so that a coexistence of both reconstructions appears plausible. Our results imply that a mobility theory for dislocations on the basal plane in ice Ih should be based on the idea of reconstructed partial dislocations.

  5. Understanding the structural ensembles of a highly extended disordered protein.

    PubMed

    Daughdrill, Gary W; Kashtanov, Stepan; Stancik, Amber; Hill, Shannon E; Helms, Gregory; Muschol, Martin; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2012-01-01

    Developing a comprehensive description of the equilibrium structural ensembles for intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is essential to understanding their function. The p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD) is an IDP that interacts with multiple protein partners and contains numerous phosphorylation sites. Multiple techniques were used to investigate the equilibrium structural ensemble of p53TAD in its native and chemically unfolded states. The results from these experiments show that the native state of p53TAD has dimensions similar to a classical random coil while the chemically unfolded state is more extended. To investigate the molecular properties responsible for this behavior, a novel algorithm that generates diverse and unbiased structural ensembles of IDPs was developed. This algorithm was used to generate a large pool of plausible p53TAD structures that were reweighted to identify a subset of structures with the best fit to small angle X-ray scattering data. High weight structures in the native state ensemble show features that are localized to protein binding sites and regions with high proline content. The features localized to the protein binding sites are mostly eliminated in the chemically unfolded ensemble; while, the regions with high proline content remain relatively unaffected. Data from NMR experiments support these results, showing that residues from the protein binding sites experience larger environmental changes upon unfolding by urea than regions with high proline content. This behavior is consistent with the urea-induced exposure of nonpolar and aromatic side-chains in the protein binding sites that are partially excluded from solvent in the native state ensemble.

  6. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED FINE STRUCTURE WITH AUTOREGRESSIVE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Autoregressive prediction is adapted to double the resolution of Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) Fourier transforms. Even with the optimal taper (weighting function), the commonly used taper-and-transform Fourier method has limited resolution: it assumes the signal is zero beyond the limits of the measurement. By seeking the Fourier spectrum of an infinite extent oscillation consistent with the measurements but otherwise having maximum entropy, the errors caused by finite data range can be reduced. Our procedure developed to implement this concept applies autoregressive prediction to extrapolate the signal to an extent controlled by a taper width. Difficulties encountered when processing actual ARPEFS data are discussed. A key feature of this approach is the ability to convert improved measurements (signal-to-noise or point density) into improved Fourier resolution.

  7. Structure and computation of two-dimensional incompressible extended MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Tassi, E.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Morrison, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the extended magnetohydrodynamic model obtained from the two-fluid theory for electrons and ions with the enforcement of quasineutrality is given. Starting from the Hamiltonian structure of the fully three-dimensional theory, a Hamiltonian two-dimensional incompressible four-field model is derived. In this way, the energy conservation along with four families of Casimir invariants is naturally obtained. The construction facilitates various limits leading to the Hamiltonian forms of Hall, inertial, and ideal MHD, with their conserved energies and Casimir invariants. Basic linear theory of the four-field model is treated, and the growth rate for collisionless reconnection is obtained. Results from nonlinear simulations of collisionless tearing are presented and interpreted using, in particular, normal fields, a product of the Hamiltonian theory that gives rise to simplified equations of motion.

  8. The extended evolutionary synthesis: its structure, assumptions and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Laland, Kevin N.; Uller, Tobias; Feldman, Marcus W.; Sterelny, Kim; Müller, Gerd B.; Moczek, Armin; Jablonka, Eva; Odling-Smee, John

    2015-01-01

    Scientific activities take place within the structured sets of ideas and assumptions that define a field and its practices. The conceptual framework of evolutionary biology emerged with the Modern Synthesis in the early twentieth century and has since expanded into a highly successful research program to explore the processes of diversification and adaptation. Nonetheless, the ability of that framework satisfactorily to accommodate the rapid advances in developmental biology, genomics and ecology has been questioned. We review some of these arguments, focusing on literatures (evo-devo, developmental plasticity, inclusive inheritance and niche construction) whose implications for evolution can be interpreted in two ways—one that preserves the internal structure of contemporary evolutionary theory and one that points towards an alternative conceptual framework. The latter, which we label the ‘extended evolutionary synthesis' (EES), retains the fundaments of evolutionary theory, but differs in its emphasis on the role of constructive processes in development and evolution, and reciprocal portrayals of causation. In the EES, developmental processes, operating through developmental bias, inclusive inheritance and niche construction, share responsibility for the direction and rate of evolution, the origin of character variation and organism–environment complementarity. We spell out the structure, core assumptions and novel predictions of the EES, and show how it can be deployed to stimulate and advance research in those fields that study or use evolutionary biology. PMID:26246559

  9. Structure of the extended emission in the infrared celestial background

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.D.

    1986-09-30

    The extended emission in the infrared celestial background may be divided into three main components: the zodiacal background, the large discrete sources in the galaxy, and the interstellar dust. The zodiacal background is due to the thermal reradiation of sunlight absorbed by the dust in the solar system. An earth-orbiting infrared telescope will detect the diffuse emission from this dust in all directions with maximum intensity lying roughly along the ecliptic plane where the density of dust is highest. Structure with scale lengths of 10/sup 0/ was measured in both the visual and infrared; finer structure was detected in the infrared by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite. H II regions, areas of ionized gas mixed with and surrounded by dust, are the brightest discrete objects in the galaxy in the long wavelength infrared re-emitted in the infrared with a range of temperatures characteristic of the thermal equilibrium for the surroundings of the dust. The emission from the interstellar dust produces a filimentary structured background, the infrared cirrus. The observed far-infrared color temperature of about 20-35K for the cirrus is consistent with emission-form graphite and silicate grains which absorb the interstellar radiation field. The much-larger LWIR color temperature is likely due to a greater abundance of sub-micron particles in the interstellar medium and, perhaps, from band emission due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These galactic planes have full width at half maxima of about 2/sup 0/.

  10. The extended evolutionary synthesis: its structure, assumptions and predictions.

    PubMed

    Laland, Kevin N; Uller, Tobias; Feldman, Marcus W; Sterelny, Kim; Müller, Gerd B; Moczek, Armin; Jablonka, Eva; Odling-Smee, John

    2015-08-22

    Scientific activities take place within the structured sets of ideas and assumptions that define a field and its practices. The conceptual framework of evolutionary biology emerged with the Modern Synthesis in the early twentieth century and has since expanded into a highly successful research program to explore the processes of diversification and adaptation. Nonetheless, the ability of that framework satisfactorily to accommodate the rapid advances in developmental biology, genomics and ecology has been questioned. We review some of these arguments, focusing on literatures (evo-devo, developmental plasticity, inclusive inheritance and niche construction) whose implications for evolution can be interpreted in two ways—one that preserves the internal structure of contemporary evolutionary theory and one that points towards an alternative conceptual framework. The latter, which we label the 'extended evolutionary synthesis' (EES), retains the fundaments of evolutionary theory, but differs in its emphasis on the role of constructive processes in development and evolution, and reciprocal portrayals of causation. In the EES, developmental processes, operating through developmental bias, inclusive inheritance and niche construction, share responsibility for the direction and rate of evolution, the origin of character variation and organism-environment complementarity. We spell out the structure, core assumptions and novel predictions of the EES, and show how it can be deployed to stimulate and advance research in those fields that study or use evolutionary biology.

  11. Visibility of Extended Coronal Structures and CMEs in the EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole; Golub, Leon

    2014-06-01

    Extended coronal structures around active regions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been seen in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels to the full extent of the AIA and SWAP field of views 1.3 and 1.7 Rsun). Using off-pointed comet data in AIA we sum a large number of frames to evaluate the off-limb distance to which streamers can be detected. For CMEs, we compared the events classified as halo CMEs in the white-light LASCO CACTus catalog from July-September 2013 to the AIA and SWAP data collected around those events. We discovered that roughly 80% of events could be seen in the EUV using both regular and running difference movies, with the most effective channels being the 193 and 304Å channels. By projecting out the signal strength of several of these events, we conclude that these EUV events can in many cases be detected to over 2.5 Rsun. A larger field-of-view telescope would make it possible to track the development of these structures and events from the disk out to several solar radii, complementing the traditional white-light methods.

  12. Delineating physiologic defensive reactivity in the domain of self-report: phenotypic and etiologic structure of dispositional fear.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M D; Patrick, C J; Krueger, R F; Gasperi, M

    2012-06-01

    Individual differences in fear and fearlessness have been investigated at their extremes in relation to markedly different forms of psychopathology--anxiety disorders and psychopathy, respectively. A documented neural substrate of fear-related traits and disorders is defensive reactivity as reflected in aversive startle potentiation (ASP). The current study extended prior work by characterizing, in a sample of adult twins from the community (n = 2511), the phenotypic and etiologic structure of self-report measures of fear and fearlessness known to be associated with ASP. Analyses revealed a hierarchical structure to the trait fear domain, with an overarching, bipolar fear/fearlessness dimension saturating each measure in this domain, and subfactors labeled 'distress,' 'stimulation seeking' and 'sociability' accounting for additional variance in particular measures. The structure of genetic and non-shared environmental associations among the measures closely mirrored the phenotypic structure of the domain. The findings have implications for proposals to reconceptualize psychopathology in neurobiological terms.

  13. Extended-Spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacter aerogenes phenotypically misidentified as Klebsiella pneumoniae or K. terrigena.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Geert; De Baere, Thierry; Wauters, Georges; Vandecandelaere, Patricia; Verschraegen, Gerda; Muylaert, An; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2004-12-24

    Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae are common isolates in clinical microbiology and important as producers of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL). The discrimination between both species, which is routinely based on biochemical characteristics, is generally accepted to be straightforward. Here we report that genotypically unrelated strains of E. aerogenes can be misidentified as K. pneumoniae by routine laboratories using standard biochemical identification and using identification automates. Ten clinical isolates, identified as K. pneumoniae or K. terrigena with the routinely used biochemical tests and with API-20E, were identified as E. aerogenes by tDNA-PCR - an identification that was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing for five of these isolates. Misidentification also occurred when using the automated identification systems Vitek 2 and Phoenix, and was due to delayed positivity for ornithine decarboxylase and motility. Subculture and prolonged incubation resulted in positive results for ornithine decarboxylase and for motility. It could be shown by RAPD-analysis that the E. aerogenes strains belonged to different genotypes. Clinical E. aerogenes isolates can be easily misidentified as Klebsiella due to delayed positivity for ornithine decarboxylase and motility. The phenomenon may be widespread, since it was shown to occur among genotypically unrelated strains from different hospitals and different isolation dates. A useful clue for correct identification is the presence of an inducible beta-lactamase, which is highly unusual for K. pneumoniae. In several instances, the use of genotypic techniques like tDNA-PCR may circumvent problems of phenotypic identification.

  14. The extended phenotypes of marine symbioses: ecological and evolutionary consequences of intraspecific genetic diversity in coral-algal associations.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, John E; Baums, Iliana B

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals owe much of their success to a symbiosis with dinoflagellate microalgae in the genus Symbiodinium. In this association, the performance of each organism is tied to that of its partner, and together the partners form a holobiont that can be subject to selection. Climate change affects coral reefs, which are declining globally as a result. Yet the extent to which coral holobionts will be able to acclimate or evolve to handle climate change and other stressors remains unclear. Selection acts on individuals and evidence from terrestrial systems demonstrates that intraspecific genetic diversity plays a significant role in symbiosis ecology and evolution. However, we have a limited understanding of the effects of such diversity in corals. As molecular methods have advanced, so too has our recognition of the taxonomic and functional diversity of holobiont partners. Resolving the major components of the holobiont to the level of the individual will help us assess the importance of intraspecific diversity and partner interactions in coral-algal symbioses. Here, we hypothesize that unique combinations of coral and algal individuals yield functional diversity that affects not only the ecology and evolution of the coral holobiont, but associated communities as well. Our synthesis is derived from reviewing existing evidence and presenting novel data. By incorporating the effects of holobiont extended phenotypes into predictive models, we may refine our understanding of the evolutionary trajectory of corals and reef communities responding to climate change.

  15. The extended phenotypes of marine symbioses: ecological and evolutionary consequences of intraspecific genetic diversity in coral–algal associations

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, John E.; Baums, Iliana B.

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals owe much of their success to a symbiosis with dinoflagellate microalgae in the genus Symbiodinium. In this association, the performance of each organism is tied to that of its partner, and together the partners form a holobiont that can be subject to selection. Climate change affects coral reefs, which are declining globally as a result. Yet the extent to which coral holobionts will be able to acclimate or evolve to handle climate change and other stressors remains unclear. Selection acts on individuals and evidence from terrestrial systems demonstrates that intraspecific genetic diversity plays a significant role in symbiosis ecology and evolution. However, we have a limited understanding of the effects of such diversity in corals. As molecular methods have advanced, so too has our recognition of the taxonomic and functional diversity of holobiont partners. Resolving the major components of the holobiont to the level of the individual will help us assess the importance of intraspecific diversity and partner interactions in coral–algal symbioses. Here, we hypothesize that unique combinations of coral and algal individuals yield functional diversity that affects not only the ecology and evolution of the coral holobiont, but associated communities as well. Our synthesis is derived from reviewing existing evidence and presenting novel data. By incorporating the effects of holobiont extended phenotypes into predictive models, we may refine our understanding of the evolutionary trajectory of corals and reef communities responding to climate change. PMID:25202306

  16. The genetics of phenotypic plasticity in nematode feeding structures

    PubMed Central

    Dardiry, Mohannad; Lenuzzi, Masa; Namdeo, Suryesh; Renahan, Tess; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Werner, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been proposed as an ecological and evolutionary concept. Ecologically, it can help study how genes and the environment interact to produce robust phenotypes. Evolutionarily, as a facilitator it might contribute to phenotypic novelty and diversification. However, the discussion of phenotypic plasticity remains contentious in parts due to the absence of model systems and rigorous genetic studies. Here, we summarize recent work on the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, which exhibits a feeding plasticity allowing predatory or bacteriovorous feeding. We show feeding plasticity to be controlled by developmental switch genes that are themselves under epigenetic control. Phylogenetic and comparative studies support phenotypic plasticity and its role as a facilitator of morphological novelty and diversity. PMID:28298309

  17. Detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase in Enterobacter spp.--evaluation of six phenotypic tests.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Miranda, Keite da Silva; Palmeiro, Jussara Kasuko; Conte, Danieli; Maia, Fernanda Valverde; Reason, Iara Taborda de Messias; Monteiro, Cristina Leise; Dalla-Costa, Libera Maria

    2012-02-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) are plasmid-mediated enzymes that hydrolyze cephalosporins and monobactams. The lack of a standard method to detect ESBL in Enterobacter spp. has led to underestimating its frequency. The aim of this study was to evaluate ESBL detection in Enterobacter spp. By the double-disk synergy test (DDST) and combined disk test (CDT) assay using cefepime, cefotaxime, and ceftazime as substrates for ESBL, plus AmpC inhibitors in different associations. A total of 83 Enterobacter spp. ESBL and 31 non-ESBL Enterobacter spp. were tested, and a cutoff point ≥3 mm was defined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for combined disc methods. All tests showed 100% specificity. The sensitivity was 89.2% for DDST and CDT without AmpC inibitor, 90.4% in the combined disc test in Mueller-Hinton agar containing phenylboronic acid (CDT-PBAA), and 94% in the combined disc test in Mueller-Hinton agar containing cloxacillin (CDT-CLXA). Cefepime was the best substrate, mainly when AmpC inhibitors were not used. However, superior results were achieved when all cephalosporins were evaluated together. In conclusion, to improve ESBL detection in Enterobacter spp., some modifications in phenotypic tests are needed, such as to reduce the distance between the discs to 20 mm in DDST, to use a cutoff point for ≥3 mm on the CDT, and to include a cefepime disk or an inhibitor of AmpC in all tests.

  18. Extended-Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacter aerogenes phenotypically misidentified as Klebsiella pneumoniae or K. terrigena

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Geert; De Baere, Thierry; Wauters, Georges; Vandecandelaere, Patricia; Verschraegen, Gerda; Muylaert, An; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2004-01-01

    Background Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae are common isolates in clinical microbiology and important as producers of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL). The discrimination between both species, which is routinely based on biochemical characteristics, is generally accepted to be straightforward. Here we report that genotypically unrelated strains of E. aerogenes can be misidentified as K. pneumoniae by routine laboratories using standard biochemical identification and using identification automates. Results Ten clinical isolates, identified as K. pneumoniae or K. terrigena with the routinely used biochemical tests and with API-20E, were identified as E. aerogenes by tDNA-PCR – an identification that was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing for five of these isolates. Misidentification also occurred when using the automated identification systems Vitek 2 and Phoenix, and was due to delayed positivity for ornithine decarboxylase and motility. Subculture and prolonged incubation resulted in positive results for ornithine decarboxylase and for motility. It could be shown by RAPD-analysis that the E. aerogenes strains belonged to different genotypes. Conclusions Clinical E. aerogenes isolates can be easily misidentified as Klebsiella due to delayed positivity for ornithine decarboxylase and motility. The phenomenon may be widespread, since it was shown to occur among genotypically unrelated strains from different hospitals and different isolation dates. A useful clue for correct identification is the presence of an inducible β-lactamase, which is highly unusual for K. pneumoniae. In several instances, the use of genotypic techniques like tDNA-PCR may circumvent problems of phenotypic identification. PMID:15619329

  19. Extended Kalman filter based structural damage detection for MR damper controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Jiang, Zhaoshuo; Christenson, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers have been widely used in many building and bridge structures against earthquake and wind loadings due to its advantages including mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, low power requirements, large force capacity, and robustness. However, research about structural damage detection methods for MR damper controlled structures is limited. This paper aims to develop a real-time structural damage detection method for MR damper controlled structures. A novel state space model of MR damper controlled structure is first built by combining the structure's equation of motion and MR damper's hyperbolic tangent model. In this way, the state parameters of both the structure and MR damper are added in the state vector of the state space model. Extended Kalman filter is then used to provide prediction for state variables from measurement data. The two techniques are synergistically combined to identify parameters and track the changes of both structure and MR damper in real time. The proposed method is tested using response data of a three-floor MR damper controlled linear building structure under earthquake excitation. The testing results show that the adaptive extended Kalman filter based approach is capable to estimate not only structural parameters such as stiffness and damping of each floor, but also the parameters of MR damper, so that more insights and understanding of the damage can be obtained. The developed method also demonstrates high damage detection accuracy and light computation, as well as the potential to implement in a structural health monitoring system.

  20. The phenotypic and genetic covariance structure of drosphilid wings.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Blows, Mark W

    2007-04-01

    Evolutionary constraint results from the interaction between the distribution of available genetic variation and the position of selective optima. The availability of genetic variance in multitrait systems, as described by the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix (G), has been the subject of recent attempts to assess the prevalence of genetic constraints. However, evolutionary constraints have not yet been considered from the perspective of the phenotypes available to multivariate selection, and whether genetic variance is present in all phenotypes potentially under selection. Determining the rank of the phenotypic variance-covariance matrix (P) to characterize the phenotypes available to selection, and contrasting it with the rank of G, may provide a general approach to determining the prevalence of genetic constraints. In a study of a laboratory population of Drosophila bunnanda from northern Australia we applied factor-analytic modeling to repeated measures of individual wing phenotypes to determine the dimensionality of the phenotypic space described by P. The phenotypic space spanned by the 10 wing traits had 10 statistically supported dimensions. In contrast, factor-analytic modeling of G estimated for the same 10 traits from a paternal half-sibling breeding design suggested G had fewer dimensions than traits. Statistical support was found for only five and two genetic dimensions, describing a total of 99% and 72% of genetic variance in wing morphology in females and males, respectively. The observed mismatch in dimensionality between P and G suggests that although selection might act to shift the intragenerational population mean toward any trait combination, evolution may be restricted to fewer dimensions.

  1. Structural Modeling Insights into Human VKORC1 Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Czogalla, Katrin J.; Watzka, Matthias; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) catalyses the reduction of vitamin K and its 2,3-epoxide essential to sustain γ-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Two different phenotypes are associated with mutations in human VKORC1. The majority of mutations cause resistance to 4-hydroxycoumarin- and indandione-based vitamin K antagonists (VKA) used in the prevention and therapy of thromboembolism. Patients with these mutations require greater doses of VKA for stable anticoagulation than patients without mutations. The second phenotype, a very rare autosomal-recessive bleeding disorder caused by combined deficiency of vitamin K dependent clotting factors type 2 (VKCFD2) arises from a homozygous Arg98Trp mutation. The bleeding phenotype can be corrected by vitamin K administration. Here, we summarize published experimental data and in silico modeling results in order to rationalize the mechanisms of VKA resistance and VKCFD2. PMID:26287237

  2. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  3. Extended family history of autoimmune diseases and phenotype and genotype of children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Parkkola, Anna; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael

    2013-08-01

    Based on the concept of clustering autoimmunity, children with a positive family history of autoimmunity could be expected to have a different pathogenetic form of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and thus a stronger autoimmune reactivity against β-cells and an increased prevalence of the HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype. We tested this hypothesis in a cross-sectional observational study from the Finnish Pediatric Diabetes Register. HLA class II genotypes and β-cell autoantibodies were analyzed, and data on the extended family history of autoimmunity and clinical markers at diagnosis were collected with a structured questionnaire from 1488 children diagnosed with T1D under the age of 15 years (57% males). Only 23 children (1.5%) had another autoimmune disease (AID) known at diagnosis, and they had a milder metabolic decompensation at diabetes presentation. One-third (31.4%) had at least one relative with an AID other than T1D with affected mothers being overrepresented (8.2%) compared with fathers (2.8%). The children with a positive family history of other AIDs had higher levels of islet cell antibodies (P=0.003), and the HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype in the children was associated with celiac disease in the extended family (P<0.001), but not with an increased frequency of autoimmune disorders, in general. Approximately one-third of children with newly diagnosed T1D have a first- and/or second-degree relative affected by an AID. Our data do not consistently support the hypothesis of differential pathogenetic mechanisms in such children.

  4. Understanding the Phenotypic Structure of Adult Retrospective ADHD Symptoms during Childhood in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranby, Krista W.; Boynton, Marcella H.; Kollins, Scott H.; McClernon, F. Joseph; Yang, Chongming; Fuemmeler, Bernard F.

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder, and the phenotypic structure comprising inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive type symptoms has been the focus of a growing body of recent research. Methodological studies are needed to better characterize phenotypes to advance research as well as clinical…

  5. Population structure and genotype-phenotype associations in a collection of oat landraces and historic cultivars.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Population structure and genetic architecture of phenotypic traits in oat (Avena sativa L.) remain relatively under-researched compared to other small grain species. This study explores the historic context of current elite germplasm, including phenotypic and genetic characterization, with a partic...

  6. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature stable adhesive systems were evaluated for potential Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) vehicle applications. The program was divided into two major phases: Phase I 'Adhesive Screening' evaluated eleven selected polyimide (PI) and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) adhesive resins using eight different titanium (6Al-4V) adherend surface preparations; Phase II 'Adhesive Optimization and Characterization' extensively evaluated two adhesive systems, selected from Phase I studies, for chemical characterization and environmental durability. The adhesive systems which exhibited superior thermal and environmental bond properties were LARC-TPI polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline both developed at NASA Langley. The latter adhesive system did develop bond failures at extended thermal aging due primarily to incompatibility between the surface preparation and the polymer. However, this study did demonstrate that suitable adhesive systems are available for extended supersonic cruise vehicle design applications.

  7. Mechanism of resistance and antibacterial susceptibility in extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca isolated between 2000 and 2010 in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takafumi; Hara, Takafumi; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Kanazawa, Sachi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Maki, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca collected from 20 Japanese medical facilities between 2000 and 2010 were analysed to evaluate the mechanisms of resistance and antibacterial susceptibilities to 14 antimicrobials. Overall, eight of 484 (1.6%) K. pneumoniae and 19 of 359 (5.3%) K. oxytoca were determined to be extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype isolates, and the identified ESBLs amongst the K. pneumoniae isolates were CTX-M-2, -3, -14 and -15, and SHV-12. In contrast, overproduction of chromosomal β-lactamase OXY-2, which was due to a distinct mutation at the - 10 promoter region of this gene, conferred the ESBL phenotype to all the K. oxytoca isolates except one. Based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints, all the ESBL phenotype K. pneumoniae were susceptible to doripenem, flomoxef, moxalactam (latamoxef), cefmetazole and tazobactam/piperacillin, whereas the ESBL phenotype K. oxytoca were susceptible to ceftazidime and ceftibuten in addition to the above, with the exception of tazobactam/piperacillin. Amongst the oral antimicrobials, ceftibuten was relatively effective against both ESBL phenotype Klebsiella species compared with levofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid.

  8. Broadening of a nonequilibrium phase transition by extended structural defects.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Thomas

    2004-08-01

    We study the effects of quenched extended impurities on nonequilibrium phase transitions in the directed percolation universality class. We show that these impurities have a dramatic effect: they completely destroy the sharp phase transition by smearing. This is caused by rare strongly coupled spatial regions which can undergo the phase transition independently from the bulk system. We use extremal statistics to determine the stationary state as well as the dynamics in the tail of the smeared transition, and we illustrate the results by computer simulations.

  9. Extended ALE Method for fluid-structure interaction problems with large structural displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basting, Steffen; Quaini, Annalisa; Čanić, Sunčica; Glowinski, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Standard Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods for the simulation of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems fail due to excessive mesh deformations when the structural displacement is large. We propose a method that successfully deals with this problem, keeping the same mesh connectivity while enforcing mesh alignment with the structure. The proposed Extended ALE Method relies on a variational mesh optimization technique, where mesh alignment with the structure is achieved via a constraint. This gives rise to a constrained optimization problem for mesh optimization, which is solved whenever the mesh quality deteriorates. The performance of the proposed Extended ALE Method is demonstrated on a series of numerical examples involving 2D FSI problems with large displacements. Two-way coupling between the fluid and structure is considered in all the examples. The FSI problems are solved using either a Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm, or a Robin-Neumann algorithm. The Dirichlet-Neumann algorithm is enhanced by an adaptive relaxation procedure based on Aitken's acceleration. We show that the proposed method has excellent performance in problems with large displacements, and that it agrees well with a standard ALE method in problems with mild displacement.

  10. Phenotypic impact of genomic structural variation: insights from and for human disease.

    PubMed

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Symmons, Orsolya; Spitz, François; Korbel, Jan O

    2013-02-01

    Genomic structural variants have long been implicated in phenotypic diversity and human disease, but dissecting the mechanisms by which they exert their functional impact has proven elusive. Recently however, developments in high-throughput DNA sequencing and chromosomal engineering technology have facilitated the analysis of structural variants in human populations and model systems in unprecedented detail. In this Review, we describe how structural variants can affect molecular and cellular processes, leading to complex organismal phenotypes, including human disease. We further present advances in delineating disease-causing elements that are affected by structural variants, and we discuss future directions for research on the functional consequences of structural variants.

  11. Combinatorial phenotypic screen uncovers unrecognized family of extended thiourea inhibitors with copper-dependent anti-Staphylococcal activity

    PubMed Central

    Dalecki, Alex G.; Malalasekera, Aruni P.; Schaaf, Kaitlyn; Kutsch, Olaf; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The continuous rise of multi-drug resistant pathogenic bacteria has become a significant challenge for the health care system. In particular, novel drugs to treat infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA) are needed, but traditional drug discovery campaigns have largely failed to deliver clinically suitable antibiotics. More than simply new drugs, new drug discovery approaches are needed to combat bacterial resistance. The recently described phenomenon of copper-dependent inhibitors has galvanized research exploring the use of metal-coordinating molecules to harness copper’s natural antibacterial properties for therapeutic purposes. Here, we describe the results of the first concerted screening effort to identify copper-dependent inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus. A standard library of 10,000 compounds was assayed for anti-staphylococcal activity, with hits defined as those compounds with a strict copper-dependent inhibitory activity. A total of 53 copper-dependent hit molecules were uncovered, similar to the copper independent hit rate of a traditionally executed campaign conducted in parallel on the same library. Most prominent was a hit family with an extended thiourea core structure, termed the NNSN motif. This motif resulted in copper-dependent and copper-specific S. aureus inhibition, while simultaneously being well tolerated by eukaryotic cells. Importantly, we could demonstrate that copper binding by the NNSN motif is highly unusual and likely responsible for the promising biological qualities of these compounds. A subsequent chemoinformatic meta-analysis of the ChEMBL chemical database confirmed the NNSNs as an unrecognized staphylococcal inhibitor, despite the family’s presence in many chemical screening libraries. Thus, our copper-biased screen has proven able to discover inhibitors within previously screened libraries, offering a mechanism to reinvigorate exhausted molecular collections. PMID:26935206

  12. Extended, regular HI structures around early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterloo, T. A.; Morganti, R.; Sadler, E. M.; van der Hulst, T.; Serra, P.

    2007-04-01

    We discuss the morphology and kinematics of the H I of a sample of 30 southern gas-rich early-type galaxies selected from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This is the largest collection of high-resolution H I data of a homogeneously selected sample. Given the sensitivity of HIPASS, these galaxies represent the most H I-rich early-type galaxies. In two-thirds of the galaxies, we find the H I to be in a large, regular disk- or ring-like structure that in some cases is strongly warped. In the remaining cases we find the H I distributed in irregular tails or clouds offset from the galaxy. The giant, regular H I structures can be up to ~200 kpc in diameter and contain up to 1010~M_⊙ of H I. The incidence of irregular H I structures appears to be somewhat higher in elliptical galaxies, but the large, regular structures are observed in both elliptical and S0 galaxies and are not strictly connected to the presence of a stellar disk. If these two types of galaxies are the result of different formation paths, this is not strongly reflected in the characteristics of the H I. The size and the regular kinematics of the H I structures imply that the neutral hydrogen must have settled in these galaxies several Gyr ago. Merging as well as gas accretion from the IGM are viable explanations for the origin of the gas in these galaxies. The average column density of the H I is low so that little star formation is expected to occur and these early-type galaxies can remain gas rich for very long periods of time. The large H I structures likely represent key structures for tracing the origin and evolution of these galaxies.

  13. Genetic and clinical characterization of Pakistani families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome extends the genetic and phenotypic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Maleeha; Lamers, Ideke J. C.; Schmidts, Miriam; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jaffar, Sulman; Ullah, Ehsan; Mustafa, Bilal; Ahmad, Shakeel; Nazmutdinova, Katia; Hoskins, Bethan; van Wijk, Erwin; Koster-Kamphuis, Linda; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Beales, Phil L.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Roepman, Ronald; Azam, Maleeha; Arts, Heleen H.; Qamar, Raheel

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is both genetically and clinically heterogeneous. To date 19 genes have been associated with BBS, which encode proteins active at the primary cilium, an antenna-like organelle that acts as the cell’s signaling hub. In the current study, a combination of mutation screening, targeted sequencing of ciliopathy genes associated with BBS, and whole-exome sequencing was used for the genetic characterization of five families including four with classic BBS symptoms and one BBS-like syndrome. This resulted in the identification of novel mutations in BBS genes ARL6 and BBS5, and recurrent mutations in BBS9 and CEP164. In the case of CEP164, this is the first report of two siblings with a BBS-like syndrome with mutations in this gene. Mutations in this gene were previously associated with nephronophthisis 15, thus the current results expand the CEP164-associated phenotypic spectrum. The clinical and genetic spectrum of BBS and BBS-like phenotypes is not fully defined in Pakistan. Therefore, genetic studies are needed to gain insights into genotype-phenotype correlations, which will in turn improve the clinician’s ability to make an early and accurate diagnosis, and facilitate genetic counseling, leading to directly benefiting families with affected individuals. PMID:27708425

  14. Genetic and clinical characterization of Pakistani families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome extends the genetic and phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Maria, Maleeha; Lamers, Ideke J C; Schmidts, Miriam; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jaffar, Sulman; Ullah, Ehsan; Mustafa, Bilal; Ahmad, Shakeel; Nazmutdinova, Katia; Hoskins, Bethan; van Wijk, Erwin; Koster-Kamphuis, Linda; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Beales, Phil L; Cremers, Frans P M; Roepman, Ronald; Azam, Maleeha; Arts, Heleen H; Qamar, Raheel

    2016-10-06

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is both genetically and clinically heterogeneous. To date 19 genes have been associated with BBS, which encode proteins active at the primary cilium, an antenna-like organelle that acts as the cell's signaling hub. In the current study, a combination of mutation screening, targeted sequencing of ciliopathy genes associated with BBS, and whole-exome sequencing was used for the genetic characterization of five families including four with classic BBS symptoms and one BBS-like syndrome. This resulted in the identification of novel mutations in BBS genes ARL6 and BBS5, and recurrent mutations in BBS9 and CEP164. In the case of CEP164, this is the first report of two siblings with a BBS-like syndrome with mutations in this gene. Mutations in this gene were previously associated with nephronophthisis 15, thus the current results expand the CEP164-associated phenotypic spectrum. The clinical and genetic spectrum of BBS and BBS-like phenotypes is not fully defined in Pakistan. Therefore, genetic studies are needed to gain insights into genotype-phenotype correlations, which will in turn improve the clinician's ability to make an early and accurate diagnosis, and facilitate genetic counseling, leading to directly benefiting families with affected individuals.

  15. Local structure studies of some cobalt (II) complexes using extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath; Trivedi, Apurva

    2014-09-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis of Cobalt (II) complex as a ligand of 2 -methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]-3H-l,5 benzodiazepine for finding local structure using conventional method .The Co(II) complexes were prepared by chemical root method. The EXAFS spectra were recorded at Cobalt K-edge i.e.; 7709 eV using Dispersive EXFAS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source(SRS) at RRCAT, Indore, India. The recorded EXAFS data were analysed using the computer software Athena for determine the nearest neighbouring distances (bond lengths) of these complexes with conventional methods and it compared with Fourier transform(FT) analysis. The Fourier Transform convert EXAFS data signal into r-space or k-space. This is useful for visualizing the major contributions to the EXAFS spectrum.

  16. Estradiol as a mechanism for sex differences in the development of an addicted phenotype following extended access cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Ramôa, Carolina P; Doyle, Susan E; Naim, Diana W; Lynch, Wendy J

    2013-08-01

    Women progress more rapidly after initial cocaine use to addiction as compared with men. Similarly, female rats appear to require less cocaine exposure before developing an addicted phenotype with evidence implicating estradiol as a potential mechanism. The goals of this study were to determine whether there are sex differences in the magnitude of the addicted phenotype under optimized conditions that induce its development in both males and females and to determine the role of estradiol in this effect. Following acquisition, intact male and intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats with and without estradiol replacement were given access to cocaine (1.5 mg/kg per infusion) under either extended access (ExA; discrete trial procedure, 4 trials/h, 24 h/day, 10 days) or short access (ShA) conditions (20 infusions maximum/day, 3 days). Motivation to obtain cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion), as assessed under a progressive-ratio schedule, was then examined following a 2-week abstinence period. Results showed that following ExA self-administration, both males and females developed an addicted phenotype, with 9 of 11 males and 8 of 10 females showing a greater than 15% increase in levels of motivation to obtain cocaine as compared with ShA controls. In contrast, within the OVX groups, responding was enhanced from control levels after ExA self-administration in estradiol-replaced rats only. These results suggest that while females may have an enhanced vulnerability to developing an addicted phenotype, they may be similar to males once addiction has developed. These results also suggest that estradiol is critically involved in the development of an addicted phenotype in females.

  17. Estradiol as a Mechanism for Sex Differences in the Development of an Addicted Phenotype following Extended Access Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ramôa, Carolina P; Doyle, Susan E; Naim, Diana W; Lynch, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    Women progress more rapidly after initial cocaine use to addiction as compared with men. Similarly, female rats appear to require less cocaine exposure before developing an addicted phenotype with evidence implicating estradiol as a potential mechanism. The goals of this study were to determine whether there are sex differences in the magnitude of the addicted phenotype under optimized conditions that induce its development in both males and females and to determine the role of estradiol in this effect. Following acquisition, intact male and intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats with and without estradiol replacement were given access to cocaine (1.5 mg/kg per infusion) under either extended access (ExA; discrete trial procedure, 4 trials/h, 24 h/day, 10 days) or short access (ShA) conditions (20 infusions maximum/day, 3 days). Motivation to obtain cocaine (0.5 mg/kg/infusion), as assessed under a progressive-ratio schedule, was then examined following a 2-week abstinence period. Results showed that following ExA self-administration, both males and females developed an addicted phenotype, with 9 of 11 males and 8 of 10 females showing a greater than 15% increase in levels of motivation to obtain cocaine as compared with ShA controls. In contrast, within the OVX groups, responding was enhanced from control levels after ExA self-administration in estradiol-replaced rats only. These results suggest that while females may have an enhanced vulnerability to developing an addicted phenotype, they may be similar to males once addiction has developed. These results also suggest that estradiol is critically involved in the development of an addicted phenotype in females. PMID:23481437

  18. The Extended Granin Family: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Possenti, Roberta; Mahata, Sushil K.; Fischer-Colbrie, Reiner; Loh, Y. Peng

    2011-01-01

    The chromogranins (chromogranin A and chromogranin B), secretogranins (secretogranin II and secretogranin III), and additional related proteins (7B2, NESP55, proSAAS, and VGF) that together comprise the granin family subserve essential roles in the regulated secretory pathway that is responsible for controlled delivery of peptides, hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors. Here we review the structure and function of granins and granin-derived peptides and expansive new genetic evidence, including recent single-nucleotide polymorphism mapping, genomic sequence comparisons, and analysis of transgenic and knockout mice, which together support an important and evolutionarily conserved role for these proteins in large dense-core vesicle biogenesis and regulated secretion. Recent data further indicate that their processed peptides function prominently in metabolic and glucose homeostasis, emotional behavior, pain pathways, and blood pressure modulation, suggesting future utility of granins and granin-derived peptides as novel disease biomarkers. PMID:21862681

  19. Extending the lifespan of nuclear power plant structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1995-04-01

    By the end of this decade, 63 of the 111 commercial nuclear power plants in the United States will be more than 20 years old, with some nearing the end of their 40-year operating license term. Faced with the prospect of having to replace lost generating capacity from other sources and substantial shutdown and decommissioning costs, many utilities are expected to apply to continue the service of their plants past the initial licensing period. In support of such applications, evidence should be provided that the capacity of the safety-related systems and structures to mitigate potential extreme events has not deteriorated unacceptably due to either aging or environmental stressor effects during the previous service history.

  20. Phosphorenes with Non-Honeycomb Structures: A Much Extended Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Menghao; Fu, Huahua; Zhou, Ling; Yao, Kailun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Huazhong University of Science; Technology Team; University of Nebraska-Lincoln Team

    We predict a new class of monolayer phosphorous allotropes, namely, ɛ-P, ζ-P, η-P and θ-P. Distinctly different from the monolayer α-P (black) and previously predicted β-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 176802 (2014)), γ-P and δ-P (Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 046804 (2014)) with buckled honeycomb lattice, the new allotropes are composed of P4 square or P5 pentagon units that favor tricoordination for P atoms. The new four phases, together with 5 hybrid phases, are confirmed stable by first-principles calculations. In particularly, the θ-P is shown to be equally stable as the α-P (black) and more stable than all previously reported phosphorene allotropes. Prediction of nonvolatile ferroelastic switching and structural transformation among different phases under strains points out their potential applications via strain engineering. MHW was supported by start-up fund from Huazhong University of Science and Technology.

  1. Population structure of deep-sea chemolithoautotrophs: identification of phenotypic and genotypic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Sawabe, T.; Miyazaki, J.; Makita, H.; Nunoura, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields are areas on the seafloor of high biological productivity fueled primarily by microbial chemosynthesis. Chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella with an ability to utilize inorganic substrates such as elemental sulfur and hydrogen are important members in wide range of temperature conditions in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. However, little is known about their population genetic structure such as intraspecific genetic diversity, distribution pattern, and phenotypic characteristics. Previously, using genetic approach based on multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA), we clarified that Epsilonproteobacteria Group A, B, F, and Persephonella populations were geographically separated, and Epsilonproteobacteria appeared to diverge by mutation rather than recombination. Contrary to genetic evidence for allopatric segregation in deep-sea chemoautotrophs, however, phenotypic evidence has never been found. In addition, analyzing such a phenotypic characteristic may lead to a better understanding of the interactions microbes have with their environment. In this study, we present a metabolomic approach based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to reveal phenotypic biogeographical discrimination. We demonstrated the whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS method on Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella populations. These chemoautotrophic strains used in this study were isolated from chimney structures, vent fluids, and hydrothermal sediments. These hydrothermal samples were collected from geographically separated hydrothermal areas of the South Mariana Trough, Okinawa Trough and Central Indian Ridge. Based on mass peaks (signal/noise >10) within the m/z range of 2000-14000, phenotypic analysis was carried out by cluster analysis. The result of phenotypic analysis was compared with the genotypic clusters. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS revealed that Persephonella population was identified to

  2. Extending the phenotype of monosomy 1p36 syndrome and mapping of a critical region for obesity and hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Carla S; Kohl, Ilana; Varela, Monica Castro; de Castro, Cláudia I E; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R; Lourenço, Charles M; Koiffmann, Célia P

    2010-01-01

    Rearrangements of 1p36 are the most frequently detected abnormalities in diagnostic testing for chromosomal cryptic imbalances and include variably sized simple terminal deletions, derivative chromosomes, interstitial deletions, and complex rearrangements. These rearrangements result in the specific pattern of malformation and neurodevelopmental disabilities that characterizes monosomy 1p36 syndrome. Thus far, no individual gene within this region has been conclusively determined to be causative of any component of the phenotype. Nor is it known if the rearrangements convey phenotypes via a haploinsufficiency mechanism or through a position effect. We have used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to screen for deletions of 1p36 in a group of 154 hyperphagic and overweight/obese, PWS negative individuals, and in a separate group of 83 patients initially sent to investigate a variety of other conditions. The strategy allowed the identification and delineation of rearrangements in nine subjects with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Our work reinforces the association of monosomy 1p36 and obesity and hyperphagia, and further suggests that these features may be associated with non-classical manifestations of this disorder in addition to a submicroscopic deletion of approximately 2-3 Mb in size. Multiplex ligation probe amplification using the monosomy 1p36 syndrome-specific kit coupled to the subtelomeric kit is an effective approach to identify and delineate rearrangements at 1p36.

  3. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.; Peters, P. D.; Hendricks, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation, selection, and demonstration of structural adhesive systems for supersonic cruise research applications, and establishment of environmental durability of selected systems for up to 20,000 hours is described. Ten candidate adhesives were initially evaluated. During screening and evaluation, these candidates were narrowed to three of the most promising for environmental durability testing. The three adhesives were LARC-13, PPQ, and NR056X. The LARC-13 was eliminated because of a lack of stability at 505 K. The NRO56X was removed from the market. The LARC-TPI was added after preliminary evaluation and an abbreviated screening test. Only PPQ and LARC-TPI remained as the reasonable candidates late into the durability testing. Large area bond panels were fabricated to demonstrate the processibility of the selected systems. Specifications were prepared to assure control over critical material and process parameters. Surface characterization concentrated primarily upon titanium surface treatments of 10 volt chronic acid anodize, 5 volt chromic acid anodize and PASA-JELL. Failure analysis was conducted on lap shear adhesive bond failures which occurred in PPQ and LARC-13 test specimens after 10,000 hours at 505 K.

  4. Method for Phenotypic Detection of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases in Enterobacter Species in the Routine Clinical Setting ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, James Cohen; Diederen, Bram; al Naiemi, Nashwan; Fluit, Ad; Arents, Niek; Thijsen, Steven; Vlaminckx, Bart; Mouton, Johan W.; Leverstein-van Hall, Maurine

    2011-01-01

    In 271 Enterobacter blood culture isolates from 12 hospitals, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) prevalence varied between 0% and 30% per hospital. High prevalence was associated with dissemination, indicating the potential relevance of infection control measures. Screening with cefepime or Vitek 2, followed by a cefepime/cefepime-clavulanate Etest, was an accurate strategy for ESBL detection in Enterobacter isolates (positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 99%). PMID:21562100

  5. Genetic Analysis Workshop 18: Methods and strategies for analyzing human sequence and phenotype data in members of extended pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 provided a platform for developing and evaluating statistical methods to analyze whole-genome sequence data from a pedigree-based sample. In this article we present an overview of the data sets and the contributions that analyzed these data. The family data, donated by the Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Exploration by Next-Generation Sequencing in Ethnic Samples Consortium, included sequence-level genotypes based on sequencing and imputation, genome-wide association genotypes from prior genotyping arrays, and phenotypes from longitudinal assessments. The contributions from individual research groups were extensively discussed before, during, and after the workshop in theme-based discussion groups before being submitted for publication. PMID:25519310

  6. Genetic Analysis Workshop 18: Methods and strategies for analyzing human sequence and phenotype data in members of extended pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Bickeböller, Heike; Bailey, Julia N; Beyene, Joseph; Cantor, Rita M; Cordell, Heather J; Culverhouse, Robert C; Engelman, Corinne D; Fardo, David W; Ghosh, Saurabh; König, Inke R; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Melton, Phillip E; Santorico, Stephanie A; Satten, Glen A; Sun, Lei; Tintle, Nathan L; Ziegler, Andreas; MacCluer, Jean W; Almasy, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 provided a platform for developing and evaluating statistical methods to analyze whole-genome sequence data from a pedigree-based sample. In this article we present an overview of the data sets and the contributions that analyzed these data. The family data, donated by the Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Exploration by Next-Generation Sequencing in Ethnic Samples Consortium, included sequence-level genotypes based on sequencing and imputation, genome-wide association genotypes from prior genotyping arrays, and phenotypes from longitudinal assessments. The contributions from individual research groups were extensively discussed before, during, and after the workshop in theme-based discussion groups before being submitted for publication.

  7. Trade-offs in relative limb length among Peruvian children: extending the thrifty phenotype hypothesis to limb proportions.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Emma; Stock, Jay T; Stanojevic, Sanja; Miranda, J Jaime; Cole, Tim J; Wells, Jonathan C K

    2012-01-01

    Both the concept of 'brain-sparing' growth and associations between relative lower limb length, childhood environment and adult disease risk are well established. Furthermore, tibia length is suggested to be particularly plastic under conditions of environmental stress. The mechanisms responsible are uncertain, but three hypotheses may be relevant. The 'thrifty phenotype' assumes that some components of growth are selectively sacrificed to preserve more critical outcomes, like the brain. The 'distal blood flow' hypothesis assumes that blood nutrients decline with distance from the heart, and hence may affect limbs in relation to basic body geometry. Temperature adaptation predicts a gradient of decreased size along the limbs reflecting decreasing tissue temperature/blood flow. We examined these questions by comparing the size of body segments among Peruvian children born and raised in differentially stressful environments. In a cross-sectional sample of children aged 6 months to 14 years (n = 447) we measured head circumference, head-trunk height, total upper and lower limb lengths, and zeugopod (ulna and tibia) and autopod (hand and foot) lengths. Highland children (exposed to greater stress) had significantly shorter limbs and zeugopod and autopod elements than lowland children, while differences in head-trunk height were smaller. Zeugopod elements appeared most sensitive to environmental conditions, as they were relatively shorter among highland children than their respective autopod elements. The results suggest that functional traits (hand, foot, and head) may be partially protected at the expense of the tibia and ulna. The results do not fit the predictions of the distal blood flow and temperature adaptation models as explanations for relative limb segment growth under stress conditions. Rather, our data support the extension of the thrifty phenotype hypothesis to limb growth, and suggest that certain elements of limb growth may be sacrificed under tough

  8. Preparation of Desirable Porous Cell Structure Polylactide/Wood Flour Composite Foams Assisted by Chain Extender

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youyong; Song, Yongming; Du, Jun; Xi, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingwen

    2017-01-01

    Polylactide (PLA)/wood flour composite foam were prepared through a batch foaming process. The effect of the chain extender on the crystallization behavior and dynamic rheological properties of the PLA/wood flour composites were investigated as well as the crystal structure and cell morphology of the composite foams. The incorporation of the chain extender enhanced the complex viscosity and storage modulus of PLA/wood flour composites, indicating the improved melt elasticity. The chain extender also led to a decreased crystallization rate and final crystallinity of PLA/wood flour composites. With an increasing chain extender content, a finer and more uniform cell structure was formed, and the expansion ratio of PLA/wood flour composite foams was much higher than without the chain extender. Compared to the unfoamed composites, the crystallinity of the foamed PLA/wood flour composites was improved and the crystal was loosely packed. However, the new crystalline form was not evident. PMID:28846604

  9. Structural mapping: how to study the genetic architecture of a phenotypic trait through its formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chunfa; Shen, Lianying; Lv, Yafei; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Xiaoling; Feng, Sisi; Li, Xin; Sui, Yihan; Pang, Xiaoming; Wu, Rongling

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for genetic mapping are to simply associate the genotypes of a quantitative trait locus (QTL) with the phenotypic variation of a complex trait. A more mechanistic strategy has emerged to dissect the trait phenotype into its structural components and map specific QTLs that control the mechanistic and structural formation of a complex trait. We describe and assess such a strategy, called structural mapping, by integrating the internal structural basis of trait formation into a QTL mapping framework. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been instrumental for describing the structural components of a phenotypic trait and their interactions. By building robust mathematical models on circuit EIS data and embedding these models within a mixture model-based likelihood for QTL mapping, structural mapping implements the EM algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of QTL genotype-specific EIS parameters. The uniqueness of structural mapping is to make it possible to test a number of hypotheses about the pattern of the genetic control of structural components. We validated structural mapping by analyzing an EIS data collected for QTL mapping of frost hardiness in a controlled cross of jujube trees. The statistical properties of parameter estimates were examined by simulation studies. Structural mapping can be a powerful alternative for genetic mapping of complex traits by taking account into the biological and physical mechanisms underlying their formation.

  10. Dihydropyrimidinase deficiency: Phenotype, genotype and structural consequences in 17 patients.

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, André B P; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Meijer, Judith; Meinsma, Rutger; Benoist, Jean-François; Assmann, Birgit; Schubert, Susanne; Hoffmann, Georg F; Duran, Marinus; de Vries, Maaike C; Kurlemann, Gerd; Eyskens, François J M; Greed, Lawrence; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Schwab, K Otfried; Sewell, Adrian C; Walter, John; Hahn, Andreas; Zoetekouw, Lida; Ribes, Antonia; Lind, Suzanne; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2010-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) is the second enzyme of the pyrimidine degradation pathway and catalyses the ring opening of 5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydrothymine. To date, only 11 individuals have been reported suffering from a complete DHP deficiency. Here, we report on the clinical, biochemical and molecular findings of 17 newly identified DHP deficient patients as well as the analysis of the mutations in a three-dimensional framework. Patients presented mainly with neurological and gastrointestinal abnormalities and markedly elevated levels of 5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydrothymine in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and urine. Analysis of DPYS, encoding DHP, showed nine missense mutations, two nonsense mutations, two deletions and one splice-site mutation. Seventy-one percent of the mutations were located at exons 5-8, representing 41% of the coding sequence. Heterologous expression of 11 mutant enzymes in Escherichia coli showed that all but two missense mutations yielded mutant DHP proteins without significant activity. Only DHP enzymes containing the mutations p.R302Q and p.T343A possessed a residual activity of 3.9% and 49%, respectively. The crystal structure of human DHP indicated that the point mutations p.R490C, p.R302Q and p.V364M affect the oligomerization of the enzyme. In contrast, p.M70T, p.D81G, p.L337P and p.T343A affect regions near the di-zinc centre and the substrate binding site. The p.S379R and p.L7V mutations were likely to cause structural destabilization and protein misfolding. Four mutations were identified in multiple unrelated DHP patients, indicating that DHP deficiency may be more common than anticipated.

  11. Efficient and Accurate Multiple-Phenotype Regression Method for High Dimensional Data Considering Population Structure.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jong Wha J; Kang, Eun Yong; Org, Elin; Furlotte, Nick; Parks, Brian; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Lusis, Aldons J; Eskin, Eleazar

    2016-12-01

    A typical genome-wide association study tests correlation between a single phenotype and each genotype one at a time. However, single-phenotype analysis might miss unmeasured aspects of complex biological networks. Analyzing many phenotypes simultaneously may increase the power to capture these unmeasured aspects and detect more variants. Several multivariate approaches aim to detect variants related to more than one phenotype, but these current approaches do not consider the effects of population structure. As a result, these approaches may result in a significant amount of false positive identifications. Here, we introduce a new methodology, referred to as GAMMA for generalized analysis of molecular variance for mixed-model analysis, which is capable of simultaneously analyzing many phenotypes and correcting for population structure. In a simulated study using data implanted with true genetic effects, GAMMA accurately identifies these true effects without producing false positives induced by population structure. In simulations with this data, GAMMA is an improvement over other methods which either fail to detect true effects or produce many false positive identifications. We further apply our method to genetic studies of yeast and gut microbiome from mice and show that GAMMA identifies several variants that are likely to have true biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Phenotypic Characterization of Multidrug-resistant Escherichia Coli with Special Reference to Extended-spectrum-beta-lactamases and Metallo-beta-lactamases in a Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Shrestha, S; Mishra, S K; Kattel, H P; Tada, T; Ohara, H; Kirikae, T; Rijal, B P; Sherchand, J B; Pokhrel, B M

    2015-01-01

    The increasing reports on extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase and metallo-beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli have addressed a potential threat to global health since it is found to be highly resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics including carbapenems. The present study was aimed to determine the antibiogram of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase and metallo-beta-lactamase producing MDR E. coli isolates from various clinical samples. This was a cross-sectional study conducted over a period of seven months from December 2013 to July 2014 at bacteriology laboratory of Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital. A total of 250 clinical specimens (urine, pus, sputum, blood, body fluid, bile, tissue and central venous pressure line tip) were processed from inpatients, with multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli infections. Standard microbiological techniques were used for isolation and identification of the isolates. The presence of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase was detected by phenotypic confirmatory test recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and imipenem (IMP) /EDTA combined disc method was performed to detect metallo-beta-lactamase mediated resistance mechanism. We found high level of beta lactamase mediated resistance mechanism as part of multidrug resistance. Among 250 MDR isolates, 60% isolates were extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase producers and 17.2% isolates were metallo-beta-lactamase producers. Co-existence of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase and metallo-beta-lactamase identified in 6.8% isolates. Beta-lactamase mediated resistance mechanisms are accounting very high in the multidrug resistant isolates of E. coli. Therefore, early detection of beta lactamase mediated resistant strains and their current antibiotic susceptibility pattern is necessary to avoid treatment failure and prevent the spread of MDR.

