Science.gov

Sample records for extended skyrme interaction

  1. Investigation of Nuclear Ground State Properties of Fuel Materials of 232Th and 238U Using Skyrme-Extended-Thomas-Fermi Approach Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulianto, Yacobus; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-08-01

    It has been performed the nuclear ground state properties investigation of 232Th and 238U using Skyrme interaction. The local density, the kinetic energy density, and the spin-orbit density for proton and neutron have been calculated using Extended-Thomas-Fermi approach method. Then the calculation results have been compared with Skyrme-Hartree-Fock results (using HAFOMN and HFBRAD codes). Total energy calculations obtained from this research are -1792.973947 MeV (for 232Th) deviated 0.29244% from experiment energy and -1761.519459 MeV (for 238U) deviated 0.48369% from experiment energy. The distribution profiles of local density and local potential for 232Th and 238U are quite similar with Skyrme- Hartree-Fock results. It is indicated that Skyrme-Extended-Thomas-Fermi method can be used to study the nuclear ground state properties, especially even nuclei.

  2. Constraining the surface properties of effective Skyrme interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodon, R.; Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Meyer, J.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Deformation energy surfaces map how the total binding energy of a nuclear system depends on the geometrical properties of intrinsic configurations, thereby providing a powerful tool to interpret nuclear spectroscopy and large-amplitude collective-motion phenomena such as fission. The global behavior of the deformation energy is known to be directly connected to the surface properties of the effective interaction used for its calculation. Purpose: The precise control of surface properties during the parameter adjustment of an effective interaction is key to obtain a reliable and predictive description of nuclear properties. The most relevant indicator is the surface-energy coefficient asurf. There are several possibilities for its definition and estimation, which are not fully equivalent and require a computational effort that can differ by orders of magnitude. The purpose of this study is threefold: first, to identify a scheme for the determination of asurf that offers the best compromise between robustness, precision, and numerical efficiency; second, to analyze the correlation between values for asurf and the characteristic energies of the fission barrier of 240Pu; and third, to lay out an efficient and robust procedure for how the deformation properties of the Skyrme energy density functional (EDF) can be constrained during the parameter fit. Methods: There are several frequently used possibilities to define and calculate the surface energy coefficient asurf of effective interactions built for the purpose of self-consistent mean-field calculations. The most direct access is provided by the model system of semi-infinite nuclear matter, but asurf can also be extracted from the systematics of binding energies of finite nuclei. Calculations can be carried out either self-consistently [Hartree-Fock (HF)], which incorporates quantal shell effects, or in one of the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) or modified Thomas-Fermi (MTF) approximations. The

  3. Speed of sound in nuclear matter and Skyrme effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.K.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1987-02-01

    Using a nuclear equation of state derived from a finite-temperature Green's function method and the Skyrme effective interactions SkI, SkIII and SkM*, the authors have calculated the speed of sound in symmetric nuclear matter. For certain densities and temperatures, this speed is found to become super-luminous. Causal boundaries in the density-temperature plane are determined, and they indicate that SkM* is a more desirable effective interaction than SkI and SkIII. Comparison with a similar calculation by Osnes and Strottman is made.

  4. Comparative study of fusion barriers using Skyrme interactions and the energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Torabi, F.

    2015-12-01

    Using different Skyrme interactions, we have carried out a comparative analysis of fusion barriers for a wide range of interacting nuclei in the framework of semiclassical Skyrme energy density formalism. The results of our calculations reveal that SVI, SII, and SIII Skyrme forces are able to reproduce the empirical values of barrier heights with higher accuracy than the other considered forces in this formalism. It is also shown that the calculated nucleus-nucleus potentials derived from such Skyrme interactions are able to explain the fusion cross sections at energies near and above the barrier.

  5. Self-consistent RPA calculations with Skyrme-type interactions: The skyrme_rpa program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colò, Gianluca; Cao, Ligang; Van Giai, Nguyen; Capelli, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Random Phase Approximation (RPA) calculations are nowadays an indispensable tool in nuclear physics studies. We present here a complete version implemented with Skyrme-type interactions, with the spherical symmetry assumption, that can be used in cases where the effects of pairing correlations and of deformation can be ignored. The full self-consistency between the Hartree-Fock mean field and the RPA excitations is enforced, and it is numerically controlled by comparison with energy-weighted sum rules. The main limitations are that charge-exchange excitations and transitions involving spin operators are not included in this version. Program summaryProgram title: skyrme_rpa (v 1.00) Catalogue identifier: AENF_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5531 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 39435 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-90/95; easily downgradable to FORTRAN-77. Computer: PC with Intel Celeron, Intel Pentium, AMD Athlon and Intel Core Duo processors. Operating system: Linux, Windows. RAM: From 4 MBytes to 150 MBytes, depending on the size of the nucleus and of the model space for RPA. Word size: The code is written with a prevalent use of double precision or REAL(8) variables; this assures 15 significant digits. Classification: 17.24. Nature of problem: Systematic observations of excitation properties in finite nuclear systems can lead to improved knowledge of the nuclear matter equation of state as well as a better understanding of the effective interaction in the medium. This is the case of the nuclear giant resonances and low-lying collective excitations, which can be described as small amplitude collective motions in the framework of

  6. Determining a Skyrme-type effective interaction from realistic two-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Manisa, K.

    2011-07-15

    The Variational Monte Carlo (VMC) method is employed to determine characteristics of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter. The realistic Urbana v14 nucleon-nucleon interaction potential of Lagaris and Pandharipande was used in the VMC calculations with addition of a phenomenological density-dependent term to simulate many-body interactions. A new Skyrme parameter set SKaan-U14 is found to consistently reproduce the characteristics of the nuclear matter obtained from VMC calculations. The properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter are calculated by the new Skyrme parameter set. The results obtained by using the new Skyrme parameter set are compared with results obtained by different Skyrme parameter sets in the literature.

  7. Second RPA calculations with the Skyrme and Gogny interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambacurta, Danilo; Grasso, Marcella

    2016-07-01

    The Second Random Phase Approximation (SRPA) is a natural extension of RPA where more general excitation operators are introduced. These operators contain, in addition to the one particle-one hole configurations already considered in RPA, also two particle-two hole excitations. Only in the last years, large-scale SRPA calculations have been performed, showing the merits and limits of this approach. In the first part of this paper, we present an overview of recent applications of the SRPA based on the Skyrme and Gogny interactions. Giant resonances in 16O will be studied and their properties discussed by using different models. In particular, we will present the first applications of the SRPA model with the finite-range Gogny interaction, discussing the advantages and drawbacks of using such an interaction in this type of calculations. After that, some more recent results, obtained by using a subtraction procedure to overcome double-counting in the SRPA, will be discussed. We will show that this procedure leads to results that are weakly cutoff dependent and that a strong reduction of the SRPA downwards shift with respect to the RPA spectra is found. Moreover, applying this procedure for the first time in the Gogny-SRPA framework, we will show that this method is able to reduce the anomalous shift found in previous calculations and related to some proton-neutron matrix elements of the residual interaction.

  8. Second-order equation of state with the Skyrme interaction: Cutoff and dimensional regularization with the inclusion of rearrangement terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. J.; Grasso, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Moghrabi, K.