  13. Distribution of genotype network sizes in sequence-to-structure genotype-phenotype maps.

    PubMed

    Manrubia, Susanna; Cuesta, José A

    2017-04-01

    An essential quantity to ensure evolvability of populations is the navigability of the genotype space. Navigability, understood as the ease with which alternative phenotypes are reached, relies on the existence of sufficiently large and mutually attainable genotype networks. The size of genotype networks (e.g. the number of RNA sequences folding into a particular secondary structure or the number of DNA sequences coding for the same protein structure) is astronomically large in all functional molecules investigated: an exhaustive experimental or computational study of all RNA folds or all protein structures becomes impossible even for moderately long sequences. Here, we analytically derive the distribution of genotype network sizes for a hierarchy of models which successively incorporate features of increasingly realistic sequence-to-structure genotype-phenotype maps. The main feature of these models relies on the characterization of each phenotype through a prototypical sequence whose sites admit a variable fraction of letters of the alphabet. Our models interpolate between two limit distributions: a power-law distribution, when the ordering of sites in the prototypical sequence is strongly constrained, and a lognormal distribution, as suggested for RNA, when different orderings of the same set of sites yield different phenotypes. Our main result is the qualitative and quantitative identification of those features of sequence-to-structure maps that lead to different distributions of genotype network sizes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Trade-Offs in Relative Limb Length among Peruvian Children: Extending the Thrifty Phenotype Hypothesis to Limb Proportions

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Emma; Stock, Jay T.; Stanojevic, Sanja; Miranda, J. Jaime; Cole, Tim J.; Wells, Jonathan C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Methods Both the concept of ‘brain-sparing’ growth and associations between relative lower limb length, childhood environment and adult disease risk are well established. Furthermore, tibia length is suggested to be particularly plastic under conditions of environmental stress. The mechanisms responsible are uncertain, but three hypotheses may be relevant. The ‘thrifty phenotype’ assumes that some components of growth are selectively sacrificed to preserve more critical outcomes, like the brain. The ‘distal blood flow’ hypothesis assumes that blood nutrients decline with distance from the heart, and hence may affect limbs in relation to basic body geometry. Temperature adaptation predicts a gradient of decreased size along the limbs reflecting decreasing tissue temperature/blood flow. We examined these questions by comparing the size of body segments among Peruvian children born and raised in differentially stressful environments. In a cross-sectional sample of children aged 6 months to 14 years (n = 447) we measured head circumference, head-trunk height, total upper and lower limb lengths, and zeugopod (ulna and tibia) and autopod (hand and foot) lengths. Results Highland children (exposed to greater stress) had significantly shorter limbs and zeugopod and autopod elements than lowland children, while differences in head-trunk height were smaller. Zeugopod elements appeared most sensitive to environmental conditions, as they were relatively shorter among highland children than their respective autopod elements. Discussion The results suggest that functional traits (hand, foot, and head) may be partially protected at the expense of the tibia and ulna. The results do not fit the predictions of the distal blood flow and temperature adaptation models as explanations for relative limb segment growth under stress conditions. Rather, our data support the extension of the thrifty phenotype hypothesis to limb growth, and suggest that certain

  15. Dimensional Structure of the Autism Phenotype: Relations between Early Development and Current Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamp-Becker, Inge; Ghahreman, Mardjan; Smidt, Judith; Remschmidt, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    The dimensional structure of higher functioning autism phenotype was investigated by factor analysis. The goal of this study was to identify the degree to which early symptoms of autism (measured using the ADI-R) could be predictive of the current symptoms of autism as identified using the ADOS, the adaptive behavior scales, IQ scores and theory…

  16. Dimensional Structure of the Autism Phenotype: Relations between Early Development and Current Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamp-Becker, Inge; Ghahreman, Mardjan; Smidt, Judith; Remschmidt, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    The dimensional structure of higher functioning autism phenotype was investigated by factor analysis. The goal of this study was to identify the degree to which early symptoms of autism (measured using the ADI-R) could be predictive of the current symptoms of autism as identified using the ADOS, the adaptive behavior scales, IQ scores and theory…

  17. Correlates across the Structural, Functional, and Molecular Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; Greenough, William T.

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is characterized by a pattern of morphological, functional, and molecular characteristics with, in at least some cases, apparent relationships among phenotypic features at different levels. Gross morphology differences in the sizes of some human brain regions are accompanied by fine structural alterations in the shapes and…

  18. Correlates across the Structural, Functional, and Molecular Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckel-Mitchener, Andrea; Greenough, William T.

    2004-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is characterized by a pattern of morphological, functional, and molecular characteristics with, in at least some cases, apparent relationships among phenotypic features at different levels. Gross morphology differences in the sizes of some human brain regions are accompanied by fine structural alterations in the shapes and…

  19. Conflict between biotic and climatic selective pressures acting on an extended phenotype in a subarctic, but not temperate, environment

    PubMed Central

    Rohwer, V. G.; Bonier, F.; Martin, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Climatic selective pressures are thought to dominate biotic selective pressures at higher latitudes. However, few studies have experimentally tested how these selective pressures differentially act on traits across latitudes because traits can rarely be manipulated independently of the organism in nature. We overcame this challenge by using an extended phenotype—active bird nests—and conducted reciprocal transplant experiments between a subarctic and temperate site, separated by 14° of latitude. At the subarctic site, biotic selective pressures (nest predation) favoured smaller, non-local temperate nests, whereas climatic selective pressures (temperature) favoured larger local nests, particularly at colder temperatures. By contrast, at the temperate site, climatic and biotic selective pressures acted similarly on temperate and subarctic nests. Our results illustrate a functional trade-off in the subarctic between nest morphologies favoured by biotic versus climatic selective pressures, with climate favouring local nest morphologies. At our temperate site, however, allocative trade-offs in the time and effort devoted to nest construction favour smaller, local nests. Our findings illustrate a conflict between biotic and climatic selective pressures at the northern extremes of a species geographical range, and suggest that trade-offs between trait function and trait elaboration act differentially across latitude to create broad geographic variation in traits. PMID:26490789

  20. Prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotypes in enterobacteria isolated from blood cultures of patients at admission to the University Hospital of Bamako.

    PubMed

    Sangaré, S A; Maïga, A I; Maïga, A; Diallo, S; Camara, N; Savadogo, S; Guindo, I; Bougoudogo, F; Armand-Lefèvre, L; Andremont, A; Maïga, I I

    2017-06-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) phenotypes among the enterobacteria present in blood cultures of patients at admission to two university hospitals of Bamako (Mali). During a period of three months, we isolated enterobacteria from blood cultures from patients upon admission to the Point G and Gabriel Toure University Hospitals. The ESBL-positive enterobacteria were initially identified by API 20E strips and VITEK(®)2 and then confirmed in France by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry at the Bichat Hospital bacteriology laboratory. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the diffusion method as recommended by EUCAST. The species isolated were K. pneumoniae (14/40, 35.0 %), E. coli (11/40, 27.5 %), and E. cloacae (9/40, 22.5 %); 21/34 (61.8 %) had an ESBL phenotype, including 10/14 (71.4 %) K. pneumoniae, 8/11 (72.7 %) E. coli, and 3/9 (33 3 %), E. cloacae. The ESBL strains of K. pneumoniae, E. coli, and E. cloacae were associated, respectively, with resistance to the following antibiotics: gentamicin (10/10, 100 %; 6/8, 75%; 2/3, 67%), amikacin (2/10, 20 %; 0/8, 0%; 0/3, 0%), ofloxacin (8/10, 80. %; 7/8, 87%; 3/3, 100%), cotrimoxazole (10/10, 100 %; 6/8, 75%; 3/3, 100%). Almost two thirds (61.8%) of the enterobacteria isolated from blood cultures produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamases. They retained regular sensitivity only to carbapenems and amikacin.

  1. Structural and Genetic Assessment of the ABCA4-Associated Optical Gap Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nõupuu, Kalev; Lee, Winston; Zernant, Jana; Tsang, Stephen H.; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the developmental stages and genetic etiology of the optical gap phenotype in recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1). Methods. Single and longitudinal data points from 15 patients, including four sibling pairs, exhibiting an optical gap phenotype on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with confirmed disease-causing ABCA4 alleles were retrospectively analyzed. Fundus images with corresponding SD-OCT scans were collected with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Structural phenotypes were assigned to three developmental stages according to SD-OCT. The ABCA4 gene was screened in all patients. Results. At least two disease-causing ABCA4 variants where identified in each patient; all except one (91%) were compound heterozygous for the p.G1961E mutation. All patients exhibited structural findings on SD-OCT that grouped into three progressive developmental stages over several years. Stage 1 was characterized by mild disruptions of the ellipsoid zone (EZ) band over the fovea. Stage 2 was a progressive expansion of the EZ band loss resulting in an empty lesion devoid of photoreceptors. Stage 3 observed a structural collapse of the inner retinal layers into the optical gap space leading to involvement and atrophy of the RPE thereafter. Conclusions. The optical gap phenotype in STGD1 can be structurally divided into three progressive stages spanning several years. This particular phenotype also appears to be highly associated with the p.G1961E mutation of ABCA4. Taken together, it appears that a focal loss of photoreceptors sequentially precedes RPE dysfunction in the early development of ABCA4-associated optical gap lesions. PMID:25301883

  2. Topological Structure of the Space of Phenotypes: The Case of RNA Neutral Networks

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Jacobo; Buldú, Javier M.; Stich, Michael; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution and adaptation of molecular populations is constrained by the diversity accessible through mutational processes. RNA is a paradigmatic example of biopolymer where genotype (sequence) and phenotype (approximated by the secondary structure fold) are identified in a single molecule. The extreme redundancy of the genotype-phenotype map leads to large ensembles of RNA sequences that fold into the same secondary structure and can be connected through single-point mutations. These ensembles define neutral networks of phenotypes in sequence space. Here we analyze the topological properties of neutral networks formed by 12-nucleotides RNA sequences, obtained through the exhaustive folding of sequence space. A total of 412 sequences fragments into 645 subnetworks that correspond to 57 different secondary structures. The topological analysis reveals that each subnetwork is far from being random: it has a degree distribution with a well-defined average and a small dispersion, a high clustering coefficient, and an average shortest path between nodes close to its minimum possible value, i.e. the Hamming distance between sequences. RNA neutral networks are assortative due to the correlation in the composition of neighboring sequences, a feature that together with the symmetries inherent to the folding process explains the existence of communities. Several topological relationships can be analytically derived attending to structural restrictions and generic properties of the folding process. The average degree of these phenotypic networks grows logarithmically with their size, such that abundant phenotypes have the additional advantage of being more robust to mutations. This property prevents fragmentation of neutral networks and thus enhances the navigability of sequence space. In summary, RNA neutral networks show unique topological properties, unknown to other networks previously described. PMID:22028856

  3. Comparative proteomics reveal fundamental structural and functional differences between the two progeny phenotypes of a baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dianhai; Zhang, Leike; Deng, Fei; Fang, Wei; Wang, Ranran; Liu, Xijia; Guo, Lin; Rayner, Simon; Chen, Xinwen; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    The replication of lepidopteran baculoviruses is characterized by the production of two progeny phenotypes: the occlusion-derived virus (ODV), which establishes infection in midgut cells, and the budded virus (BV), which disseminates infection to different tissues within a susceptible host. To understand the structural, and hence functional, differences between BV and ODV, we employed multiple proteomic methods to reveal the protein compositions and posttranslational modifications of the two phenotypes of Helicoverpa armigera nucleopolyhedrovirus. In addition, Western blotting and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to identify the localization of proteins in the envelope or nucleocapsid fractions. Comparative protein portfolios of BV and ODV showing the distribution of 54 proteins, encompassing the 21 proteins shared by BV and ODV, the 12 BV-specific proteins, and the 21 ODV-specific proteins, were obtained. Among the 11 ODV-specific envelope proteins, 8 either are essential for or contribute to oral infection. Twenty-three phosphorylated and 6 N-glycosylated viral proteins were also identified. While the proteins that are shared by the two phenotypes appear to be important for nucleocapsid assembly and trafficking, the structural and functional differences between the two phenotypes are evidently characterized by the envelope proteins and posttranslational modifications. This comparative proteomics study provides new insight into how BV and ODV are formed and why they function differently.

  4. Extended Structures in RNA Folding Intermediates Are Due to Nonnative Interactions Rather than Electrostatic Repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Nathan J.; Gong, Haipeng; Zaheer, Syed S.; Freed, Karl F.; Pan, Tao; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2010-05-25

    RNA folding occurs via a series of transitions between metastable intermediate states for Mg{sup 2+} concentrations below those needed to fold the native structure. In general, these folding intermediates are considerably less compact than their respective native states. Our previous work demonstrates that the major equilibrium intermediate of the 154-residue specificity domain (S-domain) of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA is more extended than its native structure. We now investigate two models with falsifiable predictions regarding the origins of the extended intermediate structures in the S-domains of the B. subtilis and the Escherichia coli RNase P RNA that belong to different classes of P RNA and have distinct native structures. The first model explores the contribution of electrostatic repulsion, while the second model probes specific interactions in the core of the folding intermediate. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and Langevin dynamics simulations, we show that electrostatics plays only a minor role, whereas specific interactions largely account for the extended nature of the intermediate. Structural contacts in the core, including a nonnative base pair, help to stabilize the intermediate conformation. We conclude that RNA folding intermediates adopt extended conformations due to short-range, nonnative interactions rather than generic electrostatic repulsion of helical domains. These principles apply to other ribozymes and riboswitches that undergo functionally relevant conformational changes.

  5. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhengqing

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16±2° from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94±0.02Å. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27±0.04Å, up from 1.10Å for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25Å Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20Å and 15--23°) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16Å and 19°. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95Å for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius ~ 1.5 Å for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  6. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  7. A structure-function study of MID1 mutations associated with a mild Opitz phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mnayer, Laila; Khuri, Sawsan; Merheby, Hassan Al-Ali; Meroni, Germana; Elsas, Louis J

    2006-03-01

    The X-linked form of Opitz syndrome (OS) affects midline structures and produces a characteristic, but heterogeneous, phenotype that may include severe mental retardation, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, widow's peak, cleft lip/cleft palate, congenital heart disease, laryngotracheal defects, and hypospadias. The MID1 gene was implicated in OS by linkage to Xp22. It encodes a 667 amino acid protein that contains a RING finger motif, two B-box zinc fingers, a coiled-coil, a fibronectin type III (FNIII) domain, and a B30.2 domain. Several mutations in MID1 are associated with severe OS. Here, we describe an intelligent male with a milder phenotype characterized by hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, widow's peak, mild hypospadias, pectus excavatum, and a surgically corrected tracheo-esophageal fistula. He has an above average intelligence and no cleft lip/palate or heart disease. We identified a novel mutation in MID1 (P441L) which is in exon 8 and functionally associated with the FNIII domain. While OS phenotypes have been attributed to mutations in the C-terminal part of MID1, little is currently known about the structure-function relationships of MID1 mutations, and how they affect phenotype. We find from a literature review that missense mutations within the FNIII domain of MID1 are associated with a milder presentation of OS than missense mutations elsewhere in MID1. All truncating mutations (frameshift, insertions/deletions) lead to severe OS. We used homology analysis of the MID1 FNIII domain to investigate structure-function changes caused by our missense mutation. This and other missense mutations probably cause disruption of protein-protein interactions, either within MID1 or between MID1 and other proteins. We correlate these protein structure-function findings to the absence of CNS or palatal changes and conclude that the FNIII domain of the MID1 protein may be involved in midline differentiation after neural tube and palatal structures are completed.

  8. Phenotypic variation and water selection potential in the stem structure of invasive alligator weed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Leshan; Yang, Beifen; Guan, Wenbin; Li, Junmin

    2016-02-01

    The morphological and anatomical characteristics of stems have been found to be related to drought resistance in plants. Testing the phenotypic selection of water availability on stem anatomical traits would be useful for exploring the evolutionary potential of the stem in response to water availability. To test the phenotypic variation of the stem anatomical traits of an invasive plant in response to water availability, we collected a total of 320 individuals of Alternanthera philoxeroides from 16 populations from terrestrial and aquatic habitats in 8 plots in China and then analyzed the variation, differentiation, plasticity and selection potential of water availability on the stem anatomical traits. We found that except for the thickness of the cortex, all of the examined phenotypic parameters of the A. philoxeroides stem were significantly and positively correlated with soil water availability. The phenotypic differentiation coefficient for all of the anatomical structural parameters indicated that most of the variation existed between habitats within the same plot, whereas there was little variation among plots or among individuals within the same habitat except for variation in the thickness of the cortex. A significant phenotypic plasticity response to water availability was found for all of the anatomical traits of A. philoxeroides stem except for the thickness of the cortex. The associations between fitness and some of the anatomical traits, such as the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio, the pith cavity area-to-stem area ratio and the density of vascular bundles, differed with heterogeneous water availability. In both the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, no significant directional selection gradient was found for the stem diameter, the cortex area-to-stem area ratio or the density of vascular bundles. These results indicated that the anatomical structure of the A. philoxeroides stem may play an important role in the adaptation to changes

  9. Phenotypic Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta lactamase and Carbapenemase Co-producing Clinical Isolates from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Kano, North West Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yusuf; Sani, Yahaya; Saleh, Qabli; Saleh, Algarni; Hakeem, Gbadamosi

    2017-01-01

    Continue rise in unprofessional use of antibiotics in our hospitals and communities is worrisome. A research study was therefore conducted to detect extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), carbapenemase, metallobeta lactamase and their co-production phenotypically from isolates obtained from patients admitted to or attending two tertiary hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. A total of 248 isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniaewere screened phenotypically for ESBL production and carbapenemase production according to CLS1 2012 breakpoints using double disk synergy test and modified Hodge test (MHT) respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms was tested against colistin, tigecycline and 3 flouroquinolones. The result shows that 58.0% of the isolates were ESBL producers with higher percentage in K. pneumoniae (62.9%). Further, about 40.3% and 36.6% of the isolates were resistant to meropenem and imipenem respectively. However, E. coli showed higher resistance to meropenem (47.1%) while K. pneumoniae showed higher resistance to imipenem (44.4%). Co-productions of carbapenemase and ESBL were observed in both E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Carbapenemase producing isolates were more obtained from uro-pathogens and wound isolates, with almost all the cases of co-production of the β lactamases occurring in urine and cathertips isolates. Overall susceptibilities of the isolates to colistin and tigecycline were 64.6and70.0% respectively, but isolates were less susceptible to flouroquinolones. The finding of the study therefore indicates that carbapenem resistance is mediated by carbapenemase production and or overproduction of ESBL coupled with reduced porins. Co-production of carbapenemase, MBLs and ESBLs by some of the isolates is worrisome. Susceptibility to colistin and tigecycline was still promising, but increasing resistance to flouroquinolones has been observed.

  10. Is a Gall an Extended Phenotype of the Inducing Insect? A Comparative Study of Selected Morphological and Physiological Traits of Leaf and Stem Galls on Machilus thunbergii (Lauraceae) Induced by Five Species of Daphnephila (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in Northeastern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liang-Yu; Chen, Wen-Neng; Chiu, Shau-Ting; Raman, Anantanarayanan; Chiang, Tung-Chuang; Yang, Man-Miao

    2015-06-01

    Mature galls induced by Daphnephila truncicola, D. taiwanensis, D. sueyenae, D. stenocalia, and D. ornithocephala on Machilus thunbergii in northern Taiwan were examined to verify the dictum that the morphology of galls is an expression of the extended phenotype of the respective gall-inducing insect. Based on their length-width ratio, the materials were grouped into either fleshy (those induced by D. taiwanensis and D. sueyenae) or slim galls (those induced by D. truncicola, D. stenocalia, and D. ornithocephala). Stem galls induced by D. truncicola showed an energy level of 0.0178 kJ/g. Among leaf galls, the greatest energy level was in the one induced by D. stenocalia (0.0193 kJ/g), followed by D. sueyenae (0.0192 kJ/g), D. taiwanensis (0.0189 kJ/g), and D. ornithocephala (0.0160 kJ/g). The numbers of reserve and nutritive cell layers in galls were greater in the stem galls induced by D. truncicola, similar to those in the fleshy leaf galls, than in the slim leaf galls. Based on the fungal taxa isolated from the larval chambers and considering the similarities and divergences among gall characteristics, the galls induced by D. truncicola and D. taiwanensis clustered into one, whereas those of D. sueyenae aligned with the 'D. stenocalia-D. ornithocephala' cluster. The present study verified that shapes, structure, nutritive tissues, energy levels, and multiple coexisting fungal taxa within galls reinforce that they are extended phenotypes of the respective gall-inducing Daphnephila species and they represent adaptive evolution of Daphnephila on M. thunbergii.

  11. Effects of grazer presence on genetic structure of a phenotypically diverse diatom population.

    PubMed

    Sjöqvist, C; Kremp, A; Lindehoff, E; Båmstedt, U; Egardt, J; Gross, S; Jönsson, M; Larsson, H; Pohnert, G; Richter, H; Selander, E; Godhe, A

    2014-01-01

    Studies of predator-prey systems in both aquatic and terrestrial environments have shown that grazers structure the intraspecific diversity of prey species, given that the prey populations are phenotypically variable. Populations of phytoplankton have traditionally considered comprising only low intraspecific variation, hence selective grazing as a potentially structuring factor of both genetic and phenotypic diversity has not been comprehensively studied. In this study, we compared strain specific growth rates, production of polyunsaturated aldehydes, and chain length of the marine diatom Skeletonema marinoi in both grazer and non-grazer conditions by conducting monoclonal experiments. Additionally, a mesocosm experiment was performed with multiclonal experimental S. marinoi populations exposed to grazers at different levels of copepod concentration to test effects of grazer presence on diatom diversity in close to natural conditions. Our results show that distinct genotypes of a geographically restricted population exhibit variable phenotypic traits relevant to grazing interactions such as chain length and growth rates. Grazer presence affected clonal richness and evenness of multiclonal Skeletonema populations in the mesocosms, likely in conjunction with intrinsic interactions among the diatom strains. Only the production of polyunsaturated aldehydes was not affected by grazer presence. Our findings suggest that grazing can be an important factor structuring diatom population diversity in the sea and emphasize the importance of considering clonal differences when characterizing species and their role in nature.

  12. Plant phenotyping using multi-view stereo vision with structured lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C.; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima

    2016-05-01

    A multi-view stereo vision system for true 3D reconstruction, modeling and phenotyping of plants was created that successfully resolves many of the shortcomings of traditional camera-based 3D plant phenotyping systems. This novel system incorporates several features including: computer algorithms, including camera calibration, excessive-green based plant segmentation, semi-global stereo block matching, disparity bilateral filtering, 3D point cloud processing, and 3D feature extraction, and hardware consisting of a hemispherical superstructure designed to hold five stereo pairs of cameras and a custom designed structured light pattern illumination system. This system is nondestructive and can extract 3D features of whole plants modeled from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different view angles. The study characterizes the systems phenotyping performance for 3D plant features: plant height, total leaf area, and total leaf shading area. For plants having specified leaf spacing and size, the algorithms used in our system yielded satisfactory experimental results and demonstrated the ability to study plant development where the same plants were repeatedly imaged and phenotyped over the time.

  13. SCOPe: Manual Curation and Artifact Removal in the Structural Classification of Proteins - extended Database.

    PubMed

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Fox, Naomi K; Brenner, Steven E

    2017-02-03

    SCOPe (Structural Classification of Proteins-extended, http://scop.berkeley.edu) is a database of relationships between protein structures that extends the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database. SCOP is an expert-curated ordering of domains from the majority of proteins of known structure in a hierarchy according to structural and evolutionary relationships. SCOPe classifies the majority of protein structures released since SCOP development concluded in 2009, using a combination of manual curation and highly precise automated tools, aiming to have the same accuracy as fully hand-curated SCOP releases. SCOPe also incorporates and updates the ASTRAL compendium, which provides several databases and tools to aid in the analysis of the sequences and structures of proteins classified in SCOPe. SCOPe continues high-quality manual classification of new superfamilies, a key feature of SCOP. Artifacts such as expression tags are now separated into their own class, in order to distinguish them from the homology-based annotations in the remainder of the SCOPe hierarchy. SCOPe 2.06 contains 77,439 Protein Data Bank entries, double the 38,221 structures classified in SCOP. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural Properties of Gene Promoters Highlight More than Two Phenotypes of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guja, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) published in the last decade raised the number of loci associated with type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) to more than 50 for each of these diabetes phenotypes. The environmental factors seem to play an important role in the expression of these genes, acting through transcription factors that bind to promoters. Using the available databases we examined the promoters of various genes classically associated with the two main diabetes phenotypes. Our comparative analyses have revealed significant architectural differences between promoters of genes classically associated with T1D and T2D. Nevertheless, five gene promoters (about 16%) belonging to T1D and six gene promoters (over 19%) belonging to T2D have shown some intermediary structural properties, suggesting a direct relationship to either LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults) phenotype or to non-autoimmune type 1 phenotype. The distribution of these promoters in at least three separate classes seems to indicate specific pathogenic pathways. The image-based patterns (DNA patterns) generated by promoters of genes associated with these three phenotypes support the clinical observation of a smooth link between specific cases of typical T1D and T2D. In addition, a global distribution of these DNA patterns suggests that promoters of genes associated with T1D appear to be evolutionary more conserved than those associated with T2D. Though, the image based patterns obtained by our method might be a new useful parameter for understanding the pathogenetic mechanism and the diabetogenic gene networks. PMID:26379145

  15. On implementation of the extended interior penalty function. [optimum structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassis, J. H.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The extended interior penalty function formulation is implemented. A rational method for determining the transition between the interior and extended parts is set forth. The formulation includes a straightforward method for avoiding design points with some negative components, which are physically meaningless in structural analysis. The technique, when extended to problems involving parametric constraints, can facilitate closed form integration of the penalty terms over the most important parts of the parameter interval. The method lends itself well to the use of approximation concepts, such as design variable linking, constraint deletion and Taylor series expansions of response quantities in terms of design variables. Examples demonstrating the algorithm, in the context of planar orthogonal frames subjected to ground motion, are included.

  16. On implementation of the extended interior penalty function. [optimum structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassis, J. H.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The extended interior penalty function formulation is implemented. A rational method for determining the transition between the interior and extended parts is set forth. The formulation includes a straightforward method for avoiding design points with some negative components, which are physically meaningless in structural analysis. The technique, when extended to problems involving parametric constraints, can facilitate closed form integration of the penalty terms over the most important parts of the parameter interval. The method lends itself well to the use of approximation concepts, such as design variable linking, constraint deletion and Taylor series expansions of response quantities in terms of design variables. Examples demonstrating the algorithm, in the context of planar orthogonal frames subjected to ground motion, are included.

  17. Local atomic structure of a clean surface by surface-extended x-ray absorption fine structure: Amorphized Si

    SciTech Connect

    Comin, F.; Incoccia, L.; Lagarde, P.; Rossi, G.; Citrin, P.H.

    1985-01-14

    The application of near-edge surface, extended x-ray absorption fine structure to the study of a clean surface is reported. Direct evidence is found for surface recrystallization of ion-damaged (amorphized) Si, whereas no such evidence is seen for evaporated (amorphous) Si. The procedures described here are applicable to almost all clean or adsorbate-covered surfaces.

  18. Phenotype, Sex of Rearing, Gender Re-Assignment, and Response to Medical Treatment in Extended Family Members with a Novel Mutation in the SRD5A2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Asma; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Ibukunoluwa, Fakunle; Attia, Salima

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of steroid 5-alpha reductase-2 (5ARD2) is an inborn error of metabolism causing a disorder of sexual differentiation. It is caused by a mutation in the SRD5A2 gene in which various mutation types have been reported. Affected individuals have a broad spectrum of presentation ranging from normal female-appearing genitalia, cliteromegaly, microphallus, hypospadias, to completely male-appearing genitalia. We report an extended Emirati family with 11 affected members. The family displayed various phenotypes on presentation leading to different sex of rearing. Some family members were reassigned gender at various stages of life. The index case was born with severe undervirilization with bilaterally palpable gonads and was raised as male from birth. He had a 46,XY karyotype and a high testosterone/dihydrotestosterone ratio. Genetic investigation revealed a novel homozygous deletion of exon 2 of the SRD5A2 gene. Both parents were found to be carriers for the gene deletion. The patient had masculinizing surgery and a course of topical dihydrotestosterone. No beneficial effect of the hormone application was noted over 3 months and the treatment was discontinued. The findings on this kindred indicate that deletion of exon 2 in the SRD5A2 gene causes various degrees of genital ambiguity leading to different sex of rearing in affected family members. Gender reassignment may be done at various ages even in conservative communities like the Gulf region. PMID:27086719

  19. Linking amphibian call structure to the environment: the interplay between phenotypic flexibility and individual attributes

    PubMed Central

    Arim, Matías; Narins, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the environment surrounding signal emission produces different patterns of degradation and attenuation. The expected adjustment of calls to ensure signal transmission in an environment was formalized in the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Within this framework, most studies considered anuran calls as fixed attributes determined by local adaptations. However, variability in vocalizations as a product of phenotypic expression has also been reported. Empirical evidence supporting the association between environment and call structure has been inconsistent, particularly in anurans. Here, we identify a plausible causal structure connecting environment, individual attributes, and temporal and spectral adjustments as direct or indirect determinants of the observed variation in call attributes of the frog Hypsiboas pulchellus. For that purpose, we recorded the calls of 40 males in the field, together with vegetation density and other environmental descriptors of the calling site. Path analysis revealed a strong effect of habitat structure on the temporal parameters of the call, and an effect of site temperature conditioning the size of organisms calling at each site and thus indirectly affecting the dominant frequency of the call. Experimental habitat modification with a styrofoam enclosure yielded results consistent with field observations, highlighting the potential role of call flexibility on detected call patterns. Both, experimental and correlative results indicate the need to incorporate the so far poorly considered role of phenotypic plasticity in the complex connection between environmental structure and individual call attributes. PMID:22479134

  20. Linking amphibian call structure to the environment: the interplay between phenotypic flexibility and individual attributes.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Lucía; Arim, Matías; Narins, Peter M

    2011-05-01

    The structure of the environment surrounding signal emission produces different patterns of degradation and attenuation. The expected adjustment of calls to ensure signal transmission in an environment was formalized in the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Within this framework, most studies considered anuran calls as fixed attributes determined by local adaptations. However, variability in vocalizations as a product of phenotypic expression has also been reported. Empirical evidence supporting the association between environment and call structure has been inconsistent, particularly in anurans. Here, we identify a plausible causal structure connecting environment, individual attributes, and temporal and spectral adjustments as direct or indirect determinants of the observed variation in call attributes of the frog Hypsiboas pulchellus. For that purpose, we recorded the calls of 40 males in the field, together with vegetation density and other environmental descriptors of the calling site. Path analysis revealed a strong effect of habitat structure on the temporal parameters of the call, and an effect of site temperature conditioning the size of organisms calling at each site and thus indirectly affecting the dominant frequency of the call. Experimental habitat modification with a styrofoam enclosure yielded results consistent with field observations, highlighting the potential role of call flexibility on detected call patterns. Both, experimental and correlative results indicate the need to incorporate the so far poorly considered role of phenotypic plasticity in the complex connection between environmental structure and individual call attributes.

  1. CHANDRA EVIDENCE FOR EXTENDED X-RAY STRUCTURE IN RY Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Audard, Marc; Guedel, Manuel E-mail: marc.audard@unige.ch

    2011-08-10

    We report results of a sensitive Chandra ACIS-S observation of the classical T Tauri star RY Tau. Previous studies have shown that it drives a spectacular bipolar jet whose blueshifted component is traced optically along P.A. {approx} 295{sup 0} at separations of 1.''5-31'' from the star. Complex X-ray emission is revealed, including a very soft non-variable spectral component (some of which may originate in shocks), a superhot flaring component (T {approx}> 100 MK), and faint extended structure near the star. The structure is visible in deconvolved images and extends northwestward out to a separation of 1.''7, overlapping the inner part of the optical jet. Image analysis suggests that most of the extension is real, but some contamination by point-spread-function-induced structure within the central arcsecond may be present. The predicted temperature for a shock-heated jet based on jet speed and shock speed estimates from optical measurements is too low to explain the extended X-ray structure. Either higher speed material within the jet has escaped optical detection or other mechanisms besides shock heating are involved. Alternative mechanisms that could produce higher temperature plasma at small offsets to the northwest of RY Tau include magnetic heating in the jet, hot plasmoids ejected at high speeds, or X-ray emission from a putative close companion whose presence has been inferred from Hipparcos variations.

  2. DETERMINING THE NATURE OF THE EXTENDED H I STRUCTURE AROUND LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXY NGC 1569

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Megan

    2013-06-15

    This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1. Degree-Sign 5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0. Degree-Sign 5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

  3. Determining the Nature of the Extended H I Structure around LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Galaxy NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Megan

    2013-06-01

    This work presents an extended, neutral hydrogen emission map around Magellanic-type dwarf irregular galaxy (dIm) NGC 1569. In the spring of 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope was used to map a 9° × 2° region in H I line emission that includes NGC 1569 and IC 342 as well as two other dwarf galaxies. The primary objective for these observations was to search for structures potentially connecting NGC 1569 with IC 342 group members in order to trace previous interactions and thus, provide an explanation for the starburst and peculiar kinematics prevalent in NGC 1569. A large, half-degree diameter H I cloud was detected that shares the same position and velocity as NGC 1569. Also, two long structures were discovered that are reminiscent of intergalactic filaments extending out in a V-shaped manner from NGC 1569 toward UGCA 92, a nearby dwarf galaxy. These filamentary structures extend for about 1.°5, which is 77 kpc at NGC 1569. There is a continuous velocity succession with the 0.°5 H I cloud, filaments, and main body of the galaxy. The 0.°5 H I cloud and filamentary structures may be foreground Milky Way, but are suggestive as possible remnants of an interaction between NGC 1569 and UGCA 92. The data also show two tidal tails extending from UGCA 86 and IC 342, respectively. These structures may be part of a continuous H I bridge but more data are needed to determine if this is the case.

  4. Muscular dystrophy with large mitochondria associated with mutations in the CHKB gene in three British patients: extending the clinical and pathological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Ros; Mitsuahashi, Satomi; Sewry, Caroline; Cirak, Sebahattin; Aoyama, Chieko; Mooore, David; Abbs, Stephen; Robb, Stephanie; Newton, Tina; Moss, Celia; Birchall, Daniel; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Bushby, Kate; Guglieri, Michela; Muntoni, Francesco; Nishino, Ichizo; Straub, Volker

    2013-07-01

    Three patients with CHKB deficient muscular dystrophy are described which broadens the previously described phenotype. Blood smear in one patient showed Jordans anomaly (vacuolated leukocytes). Gastrointestinal features occurred in two patients and there appeared to be acute deterioration with infection/general anaesthesia. Brain imaging showed no structural changes but brain magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy (MRS) demonstrated significant reduction in choline:N-acetyl aspartate and choline:creatine ratios in keeping with a general decrease in the amount of choline and phosphocholine-based substrate. Muscle pathology showed either myopathic or dystrophic features, uneven oxidative enzyme staining, COX deficient fibres and peripherally located large mitochondria. CHKB activity was reduced in all three patients and complex 1 activity was significantly reduced in one patient.

  5. The Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ)-Revised Extended Version (ASSQ-REV): An Instrument for Better Capturing the Autism Phenotype in Girls? A Preliminary Study Involving 191 Clinical Cases and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Svenny; Gillberg, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to develop and validate an extension of the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ)-the ASSQ Revised Extended Version (ASSQ-REV)--for better capturing the female phenotype of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Clinic girls and Clinic boys, most of whom with ASD and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and Community…

  6. Population Structure and Genotype–Phenotype Associations in a Collection of Oat Landraces and Historic Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Louisa R.; Michael Bonman, J.; Chao, Shiaoman; Admassu Yimer, B.; Bockelman, Harold; Esvelt Klos, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Population structure and genetic architecture of phenotypic traits in oat (Avena sativa L.) remain relatively under-researched compared to other small grain species. This study explores the historic context of current elite germplasm, including phenotypic and genetic characterization, with a particular focus on identifying under-utilized areas. A diverse panel of cultivated oat accessions was assembled from the USDA National Small Grains Collection to represent a gene pool relatively unaffected by twentieth century breeding activity and unlikely to have been included in recent molecular studies. The panel was genotyped using an oat iSelect 6K beadchip SNP array. The final dataset included 759 unique individuals and 2,715 polymorphic markers. Some population structure was apparent, with the first three principal components accounting for 38.8% of variation and 73% of individuals belonging to one of three clusters. One cluster with high genetic distinctness appears to have been largely overlooked in twentieth century breeding. Classification and phenotype data provided by the Germplasm Resources Information Network were evaluated for their relationship to population structure. Of the structuring variables evaluated, improvement status (cultivar or landrace) was relatively unimportant, indicating that landraces and cultivars included in the panel were all sampled from a similar underlying population. Instead, lemma color and region of origin showed the strongest explanatory power. An exploratory association mapping study of the panel using a subset of 2,588 mapped markers generated novel indications of genomic regions associated with awn frequency, kernels per spikelet, lemma color, and panicle type. Further results supported previous findings of loci associated with barley yellow dwarf virus tolerance, crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae) resistance, days to anthesis, and growth habit (winter/spring). In addition, two novel loci were identified for

  7. Ultrasonic array imaging of multilayer structures using full matrix capture and extended phase shift migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haiteng; Chen, Jian; Yang, Keji; Hu, Xuxiao

    2016-04-01

    Multilayer structures have been widely used in industrial fields, and non-destructive evaluation of these structures is of great importance to assure their quality and performance. Recently, ultrasonic array imaging using full matrix capture, e.g. the total focusing method (TFM), has been shown to increase sensitivity to small defects and improve imaging resolution in homogeneous media. However, it cannot be applied to multilayer structures directly, due to the sound velocity variation in different layers and because refraction occurs at layer interfaces, which gives rise to difficulties in determining the propagation path and time. To overcome these problems, an extended phase shift migration (EPSM) is proposed for the full matrix imaging of multilayer structures in this paper. Based on the theory of phase shift migration for monostatic pulse-echo imaging, full matrix imaging using EPSM is derived by extrapolating the wavefields in both transmission and reception, and extended to the multilayer case. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by full matrix imaging of a two-layer structure with side-drilled holes conducted both in the simulation and the experiment. The results verify that the proposed algorithm is capable of full matrix imaging of a layered structure with a high resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. For comparison, full matrix imaging using the TFM with root-mean-squared velocity is also performed, and the results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is superior to the TFM in improving both the image quality and resolution.

  8. Apparent mismatch between extended x-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction structures of crystalline metastable WO3 phases.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, J; Rougier, A; Laruelle, S; Michalowicz, A

    2006-09-28

    The local structure of monoclinic, monohydrate, hexagonal, and pyrochlore WO3 phases was investigated by the extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy as preliminary studies of model compounds of amorphous and thin film WO3 based electrochromic species. In the four cases, we found a large W-O distribution of distances ranging from 1.70 to 2.35 A. The apparent discrepancy of these results and previously published crystal structures are discussed and interpreted as the detection of vacancies and local distortion disorder.

  9. Packaging and structural phenotype of brome mosaic virus capsid protein with altered N-terminal {beta}-hexamer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wispelaere, Melissanne de; Chaturvedi, Sonali; Wilkens, Stephan; Rao, A.L.N.

    2011-10-10

    The first 45 amino acid region of brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid protein (CP) contains RNA binding and structural domains that are implicated in the assembly of infectious virions. One such important structural domain encompassing amino acids {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32}, highly conserved between BMV and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), exhibits a {beta}-hexamer structure. In this study we report that alteration of the {beta}-hexamer structure by mutating {sup 28}QPVIV{sup 32} to {sup 28}AAAAA{sup 32} had no effect either on symptom phenotype, local and systemic movement in Chenopodium quinoa and RNA profile of in vivo assembled virions. However, sensitivity to RNase and assembly phenotypes distinguished virions assembled with CP subunits having {beta}-hexamer from those of wild type. A comparison of 3-D models obtained by cryo electron microscopy revealed overall similar structural features for wild type and mutant virions, with small but significant differences near the 3-fold axes of symmetry.

  10. Structural stabilization of tissue for embryo phenotyping using micro-CT with iodine staining.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael D; Spring, Shoshana; Henkelman, R Mark

    2013-01-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium has been established to conduct large-scale phenotyping of the approximately 23,000 single-gene knockout mice generated by the International Knockout Mouse Consortium to investigate the role of each gene in the mouse genome. Of the generated mouse lines, 30% are predicted to be embryonic lethal, requiring the implementation of imaging techniques and analysis tools specific to late gestation mouse embryo phenotyping. A well-adopted technique combines the use of iodinated contrast solutions and micro-computed tomography imaging. This simple iodine immersion technique provides superior soft-tissue contrast enhancement, however, the hypertonic nature of iodine promotes dehydration causing moderate to severe tissue deformation. Here, we combine the stabilizing properties of a hydrogel mesh with the enhanced contrast properties of iodine. The protocol promotes cross linking of tissue through formaldehyde fixation and the linking of hydrogel monomers to biomolecules. As a result, the hydrogel supports tissue structure and preserves its conformation taking advantage of iodine-enhanced soft tissue contrast to produce high quality mouse embryo images with minimal tissue distortion. Hydrogel stabilization substantially reduces intersample anatomical variation of mature mouse embryos subjected to iodine preparation protocols. A 20% and 50% reduction in intersample variation of normalized brain and lung volume is achieved through hydrogel stabilization, as well as a 20% reduction in variation in overall embryo anatomy as measured through image registration methods. This increases the sensitivity of computer automated analysis to reveal significant anatomical differences between mutant and wild-type mice.

  11. Structural transformations from point to extended defects in silicon: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Santos, Ivan; Lopez, Pedro; Aboy, Maria

    2008-11-15

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study how point defects aggregate to form extended defects in silicon. We have found that <110> chains of alternating interstitials and bond defects, a generalization of the Si di-interstitial structure, are metastable at room temperature but spontaneously transform into (311) defects when annealed at higher temperatures. Obtained atomic configurations and energetics are in good agreement with experiments and previous theoretical calculations. We have found a (311) structural unit which consists of two interstitial chains along <110> but arranged differently with respect to the known (311) units.

  12. Extending CATH: increasing coverage of the protein structure universe and linking structure with function.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Alison L; Sillitoe, Ian; Lewis, Tony; Clegg, Andrew B; Rentzsch, Robert; Furnham, Nicholas; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa; Jones, David; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    CATH version 3.3 (class, architecture, topology, homology) contains 128,688 domains, 2386 homologous superfamilies and 1233 fold groups, and reflects a major focus on classifying structural genomics (SG) structures and transmembrane proteins, both of which are likely to add structural novelty to the database and therefore increase the coverage of protein fold space within CATH. For CATH version 3.4 we have significantly improved the presentation of sequence information and associated functional information for CATH superfamilies. The CATH superfamily pages now reflect both the functional and structural diversity within the superfamily and include structural alignments of close and distant relatives within the superfamily, annotated with functional information and details of conserved residues. A significantly more efficient search function for CATH has been established by implementing the search server Solr (http://lucene.apache.org/solr/). The CATH v3.4 webpages have been built using the Catalyst web framework.

  13. Absence of population structure across elevational gradients despite large phenotypic variation in mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli)

    PubMed Central

    Jahner, Joshua P.; Kozlovsky, Dovid Y.; Parchman, Thomas L.; Pravosudov, Vladimir V.

    2017-01-01

    Montane habitats are characterized by predictably rapid heterogeneity along elevational gradients and are useful for investigating the consequences of environmental heterogeneity for local adaptation and population genetic structure. Food-caching mountain chickadees inhabit a continuous elevation gradient in the Sierra Nevada, and birds living at harsher, high elevations have better spatial memory ability and exhibit differences in male song structure and female mate preference compared to birds inhabiting milder, low elevations. While high elevation birds breed, on average, two weeks later than low elevation birds, the extent of gene flow between elevations is unknown. Despite phenotypic variation and indirect evidence for local adaptation, population genetic analyses based on 18 073 single nucleotide polymorphisms across three transects of high and low elevation populations provided no evidence for genetic differentiation. Analyses based on individual genotypes revealed no patterns of clustering, pairwise estimates of genetic differentiation (FST, Nei's D) were very low, and AMOVA revealed no evidence for genetic variation structured by transect or by low and high elevation sites within transects. In addition, we found no consistent evidence for strong parallel allele frequency divergence between low and high elevation sites within the three transects. Large elevation-related phenotypic variation may be maintained by strong selection despite gene flow and future work should focus on the mechanisms underlying such variation. PMID:28405402

  14. Family Structure and Adolescent Alcohol Use Problems: Extending Popular Explanations to American Indians.

    PubMed

    Eitle, Tamela McNulty; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle; Eitle, David J

    2013-11-01

    Competing explanations of the relationship between family structure and alcohol use problems are examined using a sample of American Indian adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Living in a single-parent family is found to be a marker for the unequal distribution of stress exposure and parental alcohol use, but the effects of other family structures like non-parent families and the presence of under 21-year-old extended family or non-family members emerge or remain as risk or protective factors for alcohol use problems after a consideration of SES, family processes, peer socialization, and social stress. In particular, a non-parent family structure that has not been considered in prior research emerged as a protective family structure for American Indian adolescent alcohol use problems.

  15. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of the first two cases of extended-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in South Africa and association with cefixime treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David A; Sriruttan, Charlotte; Müller, Etienne E; Golparian, Daniel; Gumede, Lindy; Fick, Donald; de Wet, Johan; Maseko, Venessa; Coetzee, Jennifer; Unemo, Magnus

    2013-06-01

    To describe the phenotypic and genetic characteristics of the first two cases of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in South Africa, one of which was associated with verified cefixime treatment failure. Two ESC-resistant N. gonorrhoeae isolates were cultured from the urethral discharge of two men who have sex with men (MSM). One man reported a persistent urethral discharge that had failed to respond to previous therapy with oral cefixime. Agar dilution MICs were determined for eight antibiotics. β-Lactam-associated resistance mutations were identified through PCR-based amplification and sequencing for several key genes: penA, mtrR and its promoter, porB1b (penB), ponA and pilQ. For molecular epidemiological characterization, full-length porB gene sequencing, N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were performed. Both isolates were resistant to cefixime, ciprofloxacin, penicillin and tetracycline and intermediate/resistant to azithromycin, but susceptible to ceftriaxone, gentamicin and spectinomycin. Both isolates had the type XXXIV penA mosaic allele in addition to previously described resistance mutations in the mtrR promoter (A deletion), porB1b (penB) (G101K and A102N) and ponA1 (L421P). Both isolates had an identical NG-MAST sequence type (ST4822) and MLST sequence type (ST1901). Both isolates were resistant to cefixime and possessed a number of identical mutations in key genes contributing to ESC resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. The two isolates contained the type XXXIV penA mosaic allele and belonged to a successful international MSM-linked multidrug-resistant gonococcal clone (MLST ST1901) associated with several cefixime treatment failures in Europe and North America.

  16. Modified CLSI Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL) Confirmatory Test for Phenotypic Detection of ESBLs among Enterobacteriaceae Producing Various β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Aggeliki; Grivakou, Evgenia; Vrioni, Georgia; Koumaki, Vassiliki; Pittaras, Theodoros; Pournaras, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide dissemination of Enterobacteriaceae producing AmpC β-lactamases and carbapenemases makes difficult the phenotypic detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), as they may be masked by these additional enzymes. A modification of the CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was developed and evaluated in a comparative study for its ability to successfully detect ESBLs among Enterobacteriaceae producing various carbapenemases (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase [KPC], VIM, NDM, and OXA-48) and plasmidic or derepressed AmpCs. The modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was performed with cefotaxime and ceftazidime disks with and without clavulanate, on which both boronic acid (BA) and EDTA were dispensed. A total of 162 genotypically confirmed ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates (83 carbapenemase/ESBL producers, 25 AmpC/ESBL producers, and 54 ESBL-only producers) were examined. For comparison, 139 genotypically confirmed ESBL-negative Enterobacteriaceae isolates (94 of them possessed carbapenemases and 20 possessed AmpCs) were also tested. The standard CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was positive for 106 of the 162 ESBL producers (sensitivity, 65.4%) and showed false-positive results for 4 of the 139 non-ESBL producers (specificity, 97.1%). The modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test detected 158 of 162 ESBL producers (sensitivity, 97.5%) and showed no false-positive results for non-ESBL producers (specificity, 100%). The findings of the study demonstrate that the modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test using antibiotic disks containing both BA and EDTA accurately detects ESBLs in Enterobacteriaceae regardless of the coexistence of additional β-lactam resistance mechanisms. PMID:24574283

  17. Modified CLSI extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) confirmatory test for phenotypic detection of ESBLs among Enterobacteriaceae producing various β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Poulou, Aggeliki; Grivakou, Evgenia; Vrioni, Georgia; Koumaki, Vassiliki; Pittaras, Theodoros; Pournaras, Spyros; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2014-05-01

    The worldwide dissemination of Enterobacteriaceae producing AmpC β-lactamases and carbapenemases makes difficult the phenotypic detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), as they may be masked by these additional enzymes. A modification of the CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was developed and evaluated in a comparative study for its ability to successfully detect ESBLs among Enterobacteriaceae producing various carbapenemases (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase [KPC], VIM, NDM, and OXA-48) and plasmidic or derepressed AmpCs. The modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was performed with cefotaxime and ceftazidime disks with and without clavulanate, on which both boronic acid (BA) and EDTA were dispensed. A total of 162 genotypically confirmed ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates (83 carbapenemase/ESBL producers, 25 AmpC/ESBL producers, and 54 ESBL-only producers) were examined. For comparison, 139 genotypically confirmed ESBL-negative Enterobacteriaceae isolates (94 of them possessed carbapenemases and 20 possessed AmpCs) were also tested. The standard CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was positive for 106 of the 162 ESBL producers (sensitivity, 65.4%) and showed false-positive results for 4 of the 139 non-ESBL producers (specificity, 97.1%). The modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test detected 158 of 162 ESBL producers (sensitivity, 97.5%) and showed no false-positive results for non-ESBL producers (specificity, 100%). The findings of the study demonstrate that the modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test using antibiotic disks containing both BA and EDTA accurately detects ESBLs in Enterobacteriaceae regardless of the coexistence of additional β-lactam resistance mechanisms.

  18. The red extended structure of IC 10, the nearest blue compact galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie A. N.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Mike

    2015-11-01

    The Local Group starburst galaxy IC 10 is the closest example of a blue compact galaxy. Here, we use optical gi imaging from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam and near infrared JHK imaging from United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Camera to conduct a comprehensive survey of the structure of IC 10. We examine the spatial distribution of its resolved young, intermediate and old stellar populations to large radius and low effective surface brightness levels. Akin to other dwarfs with multiple populations of different ages, stellar populations of decreasing average age are increasingly concentrated in this galaxy. We find that the young, starbursting population and the asymptotic giant branch population are both offset from the geometric centre of the older red giant branch (RGB) population by a few hundred parsecs, implying that the younger star formation occurred significantly away from the centre of the galaxy. The RGB population traces an extended structure that is typical of blue compact galaxies, with an effective radius of ˜5.75 arcmin (˜1.25 kpc). These measurements show that IC 10 is much more extended than has previously been realized, and this blue compact galaxy is one of the most extended dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. The outermost isophotes of this galaxy are very regular in shape and essentially circular in morphology. Based on this analysis, we do not find any evidence to suggest that IC 10 has undergone a recent, significant, interaction with an unknown companion.

  19. Modeling the structure and composition of nanoparticles by extended X-Ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Yevick, Aaron; Cooper, Chana; Vasic, Relja

    2011-07-19

    Many metal clusters in the 1-nm size range are catalytically active, and their enhanced reactivity is often attributed to their size, structure, morphology, and details of alloying. Synchrotron sources provide a wide range of opportunities for studying catalysis. Among them, extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is the premier method for investigating structure and composition of nanocatalysts. In this review, we summarize common methods of EXAFS analysis for geometric and compositional characterization of nanoparticles. We discuss several aspects of the experiments and analyses that are critical for reliably modeling EXAFS data. The most important are sample homogeneity, the width of the size and compositional distribution functions, and accounting for multiple-scattering contributions to EXAFS. We focus on the contribution of structural disorder and structural/compositional heterogeneity to the accuracy of three-dimensional modeling.

  20. Microlensing on extended structures having a spherically-symmetric mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V.; Alexandrov, A.; Stashko, O.

    2016-06-01

    Different dark matter (DM) models predict various clustering properties, i.e. the possibility of DM to form massive objects on different scales. The lower mass limit of these objects according to [1, 2]. may be of the order of planetary masses. The gravitational microlensing can be used to confirm or to reject the existence of such structures and therefore to argue in favor or against concrete DM theories. There are observational programs (OGLE, EROS etc) yielding the light curves of a remote objects in high amplification events (HAE) due to microlensing on foreground masses of the Galaxy. In case when the foreground mass is an extended one, then the light curve in HAE must differ from the light curve due to ordinary microlensing on a point mass. However the question is: what is the value of this difference and is it possible to register this difference with modern observational facilities. This question has been studied elsewhere [3–5] by means of special model lens mappings. In this paper we study this problem starting directly from mass distribution of the extended structure. Namely, we consider microlensing on an extended DM clump with the cored spherically-symmetric mass profile (without a singularity in the center). We present examples of the amplification curves in both cases. Then we generate the amplification curves in case of the extended clump model for different values R, γ when the clump moves uniformly with respect to the line of sight with some impact parameter p and velocity V. These curves are then fitted with the point microlens model (with free parameters p and V) and we estimate the difference between the curves. The general outcome is that the amplification curves in case of the extended clumps are very similar to those in case of the point microlens (with appropriately chosen parameters p and V that cannot be derived from observations independently), and it would be difficult to distinguish them on the basis of observations if we deal with

  1. Structure-Activity Relationships in Salinomycin: Cytotoxicity and Phenotype Selectivity of Semi-synthetic Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Björn; Huang, Xiaoli; Hegardt, Cecilia; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel

    2017-02-10

    The ionophore salinomycin has attracted attention for its exceptional ability to selectively reduce the proportion of cells with stem-like properties in cancer cell populations of varying origin. Targeting the tumorigenicity of such cells is of interest as they are implicated in recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Structural derivatives of salinomycin are thus sought after, both as tools for probing the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the observed phenotype effects, and for improving selectivity and activity against cancer stem cells. Synthetic strategies for modification of each of the directly accessible functional groups of salinomycin are presented and the resulting library of analogues was investigated to establish structure-activity relationships, both with respect to cytotoxicity and phenotype selectivity in breast cancer cells. 20-O-Acylated derivatives stand out by exhibiting both improved selectivity and activity. Mechanistically, the importance of the ionophore properties of salinomycin is highlighted by a significant loss of activity by modifications directly interfering with either of the two primary ion coordinating motifs in salinomycin, the C11 ketone and the C1 carboxylate.

  2. Metal-organic extended 2D structures: Fe-PTCDA on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Lucía; Peláez, Samuel; Caillard, Renaud; Serena, Pedro A; Martín-Gago, José A; Méndez, Javier

    2010-07-30

    In this work we combine organic molecules of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with iron atoms on an Au (111) substrate in ultra-high vacuum conditions at different temperatures. By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) we study the formation of stable 2D metal-organic structures. We show that at certain growth conditions (temperature, time and coverage) stable 'ladder-like' nanostructures are obtained. These are the result of connecting together two metal-organic chains through PTCDA molecules placed perpendicularly, as rungs of a ladder. These structures, stable up to 450 K, can be extended in a 2D layer covering the entire surface and presenting different rotation domains. STM images at both polarities show a contrast reversal between the two molecules at the unit cell. By means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we confirm the stability of these structures and that their molecular orbitals are placed separately at the different molecules.

  3. Extended structure design with simple molybdenum oxide building blocks and urea as a directing agent.

    PubMed

    Veen, Sandra J; Roy, Soumyajit; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Petukhov, Andrei V; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Broersma, Alfred; Soulimani, Fouad; Visser, Tom; Kegel, Willem K

    2008-08-04

    We report here a simple one-pot directed synthesis of an oxomolybdate urea composite in which elementary molybdenum oxide building blocks are linked together with the aid of urea. This type of directed material design resulted in large rod-like crystals of an inorganic-organic hybrid extended structure of {MoO 3(NH 2-CO-NH 2)} infinity consisting of right- and left-handed helical units. In the crystal structure urea acts both as a glue that links the inorganic molybdenum units into a helix and as a supramolecular linker for the stabilization of the crystal structure as a whole. This type of molecular topology resulted in an unexpectedly high thermal stability.

  4. Extended Theories of Gravitation. Structure of Spacetime and Fundamental Principles of Physics, following Ehlers-Pirani-Schild Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatibene, Lorenzo; Ferraris, Marco; Francaviglia, Mauro; Magnano, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Extended theories of gravitation are naturally singled out by an analysis inspired by the Ehelers-Pirani-Schild framework. In this framework the structure of spacetime is described by a Weyl geometry which is enforced by dynamics. Standard General Relativity is just one possible theory within the class of extended theories of gravitation. Also all Palatini f(R) theories are shown to be extended theories of gravitation. This more general setting allows a more general interpretation scheme and more general possible couplings between gravity and matter. The definitions and constructions of extended theories will be reviewed. A general interpretation scheme will be considered for extended theories and some examples will be considered.

  5. Structural damage detection using extended Kalman filter combined with statistical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Traditional modal-based methods, which identify damage based upon changes in vibration characteristics of the structure on a global basis, have received considerable attention in the past decades. However, the effectiveness of the modalbased methods is dependent on the type of damage and the accuracy of the structural model, and these methods may also have difficulties when applied to complex structures. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm which has the capability to estimate parameters and catch abrupt changes, is currently used in continuous and automatic structural damage detection to overcome disadvantages of traditional methods. Structural parameters are typically slow-changing variables under effects of operational and environmental conditions, thus it would be difficult to observe the structural damage and quantify the damage in real-time with EKF only. In this paper, a Statistical Process Control (SPC) is combined with EFK method in order to overcome this difficulty. Based on historical measurements of damage-sensitive feathers involved in the state-space dynamic models, extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm is used to produce real-time estimations of these features as well as standard derivations, which can then be used to form control ranges for SPC to detect any abnormality of the selected features. Moreover, confidence levels of the detection can be adjusted by choosing different times of sigma and number of adjacent out-of-range points. The proposed method is tested using simulated data of a three floors linear building in different damage scenarios, and numerical results demonstrate high damage detection accuracy and light computation of this presented method.

  6. Structural Cues from the Tissue Microenvironment Are Essential Determinants of the Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Schmeichel, Karen L.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the study of normal human breast function and breast disorders has been significantly impaired by limitations inherent to available model systems. Recent improvements in human breast epithelial cell lines and three-dimensional (3-D)3 culture systems have contributed to the development of in vitro model systems that recapitulate differentiated epithelial cell phenotypes with remarkable fidelity. Molecular characterization of these human breast cell models has demonstrated that normal breast epithelial cell behavior is determined in part by the precise interplay that exists between a cell and its surrounding microenvironment. Recent functional studies of integrins in a human model system provide evidence to support the idea that the structural stability afforded by integrin-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interactions is an important determinant of normal cellular behavior, and that alterations in tissue structure can give rise to tumorigenic progression. PMID:10819528

  7. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, Ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-11-26

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures.

  8. Effect of extended confinement on the structure of edge channels in the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Z.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    The Quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in the films with nontrivial band structure accompanies the ferromagnetic transition in the system of magnetic dopants. Experimentally, the QAH transition manifests itself as a jump in the dependence of longitudinal resistivity on a weak external magnetic field. Microscopically, this jump originates from the emergence of a chiral edge mode on one side of the ferromagnetic transition. We study analytically the effect of an extended confinement on the structure of the edge modes. We employ the simplest model of the extended confinement in the form of a potential step next to the hard wall. It is shown that, unlike the conventional quantum Hall effect, where all edge channels are chiral, in the QAH effect, a complex structure of the boundary leads to nonchiral edge modes which are present on both sides of the ferromagnetic transition. Wave functions of nonchiral modes are different above and below the transition: on the "topological" side, where the chiral edge mode is supported, nonchiral modes are "repelled" from the boundary; i.e., they are much less localized than on the "trivial" side. Thus, the disorder-induced scattering into these modes will boost the extension of the chiral edge mode. The prime experimental manifestation of nonchiral modes is that, by contributing to longitudinal resistance, they smear the QAH transition.

  9. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  10. ECG denoising and compression using a modified extended Kalman filter structure.

    PubMed

    Sayadi, Omid; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Bagher

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents efficient denoising and lossy compression schemes for electrocardiogram (ECG) signals based on a modified extended Kalman filter (EKF) structure. We have used a previously introduced two-dimensional EKF structure and modified its governing equations to be extended to a 17-dimensional case. The new EKF structure is used not only for denoising, but also for compression, since it provides estimation for each of the new 15 model parameters. Using these specific parameters, the signal is reconstructed with regard to the dynamical equations of the model. The performances of the proposed method are evaluated using standard denoising and compression efficiency measures. For denosing, the SNR improvement criterion is used, while for compression, we have considered the compression ratio (CR), the percentage area difference (PAD), and the weighted diagnostic distortion (WDD) measure. Several Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (MIT-BIH) ECG databases are used for performance evaluation. Simulation results illustrate that both applications can contribute to and enhance the clinical ECG data denoising and compression performance. For denoising, an average SNR improvement of 10.16 dB was achieved, which is 1.8 dB more than the next benchmark methods such as MABWT or EKF2. For compression, the algorithm was extended to include more than five Gaussian kernels. Results show a typical average CR of 11.37:1 with WDD < 1.73%. Consequently, the proposed framework is suitable for a hybrid system that integrates these algorithmic approaches for clean ECG data storage or transmission scenarios with high output SNRs, high CRs, and low distortions.

  11. Static network structure can be used to model the phenotypic effects of perturbations in regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Feiglin, Ariel; Hacohen, Adar; Sarusi, Avital; Fisher, Jasmin; Unger, Ron; Ofran, Yanay

    2012-11-01

    Biological processes are dynamic, whereas the networks that depict them are typically static. Quantitative modeling using differential equations or logic-based functions can offer quantitative predictions of the behavior of biological systems, but they require detailed experimental characterization of interaction kinetics, which is typically unavailable. To determine to what extent complex biological processes can be modeled and analyzed using only the static structure of the network (i.e. the direction and sign of the edges), we attempt to predict the phenotypic effect of perturbations in biological networks from the static network structure. We analyzed three networks from different sources: The EGFR/MAPK and PI3K/AKT network from a detailed experimental study, the TNF regulatory network from the STRING database and a large network of all NCI-curated pathways from the Protein Interaction Database. Altogether, we predicted the effect of 39 perturbations (e.g. by one or two drugs) on 433 target proteins/genes. In up to 82% of the cases, an algorithm that used only the static structure of the network correctly predicted whether any given protein/gene is upregulated or downregulated as a result of perturbations of other proteins/genes. While quantitative modeling requires detailed experimental data and heavy computations, which limit its scalability for large networks, a wiring-based approach can use available data from pathway and interaction databases and may be scalable. These results lay the foundations for a large-scale approach of predicting phenotypes based on the schematic structure of networks.

  12. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  13. UGC 4599: Revealing the Extended Structure of a Hoag’s Object Analog with HERON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Michael; Thilker, David A.; Wen, Fufang; Xia, Junjie; Storment, Stephen; Brosch, Noah; Longstaff, Francis; Kennefick, Julia D.; Rich, Robert Michael; Halos and Environments of Nearby galaxies (HERON) Team

    2017-01-01

    The Halos and Environments of Nearby Galaxies (HERON) survey utilizes a specialized telescope for imaging low surface brightness halos and galaxy environments. One such galaxy is UGC 4599, whose HERON images show improvements in observing the extended low luminosity structure as compared to previous studies. UGC 4599 is a nearby Hoag-Type Ring Galaxy with an extremely extended HI disk. Hoag's Object is characterized by a blue star-forming ring surrounding an older yellow nucleus. In the case of UGC 4599, the nuclear region was previously revealed to closely follow a De Vaucouleurs luminosity profile, suggesting the object to be at least elliptical-like. While previous photometric studies of UGC 4599 were focused mainly on the bright core and star forming ring of the galaxy, the HERON survey is able to probe the fainter, extended halo. With an eight hour integration time, we find spiral structure surrounding the core and ring of UGC 4599. The main ring of the galaxy is broken with an m=2 (180 degree) symmetry, suggesting a two armed spiral structure. However, once the core and ring of UGC 4599 are modeled with the software GALFIT, a well defined m=1 (single arm) spiral emerges, extending from the central region to several times the radius of the ring. Though the ring appears to break in two places, the spiral structure may be comprised of mainly one dominant arm. In late type galaxies, the pitch angle of spiral arms has been shown to correlate well with the mass of the central Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) in an M-P relation. The pitch angle of the one arm spiral of UGC 4599 is measured to be roughly P=9 degrees, corresponding to a SMBH mass for UGC 4599 of between 107 and 108 solar masses (further constrained pitch angle measurements forthcoming). The outermost edge of UGC 4599 as detected in our imaging may be modeled as an extension of this one armed spiral, or as yet another ring feature. Due to many bright foreground stars, there is difficulty in ascertaining

  14. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study of CaSO 4:Dy phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Bakshi, A. K.; Ciatto, G.; Aquilanti, G.; Pradhan, A. S.; Pascarelli, S.

    2006-03-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements have been carried out on CaSO 4:Dy phosphors at the Dy L 3 edge with synchrotron radiation. The data have been analysed to find out the Dy-S and Dy-O bond lengths in the neighborhood of the Dy atoms. Measurements have been carried out over several samples thermally annealed for different cycles at 400 °C in air for 1 h and the change in bond lengths in samples with increasing number of annealing cycles have been studied by analyzing the EXAFS data.

  15. Applications of a quadratic extended interior penalty function for structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A quadratic extended interior penalty function formulation especially well suited for second-order unconstrained optimization procedures is presented. Analytical derivatives of constraints and an approximate analysis technique are used. Minimum-mass design results are presented which indicate that the combination of these procedures can help make mathematical programming a useful optimization tool for large-order structural design problems with a large number of design variables and multiple constraints. Examples include statically loaded high- and low-aspect-ratio wings simultaneously subjected to stress, displacement, minimum gage and, in some cases, maximum strain constraints.

  16. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  17. Where is the extended phenotype in the wild? The community composition of arthropods on mature oak trees does not depend on the oak genotype.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Martin M; Brändle, Martin; Brandl, Roland; Bail, Johannes; Müller, Jörg; Opgenoorth, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Through a series of common garden experiments, it has been shown that heritable phenotypic differences between individual trees can affect arthropod communities. However, field studies under heterogeneous environmental conditions remain rare. In the present study, we investigated the genetic constitution of 121 mature oak host trees at different trophic levels from 10 sites across Bavaria, southern Germany and their associated insect communities. A total of 23,576 individuals representing 395 species of beetles and true bugs were evaluated. In particular, we determined whether the composition of arthropod communities is related to the oak genotype and whether the strength of the relationships decreases from lower to higher trophic levels, such as for phytophagous, xylophagous, zoophagous, and mycetophagous species. The genetic differentiation of oaks was assessed using eight microsatellite markers. We found no significant influence of the oak genotype on neither the full beetle and true bug community nor on any of the analyzed trophic guilds. In contrast, the community composition of the insects was highly related to the space and climate, such that the community similarity decreased with increases in spatial distance and climatic differences. The relationship with space and climate was much stronger in beetles than in true bugs, particularly in mycetophagous species. Our results suggest that spatial processes override the genetic effects of the host plant in structuring arthropod communities on oak trees. Because we used neutral markers, we cannot exclude the possibility that trait-specific markers may reveal a genetic imprint of the foundation tree species on the composition of the arthropod community. However, based on the strength of the spatial patterns in our data set, we assume that genetic differences among oaks are less important in the structuring of arthropod communities. Future whole-genome studies are required to draw a final conclusion.

  18. Regulator of the mucoid phenotype A gene increases the virulent ability of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing serotype non-K1/K2 Klebsiella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-An; Huang, Ya-Li; Yeh, Kao-Ming; Siu, L K; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the presence of a capsule regulator gene [i.e., regulator of mucoid phenotype A (rmpA) gene] contributes to virulence on extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP) with serotype non-K1/K2 strains. Twenty-eight ESBL-KP and non-ESBL-KP isolates were collected from the Tri-Service General Hospital (Taipei, Taiwan). The impact of the virulent rmpA gene in different capsular polysaccharide serotypes on ESBL-KP and non-ESBL-KP isolates was studied by a neutrophil phagocytosis reaction, a serum bactericidal assay, and an animal survival model. Resistance to broad spectrum antibiotics was more prevalent in ESBL-KP strains than in non-ESBL-KP strains (p < 0.01). The ESBL-KP strains had different molecular patterns from non-ESBL-KP strains, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The frequency of serum-resistant isolates was the highest among ESBL-KP strains with rmpA (i.e., rmpA(+)) [71.4% (5/7)] than among of non-ESBL-KP rmpA(+) strains [42.8% (6/14)], ESBL-KP strains without rmpA (rmpA(-)) [33.3% (7/21)], and non-ESBL-KP rmpA(-) strains [14.2% (2/14)]. The most significant increase in neutrophil resistance occurred in the ESBL-KP rmpA(+) strains in comparison to the non-ESBL-KP rmpA(+), ESBL-KP rmpA(-), and non-ESBL-KP rmpA(-) strains (p < 0.01). The results of the animal survival model were compatible with the neutrophil phagocytosis reaction and serum bactericidal assay. We conclude that the pathogenic potential is greater in rmpA(+) ESBL-KP strains than in rmpA(-) ESBL-KP and non-ESBL-KP strains. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Cardiac Troponin and Tropomyosin: Structural and Cellular Perspectives to Unveil the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Mayra de A.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited myopathies affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle and are commonly associated with genetic dysfunctions, leading to the production of anomalous proteins. In cardiomyopathies, mutations frequently occur in sarcomeric genes, but the cause-effect scenario between genetic alterations and pathological processes remains elusive. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was the first cardiac disease associated with a genetic background. Since the discovery of the first mutation in the β-myosin heavy chain, more than 1400 new mutations in 11 sarcomeric genes have been reported, awarding HCM the title of the “disease of the sarcomere.” The most common macroscopic phenotypes are left ventricle and interventricular septal thickening, but because the clinical profile of this disease is quite heterogeneous, these phenotypes are not suitable for an accurate diagnosis. The development of genomic approaches for clinical investigation allows for diagnostic progress and understanding at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate in vivo models to better comprehend the cellular events triggered by this pathology has become a challenge. Notwithstanding, the imbalance of Ca2+ concentrations, altered signaling pathways, induction of apoptotic factors, and heart remodeling leading to abnormal anatomy have already been reported. Of note, a misbalance of signaling biomolecules, such as kinases and tumor suppressors (e.g., Akt and p53), seems to participate in apoptotic and fibrotic events. In HCM, structural and cellular information about defective sarcomeric proteins and their altered interactome is emerging but still represents a bottleneck for developing new concepts in basic research and for future therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the structural and cellular alterations triggered by HCM-causing mutations in troponin and tropomyosin proteins and how structural biology can aid in the discovery of new platforms for therapeutics. We highlight the

  20. Genomic structural variation contributes to phenotypic change of industrial bioethanol yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Li-Jie; Fang, Ya-Hong; Jin, Xin-Na; Qi, Lei; Wu, Xue-Chang; Zheng, Dao-Qiong

    2016-03-01

    Genomic structural variation (GSV) is a ubiquitous phenomenon observed in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different genetic backgrounds; however, the physiological and phenotypic effects of GSV are not well understood. Here, we first revealed the genetic characteristics of a widely used industrial S. cerevisiae strain, ZTW1, by whole genome sequencing. ZTW1 was identified as an aneuploidy strain and a large-scale GSV was observed in the ZTW1 genome compared with the genome of a diploid strain YJS329. These GSV events led to copy number variations (CNVs) in many chromosomal segments as well as one whole chromosome in the ZTW1 genome. Changes in the DNA dosage of certain functional genes directly affected their expression levels and the resultant ZTW1 phenotypes. Moreover, CNVs of large chromosomal regions triggered an aneuploidy stress in ZTW1. This stress decreased the proliferation ability and tolerance of ZTW1 to various stresses, while aneuploidy response stress may also provide some benefits to the fermentation performance of the yeast, including increased fermentation rates and decreased byproduct generation. This work reveals genomic characters of the bioethanol S. cerevisiae strain ZTW1 and suggests that GSV is an important kind of mutation that changes the traits of industrial S. cerevisiae strains.

  1. Novel angular encoder for a quick-extended x-ray absorption fine structure monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Stoetzel, J.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Fonda, E.; De Oliveira, N.; Briois, V.

    2008-08-15

    New concepts for time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy using the quick-extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) method are presented. QEXAFS is a powerful tool to gain structural information about, e.g., fast chemical reactions or phase transitions on a subsecond scale. This can be achieved with a monochromator design that employs a channel-cut crystal on a cam driven tilt table for rapid angular oscillations of the Bragg angle. A new angular encoder system and a new data acquisition were described and characterized that were applied to a QEXAFS monochromator to get spectra with a directly measured accurate energy scale. New electronics were designed to allow a fast acquisition of the Bragg angle values and the absorption data during the measurements simultaneously.

  2. Negative thermal expansion in CuCl: An extended x-ray absorption fine structure study

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccari, M.; Grisenti, R.; Fornasini, P.; Rocca, F.; Sanson, A.

    2007-05-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been measured from liquid helium to ambient temperature at the Cu K edge of copper chloride (CuCl) to investigate the local origin of negative thermal expansion. A quantitative analysis of the first coordination shell, performed by the cumulant method, reveals that the nearest-neighbor Cu-Cl interatomic distance undergoes a strong positive expansion, contrasting with the much weaker negative expansion of the crystallographic distance between average atomic positions below 100 K. The anisotropy of relative thermal vibrations, monitored by the ratio {gamma} between perpendicular and parallel mean square relative displacements, is considerably high, while the diffraction thermal factors are isotropic. The relative perpendicular vibrations measured by EXAFS are related to the tension mechanism and to the transverse acoustic modes, which are considered responsible for negative thermal expansion in zinc-blende structures.

  3. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies: Imaging and Source Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boboltz, David A.; Fey, Alan L.; Charlot, Patrick; Fomalont, Edward B.; Lanyi, Gabor E.; Zhang, Li-Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present imaging results and source structure analysis of extragalactic radio sources observed using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 24 GHz and 43 GHz as part of an ongoing NASA, USNO, NRAO and Bordeaux Observatory collaboration to extend the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to higher radio frequencies. The K/Q-band image database now includes images of 108 sources at 43 GHz (Q-braid) and images of 230 sources at 24 GHz (K-band). Preliminary analysis of the observations taken to date shows that the sources are generally more compact as one goes from the ICRF frequency of 8.4 GHz to 24 GHz. This result is consistent with the standard theory of compact extragalactic radio sources and suggests that reference frames defined at these higher radio frequencies will be less susceptible to the effects of intrinsic source structure than those defined at lower frequencies.

  4. Structural characteristics of the shock-induced boundary layer separation extended to the leading edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Liu, W. D.; Fan, X. Q.; Zhao, Y. L.

    2017-07-01

    For a better understanding of the local unstart of supersonic/hypersonic inlet, a series of experiments has been conducted to investigate the shock-induced boundary layer separation extended to the leading edge. Using the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering, we recorded the fine structures of these interactions under different conditions and paid more attention to their structural characteristics. According to their features, these interactions could be divided into four types. Specifically, Type A wave pattern is similar to the classic shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction, and Type B wave configuration consists of an overall Mach reflection above the large scale separation bubble. Due to the gradual decrease in the size of the separation bubble, the separation bubble was replaced by several vortices (Type C wave pattern). Besides, for Type D wave configuration which exists in the local unstart inlet, there appears to be some flow spillage around the leading edge.

  5. Deep skin structural and microcirculation imaging with extended-focus OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Grajciar, Branislav; Huber, Robert; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2012-02-01

    We present an extended focus OCT system for dermatologic applications that maintains high lateral resolution over a large depth range by using Bessel beam illumination. More, Bessel beams exhibit a self-reconstruction property that is particularly useful to avoid shadowing from surface structures such as hairs. High lateral resolution and high-speed measurement, thanks to a rapidly tuning swept source, allows not only for imaging of small skin structures in depth but also for comprehensive visualization of the small capillary network within the human skin in-vivo. We use this information for studying temporal vaso-responses to hypothermia. In contrast to other perfusion imaging methods such as laser Doppler imaging (LDI), OCT gives specific access to vascular responses in different vascular beds in depth.

  6. Phenotypic and Causal Structure of Conduct Disorder in the Broader Context of Prevalent Forms of Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Benjamin B.; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2011-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the nature and etiology of conduct disorder (CD) can inform nosology and vice-versa. We posit that any prevalent form of psychopathology, including CD, can be best understood if it is studied in the context of other correlated forms of child and adolescent psychopathology using formal models to guide inquiry. Methods Review of both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of the place of CD in the phenotypic and causal structure of prevalent psychopathology, with an emphasis on similarities and differences between CD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Papers were located using Web of Science by topic searches with no restriction on year of publication. Results Although some important nosologic questions remain unanswered, the dimensional phenotype of CD is well defined. CD differs from other disorders in its correlates, associated impairment, and course. Nonetheless, it is robustly correlated with many other prevalent dimensions of psychopathology both concurrently and predictively, including both other “externalizing” disorders and some “internalizing” disorders. Based on emerging evidence, we hypothesize that these concurrent and predictive correlations result primarily from widespread genetic pleiotropy, with some genetic factors nonspecifically influencing risk for multiple correlated dimensions of psychopathology. In contrast, environmental influences mostly act to differentiate dimensions of psychopathology from one another both concurrently and over time. CD and ODD share half of their genetic influences, but their genetic etiologies are distinct in other ways. Unlike most other dimensions of psychopathology, half of the genetic influences on CD appear to be unique to CD. In contrast, ODD broadly shares nearly all of its genetic influences with other disorders and has little unique genetic variance. Conclusions CD is a relatively distinct syndrome at both phenotypic and etiologic levels, but much is revealed

  7. A preliminary study of extended magnetic field structures in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, James D.; Lane, Barton G.; Post, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    Several plasma phenomena which are to be expected around a magnet in LEO were identified and analyzed qualitatively. The ASTROMAG cusp magnet will create an extended field whose strength drops to the ambient level over a scale length of approx. 15 m; the combined field has a complex topology with ring nulls and open and closed field lines. The entire configuration is moving through the partially ionized F-layer of the ionosphere at a speed slow compared to the local Alfven speed but fast compared to the ion sound speed. The ambient plasma crosses the extended field structure in a time short compared to the ion Larmor period yet long relative to the electron Larmor period. Thus, electrons behave as a magnetized fluid while ions move ballistically until reflected from higher fields near the cusp. Since the Debye length is short compared to the field scale length, an electrostatic shock-like structure forms to equilibrate the flows and achieve quasi-neutrality. The ambient plasma will be excluded from a cavity near the magnet. The size and nature of the strong interaction region in which the magnet significantly perturbs the ambient flow were determined by studying ion orbits numerically. Lecture viewgraphs summarizing these results are presented.

  8. Structure of an extended-spectrum class A beta-lactamase from Proteus vulgaris K1.

    PubMed

    Nukaga, Michiyoshi; Mayama, Kayoko; Crichlow, Gregg V; Knox, James R

    2002-03-15

    The structure of a chromosomal extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) having the ability to hydrolyze cephalosporins including cefuroxime and ceftazidime has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.75 A resolution. The species-specific class A beta-lactamase from Proteus vulgaris K1 was crystallized at pH 6.25 and its structure solved by molecular replacement. Refinement of the model resulted in crystallographic R and R(free) of 16.9 % and 19.3 %, respectively. The folding of the K1 enzyme is broadly similar to that of non-ESBL TEM-type beta-lactamases (2 A rmsd for C(alpha)) and differs by only 0.35 A for all atoms of six conserved residues in the catalytic site. Other residues promoting extended-spectrum activity in K1 include the side-chains of atypical residues Ser237 and Lys276. These side-chains are linked by two water molecules, one of which lies in the position normally filled by the guanidinium group of Arg244, present in most non-ESBL enzymes but absent from K1. The ammonium group of Lys276, ca 3.5 A from the virtual Arg244 guanidinium position, may interact with polar R2 substitutents on the dihydrothiazene ring of cephalosporins.

  9. An extended structure-based model based on a stochastic eddy-axis evolution equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassinos, S. C.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have proposed and implemented an extension of the structure-based model for weak deformations. It was shown that the extended model will correctly reduce to the form of standard k-e models for the case of equilibrium under weak mean strain. The realizability of the extended model is guaranteed by the method of its construction. The predictions of the proposed model were very good for rotating homogeneous shear flows and for irrotational axisymmetric contraction, but were seriously deficient in the case of plane strain and axisymmetric expansion. We have concluded that the problem behind these difficulties lies in the algebraic constitutive equation relating the Reynolds stresses to the structure parameters rather than in the slow model developed here. In its present form, this equation assumes that under irrotational strain the principal axes of the Reynolds stresses remain locked onto those of the eddy-axis tensor. This is correct in the RDT limit, but inappropriate under weaker mean strains, when the non-linear eddy-eddy interactions tend to misalign the two sets of principal axes and create some non-zero theta and gamma.

  10. Role of biomarkers in cardiac structure phenotyping in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: critical appraisal and practical use.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Emilia; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Gori, Mauro; Gavazzi, Antonello; Butler, Javed; Senni, Michele

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome characterized by cardiovascular, metabolic, and pro-inflammatory diseases associated with advanced age and extracardiac comorbidities. All of these conditions finally lead to impairment of myocardial structure and function. The large phenotypic heterogeneity of HFpEF from pathophysiological underpinnings presents a major hurdle to HFpEF therapy. The new therapeutic approach in HFpEF should be targeted to each HF phenotype, instead of the 'one-size-fits-all' approach, which has not been successful in clinical trials. Unless the structural and biological determinants of the failing heart are deeply understood, it will be impossible to appropriately differentiate HFpEF patients, identify subtle myocardial abnormalities, and finally reverse abnormal cardiac function. Based on evidence from endomyocardial biopsies, some of the specific cardiac structural phenotypes to be targeted in HFpEF may be represented by myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, myocardial inflammation associated with oxidative stress, and coronary disease. Once the diagnosis of HFpEF has been established, a potential approach could be to use a panel of biomarkers to identify the main cardiac structural HFpEF phenotypes, guiding towards more appropriate therapeutic strategies. Accordingly, the purpose of this review is to investigate the potential role of biomarkers in identifying different cardiac structural HFpEF phenotypes and to discuss the merits of a biomarker-guided strategy in HFpEF.

  11. Optical coherence tomography for live phenotypic analysis of embryonic ocular structures in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Saba H.; Sudheendran, Narendran; Overbeek, Paul A.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Mouse models of ocular diseases provide a powerful resource for exploration of molecular regulation of eye development and pre-clinical studies. Availability of a live high-resolution imaging method for mouse embryonic eyes would significantly enhance longitudinal analyses and high-throughput morphological screening. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used for live embryonic ocular imaging throughout gestation. At all studied stages, the whole eye is within the imaging distance of the system and there is a good optical contrast between the structures. We also performed OCT eye imaging in the embryonic retinoblastoma mouse model Pax6-SV40 T-antigen, which spontaneously forms lens and retinal lesions, and demonstrate that OCT allows us to clearly differentiate between the mutant and wild type phenotypes. These results demonstrate that OCTin utero imaging is a potentially useful tool to study embryonic ocular diseases in mouse models. PMID:23224171

  12. Optical coherence tomography for live phenotypic analysis of embryonic ocular structures in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Sudheendran, Narendran; Overbeek, Paul A.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-08-01

    Mouse models of ocular diseases provide a powerful resource for exploration of molecular regulation of eye development and pre-clinical studies. Availability of a live high-resolution imaging method for mouse embryonic eyes would significantly enhance longitudinal analyses and high-throughput morphological screening. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used for live embryonic ocular imaging throughout gestation. At all studied stages, the whole eye is within the imaging distance of the system and there is a good optical contrast between the structures. We also performed OCT eye imaging in the embryonic retinoblastoma mouse model Pax6-SV40 T-antigen, which spontaneously forms lens and retinal lesions, and demonstrate that OCT allows us to clearly differentiate between the mutant and wild type phenotypes. These results demonstrate that OCTin utero imaging is a potentially useful tool to study embryonic ocular diseases in mouse models.

  13. Extended phenotype description and new molecular findings in late onset glycogen storage disease type II: a northern Italy population study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Remiche, Gauthier; Ronchi, Dario; Magri, Francesca; Lamperti, Costanza; Bordoni, Andreina; Moggio, Maurizio; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid alpha-1,4-glucosidase deficiency and associated with recessive mutations in its coding gene GAA. Few studies have provided so far a detailed phenotypical characterization in late onset GSDII (LO-GSDII) patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation has been previously attempted with controversial results. We aim to provide an in-depth description of a cohort (n = 36) of LO-GSDII patients coming from the north of Italy and compare our population's findings to the literature. We performed a clinical record-based retrospective and prospective study of our patients. LO-GSDII in our cohort covers a large variability of phenotype including subtle clinical presentation and did not differ significantly from previous data. In all patients, molecular analysis disclosed GAA mutations, five of them being novel. To assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations we divided IVS1-32-13T>G heterozygous patients into two groups following the severity of the mutations on the second allele. Our patients harbouring "severe" mutations (n = 21) presented a strong tendency to have more severe phenotypes and more disability, more severe phenotypes and more disability, higher prevalence of assisted ventilation and a shorter time of evolution to show it. The determination of prognostic factors is mandatory in order to refine the accuracy of prognostic information, to develop follow-up strategy and, more importantly, to improve the decision algorithm for enzyme replacement therapy administration. The demonstration of genotype-phenotype correlations could help to reach this objective. Clinical assessment homogeneity is required to overcome limitations due to the lack of power of most studies.

  14. RAD sequencing resolves fine-scale population structure in a benthic invertebrate: implications for understanding phenotypic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Hannah; Weiss, Martina; Fawcett, Katie; Lehman, Katrin; Clark, M. S.; Leese, Florian; McMinn, Carrie; Moore, Heather; Hoffman, Joseph I.

    2017-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology is transitioning from the use of small panels of classical genetic markers such as microsatellites to much larger panels of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) generated by approaches like RAD sequencing. However, few empirical studies have directly compared the ability of these methods to resolve population structure. This could have implications for understanding phenotypic plasticity, as many previous studies of natural populations may have lacked the power to detect genetic differences, especially over micro-geographic scales. We therefore compared the ability of microsatellites and RAD sequencing to resolve fine-scale population structure in a commercially important benthic invertebrate by genotyping great scallops (Pecten maximus) from nine populations around Northern Ireland at 13 microsatellites and 10 539 SNPs. The shells were then subjected to morphometric and colour analysis in order to compare patterns of phenotypic and genetic variation. We found that RAD sequencing was superior at resolving population structure, yielding higher Fst values and support for two distinct genetic clusters, whereas only one cluster could be detected in a Bayesian analysis of the microsatellite dataset. Furthermore, appreciable phenotypic variation was observed in size-independent shell shape and coloration, including among localities that could not be distinguished from one another genetically, providing support for the notion that these traits are phenotypically plastic. Taken together, our results suggest that RAD sequencing is a powerful approach for studying population structure and phenotypic plasticity in natural populations. PMID:28386419

  15. Novel and De Novo Mutations Extend Association of POU3F4 with Distinct Clinical and Radiological Phenotype of Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Agnieszka; Lechowicz, Urszula; Kędra, Anna; Stawiński, Piotr; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Furmanek, Mariusz; Brzozowska, Małgorzata; Mrówka, Maciej; Skarżyński, Henryk; Skarżyński, Piotr H.

    2016-01-01

    POU3F4 mutations (DFNX2) are the most prevalent among non-syndromic X-linked hearing loss (HL) identified to date. Clinical manifestations of DFNX2 usually comprise congenital HL either sensorineural or mixed, a tendency towards perilymphatic gusher during otologic surgery and temporal bone malformations. The aim of the present study was to screen for POU3F4 mutations in a group of 30 subjects with a suggestive clinical phenotype as well as a group (N = 1671–2018) of unselected hearing loss patients. We also planned to analyze audiological and radiological features in patients with HL caused by POU3F4 defects. The molecular techniques used to detect POU3F4 mutations included whole exome sequencing (WES), Sanger sequencing and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Hearing status was assessed with pure-tone audiometry and auditory brainstem response. Computer tomography scans were evaluated to define the pattern of structural changes in the temporal bones. Six novel (p.Gln27*, p.Glu187*, p.Leu217*, p.Gln275*, p.Gln306*, p.Val324Asp) and two known (p.Ala116fs141*, p.Leu208*) POU3F4 mutations were detected in the studied cohort. All probands with POU3F4 defects suffered from bilateral, prelingual, severe to profound HL. Morphological changes of the temporal bone in these patients presented a similar pattern, including malformations of the internal auditory canal, vestibular aqueduct, modiolus and vestibule. Despite different localization in the POU3F4 gene all mutations severely impair the protein structure affecting at least one functional POU3F4 domain, and results in similar and severe clinical manifestations. Sequencing of the entire POU3F4 gene is recommended in patients with characteristic temporal bone malformations. Results of POU3F4 mutation testing are important not only for a proper genetic counseling, but also for adequate preparation and conduction of a surgical procedure. PMID:27941975

  16. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of the atomic structure of nanoparticles in different metallic matrices.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Gurman, S J; Binns, C

    2009-05-06

    It has been appreciated for some time that the novel properties of particles in the size range 1-10 nm are potentially exploitable in a range of applications. In order to ultimately produce commercial devices containing nanosized particles, it is necessary to develop controllable means of incorporating them into macroscopic samples. One way of doing this is to embed the nanoparticles in a matrix of a different material, by co-deposition for example, to form a nanocomposite film. The atomic structure of the embedded particles can be strongly influenced by the matrix. Since some of the key properties of materials, including magnetism, strongly depend on atomic structure, the ability to determine atomic structure in embedded nanoparticles is very important. This review focuses on nanoparticles, in particular magnetic nanoparticles, embedded in different metal matrices. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provides an excellent means of probing atomic structure in nanocomposite materials, and an overview of this technique is given. Its application in probing catalytic metal clusters is described briefly, before giving an account of the use of EXAFS in determining atomic structure in magnetic nanocomposite films. In particular, we focus on cluster-assembled films comprised of Fe and Co nanosized particles embedded in various metal matrices, and show how the crystal structure of the particles can be changed by appropriate choice of the matrix material. The work discussed here demonstrates that combining the results of structural and magnetic measurements, as well as theoretical calculations, can play a significant part in tailoring the properties of new magnetic cluster-assembled materials.

  17. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.R.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has led to a significant increase in activity in many areas of science dealing with the interaction of x-rays with matter. Synchrotron radiation provides intense, linearly polarized, naturally collimated, continuously tunable photon beams, which are used to determine not only the elemental composition of a complex, polyatomic, dilute material but also the chemical form of the elements with improved accuracy. Examples of the application of synchrotron radiation include experiments in synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. New synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobes for elemental analysis in the parts per billion range are under construction at several laboratories. 76 references, 24 figures.

  18. The coefficient of bond thermal expansion measured by extended x-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R

    2014-10-28

    The bond thermal expansion is in principle different from the lattice expansion and can be measured by correlation sensitive probes such as extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and diffuse scattering. The temperature dependence of the coefficient α(bond)(T) of bond thermal expansion has been obtained from EXAFS for CdTe and for Cu. A coefficient α(tens)(T) of negative expansion due to tension effects has been calculated from the comparison of bond and lattice expansions. Negative lattice expansion is present in temperature intervals where α(bond) prevails over α(tens); this real-space approach is complementary but not equivalent to the Grüneisen theory. The relevance of taking into account the asymmetry of the nearest-neighbours distribution of distances in order to get reliable bond expansion values and the physical meaning of the third cumulant are thoroughly discussed.

  19. Nearest-neighbour distribution of distances in crystals from extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, P.; Grisenti, R.; Dapiaggi, M.; Agostini, G.; Miyanaga, T.

    2017-07-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is a powerful probe of the distribution of nearest-neighbour distances around selected atomic species. We consider here the effect of vibrational disorder in crystals. The potential of EXAFS for the accurate evaluation of the coefficient of bond thermal expansion and its temperature dependence is discussed, with the aim of stimulating and facilitating the comparison with the results from total scattering experiments. The meaning of the distribution asymmetry in crystals and its connection with the effective potential anharmonicity and the bond expansion is quantitatively explored by comparing the results for a number of different systems. The extent of the relative atomic vibrations perpendicular to the bond direction and the perpendicular to parallel anisotropy are correlated with the extent of lattice negative thermal expansion as well as with the ionic mobility in superionic crystals.

  20. Nearest-neighbour distribution of distances in crystals from extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R; Dapiaggi, M; Agostini, G; Miyanaga, T

    2017-07-28

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is a powerful probe of the distribution of nearest-neighbour distances around selected atomic species. We consider here the effect of vibrational disorder in crystals. The potential of EXAFS for the accurate evaluation of the coefficient of bond thermal expansion and its temperature dependence is discussed, with the aim of stimulating and facilitating the comparison with the results from total scattering experiments. The meaning of the distribution asymmetry in crystals and its connection with the effective potential anharmonicity and the bond expansion is quantitatively explored by comparing the results for a number of different systems. The extent of the relative atomic vibrations perpendicular to the bond direction and the perpendicular to parallel anisotropy are correlated with the extent of lattice negative thermal expansion as well as with the ionic mobility in superionic crystals.

  1. Relativistic extended-coupled-cluster method for the magnetic hyperfine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Sudip; Pathak, Himadri; Nayak, Malaya K.; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2015-02-01

    The article deals with the general implementation of the four-component spinor relativistic extended-coupled-cluster (ECC) method to calculate first-order property of atoms and molecules in their open-shell ground-state configuration. The implemented relativistic ECC is employed to calculate hyperfine structure constants of alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), singly charged alkaline-earth-metal atoms (Be+ ,Mg+,Ca+, and Sr+), and molecules (BeH, MgF, and CaH). We have compared our ECC results with the calculations based on the restricted active space configuration interaction (RAS-CI) method. Our results are in better agreement with the available experimental values than those of the RAS-CI values.

  2. Extended-resolution structured illumination imaging of endocytic and cytoskeletal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Shao, Lin; Chen, Bi-Chang; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Moses, Brian; Milkie, Daniel E.; Beach, Jordan R.; Hammer, John A.; Pasham, Mithun; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Xu, Pingyong; Betzig, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is distinct among nanoscale imaging tools in its ability to image protein dynamics in living cells. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) stands out in this regard because of its high speed and low illumination intensities, but typically offers only a twofold resolution gain. We extended the resolution of live-cell SIM through two approaches: ultrahigh numerical aperture SIM at 84-nanometer lateral resolution for more than 100 multicolor frames, and nonlinear SIM with patterned activation at 45- to 62-nanometer resolution for approximately 20 to 40 frames. We applied these approaches to image dynamics near the plasma membrane of spatially resolved assemblies of clathrin and caveolin, Rab5a in early endosomes, and a-actinin, often in relationship to cortical actin. In addition, we examined mitochondria, actin, and the Golgi apparatus dynamics in three dimensions. PMID:26315442

  3. First examples of extended structures based on {PMo(12)Sb(2)O(40)} polyoxoanions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shu-Yun; Sun, Ying-Hua; Chen, Yan; Xu, Jia-Ning; Cui, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Yan; Wang, Guo-Wu; Yang, Guang-Di; Xu, Ji-Qing

    2010-02-07

    Three novel heteropolyanions [PMo(12)Sb(2)O(40)][Cu(enMe)(2)].4H(2)O (), [PMo(12)Sb(2)O(40)][Ni(enMe)(2)].4H(2)O (2) and [PMo(12)Sb(2)O(40)][Cu(en)(2)].H(3)O.H(2)O (3) (enMe = 1,2-diaminopropane, en = ethylene diamine) have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analyses and elemental analyses. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that these three compounds represent the first examples of compounds based on the novel polyoxoanion {PMo(12)Sb(2)O(40)} and different transition metal coordination complexes. 1 and 2 are isostructural and both exhibit novel 1-D structures. In contrast to 1 and 2, 3 exhibits a substantially distinct novel 1-D structure. In addition, 3 is the first example of an extended structure constructed from polyoxoanions and Cu(+) transition metal coordination complexes.

  4. Extended polyglutamine tracts cause aggregation and structural perturbation of an adjacent beta barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2006-05-05

    Formation of fibrillar intranuclear inclusions and related neuropathologies of the CAG-repeat disorders are linked to the expansion of a polyglutamine tract. Despite considerable effort, the etiology of these devastating diseases remains unclear. Although polypeptides with glutamine tracts recapitulate many of the observed characteristics of the gene products with CAG repeats, such as in vitro and in vivo aggregation and toxicity in model organisms, extended polyglutamine segments have also been reported to structurally perturb proteins into which they are inserted. Additionally, the sequence context of a polyglutamine tract has recently been shown to modulate its propensity to aggregate. These findings raise the possibility that indirect influences of the repeat tract on adjacent protein domains are contributory to pathologies. Destabilization of an adjacent domain may lead to loss of function, as well as favoring non-native structures in the neighboring domain causing them to be prone to intermolecular association and consequent aggregation. To explore these phenomena, we have used chimeras of a well studied globular protein and exon 1 of huntingtin. We find that expansion of the polyglutamine segment beyond the pathological threshold (>35 glutamines) results in structural perturbation of the neighboring protein whether the huntingtin exon is N- or C-terminal. Elongation of the polyglutamine region also substantially increases the propensity of the chimera to aggregate, both in vitro and in vivo, and in vitro aggregation kinetics of a chimera with a 53-glutamine repeat follow a nucleation polymerization mechanism with a monomeric nucleus.

  5. Changes in the structural properties and rate of hydrolysis of cotton fibers during extended enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lushan; Zhang, Yuzhong; Gao, Peiji; Shi, Dongxia; Liu, Hongwen; Gao, Hongjun

    2006-02-20

    An extended enzymatic hydrolysis of cotton fibers by crude cellulase from Trichoderma pseudokoningii S-38 is described with characterization of both the enzyme changes of activities and cellulose structure. The hydrolysis rates declined drastically during the early stage and then slowly and steadily throughout the whole hydrolysis process the same trend could be seen during the following re-hydrolysis process. Morphological and structural changes to the fibers, such as swelling, frequent surface erosion, and variation in the packing and orientation of microfibrils, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Observation of X-ray diffraction and IR spectra suggests that the hydrolysis process results in a gradual increase in the relative intensity of the hydrogen bond network, and a gradual decrease in the apparent crystal size of cellulose. The I(alpha) crystal phase was hydrolyzed more easily than was the I(beta) crystal phase. Apart from the inactivation of CBHs activity, changes in the packing and arrangement of microfibrils and the structural heterogeneity of cellulose during hydrolysis could be responsible for the reduction in the rate of reaction, especially in its later stages. The results indicate that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose occurs on the outer layer of the fiber surface and that, following this, the process continues in a sub-layer manner.

  6. An extended DNA structure through deoxyribose-base stacking induced by RecA protein

    PubMed Central

    Nishinaka, Taro; Ito, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shibata, Takehiko

    1997-01-01

    The family of proteins that are homologous to RecA protein of Escherichia coli is essential to homologous genetic recombination in various organisms including viruses, bacteria, lower eukaryotes, and mammals. In the presence of ATP (or ATPγS), these proteins form helical filaments containing single-stranded DNA at the center. The single-stranded DNA bound to RecA protein is extended 1.5 times relative to B-form DNA with the same sequence, and the extension is critical to pairing with homologous double-stranded DNA. This pairing reaction, called homologous pairing, is a key reaction in homologous recombination. In this NMR study, we determined a three-dimensional structure of the single-stranded DNA bound to RecA protein. The DNA structure contains novel deoxyribose-base stacking in which the 2′-methylene moiety of each deoxyribose is placed above the base of the following residue, instead of normal stacking of adjacent bases. As a result of this deoxyribose-base stacking, bases of the single-stranded DNA are spaced out nearly 5 Å. Thus, this novel structure well explains the axial extension of DNA in the RecA-filaments relative to B-form DNA and leads to a possible interpretation of the role of this extension in homologous pairing. PMID:9192615

  7. Asymmetric Dust Jets and Extended Structure of 22P/Kopff Observed During 2009 Appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanayama, Hidekazu; Ishiguro, Masateru; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Fukushima, Hideo; Miyaji, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ohta, Kouji; Nobuyuki, Kawai

    2012-12-01

    22P/Kopff images were taken with Multicolor Imaging Telescopes for Survey and Monstrous Explosions (MITSuME) 3ch simultaneous CCD cameras on the Ishigakijima astronomical observatory 105-cm telescope and a 2kCCD camera on the Kiso 105-cm Schmidt telescope from 2009 August to December after the passage of its perihelion on 2009 May 25. We confirmed that the near-nuclear fan-shaped jet structure extended toward the south. Whereas we detected a dust trail structure on the project orbit of the parent nucleus, we could not confirm the obvious neck-line structure. We deduced a pole orientation of (αp1, δp1) = (302°±30°, 62°±10°) or (αp1, δp1) = (122°±30°, -62°±10°) in the case of prograde or retrograde rotation, based on the fan-shaped jet. In addition, we conducted a model simulation of the dust orbital evolution, and found that the observed dust morphology of the fan-shaped jet and dust trail can well explain the dust emission near the south polar region. Finally, we conclude that the surface of 22P/Kopff is becoming largely dormant, but the polar region is still active, as we saw in the Deep Space 1 image of 19P/Borrelly.

  8. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  9. Are turtleback fault surfaces common structural elements of highly extended terranes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çemen, Ibrahim; Tekeli, Okan; Seyitoğlu, Gűrol; Isik, Veysel

    2005-12-01

    The Death Valley region of the U.S.A. contains three topographic surfaces resembling the carapace of a turtle. These three surfaces are well exposed along the Black Mountain front and are named the Badwater, Copper Canyon, and Mormon Point Turtlebacks. It is widely accepted that the turtlebacks are also detachment surfaces that separate brittlely deformed Cenozoic volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the hanging wall from the strongly mylonitic, ductilely deformed pre-Cenozoic rocks of the footwall. We have found a turtleback-like detachment surface along the southern margin of the Alasehir (Gediz) Graben in western Anatolia, Turkey. This surface qualifies as a turtleback fault surface because it (a) is overall convex-upward and (b) separates brittlely deformed hanging wall Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from the ductilely to brittlely deformed, strongly mylonitic pre-Cenozoic footwall rocks. The surface, named here Horzum Turtleback, contains striations that overprint mylonitic stretching lineations indicating top to the NE sense of shear. This suggests that the northeasterly directed Cenozoic extension in the region resulted in a ductile deformation at depth and as the crust isostatically adjusted to the removal of the rocks in the hanging wall of the detachment fault, the ductilely deformed mylonitic rocks of the footwall were brought to shallower depths where they were brittlely deformed. The turtleback surfaces have been considered unique to the Death Valley region, although detachment surfaces, rollover folds, and other extensional structures have been well observed in other extended terranes of the world. The presence of a turtleback fault surface in western Anatolia, Turkey, suggests that the turtleback faults may be common structural features of highly extended terranes.

  10. Saccharomyces SRP RNA secondary structures: a conserved S-domain and extended Alu-domain.

    PubMed

    Van Nues, Rob W; Brown, Jeremy D

    2004-01-01

    The contribution made by the RNA component of signal recognition particle (SRP) to its function in protein targeting is poorly understood. We have generated a complete secondary structure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRP RNA, scR1. The structure conforms to that of other eukaryotic SRP RNAs. It is rod-shaped with, at opposite ends, binding sites for proteins required for the SRP functions of signal sequence recognition (S-domain) and translational elongation arrest (Alu-domain). Micrococcal nuclease digestion of purified S. cerevisiae SRP separated the S-domain of the RNA from the Alu-domain as a discrete fragment. The Alu-domain resolved into several stable fragments indicating a compact structure. Comparison of scR1 with SRP RNAs of five yeast species related to S. cerevisiae revealed the S-domain to be the most conserved region of the RNA. Extending data from nuclease digestion with phylogenetic comparison, we built the secondary structure model for scR1. The Alu-domain contains large extensions, including a sequence with hallmarks of an expansion segment. Evolutionarily conserved bases are placed in the Alu- and S-domains as in other SRP RNAs, the exception being an unusual GU(4)A loop closing the helix onto which the signal sequence binding Srp54p assembles (domain IV). Surprisingly, several mutations within the predicted Srp54p binding site failed to disrupt SRP function in vivo. However, the strength of the Srp54p-scR1 and, to a lesser extent, Sec65p-scR1 interaction was decreased in these mutant particles. The availability of a secondary structure for scR1 will facilitate interpretation of data from genetic analysis of the RNA.

  11. Robust phenotyping strategies for evaluation of stem non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in rice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Diane R.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Virk, Parminder; Ismail, Abdelbagi; Greenberg, Anthony J.; McCouch, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice plants (Oryza sativa) accumulate excess photoassimilates in the form of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in their stems prior to heading that can later be mobilized to supplement photosynthate production during grain-filling. Despite longstanding interest in stem NSC for rice improvement, the dynamics of NSC accumulation, remobilization, and re-accumulation that have genetic potential for optimization have not been systematically investigated. Here we conducted three pilot experiments to lay the groundwork for large-scale diversity studies on rice stem NSC. We assessed the relationship of stem NSC components with 21 agronomic traits in large-scale, tropical yield trials using 33 breeder-nominated lines, established an appropriate experimental design for future genetic studies using a Bayesian framework to sample sub-datasets from highly replicated greenhouse data using 36 genetically diverse genotypes, and used 434 phenotypically divergent rice stem samples to develop two partial least-squares (PLS) models using near-infrared (NIR) spectra for accurate, rapid prediction of rice stem starch, sucrose, and total non-structural carbohydrates. We find evidence that stem reserves are most critical for short-duration varieties and suggest that pre-heading stem NSC is worthy of further experimentation for breeding early maturing rice. PMID:27707775

  12. Robust phenotyping strategies for evaluation of stem non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diane R; Wolfrum, Edward J; Virk, Parminder; Ismail, Abdelbagi; Greenberg, Anthony J; McCouch, Susan R

    2016-11-01

    Rice plants (Oryza sativa) accumulate excess photoassimilates in the form of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in their stems prior to heading that can later be mobilized to supplement photosynthate production during grain-filling. Despite longstanding interest in stem NSC for rice improvement, the dynamics of NSC accumulation, remobilization, and re-accumulation that have genetic potential for optimization have not been systematically investigated. Here we conducted three pilot experiments to lay the groundwork for large-scale diversity studies on rice stem NSC. We assessed the relationship of stem NSC components with 21 agronomic traits in large-scale, tropical yield trials using 33 breeder-nominated lines, established an appropriate experimental design for future genetic studies using a Bayesian framework to sample sub-datasets from highly replicated greenhouse data using 36 genetically diverse genotypes, and used 434 phenotypically divergent rice stem samples to develop two partial least-squares (PLS) models using near-infrared (NIR) spectra for accurate, rapid prediction of rice stem starch, sucrose, and total non-structural carbohydrates. We find evidence that stem reserves are most critical for short-duration varieties and suggest that pre-heading stem NSC is worthy of further experimentation for breeding early maturing rice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Robust phenotyping strategies for evaluation of stem non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in rice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diane R.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Virk, Parminder; Ismail, Abdelbagi; Greenberg, Anthony J.; McCouch, Susan R.