    2016-09-01

    We evaluate the second-order (beyond-mean-field) contribution to the equation of state of nuclear matter with the effective Skyrme force and use cutoff and dimensional regularizations to treat the ultraviolet divergence produced by the zero-range character of this interaction. An adjustment of the force parameters is then performed in both cases to remove any double counting generated by the explicit computation of beyond-mean-field corrections with the Skyrme force. In addition, we include at second order the rearrangement terms associated with the density-dependent part of the Skyrme force and discuss their effect. Sets of parameters are proposed to define new effective forces which are specially designed for second-order calculations in nuclear matter.

  9. Kaon-Nucleon systems and their interactions in the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezoe, Takashi; Hosaka, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    We study kaon-nucleon systems in the Skyrme model in a method based on the bound state approach of Callan-Klebanov but with the kaon around the physical nucleon of the rotating hedgehog. This corresponds to the variation after projection, reversing the order of semiclassical quantization of 1 /Nc expansion. The method, however, is considered to be suited to the study of weakly interacting kaon-nucleon systems including loosely K ¯N bound states such as Λ (1405 ). We have found a bound state with binding energy of order 10 MeV, consistent with the observed state. We also discuss the K ¯N interaction and find that it consists of an attraction in the middle range and a repulsion in the short range.

  10. Dipole response in neutron-rich nuclei with new Skyrme interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Burrello, S.; Colonna, M.; Baran, V.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the isoscalar and isovector E 1 response of neutron-rich nuclei, within a semiclassical transport model employing effective interactions for the nuclear mean field. In particular, we adopt the recently introduced SAMi-J Skyrme interactions, whose parameters are specifically tuned to improve the description of spin-isospin properties of nuclei. Our analysis evidences a relevant degree of isoscalar-isovector mixing of the collective excitations developing in neutron-rich systems. Focusing on the low-lying strength emerging in the isovector response, we show that this energy region essentially corresponds to the excitation of isoscalar-like modes, which also contribute to the isovector response owing to their mixed character. Considering effective interactions which mostly differ in the isovector channels, we observe that these mixing effects increase with the slope L of the symmetry energy at saturation density, leading to a larger strength in the low-energy region of the isovector response. This result appears connected to the increase, with L , of the neutron-proton asymmetry at the surface of the considered nuclei, i.e., to the neutron skin thickness.

  11. Isovector splitting of nucleon effective masses, ab initio benchmarks and extended stability criteria for Skyrme energy functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lesinski, T.; Meyer, J.

    2006-10-15

    We study the effect of the splitting of neutron and proton effective masses with isospin asymmetry on the properties of the Skyrme energy density functional. We discuss the ability of the latter to predict observables of infinite matter and finite nuclei, paying particular attention to controlling the agreement with ab initio predictions of the spin-isospin content of the nuclear equation of state, as well as diagnosing the onset of finite size instabilities, which we find to be of critical importance. We show that these various constraints cannot be simultaneously fulfilled by the standard Skyrme force, calling at least for an extension of its P-wave part.

  12. Stochastic approach to correlations beyond the mean field with the Skyrme interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Funaki, Y.; Yabana, K.

    2012-10-20

    Large-scale calculation based on the multi-configuration Skyrme density functional theory is performed for the light N=Z even-even nucleus, {sup 12}C. Stochastic procedures and the imaginary-time evolution are utilized to prepare many Slater determinants. Each state is projected on eigenstates of parity and angular momentum. Then, performing the configuration mixing calculation with the Skyrme Hamiltonian, we obtain low-lying energy-eigenstates and their explicit wave functions. The generated wave functions are completely free from any assumption and symmetry restriction. Excitation spectra and transition probabilities are well reproduced, not only for the ground-state band, but for negative-parity excited states and the Hoyle state.

  13. Thermal quasiparticle random-phase approximation with Skyrme interactions and supernova neutral-current neutrino-nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhioev, Alan A.; Vdovin, A. I.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Wambach, J.; Stoyanov, Ch.

    2016-07-01

    The thermal quasiparticle random-phase approximation is combined with the Skyrme energy density functional method (Skyrme-TQRPA) to study the response of a hot nucleus to an external perturbation. For the sample nuclei 56Fe and 82Ge, the Skyrme-TQRPA is applied to analyze thermal effects on the strength function of charge-neutral Gamow-Teller transitions, which dominate neutrino-nucleus reactions at Eν≲20 MeV. For the relevant supernova temperatures we calculate the cross sections for inelastic neutrino scattering. We also apply the method to examine the rate of neutrino-antineutrino pair emission by hot nuclei. The cross sections and rates are compared with those obtained earlier from the TQRPA calculations based on the phenomenological quasiparticle-phonon model Hamiltonian. For inelastic neutrino scattering on 56Fe we also compare the Skyrme-TQRPA results to those obtained earlier from a hybrid approach that combines shell-model and RPA calculations.

  14. Electromagnetic interactions of extended nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, K. )

    1989-09-01

    An electromagnetic current operator is deduced from the most general form of the extended pion-nucleon vertex function using the minimal substitution prescription. It is proved that the sum of the obtained current operator and the isolated-pole contribution satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity derived for the pion photoproduction. The minimal-coupling interaction is applied to the calculation of the one-pion exchange current regularized by the pion-nucleon form factors. It is found that the one-pion exchange current operator including hadronic and electromagnetic form factors satisfies the Ward-Takahashi equation for the nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  15. Extended Thomas-Fermi density functionals in the presence of a tensor interaction in spherical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, J.; Bencheikh, K.; Meyer, J.

    2008-02-15

    For a one-body Hamiltonian obtained from the energy-density functional associated with a Skyrme effective interaction, including a tensor force, semiclassical functional densities are derived in the framework of the Extended Thomas-Fermi method, in spherical symmetry, for the kinetic energy and spin-orbit density. The structure of the self-consistent mean-field potentials constructed with such semiclassical functionals is studied. The impact of the tensor force in particular on the spin-orbit form factor clearly indicates the necessity of including such tensor-force terms in the theoretical description of atomic nuclei and their possible influence on the shell structure of exotic nuclei.

  16. Exact results in the Skyrme model in (3+1) dimensions via the generalized hedgehog ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    We present exact results in the (3 + 1) -dimensional Skyrme model. First of all, it will be shown that, in the Pionic sector, a quite remarkable phenomenon for a non-integrable (3 + 1) -dimensional field theory appears: a non-linear superposition law is available allowing the composition of solutions in order to generate new solutions of the full field equations keeping alive, at the same time, the interactions terms in the energy-density. Secondly, it will be shown that the generalized hedgehog ansatz can be extended to suitable curved backgrounds. Interestingly, one can choose the background metric in such a way to describe finite-volume effects and, at the same time, to simplify the Skyrme field equations. In this way, it is possible to construct the first exact multi-Skyrmionic configurations of the (3 + 1) -dimensional Skyrme model with arbitrary high winding number and living at finite volume. Last but not least, a novel BPS bound (which is sharper than the usual one in term of the winding number) will be derived which can be saturated and reduces the field equations to a first-order equation for the profile.

  17. Gauged multisoliton baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenka, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of U (1 ) gauged modification of the 2 +1 -dimensional planar Skyrme model with a particular choice of the symmetry breaking potential term which combines a short-range repulsion and a long-range attraction. In the absence of the gauge interaction, the multisolitons of the model are aloof, as they consist of the individual constituents which are well separated. A peculiar feature of the model is that there are usually several different stable static multisoliton solutions of rather similar energy in a topological sector of given degree. We investigate the pattern of the solutions and find new previously unknown local minima. It is shown that coupling of the aloof planar multi-Skyrmions to the magnetic field strongly affects the pattern of interaction between the constituents. We analyze the dependency of the structure of the solutions, their energies, and magnetic fluxes on the strength of the gauge coupling. It is found that, generically, in the strong coupling limit, the coupling to the gauge field results in effective recovery of the rotational invariance of the configuration.