    2016-10-05

    Rice plants (Oryza sativa) accumulate excess photoassimilates in the form of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in their stems prior to heading that can later be mobilized to supplement photosynthate production during grain-filling. Despite longstanding interest in stem NSC for rice improvement, the dynamics of NSC accumulation, remobilization, and re-accumulation that have genetic potential for optimization have not been systematically investigated. Here we conducted three pilot experiments to lay the groundwork for large-scale diversity studies on rice stem NSC. We assessed the relationship of stem NSC components with 21 agronomic traits in large-scale, tropical yield trials using 33 breeder-nominated lines, established an appropriate experimental design for future genetic studies using a Bayesian framework to sample sub-datasets from highly replicated greenhouse data using 36 genetically diverse genotypes, and used 434 phenotypically divergent rice stem samples to develop two partial least-squares (PLS) models using near-infrared (NIR) spectra for accurate, rapid prediction of rice stem starch, sucrose, and total non-structural carbohydrates. Lastly, we find evidence that stem reserves are most critical for short-duration varieties and suggest that pre-heading stem NSC is worthy of further experimentation for breeding early maturing rice.

  14. Robust phenotyping strategies for evaluation of stem non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in rice

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Diane R.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Virk, Parminder; ...

    2016-10-05

    Rice plants (Oryza sativa) accumulate excess photoassimilates in the form of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in their stems prior to heading that can later be mobilized to supplement photosynthate production during grain-filling. Despite longstanding interest in stem NSC for rice improvement, the dynamics of NSC accumulation, remobilization, and re-accumulation that have genetic potential for optimization have not been systematically investigated. Here we conducted three pilot experiments to lay the groundwork for large-scale diversity studies on rice stem NSC. We assessed the relationship of stem NSC components with 21 agronomic traits in large-scale, tropical yield trials using 33 breeder-nominated lines, established anmore » appropriate experimental design for future genetic studies using a Bayesian framework to sample sub-datasets from highly replicated greenhouse data using 36 genetically diverse genotypes, and used 434 phenotypically divergent rice stem samples to develop two partial least-squares (PLS) models using near-infrared (NIR) spectra for accurate, rapid prediction of rice stem starch, sucrose, and total non-structural carbohydrates. Lastly, we find evidence that stem reserves are most critical for short-duration varieties and suggest that pre-heading stem NSC is worthy of further experimentation for breeding early maturing rice.« less

  15. Distinct population structure in a phenotypically homogeneous rock-dwelling cichlid fish from Lake Tanganyika.

    PubMed

    Duftner, Nina; Sefc, Kristina M; Koblmüller, Stephan; Nevado, Bruno; Verheyen, Erik; Phiri, Harris; Sturmbauer, Christian

    2006-08-01

    Several lineages of cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes display stunning levels of morphological diversification. The rapid evolution of rock-dwelling polygynous mouthbrooders in Lake Malawi, for example, was in part ascribed to their allopatric distribution on disjunct stretches of rocky coast, where even short habitat discontinuities reduce gene flow effectively. However, as seen in other cichlids, ecological barriers do not always prevent gene flow, whereas genetic structure can develop along continuous habitat, and morphological diversification does not necessarily accompany genetic differentiation. The present study investigates the population structure of Variabilichromis moorii, a monogamous substrate-brooding lamprologine of rocky coasts in Lake Tanganyika, which occurs over about 1000 km of shoreline almost without phenotypic variation. Phylogeographic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences indicated that dispersal is infrequent and generally occurs between adjacent locations only. Exceptions to this pattern are closely related haplotypes from certain locations on opposite lakeshores, a phenomenon which has been observed in other species and is thought to reflect lake crossing along an underwater ridge in times of low water level. Genetic population differentiation, estimated from mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data in six adjacent populations, was equally high across localities separated by sandy shores and along uninterrupted stretches of rocky shore. Our results suggest that ecological barriers are not required to induce philopatric behavior in Variabilichromis, and that morphological stasis persists in the face of high levels of neutral genetic differentiation.

  16. Structure of linkage disequilibrium and phenotypic associations in the maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Remington, David L.; Thornsberry, Jeffry M.; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Wilson, Larissa M.; Whitt, Sherry R.; Doebley, John; Kresovich, Stephen; Goodman, Major M.; Buckler, Edward S.

    2001-01-01

    Association studies based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) can provide high resolution for identifying genes that may contribute to phenotypic variation. We report patterns of local and genome-wide LD in 102 maize inbred lines representing much of the worldwide genetic diversity used in maize breeding, and address its implications for association studies in maize. In a survey of six genes, we found that intragenic LD generally declined rapidly with distance (r2 < 0.1 within 1500 bp), but rates of decline were highly variable among genes. This rapid decline probably reflects large effective population sizes in maize during its evolution and high levels of recombination within genes. A set of 47 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci showed stronger evidence of genome-wide LD than did single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes. LD was greatly reduced but not eliminated by grouping lines into three empirically determined subpopulations. SSR data also supplied evidence that divergent artificial selection on flowering time may have played a role in generating population structure. Provided the effects of population structure are effectively controlled, this research suggests that association studies show great promise for identifying the genetic basis of important traits in maize with very high resolution. PMID:11562485

  17. Drug Repositioning by Kernel-Based Integration of Molecular Structure, Molecular Activity, and Phenotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems. PMID:24244318

  18. A testosterone-related structural brain phenotype predicts aggressive behavior from childhood to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here, we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6-22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Testosterone-Related Structural Brain Phenotype Predicts Aggressive Behavior From Childhood to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N.; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6 to 22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. PMID:26431805

  20. Brain structural differences associated with the behavioural phenotype in children with Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Linda E; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Stevens, Angela; Azuma, Rayna; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Murphy, Declan G M; Murphy, Kieran C

    2009-03-03

    We investigated structural brain morphology of intellectually disabled children with Williams (WS) syndrome and its relationship to the behavioural phenotype. We compared the neuroanatomy of 15 children (mean age:13+/-2) with WS and 15 age/gender-matched healthy children using a manual region-of-interest analysis to measure bulk (white+grey) tissue volumes and unbiased fully-automated voxel-based morphometry to assess differences in grey/white matter throughout the brain. Ratings of abnormal behaviours were correlated with brain structure. Compared to controls, the brains of children with WS had a decreased volume of the right parieto-occipital regions and basal ganglia. We identified reductions of grey matter of the parieto-occipital regions, left putamen/globus pallidus and thalamus; and in white matter of the basal ganglia and right posterior cingulate gyrus. In contrast, significant increases of grey matter were identified in the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate gyrus, left temporal lobe, and of white matter bilaterally in the anterior cingulate. Inattention in WS was correlated with volumetric differences in the frontal lobes, caudate nucleus and cerebellum, and hyperactivity was related to differences in the left temporal and parietal lobes and cerebellum. Finally, ratings of peer problems were related to differences in the temporal lobes, right basal ganglia and frontal lobe. In one of the first studies of brain structure in intellectually disabled children with WS using voxel-based morphometry, our findings suggest that this group has specific differences in grey/white matter morphology. In addition, it was found that structural differences were correlated to ratings of inattention, hyperactivity and peer problems in children with WS.

  1. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-03-03

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor.

  2. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure

    PubMed Central

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor. PMID:25730860

  3. Cladistic structure within the human Lipoprotein lipase gene and its implications for phenotypic association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A R; Weiss, K M; Nickerson, D A; Boerwinkle, E; Sing, C F

    2000-01-01

    Haplotype variation in 9.7 kb of genomic DNA sequence from the human lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene was scored in three populations: African-Americans from Jackson, Mississippi (24 individuals), Finns from North Karelia, Finland (24), and non-Hispanic whites from Rochester, Minnesota (23). Earlier analyses had indicated that recombination was common but concentrated into a hotspot and that recurrent mutations at multiple sites may have occurred. We show that much evolutionary structure exists in the haplotype variation on either side of the recombinational hotspot. By peeling off significant recombination events from a tree estimated under the null hypothesis of no recombination, we also reveal some cladistic structure not disrupted by recombination during the time to coalescence of this variation. Additional cladistic structure is estimated to have emerged after recombination. Many apparent multiple mutational events at sites still remain after removing the effects of the detected recombination/gene conversion events. These apparent multiple events are found primarily at sites identified as highly mutable by previous studies, strengthening the conclusion that they are true multiple events. This analysis portrays the complexity of the interplay among many recombinational and mutational events that would be needed to explain the patterns of haplotype diversity in this gene. The cladistic structure in this region is used to identify four to six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that would provide disequilibrium coverage over much of this region. These sites may be useful in identifying phenotypic associations with variable sites in this gene. Evolutionary considerations also imply that the SNPs in the 3' region should have general utility in most human populations, but the 5' SNPs may be more population specific. Choosing SNPs at random would generally not provide adequate disequilibrium coverage of the sequenced region. PMID:11063700

  4. A Deeper Look at Leo IV: Star Formation History and Extended Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, David J.; Seth, Anil; Olszewski, Edward W.; Willman, Beth; Zaritsky, Dennis; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2010-07-01

    We present MMT/Megacam imaging of the Leo IV dwarf galaxy in order to investigate its structure and star formation history, and to search for signs of association with the recently discovered Leo V satellite. Based on parameterized fits, we find that Leo IV is round, with epsilon < 0.23 (at the 68% confidence limit) and a half-light radius of rh ~= 130 pc. Additionally, we perform a thorough search for extended structures in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight. We derive our surface brightness detection limit by implanting fake structures into our catalog with stellar populations identical to that of Leo IV. We show that we are sensitive to stream-like structures with surface brightness μ r <~ 29.6 mag arcsec-2, and at this limit we find no stellar bridge between Leo IV (out to a radius of ~0.5 kpc) and the recently discovered, nearby satellite Leo V. Using the color-magnitude fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Leo IV is consistent with a single age (~14 Gyr), single metallicity ([Fe/H] ~ -2.3) stellar population, although we cannot rule out a significant spread in these values. We derive a luminosity of MV = -5.5 ± 0.3. Studying both the spatial distribution and frequency of Leo IV's "blue plume" stars reveals evidence for a young (~2 Gyr) stellar population which makes up ~2% of its stellar mass. This sprinkling of star formation, only detectable in this deep study, highlights the need for further imaging of the new Milky Way satellites along with theoretical work on the expected, detailed properties of these possible "reionization fossils." Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  5. A DEEPER LOOK AT LEO IV: STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND EXTENDED STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, David J.; Seth, Anil; Olszewski, Edward W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Willman, Beth; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2010-07-20

    We present MMT/Megacam imaging of the Leo IV dwarf galaxy in order to investigate its structure and star formation history, and to search for signs of association with the recently discovered Leo V satellite. Based on parameterized fits, we find that Leo IV is round, with {epsilon} < 0.23 (at the 68% confidence limit) and a half-light radius of r{sub h} {approx_equal} 130 pc. Additionally, we perform a thorough search for extended structures in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight. We derive our surface brightness detection limit by implanting fake structures into our catalog with stellar populations identical to that of Leo IV. We show that we are sensitive to stream-like structures with surface brightness {mu}{sub r} {approx}< 29.6 mag arcsec{sup -2}, and at this limit we find no stellar bridge between Leo IV (out to a radius of {approx}0.5 kpc) and the recently discovered, nearby satellite Leo V. Using the color-magnitude fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Leo IV is consistent with a single age ({approx}14 Gyr), single metallicity ([Fe/H] {approx} -2.3) stellar population, although we cannot rule out a significant spread in these values. We derive a luminosity of M{sub V} = -5.5 {+-} 0.3. Studying both the spatial distribution and frequency of Leo IV's 'blue plume' stars reveals evidence for a young ({approx}2 Gyr) stellar population which makes up {approx}2% of its stellar mass. This sprinkling of star formation, only detectable in this deep study, highlights the need for further imaging of the new Milky Way satellites along with theoretical work on the expected, detailed properties of these possible 'reionization fossils'.

  6. Phenotype/karyotype correlations of Y chromosome aneuploidy with emphasis on structural aberrations in postnatally diagnosed cases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.Y.F.

    1994-11-01

    Over 600 cases with Y aneuploidy (other than non-mosaic 47,XYY) were reviewed for phenotype/karyotype correlations. Except for 93 prenatally diagnosed cases of mosaicism, all other cases were ascertained postnatally. Special emphasis was placed on structural abnormalities. It is clear that in the absence of a 45,X cell line, the presence of an entire Yp or a region of it including SRY would lead to a male phenotype in an individual with a Y aneuploidy, whereas the lack of Yp invariably leads to a female phenotype with typical or atypical Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS). Once there is a 45,X cell line, regardless of whether there is a Yp, Yq, or both Yp and Yq, or even a free Y chromosome in other cell lines, there is an increased chance for that individual to be a phenotypic female with UTS manifestations or to have ambiguous external genitalia. This review once again shows a major difference in reported phenotypes between postnatally and prenatally diagnosed cases of 45,X/46,XY, 45,X/47,XYY, and 45,X/46,XY/47,XYY mosaicism. It appears that ascertainment bias can explain the fact that all known patients with postnatal diagnosis are phenotypically abnormal, while over 90% of prenatally diagnosed cases are reported to have a normal male phenotype. Further elucidation of major Y genes and their clinical significance can be expected in the rapidly expanding gene mapping projects. More, consequently better, phenotype/karyotype correlations can be anticipated at both the cytogenetic and the molecular level. 486 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p{sub o} final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA.

  8. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of IBS Fe--Tb alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, V.G.; Aylesworth, K.D.; Kim, K.H.; Elam, W.T.; Koon, N.C. )

    1991-11-15

    We have employed extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis to study the compositional dependence of the atomic structure in Fe--Tb alloy films. Fourier transforms of EXAFS data, relative to both the Fe {ital K} and the Tb {ital L}{sub III} absorption edges, provide information about the local atomic environments relative to each atom. Results indicate the Fe EXAFS data to be dominated by Fe--Fe correlations, and consists of contributions from two Fe atomic shells at radial distances near 2.47 and 2.66 A and a Tb shell near 2.91 A. The coordination number of the Fe shells are measured to increase, while radial distances decrease, with increased Fe content. The Tb EXAFS data was found to have an atomic shells of Fe and Tb at 2.91 and 3.47 A, respectively. Analysis suggests that the Fe shell is very disordered and is comprised of approximately 9.5 atoms while the Tb shell has {approx}3 atoms.

  9. Genetic structure of a foundation species: scaling community phenotypes from the individual to the region.

    PubMed

    Bangert, R K; Lonsdorf, E V; Wimp, G M; Shuster, S M; Fischer, D; Schweitzer, J A; Allan, G J; Bailey, J K; Whitham, T G

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the local and regional patterns of species distributions has been a major goal of ecological and evolutionary research. The notion that these patterns can be understood through simple quantitative rules is attractive, but while numerous scaling laws exist (e.g., metabolic, fractals), we are aware of no studies that have placed individual traits and community structure together within a genetics based scaling framework. We document the potential for a genetic basis to the scaling of ecological communities, largely based upon our long-term studies of poplars (Populus spp.). The genetic structure and diversity of these foundation species affects riparian ecosystems and determines a much larger community of dependent organisms. Three examples illustrate these ideas. First, there is a strong genetic basis to phytochemistry and tree architecture (both above- and belowground), which can affect diverse organisms and ecosystem processes. Second, empirical studies in the wild show that the local patterns of genetics based community structure scale up to western North America. At multiple spatial scales the arthropod community phenotype is related to the genetic distance among plants that these arthropods depend upon for survival. Third, we suggest that the familiar species-area curve, in which species richness is a function of area, is also a function of genetic diversity. We find that arthropod species richness is closely correlated with the genetic marker diversity and trait variance suggesting a genetic component to these curves. Finally, we discuss how genetic variation can interact with environmental variation to affect community attributes across geographic scales along with conservation implications.

  10. Extended Kalman filter for modal identification of structures equipped with a pendulum tuned mass damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roffel, A. J.; Narasimhan, S.

    2014-11-01

    Pendulum tuned mass dampers (PTMDs) have been employed in several full-scale applications to attenuate excessive structural motions, which are mostly due to wind. Conducting periodic condition assessments of the devices to ascertain their health is necessary to ensure their continued optimal performance, which involves identifying the modal parameters of the underlying (bare) structure to which they are tuned to. Such an identification is also necessary for the design of control systems such as adaptive tuned mass dampers. Existing methods of arresting the motion of the damper to estimate the modal properties are expensive, time-consuming, and not suitable for online tuning. Instead, in this paper, parameter estimation using the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed to undertake this task. The central task accomplished here is to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the bare structure (structure without the PTMD) from response measurements of the coupled main structure and PTMD system. The proposed methodology relies on ambient acceleration measurements of TMD-attenuated responses to estimate the bare structural modal frequencies, damping, and mode shapes, which can then be used either for condition assessment or for control. The application of EKF to modal parameter estimation is not new. However, a methodology to address the problem in wind engineering arising from stochastic disturbances present in both the measurement and state equations, and unknown process and noise covariances arising due to ambient excitations, is presented for the first time. Extensively studied for synthetic data, these two challenges have limited thus far the application of Kalman filtering to practical wind engineering parameter estimation problems using experimentally obtained measurements. In this paper, a detailed methodology is presented to address these challenges by using a modified form of the standard EKF equations, together with an algorithm to estimate the unknown

  11. Organic free decavanadate based materials: Inorganic linkers to obtain extended structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerra, Sridevi; Das, Samar K.

    2017-10-01

    Decavanadate based extended structures containing compounds [{Na3(H2O)8(μ2-H2O)6Ag2}HV10O28]n·6nH2O (1), [Co(H2O)6]n[{Na2(H2O)6(μ2-H2O)4Co(H2O)2}V10O28]n·4nH2O (2) and [Zn(H2O)6]n[{Na2(H2O)6(μ2-H2O)4Zn(H2O)2}V10O28]n·4nH2O (3) have been synthesized from respective aqueous solutions of sodium metavanadate. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in a triclinic space group P-1. Compound 1 is a three-dimensional inorganic solid, whereas compounds 2 and 3 are isomorphous one-dimensional inorganic polymers. In the crystal structure of compound 1, the silver (I) cation is coordinated to the terminal oxygen as well as bridging oxygen atoms of decavanadate anion and it is also connected to bridging oxygen atom of trimeric sodium aqua cluster cation. In the crystals of compound 2, one hexa-hydrated cobalt cation is present as a counter cation and one ;di-sodium cobalt aqua-complex; cation is supported on the [V10O28]6- cluster anion by coordinate covalent bond. Compound 3 is isomorphous with compound 2, with Zn2+ present (in compound 3) in the place of Co2+ (in compound 2). Compounds 1, 2 and 3 are characterized by routine elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy and unambiguously by single crystal X-ray crystallography. In the crystal structure of compound 1, an unusual silver dimer is observed.

  12. The local structure factor near an interface; beyond extended capillary-wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Evans, R.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the local structure factor S (zq) at a free liquid-gas interface in systems with short-ranged intermolecular forces and determine the corrections to the leading-order, capillary-wave-like, Goldstone mode divergence of S (zq) known to occur for parallel (i.e. measured along the interface) wavevectors q\\to 0 . We show from explicit solution of the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation that for distances z far from the interface, where the profile decays exponentially, S (zq) splits unambiguously into bulk and interfacial contributions. On each side of the interface, the interfacial contributions can be characterised by distinct liquid and gas wavevector dependent surface tensions, {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , which are determined solely by the bulk two-body and three-body direct correlation functions. At high temperatures, the wavevector dependence simplifies and is determined almost entirely by the appropriate bulk structure factor, leading to positive rigidity coefficients. Our predictions are confirmed by explicit calculation of S (zq) within square-gradient theory and the Sullivan model. The results for the latter predict a striking temperature dependence for {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , and have implications for fluctuation effects. Our results account quantitatively for the findings of a recent very extensive simulation study by Höfling and Dietrich of the total structure factor in the interfacial region, in a system with a cut-off Lennard-Jones potential, in sharp contrast to extended capillary-wave models which failed completely to describe the simulation results.

  13. An extended structure-function model and its application to the analysis of solar wind intermittency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, C.-Y.; Marsch, E.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1995-01-01

    An extended structure-function model is developed by including the new effect in the p-model of Meneveau and Sreenivasan (1987a), i.e., that the averaged energy cascade rate changes with scale, a situation which has been found to prevail in non-fully-developed turbulence in the inner solar wind. This model is useful for the small-scale fluctuations in the inner heliosphere, where the turbulence is not fully developed and cannot be explained quantitatively by any of the previous intermittency turbulence models. With two model parameters, the intrinsic index of the energy spectrum, alpha and the fragmentation fraction p, the model can fit, for the first time, all the observed scaling exponents of the structure functions, which are calculated for time lags ranging from 81 seconds to 0.7 hours from the Helios solar wind data. From the cases we studied we can establish for p neither a clear radial evolution trend, nor a solar-wind-speed, or stream-structure dependence, or a systematic anisotropy for both the flow velocity and magnetic field component fluctuations. Generally, p has values between 0. 7 and 0.8. However, in some cases in low-speed wind p has somewhat higher values for the magnetic components, especially for the radial component. In high-speed wind, the inferred intrinsic spectral indices (alpha) of the velocity and magnetic field components are about equal, while the experimental spectral indices derived from the observed power spectra differ. The magnetic index is somewhat larger than the index of the velocity spectrum. For magnetic fluctuations in both high- and low-speed winds, the intrinsic exponent alpha has values which are near 1.5, while the observed spectral exponent has much higher values.

  14. Inferring phenotypic causal structures among meat quality traits and the application of a structural equation model in Japanese Black cattle.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Valente, B D; Shoji, N; Honda, T; Oyama, K; Rosa, G J M

    2016-10-01

    Meat quality is one of the most important traits determining carcass price in the Japanese beef market. Optimized breeding goals and management practices for the improvement of meat quality traits requires knowledge regarding any potential functional relationships between them. In this context, the objective of this research was to infer phenotypic causal networks involving beef marbling score (BMS), beef color score (BCL), firmness of beef (FIR), texture of beef (TEX), beef fat color score (BFS), and the ratio of MUFA to SFA (MUS) from 11,855 Japanese Black cattle. The inductive causation (IC) algorithm was implemented to search for causal links among these traits and was conditionally applied to their joint distribution on genetic effects. This information was obtained from the posterior distribution of the residual (co)variance matrix of a standard Bayesian multiple trait model (MTM). Apart from BFS, the IC algorithm implemented with 95% highest posterior density (HPD) intervals detected only undirected links among the traits. However, as a result of the application of 80% HPD intervals, more links were recovered and the undirected links were changed into directed ones, except between FIR and TEX. Therefore, 2 competing causal networks resulting from the IC algorithm, with either the arrow FIR → TEX or the arrow FIR ← TEX, were fitted using a structural equation model () to infer causal structure coefficients between the selected traits. Results indicated similar genetic and residual variances as well as genetic correlation estimates from both structural equation models. The genetic variances in BMS, FIR, and TEX from the structural equation models were smaller than those obtained from the MTM. In contrast, the variances in BCL, BFS, and MUS, which were not conditioned on any of the other traits in the causal structures, had no significant differences between the structural equation model and MTM. The structural coefficient for the path from MUS (BCL) to BMS

  15. Extending the phenotypic spectrum of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome: report of a patient with GJB2 (G12R) Connexin 26 mutation and unusual clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Tamara; Li, Qiaoli; Frank, Michael; Uitto, Jouni; Zhou, Linda H

    2012-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare ectodermal dysplasia, characterized mainly by the presence of hyperkeratotic skin lesions, neurosensory hearing loss, and vascularizing keratitis. Most mutations that have been discovered as a cause of KID syndrome are autosomal dominant, found in exon 2 of the Connexin (Cx) 26 gene. A G12R (p.Gly12Arg) is a GJB2 mutation reported in only two patients with KID syndrome to date. This article describes a patient with the G12R mutation and KID syndrome with interesting additional features, which include a porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus, follicular occlusion triad, and unusual persistent oral mucosal papules. We compare this patient's phenotype with the only two other patients described with the same (G12R) mutation. The phenotypic heterogeneity of KID syndrome, inexplicable according to our current understanding of these proteins, speaks to the complexity of the connexin system and its overlapping expression patterns in different tissues.

  16. The C-terminal domain of connexin43 modulates cartilage structure via chondrocyte phenotypic changes

    PubMed Central

    Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Bechberger, John F.; Varela-Eirin, Marta; Varela-Vazquez, Adrian; Acea, Benigno; Fonseca, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes in cartilage and bone cells population express connexin43 (Cx43) and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) is essential to synchronize cells for coordinated electrical, mechanical, metabolic and chemical communication in both tissues. Reduced Cx43 connectivity decreases chondrocyte differentiation and defective Cx43 causes skeletal defects. The carboxy terminal domain (CTD) of Cx43 is located in the cytoplasmic side and is key for protein functions. Here we demonstrated that chondrocytes from the CTD-deficient mice, K258stop/Cx43KO and K258stop/K258stop, have reduced GJIC, increased rates of proliferation and reduced expression of collagen type II and proteoglycans. We observed that CTD-truncated mice were significantly smaller in size. Together these results demonstrated that the deletion of the CTD negatively impacts cartilage structure and normal chondrocyte phenotype. These findings suggest that the proteolytic cleavage of the CTD under pathological conditions, such as under the activation of metalloproteinases during tissue injury or inflammation, may account for the deleterious effects of Cx43 in cartilage and bone disorders such as osteoarthritis. PMID:27682878

  17. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  18. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  19. Assessment of the effectiveness of three different cephalosporin/clavulanate combinations for the phenotypic confirmation of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing bacteria isolated from urine samples at National Public Health Laboratory, Kathmandu, Nepal

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Raju; Pant, Narayan Dutt; Poudel, Asia; Sharma, Mukunda

    2016-08-04

    The extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria are present as the serious public health problems due to their resistance to large number of antibiotics. The main aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and to find the suitable cephalosporin/clavulanate combination for phenotypic confirmation of ESBL production. During the study period from April 2013 to November 2013, a total of 1003 urine samples from the patients visiting National Public Health Laboratory, Kathmandu, Nepal were collected and processed. The isolates were identified with the help of colony characteristics, gram stain and conventional biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. ESBL production screening was done by using ceftriaxone, while ESBL production confirmation was done by using three different 3rd generation cephalosporin/clavulanate combinations. Of the 138 isolates, Escherichia coli was the most predominant with 88 (63.8 %) isolates. Among the antibiotics tested for gram negative bacteria, highest susceptibility was seen toward imipenem followed by amikacin. Of the total isolates, 68 (49.3 %) were suspected as ESBL producers. Of these, 44 (64.7 %) were phenotypically confirmed to be ESBL producers. The majority of ESBL producers were E. coli with 34 (72.3 %) isolates. Of the three different 3rd generation cephalosporin/clavulanate combinations used, ceftazidime/clavulanate combination was found to be most effective for phenotypic confirmation of ESBL producers and was statistically highly significant (P < 0.01). Based on the findings of our study, we recommend to use ceftazidime/clavulanate combination for phenotypic confirmation of ESBL producers. Routine ESBL testing for uropathogens along with conventional antibiogram would be useful for proper early management of all the cases of urinary tract

  20. A Phenotypic Structure and Neural Correlates of Compulsive Behaviors in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Montigny, Chantale; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Whelan, Robert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Büchel, Christian; Gallinat, Jürgen; Flor, Herta; Mann, Karl; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Lathrop, Mark; Loth, Eva; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Schumann, Gunter; Smolka, Michael N.; Struve, Maren; Robbins, Trevor W.; Garavan, Hugh; Conrod, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Background A compulsivity spectrum has been hypothesized to exist across Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD), Eating Disorders (ED), substance abuse (SA) and binge-drinking (BD). The objective was to examine the validity of this compulsivity spectrum, and differentiate it from an externalizing behaviors dimension, but also to look at hypothesized personality and neural correlates. Method A community-sample of adolescents (N=1938; mean age 14.5 years), and their parents were recruited via high-schools in 8 European study sites. Data on adolescents’ psychiatric symptoms, DSM diagnoses (DAWBA) and substance use behaviors (AUDIT and ESPAD) were collected through adolescent- and parent-reported questionnaires and interviews. The phenotypic structure of compulsive behaviors was then tested using structural equation modeling. The model was validated using personality variables (NEO-FFI and TCI), and Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analysis. Results Compulsivity symptoms best fit a higher-order two factor model, with ED and OCD loading onto a compulsivity factor, and BD and SA loading onto an externalizing factor, composed also of ADHD and conduct disorder symptoms. The compulsivity construct correlated with neuroticism (r=0.638; p≤0.001), conscientiousness (r=0.171; p≤0.001), and brain gray matter volume in left and right orbitofrontal cortex, right ventral striatum and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The externalizing factor correlated with extraversion (r=0.201; p≤0.001), novelty-seeking (r=0.451; p≤0.001), and negatively with gray matter volume in the left inferior and middle frontal gyri. Conclusions Results suggest that a compulsivity spectrum exists in an adolescent, preclinical sample and accounts for variance in both OCD and ED, but not substance-related behaviors, and can be differentiated from an externalizing spectrum. PMID:24244633

  1. [POLYMORPHISM IN THE PHENOTYPIC STRUCTURE OF A POPULATION OF TAIGA TICK AND ITS EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I M; Alekseev, A N; Dubinina, E V; Nikitin, A Ya; Melnikova, O V; Andaev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of 10-year (2005-2014) observations of an Ixodespersulcatus Schulze population. The purpose of this investigation was to trace long-term changes in the structure of the taiga tick population from the proportion of specimens with external skeletal anomalies and to assess a relationship between the pattern of imago phenotypic variation and the virus percentage of a carrier. There were a total of reports of the external skeletal structure of 1123 females gathered from plants to a flag in an area at 43 km from the Baikal Road connecting Irkutsk and the settlement of Listvyanka (Irkutsk Region). The proportion of specimens with anomalies averaged 37.8 +/- 1.88%. Four-to-seven varying anomalies were annually recorded. There was a preponderance of scutum impairment (an average of 17.0 +/- 3.08% of all females) that was a conglomerate of prominences and indentations along the entire clypeus surface and that was denoted P9. The nature of a change in the proportion of ticks with two anomalies (average monthly registration rate, 2.5 +/- 0.66%) is exhibited by three-year high-frequency oscillations whereas the specimens with P9 anomalies fail to show so clear cycling. The percentage of virus-containing taiga ticks was individually determined estimating the level of tick-borne encephalitis virus antigen by an enzyme immunoassay. A total of 4022 ticks were examined. The male and female data were pooled. There was a positive correlation between the change in the proportion of females with P9 anomaly and the infection of ticks in the examined population (Spearman's correlation coefficient, 0.88; P < 0.01). This supports the earlier observation of the greater epidemiological significance of the imago of a taiga tick with external skeletal anomalies particularly with considerably marked ones.

  2. Phenotypic covariance structure and its divergence for acoustic mate attraction signals among four cricket species

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Susan M; Fitzsimmons, Lauren P; McAuley, Emily M; Rundle, Howard D; Gorelick, Root

    2012-01-01

    The phenotypic variance–covariance matrix (P) describes the multivariate distribution of a population in phenotypic space, providing direct insight into the appropriateness of measured traits within the context of multicollinearity (i.e., do they describe any significant variance that is independent of other traits), and whether trait covariances restrict the combinations of phenotypes available to selection. Given the importance of P, it is therefore surprising that phenotypic covariances are seldom jointly analyzed and that the dimensionality of P has rarely been investigated in a rigorous statistical framework. Here, we used a repeated measures approach to quantify P separately for populations of four cricket species using seven acoustic signaling traits thought to enhance mate attraction. P was of full or almost full dimensionality in all four species, indicating that all traits conveyed some information that was independent of the other traits, and that phenotypic trait covariances do not constrain the combinations of signaling traits available to selection. P also differed significantly among species, although the dominant axis of phenotypic variation (pmax) was largely shared among three of the species (Acheta domesticus, Gryllus assimilis, G. texensis), but different in the fourth (G. veletis). In G. veletis and A. domesticus, but not G. assimilis and G. texensis, pmax was correlated with body size, while pmax was not correlated with residual mass (a condition measure) in any of the species. This study reveals the importance of jointly analyzing phenotypic traits. PMID:22408735

  3. Phenotypic covariance structure and its divergence for acoustic mate attraction signals among four cricket species.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Susan M; Fitzsimmons, Lauren P; McAuley, Emily M; Rundle, Howard D; Gorelick, Root

    2012-01-01

    The phenotypic variance-covariance matrix (P) describes the multivariate distribution of a population in phenotypic space, providing direct insight into the appropriateness of measured traits within the context of multicollinearity (i.e., do they describe any significant variance that is independent of other traits), and whether trait covariances restrict the combinations of phenotypes available to selection. Given the importance of P, it is therefore surprising that phenotypic covariances are seldom jointly analyzed and that the dimensionality of P has rarely been investigated in a rigorous statistical framework. Here, we used a repeated measures approach to quantify P separately for populations of four cricket species using seven acoustic signaling traits thought to enhance mate attraction. P was of full or almost full dimensionality in all four species, indicating that all traits conveyed some information that was independent of the other traits, and that phenotypic trait covariances do not constrain the combinations of signaling traits available to selection. P also differed significantly among species, although the dominant axis of phenotypic variation (p(max)) was largely shared among three of the species (Acheta domesticus, Gryllus assimilis, G. texensis), but different in the fourth (G. veletis). In G. veletis and A. domesticus, but not G. assimilis and G. texensis, p(max) was correlated with body size, while p(max) was not correlated with residual mass (a condition measure) in any of the species. This study reveals the importance of jointly analyzing phenotypic traits.

  4. Consider neuromusculoskeletal redundancy and extended proprioception when designing smart structures to interface with humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, Jack M.

    1996-05-01

    Despite many well-intentioned attempts to utilize state-of-the-art advanced control systems technology to design contact devices such as powered orthoses, there have been more failures than successes. In part this is due to our limited understanding of neuromechanical function, and of how to optimally design human-technology interfaces. This paper develops a theoretical foundation for mechanical impedance and postural stability for large-scale human systems, and for the analysis and design of human-technology contact interfaces. We start with four basic presuppositions: redundancy is a fundamental feature of biosystem design, muscle actuators possess intrinsic nonlinear stiffness which can be modulated, mechanical interaction between the human and an environment is fundamentally bicausal, and objects with certain properties can become almost a natural extension of the human body. We then develop the key concepts of intimate contact and extended proprioception, and provide examples of how these principles can be applied to practical problems in orthotics, focusing on posture-assist technologies. Finally, suggestions are put forward for applying smart materials and structures to innovative orthotic design.

  5. Computational extended magneto-hydrodynamical study of shock structure generated by flows past an obstacle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xuan; Seyler, C. E.

    2015-07-15

    The magnetized shock problem is studied in the context where supersonic plasma flows past a solid obstacle. This problem exhibits interesting and important phenomena such as a bow shock, magnetotail formation, reconnection, and plasmoid formation. This study is carried out using a discontinuous Galerkin method to solve an extended magneto-hydrodynamic model (XMHD). The main goals of this paper are to present a reasonably complete picture of the properties of this interaction using the MHD model and then to compare the results to the XMHD model. The inflow parameters, such as the magnetosonic Mach number M{sub f} and the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure β, can significantly affect the physical structures of the flow-obstacle interaction. The Hall effect can also significantly influence the results in the regime in which the ion inertial length is numerically resolved. Most of the results presented are for the two-dimensional case; however, two three-dimensional simulations are presented to make a connection to the important case in which the solar wind interacts with a solid body and to explore the possibility of performing scaled laboratory experiments.

  6. π-Extended thiadiazoles fused with thienopyrrole or indole moieties: synthesis, structures, and properties.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin-ichiro; Furuya, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Nitani, Masashi; Ie, Yutaka; Aso, Yoshio; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Nakamura, Yosuke

    2012-09-07

    We report the syntheses, structures, photophysical properties, and redox characteristics of donor-acceptor-fused π-systems, namely π-extended thiadiazoles 1-5 fused with thienopyrrole or indole moieties. They were synthesized by the Stille coupling reactions followed by the PPh(3)-mediated reductive cyclizations as key steps. X-Ray crystallographic studies showed that isomeric 1b and 2b form significantly different packing from each other, and 1a and 4a afford supramolecular networks via multiple hydrogen bonding with water molecules. Thienopyrrole-fused compounds 1b and 2b displayed bathochromically shifted intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) bands and low oxidation potentials as compared to indole-fused analog 3b and showed moderate to good fluorescence quantum yields (Φ(f)) up to 0.73. In 3b-5b, the introduction of electron-donating substituents in the indole moieties substantially shifts the intramolecular CT absorption maxima bathochromically and leads to the elevation of the HOMO levels. The Φ(f) values of 3-5 (0.04-0.50) were found to be significantly dependent on the substituents in the indole moieties. The OFET properties with 1b and 2b as an active layer were also disclosed.

  7. Enhanced traveling wave amplification of co-planar slow wave structure by extended phase-matching

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, Andrew; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar; Shin, Young-Min

    2015-09-15

    The electron beam co-propagating with slow waves in a staggered double grating array (SDGA) efficiently amplifies millimeter and sub-millimeter waves over a wide spectrum. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show that the power amplification in the fundamental passband is enhanced by the extended beam-wave phase-matching. Particle-in-cell simulations on the SDGA slow wave structure, designed with 10.4 keV and 50–100 mA sheet beam, indicate that maintaining beam-wave synchronization along the entire length of the circuit improves the gain by 7.3% leading to a total gain of 28 dB, corresponding to 62 W saturated power at the middle of operating band, and a 3-dB bandwidth of 7 GHz with 10.5% at V-band (73.5 GHz center frequency) with saturated peak power reaching 80 W and 28 dB at 71 GHz. These results also show a reasonably good agreement with analytic calculations based on Pierce small signal gain theory.

  8. On the structure and statistical theory of turbulence of extended magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevich, George; Lingam, Manasvi; Morrison, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress regarding the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of extended magnetohydrodynamics (XMHD), a model with Hall drift and electron inertia, is summarized. The advantages of the Hamiltonian approach are invoked to study some general properties of XMHD turbulence, and to compare them against their ideal MHD counterparts. For instance, the helicity flux transfer rates for XMHD are computed, and Liouville’s theorem for this model is also verified. The latter is used, in conjunction with the absolute equilibrium states, to arrive at the spectra for the invariants, and to determine the direction of the cascades, e.g., generalizations of the well-known ideal MHD inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. After a similar analysis is conducted for XMHD by inspecting second order structure functions and absolute equilibrium states, a couple of interesting results emerge. When cross helicity is taken to be ignorable, the inverse cascade of injected magnetic helicity also occurs in the Hall MHD range—this is shown to be consistent with previous results in the literature. In contrast, in the inertial MHD range, viz at scales smaller than the electron skin depth, all spectral quantities are expected to undergo direct cascading. The consequences and relevance of our results in space and astrophysical plasmas are also briefly discussed.

  9. On the structure and statistical theory of turbulence of extended magnetohydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Miloshevich, George; Lingam, Manasvi; Morrison, Philip J.

    2017-01-16

    Recent progress regarding the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of extended magnetohydrodynamics (XMHD), a model with Hall drift and electron inertia, is summarized. The advantages of the Hamiltonian approach are invoked to study some general properties of XMHD turbulence, and to compare them against their ideal MHD counterparts. For instance, the helicity flux transfer rates for XMHD are computed, and Liouville's theorem for this model is also verified. The latter is used, in conjunction with the absolute equilibrium states, to arrive at the spectra for the invariants, and to determine the direction of the cascades, e.g., generalizations of the well-known ideal MHDmore » inverse cascade of magnetic helicity. After a similar analysis is conducted for XMHD by inspecting second order structure functions and absolute equilibrium states, a couple of interesting results emerge. When cross helicity is taken to be ignorable, the inverse cascade of injected magnetic helicity also occurs in the Hall MHD range-this is shown to be consistent with previous results in the literature. In contrast, in the inertial MHD range, viz at scales smaller than the electron skin depth, all spectral quantities are expected to undergo direct cascading. Finally, the consequences and relevance of our results in space and astrophysical plasmas are also briefly discussed.« less

  10. Characterization of basin concrete in support of structural integrity demonstration for extended storage

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.

    2014-09-30

    Concrete core samples from C basin were characterized through material testing and analysis to verify the design inputs for structural analysis of the L Basin and to evaluate the type and extent of changes in the material condition of the concrete under extended service for fuel storage. To avoid the impact on operations, core samples were not collected from L area, but rather, several concrete core samples were taken from the C Basin prior to its closure. C basin was selected due to its similar environmental exposure and service history compared to L Basin. The microstructure and chemical composition of the concrete exposed to the water was profiled from the water surface into the wall to evaluate the impact and extent of exposure. No significant leaching of concrete components was observed. Ingress of carbonation or deleterious species was determined to be insignificant. No evidence of alkali-silica reactions (ASR) was observed. Ettringite was observed to form throughout the structure (in air voids or pores); however, the sulfur content was measured to be consistent with the initial concrete that was used to construct the facility. Similar ettringite trends were observed in the interior segments of the core samples. The compressive strength of the concrete at the mid-wall of the basin was measured, and similar microstructural analysis was conducted on these materials post compression testing. The microstructure was determined to be similar to near-surface segments of the core samples. The average strength was 4148 psi, which is well-above the design strength of 2500 psi. The analyses showed that phase alterations and minor cracking in a microstructure did not affect the design specification for the concrete.

  11. Correlative Nanoscale 3D Imaging of Structure and Composition in Extended Objects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Helfen, Lukas; Suhonen, Heikki; Elgrabli, Dan; Bayat, Sam; Reischig, Péter; Baumbach, Tilo; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Structure and composition at the nanoscale determine the behavior of biological systems and engineered materials. The drive to understand and control this behavior has placed strong demands on developing methods for high resolution imaging. In general, the improvement of three-dimensional (3D) resolution is accomplished by tightening constraints: reduced manageable specimen sizes, decreasing analyzable volumes, degrading contrasts, and increasing sample preparation efforts. Aiming to overcome these limitations, we present a non-destructive and multiple-contrast imaging technique, using principles of X-ray laminography, thus generalizing tomography towards laterally extended objects. We retain advantages that are usually restricted to 2D microscopic imaging, such as scanning of large areas and subsequent zooming-in towards a region of interest at the highest possible resolution. Our technique permits correlating the 3D structure and the elemental distribution yielding a high sensitivity to variations of the electron density via coherent imaging and to local trace element quantification through X-ray fluorescence. We demonstrate the method by imaging a lithographic nanostructure and an aluminum alloy. Analyzing a biological system, we visualize in lung tissue the subcellular response to toxic stress after exposure to nanotubes. We show that most of the nanotubes are trapped inside alveolar macrophages, while a small portion of the nanotubes has crossed the barrier to the cellular space of the alveolar wall. In general, our method is non-destructive and can be combined with different sample environmental or loading conditions. We therefore anticipate that correlative X-ray nano-laminography will enable a variety of in situ and in operando 3D studies. PMID:23185554

  12. The Detection of Diffuse Extended Structure in 3C 273: Implications for Jet Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian; Kharb, Preeti

    2016-12-01

    We present deep Very Large Array imaging of 3C 273 in order to determine the diffuse, large scale radio structure of this famous radio-loud quasar. Diffuse extended structure (radio lobes) is detected for the first time in these observations as a consequence of high dynamic range in the 327.5 and 1365 MHz images. This emission is used to estimate a time averaged jet power, 7.2 × 1043 erg s-1 < \\overline{Q} < 3.7 × 1044 erg s-1. Brightness temperature arguments indicate consistent values of the time variability Doppler factor and the compactness Doppler factor for the inner jet, δ ≳ 10. Thus, the large apparent broadband bolometric luminosity of the jet, ˜3 × 1046 erg s-1, corresponds to a modest intrinsic luminosity ≳1042 erg s-1, or ˜1% of \\overline{Q}. In summary, we find that 3C 273 is actually a “typical” radio-loud quasar contrary to suggestions in the literature. The modest \\overline{Q} is near the peak of the luminosity distribution for radio-loud quasars and it is consistent with the current rate of dissipation emitted from millimeter wavelengths to gamma rays. The extreme core-jet morphology is an illusion from a near pole-on line of sight to a highly relativistic jet that produces a Doppler enhanced glow that previously swamped the lobe emission. 3C 273 apparently has the intrinsic kpc scale morphology of a classical double radio source, but it is distorted by an extreme Doppler aberration.

  13. Extended vs. Local Structure in Sb-Pyrochlores: An Illustration of the Valuable Interplay between Crystallography and XAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, Maria-Ondina

    2007-02-02

    The convergence between extended structure provided by X-ray diffraction and local structure of antimony extracted from spectroscopic data is reached through an alternative crystallographic description for a Sb-pyrochlore arrangement within the same space group symmetry of pyrochlore structure-type. A full account on this description is presented, along with a calculated diffraction pattern matching experimental data and conforming to Sb 1s XANES data.

  14. Further delineation of novel 1p36 rearrangements by array-CGH analysis: narrowing the breakpoints and clarifying the "extended" phenotype.

    PubMed

    Giannikou, Krinio; Fryssira, Helen; Oikonomakis, Vasilis; Syrmou, Areti; Kosma, Konstantina; Tzetis, Maria; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sofia; Kanavakis, Emmanouel

    2012-09-15

    High resolution oligonucleotide array Comparative Genome Hybridization technology (array-CGH) has greatly assisted the recognition of the 1p36 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. The 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered to be one of the most common subtelomeric microdeletion syndromes and has an incidence of ~1 in 5000 live births, while respectively the "pure" 1p36 microduplication has not been reported so far. We present seven new patients who were referred for genetic evaluation due to Developmental Delay (DD), Mental Retardation (MR), and distinct dysmorphic features. They all had a wide phenotypic spectrum. In all cases previous standard karyotypes were negative. Array-CGH analysis revealed five patients with interstitial 1p36 microdeletion (four de novo and one maternal) and two patients with de novo reciprocal duplication of different sizes. These were the first reported "pure" 1p36 microduplication cases so far. Three of our patients carrying the 1p36 microdeletion syndrome were also found to have additional pathogenetic aberrations. These findings (del 3q27.1; del 4q21.22-q22.1; del 16p13.3; dup 21q21.2-q21.3; del Xp22.12) might contribute to the patients' severe phenotype, acting as additional modifiers of their clinical manifestations. We review and compare the clinical and array-CGH findings of our patients to previously reported cases with the aim of clearly delineating more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations for the 1p36 syndrome that could allow for a more precise prognosis.

  15. Structure and development of old-growth, unmanaged second-growth, and extended rotation Pinus resinosa forests in Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silver, Emily J.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Fraver, Shawn; Palik, Brian J.; Bradford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    The structure and developmental dynamics of old-growth forests often serve as important baselines for restoration prescriptions aimed at promoting more complex structural conditions in managed forest landscapes. Nonetheless, long-term information on natural patterns of development is rare for many commercially important and ecologically widespread forest types. Moreover, the effectiveness of approaches recommended for restoring old-growth structural conditions to managed forests, such as the application of extended rotation forestry, has been little studied. This study uses several long-term datasets from old growth, extended rotation, and unmanaged second growth Pinus resinosa (red pine) forests in northern Minnesota, USA, to quantify the range of variation in structural conditions for this forest type and to evaluate the effectiveness of extended rotation forestry at promoting the development of late-successional structural conditions. Long-term tree population data from permanent plots for one of the old-growth stands and the extended rotation stands (87 and 61 years, respectively) also allowed for an examination of the long-term structural dynamics of these systems. Old-growth forests were more structurally complex than unmanaged second-growth and extended rotation red pine stands, due in large part to the significantly higher volumes of coarse woody debris (70.7 vs. 11.5 and 4.7 m3/ha, respectively) and higher snag basal area (6.9 vs. 2.9 and 0.5 m2/ha, respectively). In addition, old-growth forests, although red pine-dominated, contained a greater abundance of other species, including Pinus strobus, Abies balsamea, and Picea glauca relative to the other stand types examined. These differences between stand types largely reflect historic gap-scale disturbances within the old-growth systems and their corresponding structural and compositional legacies. Nonetheless, extended rotation thinning treatments, by accelerating advancement to larger tree diameter

  16. An Incompletely Penetrant Novel Mutation in COL7A1 Causes Epidermolysis Bullosa Pruriginosa and Dominant Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Phenotypes in an Extended Kindred

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Catherine S; Lu, Yin; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Kashgarian, Michael; Glusac, Earl J; Lifton, Richard P; Antaya, Richard J; Choate, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EBP) is a rare subtype of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) characterized by intense pruritus, nodular or lichenoid lesions, and violaceous linear scarring, most prominently on the extensor extremities. Remarkably, identical mutations in COL7A1, which encodes an anchoring fibril protein present at the dermal–epidermal junction, can cause both DEB and EBP with either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. We present one family with both dystrophic and pruriginosa phenotypes of epidermolysis bullosa. The proband is a 19-year-old Caucasian woman who initially presented in childhood with lichenoid papules affecting her extensor limbs and intense pruritus consistent with EBP. Her maternal grandmother saw a dermatologist for similar skin lesions that developed without any known triggers at age 47 and mostly resolved spontaneously after approximately 10 years. The proband’s younger brother developed a small crop of pruritic papules on his elbows, dorsal hands, knees, and ankles at age 13. Her second cousin once removed, however, reported a mild blistering disease without pruritus consistent with DEB. Genetic sequencing of the kindred revealed a single dominant novel intron 47 splice site donor G>A mutation, c.4668 + 1 G>A, which we predict leads to exon skipping. Incomplete penetrance is confirmed in her clinically unaffected mother, who carries the same dominant mutation. The wide diversity of clinical phenotypes with one underlying genotype demonstrates that COL7A1 mutations are incompletely penetrant and strongly suggests that other genetic and environmental factors influence clinical presentation. PMID:22515571

  17. An incompletely penetrant novel mutation in COL7A1 causes epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa and dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa phenotypes in an extended kindred.

    PubMed

    Yang, Catherine S; Lu, Yin; Farhi, Anita; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Kashgarian, Michael; Glusac, Earl J; Lifton, Richard P; Antaya, Richard J; Choate, Keith A

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (EBP) is a rare subtype of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) characterized by intense pruritus, nodular or lichenoid lesions, and violaceous linear scarring, most prominently on the extensor extremities. Remarkably, identical mutations in COL7A1, which encodes an anchoring fibril protein present at the dermal-epidermal junction, can cause both DEB and EBP with either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. We present one family with both dystrophic and pruriginosa phenotypes of epidermolysis bullosa. The proband is a 19-year-old Caucasian woman who initially presented in childhood with lichenoid papules affecting her extensor limbs and intense pruritus consistent with EBP. Her maternal grandmother saw a dermatologist for similar skin lesions that developed without any known triggers at age 47 and mostly resolved spontaneously after approximately 10 years. The proband's younger brother developed a small crop of pruritic papules on his elbows, dorsal hands, knees, and ankles at age 13. Her second cousin once removed, however, reported a mild blistering disease without pruritus consistent with DEB. Genetic sequencing of the kindred revealed a single dominant novel intron 47 splice site donor G>A mutation, c.4668 + 1 G>A, which we predict leads to exon skipping. Incomplete penetrance is confirmed in her clinically unaffected mother, who carries the same dominant mutation. The wide diversity of clinical phenotypes with one underlying genotype demonstrates that COL7A1 mutations are incompletely penetrant and strongly suggests that other genetic and environmental factors influence clinical presentation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Structural and Theoretical Studies Indicate that the Cylindrical Protease ClpP Samples Extended and Compact Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimber, Matthew S.; Yu, Angela Yeou Hsiung; Borg, Mikael; Leung, Elisa; Chan, Hue Sun; Houry, Walid A.

    2010-09-21

    The highly conserved ClpP protease consists of two heptameric rings that interact by the interdigitation of an {alpha}-helix {beta} strand handle domain motif to form a tetradecameric cylinder. We previously proposed that protease dynamics results in the temporary unstructuring of interacting pairs of handle domains, opening transient equatorial side pores that allow for peptide egress. Here, we report the structure of an Escherichia coli ClpP mutant in which each opposing pair of protomers is linked by a disulfide bond. This structure resembles the compact structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Plasmodium falciparum ClpPs, rather than the active, extended structures that have previously been determined for E. coli ClpPs. The structural data, along with normal mode analysis, support a model whereby the ClpP cylinder switches dynamically between an active extended state required for substrate degradation and an inactive compact state allowing peptide product release.

  19. The Mud Hills, Mojave Desert, California: Structure, stratigraphy and sedimentology of a rapidly extended terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, R.V.; Devaney, K.A.; Geslin, J.K.; Cavazza, W.; Diamond, D.S.; Jagiello, K.J.; Marsaglia, K.M.; Paylor, E.D. II; Short, P.F. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Mud Hills exposes synorogenic breccia (Mud Hills Fm.) deposited during the final stages of crustal extension of the upper plate above the Waterman Hills detachment (20--18 Ma). Previous workers have misinterpreted fault contacts as stratigraphic contacts, and have developed intricate pseudostratigraphy to explain their observations. The authors' detailed mapping, combined with stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, documents that the volcaniclastic Pickhandle Fm. is conformably overlain by the plutoniclastic Mud Hills Fm., with no interfingering. Repetition of these south-dipping lithologic units is due to imbricate, north-dipping listric faults. These relations are demonstrated by the systematic northward v''ing of fault contacts and southward v''ing of stratigraphic contacts. Stratigraphic dip decreases upsection, which is consistent with incremental rotation of basinal strata simultaneously with deposition. Most of the Mud Hills Fm. consists of rock-avalanche breccia and megabreccia derived from granodiorite, which is identical to basement exposed beneath the Pickhandle and Jackhammer Fms. to the north. The Mud Hills Fm. was derived from now-buried granodiorite of a stranded upper-plate block to the south, as demonstrated by northward paleocurrents, facies relations and the presence of fine-grained units close to the presumed master fault (as is typical of half-graben sedimentation). Unconformably overlying the Mud Hills Fm. is the Owl Conglomerate (Barstow Fm.), which has mixed provenance with southward paleocurrents; the Owl Conglomerate was derived from residual highlands after extension ceased. Integration of structural, stratigraphic and sedimentologic information is essential for correct reconstruction of highly extended terranes.

  20. The structure of the genotype–phenotype map strongly constrains the evolution of non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dingle, Kamaludin; Schaper, Steffen; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of neutral mutations implies that biological systems typically have many more genotypes than phenotypes. But, can the way that genotypes are distributed over phenotypes determine evolutionary outcomes? Answering such questions is difficult, in part because the number of genotypes can be hyper-astronomically large. By solving the genotype–phenotype (GP) map for RNA secondary structure (SS) for systems up to length L = 126 nucleotides (where the set of all possible RNA strands would weigh more than the mass of the visible universe), we show that the GP map strongly constrains the evolution of non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Simple random sampling over genotypes predicts the distribution of properties such as the mutational robustness or the number of stems per SS found in naturally occurring ncRNA with surprising accuracy. Because we ignore natural selection, this strikingly close correspondence with the mapping suggests that structures allowing for functionality are easily discovered, despite the enormous size of the genetic spaces. The mapping is extremely biased: the majority of genotypes map to an exponentially small portion of the morphospace of all biophysically possible structures. Such strong constraints provide a non-adaptive explanation for the convergent evolution of structures such as the hammerhead ribozyme. These results present a particularly clear example of bias in the arrival of variation strongly shaping evolutionary outcomes and may be relevant to Mayr's distinction between proximate and ultimate causes in evolutionary biology. PMID:26640651

  1. Resistance phenotype-genotype correlation and molecular epidemiology of Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Proteus, Providencia, Salmonella and Serratia that carry extended-spectrum β-lactamases with or without plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase genes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Henprasert, Arunocha

    2011-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases (pAmpCs) have been increasingly reported among less commonly encountered genera of Enterobacteriaceae. However, little is known regarding the genetic characteristics of resistance genes and epidemiology of these genera. Lack of accurate ESBL and pAmpC detection may adversely affect therapeutic outcomes. This study investigated resistance phenotype-genotype correlation and molecular epidemiology among six genera of Enterobacteriaceae (Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Proteus, Providencia, Salmonella and Serratia) that carried ESBL with or without pAmpC genes at a university hospital in Thailand. From a total of 562 isolates, 105 isolates (18.7%) had ESBL-positive phenotype whilst 140 isolates (24.9%) harboured one or more ESBL genes. CTX-M and TEM were common ESBL-related bla genes among these isolates. The sensitivity and specificity of ESBL phenotypic detection as opposed to ESBL gene detection were 70.7% and 98.6%, respectively. pAmpC genes were detected in 96 ESBL gene-carrying isolates (68.6%) and significantly caused false negative detection of ESBL. Molecular typing based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed several clones that may be endemic in this hospital. This study indicated a high prevalence of ESBLs and pAmpCs among less common members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in Thailand and these resistant bacteria need to be monitored.

  2. Decentralized identification of nonlinear structure under strong ground motion using the extended Kalman filter and unscented Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Dongwang; Li, Hui; Ma, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Complete structure identification of complicate nonlinear system using extend Kalman filter (EKF) or unscented Kalman filter (UKF) may have the problems of divergence, huge computation and low estimation precision due to the large dimension of the extended state space for the system. In this article, a decentralized identification method of hysteretic system based on the joint EKF and UKF is proposed. The complete structure is divided into linear substructures and nonlinear substructures. The substructures are identified from the top to the bottom. For the linear substructure, EKF is used to identify the extended space including the displacements, velocities, stiffness and damping coefficients of the substructures, using the limited absolute accelerations and the identified interface force above the substructure. Similarly, for the nonlinear substructure, UKF is used to identify the extended space including the displacements, velocities, stiffness, damping coefficients and control parameters for the hysteretic Bouc-Wen model and the force at the interface of substructures. Finally a 10-story shear-type structure with multiple inter-story hysteresis is used for numerical simulation and is identified using the decentralized approach, and the identified results are compared with those using only EKF or UKF for the complete structure identification. The results show that the decentralized approach has the advantage of more stability, relative less computation and higher estimation precision.

  3. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Muyang; Foster, Cliff; Kelkar, Shantanu; Pu, Yunqiao; Holmes, Daniel; Ragauskas, Arthur; Saffron, Christopher M; Hodge, David B

    2012-06-06

    For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility) of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88-95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses exhibiting a diversity of lignin structures and compositions

  4. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. Results We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility) of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88–95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. Conclusions It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses exhibiting a diversity of

  5. New insights into the phenotypic covariance structure of the anthropoid cranium

    PubMed Central

    Makedonska, Jana

    2014-01-01

    In complex organisms, suites of non-random, highly intercorrelated phenotypic traits, organized according to their developmental history and forming semi-autonomous units (i.e. modules), have the potential to impose constraints on morphological diversification or to improve evolvability. Because of its structural, developmental and functional complexity, the cranium is arguably one of the best models for studying the interplay between developmental history and the need for various parts of a structure to specialize in different functions. This study evaluated the significance of two specific types of developmental imprints in the adult anthropoid cranium, those imposed by ossification pattern (i.e. ossification with and without a pre-existing cartilaginous phase) and those imposed by tissue origin (i.e. tissues derived principally from neural-crest vs. those derived from paraxial mesoderm). Specifically, this study tests the hypothesis that the face and the basicranium form two distinct modules with higher within-unit trait integration magnitudes compared with the cranium as a whole. Data on 12 anthropoid primate species were collected in the form of 23-dimensional landmarks digitized on cranial surface models that sample the basicranium as well as regions of functional importance during feeding. The presence of a significant modularity imprint in the adult cranium was assessed using a between-region within-species comparison of multivariate correlations (RV coefficients) obtained with partial least-squares, using within-module within-species eigenvalue variance (EV), and using cluster analyses and non-metric multidimensional scaling. In addition to addressing the validity of the cranial modularity hypothesis in anthropoids, this study addressed methodological aspects of the interspecific comparison of morphological integration, namely the effect of sample size and the effect of landmark number on integration magnitudes. Two methodological findings that are of

  6. Intellectual disability secondary to a 16p13 duplication in a 1;16 translocation. Extended phenotype in a four-generation family.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amal Mahmoud; Kamel, Alaa; Mahmoud, Wael; Abdelraouf, Ehab; Meguid, Nagwa

    2015-01-01

    We describe a large family from the Gaza Strip presented with multiple congenital anomalies. The proband was presented with intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies including cleft palate, low-set ears, everted upper lip, diaphragmatic hernia, and arthrogryposis. Pedigree analysis showed 19 affected patients over five generations, only 6 were alive and 11 individuals were obligate carriers. The proband had an apparently normal karyotype, although FISH studies showed a derivative chromosome 1 with duplication of 16p13.3 and deletion of the 1p subtelomere. Her father however had a balanced translocation. The seven affected patients had a similar phenotype, one of them died before genetic testing was carried out and the living six patients had the same unbalanced translocation. Array CGH revealed an 8.8 Mb duplication in 16p13 and 200,338 bp deletion in 1p36.3. Accordingly, intellectual disability, hypertelorism, cupped ears, everted upper lip, and limb anomalies were presenting clinical features of the 16p13 duplication syndrome while deep set eyes were perhaps related to the 1p terminal deletion. Prevention of recurrent intellectual disability in this family can be achieved through carrier detection and prenatal genetic diagnosis.

  7. Landscape patterns of phenotypic variation and population structuring in a selfing grass, Elymus glaucus (blue wildrye).

    Treesearch

    Vicky J. Erickson; Nancy L. Mandel; Frank C. Sorensen

    2004-01-01

    Source-related phenotypic variance was investigated in a common garden study of populations of Elymus glaucus Buckley (blue wildrye) from the Blue Mountain Ecological Province of northeastern Oregon and adjoining Washington. The primary objective of this study was to assess geographic patterns of potentially adaptive differentiation in this self-...

  8. Devices with extended area structures for mass transfer processing of fluids

    DOEpatents

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.; King, David L.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2009-04-21

    A microchannel device includes several mass transfer microchannels to receive a fluid media for processing at least one heat transfer microchannel in fluid communication with a heat transfer fluid defined by a thermally conductive wall, and at several thermally conductive fins each connected to the wall and extending therefrom to separate the mass transfer microchannels from one another. In one form, the device may optionally include another heat transfer microchannel and corresponding wall that is positioned opposite the first wall and has the fins and the mass transfer microchannels extending therebetween.

  9. Natal habitat imprinting counteracts the diversifying effects of phenotype-dependent dispersal in a spatially structured population.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Carlos; Canal, David; Potti, Jaime

    2016-08-08

    Habitat selection may have profound evolutionary consequences, but they strongly depend on the underlying preference mechanism, including genetically-determined, natal habitat and phenotype-dependent preferences. It is known that different mechanisms may operate at the same time, yet their relative contribution to population differentiation remains largely unexplored empirically mainly because of the difficulty of finding suitable study systems. Here, we investigate the role of early experience and genetic background in determining the outcome of settlement by pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) breeding in two habitat patches between which dispersal and subsequent reproductive performance is influenced by phenotype (body size). For this, we conducted a cross-fostering experiment in a two-patch system: an oakwood and a conifer plantation separated by only 1 km. Experimental birds mostly returned to breed in the forest patch where they were raised, whether it was that of their genetic or their foster parents, indicating that decisions on where to settle are determined by individuals' experience in their natal site, rather than by their genetic background. Nevertheless, nearly a third (27.6 %) moved away from the rearing habitat and, as previously observed in unmanipulated individuals, dispersal between habitats was phenotype-dependent. Pied flycatchers breeding in the oak and the pine forests are differentiated by body size, and analyses of genetic variation at microsatellite loci now provide evidence of subtle genetic differentiation between the two populations. This suggests that phenotype-dependent dispersal may contribute to population structure despite the short distance and widespread exchange of birds between the study plots. Taken together, the current and previous findings that pied flycatchers do not always settle in the habitat to which they are best suited suggest that their strong tendency to return to the natal patch regardless of their body size

  10. Growth, yield, and structure of extended rotation Pinus resinosa stands in Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Christel C. Kern

    2010-01-01

    Extended rotations are increasingly used to meet ecological objectives on forestland; however, information about long-term growth and yield of these systems is lacking for most forests in North America. Additionally, long-term growth responses to repeated thinnings in older stands have received little attention. We addressed these needs by examining the growth and...

  11. Spatial phenotypic and genetic structure of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in a heterogeneous natural system, Lake Mývatn, Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Antoine; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K; Einarsson, Árni; Räsänen, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Eco-evolutionary responses of natural populations to spatial environmental variation strongly depend on the relative strength of environmental differences/natural selection and dispersal/gene flow. In absence of geographic barriers, as often is the case in lake ecosystems, gene flow is expected to constrain adaptive divergence between environments – favoring phenotypic plasticity or high trait variability. However, if divergent natural selection is sufficiently strong, adaptive divergence can occur in face of gene flow. The extent of divergence is most often studied between two contrasting environments, whereas potential for multimodal divergence is little explored. We investigated phenotypic (body size, defensive structures, and feeding morphology) and genetic (microsatellites) structure in threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) across five habitat types and two basins (North and South) within the geologically young and highly heterogeneous Lake Mývatn, North East Iceland. We found that (1) North basin stickleback were, on average, larger and had relatively longer spines than South basin stickleback, whereas (2) feeding morphology (gill raker number and gill raker gap width) differed among three of five habitat types, and (3) there was only subtle genetic differentiation across the lake. Overall, our results indicate predator and prey mediated phenotypic divergence across multiple habitats in the lake, in face of gene flow. PMID:24223263

  12. Organization of motor and posture patterns in paradise fish (Macropodus opercularis): environmental and genetic components of phenotypical correlation structures.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R; Crusio, W E

    1995-07-01

    Paradise fish exhibit complex, environment-specific behavioral responses which consist of behavioral elements (motor and posture patterns) appearing in a typical, correlated manner. The genetic and environmental components underlying these phenotypical correlations have not been comprehensively investigated. Therefore, we have analyzed the behavioral elements of paradise fish from the nine populations of a 3 x 3 full diallel cross by employing a bivariate extension of the Hayman-Jinks variance-covariance analysis, demonstrating the presence of significant environmental and genetic correlations. To investigate the multivariate structure of the correlation matrices obtained, we subjected the phenotypical, environmental, additive genetic, and dominance correlations to principal-component analyses (PCAs). After rotation, the phenotypical principal factor pattern found was similar to previously obtained ones, suggesting stable underlying biological mechanisms. The environmental PCA extracted several environmental principal factors that were highly situation-specific. PCAs of the matrices of genetic correlations extracted only a small number of genetic principal factors which were not situation-specific, suggesting a relatively simple underlying genetic structure.

  13. Extended x-ray-absorption fine structure—Auger process for surface structure analysis: Theoretical considerations of a proposed experiment

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Uzi; Adams, David L.

    1976-01-01

    A method for surface structure analysis is proposed. The proposed process combines x-ray photoabsorption and Auger electron emission. The extended x-ray-absorption fine structure, occurring for photon energies above an atomic absorption edge, contains structural information of the microscopic environment due to the coupling of the photoelectron final state with the atomic initial state. Measurement of the variations in the intensity of particular Auger lines, as a function of the incident radiation energy, provides a surface sensitive measure of the photoabsorption cross section in the media. Theoretical considerations of the physical processes underlying the proposed experiment and its feasibility, and a discussion of background contributions are presented. PMID:16592339

  14. Ovarian structures and uterine environment are associated with phenotypic and genetic merit for performance in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, A M; Ryan, D P; Carthy, T R; Evans, R D; Berry, D P

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the association between detailed reproductive phenotypes for cows categorized as divergent for phenotypic and genetic performance. The hypothesis was that higher yielding animals, either phenotypically or genetically, would have compromised ovarian and uterine reproductive performance. Detailed reproductive traits including multiple ovulations, cystic ovarian structures, corpus luteum (CL) presence, and uterine environment were available on 9675 ultrasound records from 8174 dairy lactating cows, calved between 10 and 70 days. Cows were categorized, within parity, into low, average, or high for each of the performance traits. There was a greater likelihood of multiple ovulations in cows with greater phenotypic yields (odds ratio: 1.53-1.81) and greater genetic merit for yield (odds ratio: 1.31-1.59) relative to lower performing contemporaries. After adjustment for genetic merit, a similar trend of increased odds (odds ratio: 1.29-1.87) of multiple ovulations in higher yielding cows was observed compared with the lowest yielding category. There was no association between either phenotypic milk composition or genetic merit for milk composition with the likelihood of multiple ovulations. The likelihood of cystic ovarian structures was highest in cows with greatest phenotypic milk yields (odds ratio: 2.75-3.24), greater genetic merit for milk yield (odds ratio: 1.30-1.51), and even after adjustment for genetic merit there was a greater likelihood of cystic ovarian structures in cows with the highest milk yields (odds ratio: 2.71-2.95), compared with cows in the lowest category for each of the milk traits. Cows with average phenotypic milk yields were more likely to have a CL, compared with the lowest yielding category (odds ratio: 1.20-1.23), and these associations remained after adjustment for genetic merit of the trait. The likelihood of CL presence was highest in cows with the lowest genetic merit for milk. Lower fat

  15. Admixture in Latin America: geographic structure, phenotypic diversity and self-perception of ancestry based on 7,342 individuals.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; León-Mimila, Paola; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Burley, Mari-Wyn; Konca, Esra; de Oliveira, Marcelo Zagonel; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Gibbon, Sahra; Ray, Nicolas; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Balding, David; Gonzalez-José, Rolando

    2014-09-01

    The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry.

  16. Evaluation of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute phenotypic confirmatory test to detect the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases from 4005 Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis isolates.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Ian; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Hackel, Meredith; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Hawser, Stephen; Hoban, Daryl; Badal, Robert E

    2014-04-01

    A subset of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis isolates collected for the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends that were positive for the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotypic confirmatory test (n = 3245) or had an ertapenem MIC of ≥0.5 µg ml(-1) (n = 293), or both (n = 467), were analysed for ESBL genes. Most ESBL phenotype E. coli or K. pneumoniae possessed an ESBL gene (95.8 and 88.4 %, respectively), and this was 93.1 % if carbapenem-non-susceptible K. pneumoniae were removed. This rate was lower for P. mirabilis (73.4 %) and K. oxytoca (62.5 %). Virtually all ESBL-positive isolates (99.5 %) were cefotaxime non-susceptible [CLSI or European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints)]. Fewer isolates (82 %) were ceftazidime non-susceptible (CLSI breakpoints). In addition, 21.1 % of E. coli, 25 % of K. oxytoca and 78.7 % of P. mirabilis isolates were ceftazidime susceptible but ESBL positive. This suggests that CLSI breakpoints for ceftazidime are too high to detect ESBLs. The lower EUCAST breakpoints detected ESBLs in E. coli and K. oxytoca better, but 59.6 % of ESBL-positive isolates of P. mirabilis were ceftazidime susceptible. For isolates with ertapenem MICs ≥0.5 µg ml(-1), more accurate ESBL phenotype analysis was observed for E. coli and K. pneumoniae (sensitivity >95 % for both, specificity 94.4 and 54.1 %, respectively). If carbapenemase-positive K. pneumoniae were excluded, the specificity increased to 78 %. The positive predictive values for the ESBL phenotypic test with E. coli and K. pneumoniae were 97.6 and 81.8 %, respectively, and negative predictive values were 75.9 and 95.2 %, respectively. We therefore suggest that it would be prudent to confirm phenotypic ESBL-positive P. mirabilis, K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca with molecular analysis.

  17. Studying the local structures of novel materials using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu

    2009-12-01

    In this dissertation, investigations on the local lattice structures for a variety of novel materials using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique are presented. Different experiment schemes were applied to obtain EXAFS data with high quality, and some interesting results were obtained by careful analysis. The power of the EXAFS technique was once again proved. In Chapter 1, I first briefly introduce the EXAFS theory and experiments, then give readers who are not familiar with this technique a short introduction on data reduction and analysis, and finally discuss some problems that are easily ignored in the interpretation of the experiment results. In Chapter 2, a temperature-dependent EXAFS investigation of La 1-xCaxMnO 3 is presented for the concentration range that spans the ferromagnetic-insulator (FMI) to ferromagnetic-metal (FMM) transition region, x = 0.16, 0.18, 0.20, and 0.22; the titrated hole concentrations are slightly higher y = 0.2, 0.22, 0.24, and 0.25 respectively. In Chapter 3, I report EXAFS studies of n- and p-type Ba8Ga 16Ge30 samples (type I clathrate) at the Ga, Ge, and Ba K-edges, to probe the local structure, particularly around the Ba atoms located inside 20- and 24-atom cages (Ba1 and Ba2 sites respectively) formed of Ga/Ge atoms. In agreement with diffraction analysis we find Ba2 is off-center, with a component in the bc plane (0.15 A) comparable to that found in diffraction; however, under the assumption of a stiff cage we also require a significant a component. This suggests a coupling or attraction between the Ba2 atoms and the hexagonal rings at the top or bottom of the cage that encloses the Ba2 site. In Chapter 4, I report detailed degradation and rejuvenation studies for AC electro-luminescence (EL) devices made using the phosphor ZnS:Cu,CI. We find that the AC EL emission spectra vary considerably with AC driving frequency but all spectra can be fit to a sum of four Gaussians. The combined experiments place

  18. Photoluminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies on cadmium telluride material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangxin

    The direct-band-gap semiconductor CdTe is an important material for fabricating high efficiency, polycrystalline thin-film solar cells in a heterojunction configuration. The outstanding physical properties of this material such as its good band-gap match to the solar spectrum, ease of fabrication of stoichiometric films, and easy grain boundary passivation make it an important candidate for large area, thin-film solar cells. However, there are several poorly understood processing steps that are commonly utilized in cell fabrication. One of these is a CdCl2 treatment near 400°C in the presence of oxygen, which can improve the cell efficiency a factor of two or more. Another factor is the role of copper in cell performance. In high performance CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells, copper is usually included in the fabrication of low-resistance back contacts to obtain heavy p-type doping of the absorber CdTe at the contact. However, most of the copper is not electrically active. For example, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) on typical CdTe cells has shown Cu concentrations of 1019 atoms/cm3 and even higher, although capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements indicate typical ionized acceptor levels on the order of 1014/cm 3. Thus, there is great interest in the location and role of this inactive copper in CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. In this thesis, I will describe results obtained on magnetron-sputtered CdTe films that were diffused with copper following the procedure used for creating a cell back contact. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements identified the chemical environment of the majority of the copper and show major differences depending on whether the CdTe film has been treated with chloride prior to the Cu diffusion. The EXAFS data indicate that the Cu chemistry is strongly affected by the chloride treatments---predominantly Cu2Te when Cu was diffused into the as-deposited CdTe film, but a Cu2O environment when Cu was diffused after

  19. Phenotypic constraints and community structure: linking trade-offs within and among species.

    PubMed

    Angert, Amy L; Kimball, Sarah; Peterson, Megan; Huxman, Travis E; Venable, David L

    2014-11-01

    Trade-offs are central to many topics in biology, from the evolution of life histories to ecological mechanisms of species coexistence. Trade-offs observed among species may reflect pervasive constraints on phenotypes that are achievable given biophysical and resource limitations. If so, then among-species trade-offs should be consistent with trade-offs within species. Alternatively, trait variation among co-occurring species may reflect historical contingencies during community assembly rather than within-species constraints. Here, we test whether a key trade-off between relative growth rate (RGR) and water-use efficiency (WUE) among Sonoran Desert winter annual plants is apparent within four species representing different strategies in the system. We grew progeny of maternal families from multiple populations in a greenhouse common garden. One species, Pectocarya recurvata, displayed the expected RGR-WUE trade-off among families within populations. For other species, although RGR and WUE often varied clinally among populations, among-family variation within populations was lacking, implicating a role for past selection on these traits. Our results suggest that a combination of limited genetic variation in single traits and negative trait correlations could pose constraints on the evolution of a high-RGR and high-WUE phenotype within species, providing a microevolutionary explanation for phenotypes that influence community-level patterns of abundance and coexistence.

  20. Triplet excitons as sensitive spin probes for structure analysis of extended defects in microcrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Christoph; Teutloff, Christian; Behrends, Jan; Bittl, Robert; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Lips, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) spectroscopy is employed to study the influence of triplet excitons on the photocurrent in state-of-the-art microcrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells. These triplet excitons are used as sensitive spin probes for the investigation of their electronic and nuclear environment in this mixed-phase material. According to low-temperature EDMR results obtained from solar cells with different extended defects in the crystallites of microcrystalline silicon that give rise to shallow states in the silicon band gap. The excitons possess a rather delocalized wave function, couple to electron spins in conduction band tail states nearby, and take part in a spin-dependent recombination process. Our study shows that extended defects such as grain boundaries or stacking faults in the crystalline part of the material act as charge carrier traps that can influence the material conductivity.

  1. The phenotypic and genetic structure of depression and anxiety disorder symptoms in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Waszczuk, Monika A; Zavos, Helena M S; Gregory, Alice M; Eley, Thalia C

    2014-08-01

    The DSM-5 classifies mood and anxiety disorders as separate conditions. However, some studies in adults find a unidimensional internalizing factor that underpins anxiety and depression, while others support a bidimensional model where symptoms segregate into distress (depression and generalized anxiety) and fear factors (phobia subscales). However, little is known about the phenotypic and genetic structure of internalizing psychopathology in children and adolescents. To investigate the phenotypic associations between depression and anxiety disorder symptom subscales and to test the genetic structures underlying these symptoms (DSM-5-related, unidimensional and bidimensional) across 3 developmental stages: childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood. Two population-based prospective longitudinal twin/sibling studies conducted in the United Kingdom. The child sample included 578 twins (mean age, approximately 8 and 10 years at waves 1 and 2, respectively). The adolescent and early adulthood sample included 2619 twins/siblings at 3 waves (mean age, 15, 17, and 20 years at each wave). Self-report symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders. Phenotypically, when controlling for other anxiety subscales, depression symptoms were only associated with generalized anxiety disorder symptoms in childhood (r = 0.20-0.21); this association broadened to panic and social phobia symptoms in adolescence (r = 0.17-0.24 and r = 0.14-0.16, respectively) and all anxiety subscales in young adulthood (r = 0.06-0.19). The genetic associations were in line with phenotypic results. In childhood, anxiety subscales were influenced by a single genetic factor that did not contribute to genetic variance in depression symptoms, suggesting largely independent genetic influences on anxiety and depression. In adolescence, genetic influences were significantly shared between depression and all anxiety subscales in agreement with DSM-5 conceptualization. In young adulthood, a genetic

  2. In situ mapping of the effect of additional mutations on starch granule structure in amylose-extender (ae) maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongli; Wellner, Nikolaus; Parker, Mary L; Morris, Victor J; Cheng, Fang

    2015-03-15

    Optical (KI/I2-staining, polarised) and FTIR microscopy has been used to monitor starch granule structure within wild-type (wt), GEMS-0067 and waxy-amylose-extender (wx-ae) maize mutant kernels. In the GEMS-0067 mutant containing the high amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) plus the recessive ae gene, structural heterogeneity characteristic of the ae mutation was reduced markedly. However, enhanced variation in granule shape and size was observed distributed spatially within the kernel, which appears to be related to new heterogeneity in internal starch granule structure. In wx-ae starch mutants the ae gene led to heterogeneity of starch granule structure equivalent to that in single ae mutants, plus new structural heterogeneity coincident with novel induced variation in granule size and shape. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The potential indirect effects among plants via shared hummingbird pollinators are structured by phenotypic similarity.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Pedro Joaquim; Wolowski, Marina; Maruyama, Pietro Kiyoshi; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Carvalheiro, Luísa G; Sazima, Marlies

    2017-07-01

    Plant species within communities may overlap in pollinators' use and influence visitation patterns of shared pollinators, potentially engaging in indirect interactions (e.g., facilitation or competition). While several studies have explored the mechanisms regulating insect-pollination networks, there is a lack of studies on bird-pollination systems, particularly in species-rich tropical areas. Here, we evaluated if phenotypic similarity, resource availability (floral abundance), evolutionary relatedness and flowering phenology affect the potential for indirect effects via shared pollinators in hummingbird-pollinated plant species within four communities in the Brazilian Atlantic forest. Among the evaluated factors, phenotypic similarity (corolla length and anther height) was the most important variable, while resource availability (floral abundance) had a secondary importance. On the other hand, evolutionary relatedness and flowering phenology were less important, which altogether highlights the relevance of convergent evolution and that the contribution of a plant to the diet of the pollinators of another plant is independent of the level of temporal overlap in flowering in this tropical system. Interestingly, our findings contrast with results from multiple insect-pollinated plant communities, mostly from temperate regions, in which floral abundance was the most important driver, followed by evolutionary relatedness and phenotypic similarity. We propose that these contrasting results are due to high level of specialization inherent to tropical hummingbird-pollination systems. Moreover, our results demonstrated that factors defining linkage rules of plant-hummingbird networks also determinate plant-plant potential indirect effects. Future studies are needed to test if these findings can be generalized to other highly specialized systems. Overall, our results have important implications for the understanding of ecological processes due resource sharing in

  4. Band structures extending to very high spin in {sup 126}Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Roenn Hansen, C.; Sletten, G.; Hagemann, G. B.; Herskind, B.; Jensen, D. R.; Bringel, P.; Engelhardt, C.; Huebel, H.; Neusser-Neffgen, A.; Singh, A. K.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Bednarczyk, P.; Byrski, T.; Curien, D.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.

    2007-09-15

    High-spin states in {sup 126}Xe have been populated in the {sup 82}Se({sup 48}Ca,4n){sup 126}Xe reaction in two experiments, one at the VIVITRON accelerator in Strasbourg using the Euroball detector array, and a subsequent one with ATLAS at Argonne using the Gammasphere Ge-detector array. Levels and assignments made previously for {sup 126}Xe up to I=20 have been confirmed and extended. Four regular bands extending to a spin of almost I=60, which are interpreted as two pairs of signature partners with opposite parity, are identified for the first time. The {alpha} = 0 partner of each pair is connected to the lower-lying levels, whereas the two {alpha} = 1 partners remain floating. A fractional Doppler shift analysis of transitions in the strongest populated ({pi},{alpha})=(-,0) band provides a value of 5.2{sub 0.5}{sup 0.4} b for the transition quadrupole moment, which can be related to a minimum in the potential-energy surface calculated by the ULTIMATE CRANKER cranked shell-model code at {epsilon}{approx_equal}0.35 and {gamma}{approx_equal}5 deg. The four lowest bands calculated for this minimum compare well with the two signature pairs experimentally observed over a wide spin range. A sharp upbend at ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{approx}1170 keV is interpreted as a crossing with a band involving the j{sub 15/2} neutron orbital, for which pairing correlations are expected to be totally quenched. The four long bands extend to within {approx}5 spin units of a crossing with an yrast line defined by calculated hyperdeformed transitions and will serve as important stepping stones into the spin region beyond 60h for future experiments.

  5. The plating of rat scar myofibroblasts on matrigel unmasks a novel phenotype; the self assembly of lumen-like structures.

    PubMed

    El-Helou, Viviane; Gosselin, Hugues; Villeneuve, Louis; Calderone, Angelino

    2012-07-01

    During tissue healing, the primary role of myofibroblasts involves the synthesis and deposition of collagen. However, it has also been reported that selective populations of myofibroblasts can acquire the phenotype and/or differentiate to other cells types. The present study tested the hypothesis that myofibroblasts isolated from the scar of the ischemically damaged rat heart can recapitulate an endothelial cell-like response when plated in a permissive in vitro environment. Scar myofibroblasts, neonatal and adult ventricular fibroblasts express smooth muscle α-actin, collagen α(1) type 1 and a panel of pro-fibrotic and pro-angiogenic peptide growth factor mRNAs. Myofibroblasts plated alone on matrigel led to the self assembly of lumen-like structures whereas neonatal and adult rat ventricular fibroblasts were unresponsive. Myofibroblasts labeled with the fluorescent cell tracker CM-DiI were injected in the viable myocardium of 3-day post-myocardial infarcted Sprague-Dawley rats and sacrificed 7 days later. Injected CM-DiI-labeled myofibroblasts were detected predominantly in the peri-infarct/infarct region, highlighting their migration to the damaged region. However, engrafted myofibroblasts in the peri-infarct/infarct region were unable to adopt an endothelial cell-like phenotype or lead to the de novo formation of CM-DiI-labeled blood vessels. The non-permissive nature of the infarct region may be attributed at least in part to the presence of growth-promoting stimuli as TGF-β and the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol inhibited the self assembly of lumen-like structures by myofibroblasts. Thus, when plated in a permissive in vitro environment, scar myofibroblasts can self assemble and form lumen-like structures providing an additional novel phenotype distinguishing this population from normal ventricular fibroblasts. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of phenotype-structured populations: from individual-level mechanisms to population-level consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Rebecca H.; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Desvillettes, Laurent; Hughes, Barry D.

    2016-08-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are increasingly recognised as integral to the adaptation of species that face environmental changes. In particular, empirical work has provided important insights into the contribution of epigenetic mechanisms to the persistence of clonal species, from which a number of verbal explanations have emerged that are suited to logical testing by proof-of-concept mathematical models. Here, we present a stochastic agent-based model and a related deterministic integrodifferential equation model for the evolution of a phenotype-structured population composed of asexually-reproducing and competing organisms which are exposed to novel environmental conditions. This setting has relevance to the study of biological systems where colonising asexual populations must survive and rapidly adapt to hostile environments, like pathogenesis, invasion and tumour metastasis. We explore how evolution might proceed when epigenetic variation in gene expression can change the reproductive capacity of individuals within the population in the new environment. Simulations and analyses of our models clarify the conditions under which certain evolutionary paths are possible and illustrate that while epigenetic mechanisms may facilitate adaptation in asexual species faced with environmental change, they can also lead to a type of "epigenetic load" and contribute to extinction. Moreover, our results offer a formal basis for the claim that constant environments favour individuals with low rates of stochastic phenotypic variation. Finally, our model provides a "proof of concept" of the verbal hypothesis that phenotypic stability is a key driver in rescuing the adaptive potential of an asexual lineage and supports the notion that intense selection pressure can, to an extent, offset the deleterious effects of high phenotypic instability and biased epimutations, and steer an asexual population back from the brink of an evolutionary dead end.

  7. Phenotypic diversity, population structure and stress protein-based capacitoring in populations of Xeropicta derbentina, a heat-tolerant land snail species.

    PubMed

    Di Lellis, Maddalena A; Sereda, Sergej; Geißler, Anna; Picot, Adrien; Arnold, Petra; Lang, Stefanie; Troschinski, Sandra; Dieterich, Andreas; Hauffe, Torsten; Capowiez, Yvan; Mazzia, Christophe; Knigge, Thomas; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Krais, Stefanie; Wilke, Thomas; Triebskorn, Rita; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2014-11-01

    The shell colour of many pulmonate land snail species is highly diverse. Besides a genetic basis, environmentally triggered epigenetic mechanisms including stress proteins as evolutionary capacitors are thought to influence such phenotypic diversity. In this study, we investigated the relationship of stress protein (Hsp70) levels with temperature stress tolerance, population structure and phenotypic diversity within and among different populations of a xerophilic Mediterranean snail species (Xeropicta derbentina). Hsp70 levels varied considerably among populations, and were significantly associated with shell colour diversity: individuals in populations exhibiting low diversity expressed higher Hsp70 levels both constitutively and under heat stress than those of phenotypically diverse populations. In contrast, population structure (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene) did not correlate with phenotypic diversity. However, genetic parameters (both within and among population differences) were able to explain variation in Hsp70 induction at elevated but non-pathologic temperatures. Our observation that (1) population structure had a high explanatory potential for Hsp70 induction and that (2) Hsp70 levels, in turn, correlated with phenotypic diversity while (3) population structure and phenotypic diversity failed to correlate provides empirical evidence for Hsp70 to act as a mediator between genotypic variation and phenotype and thus for chaperone-driven evolutionary capacitance in natural populations.

  8. Structurally unique recombinant Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor retains activity when terminally extended and glycosylated.

    PubMed

    Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Kodrík, Dalibor; Grzelak, Krystyna; Nirmala, Xavier; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2005-10-01

    Recombinant derivatives of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor GmSPI2 (36 amino acid residues), which is a component of insect silk, were prepared in the expression vector Pichia pastoris. The rhSPI2 had a C-terminal hexahistidine tag attached to the GmSPI2 sequence, rtSPI2 was extended with GluAlaAla at the N-terminus, and rfSPI2 included this N-terminal extension and a C-terminal tail of 22 residues (myc epitope and hexahistidine). A portion of the secreted rfSI2 was O-glycosylated with a trimannosyl or hexamannosyl. The native inhibitor was active slightly on trypsin and highly on subtilisin and proteinase K. The extended C-terminus in rhSPI2 and rfSPI2 enhanced activity on the two latter enzymes and rendered rfSPI2 active on elastase and pronase, but abolished the inhibition of trypsin. The glycosylation of rfSPI2 reduced its inhibitory activity to a level comparable with the native inhibitor. The rtSPI2 with tripeptide extension at the N-terminus and no C-terminal modification was clearly less active than the native inhibitor. None of the tested compounds inhibited alpha-chymotrypsin and the non-serine proteinases.

  9. Structural and Functional Concepts in Current Mouse Phenotyping and Archiving Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kollmus, Heike; Post, Rainer; Brielmeier, Markus; Fernández, Julia; Fuchs, Helmut; McKerlie, Colin; Montoliu, Lluis; Otaegui, Pedro J; Rebelo, Manuel; Riedesel, Hermann; Ruberte, Jesús; Sedlacek, Radislav; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Schughart, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Collecting and analyzing available information on the building plans, concepts, and workflow from existing animal facilities is an essential prerequisite for most centers that are planning and designing the construction of a new animal experimental research unit. Here, we have collected and analyzed such information in the context of the European project Infrafrontier, which aims to develop a common European infrastructure for high-throughput systemic phenotyping, archiving, and dissemination of mouse models. A team of experts visited 9 research facilities and 3 commercial breeders in Europe, Canada, the United States, and Singapore. During the visits, detailed data of each facility were collected and subsequently represented in standardized floor plans and descriptive tables. These data showed that because the local needs of scientists and their projects, property issues, and national and regional laws require very specific solutions, a common strategy for the construction of such facilities does not exist. However, several basic concepts were apparent that can be described by standardized floor plans showing the principle functional units and their interconnection. Here, we provide detailed information of how individual facilities addressed their specific needs by using different concepts of connecting the principle units. Our analysis likely will be valuable to research centers that are planning to design new mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities. PMID:23043807

  10. Structural analysis of succinoglycan oligosaccharides from Sinorhizobium meliloti strains with different host compatibility phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Senay; Wood, Karl; Reuhs, Bradley L

    2013-05-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti NRG247 has a Fix(+) phenotype on Medicago truncatula A20 and is Fix(-) on M. truncatula A17, and the phenotype is reversed with S. meliloti NRG185. As the succinoglycan was shown to impact host specificity, an analysis of the succinoglycan oligosaccharides produced by each strain was conducted. The symbiotically active succinoglycan trimeric oligosaccharides (STOs) from the two S. meliloti strains were compared by chromatography and mass spectrometry, and the analysis of the S. meliloti NRG247 oligosaccharides showed that this strain produces an abundance of STO trimer 1 (T1), containing no succinate (i.e., three nonsuccinylated repeats), yet the low-molecular-weight pool contained no nonsuccinylated monomers (potential repeats). This showed that STO T1 is likely to be the active signal on M. truncatula A20 and that the biosynthesis of the STOs is not a random polymerization of the monomer population. The results also suggest that the fully succinylated STO T7 is required for the infection of M. truncatula A17.

  11. Structural and functional concepts in current mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities.

    PubMed

    Kollmus, Heike; Post, Rainer; Brielmeier, Markus; Fernández, Julia; Fuchs, Helmut; McKerlie, Colin; Montoliu, Lluis; Otaegui, Pedro J; Rebelo, Manuel; Riedesel, Hermann; Ruberte, Jesús; Sedlacek, Radislav; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Schughart, Klaus

    2012-07-01

    Collecting and analyzing available information on the building plans, concepts, and workflow from existing animal facilities is an essential prerequisite for most centers that are planning and designing the construction of a new animal experimental research unit. Here, we have collected and analyzed such information in the context of the European project Infrafrontier, which aims to develop a common European infrastructure for high-throughput systemic phenotyping, archiving, and dissemination of mouse models. A team of experts visited 9 research facilities and 3 commercial breeders in Europe, Canada, the United States, and Singapore. During the visits, detailed data of each facility were collected and subsequently represented in standardized floor plans and descriptive tables. These data showed that because the local needs of scientists and their projects, property issues, and national and regional laws require very specific solutions, a common strategy for the construction of such facilities does not exist. However, several basic concepts were apparent that can be described by standardized floor plans showing the principle functional units and their interconnection. Here, we provide detailed information of how individual facilities addressed their specific needs by using different concepts of connecting the principle units. Our analysis likely will be valuable to research centers that are planning to design new mouse phenotyping and archiving facilities.

  12. OpenMx: An Open Source Extended Structural Equation Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boker, Steven; Neale, Michael; Maes, Hermine; Wilde, Michael; Spiegel, Michael; Brick, Timothy; Spies, Jeffrey; Estabrook, Ryne; Kenny, Sarah; Bates, Timothy; Mehta, Paras; Fox, John

    2011-01-01

    OpenMx is free, full-featured, open source, structural equation modeling (SEM) software. OpenMx runs within the "R" statistical programming environment on Windows, Mac OS-X, and Linux computers. The rationale for developing OpenMx is discussed along with the philosophy behind the user interface. The OpenMx data structures are…

  13. OpenMx: An Open Source Extended Structural Equation Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boker, Steven; Neale, Michael; Maes, Hermine; Wilde, Michael; Spiegel, Michael; Brick, Timothy; Spies, Jeffrey; Estabrook, Ryne; Kenny, Sarah; Bates, Timothy; Mehta, Paras; Fox, John

    2011-01-01

    OpenMx is free, full-featured, open source, structural equation modeling (SEM) software. OpenMx runs within the "R" statistical programming environment on Windows, Mac OS-X, and Linux computers. The rationale for developing OpenMx is discussed along with the philosophy behind the user interface. The OpenMx data structures are…

  14. Simultaneous, laser-sintered, three-dimensional modelling of bony structures and soft tissue for surgical navigation of extended cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Ogawa, Y; Hasegawa, T; Kawaguchi, S; Yukawa, K; Nishiyama, N; Shimizu, S

    2010-05-01

    To examine the usefulness of a three-dimensional model for surgical navigation of cholesteatoma. A three-dimensional model was prototyped using selective laser sintering. Based on detailed computed tomography data, powder layers were laser-fused and accumulated to create a three-dimensional structure. The computed tomography threshold was adjusted to simultaneously replicate bony structures and soft tissues. The cholesteatoma, major vessels and bony structures were well replicated. This laser-sintered model was used to aid surgery for recurrent cholesteatoma. The cholesteatoma, which extended from the hypotympanum through the styloid process sheath and the internal carotid artery sheath, was removed safely via a minimal skin incision. The laser-sintered model was useful for surgical planning and navigation in a cholesteatoma case involving complex bony structures and soft tissue.

  15. Alteration of RH gene structure and expression in human dCCee and DCW-red blood cells: phenotypic homozygosity versus genotypic heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H

    1996-09-15

    This report describes a comparative study on the dCCee and DCW-red blood cells devoid of RhD and CcEe antigens, respectively. Southern blots showed that the two variants carried opposite deletions in the D and non-D (CcEe) genes. Rh haplotyping and exon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay indicated that the deletions did not extend beyond the 5' region upstream from exon 1 or the 3' region downstream from exon 10 of the respective genes. This was confirmed by finding intact promoters and 3' untranslated regions in both D and non-D genes in each variant. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and cDNA sequencing showed the expression of two transcripts in each cell type. In dCCee cells, one transcript was the regular Ce form and the other occurred as a D-Ce-D hybrid whose Ce sequence spanned exons 2 through 9. In DCW-cells, the two transcripts were derived from reversely arranged hybrid genes, ie, the CW-D gene was formed by fusion of CW exon 1 with D exons 2 through 10, whereas the reverse product was formed by fusion of D exons 1 through 9 with non-D exon 10. These results indicated that DNA deletion and recombination had occurred in either cis or trans configuration and involved both RH loci in the dCCee or DCW-genome. Identification of such compound alterations correlates the genotypes with phenotypes and explains the lost Rh antigenic expression. A reinvestigation of gene organization also led to the reassignment of several 5' and 3' splice sites. Together, this study not only shows the complexity of Rh phenotypic diversity, but also points to the importance of concurrent analysis of genomic structure and transcript expression in deciphering the underlying genetic mechanisms.

  16. Thermoplastic biodegradable polyurethanes: the effect of chain extender structure on properties and in-vitro degradation.

    PubMed

    Tatai, Lisa; Moore, Tim G; Adhikari, Raju; Malherbe, François; Jayasekara, Ranjith; Griffiths, Ian; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A

    2007-12-01

    Biodegradable polyurethanes are typically prepared from polyester polyols, aliphatic diisocyanates and chain extenders. We have developed a degradable chain extender (DCE) based on dl-lactic acid and ethylene glycol to accelerate hard segment degradation. Three series of polyurethane elastomers were synthesised to investigate the effect of incorporating DCE on synthesis, mechanical and thermal properties and in-vitro degradation. Polyurethane soft segments were based on poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) polyol. The hard segment was based on either ethyl lysine diisocyanate or hexamethylene diisocyanate in combination with ethylene glycol or DCE. Polyurethanes were characterised by gel permeation chromatography, tensile testing (Instron) and differential scanning calorimetry. Polymer degradation in-vitro (phosphate buffered saline) was tested by measuring mass loss, change in molecular weight and amine concentration in degradation products at three different time points over a 1 year period. Incorporation of DCE did not affect thermal or mechanical properties but had an influence on the in-vitro degradation. All polyurethanes exhibited considerable molecular weight decrease over the test period, and DCE-based polyurethanes showed the highest mass loss. The presence of the DCE and the initial molecular weight of the polyurethane are the key factors responsible for high mass losses. Differential scanning calorimetry, amine group analysis and the observation that mass loss was directly proportional to hard segment weight percentage, strongly supported that the polyurethane hard segment is the most susceptible segment to degradation in these polyurethanes. The PCL-based soft segment appears to undergo little or no degradation under these test conditions.

  17. Speciation of Gold Nanoparticles by Ex Situ Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Marco; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Ballarin, Barbara; Berrettoni, Mario; Cassani, Maria Cristina; Fazzini, Silvia; Nanni, Daniele; Tonelli, Domenica

    2016-07-05

    A combined X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methodology is here presented on a series of partially and fully reduced Au(III) samples. This allows monitoring the relative fraction of Au(III) and Au(0) in the studied samples, displaying a consistent and independent outcome. The strategy followed is based, for the first time, on two structural models that can be fitted simultaneously, and it evaluates the correlation among strongly correlated parameters such as coordination number and the Debye-Waller factor. The results of the present EXAFS and XANES approach can be extended to studies based on X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments for the in situ monitoring of the formation of gold nanoclusters.

  18. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  19. Phenotypic and genetic evidence for a unifactorial structure of spatial abilities

    PubMed Central

    Rimfeld, Kaili; Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Selzam, Saskia; Schofield, Kerry; Dale, Philip S.; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Spatial abilities encompass several skills differentiable from general cognitive ability (g). Importantly, spatial abilities have been shown to be significant predictors of many life outcomes, even after controlling for g. To date, no studies have analyzed the genetic architecture of diverse spatial abilities using a multivariate approach. We developed “gamified” measures of diverse putative spatial abilities. The battery of 10 tests was administered online to 1,367 twin pairs (age 19–21) from the UK-representative Twins Early Development Study (TEDS). We show that spatial abilities constitute a single factor, both phenotypically and genetically, even after controlling for g. This spatial ability factor is highly heritable (69%). We draw three conclusions: (i) The high heritability of spatial ability makes it a good target for gene-hunting research; (ii) some genes will be specific to spatial ability, independent of g; and (iii) these genes will be associated with all components of spatial ability. PMID:28223478

  20. Phenotypic and genetic evidence for a unifactorial structure of spatial abilities.

    PubMed

    Rimfeld, Kaili; Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Selzam, Saskia; Schofield, Kerry; Dale, Philip S; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2017-03-07

    Spatial abilities encompass several skills differentiable from general cognitive ability (g). Importantly, spatial abilities have been shown to be significant predictors of many life outcomes, even after controlling for g. To date, no studies have analyzed the genetic architecture of diverse spatial abilities using a multivariate approach. We developed "gamified" measures of diverse putative spatial abilities. The battery of 10 tests was administered online to 1,367 twin pairs (age 19-21) from the UK-representative Twins Early Development Study (TEDS). We show that spatial abilities constitute a single factor, both phenotypically and genetically, even after controlling for g This spatial ability factor is highly heritable (69%). We draw three conclusions: (i) The high heritability of spatial ability makes it a good target for gene-hunting research; (ii) some genes will be specific to spatial ability, independent of g; and (iii) these genes will be associated with all components of spatial ability.

  1. Phenotypic, Ultra-Structural, and Functional Characterization of Bovine Peripheral Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Ochoa, Amanda S.; Bishop, Elizabeth; Barlow, John W.; Golde, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are multi-functional cells that bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune systems. In bovine, significant information is lacking on the precise identity and role of peripheral blood DC subsets. In this study, we identify and characterize bovine peripheral blood DC subsets directly ex vivo, without further in vitro manipulation. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis revealed that three DC subsets could be identified. Bovine plasmacytoid DC were phenotypically identified by a unique pattern of cell surface protein expression including CD4, exhibited an extensive endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, efficiently internalized and degraded exogenous antigen, and were the only peripheral blood cells specialized in the production of type I IFN following activation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Conventional DC were identified by expression of a different pattern of cell surface proteins including CD11c, MHC class II, and CD80, among others, the display of extensive dendritic protrusions on their plasma membrane, expression of very high levels of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, efficient internalization and degradation of exogenous antigen, and ready production of detectable levels of TNF-alpha in response to TLR activation. Our investigations also revealed a third novel DC subset that may be a precursor of conventional DC that were MHC class II+ and CD11c−. These cells exhibited a smooth plasma membrane with a rounded nucleus, produced TNF-alpha in response to TLR-activation (albeit lower than CD11c+ DC), and were the least efficient in internalization/degradation of exogenous antigen. These studies define three bovine blood DC subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics which can be analyzed during immune responses to pathogens and vaccinations of cattle. PMID:25295753

  2. Specific domain structures control abscisic acid-, salicylic acid-, and stress-mediated SIZ1 phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Mi Sun; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Hong, Mi Ju; Lee, Jiyoung; Choi, Wonkyun; Jin, Jing Bo; Bohnert, Hans J; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2009-12-01

    SIZ1 (for yeast SAP and MIZ1) encodes the sole ortholog of mammalian PIAS (for protein inhibitor of activated STAT) and yeast SIZ SUMO (for small ubiquitin-related modifier) E3 ligases in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Four conserved motifs in SIZ1 include SAP (for scaffold attachment factor A/B/acinus/PIAS domain), PINIT (for proline-isoleucine-asparagine-isoleucine-threonine), SP-RING (for SIZ/PIAS-RING), and SXS (for serine-X-serine, where X is any amino acid) motifs. SIZ1 contains, in addition, a PHD (for plant homeodomain) typical of plant PIAS proteins. We determined phenotypes of siz1-2 knockout mutants transformed with SIZ1 alleles carrying point mutations in the predicted domains. Domain SP-RING is required for SUMO conjugation activity and nuclear localization of SIZ1. Salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and SA-dependent phenotypes of siz1-2, such as diminished plant size, heightened innate immunity, and abscisic acid inhibition of cotyledon greening, as well as SA-independent basal thermotolerance were not complemented by the altered SP-RING allele of SIZ1. The SXS domain also controlled SA accumulation and was involved in greening and expansion of cotyledons of seedlings germinated in the presence of abscisic acid. Mutations of the PHD zinc finger domain and the PINIT motif affected in vivo SUMOylation. Expression of the PHD and/or PINIT domain mutant alleles of SIZ1 in siz1-2 promoted hypocotyl elongation in response to sugar and light. The various domains of SIZ1 make unique contributions to the plant's ability to cope with its environment.

  3. Stimulation of stop codon readthrough: frequent presence of an extended 3' RNA structural element.

    PubMed

    Firth, Andrew E; Wills, Norma M; Gesteland, Raymond F; Atkins, John F

    2011-08-01

    In Sindbis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis and related alphaviruses, the polymerase is translated as a fusion with other non-structural proteins via readthrough of a UGA stop codon. Surprisingly, earlier work reported that the signal for efficient readthrough comprises a single cytidine residue 3'-adjacent to the UGA. However, analysis of variability at synonymous sites revealed strikingly enhanced conservation within the ∼ 150 nt 3'-adjacent to the UGA, and RNA folding algorithms revealed the potential for a phylogenetically conserved stem-loop structure in the same region. Mutational analysis of the predicted structure demonstrated that the stem-loop increases readthrough by up to 10-fold. The same computational analysis indicated that similar RNA structures are likely to be relevant to readthrough in certain plant virus genera, notably Furovirus, Pomovirus, Tobravirus, Pecluvirus and Benyvirus, as well as the Drosophilia gene kelch. These results suggest that 3' RNA stimulatory structures feature in a much larger proportion of readthrough cases than previously anticipated, and provide a new criterion for assessing the large number of cellular readthrough candidates that are currently being revealed by comparative sequence analysis.

  4. Family Structure, Maternal Dating, and Sexual Debut: Extending the Conceptualization of Instability.

    PubMed

    Zito, Rena Cornell; De Coster, Stacy

    2016-05-01

    Family structure influences the risk of early onset of sexual intercourse. This study proposes that the family structures associated with risk-single-mother, step-parent, and cohabiting-influence early sexual debut due to family instability, including shifts in family structure and maternal dating, which can undermine parental control and transmit messages about the acceptability of nonmarital sex. Previous research has not considered maternal dating as a component of family instability, assuming single mothers who date and those who do not date experience comparable levels of family disruption and transmit similar messages about the acceptability of nonmarital sex. Hypotheses are assessed using logistic regression models predicting the odds of early onset of sexual intercourse among 9959 respondents (53 % female, 47 % male) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Respondents were ages 12-17 at the first wave of data collection and 18-26 at the third wave, when respondents reported the age at which they first had sexual intercourse. Results show that maternal dating is a source of family instability with repercussions for early sexual debut. Parental control and permissive attitudes towards teenage sex and pregnancy link at-risk family structures and maternal dating to early sexual initiation among females, though these variables do not fully explain family structure and maternal dating effects. Among males, the influence of maternal dating on early sexual debut is fully explained by the learning of permissive sexual attitudes.

  5. OpenMx: An Open Source Extended Structural Equation Modeling Framework.

    PubMed

    Boker, Steven; Neale, Michael; Maes, Hermine; Wilde, Michael; Spiegel, Michael; Brick, Timothy; Spies, Jeffrey; Estabrook, Ryne; Kenny, Sarah; Bates, Timothy; Mehta, Paras; Fox, John

    2011-04-01

    OpenMx is free, full-featured, open source, structural equation modeling (SEM) software. OpenMx runs within the R statistical programming environment on Windows, Mac OS-X, and Linux computers. The rationale for developing OpenMx is discussed along with the philosophy behind the user interface. The OpenMx data structures are introduced - these novel structures define the user interface framework and provide new opportunities for model specification. Two short example scripts for the specification and fitting of a confirmatory factor model are next presented. We end with an abbreviated list of modeling applications available in OpenMx 1.0 and a discussion of directions for future development.

  6. Damage Characterization Using the Extended Finite Element Method for Structural Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of validated multidisciplinary Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) tools, technologies, and techniques to enable detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation in the presence of adverse conditions during flight will provide effective solutions to deal with safety related challenges facing next generation aircraft. The adverse conditions include loss of control caused by environmental factors, actuator and sensor faults or failures, and damage conditions. A major concern in these structures is the growth of undetected damage/cracks due to fatigue and low velocity foreign impact that can reach a critical size during flight, resulting in loss of control of the aircraft. Hence, development of efficient methodologies to determine the presence, location, and severity of damage/cracks in critical structural components is highly important in developing efficient structural health management systems.

  7. Understanding structure and electronic properties of extended self-interstitial defects in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Alippi, P.; Colombo, L.

    1999-07-01

    The results of an atomistic investigation on the coalescence mechanisms of self-interstitial {l{underscore}brace}311{r{underscore}brace} defects are presented. Formation energies and equilibrium configurations of defect structures are determined by tight-binding molecular dynamics simulation. The authors focus on the characterization of the lattice strain field around the defect complex: By means of the determination of the atomic stress distribution, they discuss how it may influence the formation mechanisms of the plana {l{underscore}brace}311{r{underscore}brace} structures. The authors also attempt a correlation between structural features and electronic properties through the analysis of defect-related orbitals occupations and inverse participation ratios.