  18. Baby Skyrme model, near-BPS approximations, and supersymmetric extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, S.; Zakrzewski, W.

    2015-02-01

    We study the baby Skyrme model as a theory that interpolates between two distinct BPS systems. For this, a near-BPS approximation can be used when there is a small deviation from each of the two BPS limits. We provide analytical explanation and numerical support for the validity of this approximation. We then study the set of all possible supersymmetric extensions of the baby Skyrme model with N =1 and the particular ones with extended N =2 supersymmetries and relate this to the above mentioned almost-BPS approximation.

  19. Effect of the tensor part of Skyrme interaction on the description of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering on the basis of the optical model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprikov, V. I.; Pilipenko, V. V.

    2013-01-15

    A microscopic optical nucleon-nucleus potential constructed on the basis of calculating the mass operator for the single-particle Green's function with Skyrme nucleon-nucleon forces was used to study the effect of the tensor part of Skyrme forces on describing differential cross sections for elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering and the structure of nuclei within a self-consistent approach. It was shown that an increase in the tensor terms of nucleon-nucleon forces impaired the description of nucleon-nucleus scattering within the model being considered. The parameters of Skyrme forces were optimized on the basis of an analysis of cross sections for neutron-nucleus scattering, the properties of nuclear matter and the structure of nuclei being tested in doing this. This optimization led to nucleon-nucleon force versions where the tensor part was small or zero and which described satisfactorily the structure of nuclei and cross sections for elastic neutron and proton scattering on nuclei over a broad range of target mass numbers.

  20. Bimodal Fission in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of 256Fm, 258Fm, and 260Fm isotopes are studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. In the particle-hole channel we take the Skyrme SkM* effective force, while in the particle-particle channel we employ the seniority pairing interaction. Three static fission paths for all investigated heavy fermium isotopes are found. The analysis of these fission modes allows to describe observed asymmetric fission of 256Fm, as well as bimodal fission of 258Fm and symmetric fission in 260Fm.

  1. COMPARISON OF SELF-CONSISTENT SKYRME AND GOGNY CALCULATIONS FOR LIGHT Hg ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Warda, Michal J; Prochniak, L.; Staszczak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state properties of neutron-deficient Hg isotopes have been investigated by the constrained self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with the Skyrme and Gogny effective forces. In the case of the Skyrme interaction we have also applied the Hartree-Fock+BCS model with the state-dependent {delta}-pairing interaction. Potential energy surfaces and pairing properties have been compared for the both types of forces.

  2. Loosening up the Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke

    2016-03-01

    We consider the Skyrme model with the addition of extra scalar potentials that decrease the classical binding energies of the Skyrmions to about the 3% level—without altering the pion mass—if we insist on keeping platonic symmetries that are usually possessed by Skyrmions. A side effect of the potentials under consideration is the smaller size of the 1-Skyrmion resulting in a smaller moment of inertia and in turn a larger spin contribution to the energy upon semiclassical quantization. After taking into account the quantum contributions we find total binding energies at the 6% level.

  3. Black hole Skyrmion in a generalized Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto; Sawado, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    We study a Skyrme-like model with the Skyrme term and a sixth-order derivative term as higher-order terms, coupled to gravity and we construct Schwarzschild black hole Skyrme hair. We find, surprisingly, that the sixth-order derivative term alone cannot stabilize the black hole hair solutions; the Skyrme term with a large enough coefficient is a necessity.

  4. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to μν decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance ofmore » the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.« less

  5. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to μν decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance of the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.

  6. Baby Skyrme models without a potential term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Jennifer; Haberichter, Mareike; Krusch, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    We develop a one-parameter family of static baby Skyrme models that do not require a potential term to admit topological solitons. This is a novel property as the standard baby Skyrme model must contain a potential term in order to have stable soliton solutions, though the Skyrme model does not require this. Our new models satisfy an energy bound that is linear in terms of the topological charge and can be saturated in an extreme limit. They also satisfy a virial theorem that is shared by the Skyrme model. We calculate the solitons of our new models numerically and observe that their form depends significantly on the choice of parameter. In one extreme, we find compactons while at the other there is a scale invariant model in which solitons can be obtained exactly as solutions to a Bogomolny equation. We provide an initial investigation into these solitons and compare them with the baby Skyrmions of other models.

  7. Fission barriers for neutron-rich nuclei by means of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Hashizume, K.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.

    2007-02-26

    The nuclear fission barrier height has been estimated by means of the constraint Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method. The potential energy surfaces obtained by the method are analyzed with the flooding method to find several saddle points. The results for U, Np, Bk isotopes are compared with the barrier derived from the extended Thomas-Fermi plus Strutinsky integral method.

  8. Self-consistent separable random-phase approximation for Skyrme forces: Giant resonances in axial nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterenko, V. O.; Dolci, D. S.; Kleinig, W.; Kvasil, J.; Vesely, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2006-12-15

    We formulate the self-consistent separable random phase approximation (SRPA) method and specify it for Skyrme forces with pairing for the case of axially symmetric deformed nuclei. The factorization of the residual interaction allows diagonalization of high-ranking RPA matrices to be avoided, which dramatically reduces the computational expense. This advantage is crucial for the systems with a huge configuration space, first of all for deformed nuclei. SRPA self-consistently takes into account the contributions of both time-even and time-odd Skyrme terms as well as of the Coulomb force and pairing. The method is implemented to describe isovector E1 and isoscalar E2 giant resonances in a representative set of deformed nuclei: {sup 154}Sm, {sup 238}U, and {sup 254}No. Four different Skyrme parameterizations (SkT6, SkM*, SLy6, and SkI3) are employed to explore the dependence of the strength distributions on some basic characteristics of the Skyrme functional and nuclear matter. In particular, we discuss the role of isoscalar and isovector effective masses and their relation to time-odd contributions. The high sensitivity of the right flank of E1 resonance to different Skyrme forces and the related artificial structure effects are analyzed.

  9. Hyperon puzzle of neutron stars with Skyrme force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho; Kwak, Kyujin; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    We consider the so-called hyperon puzzle of neutron star (NS). We employ Skyrme force models for the description of in-medium nucleon-nucleon (NN), nucleon-Lambda hyperon (NΛ) and Lambda-Lambda (ΛΛ) interactions. A phenomenological finite-range force (FRF) for the ΛΛ interaction is considered as well. Equation of state (EoS) of NS matter is obtained in the framework of density functional theory, and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relations of NSs. It has been generally known that the existence of hyperons in the NS matter is not well supported by the recent discovery of large-mass NSs (M ≃ 2M⊙) since hyperons make the EoS softer than the one without them. For the selected interaction models, NΛ interactions reduce the maximum mass of NS by about 30%, while ΛΛ interactions can give about 10% enhancement. Consequently, we find that some Skyrme force models predict the maximum mass of NS consistent with the observation of 2M⊙ NSs, and at the same time satisfy observationally constrained mass-radius relations.

  10. Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model and nuclear binding energies.