  8. The structure of Mn-doped tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)gallium by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shaojie; Pang, Zhiyong; Du, Yonghua; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Xijian; Wang, Fenggong; Yuan, Huimin; Han, Shenghao

    2012-12-01

    Metal-Mqx (M = Al, Ga, Zn, Be, and Ca, x = 2 or 3) complexes play a key role in organic spintronics and organic optoelectronics. However, the accurate structure determination of these complexes has been a challenge for a long time. Here, we report the structure of Mn-Gaq3 investigated by using first-principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. First, the structures of Mn-Gaq3 were predicted by first-principle DFT calculations. Then, all reasonable structures achieved from the calculations were used to fit the EXAFS spectra. By this method, the structure of Mn-Gaq3 is well obtained. We believe this method is also applicable to other metal-Mqx films.

  9. Iron distances in hemoglobin: comparison of x-ray crystallographic and extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fermi, G.; Perutz, M.F.; Shulman, R.G.

    1987-09-01

    A comparison is presented of the structures obtained around the iron atom in deoxyhemoglobin (Hb). The data come from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of the iron, which gave Fe-porphyrin nitrogen distances of 2.06 +- 0.01 A, and from the most recent high-resolution x-ray crystallographic study, which gave exactly the same distance-2.06 +- 0.02 A. The distance of Fe above the plane of the porphyrin nitrogens was 0.38 +- 0.04 A from the crystallographic study; this value is not far from the upper limit of the distances 0.20 +- /sub 0.20//sup 0.10/ A calculated from the EXAFS experiment by triangulation. These distances above the nitrogen plane are shorter than those estimated in the earliest x-ray structures

  10. High Sensitivity Combined with Extended Structural Coverage of Labile Compounds via Nanoelectrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Shukla, Anil K.; ...

    2014-09-15

    Subambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN) has proven to be effective in producing ions with high efficiency and transmitting them to low pressures for high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Here we present evidence that not only does the SPIN source improve MS sensitivity but also allows for gentler ionization conditions. The gentleness of a conventional heated capillary electrospray ionization (ESI) source and the SPIN source was compared by the liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of colominic acid. Colominic acid is a mixture of sialic acid polymers of different lengths containing labile glycosidic linkages between monomer units necessitating amore » gentle ion source. By coupling the SPIN source with high resolution mass spectrometry and using advanced data processing tools, we demonstrate much extended coverage of sialic acid polymer chains as compared to using the conventional ESI source. Additionally we show that SPIN-LC-MS is effective in elucidating polymer features with high efficiency and high sensitivity previously unattainable by the conventional ESI-LC-MS methods.« less

  11. Syntheses, crystal structures and properties of two novel imino- π-extended TTF derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yulan; Tian, Libin; Ma, Kuirong; Kan, Yuhe; Tang, Xueling; Hu, Huayou

    2010-03-01

    Two novel conjugated imino- π-extended tetrathiafulvalenes with p-iminobenzene, N,N'-bis(4,5-bis(methylthio)-1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)benzene-1,4-diamine ( 1) and N,N'-bis(4,5-bis(ethylenedithio)-1,3-dithiolo-2-ylidene)benzene-1,4-diamine ( 2), have been synthesized and characterized by NMR, IR, MS and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Both the two targets adopt chair-like conformation, and the central rings of p-iminobenzene moieties of the two molecules are severely twisted from the planarity of two dithiole rings, respectively. The UV-vis spectra of 1 and 2 show the lowest-energy absorption bands caused by the HOMO-LUMO one-electron promotion. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements show only one, two-electron irreversible oxidation picks. These experimentally estimated energy levels of the frontier orbital of 1 and 2 ( EHOMO1: = -5.45, 2: -5.47 eV) are in good agreement with those obtained from DFT calculations ( EHOMO1: = -5.5, 2: = -5.3 eV). The high HOMO-LUMO gaps of 1 (4.05 eV) and 2 (4.00 eV) indicate high kinetic stability of the title compounds.

  12. Pattern formation of second harmonic conical waves in a nonlinear medium with extended defect structure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y C; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2014-11-17

    We experimentally demonstrate the propagation of the conical second harmonic fields generated from a nonlinear crystal with extended defects to investigate their pattern formation. The generated second harmonic waves are found to be the interference of multiple Bessel-like beams that originate from distinct longitudinal layers inside the crystal. To reconstruct the experimental results, we model the individual Bessel-like beam to be the superposition of an ensemble of identical decentered Gaussian waves with random phases. We present that the randomness of the phases leads the Bessel-like beams to show wave profiles with different extent of localization. Moreover, we use the coherent superposition of the developed wave functions with a phase factor to manifest the interference of multiple Bessel-like beams. The relative phases among the Bessel-like beams are shown to be closely related to the near and far-field patterns. With the experimental observations and the theoretical model, the relative phases are decided to successfully reconstruct the propagation characteristics of the multiple Bessel-like beams.

  13. Learning Practice and Technology: Extending the Structurational Practice Lens to Educational Technology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Scholars in the field of educational technology have been calling for robust use of social theory within learning technology research. In view of that, interest has been noted in applying Giddens' structuration theory to the understanding of human interaction with technology in learning settings. However, only few such attempts have been published…

  14. Multilevel Modeling of Two Cyclical Processes: Extending Differential Structural Equation Modeling to Nonlinear Coupled Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butner, Jonathan; Amazeen, Polemnia G.; Mulvey, Genna M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors present a dynamical multilevel model that captures changes over time in the bidirectional, potentially asymmetric influence of 2 cyclical processes. S. M. Boker and J. Graham's (1998) differential structural equation modeling approach was expanded to the case of a nonlinear coupled oscillator that is common in bimanual coordination…

  15. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Hale, J. N.; Dumars, W. G.

    1987-01-01

    The evaluation of 3 experimental polymers from NASA-Langley and a commercially produced polymer from Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals as high temperature structural adhesives is presented. A polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ), polyimide (STPI/LaRC-2), and a polyarylene ether (PAE-SO2) were evaluated as metal-to-metal adhesives. Lap shear, crack extension, and climbing drum peel specimens were fabricated from all three polymers and tested after thermal, combined thermal/humidity, and stressed hydraulic fluid (Skydrol) exposure. The fourth polymer, LARC-TPI was evaluated as an adhesive for titanium honeycomb sandwich structure. All three experimental polymers performed well as metal-to-metal adhesives from 219 K (-65 F) to 505 K (450 F), including humidity exposure. Structural adhesive strength was also maintained at 505 K for a minimum of 3000 hours. LaRC-TPI was evaluated as a high temperature (505 K) adhesive for titanium honeycomb sandwich structure. The LaRC-TPI bonding process development concentrated on improving the honeycomb core-to-skin bond. The most promising approach of those evaluated combined a LaRC-TPI polymer solution with a semi-crystalline LaRC-TPI powder for adhesive film fabrication and fillet formation.

  16. Extending the Multiple-Goal Perspective to Tertiary Classroom Goal Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Vennessa H.; Yates, Shirley M.

    2007-01-01

    The multiple-goal perspective has recently been applied to teacher behaviours in primary school classrooms through experimental intervention (Linnenbrink, 2005) and objective observation (Sideridis, 2005). However, there is evidence suggesting that rather than centered only on teacher behaviour, classroom goal structures are a whole class feature…

  17. Structural Equation Modelling of Multiple Facet Data: Extending Models for Multitrait-Multimethod Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechger, Timo M.; Maris, Gunter

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about the structural equation modelling of quantitative measures that are obtained from a multiple facet design. A facet is simply a set consisting of a finite number of elements. It is assumed that measures are obtained by combining each element of each facet. Methods and traits are two such facets, and a multitrait-multimethod…

  18. Association Between the Probability of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Normative Sex-Related Phenotypic Diversity in Brain Structure.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Christine; Andrews, Derek S; Gudbrandsen, Christina M; Marquand, Andre F; Ginestet, Cedric E; Daly, Eileen M; Murphy, Clodagh M; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Lombardo, Michael V; Ruigrok, Amber N V; Bullmore, Edward T; Suckling, John; Williams, Steven C R; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Craig, Michael C; Murphy, Declan G M

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is 2 to 5 times more common in male individuals than in female individuals. While the male preponderant prevalence of ASD might partially be explained by sex differences in clinical symptoms, etiological models suggest that the biological male phenotype carries a higher intrinsic risk for ASD than the female phenotype. To our knowledge, this hypothesis has never been tested directly, and the neurobiological mechanisms that modulate ASD risk in male individuals and female individuals remain elusive. To examine the probability of ASD as a function of normative sex-related phenotypic diversity in brain structure and to identify the patterns of sex-related neuroanatomical variability associated with low or high probability of ASD. This study examined a cross-sectional sample of 98 right-handed, high-functioning adults with ASD and 98 matched neurotypical control individuals aged 18 to 42 years. A multivariate probabilistic classification approach was used to develop a predictive model of biological sex based on cortical thickness measures assessed via magnetic resonance imaging in neurotypical controls. This normative model was subsequently applied to individuals with ASD. The study dates were June 2005 to October 2009, and this analysis was conducted between June 2015 and July 2016. Sample and population ASD probability estimates as a function of normative sex-related diversity in brain structure, as well as neuroanatomical patterns associated with low or high ASD probability in male individuals and female individuals. Among the 98 individuals with ASD, 49 were male and 49 female, with a mean (SD) age of 26.88 (7.18) years. Among the 98 controls, 51 were male and 47 female, with a mean (SD) age of 27.39 (6.44) years. The sample probability of ASD increased significantly with predictive probabilities for the male neuroanatomical brain phenotype. For example, biological female individuals with a more male-typic pattern of brain anatomy

  19. Viroids: from genotype to phenotype just relying on RNA sequence and structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson-Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures - either global or local - determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs.

  20. Viroids: From Genotype to Phenotype Just Relying on RNA Sequence and Structural Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Ricardo; Serra, Pedro; Minoia, Sofía; Di Serio, Francesco; Navarro, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of two unique physical properties, small size and circularity, viroid RNAs do not code for proteins and thus depend on RNA sequence/structural motifs for interacting with host proteins that mediate their invasion, replication, spread, and circumvention of defensive barriers. Viroid genomes fold up on themselves adopting collapsed secondary structures wherein stretches of nucleotides stabilized by Watson–Crick pairs are flanked by apparently unstructured loops. However, compelling data show that they are instead stabilized by alternative non-canonical pairs and that specific loops in the rod-like secondary structure, characteristic of Potato spindle tuber viroid and most other members of the family Pospiviroidae, are critical for replication and systemic trafficking. In contrast, rather than folding into a rod-like secondary structure, most members of the family Avsunviroidae adopt multibranched conformations occasionally stabilized by kissing-loop interactions critical for viroid viability in vivo. Besides these most stable secondary structures, viroid RNAs alternatively adopt during replication transient metastable conformations containing elements of local higher-order structure, prominent among which are the hammerhead ribozymes catalyzing a key replicative step in the family Avsunviroidae, and certain conserved hairpins that also mediate replication steps in the family Pospiviroidae. Therefore, different RNA structures – either global or local – determine different functions, thus highlighting the need for in-depth structural studies on viroid RNAs. PMID:22719735

  1. Three-Dimensional Structure of Extended Chromatin Fibers as Revealed by Tapping-Mode Scanning Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuba, Sanford H.; Yang, Guoliang; Robert, Charles; Samori, Bruno; van Holde, Kensal; Zlatanova, Joordanka; Bustamante, Carlos

    1994-11-01

    Unfixed chicken erythrocyte chromatin fibers in very low salt have been imaged with a scanning force microscope operating in the tapping mode in air at ambient humidity. These images reveal a three-dimensional organization of the fibers. The planar "zig-zag" conformation is rare, and extended "beads-on-a-string" fibers are seen only in chromatin depleted of histones H1 and H5. Glutaraldehyde fixation reveals very similar structures. Fibers fixed in 10 mM salt appear somewhat more compacted. These results, when compared with modeling studies, suggest that chromatin fibers may exist as irregular three-dimensional arrays of nucleosomes even at low ionic strength.

  2. Extended Functional Groups (EFG): An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Elena S; Haider, Norbert; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-12-23

    The article describes a classification system termed "extended functional groups" (EFG), which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts) of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM) environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models.

  3. European Phaseolus coccineus L. landraces: Population Structure and Adaptation, as Revealed by cpSSRs and Phenotypic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Angioi, Simonetta A.; Bellucci, Elisa; Bitocchi, Elena; Nanni, Laura; Knüpffer, Helmut; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Relatively few studies have extensively analysed the genetic diversity of the runner bean through molecular markers. Here, we used six chloroplast microsatellites (cpSSRs) to investigate the cytoplasmic diversity of 331 European domesticated accessions of the scarlet runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus L.), including the botanical varieties albiflorus, bicolor and coccineus, and a sample of 49 domesticated and wild accessions from Mesoamerica. We further explored the pattern of diversity of the European landraces using 12 phenotypic traits on 262 individuals. For 158 European accessions, we studied the relationships between cpSSR polymorphisms and phenotypic traits. Additionally, to gain insights into the role of gene flow and migration, for a subset of 115 accessions, we compared and contrasted the results obtained by cpSSRs and phenotypic traits with those obtained in a previous study with 12 nuclear microsatellites (nuSSRs). Our results suggest that both demographic and selective factors have roles in the shaping of the population genetic structure of the European runner bean. In particular, we infer the existence of a moderate-to-strong cytoplasmic bottleneck that followed the expansion of the crop into Europe, and we deduce multiple domestication events for this species. We also observe an adaptive population differentiation in the phenology across a latitudinal gradient, which suggests that selection led to the diversification of the runner bean in Europe. The botanical varieties albiflorus, bicolor and coccineus, which are based solely on flower colour, cannot be distinguished based on these cpSSRs and nuSSRs, nor according to the 12 quantitative traits. PMID:23451209

  4. A Joint Inversion for Velocity and Anisotropy Structure Beneath a Highly Extended Continental Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Z.; Abers, G. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.

    2014-12-01

    We jointly invert body wave travel times for anisotropy and velocity variations within the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea, one of the youngest (≤6Ma) and most highly-extended (≤190km) continental rifts known. We use data from the CDPapua passive seismic array deployed around the D'Entrecasteaux Islands; these islands lie within the maximally-thinned continental crust at the centre of the rift and host the world's youngest (5 - 7 Ma) UHP rocks. We have previously used SK(K)S splitting to identify strong anisotropy within this rift, with fast axis orientated parallel to extension, roughly N-S. Consistency of splitting direction across station, back azimuth and method of analysis indicates a simple anisotropic fabric beneath much of this region. Consequently, we simplify the anisotropic inversion by solving for perturbations to N-S and E-W shear velocities at each node. This work builds on our previous isotropic tomographic study by resolving tradeoffs between anisotropy and velocity heterogeneities. We cross-correlate shear wave arrivals separately on N-S and E-W components, using the Christoffel equations to show that the travel times of these orthogonal quasi-shear pulses distinctly record the fast and slow velocities within our model. We invert these data for velocities on an irregular mesh, using a finite frequency approach with a first fresnel zone approximation. Preliminary results identify the locus of the rift beneath the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, and demonstrate that substantial anisotropy is present beneath the region of major extension. This anisotropy is co-located with low seismic velocities that indicate almost total removal of lithosphere, consistent with gravity fitting. Therefore, we ascribe the anisotropy within the rift to LPO of highly sheared asthenospheric mantle as a result of the large magnitude of extension.

  5. Extended Multilocus Sequence Analysis to Describe the Global Population Structure of the Genus Brucella: Phylogeography and Relationship to Biovars

    PubMed Central

    Whatmore, Adrian M.; Koylass, Mark S.; Muchowski, Jakub; Edwards-Smallbone, James; Gopaul, Krishna K.; Perrett, Lorraine L.

    2016-01-01

    An extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme applicable to the Brucella, an expanding genus that includes zoonotic pathogens that severely impact animal and human health across large parts of the globe, was developed. The scheme, which extends a previously described nine locus scheme by examining sequences at 21 independent genetic loci in order to increase discriminatory power, was applied to a globally and temporally diverse collection of over 500 isolates representing all 12 known Brucella species providing an expanded and detailed understanding of the population genetic structure of the group. Over 100 sequence types (STs) were identified and analysis of data provided insights into both the global evolutionary history of the genus, suggesting that early emerging Brucella abortus lineages might be confined to Africa while some later lineages have spread worldwide, and further evidence of the existence of lineages with restricted host or geographical ranges. The relationship between biovar, long used as a crude epidemiological marker, and genotype was also examined and showed decreasing congruence in the order Brucella suis > B. abortus > Brucella melitensis. Both the previously described nine locus scheme and the extended 21 locus scheme have been made available at http://pubmlst.org/brucella/ to allow the community to interrogate existing data and compare with newly generated data. PMID:28066370

  6. Extended Multilocus Sequence Analysis to Describe the Global Population Structure of the Genus Brucella: Phylogeography and Relationship to Biovars.

    PubMed

    Whatmore, Adrian M; Koylass, Mark S; Muchowski, Jakub; Edwards-Smallbone, James; Gopaul, Krishna K; Perrett, Lorraine L

    2016-01-01

    An extended multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme applicable to the Brucella, an expanding genus that includes zoonotic pathogens that severely impact animal and human health across large parts of the globe, was developed. The scheme, which extends a previously described nine locus scheme by examining sequences at 21 independent genetic loci in order to increase discriminatory power, was applied to a globally and temporally diverse collection of over 500 isolates representing all 12 known Brucella species providing an expanded and detailed understanding of the population genetic structure of the group. Over 100 sequence types (STs) were identified and analysis of data provided insights into both the global evolutionary history of the genus, suggesting that early emerging Brucella abortus lineages might be confined to Africa while some later lineages have spread worldwide, and further evidence of the existence of lineages with restricted host or geographical ranges. The relationship between biovar, long used as a crude epidemiological marker, and genotype was also examined and showed decreasing congruence in the order Brucella suis > B. abortus > Brucella melitensis. Both the previously described nine locus scheme and the extended 21 locus scheme have been made available at http://pubmlst.org/brucella/ to allow the community to interrogate existing data and compare with newly generated data.

  7. Detection of a Diffuse Extended Halo-like Structure around 47 Tuc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, Andrés E.

    2017-09-01

    We constructed for the first time a stellar density profile of 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc) out of ∼5.5 times its tidal radius (r t ) using high-quality deep BV photometry. After carefully considering the influence of photometric errors, and Milky Way and Small Magellanic Cloud composite stellar population contamination, we found that the cluster stellar density profile reaches a nearly constant value from ∼1.7r t outward, which does not depend on the direction from the cluster’s center considered. These results visibly contrast with recent distinct theoretical predictions on the existence of tidal tails or on a density profile that falls as {r}-4 at large distances, and with observational outcomes of a clumpy structure as well. Our results suggest that the envelope of 47 Tuc is a halo-like, nearly constant low-density structure.

  8. Exact algorithms for computing pairwise alignments and 3-medians from structure-annotated sequences (extended abstract).

    PubMed

    Evans, P A; Wareham, H T

    2001-01-01

    Given the problem of mutation saturation in ancient molecular sequences, there is great interest in inferring phylogenies from higher-order types of molecular data that change more slowly, such as genomic organization and the secondary and tertiary structures of ribosomal RNA and proteins. In this paper, we define edit distances based on two representations of RNA secondary structure, arc annotation and hierarchical string annotation, and give algorithms for computing these distances on pairs of annotated sequences, aligning pairs of annotated sequences, and computing 3-median annotated sequences from triples of annotated sequences. The 3-median algorithms can be used as part of a well-known iterative heuristic for inferring phylogenies. All given algorithms are adapted from algorithms for computing longest common annotated subsequences of pairs of annotated sequences.

  9. Corrugated structure insertion for extending the SASE bandwidth up to 3% at the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorodnov, I.; Feng, G.; Limberg, T.

    2016-11-01

    The usage of x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) in femtosecond nanocrystallography involves sequential illumination of many small crystals of arbitrary orientation. Hence a wide radiation bandwidth will be useful in order to obtain and to index a larger number of Bragg peaks used for determination of the crystal orientation. Considering the baseline configuration of the European XFEL in Hamburg, and based on beam dynamics simulations, we demonstrate here that the usage of corrugated structures allows for a considerable increase in radiation bandwidth. Data collection with a 3% bandwidth, a few microjoule radiation pulse energy, a few femtosecond pulse duration, and a photon energy of 5.4 keV is possible. For this study we have developed an analytical modal representation of the short-range wake function of the flat corrugated structures for arbitrary offsets of the source and the witness particles.

  10. Effects of task autonomy on performance: an extended model considering motivational, informational, and structural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Langfred, Claus W; Moye, Neta A

    2004-12-01

    A model explaining the relationship between task autonomy and performance is proposed that incorporates 3 different causal mechanisms. The performance benefits of task autonomy may be realized by increased motivation (motivational mechanisms), by capitalization of information asymmetries (informational mechanisms), or by better alignment with task and organizational structures (structural mechanisms). Further, it is proposed that these performance benefits are moderated by a variety of variables ranging from individual traits to organizational design. This model may provide a means for accounting for the sometimes inconsistent findings in the empirical literature exploring the relationship between autonomy and performance. The model also offers guidance in the search for additional boundary conditions as well as prescriptive guidelines for the allocation of autonomy in practice.

  11. A Gene for an Extended Phenotype

    Treesearch

    K. Hoover; M. Grove; M. Gardner; D. P. Hughes; J. McNeil; J. Slavicek

    2011-01-01

    Manipulation of host behavior by parasites and pathogens has been widely observed, but the basis for these behaviors has remained elusive. Gypsy moths infected by a baculovirus climb to the top of trees to die, liquefy, and "rain" virus on the foliage below to infect new hosts. The viral gene that manipulates climbing behavior of the host was identified,...

  12. Surface structure of an invariant manifold of a Halo Orbit (extended abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirani, Anil N.; Lo, Martin W.

    2005-01-01

    We extract the surface structure of the unstable invariant manifold tube projected into position space, of a halo orbit near L2. We do this by using transversal planes to intersect trajectories that approximate the tube. From these intersection points we construct spline-interpolated cross section curves which give a good idea of the structure of the tube. For example, we show that, for the value of (mu) we use, the tube pinches, develops a self-intersection, develops loop-inside-tube structure, pinches some more, and so on. We also construct surfaces made of quadrilaterals and triangles from these cross-sections. The transversal planes are obtained by taking planes orthogonal to a curve that follows the general shape of the tube. One such curve we use, is the unstable invariant manifold of the equilibrium point L2 itself. In another example, we take a circle that follows the tube, as the curve for finding planes transversal to the tube. Our method is complementary to the method of taking cross-sections of constant time (the isochronous method), as used by some other researchers. The isochronous method is good at revealing the temporal structure of trajectories on a tube. However, due to the unequal speeds of different trajectories, it is harder to use for long length surface extraction. In contrast, using our method, we show cross-sections of the tube through an angular extent of nearly (pi) during which the tube becomes extremely convoluted. We also show that tubes of different energies, that start out in certain ordering, do not obey the ordering after a while. Our work is motivated by applications to space mission design.

  13. Surface structure of an invariant manifold of a Halo Orbit (extended abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirani, Anil N.; Lo, Martin W.

    2005-01-01

    We extract the surface structure of the unstable invariant manifold tube projected into position space, of a halo orbit near L2. We do this by using transversal planes to intersect trajectories that approximate the tube. From these intersection points we construct spline-interpolated cross section curves which give a good idea of the structure of the tube. For example, we show that, for the value of (mu) we use, the tube pinches, develops a self-intersection, develops loop-inside-tube structure, pinches some more, and so on. We also construct surfaces made of quadrilaterals and triangles from these cross-sections. The transversal planes are obtained by taking planes orthogonal to a curve that follows the general shape of the tube. One such curve we use, is the unstable invariant manifold of the equilibrium point L2 itself. In another example, we take a circle that follows the tube, as the curve for finding planes transversal to the tube. Our method is complementary to the method of taking cross-sections of constant time (the isochronous method), as used by some other researchers. The isochronous method is good at revealing the temporal structure of trajectories on a tube. However, due to the unequal speeds of different trajectories, it is harder to use for long length surface extraction. In contrast, using our method, we show cross-sections of the tube through an angular extent of nearly (pi) during which the tube becomes extremely convoluted. We also show that tubes of different energies, that start out in certain ordering, do not obey the ordering after a while. Our work is motivated by applications to space mission design.

  14. Core Mediator structure at 3.4 Å extends model of transcription initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Kayo; Schneider, Thomas R; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-05-11

    Mediator is a multiprotein co-activator that binds the transcription pre-initiation complex (PIC) and regulates RNA polymerase (Pol) II. The Mediator head and middle modules form the essential core Mediator (cMed), whereas the tail and kinase modules play regulatory roles. The architecture of Mediator and its position on the PIC are known, but atomic details are limited to Mediator subcomplexes. Here we report the crystal structure of the 15-subunit cMed from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 3.4 Å resolution. The structure shows an unaltered head module, and reveals the intricate middle module, which we show is globally required for transcription. Sites of known Mediator mutations cluster at the interface between the head and middle modules, and in terminal regions of the head subunits Med6 (ref. 16) and Med17 (ref. 17) that tether the middle module. The structure led to a model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cMed that could be combined with the 3.6 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the core PIC (cPIC). The resulting atomic model of the cPIC-cMed complex informs on interactions of the submodules forming the middle module, called beam, knob, plank, connector, and hook. The hook is flexibly linked to Mediator by a conserved hinge and contacts the transcription initiation factor IIH (TFIIH) kinase that phosphorylates the carboxy (C)-terminal domain (CTD) of Pol II and was recently positioned on the PIC. The hook also contains residues that crosslink to the CTD and reside in a previously described cradle. These results provide a framework for understanding Mediator function, including its role in stimulating CTD phosphorylation by TFIIH.

  15. The Matchmaker Exchange API: automating patient matching through the exchange of structured phenotypic and genotypic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Buske, Orion J.; Schiettecatte, François; Hutton, Benjamin; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Misyura, Andriy; Huang, Lijia; Hartley, Taila; Girdea, Marta; Sobreira, Nara; Mungall, Chris; Brudno, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of clinical sequencing, the difficulty of identifying additional affected families is a key obstacle to solving many rare diseases. There may only be a handful of similar patients worldwide, and their data may be stored in diverse clinical and research databases. Computational methods are necessary to enable finding similar patients across the growing number of patient repositories and registries. We present the Matchmaker Exchange Application Programming Interface (MME API), a protocol and data format for exchanging phenotype and genotype profiles to enable matchmaking among patient databases, facilitate the identification of additional cohorts, and increase the rate with which rare diseases can be researched and diagnosed. We designed the API to be straightforward and flexible in order to simplify its adoption on a large number of data types and workflows. We also provide a public test data set, curated from the literature, to facilitate implementation of the API and development of new matching algorithms. The initial version of the API has been successfully implemented by three members of the Matchmaker Exchange and was immediately able to reproduce previously-identified matches and generate several new leads currently being validated. The API is available at https://github.com/ga4gh/mme-apis. PMID:26255989

  16. Phenotypic flexibility in digestive system structure and function in migratory birds and its ecological significance.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, S R; Karasov, W H

    2001-03-01

    Birds during migration must satisfy the high energy and nutrient demands associated with repeated, intensive flight while often experiencing unpredictable variation in food supply and food quality. Solutions to such different challenges may often be physiologically incompatible. For example, increased food intake and gut size are primarily responsible for satisfying the high energy and nutrient demands associated with migration in birds. However, short-term fasting or food restriction during flight may cause partial atrophy of the gut that may limit utilization of ingested food energy and nutrients. We review the evidence available on the effects of long- and short-term changes in food quality and quantity on digestive performance in migratory birds, and the importance of digestive constraints in limiting the tempo of migration in birds. Another important physiological consequence of feeding in birds is the effect of diet on body composition dynamics during migration. Recent evidence suggests that birds utilize and replenish both protein and fat reserves during migration, and diet quality influences the rate of replenishment of both these reserves. We conclude that diet and phenotypic flexibility in both body composition and the digestive system of migratory birds are important in allowing birds to successfully overcome the often-conflicting physiological challenges of migration.

  17. Phenotypic flexibility of structure and function of the digestive system of Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Starck, J Matthias; Rahmaan, Gamal Hasan Abdel

    2003-06-01

    Organisms adjust their phenotype to fluctuating conditions of the environment and to changing internal demands. We report flexible responses of the gizzard and the small intestine of Japanese quail to a high-fibre diet. Switching from a standard diet to a high-fibre diet results in a highly significant increase in gizzard size, intestine length, mucosal surface, thickness of the intestinal muscular layer and vascularization of the mucosa. After diet switching, increased or decreased gizzard size results from changes in cell size, i.e. smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hypotrophy, respectively. Increased cell proliferation is not the cause of increase in gizzard size. In the small intestine, however, we found elevated levels of cell proliferation after diet switching and conclude that increased capacity (upregulation) of the small intestine is based on increased rates of mitosis in the intestinal crypts. It is highly probable that elevated levels of cell proliferation in the crypts are balanced by elevated levels of cell extrusion at the tip of intestinal villi. The lipid contents of the liver were reduced, indicating that lipid stores in the liver were mobilized to fuel the flexible response of the gastrointestinal tract. During changes of organ size in response to changes in food composition, resting metabolic rate was not altered.

  18. Joint degradation assessment in an extended structure using chaotic attractor property analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, M. D.; Wait, J. R.; Nichols, J. M.; Trickey, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a new approach in vibration-based structural health monitoring has been developed utilizing features extracted from concepts in nonlinear dynamics systems theory . The structure is excited with a low-dimensional chaotic input, and the steady-state structural response attractor is reconstructed using a false nearest neighbors algorithm . Certain features have been computed from the attractor such as average local 'neighborhood' variance, and these features have been shown in previous works to exceed the damage resolving capability of traditional modal-based features in several computational and experimental studies. In this work, we adopt a similar attractor approach, but we present a feature based on nonlinear predictive models of evolving attractor geometry. This feature has an advantage, over previous attractor-based features in that the input excitation need not be monitored. We apply this overall approach to a steel frame model of a multi-story building, where damage is incurred by the loosening of bolted connections between model members .

  19. Analysis and design for inelastic structural response of extended pile shaft foundations in laterally spreading ground during earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravifar, Arash

    Experiences from past earthquakes have shown that lateral spreading associated with liquefaction of cohesionless soils can be a cause of severe damage to bridge foundations. Large diameter extended pile shafts can be an effective bridge foundation choice for areas subjected to lateral spreading because they offer greater stiffness and strength relative to the magnitude of lateral spreading loads that can develop against them. A limited degree of plastic hinging below the ground surface may be allowable in design of extended pile shafts. Issues for design for extended pile shafts include: (a) how to estimate the demands due to superstructure inertia and lateral spreading in liquefied soils, and (b) how to combine these two loads in estimating the local and global inelastic demands on the structure. Studies of the response of pile foundations and pile-supported structures in liquefiable soils using physical models, numerical models, and case studies have provided the basis for a number of design recommendations. The guidance is, however, quite varied regarding how lateral spreading and superstructure inertial loads should be combined in design. To answer the above questions a series of Nonlinear Dynamic Finite Element Analyses (NDA) have been performed to investigate inelastic response of extended pile shafts subjected to liquefaction-induced lateral spreading, covering a range of soil, pile, and ground motion conditions. The results of NDA were first used to show that combined effects of lateral spreading and superstructure inertia produce larger demands than are produced by either loading case alone, such that the combined demand cannot be enveloped by analyzing the two load cases separately. The results were then used to evaluate current equivalent static analysis (ESA) method (Caltrans, 2008), with the relatively poor agreement illustrating the limitations of methods that do not combine the two loads. The results of NDA parametric study were then used to develop

  20. Pre-adsorbed type-I collagen structure-dependent changes in osteoblastic phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Hanagata, Nobutaka . E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.jp; Takemura, Taro; Monkawa, Akira; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2006-06-16

    Type-I collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix in bones and modulates various functions of osteoblasts. We prepared two different structures of type-I collagen on tissue culture grade polystylene (TCPS) surfaces, one is feltwork structure of filamentous molecules from acid solutions (ACs) and the other is network structure of fibrils from neutral solutions (NCs), to examine effects of the structures on the maturation process of osteoblast-like cells. No significant differences of cell proliferation were observed between TCPS and ACs, but NCs delayed the proliferation. In initial cell attachment, the cells on ACs had tense lamellipodia with sharp tips, while those on NCs had loose lamellipodia. No detectable differences in levels of expressed integrin {alpha}{sub 2}- and {alpha}{sub 5}-subunits were observed between the structures. Although the matrix mineralization in NCs was also delayed in comparison with TCPS and ACs, fully mineralized levels in NCs were the same as those of TCPS and ACs. In addition, although we examined the effects of densities of pre-adsorbed collagen molecules on osteoblast maturation, the effects were less serious than those of the structures. This study suggests that the structures of collagen affect proliferation and mineralization of osteoblast-like cells.

  1. Quantifying seascape structure: Extending terrestrial spatial pattern metrics to the marine realm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedding, L.M.; Christopher, L.A.; Pittman, S.J.; Friedlander, A.M.; Jorgensen, S.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial pattern metrics have routinely been applied to characterize and quantify structural features of terrestrial landscapes and have demonstrated great utility in landscape ecology and conservation planning. The important role of spatial structure in ecology and management is now commonly recognized, and recent advances in marine remote sensing technology have facilitated the application of spatial pattern metrics to the marine environment. However, it is not yet clear whether concepts, metrics, and statistical techniques developed for terrestrial ecosystems are relevant for marine species and seascapes. To address this gap in our knowledge, we reviewed, synthesized, and evaluated the utility and application of spatial pattern metrics in the marine science literature over the past 30 yr (1980 to 2010). In total, 23 studies characterized seascape structure, of which 17 quantified spatial patterns using a 2-dimensional patch-mosaic model and 5 used a continuously varying 3-dimensional surface model. Most seascape studies followed terrestrial-based studies in their search for ecological patterns and applied or modified existing metrics. Only 1 truly unique metric was found (hydrodynamic aperture applied to Pacific atolls). While there are still relatively few studies using spatial pattern metrics in the marine environment, they have suffered from similar misuse as reported for terrestrial studies, such as the lack of a priori considerations or the problem of collinearity between metrics. Spatial pattern metrics offer great potential for ecological research and environmental management in marine systems, and future studies should focus on (1) the dynamic boundary between the land and sea; (2) quantifying 3-dimensional spatial patterns; and (3) assessing and monitoring seascape change. ?? Inter-Research 2011.

  2. Admixture in Latin America: Geographic Structure, Phenotypic Diversity and Self-Perception of Ancestry Based on 7,342 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; León-Mimila, Paola; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Burley, Mari-Wyn; Konca, Esra; de Oliveira, Marcelo Zagonel; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Gibbon, Sahra; Ray, Nicolas; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Balding, David; Gonzalez-José, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry. PMID:25254375

  3. SOS1 mutations in Noonan syndrome: molecular spectrum, structural insights on pathogenic effects, and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Stella, Lorenzo; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Cordeddu, Viviana; Williams, Bradley J; Dentici, Maria L; Caputo, Viviana; Venanzi, Serenella; Bonaguro, Michela; Kavamura, Ines; Faienza, Maria F; Pilotta, Alba; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gabrielli, Orazio; Marino, Bruno; Neri, Giovanni; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Torrrente, Isabella; Selicorni, Angelo; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco

    2011-07-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common nonchromosomal disorders affecting development and growth. NS is caused by aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling and is genetically heterogeneous, which explains, in part, the marked clinical variability documented for this Mendelian trait. Recently, we and others identified SOS1 as a major gene underlying NS. Here, we explored further the spectrum of SOS1 mutations and their associated phenotypic features. Mutation scanning of the entire SOS1 coding sequence allowed the identification of 33 different variants deemed to be of pathological significance, including 16 novel missense changes and in-frame indels. Various mutation clusters destabilizing or altering orientation of regions of the protein predicted to contribute structurally to the maintenance of autoinhibition were identified. Two previously unappreciated clusters predicted to enhance SOS1's recruitment to the plasma membrane, thus promoting a spatial reorientation of domains contributing to inhibition, were also recognized. Genotype-phenotype analysis confirmed our previous observations, establishing a high frequency of ectodermal anomalies and a low prevalence of cognitive impairment and reduced growth. Finally, mutation analysis performed on cohorts of individuals with nonsyndromic pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects excluded a major contribution of germline SOS1 lesions to the isolated occurrence of these cardiac anomalies. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. SOS1 Mutations in Noonan Syndrome: Molecular Spectrum, Structural Insights on Pathogenic Effects, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Stella, Lorenzo; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Cordeddu, Viviana; Williams, Bradley J; Dentici, Maria L; Caputo, Viviana; Venanzi, Serenella; Bonaguro, Michela; Kavamura, Ines; Faienza, Maria F; Pilotta, Alba; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gabrielli, Orazio; Marino, Bruno; Neri, Giovanni; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Torrrente, Isabella; Selicorni, Angelo; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common nonchromosomal disorders affecting development and growth. NS is caused by aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling and is genetically heterogeneous, which explains, in part, the marked clinical variability documented for this Mendelian trait. Recently, we and others identified SOS1 as a major gene underlying NS. Here, we explored further the spectrum of SOS1 mutations and their associated phenotypic features. Mutation scanning of the entire SOS1 coding sequence allowed the identification of 33 different variants deemed to be of pathological significance, including 16 novel missense changes and in-frame indels. Various mutation clusters destabilizing or altering orientation of regions of the protein predicted to contribute structurally to the maintenance of autoinhibition were identified. Two previously unappreciated clusters predicted to enhance SOS1's recruitment to the plasma membrane, thus promoting a spatial reorientation of domains contributing to inhibition, were also recognized. Genotype–phenotype analysis confirmed our previous observations, establishing a high frequency of ectodermal anomalies and a low prevalence of cognitive impairment and reduced growth. Finally, mutation analysis performed on cohorts of individuals with nonsyndromic pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects excluded a major contribution of germline SOS1 lesions to the isolated occurrence of these cardiac anomalies. Hum Mutat 32:760–772, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21387466

  5. Tissue phenotype depends on reciprocal interactions between the extracellular matrix and the structural organization of the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Lelie'vre, S.A.; Weaver, V.M.; Nickerson, J.A.; Larabell, C.A.; Bhaumik, A.; Petersen, O.W.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-08-14

    What determines the nuclear organization within a cell and whether this organization itself can impose cellular function within a tissue remains unknown. To explore the relationship between nuclear organization and tissue architecture and function, we used a model of human mammary epithelial cell acinar morphogenesis. When cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane (rBM), HMT-3522 cells form polarized and growth-arrested tissue-like acini with a central lumen and deposit an endogenous BM. We show that rBM-induced morphogenesis is accompanied by relocalization of the nuclear matrix proteins NuMA, splicing factor SRm160, and cell cycle regulator Rb. These proteins had distinct distribution patterns specific for proliferation, growth arrest, and acini formation, whereas the distribution of the nuclear lamina protein, lamin B, remained unchanged. NuMA relocalized to foci, which coalesced into larger assemblies as morphogenesis progressed. Perturbation of histone acetylation in the acini by trichostatin A treatment altered chromatin structure, disrupted NuMA foci, and induced cell proliferation. Moreover, treatment of transiently permeabilized acini with a NuMA antibody led to the disruption of NuMA foci, alteration of histone acetylation, activation of metalloproteases, and breakdown of the endogenous BM. These results experimentally demonstrate a dynamic interaction between the extracellular matrix, nuclear organization, and tissue phenotype. They further show that rather than passively ref lecting changes in gene expression, nuclear organization itself can modulate the cellular and tissue phenotype.

  6. Annual research review: phenotypic and causal structure of conduct disorder in the broader context of prevalent forms of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Benjamin B; Waldman, Irwin D

    2012-05-01

    A better understanding of the nature and etiology of conduct disorder (CD) can inform nosology and vice versa. We posit that any prevalent form of psychopathology, including CD, can be best understood if it is studied in the context of other correlated forms of child and adolescent psychopathology using formal models to guide inquiry. Review of both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of the place of CD in the phenotypic and causal structure of prevalent psychopathology, with an emphasis on similarities and differences between CD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Papers were located using Web of Science by topic searches with no restriction on year of publication. Although some important nosologic questions remain unanswered, the dimensional phenotype of CD is well defined. CD differs from other disorders in its correlates, associated impairment, and course. Nonetheless, it is robustly correlated with many other prevalent dimensions of psychopathology both concurrently and predictively, including both other 'externalizing' disorders and some 'internalizing' disorders. Based on emerging evidence, we hypothesize that these concurrent and predictive correlations result primarily from widespread genetic pleiotropy, with some genetic factors nonspecifically influencing risk for multiple correlated dimensions of psychopathology. In contrast, environmental influences mostly act to differentiate dimensions of psychopathology from one another both concurrently and over time. CD and ODD share half of their genetic influences, but their genetic etiologies are distinct in other ways. Unlike most other dimensions of psychopathology, half of the genetic influences on CD appear to be unique to CD. In contrast, ODD broadly shares nearly all of its genetic influences with other disorders and has little unique genetic variance. Conduct disorder is a relatively distinct syndrome at both phenotypic and etiologic levels, but much is revealed by studying CD in the context of

  7. An extended diffraction tomography method for quantifying structural damage using numerical Green's functions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eugene; Rose, L R Francis; Wang, Chun H

    2015-05-01

    Existing damage imaging algorithms for detecting and quantifying structural defects, particularly those based on diffraction tomography, assume far-field conditions for the scattered field data. This paper presents a major extension of diffraction tomography that can overcome this limitation and utilises a near-field multi-static data matrix as the input data. This new algorithm, which employs numerical solutions of the dynamic Green's functions, makes it possible to quantitatively image laminar damage even in complex structures for which the dynamic Green's functions are not available analytically. To validate this new method, the numerical Green's functions and the multi-static data matrix for laminar damage in flat and stiffened isotropic plates are first determined using finite element models. Next, these results are time-gated to remove boundary reflections, followed by discrete Fourier transform to obtain the amplitude and phase information for both the baseline (damage-free) and the scattered wave fields. Using these computationally generated results and experimental verification, it is shown that the new imaging algorithm is capable of accurately determining the damage geometry, size and severity for a variety of damage sizes and shapes, including multi-site damage. Some aspects of minimal sensors requirement pertinent to image quality and practical implementation are also briefly discussed.

  8. Molecular structural formulas as one-electron density and hamiltonian operators: the VIF method extended.

    PubMed

    Alia, Joseph D

    2007-03-29

    The valency interaction formula (VIF) method is given a broader and more general interpretation in which these simple molecular structural formulas implicitly include all overlaps between valence atomic orbitals even for interactions not drawn in the VIF picture. This applies for VIF pictures as one-electron Hamiltonian operators as well as VIF pictures as one-electron density operators that constitute a new implementation of the VIF method simpler in its application and more accurate in its results than previous approaches. A procedure for estimating elements of the effective charge density-bond order matrix, Pmunu, from electron configurations in atoms is presented, and it is shown how these lead to loop and line constants in the VIF picture. From these structural formulas, one finds the number of singly, doubly, and unoccupied molecular orbitals, as well as the number of molecular orbitals with energy lower, equal, and higher than -1/2Eh, the negative of the hydrogen atom's ionization energy. The VIF results for water are in qualitative agreement with MP2/6311++G3df3pd, MO energy levels where the simple VIF for water presented in the earlier literature does not agree with computed energy levels. The method presented here gives the simplest accurate VIF pictures for hydrocarbons. It is shown how VIF can be used to predict thermal barriers to chemical reactions. Insertion of singlet carbene into H2 is given as an example. VIF pictures as one-electron density operators describe the ground-state multiplicities of B2, N2, and O2 molecules and as one-electron Hamiltonian operators give the correct electronegativity trend across period two. Previous implementations of VIF do not indicate singly occupied molecular orbitals directly from the pictorial VIF rules for these examples. The direct comparison between structural formulas that represent electron density and those that represent energy is supported by comparison of a simple electronegativity scale, chiD=N/n2, with

  9. Ferritin Structure from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Comparative Study with Homologues Identifies Extended C-Terminus Involved in Ferroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Garima; Gupta, Vibha; Nangpal, Prachi; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Tyagi, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Ferritins are recognized as key players in the iron storage and detoxification processes. Iron acquisition in the case of pathogenic bacteria has long been established as an important virulence mechanism. Here, we report a 3.0 Å crystal structure of a ferritin, annotated as Bacterioferritin B (BfrB), from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis that continues to be one of the world's deadliest diseases. Similar to the other members of ferritin family, the Mtb BfrB subunit exhibits the characteristic fold of a four-helical bundle that possesses the ferroxidase catalytic centre. We compare the structure of Mtb BfrB with representatives of the ferritin family belonging to the archaea, eubacteria and eukarya. Unlike most other ferritins, Mtb BfrB has an extended C-terminus. To dissect the role of this extended C-terminus, truncated Mtb BfrB was purified and biochemical studies implicate this region in ferroxidase activity and iron release in addition to providing stability to the protein. Functionally important regions in a protein of known 3D-structure can be determined by estimating the degree of conservation of the amino-acid sites with its close homologues. Based on the comparative studies, we identify the slowly evolving conserved sites as well as the rapidly evolving variable sites and analyze their role in relation to structure and function of Mtb BfrB. Further, electrostatic computations demonstrate that although the electrostatic environment of catalytic residues is preserved within the family, extensive variability is exhibited by residues defining the channels and pores, in all likelihood keeping up with the diverse functions executed by these ferritins in varied environments. PMID:21494619

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structural studies of copper and nickel ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malviya, P. K.; Sharma, P.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Bhalse, D.

    2014-09-01

    The Cu-Ni ferrites with general formula Cu1-xNix Fe2O4 (where x=0.0, 0.05, 0.10, 0. 15, 0.20) were prepared by solid state root method. X-ray, K- absorption fine structural measurements were carried out. EXAFS spectra have been recorded at the K-edge of Fe using the dispersive EXAFS (DEXAFS) beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source RRCAT, Indore, India. The EXAFS data have been analysed using the computer software Athena. These have been used to determine the bond lengths in these ferrites with the help of four different methods, namely, Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods.

  11. Four reversible and reconfigurable structures for three-phase emulsions: extended morphologies and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xue-hui; Geng, Yu-hao; Zhang, Qiao-chu; Shao, Meng; Chen, Jian; Luo, Guang-sheng; Xu, Jian-hong

    2017-01-01

    Here in this article, we classify and conclude the four morphologies of three-phase emulsions. Remarkably, we achieve the reversible transformations between every shape. Through theoretical analysis, we choose four liquid systems to form these four morphologies. Then monodispersed droplets with these four morphologies are formed through a microfluidic device and captured in a petri-dish. By replacing their ambient solution of the captured emulsions, in-situ morphology transformations between each shape are achieved. The process is well recorded through photographs and videos and they are systematical and reversible. Finally, we use the droplets structure to form an on-off switch to start and shut off the evaporation of one volatile phase to achieve the process monitoring. This could be used to initiate and quench a reaction, which offers a novel idea to achieve the switchable and reversible reaction control in multiple-phase reactions. PMID:28198444

  12. OpenMx 2.0: Extended Structural Equation and Statistical Modeling.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C; Hunter, Michael D; Pritikin, Joshua N; Zahery, Mahsa; Brick, Timothy R; Kirkpatrick, Robert M; Estabrook, Ryne; Bates, Timothy C; Maes, Hermine H; Boker, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    The new software package OpenMx 2.0 for structural equation and other statistical modeling is introduced and its features are described. OpenMx is evolving in a modular direction and now allows a mix-and-match computational approach that separates model expectations from fit functions and optimizers. Major backend architectural improvements include a move to swappable open-source optimizers such as the newly written CSOLNP. Entire new methodologies such as item factor analysis and state space modeling have been implemented. New model expectation functions including support for the expression of models in LISREL syntax and a simplified multigroup expectation function are available. Ease-of-use improvements include helper functions to standardize model parameters and compute their Jacobian-based standard errors, access to model components through standard R $ mechanisms, and improved tab completion from within the R Graphical User Interface.

  13. Four reversible and reconfigurable structures for three-phase emulsions: extended morphologies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xue-Hui; Geng, Yu-Hao; Zhang, Qiao-Chu; Shao, Meng; Chen, Jian; Luo, Guang-Sheng; Xu, Jian-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Here in this article, we classify and conclude the four morphologies of three-phase emulsions. Remarkably, we achieve the reversible transformations between every shape. Through theoretical analysis, we choose four liquid systems to form these four morphologies. Then monodispersed droplets with these four morphologies are formed through a microfluidic device and captured in a petri-dish. By replacing their ambient solution of the captured emulsions, in-situ morphology transformations between each shape are achieved. The process is well recorded through photographs and videos and they are systematical and reversible. Finally, we use the droplets structure to form an on-off switch to start and shut off the evaporation of one volatile phase to achieve the process monitoring. This could be used to initiate and quench a reaction, which offers a novel idea to achieve the switchable and reversible reaction control in multiple-phase reactions.

  14. A framework for performance measurement in university using extended network data envelopment analysis (DEA) structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashim, Rosmaini; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Rahman, Rosshairy Abd

    2015-12-01

    Measuring university performance is essential for efficient allocation and utilization of educational resources. In most of the previous studies, performance measurement in universities emphasized the operational efficiency and resource utilization without investigating the university's ability to fulfill the needs of its stakeholders and society. Therefore, assessment of the performance of university should be separated into two stages namely efficiency and effectiveness. In conventional DEA analysis, a decision making unit (DMU) or in this context, a university is generally treated as a black-box which ignores the operation and interdependence of the internal processes. When this happens, the results obtained would be misleading. Thus, this paper suggest an alternative framework for measuring the overall performance of a university by incorporating both efficiency and effectiveness and applies network DEA model. The network DEA models are recommended because this approach takes into account the interrelationship between the processes of efficiency and effectiveness in the system. This framework also focuses on the university structure which is expanded from the hierarchical to form a series of horizontal relationship between subordinate units by assuming both intermediate unit and its subordinate units can generate output(s). Three conceptual models are proposed to evaluate the performance of a university. An efficiency model is developed at the first stage by using hierarchical network model. It is followed by an effectiveness model which take output(s) from the hierarchical structure at the first stage as a input(s) at the second stage. As a result, a new overall performance model is proposed by combining both efficiency and effectiveness models. Thus, once this overall model is realized and utilized, the university's top management can determine the overall performance of each unit more accurately and systematically. Besides that, the result from the network

  15. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND EXTENDED STRUCTURE OF THE HERCULES MILKY WAY SATELLITE

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, David J.; Seth, Anil; Olszewski, Edward W.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Willman, Beth; Harris, Jason; Saha, Abi; Piatek, Slawomir

    2009-10-20

    We present imaging of the recently discovered Hercules Milky Way satellite and its surrounding regions to study its structure, star formation history and to thoroughly search for signs of disruption. We robustly determine the distance, luminosity, size, and morphology of Hercules utilizing a bootstrap approach to characterize our uncertainties. We derive a distance to Hercules via a comparison to empirical and theoretical isochrones, finding a best match with the isochrone of M92, which yields a distance of 133 +- 6 kpc. As previous studies have found, Hercules is very elongated, with epsilon = 0.67 +- 0.03 and a half-light radius of r{sub h} approx = 230 pc. Using the color-magnitude-fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Hercules is old (>12 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] approx -2.0), with a spread in metallicity, in agreement with previous spectroscopic work. This result is robust with respect to slight variations in the distance to Hercules and mismatches between the observed Hercules color-magnitude diagram and theoretical isochrones. We infer a total absolute magnitude of M{sub V} = -6.2 +- 0.4. Our innovative search for external Hercules structure both in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight yields some evidence that Hercules is embedded in a larger stream of stars. A clear stellar extension is seen to the northwest with several additional candidate stellar overdensities along the position angle of Hercules out to approx35' (approx1.3 kpc). While the association of any of the individual stellar overdensities with Hercules is difficult to determine, we do show that the summed color-magnitude diagram of all three is consistent with Hercules' stellar population. Finally, we estimate that any change in the distance to Hercules across its face is at most approx6 kpc, and the data are consistent with Hercules being at the same distance throughout.

  16. Shark IgNAR antibody mimotopes target a murine immunoglobulin through extended CDR3 loop structures.

    PubMed

    Simmons, David P; Streltsov, Victor A; Dolezal, Olan; Hudson, Peter J; Coley, Andrew M; Foley, Michael; Proll, David F; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2008-04-01

    Mimotopes mimic the three-dimensional topology of an antigen epitope, and are frequently recognized by antibodies with affinities comparable to those obtained for the original antibody-antigen interaction. Peptides and anti-idiotypic antibodies are two classes of protein mimotopes that mimic the topology (but not necessarily the sequence) of the parental antigen. In this study, we combine these two classes by selecting mimotopes based on single domain IgNAR antibodies, which display exceptionally long CDR3 loop regions (analogous to a constrained peptide library) presented in the context of an immunoglobulin framework with adjacent and supporting CDR1 loops. By screening an in vitro phage-display library of IgNAR variable domains (V(NAR)s) against the target antigen monoclonal antibody MAb5G8, we obtained four potential mimotopes. MAb5G8 targets a linear tripeptide epitope (AYP) in the flexible signal sequence of the Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1), and this or similar motifs were detected in the CDR loops of all four V(NAR)s. The V(NAR)s, 1-A-2, -7, -11, and -14, were demonstrated to bind specifically to this paratope by competition studies with an artificial peptide and all showed enhanced affinities (3-46 nM) compared to the parental antigen (175 nM). Crystallographic studies of recombinant proteins 1-A-7 and 1-A-11 showed that the SYP motifs on these V(NAR)s presented at the tip of the exposed CDR3 loops, ideally positioned within bulge-like structures to make contact with the MAb5G8 antibody. These loops, in particular in 1-A-11, were further stabilized by inter- and intra- loop disulphide bridges, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions, and aromatic residue packing. We rationalize the higher affinity of the V(NAR)s compared to the parental antigen by suggesting that adjacent CDR1 and framework residues contribute to binding affinity, through interactions with other CDR regions on the antibody, though of course definitive support of

  17. The Star Formation History and Extended Structure of the Hercules Milky Way Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, David J.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Willman, Beth; Zaritsky, Dennis; Seth, Anil; Harris, Jason; Piatek, Slawomir; Saha, Abi

    2009-10-01

    We present imaging of the recently discovered Hercules Milky Way satellite and its surrounding regions to study its structure, star formation history and to thoroughly search for signs of disruption. We robustly determine the distance, luminosity, size, and morphology of Hercules utilizing a bootstrap approach to characterize our uncertainties. We derive a distance to Hercules via a comparison to empirical and theoretical isochrones, finding a best match with the isochrone of M92, which yields a distance of 133 ± 6 kpc. As previous studies have found, Hercules is very elongated, with epsilon = 0.67 ± 0.03 and a half-light radius of rh sime 230 pc. Using the color-magnitude-fitting package StarFISH, we determine that Hercules is old (>12 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -2.0), with a spread in metallicity, in agreement with previous spectroscopic work. This result is robust with respect to slight variations in the distance to Hercules and mismatches between the observed Hercules color-magnitude diagram and theoretical isochrones. We infer a total absolute magnitude of MV = -6.2 ± 0.4. Our innovative search for external Hercules structure both in the plane of the sky and along the line of sight yields some evidence that Hercules is embedded in a larger stream of stars. A clear stellar extension is seen to the northwest with several additional candidate stellar overdensities along the position angle of Hercules out to ~35' (~1.3 kpc). While the association of any of the individual stellar overdensities with Hercules is difficult to determine, we do show that the summed color-magnitude diagram of all three is consistent with Hercules' stellar population. Finally, we estimate that any change in the distance to Hercules across its face is at most ~6 kpc, and the data are consistent with Hercules being at the same distance throughout. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the US

  18. Associative Account of Self-Cognition: Extended Forward Model and Multi-Layer Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    2013-01-01

    The neural correlates of “self” identified by neuroimaging studies differ depending on which aspects of self are addressed. Here, three categories of self are proposed based on neuroimaging findings and an evaluation of the likely underlying cognitive processes. The physical self, representing self-agency of action, body-ownership, and bodily self-recognition, is supported by the sensory and motor association cortices located primarily in the right hemisphere. The interpersonal self, representing the attention or intentions of others directed at the self, is supported by several amodal association cortices in the dorsomedial frontal and lateral posterior cortices. The social self, representing the self as a collection of context-dependent social-values, is supported by the ventral aspect of the medial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex. Despite differences in the underlying cognitive processes and neural substrates, all three categories of self are likely to share the computational characteristics of the forward model, which is underpinned by internal schema or learned associations between one’s behavioral output and the consequential input. Additionally, these three categories exist within a hierarchical layer structure based on developmental processes that updates the schema through the attribution of prediction error. In this account, most of the association cortices critically contribute to some aspect of the self through associative learning while the primary regions involved shift from the lateral to the medial cortices in a sequence from the physical to the interpersonal to the social self. PMID:24009578

  19. High Structural Resolution Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Reveals an Extended Robo1-Heparin Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  20. High structural resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting reveals an extended Robo1-heparin binding interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-04-24

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes.

  1. Extended Structure and Fate of the Nucleus in Henize 2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dieu D.; Seth, Anil C.; Reines, Amy E.; den Brok, Mark; Sand, David; McLeod, Brian

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the structure and nuclear region of the black hole (BH) hosting galaxy Henize 2-10. Surface brightness profiles are analyzed using Magellan/Megacam g- and r-band images. Excluding the central starburst, we find a best-fit two-component Sérsic profile with n in ~ 0.6, r eff, in ~ 260 pc and n out ~ 1.8, r ~ 1 kpc. Integrating out to our outermost data point (100'' ~ 4.3 kpc), we calculate Mg = -19.2 and Mr = -19.8. The corresponding enclosed stellar mass is M sstarf ~ (10 ± 3) × 109 M ⊙, ~3 × larger than previous estimates. Apart from the central lsim500 pc, with blue colors and an irregular morphology, the galaxy appears to be an early-type system. The outer color is quite red, (g - r)0 = 0.75, suggesting a dominant old population. We study the nuclear region of the galaxy using archival Gemini/NIFS K-band adaptive optics spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We place an upper limit on the BH mass of ~107 M ⊙ from the NIFS data, consistent with that from the M BH-radio-X-ray fundamental plane. No coronal lines are seen, but a Brγ source is located at the position of the BH with a luminosity consistent with the X-ray emission. The starburst at the center of Henize 2-10 has led to the formation of several super star clusters, which are within ~100 pc of the BH. We examine the fate of the nucleus by estimating the dynamical masses and dynamical friction timescales of the clusters. The most massive clusters (~106 M ⊙) have τdyn <~ 200 Myr, and thus Henize 2-10 may represent a rare snapshot of nuclear star cluster formation around a preexisting massive BH.

  2. Extending modal testing technology for model validation of engineering structures with sparse nonlinearities: A first case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    delli Carri, Arnaldo; Weekes, B.; Di Maio, Dario; Ewins, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    Modal testing is widely used today as a means of validating theoretical (Finite Element) models for the dynamic analysis of engineering structures, prior to these models being used for optimisation of product design. Current model validation methodology is confined to linear models and is primarily concerned with (i) correcting inaccurate model parameters and (ii) ensuring that sufficient elements are included for these cases, using measured data. Basic experience is that this works quite well, largely because the weaknesses in the models are relatively sparse and, as a result, are usually identifiable and correctable. The current state-of-the-art in linear model validation has contributed to an awareness that residual errors in FE models are increasingly the consequence of some unrepresented nonlinearity in the structure. In these cases, additional, higher order parameters are required to improve the model so that it can represent the nonlinear behaviour. This is opposed to the current practice of simply refining the mesh. Again, these nonlinear features are generally localised, and are often associated with joints. We seek to provide a procedure for extending existing modal testing to enable these nonlinear elements to be addressed using current nonlinear identification methods directed at detection, characterisation, location and then quantification - in order to enhance the elements in an FE model as necessary to describe nonlinear dynamic behaviour. Emphasis is placed on the outcome of these extended methods to relate specifically to the physical behaviour of the relevant components of the structure, rather than to the nonlinear response characteristics that are the result of their presence.

  3. Stereomicroscopic 3D-pattern profiling of murine and human intestinal inflammation reveals unique structural phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Kodani, Tomohiro; Kaydo, Lindsey; Pietropaoli, Davide; Corridoni, Daniele; Howell, Scott; Katz, Jeffry; Xin, Wei; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Histology is fundamental to assess two-dimensional intestinal inflammation; however, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are often indistinguishable microscopically on the basis of mucosal biopsies. Here, we use stereomicroscopy (SM) to rapidly profile the entire intestinal topography and assess inflammation. We examine the mucosal surface of >700 mice (encompassing >16 strains and various IBD-models), create a profiling catalogue of 3D-stereomicroscopic abnormalities and demonstrate that mice with comparable histological scores display unique sub-clusters of 3D-structure-patterns of IBD pathology, which we call 3D-stereoenterotypes, and which are otherwise indiscernible histologically. We show that two ileal IBD-stereoenterotypes (‘cobblestones' versus ‘villous mini-aggregation') cluster separately within two distinct mouse lines of spontaneous ileitis, suggesting that host genetics drive unique and divergent inflammatory 3D-structural patterns in the gut. In humans, stereomicroscopy reveals ‘liquefaction' lesions and hierarchical fistulous complexes, enriched with clostridia/segmented filamentous bacteria, running under healthy mucosa in Crohn's disease. We suggest that stereomicroscopic (3D-SMAPgut) profiling can be easily implemented and enable the comprehensive study of inflammatory 3D structures, genetics and flora in IBD. PMID:26154811

  4. Extended structure and fate of the nucleus in Henize 2-10

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dieu D.; Seth, Anil C.; Den Brok, Mark; Reines, Amy E.; Sand, David; McLeod, Brian E-mail: aseth@astro.utah.edu E-mail: areines@nrao.edu E-mail: bmcleod@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-10-10

    We investigate the structure and nuclear region of the black hole (BH) hosting galaxy Henize 2-10. Surface brightness profiles are analyzed using Magellan/Megacam g- and r-band images. Excluding the central starburst, we find a best-fit two-component Sérsic profile with n {sub in} ∼ 0.6, r {sub eff,} {sub in} ∼ 260 pc and n {sub out} ∼ 1.8, r ∼ 1 kpc. Integrating out to our outermost data point (100'' ∼ 4.3 kpc), we calculate M{sub g} = –19.2 and M{sub r} = –19.8. The corresponding enclosed stellar mass is M {sub *} ∼ (10 ± 3) × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, ∼3 × larger than previous estimates. Apart from the central ≲500 pc, with blue colors and an irregular morphology, the galaxy appears to be an early-type system. The outer color is quite red, (g – r){sub 0} = 0.75, suggesting a dominant old population. We study the nuclear region of the galaxy using archival Gemini/NIFS K-band adaptive optics spectroscopy and Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We place an upper limit on the BH mass of ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} from the NIFS data, consistent with that from the M {sub BH}-radio-X-ray fundamental plane. No coronal lines are seen, but a Brγ source is located at the position of the BH with a luminosity consistent with the X-ray emission. The starburst at the center of Henize 2-10 has led to the formation of several super star clusters, which are within ∼100 pc of the BH. We examine the fate of the nucleus by estimating the dynamical masses and dynamical friction timescales of the clusters. The most massive clusters (∼10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) have τ{sub dyn} ≲ 200 Myr, and thus Henize 2-10 may represent a rare snapshot of nuclear star cluster formation around a preexisting massive BH.

  5. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SHAOWEI; SUN, YEXIAO; GENG, ZHIJUN; MA, KUI; SUN, XIAOYAN; FU, XIAOBING

    2016-01-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26986690

  6. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: Generalizations using an extended Lagrangian treatment of diabatic states coupled through multireference electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohu; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2010-11-01

    We present a generalization to our previously developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics (QWAIMD) method by using multiple diabatic electronic reduced single particle density matrices, propagated within an extended Lagrangian paradigm. The Slater determinantal wavefunctions associated with the density matrices utilized may be orthogonal or nonorthogonal with respect to each other. This generalization directly results from an analysis of the variance in electronic structure with quantum nuclear degrees of freedom. The diabatic electronic states are treated here as classical parametric variables and propagated simultaneously along with the quantum wavepacket and classical nuclei. Each electronic density matrix is constrained to be N-representable. Consequently two sets of new methods are derived: extended Lagrangian-QWAIMD (xLag-QWAIMD) and diabatic extended Lagrangian-QWAIMD (DxLag-QWAIMD). In both cases, the instantaneous potential energy surface for the quantum nuclear degrees of freedom is constructed from the diabatic states using an on-the-fly nonorthogonal multireference formalism. By introducing generalized grid-based electronic basis functions, we eliminate the basis set dependence on the quantum nucleus. Subsequent reuse of the two-electron integrals during the on-the-fly potential energy surface computation stage yields a substantial reduction in computational costs. Specifically, both xLag-QWAIMD and DxLag-QWAIMD turn out to be about two orders of magnitude faster than our previously developed time-dependent deterministic sampling implementation of QWAIMD. Energy conservation properties, accuracy of the associated potential surfaces, and vibrational properties are analyzed for a family of hydrogen bonded systems.

  7. Structural study on Ni nanowires in an anodic alumina membrane by using in situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quan; Zhang, Junxi; Chen, Xing; Chen, Zhongjun; Wang, Wei; Mo, Guang; Wu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lide; Pan, Wei

    2008-03-19

    Polycrystalline Ni nanowires have been prepared by electrochemical deposition in an anodic alumina membrane template with a nanopore size of about 60 nm. In situ heating extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction techniques are used to probe the atomic structures. The nanowires are identified as being mixtures of nanocrystallites and amorphous phase. The nanocrystallites have the same thermal expansion coefficient, of 1.7 × 10(-5) K(-1), as Ni bulk; however, the amorphous phase has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient of 3.5 × 10(-5) K(-1). Details of the Ni nanowire structures are discussed in this paper.

  8. Applications of extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy to studies of bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Anatoly I

    2012-12-21

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been used to study short range order in heterometallic alloys for almost four decades. In this critical review, experimental, theoretical and data analytical approaches are revisited to examine their power, and limitations, in studies of bimetallic nanocatalysts. This article covers the basics of EXAFS experiments, data analysis, and modelling of nanoscale clusters. It demonstrates that, in the best case scenario, quantitative information about the nanocatalyst's size, shape, details of core-shell architecture, as well as static and dynamic disorder in metal-metal bond lengths can be obtained. The article also emphasizes the main challenge accompanying such insights: the need to account for the statistical nature of the EXAFS technique, and discusses corrective strategies.

  9. A Search for Structure in PAH Emission in Extended Sources at 3.3 and 3.4 Microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Temi, P.; Rank, D. M.; Sloan, G. C.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have observed three extended sources of the infrared emission features associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), using a 128x128 InSb array mounted on the 1.5 m NASA/Steward telescope on Mt. Lemmon. We used a CVF (1.5% bandpass) to isolate the emission from the 3.29 and 3.40 microns PAH features in NGC 1333 #3, Sharpless 106, and the Orion Bar. In all three sources, the 3.29 and 3.40 microns emission features arise from the same regions, but show decidedly different structure. We are analyzing the images to determine the relationship of the 3.40 microns feature to the main feature at 3.29 microns. The 3.40 microns feature may be a vibrational overtone of the 3.29 microns feature, or it may arise from attached molecular sidegroups.

  10. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  11. Refactoring Problem of Acyclic Extended Free-Choice Workflow Nets to Acyclic Well-Structured Workflow Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Shingo

    A workflow net (WF-net for short) is a Petri net which represents a workflow. There are two important subclasses of WF-nets: extended free-choice (EFC for short) and well-structured (WS for short). It is known that most actual workflows can be modeled as EFC WF-nets; Acyclic WS is a subclass of acyclic EFC but has more analysis methods. An acyclic EFC WF-net may be transformed to an acyclic WS WF-net without changing the external behavior of the net. We name such a transformation Acyclic EFC WF-net refactoring. We give a formal definition of acyclic EFC WF-net refactoring problem. We also give a necessary condition and a sufficient condition for solving the problem. Those conditions can be checked in polynomial time. These result in the enhancement of the analysis power of acyclic EFC WF-nets.

  12. Topolology-symmetry law of structure of natural titanosilicate micas and related heterophyllosilicates based on the extended OD theory: Structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokoneva, E. L.; Topnikova, A. P.; Aksenov, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    A topology-symmetry analysis of the structures in the family of titanosilicate micas and related heterophyllosilicates based on the extended OD theory reveals their kinship with the family of rhodezite, delhayelite, and other minerals that had been analyzed earlier by distinguishing sheets common for all the structures. Like in the family studied earlier, the structural variety of a more complex titanosilicate family is determined by different local symmetries of sheets. Sheets consist of central O layers of edge-sharing octahedra and H layers formed by tetrahedra connected into diortho groups and Ti(Nb,Fe) semioctahedra (octahedra). Three patterns of connection of O and H layers correspond to sheet symmetry P2/ m, P21/ m, and . Various symmetry modes of sheet connection in the structures are analyzed. Hypothetical structures, including structures with a higher degree of disorder, which can be found in nature or obtained by crystal synthesis, are deduced. Factors responsible for structural variety, including the existence of two main sheet varieties (with P2/ m and P21/ m symmetry) are considered a consequence of the difference in the chemism of the mineral formation medium.

  13. Expanding the SHOC2 Mutation Associated Phenotype of Noonan Syndrome with Loose Anagen Hair: Structural Brain Anomalies and Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gripp, Karen W.; Zand, Dina J.; Demmer, Laurie; Anderson, Carol E.; Dobyns, William B.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Denenberg, Elizabeth; Jenny, Kim; Stabley, Deborah L.; Sol-Church, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a heterogenous rasopathy typically presenting with short stature, characteristic facial features, cardiac abnormalities including pulmonic valve stenosis, ASD and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cryptorchidism, ectodermal abnormalities and learning differences. The phenotype is variable, and limited genotype phenotype correlation exists with SOS1 mutations often associated with normal cognition and stature, RAF1 mutations entailing a high HCM risk, and certain PTPN11 mutations predisposing to juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The recently identified SHOC2 mutation (p.Ser2Gly) causes Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair. We report five patients with this mutation. All had skin hyperpigmentation, sparse light colored hair, increased fine wrinkles, ligamentous laxity, developmental delay and 4/4 had a structural cardiac anomaly. Hypotonia and macrocephaly occurred in 4/5 (80%); 3/5 (60%) had polyhydramnios, increased birth weight or required use of a feeding tube. Distinctive brain abnormalities included relative megalencephaly and enlarged subarachnoid spaces suggestive of benign external hydrocephalus, and a relatively small posterior fossa as indicated by a vertical tentorium. The combination of a large brain with a small posterior fossa likely resulted in the high rate of cerebellar tonsillar ectopia (3/4) (75%). Periventricular nodular heterotopia was seen in one patient with a thick and dysplastic corpus callosum. We report on the first hematologic neoplasm, myelofibrosis, in a 2-year-old patient with SHOC2 mutation. Myelofibrosis is exceedingly rare in children and young adults. The absence of a somatic JAK2 mutation, seen in the majority of patients with myelofibrosis, is noteworthy as it suggests that germline or somatic SHOC2 mutations are causally involved in myelofibrosis. PMID:23918763

  14. Expanding the SHOC2 mutation associated phenotype of Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair: structural brain anomalies and myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gripp, Karen W; Zand, Dina J; Demmer, Laurie; Anderson, Carol E; Dobyns, William B; Zackai, Elaine H; Denenberg, Elizabeth; Jenny, Kim; Stabley, Deborah L; Sol-Church, Katia

    2013-10-01

    Noonan syndrome is a heterogenous rasopathy typically presenting with short stature, characteristic facial features, cardiac abnormalities including pulmonic valve stenosis, ASD and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cryptorchidism, ectodermal abnormalities, and learning differences. The phenotype is variable, and limited genotype phenotype correlation exists with SOS1 mutations often associated with normal cognition and stature, RAF1 mutations entailing a high HCM risk, and certain PTPN11 mutations predisposing to juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The recently identified SHOC2 mutation (p.Ser2Gly) causes Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair. We report five patients with this mutation. All had skin hyperpigmentation, sparse light colored hair, increased fine wrinkles, ligamentous laxity, developmental delay, and 4/4 had a structural cardiac anomaly. Hypotonia and macrocephaly occurred in 4/5 (80%); 3/5 (60%) had polyhydramnios, increased birth weight or required use of a feeding tube. Distinctive brain abnormalities included relative megalencephaly and enlarged subarachnoid spaces suggestive of benign external hydrocephalus, and a relatively small posterior fossa as indicated by a vertical tentorium. The combination of a large brain with a small posterior fossa likely resulted in the high rate of cerebellar tonsillar ectopia (3/4; 75%). Periventricular nodular heterotopia was seen in one patient with a thick and dysplastic corpus callosum. We report on the first hematologic neoplasm, myelofibrosis, in a 2-year-old patient with SHOC2 mutation. Myelofibrosis is exceedingly rare in children and young adults. The absence of a somatic JAK2 mutation, seen in the majority of patients with myelofibrosis, is noteworthy as it suggests that germline or somatic SHOC2 mutations are causally involved in myelofibrosis.

  15. Molecular Structure of Three Mutations at the Maize sugary1 Locus and Their Allele-Specific Phenotypic Effects1

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Jason R.; Colleoni, Christophe; Myers, Alan M.; James, Martha G.

    2001-01-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required. PMID:11244120

  16. Molecular structure of three mutations at the maize sugary1 locus and their allele-specific phenotypic effects.

    PubMed

    Dinges, J R; Colleoni, C; Myers, A M; James, M G

    2001-03-01

    Starch production in all plants examined is altered by mutations of isoamylase-type starch-debranching enzymes (DBE), although how these proteins affect glucan polymer assembly is not understood. Various allelic mutations in the maize (Zea mays) gene sugary1 (su1), which codes for an isoamylase-type DBE, condition distinct kernel phenotypes. This study characterized the recessive mutations su1-Ref, su1-R4582::Mu1, and su1-st, regarding their molecular basis, chemical phenotypes, and effects on starch metabolizing enzymes. The su1-Ref allele results in two specific amino acid substitutions without affecting the Su1 mRNA level. The su1-R4582::Mu1 mutation is a null allele that abolishes transcript accumulation. The su1-st mutation results from insertion of a novel transposon-like sequence, designated Toad, which causes alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Three su1-st mutant transcripts are produced, one that is nonfunctional and two that code for modified SU1 polypeptides. The su1-st mutation is dominant to the null allele su1-R4582::Mu1, but recessive to su1-Ref, suggestive of complex effects involving quaternary structure of the SU1 enzyme. All three su1- alleles severely reduce or eliminate isoamylase-type DBE activity, although su1-st kernels accumulate less phytoglycogen and Suc than su1-Ref or su1-R4582::Mu1 mutants. The chain length distribution of residual amylopectin is significantly altered by su1-Ref and su1-R4582::Mu1, whereas su1-st has modest effects. These results, together with su1 allele-specific effects on other starch- metabolizing enzymes detected in zymograms, suggest that total DBE catalytic activity is the not the sole determinant of Su1 function and that specific interactions between SU1 and other components of the starch biosynthetic system are required.

  17. Contribution of structural brain phenotypes to the variance in resting energy expenditure in healthy Caucasian subjects.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Corinna; Hübers, Mark; Granert, Oliver; Muller, Manfred James

    2017-09-21

    Brain gray (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes are related to weight changes. The impact of structural variations in GM and WM on the variance in resting energy expenditure (REE) and the REE on fat free mass (FFM) association is unknown. The aim of this study was to address this in healthy Caucasian subjects. Cross-sectional data analysis of 493 healthy Caucasian subjects (age range 6 to 80 years; three age groups) with comprehensive information on FFM, organ and tissue masses and detailed brain composition as assessed by whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and REE (assessed by indirect calorimetry). REE was calculated (REEc) using organ and tissue masses times their specific metabolic rates. FFM was the major determinant of REE (70.6%), individual masses of liver, total brain and heart explained further 2.1% of the variance in REE. Replacing total brain by GM and WM did not change the total R². Nevertheless, GM added more to the variance in REE (5.6%) and corresponding residuals (12.5%) than total brain. Additionally, up to 12% were explained by age and sex (<2%). There was a systematic bias between REE and REEc with positive values in younger subjects but negative values in the older ones. This bias remained after substituting the specific metabolic rate of brain by the specific metabolic rates of GM and WM. In healthy Caucasian subjects, GM and WM contributed to the variance in REE. Detailed brain structures do not explain the bias between REE and REEc. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  18. Non-patchy strategy for inter-atomic distances from Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gu; Li, Guifang; LI, Xianya; Liang, Yi; Feng, Zhechuan

    2017-01-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) has been one of the few structural probes available for crystalline, non-crystalline and even highly disordered specimens. However, the data analysis involves a patchy and tinkering process, including back-and-forth fitting and filtering, leading to ambiguous answers sometimes. Here we try to resolve this long standing problem, to extract the inter-atomic distances from the experimental data by a single step minimization, in order to replace the tedious and tinkering process. The new strategy is built firmly by the mathematical logic, and made straightforward and undeniable. The finding demonstrates that it is possible to break off from the traditional patchy model fitting, and to remove the logical confusion of a priori prediction of the structure to be matched with experimental data, making it a much more powerful technique than the existing methods. The new method is expected to benefit EXAFS users covering all disciplines. Also, it is anticipated that the current work to be the motivation and inspiration to the further efforts. PMID:28181529

  19. Synthesis, Structure and Thermal Behavior of Oxalato-Bridged Rb+ and H3O+ Extended Frameworks with Different Dimensionalities

    PubMed Central

    Kherfi, Hamza; Hamadène, Malika; Guehria-Laïdoudi, Achoura; Dahaoui, Slimane; Lecomte, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Correlative studies of three oxalato-bridged polymers, obtained under hydrothermal conditions for the two isostructural compounds {Rb(HC2O4)(H2C2O4)(H2O)2}∞1, 1, {H3O(HC2O4)(H2C2O4).2H2O}∞1, 2, and by conventional synthetic method for {Rb(HC2O4)}∞3, 3, allowed the identification of H-bond patterns and structural dimensionality. Ferroïc domain structures are confirmed by electric measurements performed on 3. Although 2 resembles one oxalic acid sesquihydrate, its structure determination doesn’t display any kind of disorder and leads to recognition of a supramolecular network identical to hybrid s-block series, where moreover, unusual H3O+ and NH4+ similarity is brought out. Thermal behaviors show that 1D frameworks with extended H-bonds, whether with or without a metal center, have the same stability. Inversely, despite the dimensionalities, the same metallic intermediate and final compounds are obtained for the two Rb+ ferroïc materials.

  20. Non-patchy strategy for inter-atomic distances from Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu; Li, Guifang; Li, Xianya; Liang, Yi; Feng, Zhechuan

    2017-02-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) has been one of the few structural probes available for crystalline, non-crystalline and even highly disordered specimens. However, the data analysis involves a patchy and tinkering process, including back-and-forth fitting and filtering, leading to ambiguous answers sometimes. Here we try to resolve this long standing problem, to extract the inter-atomic distances from the experimental data by a single step minimization, in order to replace the tedious and tinkering process. The new strategy is built firmly by the mathematical logic, and made straightforward and undeniable. The finding demonstrates that it is possible to break off from the traditional patchy model fitting, and to remove the logical confusion of a priori prediction of the structure to be matched with experimental data, making it a much more powerful technique than the existing methods. The new method is expected to benefit EXAFS users covering all disciplines. Also, it is anticipated that the current work to be the motivation and inspiration to the further efforts.

  1. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, S.; Caliebe, W.; Siddons, P.; So, I.; Clay, b.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Frenkel, A.; Marinkovicl, N.; Hould, N.; ginder-Vogel, M.; Landrot, G.L.; Sparks, D.L.; Ganjoo, A.

    2010-01-19

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  2. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Khalid, S; Caliebe, W; Siddons, P; So, I; Clay, B; Lenhard, T; Hanson, J; Wang, Q; Frenkel, A I; Marinkovic, N; Hould, N; Ginder-Vogel, M; Landrot, G L; Sparks, D L; Ganjoo, A

    2010-01-01

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  3. Genetic, Structural, and Phenotypic Properties of MS2 Coliphage with Resistance to ClO2 Disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qingxia; Carratalà, Anna; Nazarov, Sergey; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo Cesar; Piccinini, Laura; Bachmann, Virginie; Leiman, Petr G; Kohn, Tamar

    2016-12-20

    Common water disinfectants like chlorine have been reported to select for resistant viruses, yet little attention has been devoted to characterizing disinfection resistance. Here, we investigated the resistance of MS2 coliphage to inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2). ClO2 inactivates MS2 by degrading its structural proteins, thereby disrupting the ability of MS2 to attach to and infect its host. ClO2-resistant virus populations emerged not only after repeated cycles of ClO2 disinfection followed by regrowth but also after dilution-regrowth cycles in the absence of ClO2. The resistant populations exhibited several fixed mutations which caused the substitution of ClO2-labile by ClO2-stable amino acids. On a phenotypic level, these mutations resulted in a more stable host binding during inactivation compared to the wild-type, thus resulting in a greater ability to maintain infectivity. This conclusion was supported by cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the virus particle, which demonstrated that most structural modification occurred in the putative A protein, an important binding factor. Resistance was specific to the inactivation mechanism of ClO2 and did not result in significant cross-resistance to genome-damaging disinfectants. Overall, our data indicate that resistant viruses may emerge even in the absence of ClO2 pressure but that they can be inactivated by other common disinfectants.

  4. Decomposing variation in population growth into contributions from environment and phenotypes in an age-structured population.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Fanie; Moyes, Kelly; Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Coulson, Tim

    2012-01-22

    Evaluating the relative importance of ecological drivers responsible for natural population fluctuations in size is challenging. Longitudinal studies where most individuals are monitored from birth to death and where environmental conditions are known provide a valuable resource to characterize complex ecological interactions. We used a recently developed approach to decompose the observed fluctuation in population growth of the red deer population on the Isle of Rum into contributions from climate, density and their interaction and to quantify their relative importance. We also quantified the contribution of individual covariates, including phenotypic and life-history traits, to population growth. Fluctuations in composition in age and sex classes ((st)age structure) of the population contributed substantially to the population dynamics. Density, climate, birth weight and reproductive status contributed less and approximately equally to the population growth. Our results support the contention that fluctuations in the population's (st)age structure have important consequences for population dynamics and underline the importance of including information on population composition to understand the effect of human-driven changes on population performance of long-lived species.

  5. ß-ureidopropionase deficiency: phenotype, genotype and protein structural consequences in 16 patients.

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, André B P; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Meijer, Judith; Krumpel, Michael; Selim, Laila A; Rashed, Mohamed S; Assmann, Birgit; Meinsma, Rutger; Lohkamp, Bernhard; Ito, Tetsuya; Abeling, Nico G G M; Saito, Kayoko; Eto, Kaoru; Smitka, Martin; Engvall, Martin; Zhang, Chunhua; Xu, Wang; Zoetekouw, Lida; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2012-07-01

    ß-ureidopropionase is the third enzyme of the pyrimidine degradation pathway and catalyzes the conversion of N-carbamyl-ß-alanine and N-carbamyl-ß-aminoisobutyric acid to ß-alanine and ß-aminoisobutyric acid, ammonia and CO(2). To date, only five genetically confirmed patients with a complete ß-ureidopropionase deficiency have been reported. Here, we report on the clinical, biochemical and molecular findings of 11 newly identified ß-ureidopropionase deficient patients as well as the analysis of the mutations in a three-dimensional framework. Patients presented mainly with neurological abnormalities (intellectual disabilities, seizures, abnormal tonus regulation, microcephaly, and malformations on neuro-imaging) and markedly elevated levels of N-carbamyl-ß-alanine and N-carbamyl-ß-aminoisobutyric acid in urine and plasma. Analysis of UPB1, encoding ß-ureidopropionase, showed 6 novel missense mutations and one novel splice-site mutation. Heterologous expression of the 6 mutant enzymes in Escherichia coli showed that all mutations yielded mutant ß-ureidopropionase proteins with significantly decreased activity. Analysis of a homology model of human ß-ureidopropionase generated using the crystal structure of the enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster indicated that the point mutations p.G235R, p.R236W and p.S264R lead to amino acid exchanges in the active site and therefore affect substrate binding and catalysis. The mutations L13S, R326Q and T359M resulted most likely in folding defects and oligomer assembly impairment. Two mutations were identified in several unrelated ß-ureidopropionase patients, indicating that ß-ureidopropionase deficiency may be more common than anticipated. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Phenotypes in phylogeography: Species’ traits, environmental variation, and vertebrate diversification

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Rayna C.; Mason, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost 30 y ago, the field of intraspecific phylogeography laid the foundation for spatially explicit and genealogically informed studies of population divergence. With new methods and markers, the focus in phylogeography shifted to previously unrecognized geographic genetic variation, thus reducing the attention paid to phenotypic variation in those same diverging lineages. Although phenotypic differences among lineages once provided the main data for studies of evolutionary change, the mechanisms shaping phenotypic differentiation and their integration with intraspecific genetic structure have been underexplored in phylogeographic studies. However, phenotypes are targets of selection and play important roles in species performance, recognition, and diversification. Here, we focus on three questions. First, how can phenotypes elucidate mechanisms underlying concordant or idiosyncratic responses of vertebrate species evolving in shared landscapes? Second, what mechanisms underlie the concordance or discordance of phenotypic and phylogeographic differentiation? Third, how can phylogeography contribute to our understanding of functional phenotypic evolution? We demonstrate that the integration of phenotypic data extends the reach of phylogeography to explain the origin and maintenance of biodiversity. Finally, we stress the importance of natural history collections as sources of high-quality phenotypic data that span temporal and spatial axes. PMID:27432983

  7. Assembling Porphyrins into Extended Network Structures by Employing Aromatic Dicarboxylates: Synthesis, Metal Exchange, and Heterogeneous Catalytic Studies.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Gargi; Jana, Ajay Kumar; Natarajan, Srinivasan

    2017-07-03

    Three new metal-organic porphyrinic framework compounds of zinc and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TPyP) have been synthesized under solvothermal conditions. The compounds [Zn5 (C40 H24 N8 )(C8 H4 O4 )2 (NO3 )6 (DMA)2 ] (DMA)3 (H2 O)8 (1; DMA=dimethylacetamide), [Zn3 (C40 H24 N8 )(C8 H4 O4 )2 (DMF)](DMF)5 (H2 O)12 (2), and [Zn3 (C40 H24 N8 )(C12 H6 O4 )2 (DMA)2 ](H2 O)7 (3) have two (1) and three dimensionally (2 and 3) extended structures. All the three structures contain porphyrinic units connected through the carboxylate linkers. The nitrates bind the metal centers and are not hydrogen bonded. The different binding modes of nitrate in the structure of 1 are observed for the first time in a porphyrin-based MOF. The openness of the structure allowed us to explore metal exchange through a room-temperature metathetic route. Compound 2 undergoes 100 % exchange with copper, whereas compound 3 exchanges 70 % with copper. The copper-exchanged compounds Cu∈2 and Cu∈3 were observed to be good heterogeneous catalysts for many important organic reactions. The chemo and regioselective enamination of β-ketoesters, preparation of propargylamine derivatives as well as regioselective cycloadditions of alkyne and azide (click reactions) have been carried out with good yields and selectivity. All the compounds have been characterized by PXRD, IR, UV/Vis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (for Cu exchange). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  9. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2008-04-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  10. Dosage effect of high-amylose modifier gene(s) on the starch structure of maize amylose-extender mutant.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongxin; Campbell, Mark; Wu, Yusheng; Du, Shuangkui; Srichuwong, Sathaporn; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to investigate how dosages of high-amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) affected the structure of maize amylose extender (ae) mutant starch. GEMS-0067 (G), a homozygous mutant of ae and the HAM gene(s), and H99ae (H), an ae single mutant, were self-pollinated or inter-crossed to produce maize endosperms of G/G, G/H, H/G, and H/H with 3, 2, 1, and 0 doses of HAM gene(s), respectively. Endosperm starch was fractionated into amylopectin, amylose, and intermediate component (IC) of large and small molecular weights using 1-butanol precipitation of amylose followed by gel-permeation chromatography. Increases in the dosage of HAM gene(s) from 0 to 3 decreased the amylopectin content. The HAM-gene dosage significantly changed the branch chain-length of small-molecular-weight IC, but had little effect on the branch chain-length distributions of amylopectin and large-molecular-weight IC and the molecular structure of amylose.

  11. Crystal chemistry and application development of uranyl extended structure and nanoscale materials and actinyl ion-substituted mineral phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Ernest M.

    The worldwide use of nuclear energy presents both significant advantages and challenges for society. Actinide research seeks to address these challenges and drive advancement in the fields of nuclear science and engineering. Here, key aspects of the fuel cycle are examined from both a fundamental and an applications-based perspective. Hydrothermal, ionothermal, room-temperature evaporation, and liquid diffusion synthesis techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction were used to study the structures of 18 uranyl compounds and six actinyl-doped mineral phases. These compounds represent a diverse group ranging from unique molecular clusters to novel and known extended structures isolated from aqueous and ionic liquid media. Ultrafiltration techniques were utilized to separate uranyl peroxide nanoclusters from complex aqueous solutions. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry were used to quantify elemental distributions in the feed and permeate solutions while Raman spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were used to define the characteristics of the cluster species across a range different solution conditions.

  12. Phenotype characterization of embryoid body structures generated by a crystal comet effect tail in an intercellular cancer collision scenario

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is, by definition, the uncontrolled growth of autonomous cells that eventually destroy adjacent tissues and generate architectural disorder. However, this concept cannot be totally true. In three well documented studies, we have demonstrated that cancer tissues produce order zones that evolve over time and generate embryoid body structures in a space-time interval. The authors decided to revise the macroscopic and microscopic material in well-developed malignant tumors in which embryoid bodies were identified to determine the phenotype characterization that serves as a guideline for easy recognition. The factors responsible for this morphogenesis are physical, bioelectric, and magnetic susceptibilities produced by crystals that act as molecular designers for the topographic gradients that guide the surrounding silhouette and establish tissue head-tail positional identities. The structures are located in amniotic-like cavities and show characteristic somite-like embryologic segmentation. Immunophenotypic study has demonstrated exclusion factor positional identity in relation to enolase-immunopositive expression of embryoid body and human chorionic gonadotropin immunopositivity exclusion factor expression in the surrounding tissues. The significance of these observations is that they can also be predicted by experimental image data collected by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in which two-beam subatomic collision particles in the resulting debris show hyperorder domains similar to those identified by us in intercellular cancer collisions. Our findings suggest that we are dealing with true reverse biologic system information in an activated collective cancer stem cell memory, in which physics participates in the elaboration of geometric complexes and chiral biomolecules that serve to build bodies with embryoid print as it develops during gestation. Reversal mechanisms in biology are intimately

  13. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of voltage-induced effects in the interfacial atomic structure of Fe/Pt/MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motohiro; Tsukahara, Takuya; Miyakaze, Risa; Furuta, Taishi; Shimose, Koki; Goto, Minori; Nozaki, Takayuki; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Miwa, Shinji

    2017-06-01

    The voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy of ferromagnetic metals may offer potential applications of nonvolatile memories with ultralow power consumption. For achieving ultrafast recording and long-time endurance, voltage-induced effects without undesirable lattice distortions should be ensured. In this study, in-situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of an Fe/Pt/MgO junction demonstrated the unaltered interfacial atomic structure, in which the radial distances between the Pt and the neighboring Fe, Pt, O, and Mg atoms changed by less than ±0.01 Å under electric fields of ±0.18 V/nm. Therefore, the anisotropy change is driven by a purely electronic mechanism without lattice deformation or atomic relaxation.

  14. Surface structure determination of Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellar, S. A.; Chen, Y.; Huff, W. R. A.; Moler, E. J.; Hussain, Z.; Shirley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    We have determined the atomic surface structure of a thin film of Fe (15 ML) grown on the Au(100) surface, Au(1 ML)/Fe(15 ML)/Au(100), with angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) using the Au 4f7/2 core level. We have confirmed that a bcc crystalline Fe film grows epitaxially on the Au(100) substrate with 1 ML of Au atoms remaining on the surface using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We analyzed the ARPEFS oscillations using an electron-scattering code based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism. Our analysis finds that the surface Au atoms are positioned in the fourfold hollow sites 1.67+/-0.02 Å above the Fe surface. We also find that the grown Fe layers are very like bulk bcc Fe, with an interlayer spacing of 1.43+/-0.03 Å.

  15. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of quasi-isentropically compressed vanadium targets on the OMEGA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Remington, B. A.; Allen, P. G.; Pollaine, S. M.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Lorenz, K. T.; Hawreliak, J. A.

    2008-06-15

    The use of in situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for characterizing nanosecond laser-shocked vanadium, titanium, and iron has recently been demonstrated. These measurements are extended to laser-driven, quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE). The radiation source (backlighter) for EXAFS in all of these experiments is obtained by imploding a spherical target on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)]. Isentropic compression (where the entropy is kept constant) enables to reach high compressions at relatively low temperatures. The absorption spectra are used to determine the temperature and compression in a vanadium sample quasi-isentropically compressed to pressures of up to {approx}0.75 Mbar. The ability to measure the temperature and compression directly is unique to EXAFS. The drive pressure is calibrated by substituting aluminum for the vanadium and interferometrically measuring the velocity of the back target surface by the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). The experimental results obtained by EXAFS and VISAR agree with each other and with the simulations of a hydrodynamic code. The role of a shield to protect the sample from impact heating is studied. It is shown that the shield produces an initial weak shock that is followed by a quasi-isentropic compression at a relatively low temperature. The role of radiation heating from the imploding target as well as from the laser-absorption region is studied. The results show that in laser-driven ICE, as compared with laser-driven shocks, comparable compressions can be achieved at lower temperatures. The EXAFS results show important details not seen in the VISAR results.

  16. Local structure and polarization resistance of Ce doped SrMnO{sub 3} using extended x-ray fine structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Jiseung; Lee, Heesoo

    2014-09-15

    Changes to the local structure of Sr and Mn atoms in Sr{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (SCM) according to increasing Ce content and the effect of the structural change on the polarization resistance of SCM were investigated. The reduction of manganese was confirmed by the absorption edge shift of the Mn K-edge toward lower energies. The noise of oscillation in extended X-ray absorption fine structure k{sup 3}χ data at Mn K-edge reveals the distortion of the local structure of Mn atoms, and the peak that indicates the bonding length of Mn-O, Sr/Ce, and -Mn decreased with the addition of Ce content in Fourier transformations of the Mn K-edge. The distortion of the local structure at Mn atoms was affected by the reduced manganese ions having larger ionic radii than Mn{sup 4+}. Meanwhile, few distortions of local atomic structures of Sr atoms occurred, and the average nearest neighboring distances of Sr-O and Sr-Mn are ∼2.13 Å and ∼2.95 Å, respectively. The average bonding lengths of the Ce-O and Ce-Mn increased because the ionic radius of substituted Ce ion with 12 coordination number is smaller than that of Sr ion, which leads the reduction of Mn ions and the distortion of local structure at the substituted A-site. Therefore, we reasoned that the distortion of the local atomic structure at Mn atoms in MnO{sub 6} and Ce atoms in A-site is one of the causes for interrupting oxygen ion transfers as a geometric factor, which results in an increase in the polarization resistance of SCM within the Ce composition range from 10 mol. % to 30 mol. %.

  17. Rethinking inheritance, yet again: inheritomes, contextomes and dynamic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, N G; Dey, Sutirth; Joshi, Amitabh; Vidya, T N C

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there have been many calls for an extended evolutionary synthesis, based in part upon growing evidence for nongenetic mechanisms of inheritance, i.e., similarities in phenotype between parents and offspring that are not due to shared genes. While there has been an impressive marshalling of evidence for diverse forms of nongenetic inheritance (epigenetic, ecological, behavioural and symbolic), there have been relatively few studies trying to integrate the different forms of inheritance into a common conceptual structure, a development that would be important to formalize elements of the extended evolutionary synthesis. Here, we propose a framework for an extended view of inheritance and introduce some conceptual distinctions that we believe, are important to this issue. In this framework, the phenotype is conceived of as a dynamic entity, its state, at any point in time resulting from intertwined effects of previous phenotypic state, and of hereditary materials (DNA and otherwise) and environment. We contrast our framework with the standard gene-based view of inheritance, and also discuss our framework in the specific context of recent attempts to accommodate nongenetic inheritance within the framework of classical quantitative genetics and the Price equation. In particular, we believe that the extended view of inheritance and effects on the phenotype developed here is particularly well-suited to individual-based simulation studies of evolutionary dynamics. The results of such simulations, in turn, could be useful for assessing, how well extended models based on quantitative genetics or the Price equation perform at capturing complex evolutionary dynamics.

  18. The solution structures of native and patient monomeric human IgA1 reveal asymmetric extended structures: implications for function and IgAN disease

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Gar Kay; Wright, David W.; Vennard, Owen L.; Rayner, Lucy E.; Pang, Melisa; Yeo, See Cheng; Gor, Jayesh; Molyneux, Karen; Barratt, Jonathan; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Native IgA1, for which no crystal structure is known, contains an O-galactosylated 23-residue hinge region that joins its Fab and Fc regions. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries. Because IgA1 in IgAN often has a poorly O-galactosylated hinge region, the solution structures of monomeric IgA1 from a healthy subject and three IgAN patients with four different O-galactosylation levels were studied. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that all four IgA1 samples were monomeric with similar sedimentation coefficients, s020,w. X-ray scattering showed that the radius of gyration (Rg) slightly increased with IgA1 concentration, indicating self-association, although their distance distribution curves, P(r), were unchanged with concentration. Neutron scattering indicated similar Rg values and P(r) curves, although IgA1 showed a propensity to aggregate in heavy water buffer. A new atomistic modelling procedure based on comparisons with 177000 conformationally-randomized IgA1 structures with the individual experimental scattering curves revealed similar extended Y-shaped solution structures for all four differentially-glycosylated IgA1 molecules. The final models indicated that the N-glycans at Asn263 were folded back against the Fc surface, the C-terminal tailpiece conformations were undefined and hinge O-galactosylation had little effect on the solution structure. The solution structures for full-length IgA1 showed extended hinges and the Fab and Fc regions were positioned asymmetrically to provide ample space for the functionally-important binding of two FcαR receptors to its Fc region. Whereas no link between O-galactosylation and the IgA1 solution structure was detected, an increase in IgA1 aggregation with reduced O-galactosylation may relate to IgAN. PMID:26268558

  19. Growth in Turface® clay permits root hair phenotyping along the entire crown root in cereal crops and demonstrates that root hair growth can extend well beyond the root hair zone.

    PubMed

    Goron, Travis L; Watts, Sophia; Shearer, Charles; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-04-12

    In cereal crops, root hairs are reported to function within the root hair zone to carry out important roles in nutrient and water absorption. Nevertheless, these single cells remain understudied due to the practical challenges of phenotyping these delicate structures in large cereal crops growing on soil or other growth systems. Here we present an alternative growth system for examining the root hairs of cereal crops: the use of coarse Turface® clay alongside fertigation. This system allowed for root hairs to be easily visualized along the entire lengths of crown roots in three different cereal crops (maize, wheat, and finger millet). Surprisingly, we observed that the root hairs in these crops continued to grow beyond the canonical root hair zone, with the most root hair growth occurring on older crown root segments. We suggest that the Turface® fertigation system may permit a better understanding of the changing dynamics of root hairs as they age in large plants, and may facilitate new avenues for crop improvement below ground. However, the relevance of this system to field conditions must be further evaluated in other crops.

  20. Nectar robbery by a hermit hummingbird: association to floral phenotype and its influence on flowers and network structure.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Pietro Kiyoshi; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Dalsgaard, Bo; Sazima, Ivan; Sazima, Marlies

    2015-07-01

    Interactions between flowers and their visitors span the spectrum from mutualism to antagonism. The literature is rich in studies focusing on mutualism, but nectar robbery has mostly been investigated using phytocentric approaches focused on only a few plant species. To fill this gap, we studied the interactions between a nectar-robbing hermit hummingbird, Phaethornis ruber, and the array of flowers it visits. First, based on a literature review of the interactions involving P. ruber, we characterized the association of floral larceny to floral phenotype. We then experimentally examined the effects of nectar robbing on nectar standing crop and number of visits of the pollinators to the flowers of Canna paniculata. Finally, we asked whether the incorporation of illegitimate interactions into the analysis affects plant-hummingbird network structure. We identified 97 plant species visited by P. ruber and found that P. ruber engaged in floral larceny in almost 30% of these species. Nectar robbery was especially common in flowers with longer corolla. In terms of the effect on C. paniculata, the depletion of nectar due to robbery by P. ruber was associated with decreased visitation rates of legitimate pollinators. At the community level, the inclusion of the illegitimate visits of P. ruber resulted in modifications of how modules within the network were organized, notably giving rise to a new module consisting of P. ruber and mostly robbed flowers. However, although illegitimate visits constituted approximately 9% of all interactions in the network, changes in nestedness, modularity, and network-level specialization were minor. Our results indicate that although a flower robber may have a strong effect on the pollination of a particular plant species, the inclusion of its illegitimate interactions has limited capacity to change overall network structure.

  1. Multiresistant Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from a Region in India Where Urinary Tract Infections Are Endemic: Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics of Sequence Type 131 Isolates of the CTX-M-15 Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Arif; Ewers, Christa; Nandanwar, Nishant; Guenther, Sebastian; Jadhav, Savita; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (O25b:H4), associated with the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and linked predominantly to the community-onset antimicrobial-resistant infections, has globally emerged as a public health concern. However, scant attention is given to the understanding of the molecular epidemiology of these strains in high-burden countries such as India. Of the 100 clinical E. coli isolates obtained by us from a setting where urinary tract infections are endemic, 16 ST131 E. coli isolates were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Further, genotyping and phenotyping methods were employed to characterize their virulence and drug resistance patterns. All the 16 ST131 isolates harbored the CTX-M-15 gene, and half of them also carried TEM-1; 11 of these were positive for blaOXA groups 1 and 12 for aac(6′)-Ib-cr. At least 12 isolates were refractory to four non-beta-lactam antibiotics: ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Nine isolates carried the class 1 integron. Plasmid analysis indicated a large pool of up to six plasmids per strain with a mean of approximately three plasmids. Conjugation and PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) revealed that the spread of resistance was associated with the FIA incompatibility group of plasmids. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and genotyping of the virulence genes showed a low level of diversity among these strains. The association of ESBL-encoding plasmid with virulence was demonstrated in transconjugants by serum assay. None of the 16 ST131 ESBL-producing E. coli strains were known to synthesize carbapenemase enzymes. In conclusion, our study reports a snapshot of the highly virulent/multiresistant clone ST131 of uropathogenic E. coli from India. This study suggests that the ST131 genotypes from this region are clonally evolved and are strongly associated with the CTX-M-15 enzyme, carry a high antibiotic resistance background, and have

  2. Studies of vibrational properties in Ga stabilized delta-Pu by extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Henderson, A.L.; Sylwester, E.R.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Shen, T.H.; Gallegos, G.F.; Booth, C.H.

    2002-02-14

    Temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra were measured for a 3.3 at. % Ga stabilized Pu alloy over the range T= 20 - 300 K. EXAFS data were acquired at both the Ga K-edge and the Pu L{sub III} edge. Curve-fits were performed to the first shell interactions to obtain pair-distance distribution widths, {sigma}, as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of {sigma}(T) was accurately modeled using a correlated-Debye model for the lattice vibrational properties, suggesting Debye-like behavior in this material. Using this formalism, we obtain pair-specific correlated-Debye temperatures, {Theta}{sub cD}, of 110.7 {+-} 1.7 K and 202.6 {+-} 3.7 K, for the Pu-Pu and Ga-Pu pairs, respectively. The result for the Pu-{Theta}{sub cD} value compares well with previous vibrational studies on {delta}-Pu. In addition, our results represent the first unambiguous determination of Ga-specific vibrational properties in Pu-Ga alloys, i.e, {Theta}{sub cD} for the Ga-Pu pair. Because the Debye temperature can be related to a measure of the lattice stiffness, these results indicate the Ga-Pu bonds are significantly stronger than the Pu-Pu bonds. This effect has important implications for lattice stabilization mechanisms in these alloys.

  3. Surface geometry of (1×1)PHx/Ge(111) determined with angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terminello, L. J.; Leung, K. T.; Hussain, Z.; Hayashi, T.; Zhang, X. S.; Shirley, D. A.

    1990-06-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) obtained from the phosphorus 1s core level was studied to determine the chemisorption geometry of (1×1)PHx/Ge(111), prepared by partial dissociation of PH3 adsorbed on Ge(111). We determined that the phosphorus adsorbs 2.26 Å above a first-layer germanium atom, and preferentially tilts toward the second-layer germanium atom with a 0.63-Å lateral displacement from a true atop position. Other geometrical parameters determined from the multiple-scattering, spherical-wave analysis of the ARPEFS include the first- to second-layer germanium Ge(1)-Ge(2) spacing (0.68 Å) and the second- to third-layer germanium Ge(2)-Ge(3) spacing (2.68 Å). This represents a 17% contraction for Ge(1)-Ge(2) and a 9% expansion for Ge(2)-Ge(3). The importance of adsorbate scattering and how it affects data interpretation are also discussed. Comparison of this chemisorption system with other systems is made.

  4. How do students with dyslexia perform in extended matching questions, short answer questions and observed structured clinical examinations?

    PubMed

    Gibson, Sandra; Leinster, Samuel

    2011-08-01

    There are an increasing number of students with learning difficulties attending university, and currently much debate about the suitability and ability of students with dyslexia at both medical school and once they graduate into clinical practice. In this study we describe the performance of students with dyslexia compared to fellow students in extended matching questions (EMQ), short answer question (SAQ) and observed structured clinical examinations (OSCE) and discuss the implications of differences identified. End of year assessment results for 5 cohorts of medical students were analysed. Students with dyslexia did less well overall in all assessment types in year 1 but this difference was not evident in later years. Dyslexic students who were allowed extra time in written assessments did better than dyslexic students who did not have their assessment concessions in place. When station type within OSCE assessments was analysed students with dyslexia did less well in both examination skills and data interpretation stations in years 1, 2 & 3. In conclusion, differences in performance in written assessments are only evident early in training and may be partly due to delayed adjustment to medical school or implementation of assessment concessions. Performance in individual OSCE stations is dependent on station type. Why students with specific learning difficulties (SpLDs) perform less well in examination skills and data analysis OSCE stations requires further investigation.

  5. An X-ray survey of the 2 Jy sample - II. X-ray emission from extended structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingo, B.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Ineson, J.; Mahatma, V.; Croston, J. H.; Dicken, D.; Evans, D. A.; Morganti, R.; Tadhunter, C.

    2017-09-01

    The 2 Jy sample is a survey of radio galaxies with flux densities above 2 Jy at 2.7 GHz. As part of our ongoing work on the southern subset of 2 Jy sources, in paper I of this series we analysed the X-ray cores of the complete 2 Jy sample with redshifts 0.05 < z < 0.7. For this work we focus on the X-ray emission associated with the extended structures (jets, lobes, and environments) of the complete subset of 2 Jy sources with 0.05 < z < 0.2 that we have observed with Chandra. We find that hotspots and jet knots are ubiquitous in Fanaroff-Riley class II (FRII) sources, which also inhabit systematically poorer environments than the Fanaroff-Riley class I (FRI) sources in our sample. Spectral fits of the hotspots with good X-ray statistics invariably show properties consistent with synchrotron emission, and we show that inverse-Compton mechanisms underpredict the X-ray emission we observe by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Inverse-Compton emission is detected from many of the lobes in our sample, and we find that the lobes of the FRII sources show magnetic fields lower by up to an order of magnitude than expected from equipartition extrapolations. This is consistent with previous results, which show that most FRII sources have electron energy densities higher than minimum energy requirements.

  6. Bond length variation in Zn substituted NiO studied from extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. D.; Poswal, A. K.; Kamal, C.; Rajput, Parasmani; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Jha, S. N.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2017-06-01

    Bond length behavior for Zn substituted NiO is determined through extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements performed at ambient conditions. We report bond length value of 2.11±0.01 Å for Zn-O of rock salt (RS) symmetry, when Zn is doped in RS NiO. Bond length for Zn substituted NiO RS ternary solid solutions shows relaxed behavior for Zn-O bond, while it shows un-relaxed behavior for Ni-O bond. These observations are further supported by first-principles calculations. It is also inferred that Zn sublattice remains nearly unchanged with increase in lattice parameter. On the other hand, Ni sublattice dilates for Zn compositions up to 20% to accommodate increase in the lattice parameter. However, for Zn compositions more than 20%, it does not further dilate. It has been attributed to the large disorder that is incorporated in the system at and beyond 20% of Zn incorporation in the cubic RS lattice of ternary solid solutions. For these large percentages of Zn incorporation, the Ni and the Zn atoms re-arrange themselves microscopically about the same nominal bond length rather than systematically increase in magnitude to minimize the energy of the system. This results in an increase in the Debye-Waller factor with increase in the Zn concentration rather than a systematic increase in the bond lengths.