    PubMed

    Adam, C; Naya, C; Sanchez-Guillen, J; Wereszczynski, A

    2013-12-01

    We use the classical Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) soliton solutions of the BPS Skyrme model together with corrections from the collective coordinate quantization of spin and isospin, the electrostatic Coulomb energies, and a small explicit breaking of the isospin symmetry-accounting for the proton-neutron mass difference-to calculate nuclear binding energies. We find that the resulting binding energies are already in excellent agreement with their physical values for heavier nuclei, demonstrating thereby that the BPS Skyrme model is a distinguished starting point for a detailed quantitative investigation of nuclear and low-energy strong interaction physics.

  11. Skyrme-Einstein closed cosmic chiral strings

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P. Ivanova, I. S.

    2007-07-15

    Within the theory of general relativity, the configuration of a closed string (vortex) characterized by a topological charge of the degree type is described for the Skyrme-Einstein SU (2) chiral model. In the approximation of a large vortex-closure radius (a), a solution to equations of motion is obtained, along with estimates for the vortex energy and radius.

  12. Compact and extended objects from self-interacting phantom fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Makhmudov, Arislan; Urazalina, Ainur; Singleton, Douglas; Scott, John

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate localized and extended objects for gravitating, self-interacting phantom fields. The phantom fields come from two scalar fields with a "wrong-sign" (negative) kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian. This study covers several solutions supported by these phantom fields: phantom balls, traversable wormholes, phantom cosmic strings, and "phantom" domain walls. These four systems are solved numerically, and we try to draw out general, interesting features in each case.

  13. On extended sign-changeable interactions in the dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Mónica

    2014-10-01

    We extend the cosmological couplings proposed in Sun et al. and Wei, where they suggested interactions with change of signs along the cosmological evolution. Our extension liberates the changes of sign of the interaction from the deceleration parameter and from the relation of energy densities of the dark sector and considers the presence of non interactive matter. In three cases we obtain the general solutions and the results obtained in models fitted with Hubble's function and SNe Ia data, are analyzed regarding the problem of the cosmological coincidence, the problem of the crisis of the cosmological age and the magnitude of the energy density of dark energy at early universe. Also we graphically study the range of variation of, the actual dark matter density parameter, the effective equation of state of the dark energy and the redshift of transition to the accelerated regimen, generated by variations at order $1\\sigma$ in the coupling parameters.

  14. Solitons in Skyrme - Faddeev spinor model and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the possibility of unification of Skyrme and Faddeev approaches for the description of baryons and leptons respectively as topological solitons within the scope of 16-spinor model. The motivation for such a unification is based on a special 8- semispinor identity invented by the Italian geometrician F. Brioschi. This remarkable identity permits one to realize baryon or lepton states through the effect of spontaneous symmetry breaking emerging due to special structure of the Higgs potential in the model. At large distances from the particle - soliton small excitation of the vacuum satisfies Klein - Gordon equation with some mass that permits one to establish the correspondence with quantum mechanics in special stochastic representation of the wave function for extended particles - solitons. Finally, we illustrate the peculiar properties of stochastic representation by the famous T. Young's experiment with n slits in soliton realization.

  15. Vacuum alignment in the breaking of extended hypercolor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, J.; Ramón-Medrano, M.

    1983-08-01

    We analyze how the search for the true vacuum at the first breaking of an extended-hypercolor-interaction theory determines the physics at energies of the order of ΛHC. The effects of vacuum alignment on the light-fermion spectrum-number of families, isospin violations in fermion mass matrices, along with pseudo-Goldstone-boson and gauge-meson spectra-are explicitly shown in a SUL(2)×SUC(3)×UY(1)×SUEHC(8)×OHC'(6) model.

  16. Nuclear Mass Predictions within the Skyrme HFB Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J.M.

    2005-05-24

    To increase the reliability of predictions of highly neutron-rich nuclear masses we systematically analyze the sensitivity of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass formulae to various physical inputs, such as a density dependence of the pairing interaction, a low effective mass, the particle-number projection, the symmetry energy, ... We typically use a 10-parameter Skyrme force and a 4-parameter {delta}-function pairing force. The 14 degrees of freedom are adjusted to the masses of all measured nuclei with N,Z {>=} 8 given in the 2001 and 2003 Audi et al. compilations. The masses of light and proton-rich nuclei are corrected by a 4-parameter phenomenological Wigner term. With more than ten such parameter sets complete mass tables are constructed, going from one drip line to the other, up to Z = 120.

  17. Nuclear Mass Predictions within the Skyrme HFB Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samyn, M.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    2005-05-01

    To increase the reliability of predictions of highly neutron-rich nuclear masses we systematically analyze the sensitivity of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass formulae to various physical inputs, such as a density dependence of the pairing interaction, a low effective mass, the particle-number projection, the symmetry energy, … We typically use a 10-parameter Skyrme force and a 4-parameter δ-function pairing force. The 14 degrees of freedom are adjusted to the masses of all measured nuclei with N,Z ⩾ 8 given in the 2001 and 2003 Audi et al. compilations. The masses of light and proton-rich nuclei are corrected by a 4-parameter phenomenological Wigner term. With more than ten such parameter sets complete mass tables are constructed, going from one drip line to the other, up to Z = 120.

  18. Gd isotope systematics with Skyrme and {delta}-pairing forces

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Hoehenberger, W.

    1996-04-01

    Assuming axial symmetry of the nuclear shape and the Skyrme force SIII updated on the pairing interaction {ital V}{sub 0}{delta}({ital r}{searrow}{sub 12}) we performed constrained Hartree-Fock calculations of well deformed even gadolinium {sub 64}Gd isotopes with neutron numbers {ital N}=86{endash}106. The mass spectrum, nuclear radii, neutron skin thickness, quadrupole moments (deformations), and low-spin rotational levels are calculated. In all the cases viewed the angular momentum projection after variation was performed. This was achieved by explicit inclusion of the rotational energy {minus}{l_angle}{cflx {sq_bullet}}{sup 2}{r_angle}/2J. The procedure corrects the ground state deformations and gives deformations and energies of low excited states as well. The results found have all been compared to experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Interacting-Holstein and extended-Holstein bipolarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Monodeep; Tezuka, Masaki; Min, B. I.

    2014-01-01

    Employing the recently developed self-consistent variational basis generation scheme, we have investigated the bipolaron-bipolaron interaction within the purview of the Holstein-Hubbard and the extended-Holstein-Hubbard (F2H) models on a discrete one-dimensional lattice. The density-matrix renormalization group method has also been used for the Holstein-Hubbard model. We have shown that there exists no bipolaron-bipolaron attraction in the Holstein-Hubbard model. In contrast, we have obtained clear-cut bipolaron-bipolaron attraction in the F2H model. Composite bipolarons are formed above a critical electron-phonon coupling strength, which can survive the finite Hubbard U effect. We have constructed the phase diagram of F2H polarons and bipolarons, and discussed the phase separation in terms of the formation of composite bipolarons.

  20. Skyrme-like models and supersymmetry in 3 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiruga, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    We construct supersymmetric extensions for different Skyrme-like models in 3 +1 dimensions. BPS equations and BPS bounds are obtained from supersymmetry in some cases. We discuss also the emergence of several Skyrme-like models from supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory and Born-Infeld theory in 5 dimensions.

  1. Deformation around Neutron-Rich Cr Isotopes in Axially Symmetric Skyrme-Hatree-Fock-Bogoliubov Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, H.; Matsuo, M.

    2008-07-01

    We analyse the deformation mechanism in neutron-rich Cr, Fe and Ti isotopes with N = 32-44 using a Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field code employing a two-dimensional mesh representation in the cylindrical coordinate system. Evaluating the quadrupole deformation energy systematically, we show that the Skyrme parameter set SkM* gives a quadrupole instability around the neutron numbers N ˜ 38-42 in Cr isotopes, where the deformation energy curve suggests a transitional behavior with a shallow minimum extending to a large prolate deformation. The roles of a deformed N = 38 gap and the position of the neutron g_{9/2} orbit are analysed in detail.

  2. The extended interacting wind structure of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Corcoran, M. F.; Madura, T. I.; Owocki, S. P.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hillier, D. J.; Hamaguchi, K.; Kober, G. V.; Weis, K.; Stahl, O.; Okazaki, A. T.

    2009-07-01

    The highly eccentric binary system, η Car, provides clues to the transition of massive stars from hydrogen-burning via the CNO cycle to a helium-burning evolutionary state. The fast-moving wind of η Car B creates a cavity in η Car A's slower, but more massive, stellar wind, providing an in situ probe. The Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), with its high spatial and spectral resolutions, is well matched to follow temporal spatial and velocity variations of multiple wind features. We use observations obtained across 1998-2004 to produce a rudimentary three-dimensional model of the wind interaction in the η Car system. Broad (+/-500 km s-1) [FeII] emission line structures extend 0.7arcsec (~1600 au) from the stellar core. In contrast, [FeIII], [ArIII], [NeIII] and [SIII] lines extend only 0.3arcsec (700 au) from NE to SW and are blue shifted from -500 to +200 km s-1. All observed spectral features vary with the 5.54-year orbital period. The highly ionized, forbidden emission disappears during the low state, associated with periastron passage. The high-ionization emission originates in the outer wind interaction region that is directly excited by the far-ultraviolet radiation from η Car B. The HST/STIS spectra reveal a time-varying, distorted paraboloidal structure, caused by the interaction of the massive stellar winds. The model and observations are consistent with the orbital plane aligned with the skirt of the Homunculus. However, the axis of the distorted paraboloid, relative to the major axis of the binary orbit, is shifted in a prograde rotation along the plane, which projected on the sky is from NE to NW. Based on observations made with the National Aeronautics and Space Agency/European Space Agency (NASA/ESA) HST. Support for Programme numbers 7302, 8036, 8483, 8619, 9083, 9337, 9420, 9973, 10957 and 11273 was provided by NASA directly to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Science Team and through grants from the

  3. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  4. Higgs-and Skyrme-Chern-Simons densities in all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchrakian, D. H.

    2015-09-01

    Two types of new Chern-Simons (CS) densities, both defined in all odd and even dimensions, are proposed. These new CS densities feature a scalar field interacting with the gauge field. In one case this is a Higgs scalar while in the other it is a Skyrme scalar. The motivation is to study the effects of adding these new CS terms to a Lagrangian which supports static soliton solutions prior to their introduction.

  5. Skyrme forces versus relativistic models: Reexamining instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dutra, M.; Lourenco, O.; Delfino, A.; Sa Martins, J. S.; Providencia, C.; Avancini, S. S.; Menezes, D. P.

    2008-03-15

    Experimental constraints are useful tools in helping to decide, among a number of candidates, which is the more suitable equation of state for nuclear matter. In this work we compare nonrelativistic Skyrme-type and relativistic Walecka-type models when they are used to describe processes related to binary system instabilities and phases coexistence. In general, nonrelativistic and relativistic models predict somewhat different behaviors, but we found that one of the parametrizations of the density-dependent hadronic model shows some similarities with nonrelativistic models in many of the features addressed in our investigation. We have checked that, once experimental data obtained in heavy-ion collisions are extrapolated to account for symmetric and neutron matter, some of the models discussed in the present work, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, should be ruled out.

  6. Skyrme tensor force in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Fracasso, S.; Barton, M. C.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Background: It is generally acknowledged that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method provides a useful foundation for a fully microscopic many-body theory of low-energy heavy ion reactions. The TDHF method is also known in nuclear physics in the small-amplitude domain, where it provides a useful description of collective states, and is based on the mean-field formalism, which has been a relatively successful approximation to the nuclear many-body problem. Currently, the TDHF theory is being widely used in the study of fusion excitation functions, fission, and deep-inelastic scattering of heavy mass systems, while providing a natural foundation for many other studies. Purpose: With the advancement of computational power it is now possible to undertake TDHF calculations without any symmetry assumptions and incorporate the major strides made by the nuclear structure community in improving the energy density functionals used in these calculations. In particular, time-odd and tensor terms in these functionals are naturally present during the dynamical evolution, while being absent or minimally important for most static calculations. The parameters of these terms are determined by the requirement of Galilean invariance or local gauge invariance but their significance for the reaction dynamics have not been fully studied. This work addresses this question with emphasis on the tensor force. Method: The full version of the Skyrme force, including terms arising only from the Skyrme tensor force, is applied to the study of collisions within a completely symmetry-unrestricted TDHF implementation. Results: We examine the effect on upper fusion thresholds with and without the tensor force terms and find an effect on the fusion threshold energy of the order several MeV. Details of the distribution of the energy within terms in the energy density functional are also discussed. Conclusions: Terms in the energy density functional linked to the tensor force can play a non

  7. Relativistic interactions and realistic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, T.; Madland, D.; Manakos, P.; Mannel, T.; Nikolaus, B.A.; Strottman, D. |

    1992-12-31

    A four-fermion-coupling Lagrangian (relativistic Skyrme-type) interaction has been proposed for relativistic nuclear structure calculations. This interaction, which has the merit of simplicity, is from the outset tailored as an effective interaction for relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations. Various extensions of such a model are discussed and compared with Walecka`s meson-nucleon mean field approach. We also present results of the calculation of nuclear ground state properties with an extended (density dependent) version of the four fermion interaction in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation.

  8. Extending Interactive Writing into Grades 2-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Kate; Dabrowski, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Interactive writing is an instructional practice widely considered effective and most appropriate for emergent writers. This article asserts that it is a valuable method for more fluent writers in grades 2-5. It outlines the basic lesson sequence and proposes four key shifts to adapt interactive writing for older, more fluent writers: 1) The…

  9. Description of induced nuclear fission with Skyrme energy functionals. II. Finite temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Duke, D.; Carr, H.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of induced nuclear fission for a broad range of neutron energies could help resolve fundamental science issues, such as the formation of elements in the universe, but could have also a large impact on societal applications in energy production or nuclear waste management. The goal of this paper is to set up the foundations of a microscopic theory to study the static aspects of induced fission as a function of the excitation energy of the incident neutron, from thermal to fast neutrons. To account for the high excitation energy of the compound nucleus, we employ a statistical approach based on finite temperature nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme energy densities, which we benchmark on the 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction. We compute the evolution of the least-energy fission pathway across multidimensional potential energy surfaces with up to five collective variables as a function of the nuclear temperature and predict the evolution of both the inner and the outer fission barriers as a function of the excitation energy of the compound nucleus. We show that the coupling to the continuum induced by the finite temperature is negligible in the range of neutron energies relevant for many applications of neutron-induced fission. We prove that the concept of quantum localization introduced recently can be extended to T >0 , and we apply the method to study the interaction energy and total kinetic energy of fission fragments as a function of the temperature for the most probable fission. While large uncertainties in theoretical modeling remain, we conclude that a finite temperature nuclear density functional may provide a useful framework to obtain accurate predictions of fission fragment properties.