  7. New clues to the local atomic structure of short-range ordered ferric arsenate from extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mikutta, Christian; Mandaliev, Petar N; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-04-02

    Short-range ordered ferric arsenate (FeAsO4 · xH2O) is a secondary As precipitate frequently encountered in acid mine waste environments. Two distinct structural models have recently been proposed for this phase. The first model is based on the structure of scorodite (FeAsO4 · 2H2O) where isolated FeO6 octahedra share corners with four adjacent arsenate (AsO4) tetrahedra in a three-dimensional framework (framework model). The second model consists of single chains of corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra being bridged by AsO4 bound in a monodentate binuclear (2)C complex (chain model). In order to rigorously test the accuracy of both structural models, we synthesized ferric arsenates and analyzed their local (<6 Å) structure by As and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We found that both As and Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra were most compatible with isolated FeO6 octahedra being bridged by AsO4 tetrahedra (RFe-As = 3.33 ± 0.01 Å). Our shell-fit results further indicated a lack of evidence for single corner-sharing FeO6 linkages in ferric arsenate. Wavelet-transform analyses of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra of ferric arsenates complemented by shell fitting confirmed Fe atoms at an average distance of ∼5.3 Å, consistent with crystallographic data of scorodite and in disagreement with the chain model. A scorodite-type local structure of short-range ordered ferric arsenates provides a plausible explanation for their rapid transformation into scorodite in acid mining environments.

  8. Profiling functions of ectomycorrhizal diversity and root structuring in seedlings of Norway spruce (Picea abies) with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Rajala, Tiina; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Taylor, Andy F S; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    We studied the role of taxonomical and functional ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal diversity in root formation and nutrient uptake by Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings with fast- and slow-growing phenotypes. Seedlings were grown with an increasing ECM fungal diversity gradient from one to four species and sampled before aboveground growth differences between the two phenotypes were apparent. ECM fungal colonization patterns were determined and functional diversity was assayed via measurements of potential enzyme activities of eight exoenzymes probably involved in nutrient mobilization. Phenotypes did not vary in their receptiveness to different ECM fungal species. However, seedlings of slow-growing phenotypes had higher fine-root density and thus more condensed root systems than fast-growing seedlings, but the potential enzyme activities of ectomycorrhizas did not differ qualitatively or quantitatively. ECM species richness increased host nutrient acquisition potential by diversifying the exoenzyme palette. Needle nitrogen content correlated positively with high chitinase activity of ectomycorrhizas. Rather than fast- and slow-growing phenotypes exhibiting differing receptiveness to ECM fungi, our results suggest that distinctions in fine-root structuring and in the belowground growth strategy already apparent at early stages of seedling development may explain later growth differences between fast- and slow-growing families.

  9. Extended structure-activity study of thienopyrimidine-based EGFR inhibitors with evaluation of drug-like properties.

    PubMed

    Bugge, Steffen; Buene, Audun Formo; Jurisch-Yaksi, Nathalie; Moen, Ingri Ullestad; Skjønsfjell, Ellen Martine; Sundby, Eirik; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2016-01-01

    Thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines are attractive derivatives for cancer treatment, among others through regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK). In an extended SAR study, 44 new compounds of this class have been evaluated as inhibitors, while simultaneously focussing on ADME properties. Through the application of bioisosters, hybrid structures, solubilizing tails, and a combination approach several successful alterations in terms of activity and physiochemical properties were accomplished. Compounds based on benzylamines were found superior to aniline hybrid structures with respect to activity and ADME profile. Exploration of the former class revealed meta- and para amides as favourable 6-aryl substituents, contributing to an increase in activity and acting as a linker for solubilizing tails. Next, combinations of activity-inducing groups on the same scaffold resulted in new drug candidates. Compounds containing 6-aryls with the (2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)carbamoyl substituent were found equipotent to Erlotinib. Compared to this commercial drug, improved solubility and metabolic stability were observed. However, the thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidines with a solubilizing tail was by Caco-2 experiments found to have permeability issues, making further drug development difficult. Selected compounds were further analysed for toxicity and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos. Two thienopyrimidines were both found to be less lethal than Erlotinib and to perform as well in terms of teratogenicity. Finally, the most promising thienopyrimidine drug was evaluated in a panel of human cancer cell lines, showing a clear potential for thienopyrimidines as anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. A Complex Structural Variation on Chromosome 27 Leads to the Ectopic Expression of HOXB8 and the Muffs and Beard Phenotype in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanqiang; Luo, Chenglong; Liu, Ranran; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming; Wen, Jie; Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A.; Zhao, Yiqiang; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Muffs and beard (Mb) is a phenotype in chickens where groups of elongated feathers gather from both sides of the face (muffs) and below the beak (beard). It is an autosomal, incomplete dominant phenotype encoded by the Muffs and beard (Mb) locus. Here we use genome-wide association (GWA) analysis, linkage analysis, Identity-by-Descent (IBD) mapping, array-CGH, genome re-sequencing and expression analysis to show that the Mb allele causing the Mb phenotype is a derived allele where a complex structural variation (SV) on GGA27 leads to an altered expression of the gene HOXB8. This Mb allele was shown to be completely associated with the Mb phenotype in nine other independent Mb chicken breeds. The Mb allele differs from the wild-type mb allele by three duplications, one in tandem and two that are translocated to that of the tandem repeat around 1.70 Mb on GGA27. The duplications contain total seven annotated genes and their expression was tested during distinct stages of Mb morphogenesis. A continuous high ectopic expression of HOXB8 was found in the facial skin of Mb chickens, strongly suggesting that HOXB8 directs this regional feather-development. In conclusion, our results provide an interesting example of how genomic structural rearrangements alter the regulation of genes leading to novel phenotypes. Further, it again illustrates the value of utilizing derived phenotypes in domestic animals to dissect the genetic basis of developmental traits, herein providing novel insights into the likely role of HOXB8 in feather development and differentiation. PMID:27253709

  11. A Complex Structural Variation on Chromosome 27 Leads to the Ectopic Expression of HOXB8 and the Muffs and Beard Phenotype in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Gu, Xiaorong; Sheng, Zheya; Wang, Yanqiang; Luo, Chenglong; Liu, Ranran; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming; Wen, Jie; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Carlborg, Örjan; Zhao, Yiqiang; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2016-06-01

    Muffs and beard (Mb) is a phenotype in chickens where groups of elongated feathers gather from both sides of the face (muffs) and below the beak (beard). It is an autosomal, incomplete dominant phenotype encoded by the Muffs and beard (Mb) locus. Here we use genome-wide association (GWA) analysis, linkage analysis, Identity-by-Descent (IBD) mapping, array-CGH, genome re-sequencing and expression analysis to show that the Mb allele causing the Mb phenotype is a derived allele where a complex structural variation (SV) on GGA27 leads to an altered expression of the gene HOXB8. This Mb allele was shown to be completely associated with the Mb phenotype in nine other independent Mb chicken breeds. The Mb allele differs from the wild-type mb allele by three duplications, one in tandem and two that are translocated to that of the tandem repeat around 1.70 Mb on GGA27. The duplications contain total seven annotated genes and their expression was tested during distinct stages of Mb morphogenesis. A continuous high ectopic expression of HOXB8 was found in the facial skin of Mb chickens, strongly suggesting that HOXB8 directs this regional feather-development. In conclusion, our results provide an interesting example of how genomic structural rearrangements alter the regulation of genes leading to novel phenotypes. Further, it again illustrates the value of utilizing derived phenotypes in domestic animals to dissect the genetic basis of developmental traits, herein providing novel insights into the likely role of HOXB8 in feather development and differentiation.

  12. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance in Klebsiella spp. Isolates from Companion Animals in Japan: Clonal Dissemination of Multidrug-Resistant Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Shimizu, Takae; Mukai, Yujiro; Kuwajima, Ken; Sato, Tomomi; Usui, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka; Kimura, Yui; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Tsuyuki, Yuzo; Ohki, Asami; Kataoka, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella spp., including resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) and fluoroquinolones, is of great concern in both human and veterinary medicine. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in a total of 103 Klebsiella spp. isolates, consisting of Klebsiella pneumoniae complex (KP, n = 89) and K. oxytoca (KO, n = 14) from clinical specimens of dogs and cats in Japan. Furthermore, we characterized the resistance mechanisms, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase (PABL), and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR); and assessed genetic relatedness of ESC-resistant Klebsiella spp. strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing demonstrated that resistance rates to ampicillin, cephalothin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefotaxime, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and cefmetazole were 98.1, 37.9, 37.9, 35.9, 35.0, 34.0, 31.1, 30.1, 28.2, 14.6, and 6.8%, respectively. Phenotypic testing detected ESBLs and/or AmpC β-lactamases in 31 of 89 (34.8%) KP isolates, but not in KO isolates. Resistances to 5 of the 12 antimicrobials tested, as well as the three PMQRs [qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6')-Ib-cr], were detected significantly more frequently in ESBL-producing KP, than in non-ESBL-producing KP and KO. The most frequent ESBL was CTX-M-15 (n = 13), followed by CTX-M-14 (n = 7), CTX-M-55 (n = 6), SHV-2 (n = 5), CTX-M-2 (n = 2), and CTX-M-3 (n = 2). Based on the rpoB phylogeny, all ESBL-producing strains were identified as K. pneumoniae, except for one CTX-M-14-producing strain, which was identified as K. quasipneumoniae. All of AmpC β-lactamase positive isolates (n = 6) harbored DHA-1, one of the PABLs. Based on MLST and PFGE analysis, ST15 KP clones producing CTX-M-2, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55, and

  13. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance in Klebsiella spp. Isolates from Companion Animals in Japan: Clonal Dissemination of Multidrug-Resistant Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kazuki; Shimizu, Takae; Mukai, Yujiro; Kuwajima, Ken; Sato, Tomomi; Usui, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka; Kimura, Yui; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Tsuyuki, Yuzo; Ohki, Asami; Kataoka, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Klebsiella spp., including resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC) and fluoroquinolones, is of great concern in both human and veterinary medicine. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in a total of 103 Klebsiella spp. isolates, consisting of Klebsiella pneumoniae complex (KP, n = 89) and K. oxytoca (KO, n = 14) from clinical specimens of dogs and cats in Japan. Furthermore, we characterized the resistance mechanisms, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase (PABL), and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR); and assessed genetic relatedness of ESC-resistant Klebsiella spp. strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing demonstrated that resistance rates to ampicillin, cephalothin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefotaxime, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and cefmetazole were 98.1, 37.9, 37.9, 35.9, 35.0, 34.0, 31.1, 30.1, 28.2, 14.6, and 6.8%, respectively. Phenotypic testing detected ESBLs and/or AmpC β-lactamases in 31 of 89 (34.8%) KP isolates, but not in KO isolates. Resistances to 5 of the 12 antimicrobials tested, as well as the three PMQRs [qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6′)-Ib-cr], were detected significantly more frequently in ESBL-producing KP, than in non-ESBL-producing KP and KO. The most frequent ESBL was CTX-M-15 (n = 13), followed by CTX-M-14 (n = 7), CTX-M-55 (n = 6), SHV-2 (n = 5), CTX-M-2 (n = 2), and CTX-M-3 (n = 2). Based on the rpoB phylogeny, all ESBL-producing strains were identified as K. pneumoniae, except for one CTX-M-14-producing strain, which was identified as K. quasipneumoniae. All of AmpC β-lactamase positive isolates (n = 6) harbored DHA-1, one of the PABLs. Based on MLST and PFGE analysis, ST15 KP clones producing CTX-M-2, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55, and

  14. Adsorption site and structure determination of c(2 × 2) N2/Ni(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moler, Edward J.; Kellar, Scot A.; Huff, W. R. A.; Hussain, Zahid; Zheng, Yu; Hudson, Eric A.; Chen, Yufeng; Shirley, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We have determined the atomic spatial structure of c(2 × 2) N2/Ni(100) with angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure using the nitrogen 1s core level. The chemically shifted N 1s peak intensities were summed to obtain ARPEFS curves for both nitrogen atoms in the molecule. We used a new, highly optimized program based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism to find the adsorption site and to determine the bond lengths quantitatively. The nitrogen molecule stands upright at an atop site, with a NNi bond length of 2.25(1) Å, a NN bond length of 1.10(7) Å, and a first layer NiNi spacing of 1.76(4) Å. The shake-up peak shows an identical ARPEFS diffraction pattern, confirming its intrinsic nature and supporting a previous use of this feature to decompose the peak into contributions from the chemically inequivalent nitrogen atoms. Comparison to a previously published theoretical treatment of NNNi and experimental structures of analogous adsorbate systems demonstrates the importance of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in weakly chemisorbed systems.

  15. Extended x-ray-absorption and electron-energy-loss fine-structure studies of the local atomic structure of amorphous unhydrogenated and hydrogenated silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloyeros, A.E.; Rizk, R.B.; Woodhouse, J.B.

    1988-12-15

    Extended x-ray-absorption (EXAFS) and electron-energy-loss fine-structure (EXELFS) measurements have been performed on amorphous unhydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC, and amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC:H. Two hydrogenated samples with hydrogen concentrations corresponding, respectively, to H flows of 4 sccm (20% of argon flow) and 8 sccm (40% of argon flow) during the reactive sputtering process, were analyzed (sccm denotes standard cubic centimeters per minute at STP). It is found that short-range order (SRO), consisting of the same tetrahedrally coordinated units present in cubic crystalline c-SiC (zinc-blende structure), where a Si atom is surrounded by nearly four C atoms and vice versa, does exist in all the amorphous samples. This SRO, however, is detected only at a level of the first C and Si coordination shells in a-SiC and a-SiC:H. The structural disorder of the first Si and C coordination shells in all forms of amorphous SiC is somewhat greater than c-SiC, and it decreases appreciably as hydrogen is added. The a-SiC sample exhibits large Si and C coordination numbers, almost identical to c-SiC, a low atomic density, and virtually the same Si-C bond length as c-SiC. These results indicate that a relatively small concentration of large voids exist in a highly disordered a-SiC matrix.

  16. Geometric Structure Determination of N694C Lipoxygenase: a Comparative Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy And Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sarangi, R.; Hocking, R.K.; Neidig, M.L.; Benfatto, M.; Holman, T.R.; Solomon, E.I.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.

    2009-05-27

    The mononuclear nonheme iron active site of N694C soybean lipoxygenase (sLO1) has been investigated in the resting ferrous form using a combination of Fe-K-pre-edge, near-edge (using the minuit X-ray absorption near-edge full multiple-scattering approach), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. The results indicate that the active site is six-coordinate (6C) with a large perturbation in the first-shell bond distances in comparison to the more ordered octahedral site in wild-type sLO1. Upon mutation of the asparigine to cystiene, the short Fe-O interaction with asparigine is replaced by a weak Fe-(H{sub 2}O), which leads to a distorted 6C site with an effective 5C ligand field. In addition, it is shown that near-edge multiple scattering analysis can give important three-dimensional structural information, which usually cannot be accessed using EXAFS analysis. It is further shown that, relative to EXAFS, near-edge analysis is more sensitive to partial coordination numbers and can be potentially used as a tool for structure determination in a mixture of chemical species.

  17. Adsorption site and structure determination of c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have determined the atomic spatial structure of c(2x2) N2Ni(100) with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the nitrogen 1s core level using monochromatized x-rays from beamline 6.1 at SSRL and beamline 9.3.2 at the ALS. The chemically shifted N 1s peak intensities were summed together to obtain ARPEFS curves for both nitrogen atoms in the molecule. They used a new, highly-optimized program based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism to find the adsorption site and to quantitatively determine the bond-lengths. The nitrogen molecule stands upright at an atop site, with a N-Ni bond length of 2.25(1) {angstrom}, a N-N bond length of 1.10(7) {angstrom}, and a first layer Ni-Ni spacing of 1.76(4) {angstrom}. The shake-up peak shows an identical ARPEFS diffraction pattern, confirming its intrinsic nature and supporting a previous use of this feature to decompose the peak into contributions from the chemically inequivalent nitrogen atoms. Comparison to a previously published theoretical treatment of N-N-Ni and experimental structures of analogous adsorbate systems demonstrates the importance of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in weakly chemisorbed systems.

  18. A combined fit of total scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine structure data for local-structure determination in crystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Proffen, Thomas E; Krayzman, Victor; Levin, Igor; Tucker, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) refinements of local structure using a simultaneous fit of X-ray/neutron total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data were developed to incorporate an explicit treatment of both single- and multiple-scattering contributions to EXAFS. The refinement algorithm, implemented as an extension to the public domain computer software RMCProfile, enables accurate modeling of EXAFS over distances encompassing several coordination shells around the absorbing species. The approach was first tested on Ni, which exhibits extensive multiple scattering in EXAFS, and then applied to perovskite-like SrAl{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3}. This compound crystal1izes with a cubic double-perovskite structure but presents a challenge for local-structure determination using a total pair-distribution function (PDF) alone because of overlapping peaks of the constituent partial PDFs (e.g. Al-O and Nb-O or Sr-O and O-O). The results obtained here suggest that the combined use of the total scattering and EXAFS data provides sufficient constraints for RMC refinements to recover fine details of local structure in complex perovskites. Among other results, it was found that the probability density distribution for Sr in SrAl{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3} adopts T{sub d} point-group symmetry for the Sr sites, determined by the ordered arrangement of Al and Nb, as opposed to a spherical distribution commonly assumed in traditional Rietveld refinements.

  19. CHRM2 gene predisposes to alcohol dependence, drug dependence and affective disorders: results from an extended case-control structured association study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xingguang; Kranzler, Henry R; Zuo, Lingjun; Wang, Shuang; Blumberg, Hilary P; Gelernter, Joel

    2005-08-15

    Cholinergic muscarinic 2 receptor (CHRM2) is implicated in memory and cognition, functions impaired in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Wang et al. [Wang, J.C., Hinrichs, A.L., Stock, H., Budde, J., Allen, R., Bertelsen, S., Kwon, J.M., Wu, W., Dick, D.M., Rice, J. et al. (2004) Evidence of common and specific genetic effects: association of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (CHRM2) gene with alcohol dependence and major depressive syndrome. Hum. Mol. Genet., 13, 1903-1911] reported that variation in CHRM2 gene predisposed to alcohol dependence (AD) and major depressive syndrome. We examined the relationships between variation in CHRM2 and AD, drug dependence (DD) and affective disorders, using a novel extended case-control structured association (SA) method. Six markers at CHRM2 and 38 ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) were genotyped in a sample of 871 subjects, including 333 healthy controls [287 European-Americans (EAs) and 46 African-Americans (AAs)] and 538 AD and/or DD subjects (415 with AD and 346 with DD and 382 EAs and 156 AAs). The same CHRM2 markers were genotyped in a sample of 137 EA subjects with affective disorders. All of the six markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in controls, but SNP3 (rs1824024) was in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in the AD and DD groups. Using conventional case-control comparisons, some markers were nominally significantly or suggestively associated with phenotypes before or after controlling for population stratification and admixture effects, but these associations were not significant after multiple test correction. However, regression analysis identified specific alleles, genotypes, haplotypes and diplotypes that were significantly associated with risk for each disorder. We conclude that variation in CHRM2 predisposes to AD, DD and affective disorders. One haplotype block within the 5'-UTR of CHRM2 may be more important for the development of these disorders than other regions. Interaction between two

  20. Discordant phenotypes and 45,X/46,X,idic(Y).

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, T E; Franko, J B; Rogol, A; Golden, W L

    1998-01-01

    Mosaicism introduces wide variability into the clinical expression of numerical and unbalanced structural chromosomal abnormalities. The phenotypic range of variability of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism extends from Turner syndrome to mixed gonadal dysgenesis to normal males. The specific phenotype is primarily dependent on the chromosomal constitution of the developing gonad. Similar phenotypic variability is observed with mosaicism for 45,X and a second cell line with an abnormal sex chromosome. This report describes a patient with Turner syndrome and a patient with mixed gonadal dysgenesis who have identical karyotypes, namely 45,X/46,X,idic(Y)(p11.2). While mosaicism alone might have accounted for the phenotypic differences, by PCR analysis the Turner syndrome patient was SRY and ZFY negative and the mixed gonadal dysgenesis patient was SRY and ZFY positive. Images PMID:9783714

  1. Discordant phenotypes and 45,X/46,X,idic(Y).

    PubMed

    Kelly, T E; Franko, J B; Rogol, A; Golden, W L

    1998-10-01

    Mosaicism introduces wide variability into the clinical expression of numerical and unbalanced structural chromosomal abnormalities. The phenotypic range of variability of 45,X/46,XY mosaicism extends from Turner syndrome to mixed gonadal dysgenesis to normal males. The specific phenotype is primarily dependent on the chromosomal constitution of the developing gonad. Similar phenotypic variability is observed with mosaicism for 45,X and a second cell line with an abnormal sex chromosome. This report describes a patient with Turner syndrome and a patient with mixed gonadal dysgenesis who have identical karyotypes, namely 45,X/46,X,idic(Y)(p11.2). While mosaicism alone might have accounted for the phenotypic differences, by PCR analysis the Turner syndrome patient was SRY and ZFY negative and the mixed gonadal dysgenesis patient was SRY and ZFY positive.

  2. The genomic and phenotypic diversity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Jeffares, Daniel C; Rallis, Charalampos; Rieux, Adrien; Speed, Doug; Převorovský, Martin; Mourier, Tobias; Marsellach, Francesc X; Iqbal, Zamin; Lau, Winston; Cheng, Tammy M K; Pracana, Rodrigo; Mülleder, Michael; Lawson, Jonathan L D; Chessel, Anatole; Bala, Sendu; Hellenthal, Garrett; O'Fallon, Brendan; Keane, Thomas; Simpson, Jared T; Bischof, Leanne; Tomiczek, Bartlomiej; Bitton, Danny A; Sideri, Theodora; Codlin, Sandra; Hellberg, Josephine E E U; van Trigt, Laurent; Jeffery, Linda; Li, Juan-Juan; Atkinson, Sophie; Thodberg, Malte; Febrer, Melanie; McLay, Kirsten; Drou, Nizar; Brown, William; Hayles, Jacqueline; Carazo Salas, Rafael E; Ralser, Markus; Maniatis, Nikolas; Balding, David J; Balloux, Francois; Durbin, Richard; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-03-01

    Natural variation within species reveals aspects of genome evolution and function. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model for eukaryotic biology, but researchers typically use one standard laboratory strain. To extend the usefulness of this model, we surveyed the genomic and phenotypic variation in 161 natural isolates. We sequenced the genomes of all strains, finding moderate genetic diversity (π = 3 × 10(-3) substitutions/site) and weak global population structure. We estimate that dispersal of S. pombe began during human antiquity (∼340 BCE), and ancestors of these strains reached the Americas at ∼1623 CE. We quantified 74 traits, finding substantial heritable phenotypic diversity. We conducted 223 genome-wide association studies, with 89 traits showing at least one association. The most significant variant for each trait explained 22% of the phenotypic variance on average, with indels having larger effects than SNPs. This analysis represents a rich resource to examine genotype-phenotype relationships in a tractable model.

  3. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K

    2015-11-03

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual's genetic and environmental context. Copyright © 2015 Williams et al.

  4. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual’s genetic and environmental context. PMID:26530416

  5. Adsorption sites and bond lengths of iodine on Cu)111) and Cu)100) from surface extended x-ray-absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, P.H.; Eisenberger, P.; Hewitt, R.C.

    1980-12-15

    The unambiguous identification of adsorption sites is demonstrated using absolute and relative polarization-dependent surface extended-x-ray-absorption fine-structure amplitude functions. This empirical procedure is generally applicable to all oriented adsorbates on single-crystal substrates.

  6. Structural Studies of Clean Semiconductor Surfaces and Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces by Photoemission Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangat, Pawitterjit Singh

    We determined the atomic geometries for clean InP(110)-(1 x 1) and Si(111)-(2 x 1) surfaces and Al/InP(110), Ag/InP(110), Bi/InP(110), Na/InP(110) and Al/Si(111) interfaces by photoemission extended x-ray absorption fine structure (PEXAFS) spectroscopy to understand the correlation between electrical Schottky barrier heights and interfacial structure. P 2p PEXAFS for the InP(110) surface and Si 2p PEXAFS for the Si(111) surface were acquired which yielded information on the short range order of substrate atoms on the surface or at the interface. For Al/Si(111) interfaces, we also obtained Al 2p PEXAFS. The data analyzed by Fourier analysis and curve-fitting procedures. The theoretical backscattering phase function of McKale et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 3763 (1988)) and absorber phase function of Teo and Lee (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 101, 2815 (1979)) were used for phase analysis to determine the interatomic bond lengths. For the clean InP(110) surface, we observed surface relaxation. For the Si(111)-(2 x 1) surface, we found 10% contraction in the second near neighborhood Si-Si distance which is not reported in any model. For low coverage reactive metal (Al, Na)/InP(110) interfaces, we observed metal induced surface structural changes which involve removal of relaxation and change in the basis of the surface unit mesh of the substrate. For Ag/InP(110) interfaces, the noble metal atoms were found to remove the relaxation of the first P-In bond length at the interface. These changes in the substrate might bring in interface states within the semiconductor band gap and, consequently, influencing Fermi-level pinning during the Schottky barrier formation. For the Bi/InP(110) interfaces, the relaxation of the clean InP(110) surface is not removed by the deposited Bi atoms. Hence, the Bi/InP(110) interface might not have Fermi-level pinning by interface states due to the interfacial structure of InP. For Al/Si(111) interfaces, the Al atoms do not induce drastic surface

  7. The role of phenotype structure in the population dynamics of gypsy moth in the Lower Dnieper region

    Treesearch

    Nikolaj M. Derevyanko

    1991-01-01

    One of the characteristic features of the gypsy moth population in the Lower Dnieper area is its variable larval coloring. Phenotype frequency has been recorded over the years in separate micropopulations at different density levels. The data show the population to consist mainly of gray larvae in all life stages, and their abundance varying from 85 to 99.6 percent....

  8. Structural gene (prME) chimeras of St Louis encephalitis virus and West Nile virus exhibit altered in vitro cytopathic and growth phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Payal D.; Anishchenko, Michael; Langevin, Stanley A.; Fang, Ying; Reisen, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Despite utilizing the same avian hosts and mosquito vectors, St Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) display dissimilar vector-infectivity and vertebrate-pathogenic phenotypes. SLEV exhibits a low oral infection threshold for Culex mosquito vectors and is avirulent in avian hosts, producing low-magnitude viraemias. In contrast, WNV is less orally infective to mosquitoes and elicits high-magnitude viraemias in a wide range of avian species. In order to identify the genetic determinants of these different phenotypes and to assess the utility of mosquito and vertebrate cell lines for recapitulating in vivo differences observed between these viruses, reciprocal WNV and SLEV pre-membrane and envelope protein (prME) chimeric viruses were generated and growth of these mutant viruses was characterized in mammalian (Vero), avian (duck) and mosquito [Aedes (C6/36) and Culex (CT)] cells. In both vertebrate lines, WNV grew to 100-fold higher titres than SLEV, and growth and cytopathogenicity phenotypes, determined by chimeric phenotypes, were modulated by genetic elements outside the prME gene region. Both chimeras exhibited distinctive growth patterns from those of SLEV in C6/36 cells, indicating the role of both structural and non-structural gene regions for growth in this cell line. In contrast, growth of chimeric viruses was indistinguishable from that of virus containing homologous prME genes in CT cells, indicating that structural genetic elements could specifically dictate growth differences of these viruses in relevant vectors. These data provide genetic insight into divergent enzootic maintenance strategies that could also be useful for the assessment of emergence mechanisms of closely related flaviviruses. PMID:21940408

  9. The evolution of phenotypic plasticity in spatially structured environments: implications of intraspecific competition, plasticity costs and environmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ernande, B; Dieckmann, U

    2004-05-01

    We model the evolution of reaction norms focusing on three aspects: frequency-dependent selection arising from resource competition, maintenance and production costs of phenotypic plasticity, and three characteristics of environmental heterogeneity (frequency of environments, their intrinsic carrying capacity and the sensitivity to phenotypic maladaptation in these environments). We show that (i) reaction norms evolve so as to trade adaptation for acquiring resources against cost avoidance; (ii) maintenance costs cause reaction norms to better adapt to frequent rather than to infrequent environments, whereas production costs do not; and (iii) evolved reaction norms confer better adaptation to environments with low rather than with high intrinsic carrying capacity. The two previous findings contradict earlier theoretical results and originate from two previously unexplored features that are included in our model. First, production costs of phenotypic plasticity are only incurred when a given phenotype is actually produced. Therefore, they are proportional to the frequency of environments, and these frequencies thus affect the selection pressure to avoid costs just as much as the selection pressure to improve adaptation. This prevents the frequency of environments from affecting the evolving reaction norm. Secondly, our model describes the evolution of plasticity for a phenotype determining an individual's capability to acquire resources, and thus its realized carrying capacity. When individuals are distributed randomly across environments, they cannot avoid experiencing environments with intrinsically low carrying capacity. As selection pressures arising from the need to improve adaptation are stronger under such extreme conditions than under mild ones, better adaptation to environments with low rather than with high intrinsic carrying capacity results.

  10. A multi-species comparative structural bioinformatics analysis of inherited mutations in α-D-Mannosidase reveals strong genotype-phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysosomal α-mannosidase is an enzyme that acts to degrade N-linked oligosaccharides and hence plays an important role in mannose metabolism in humans and other mammalian species, especially livestock. Mutations in the gene (MAN2B1) encoding lysosomal α-D-mannosidase cause improper coding, resulting in dysfunctional or non-functional protein, causing the disease α-mannosidosis. Mapping disease mutations to the structure of the protein can help in understanding the functional consequences of these mutations and thus indirectly, the finer aspects of the pathology and clinical manifestations of the disease, including phenotypic severity as a function of the genotype. Results A comprehensive homology modeling study of all the wild-type and inherited mutations of lysosomal α-mannosidase in four different species, human, cow, cat and guinea pig, reveals a significant correlation between the severity of the genotype and the phenotype in α-mannosidosis. We used the X-ray crystallographic structure of bovine lysosomal α-mannosidase as template, containing only two disulphide bonds and some ligands, to build structural models of wild-type structures with four disulfide linkages and all bound ligands. These wild-type models were then used as templates for disease mutations. All the truncations and substitutions involving the residues in and around the active site and those that destabilize the fold led to severe genotypes resulting in lethal phenotypes, whereas the mutations lying away from the active site were milder in both their genotypic and phenotypic expression. Conclusion Based on the co-location of mutations from different organisms and their proximity to the enzyme active site, we have extrapolated observed mutations from one species to homologous positions in other organisms, as a predictive approach for detecting likely α-mannosidosis. Besides predicting new disease mutations, this approach also provides a way for detecting mutation hotspots in the

  11. Effect of Extender and Equilibration Time on Post Thaw Motility and Chromatin Structure of Buffalo Bull (Bubalus Bubalis) Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Shahverdi, Abdolhossain; Rastegarnia, Abdolreza; Rezaei Topraggaleh, Tohid

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of four equilibration times (2, 4, 8 and 16 hours) and two extenders (tris or Bioxcell®) on cryopreservation of buffalo semen. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, split pooled ejaculates (n=4), possessing more than 70% visual sperm motility were divided in two aliquots and diluted in Bioxcell® and tris-citric egg yolk (TCE) extenders. Semen was cooled to 4°C within 2 hours, equilibrated at 4°C for 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours, then transferred into 0.5 ml French straws, and frozen in a programmable cell freezer before being plunged into liquid nitrogen. Postthaw motility characteristics, plasma membrane integrity, acrosome morphology and DNA integrity of the buffalo sperm were studied after thawing. Results There were significant interactions between equilibration times and extenders for sperm motility and membrane integrity. Post thaw sperm motility (PMOT), progressive motile spermatozoa (PROG), plasma membrane integrity (PMI) and normal apical ridge (NAR) measures were lower for sperm equilibrated for 2 hours in both TCE and Bioxcell® extender compared to others equilibration times. PMOT, PMI and NAR for sperm equilibrated for 4, 8 and 16 hours showed no significant differences in either extender, although PROG measures were superior in Bioxcell®compared to TCE at all equilibration times (p<0.05). Kinematic parameters such as average path velocity, curvilinear velocity and linearity in the Bioxcell®extender were superior to those in the TCE extender studied. In contrast to motility and viability, the DNA integrity of post thaw spermatozoa remained unaffected by different equilibration times. Conclusion Equilibration time is necessary for preservation of the motility and integrity of buffalo sperm membranes. Equilibration times of over than 2 hours resulted in the greatest preservation of total semen parameters during cryopreservation. There were no significant interactions between

  12. New dicyano cyclometalated compounds containing Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds as building blocks in 2D extended structures: synthesis, structure, and luminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Fuertes, Sara; Martín, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    New mixed metal complexes [PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = 7,8-benzoquinolinate (bzq, 3); 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy, 4)] have been synthesized by reaction of their corresponding precursors (NBu(4))[Pd(C^N)(CN)(2)] [C^N = bzq (1), ppy (2)] with TlPF(6). Compounds 3 and 4 were studied by X-ray diffraction, showing the not-so-common Pd(II)-Tl(I) bonds. Both crystal structures exhibit 2-D extended networks fashioned by organometallic "PdTl(C^N)(CN)(2)" units, each one containing a donor-acceptor Pd(II)-Tl(I) bond, which are connected through additional Tl···N≡C contacts and weak Tl···π (bzq) contacts in the case of 3. Solid state emissions are red-shifted compared with those of the precursors and have been assigned to metal-metal'-to-ligand charge transfer (MM'LCT [d/s σ*(Pd,Tl) → π*(C^N)]) mixed with some intraligand ((3)IL[π(C^N) → π*(C^N)]) character. In diluted solution either at room temperature or 77 K, the Pd-Tl bond is no longer retained as confirmed by mass spectrometry, NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques.

  13. Full-potential theoretical investigations of electron inelastic mean free paths and extended x-ray absorption fine structure in molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2014-04-09

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is one of the most robust, adaptable, and widely used structural analysis tools available for a range of material classes from bulk solids to aqueous solutions and active catalytic structures. Recent developments in XAFS theory have enabled high-accuracy calculations of spectra over an extended energy range using full-potential cluster modelling, and have demonstrated particular sensitivity in XAFS to a fundamental electron transport property-the electron inelastic mean free path (IMFP). We develop electron IMFP theory using a unique hybrid model that simultaneously incorporates second-order excitation losses, while precisely accounting for optical transitions dictated by the complex band structure of the solid. These advances are coupled with improved XAFS modelling to determine wide energy-range absorption spectra for molybdenum. This represents a critical test case of the theory, as measurements of molybdenum K-edge XAFS represent the most accurate determinations of XAFS spectra for any material. We find that we are able to reproduce an extended range of oscillatory structure in the absorption spectrum, and demonstrate a first-time theoretical determination of the absorption coefficient of molybdenum over the entire extended XAFS range utilizing a full-potential cluster model.

  14. Structural and Dynamic Characterization of the C313Y Mutation in Myostatin Dimeric Protein, Responsible for the “Double Muscle” Phenotype in Piedmontese Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bongiorni, Silvia; Valentini, Alessio; Chillemi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the molecular effects of the C313Y mutation, responsible for the “double muscle” phenotype in Piedmontese cattle, can help understanding the actual mechanism of phenotype determination and paves the route for a better modulation of the positive effects of this economic important phenotype in the beef industry, while minimizing the negative side effects, now inevitably intersected. The structure and dynamic behavior of the active dimeric form of Myostatin in cattle was analyzed by means of three state-of-the-art Molecular Dynamics simulations, 200-ns long, of wild-type and C313Y mutants. Our results highlight a role for the conserved Arg333 in establishing a network of short and long range interactions between the two monomers in the wild-type protein that is destroyed upon the C313Y mutation even in a single monomer. Furthermore, the native protein shows an asymmetry in residue fluctuation that is absent in the double monomer mutant. Time window analysis on further 200-ns of simulation demonstrates that this is a characteristic behavior of the protein, likely dependent on long range communications between monomers. The same behavior, in fact, has already been observed in other mutated dimers. Finally, the mutation does not produce alterations in the secondary structure elements that compose the characteristic TGF-β cystine-knot motif. PMID:26904102

  15. Efficient Direct Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Detection by Multiplex Real-Time PCR: Accurate Assignment of Phenotype by Use of a Limited Set of Genetic Markers ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ellem, Justin; Partridge, Sally R.; Iredell, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    The number and diversity of genes potentially complicate genetic approaches to the rapid detection of transmissible extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes. We developed a robust multiplexed real-time PCR assay based on targets identified in a prior survey and used this to detect relevant genes in 617 consecutive clinical isolates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:21613435

  16. Using an Advanced Computational Laboratory Experiment to Extend and Deepen Physical Chemistry Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    A computational laboratory experiment is described, which involves the advanced study of an atomic system. The students use concepts and techniques typically covered in a physical chemistry course but extend those concepts and techniques to more complex situations. The students get a chance to explore the study of atomic states and perform…

  17. Characterization of Maize Amylose-Extender (ae) Mutant Starches. Part I: Relationship Between Resistant Starch Contents and Molecular Structures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endosperm starches were isolated from kernels of seven maize amylose-extender (ae) lines. The resistant starch (RS) contents, measured using AOAC method 991.43, showed that three new ae-mutant starch lines developed by the USDA-ARS Germplasm Enhancement (GEM) and Truman State University had larger R...

  18. Using an Advanced Computational Laboratory Experiment to Extend and Deepen Physical Chemistry Students' Understanding of Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    A computational laboratory experiment is described, which involves the advanced study of an atomic system. The students use concepts and techniques typically covered in a physical chemistry course but extend those concepts and techniques to more complex situations. The students get a chance to explore the study of atomic states and perform…

  19. Extended x-ray-absorption and electron-energy-loss fine-structure studies of the local atomic structure of amorphous unhydrogenated and hydrogenated silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Rizk, Richard B.; Woodhouse, John B.

    1988-12-01

    Extended x-ray-absorption (EXAFS) and electron-energy-loss fine-structure (EXELFS) measurements have been performed on amorphous unhydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC, and amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC:H. Two hydrogenated samples with hydrogen concentrations corresponding, respectively, to H flows of 4 sccm (20% of argon flow) and 8 sccm (40% of argon flow) during the reactive sputtering process, were analyzed (sccm denotes standard cubic centimeters per minute at STP). It is found that short-range order (SRO), consisting of the same tetrahedrally coordinated units present in cubic crystalline c-SiC (zinc-blende structure), where a Si atom is surrounded by nearly four C atoms and vice versa, does exist in all the amorphous samples. This SRO, however, is detected only at a level of the first C and Si coordination shells in a-SiC and a-SiC:H. The structural disorder of the first Si and C coordination shells in all forms of amorphous SiC is somewhat greater than c-SiC, and it decreases appreciably as hydrogen is added. The a-SiC sample exhibits large Si and C coordination numbers, almost identical to c-SiC, a low atomic density, and virtually the same Si-C bond length as c-SiC. These results indicate that a relatively small concentration of large voids exist in a highly disordered a-SiC matrix. The a-SiC:H samples, on the other hand, exhibit a decrease in the C coordination number relative to a-SiC, which is independent of H concentration, low Si and C atomic densities, comparable to a-SiC, and virtually the same Si coordination number as a-SiC. These EXAFS-EXELFS results are consistent with a model where part of the H is substituting for Si in the local tetrahedra surrounding C atoms, while the rest is located inside internal voids in the a-SiC:H samples. The surface of the voids is composed of C atoms which have at least one bond to H, and of Si atoms. Finally, a straightforward computational procedure is applied to estimate the size of these voids

  20. Mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Extended RMS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-02

    ISS011-E-11416 (2 August 2005) --- A line of thunderstorms form the backdrop for this view of the extended Space Shuttle Discovery’;s remote manipulator system (RMS) robotic arm while docked to the International Space Station during the STS-114 mission.

  2. Phenotypic variability and population structure of peridomestic Triatoma infestans in rural areas of the arid Chaco (Western Argentina): spatial influence of macro- and microhabitats.

    PubMed

    Hernández, María Laura; Abrahan, Luciana Beatriz; Dujardin, Jean Pierre; Gorla, David E; Catalá, Silvia S

    2011-05-01

    Triatoma infestans, one of the main vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, is strongly associated with rural human ecotopes. Infested peridomestic places could act as a source of house infestation as a result of the movement of vectors among habitats. The quantitative study of phenotypic traits and nutritional variables could be informative about the population structure and the relative mobility of vectors. This is the first approach toward analyzing the phenetic characteristics of T. infestans and the relationship with their potential role to invade and colonize other habitats in the arid Chaco region. This article compares the phenotypic structure of T. infestans populations living in chicken coops and goat corrals, analyzing the geometric morphometry of wings and heads, antennal phenotypes, and the nutritional status of 257 adults and nymphs. The study area remained untreated with insecticides during the 15 years before the present study. The insects collected in peridomestic structures located in two zones 80 km apart exhibited significant differences in their morphotypes, suggesting an environmental effect and/or the absence of individual exchange between zones. The population structure was clear in T. infestans from goat corrals and chicken coops in one zone and less pronounced in the other. These results suggest the existence of a different rate of individual exchange among ecotopes within each zone. Morphometric variables of heads and wings were significantly correlated in insects collected in goat corrals but not in chicken coops, suggesting a habitat effect and supporting the hypothesis of different canalization forces that affect the two organs. The nutritional status of adults indicated a low dispersal probability with zonal differences. This article provides the first combined morphometric analysis of the head of adults and fifth instar nymphs in triatomines and the first combined analysis of head and wing in T. infestans.

  3. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  4. Extended antipaternalism

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, S

    2005-01-01

    Extended antipaternalism means the use of antipaternalist arguments to defend activities that harm (consenting) others. As an example, a smoker's right to smoke is often invoked in defence of the activities of tobacco companies. It can, however, be shown that antipaternalism in the proper sense does not imply such extended antipaternalism. We may therefore approve of Mill's antipaternalist principle (namely, that the only reason to interfere with someone's behaviour is to protect others from harm) without accepting activities that harm (consenting) others. This has immediate consequences for the ethics of public health. An antipaternalist need not refrain from interfering with activities such as the marketing of tobacco or heroin, boxing promotion, driving with unbelted passengers, or buying sex from "voluntary" prostitutes. PMID:15681674

  5. Defining 5S rRNA structure space: point mutation data can be used to predict the phenotype of multichange variants.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Madhavi; Fox, George E

    2011-09-01

    A portion of the 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structure space in the vicinity of the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA sequence is explored in detail with the intention of establishing principles that will allow a priori prediction of which sequences would be valid members of a particular RNA structure space. Four hundred and one sequence variants differing from the V. proteolyticus 5S rRNA wild-type sequence in 1-7 positions were characterized using an in vivo assay system. Most significantly, it was found that in general, the phenotypic effects of single changes were independent of the phenotypic effect of a second change. As a result, it was possible to use the new data in conjunction with results from prior studies of the same RNA to develop "truth tables" to predict which multiple change variants would be functional and which would be nonfunctional. The actual phenotype of 93.8% of the multichange variants studied was consistent with the predictions made using truth tables thereby providing for perhaps the first time an upper limit estimate of how frequent unexpected interactions are. It was also observed that single changes at positions involved in secondary structure were no more likely to be invalid than changes in other regions. In particular, internal changes in long standard stems were in fact almost always tolerated. Changes at positions that were hypervariable in the context of an alignment of related sequences were, as expected, usually found to be valid. However, the potential validity of changes that were idiosyncratic to a single lineage of related sequences when placed in the V. proteolyticus 5S rRNA context was unpredictable.

  6. Fuel extender

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, G.K.; Gilbert, H.A.

    1989-02-21

    An efficient and cost competitive fuel extender liquid is described for blending with lead-free gasoline as an additive thereto in a maximum amount of up to about 35% thereof with 65% by volume of the gasoline in a blended mixture wherein. The content of the extender in the resultant fuel as proportioned on the basis of its thus representative maximum content consists essentially of: naphtha X as represented by C/sub 4/, C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ hydrocarbons having a Reid vapor pressure of about 8.5 to 9.6 per ASTM, D323 test procedure and an initial distillation point of about 101/sup 0/F. and an end point of about 280/sup 0/F. within a range of about 10 to 25% by volume, about 3.8 to 6.0% by volume of anhydrous ethanol, a stabilizing amount of a water repellent of the class consisting of ethyl acetate and methyl isotubyl ketone; and about 4 to 10.5% by volume of aromatics benzene and toluene, of benzene and xylene or of benzene with toluene and xylene; the extender having a specific gravity substantially comparable with that of the lead-free gasoline to which it is to be added and having phase stability in the presence of water when mixed with the gasoline.

  7. Trust-region based instantaneous optimal semi-active control of long-span spatially extended structures with MRF-04K damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Li, Zhongxian; Ding, Yang

    2008-12-01

    In the field of civil engineering, magneto rheological fluid (MRF) damper-based semi-active control systems have received considerable attention for use in protecting structures from natural hazards such as strong earthquakes and high winds. In this paper, the MRF damper-based semi-active control system is applied to a long-span spatially extended structure and its feasibility is discussed. Meanwhile, a trust-region method based instantaneous optimal semi-active control algorithm (TIOC) is proposed to improve the performance of the semi-active control system in a multiple damper situation. The proposed TIOC describes the control process as a bounded constraint optimization problem, in which an optimal semiactive control force vector is solved by the trust-region method in every control step to minimize the structural responses. A numerical example of a railway station roof structure installed with MRF-04K dampers is presented. First, a modified Bouc-Wen model is utilized to describe the behavior of the selected MRF-04K damper. Then, two semi-active control systems, including the well-known clipped-optimal controller and the proposed TIOC controller, are considered. Based on the characteristics of the long-span spatially extended structure, the performance of the control system is evaluated under uniform earthquake excitation and travelling-wave excitation with different apparent velocities. The simulation results indicate that the MR fluid damper-based semi-active control systems have the potential to mitigate the responses of full-scale long-span spatially extended structures under earthquake hazards. The superiority of the proposed TIOC controller is demonstrated by comparing its control effectiveness with the clipped-optimal controller for several different cases.

  8. The Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse bleb phenotype.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Petros; Makrygiannis, Apostolos K; Chalepakis, Georges

    2008-01-01

    Fras1 and the structurally related proteins Frem1, Frem2, and Frem3, comprise a novel family of extracellular matrix proteins, which localize in a similar fashion underneath the lamina densa of epithelial basement membranes. They are involved in the structural adhesion of the skin epithelium to its underlying mesenchyme. Deficiency in the individual murine Fras1/Frem genes gives rise to the bleb phenotype, which is equivalent to the human hereditary disorder Fraser syndrome, characterized by cryptophthalmos (hidden eyes), embryonic skin blistering, renal agenesis, and syndactyly. Recent studies revealed a functional cooperation between the Fras1/Frem gene products, in which Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 are simultaneously stabilized at the lowermost region of the basement membrane by forming a macromolecular ternary complex. Loss of any of these proteins results in the collapse of the protein assembly, thus providing a molecular explanation for the highly similar phenotypic defects displayed by the respective mutant mice. Here, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the structure, function, and interplay between the proteins of the Fras1/Frem family and further propose a possible scenario for the evolution of the corresponding genes.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: An Extended Extrinsic Mechanism for Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu-Zhen; Li, Hui-Wu; Hu, Liang-Bin

    2009-12-01

    The extrinsic mechanism for anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets is extended to include the contributions both from spin-orbit-dependent impurity scattering and from the spin-orbit coupling induced by external electric fields. The results obtained suggest that, within the framework of the extrinsic mechanisms, the anomalous Hall current in a ferromagnet may also contain a substantial amount of dissipationless contribution independent of impurity scattering. After the contribution from the spin-orbit coupling induced by external electric fields is included, the total anomalous Hall conductivity is about two times larger than that due to spin-orbit dependent impurity scatterings.

  10. Structure of ADC-68, a novel carbapenem-hydrolyzing class C extended-spectrum β-lactamase isolated from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Ho; Hong, Myoung Ki; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Jae Jin; Park, Kwang Seung; Karim, Asad Mustafa; Jo, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Ji Hwan; Ko, Kwan Soo; Kang, Lin Woo; Lee, Sang Hee

    2014-11-01

    Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections have become more frequent worldwide owing to the emergence of several different classes of β-lactamases. In this study, the molecular, biochemical and structural characteristics of an Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinase (ADC)-type class C β-lactamase, ADC-68, isolated from the carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii D015 were investigated. The blaADC-68 gene which encodes ADC-68 was confirmed to exist on the chromosome via Southern blot analysis and draft genome sequencing. The catalytic kinetics of β-lactams and their MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) for A. baumannii D015 and purified ADC-68 (a carbapenemase obtained from this strain) were assessed: the strain was resistant to penicillins, narrow-spectrum and extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and carbapenems, which were hydrolyzed by ADC-68. The crystal structure of ADC-68 was determined at a resolution of 1.8 Å. The structure of ADC-68 was compared with that of ADC-1 (a non-carbapenemase); differences were found in the central part of the Ω-loop and the C-loop constituting the edge of the R1 and R2 subsites and are close to the catalytic serine residue Ser66. The ADC-68 C-loop was stabilized in the open conformation of the upper R2 subsite and could better accommodate carbapenems with larger R2 side chains. Furthermore, a wide-open conformation of the R2-loop allowed ADC-68 to bind to and hydrolyze extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Therefore, ADC-68 had enhanced catalytic efficiency against these clinically important β-lactams (extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems). ADC-68 is the first reported enzyme among the chromosomal class C β-lactamases to possess class C extended-spectrum β-lactamase and carbapenemase activities.

  11. Structure and development of old-growth, unmanaged second-growth, and extended rotation Pinus resinosa forests in Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Emily J. Silver; Anthony W. D' Amato; Shawn Fraver; Brian J. Palik; John B. Bradford

    2013-01-01

    The structure and developmental dynamics of old-growth forests often serve as important baselines for restoration prescriptions aimed at promoting more complex structural conditions in managed forest landscapes. Nonetheless, long-term information on natural patterns of development is rare for many commercially important and ecologically widespread forest types....

  12. Structure of sorting nexin 11 (SNX11) reveals a novel extended phox homology (PX) domain critical for inhibition of SNX10-induced vacuolation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinxin; Xu, Tingting; Wu, Bin; Ye, Yinghua; You, Xiaojuan; Shu, Xiaodong; Pei, Duanqing; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-06-07

    Sorting nexins are phox homology (PX) domain-containing proteins involved in diverse intracellular endosomal trafficking pathways. The PX domain binds to certain phosphatidylinositols and is recruited to vesicles rich in these lipids. The structure of the PX domain is highly conserved, containing a three-stranded β-sheet, followed by three α-helices. Here, we report the crystal structures of truncated human SNX11 (sorting nexin 11). The structures reveal that SNX11 contains a novel PX domain, hereby named the extended PX (PXe) domain, with two additional α-helices at the C terminus. We demonstrate that these α-helices are indispensible for the in vitro functions of SNX11. We propose that this PXe domain is present in SNX10 and is responsible for the vacuolation activity of SNX10. Thus, this novel PXe domain constitutes a structurally and functionally important PX domain subfamily.

  13. An ontology for microbial phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Chibucos, Marcus C; Zweifel, Adrienne E; Herrera, Jonathan C; Meza, William; Eslamfam, Shabnam; Uetz, Peter; Siegele, Deborah A; Hu, James C; Giglio, Michelle G

    2014-11-30

    Phenotypic data are routinely used to elucidate gene function in organisms amenable to genetic manipulation. However, previous to this work, there was no generalizable system in place for the structured storage and retrieval of phenotypic information for bacteria. The Ontology of Microbial Phenotypes (OMP) has been created to standardize the capture of such phenotypic information from microbes. OMP has been built on the foundations of the Basic Formal Ontology and the Phenotype and Trait Ontology. Terms have logical definitions that can facilitate computational searching of phenotypes and their associated genes. OMP can be accessed via a wiki page as well as downloaded from SourceForge. Initial annotations with OMP are being made for Escherichia coli using a wiki-based annotation capture system. New OMP terms are being concurrently developed as annotation proceeds. We anticipate that diverse groups studying microbial genetics and associated phenotypes will employ OMP for standardizing microbial phenotype annotation, much as the Gene Ontology has standardized gene product annotation. The resulting OMP resource and associated annotations will facilitate prediction of phenotypes for unknown genes and result in new experimental characterization of phenotypes and functions.

  14. The Genomic and Phenotypic Diversity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Jeffares, Daniel C.; Rallis, Charalampos; Rieux, Adrien; Speed, Doug; Převorovský, Martin; Mourier, Tobias; Marsellach, Francesc X.; Iqbal, Zamin; Lau, Winston; Cheng, Tammy M.K.; Pracana, Rodrigo; Mülleder, Michael; Lawson, Jonathan L.D.; Chessel, Anatole; Bala, Sendu; Hellenthal, Garrett; O’Fallon, Brendan; Keane, Thomas; Simpson, Jared T.; Bischof, Leanne; Tomiczek, Bartlomiej; Bitton, Danny A.; Sideri, Theodora; Codlin, Sandra; Hellberg, Josephine E.E.U.; van Trigt, Laurent; Jeffery, Linda; Li, Juan-Juan; Atkinson, Sophie; Thodberg, Malte; Febrer, Melanie; McLay, Kirsten; Drou, Nizar; Brown, William; Hayles, Jacqueline; Carazo Salas, Rafael E.; Ralser, Markus; Maniatis, Nikolas; Balding, David J.; Balloux, Francois; Durbin, Richard; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    Natural variation within species reveals aspects of genome evolution and function. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important model for eukaryotic biology, but researchers typically use one standard laboratory strain. To extend the utility of this model, we surveyed the genomic and phenotypic variation in 161 natural isolates. We sequenced the genomes of all strains, revealing moderate genetic diversity (π = 3 ×10−3) and weak global population structure. We estimate that dispersal of S. pombe began within human antiquity (~340 BCE), and ancestors of these strains reached th