  10. Comparing Extended System Interactions with Motions in Softened Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Eric I.

    2016-08-01

    Using an N-body evolution code that does not rely on softened potentials, I have created a suite of unbound interacting cluster pair simulations. The motions of the centers of mass of the clusters have been tracked and compared to the trajectories of point masses interacting via one of four different softened potential prescriptions. I find that the relationship between the impact parameter of the cluster interaction and the point-mass softening length that best approximates each cluster’s center-of-mass motion depends on the adopted prescription. In general, the range of allowed softening lengths grows roughly linearly with the impact parameter, but zero softening is acceptable in the majority of situations. In an N-body simulation that adopts a fixed softening length, such relationships lead to the possibility of two-body effects, like dynamical friction, being either larger or smaller than the corresponding cluster situation. Further consideration of more specific N-body situations leads to estimating that a very small fraction of point-mass encounters experience two-body effects significantly different from those of equivalent clusters.

  11. Electric multipole interactions in an extended BEG model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Teresa; Dennison, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    General 2D dielectric phase diagrams and phase transitions for multipolar molecules adsorbed to a square ionic crystal are presented. The adsorbed molecules are modeled using a dilute spin-one Ising model in the Blume-Emery-Griffiths formalism, using a mean-field approximation. Physical constants such as the electric multipole moments and binding energies are used to uniquely determine the interaction parameters over the full range of physically-relevant values. We find that temperature- and coverage-dependent antiferroelectric to ferroelectric, coverage-dependent ferroelectric up to ferroelectric down, reentrant ferroelectric to ferrielectric, and order-disorder dipole phase transitions can occur. The results are presented as a quasi-continuous set of phase diagrams. Extensions into ferro-electric parameter space are discussed and connections to analytical solutions are explored.

  12. Skyrme models and nuclear matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Haberichter, M.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the role of pressure in a class of generalized Skyrme models. We introduce pressure as the trace of the spatial part of the energy-momentum tensor and show that it obeys the usual thermodynamical relation. Then, we compute analytically the mean-field equation of state in the high- and medium-pressure regimes by applying topological bounds on compact domains. The equation of state is further investigated numerically for the charge-one Skyrmions. We identify which term in a generalized Skyrme model is responsible for which part in the equation of state. Further, we compare our findings with the corresponding results in the Walecka model.

  13. Tensor part of the Skyrme energy density functional. II. Deformation properties of magic and semi-magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, M.; Bennaceur, K.; Duguet, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; Lesinski, T.; Meyer, J.

    2009-12-01

    We study systematically the impact of the time-even tensor terms of the Skyrme energy density functional, i.e., terms bilinear in the spin-current tensor density, on deformation properties of closed-shell nuclei corresponding to 20,28,40,50,82, and 126 neutron or proton shell closures. We compare results obtained with three different families of Skyrme parametrizations whose tensor terms have been adjusted on properties of spherical nuclei: (i) TIJ interactions proposed in the first article of this series [T. Lesinski , Phys. Rev. C 76, 014312 (2007)] that were constructed through a complete readjustment of the rest of the functional and (ii) parametrizations whose tensor terms have been added perturbatively to existing Skyrme interactions, with or without readjusting the spin-orbit coupling constant. We analyze in detail the mechanisms at play behind the impact of tensor terms on deformation properties and how studying the latter can help screen out unrealistic parametrizations. It is expected that findings of the present article are to a large extent independent of remaining deficiencies of the central and spin-orbit interactions and will be of great value for the construction of future, improved energy functionals.

  14. Baryonic torii: Toroidal baryons in a generalized Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto

    2015-02-01

    We study a Skyrme-type model with a potential term motivated by Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), which we call the BEC Skyrme model. We consider two flavors of the model: the first is the Skyrme model, and the second has a sixth-order derivative term instead of the Skyrme term, both with the added BEC-motivated potential. The model contains toroidally shaped Skyrmions, and they are characterized by two integers P and Q , representing the winding numbers of two complex scalar fields along the toroidal and poloidal cycles of the torus, respectively. The baryon number is B =P Q . We find stable Skyrmion solutions for P =1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 with Q =1 , while for P =6 and Q =1 , it is only metastable. We further find that configurations with higher Q >1 are all unstable and split into Q configurations with Q =1 . Finally we discover a phase transition, possibly of first order, in the mass parameter of the potential under study.

  15. Structure of topological solitons in the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Kozhevnikov, I.R.; Rybakov, Yu.P.; Fomin, M.B.

    1988-12-01

    The types of invariant configurations admitted by the field equations in four-dimensional SU(2) chiral models are studied. It is shown that in the Skyrme model in the second and higher homotopy classes the fields that realize an absolute minimum of the energy are axisymmetric, while those in the first class are spherically symmetric.

  16. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XVI. Inclusion of self-energy effects in pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Extending our earlier work, a new family of three Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled HFB-30, HFB-31, and HFB-32, is presented, along with their underlying interactions, BSk30, BSk31, and BSk32, respectively. The principle new feature is a purely phenomenological pairing term that depends on the density gradient. This enables us to have a bulk pairing term that is fitted to realistic nuclear-matter calculations in which for the first time the self-energy corrections are included, while the behavior of the nucleon effective masses in asymmetric homogeneous nuclear matter is significantly improved. Furthermore, in the particle-hole channel all the highly realistic constraints of our earlier work are retained. In particular, the unconventional Skyrme forces containing t4 and t5 terms are still constrained to fit realistic equations of state of neutron matter stiff enough to support the massive neutron stars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432. All unphysical long-wavelength spin and spin-isospin instabilities of nuclear matter, including the unphysical transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated. Our three interactions are characterized by values of the symmetry coefficient J of 30, 31, and 32 MeV, respectively. The best fit to the database of 2353 nuclear masses is found for model HFB-31 (J =31 MeV ) with a model error of 0.561 MeV. This model also fits the charge-radius data with an root-mean-square error of 0.027 fm.

  17. Genesis and evolution of the Skyrme model from 1954 to the present

    SciTech Connect

    San Yuk, V.I. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-10

    Not widely known facts on the genesis of the Skyrme model are presented in a historical survey, based on Skyrme's earliest papers and on his own published remembrance. This paper considers the evolution of Skyrme's model description of nuclear matter from the Mesonic Fluid model up to its final version, known as the baryon model. We pay special tribute to some well-known ideas in contemporary particle physics which one can find in Skyrme's earlier papers, such as: Nuclear Democracy, the Solitonic Mechanism, the Nonlinear Realization of Chiral Symmetry, Topological Charges, Fermi-Bose Transmutations, etc. It is curious to note in the final version of the Skyrme model gleams of Kelvin's Vortex Atoms theory. In conclusion we make a brief analysis of the validity of Skyrme's conjectures in view of recent results and pinpoint some questions which still remain.

  18. Hairy black holes in the general Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Kichakova, O.; Shnir, Ya.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the existence of hairy black holes in the generalized Einstein-Skyrme model. It is proven that in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield model limit there are no hairy black hole solutions, although the model admits gravitating (and flat space) solitons. Furthermore, we find strong evidence that a necessary condition for the existence of black holes with Skyrmionic hair is the inclusion of the Skyrme term L4. As an example, we show that there are no hairy black holes in the L2+L6+L0 model and present a new kind of black hole solutions with compact Skyrmion hair in the L4+L6+L0 model.

  19. Skyrme functional from a three-body pseudopotential of second order in gradients: Formalism for central terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoudi, J.; Duguet, T.; Meyer, J.; Bender, M.

    2013-12-01

    Background: In one way or another, all modern parametrizations of the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) do not respect the exchange symmetry associated with Pauli's principle. It has been recently shown that this practice jeopardizes multireference (MR) EDF calculations by contaminating the energy with spurious self-interactions that, for example, lead to finite steps or even divergences when plotting it as a function of collective coordinates [J. Dobaczewski , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.76.054315 76, 054315 (2007); D. Lacroix , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.79.044318 79, 044318 (2009)]. As of today, the only viable option to bypass these pathologies is to rely on EDF kernels that enforce Pauli's principle from the outset by strictly and exactly deriving from a genuine, i.e., density-independent, Hamilton operator.Purpose: The objective is to build cutting-edge parametrizations of the EDF kernel deriving from a pseudopotential that can be safely employed in symmetry restoration and configuration mixing calculations.Methods: We wish to develop the most general Skyrme-like EDF parametrization containing linear, bilinear, and trilinear terms in the density matrices with up to two gradients, under the key constraint that it derives strictly from an effective Hamilton operator. While linear and bilinear terms are obtained from a standard one-body kinetic energy operator and a (density-independent) two-body Skyrme pseudopotential, the most general three-body Skyrme-like pseudopotential containing up to two gradient operators is constructed to generate the trilinear part. The present study is limited to central terms. Spin orbit and tensor will be addressed in a forthcoming paper.Results: The most general central Skyrme-type zero-range three-body interaction is built up to second order in derivatives. The complete trilinear EDF, including time-odd and T=1 pairing parts, is derived along with the corresponding normal and anomalous

  20. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  1. Exact vortex solutions in a CP N Skyrme-Faddeev type model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Klimas, P.

    2010-10-01

    We consider a four dimensional field theory with target space being CP N which constitutes a generalization of the usual Skyrme-Faddeev model defined on CP 1. We show that it possesses an integrable sector presenting an infinite number of local conservation laws, which are associated to the hidden symmetries of the zero curvature representation of the theory in loop space. We construct an infinite class of exact solutions for that integrable submodel where the fields are meromorphic functions of the combinations ( x 1 + ix 2) and x 3 + x 0 of the Cartesian coordinates of four dimensional Minkowski space-time. Among those solutions we have static vortices and also vortices with waves traveling along them with the speed of light. The energy per unity of length of the vortices show an interesting and intricate interaction among the vortices and waves.

  2. Systematics of the First 2{sup +} Excitation in Spherical Nuclei with Skyrme-QRPA

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.

    2009-05-07

    We use the Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) and the Skyrme interactions SLy4 and SkM* to systematically calculate energies and transition strengths for the lowest 2{sup +} state in spherical even-even nuclei. The SkM* functional, applied to 178 spherical nuclei between Z = 10 and 90, produces excitation energies that are on average 11% higher than experimental values, with residuals that fluctuate about the average by -35%+55%. The predictions of SkM* and SLy4 have significant differences, in part because of differences in the calculated ground state deformations; SkM* performs better in both the average and dispersion of energies. Comparing the QRPA results with those of generator-coordinate-method (GCM) calculations, we find that the QRPA reproduces trends near closed shells better than the GCM, and overpredicts the energies less severely in general.

  3. Isolate extended state in the DNA molecular transistor with surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Qin, Zhi-Jie

    2016-02-01

    The field effect characteristic of a DNA molecular device is investigated in a tight binding model with binary disorder and side site correlation. Using the transfer-matrix method and Landauer-Büttiker theory, we find that the system has isolated extended state that is irrespective of the DNA sequence and can be modulated by the gate voltage. When the gate voltage reaches some proper value, the isolated extended state appears at the Fermi level of the system and the long range charge transport is greatly enhanced. We attribute this phenomenon to the combination of the external field, the surface interaction, and the intrinsic disorder of DNA. The result is a generic feature of the nanowire with binary disorder and surface interaction.

  4. Causal dynamical triangulation with extended interactions in 1+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuji, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yuki; Watabiki, Yoshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    We study the Causal Dynamical Triangulation (CDT) with extended interactions in 1 + 1 dimensions applying the method in the non-critical String Field Theory (SFT) constructed by Ishibashi and Kawai. For this model, we solve Schwinger-Dyson's Equation (SDE) for disk amplitude perturbatively, and find a matrix model in the continuum limit reproducing the SDE in the non-critical SFT approach as the loop equation.

  5. Error estimates for the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2015-03-01

    There are many complementary strategies to estimate the extrapolation errors of a model calibrated in least-squares fits. We consider the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model for nuclear structure and dynamics and exemplify the following five strategies: uncertainties from statistical analysis, covariances between observables, trends of residuals, variation of fit data, and dedicated variation of model parameters. This gives useful insight into the impact of the key fit data as they consist of binding energies, charge rms radii, and charge formfactor. Amongst others, we check in particular the predictive value for observables in the stable nucleus 208Pb, the super-heavy element 266Hs, r-process nuclei, and neutron stars.

  6. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The TOR kinase pathway is central in modulating aging in a variety of animal models. The target of rapamycin (TOR) integrates a complex network of signals from growth conditions, nutrient availability, energy status, and physiological stresses and matches an organism's growth rate to the resource environment. Important remaining problems are the identification of the pathways that interact with TOR and their characterization as additive or synergistic. One of the most versatile stress sensors in metazoans is the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. JNK is an evolutionarily conserved stress-activated protein kinase that is induced by a range of stressors, including UV irradiation, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, heat, and bacterial antigens. JNK is thought to interact with the TOR pathway, but its effects on TOR are poorly understood. We used the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas as a model animal to probe the regulation of TOR and JNK pathways and explore their interaction. The effect of various chemical inhibitors was examined in life table and stressor challenge experiments. A survey of 12 inhibitors revealed two, rapamycin and JNK inhibitor, that significantly extended lifespan of B. manjavacas. At 1 μM concentration, exposure to rapamycin or JNK inhibitor extended mean rotifer lifespan by 35% and maximum lifespan by 37%. Exposure to both rapamycin and JNK inhibitor simultaneously extended mean rotifer lifespan by 65% more than either alone. Exposure to a combination of rapamycin and JNK inhibitors conveyed greater protection to starvation, UV and osmotic stress than either inhibitor alone. RNAi knockdown of TOR and JNK gene expression was investigated for its ability to extend rotifer lifespan. RNAi knockdown of the TOR gene resulted in 29% extension of the mean lifespan compared to control and knockdown of the JNK gene resulted in 51% mean lifespan extension. In addition to the lifespan, we quantified mitochondria activity using the fluorescent

  7. A Skyrme-like model with an exact BPS bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. A.; Zakrzewski, Wojtek J.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new Skyrme-like model with fields taking values on the sphere S 3 or, equivalently, on the group SU(2). The action of the model contains a quadratic kinetic term plus a quartic term which is the same as that of the Skyrme-Faddeev model. The novelty of the model is that it possess a first order Bogomolny type equation whose solutions automatically satisfy the second order Euler-Lagrange equations. It also possesses a lower bound on the static energy which is saturated by the Bogomolny solutions. Such Bogomolny equation is equivalent to the so-called force free equation used in plasma and solar Physics, and which possesses large classes of solutions. An old result due to Chandrasekhar prevents the existence of finite energy solutions for the force free equation on the entire three-dimensional space . We construct new exact finite energy solutions to the Bogomolny equations for the case where the space is the three-sphere S 3, using toroidal like coordinates.

  8. Extending plasma transport theory to strong coupling through the concept of an effective interaction potential

    SciTech Connect

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2014-05-15

    A method for extending traditional plasma transport theories into the strong coupling regime is presented. Like traditional theories, this is based on a binary scattering approximation, but where physics associated with many body correlations is included through the use of an effective interaction potential. The latter is simply related to the pair-distribution function. Modeling many body effects in this manner can extend traditional plasma theory to orders of magnitude stronger coupling. Theoretical predictions are tested against molecular dynamics simulations for electron-ion temperature relaxation as well as diffusion in one component systems. Emphasis is placed on the connection with traditional plasma theory, where it is stressed that the effective potential concept has precedence through the manner in which screening is imposed. The extension to strong coupling requires accounting for correlations in addition to screening. Limitations of this approach in the presence of strong caging are also discussed.

  9. Time evolution of initial states that extend beyond the potential interaction region in quantum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Calderón, Gastón; Villavicencio, Jorge; Hernández-Maldonado, Alberto; Romo, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the decay of initial states that possess a tail that extends beyond the interaction potential region, for potentials of arbitrary shape that vanish exactly after a distance. This is the case for a relevant class of artificial quantum structures. We obtain that along the internal interaction region, the time evolution of the decaying wave function is formed by two terms. The first one refers to the proper decay of the internal portion of the initial state, whereas the second one, that arises from the external tail, yields a transient contribution that tunnels into the internal region, builds up to a value, and then decays. We obtain that depending on the parameters of the initial state, the nonexponential tail decaying contribution may be larger than the contribution of the proper nonexponential term. These results are illustrated by an exactly solvable model and the Heidelberg potential for decay of ultracold atoms and open the possibility to control initial states in artificial decaying systems.

  10. Topological phase transitions in the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model with a double vacuum potential allows for phase transitions from a non-solitonic to a solitonic phase, where the latter corresponds to a ferromagnetic liquid. Such a transition can be generated by increasing the external pressure P or by turning on an external magnetic field H. As a consequence, the topological phase where gauged BPS baby skyrmions exist, is a higher density phase. For smaller densities, obtained for smaller values of P and H, a phase without solitons is reached. We find the critical line in the P, H parameter space. Furthermore, in the soliton phase, we find the equation of state for the baby skyrmion matter V = V( P,H) at zero temperature, where V is the "volume", i.e., area of the solitons.

  11. Toroidal Superheavy Nuclei in Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Within the self-consistent constraint Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS model (SHF+BCS), we found equilibrium toroidal nuclear density distributions in the region of superheavy elements. For nuclei with a sufficient oblate deformation (Q_{20} < -200 b), it becomes energetically favorable to change the genus of nuclear surface from 0 to 1, i.e., to switch the shape from a biconcave disc to a torus. The energy of the toroidal (genus=1) SHF+BCS solution relative to the compact (genus=0) ground state energy is strongly dependent both on the atomic number Z and the mass number A. We discuss the region of Z and A where the toroidal SHF+BCS total energy begins to be a global minimum.

  12. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-01

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in 208Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31-33 MeV and 75-95 MeV, respectively.

  13. A new Skyrme energy density functional for a better description of spin-isospin resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Cao, Li-Gang; Sagawa, H.

    2015-10-15

    A correct determination of the isospin and spin-isospin properties of the nuclear effective interaction should lead to an accurate description of the Gamow-Teller resonance (GT), the Spin Dipole Resonance (SDR), the Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) or the Antianalog Giant Dipole Resonance (AGDR), among others. A new Skyrme energy density functional named SAMi is introduced with the aim of going a step forward in setting the bases for a more precise description of spin-isospin resonances [1, 2]. In addition, we will discuss some new features of our analysis on the AGDR in {sup 208}Pb [3] as compared with available experimental data on this resonance [4, 5, 6], and on the GDR [7]. Such study, guided by a simple yet physical pocket formula, has been developed by employing the so called SAMi-J family of systematically varied interactions. This set of interactions is compatible with experimental data for values of the symmetry energy at saturation J and slope parameter L falling in the ranges 31−33 MeV and 75−95 MeV, respectively.

  14. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  15. Quantitative interaction mapping reveals an extended UBX domain in ASPL that disrupts functional p97 hexamers

    PubMed Central

    Arumughan, Anup; Roske, Yvette; Barth, Carolin; Forero, Laura Lleras; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Redel, Alexandra; Kostova, Simona; McShane, Erik; Opitz, Robert; Faelber, Katja; Rau, Kirstin; Mielke, Thorsten; Daumke, Oliver; Selbach, Matthias; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Rocks, Oliver; Panáková, Daniela; Heinemann, Udo; Wanker, Erich E.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction mapping is a powerful strategy to elucidate the biological function of protein assemblies and their regulators. Here, we report the generation of a quantitative interaction network, directly linking 14 human proteins to the AAA+ ATPase p97, an essential hexameric protein with multiple cellular functions. We show that the high-affinity interacting protein ASPL efficiently promotes p97 hexamer disassembly, resulting in the formation of stable p97:ASPL heterotetramers. High-resolution structural and biochemical studies indicate that an extended UBX domain (eUBX) in ASPL is critical for p97 hexamer disassembly and facilitates the assembly of p97:ASPL heterotetramers. This spontaneous process is accompanied by a reorientation of the D2 ATPase domain in p97 and a loss of its activity. Finally, we demonstrate that overproduction of ASPL disrupts p97 hexamer function in ERAD and that engineered eUBX polypeptides can induce cell death, providing a rationale for developing anti-cancer polypeptide inhibitors that may target p97 activity. PMID:27762274

  16. Interactive Visualization of 3-D Mantle Convection Extended Through AJAX Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, J. C.; Czech, W.; Yuen, D.; Greensky, J.; Knox, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a new software system for real-time interactive visualization of results taken directly from large-scale simulations of 3-D mantle convection and other large-scale simulations. This approach allows for intense visualization sessions for a couple of hours as opposed to storing massive amounts of data in a storage system. Our data sets consist of 3-D data for volume rendering with over 10 million unknowns at each timestep. Large scale visualization on a display wall holding around 13 million pixels has already been accomplished with extension to hand-held devices, such as the OQO and Nokia N800 and recently the iPHONE. We are developing web-based software in Java to extend the use of this system across long distances. The software is aimed at creating an interactive and functional application capable of running on multiple browsers by taking advantage of two AJAX-enabled web frameworks: Echo2 and Google Web Toolkit. The software runs in two modes allowing for a user to control an interactive session or observe a session controlled by another user. Modular build of the system allows for components to be swapped out for new components so that other forms of visualization could be accommodated such as Molecular Dynamics in mineral physics or 2-D data sets from lithospheric regional models.

  17. Collective Inertia and Fission Barriers Within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous fission barriers, quadrupole inertia tensor, and zero-point quadrupole correlation energy are calculated for 252,256,258Fm in the framework of the self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS theory. Two ways of computing collective inertia are employed: the Gaussian Overlap Approximation to the Generator Coordinate Method and cranking ansatz. The Skyrme results are compared with those of the Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model.

  18. Extending fragment-based free energy calculations with library Monte Carlo simulation: annealing in interaction space.

    PubMed

    Lettieri, Steven; Mamonov, Artem B; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2011-04-30

    Pre-calculated libraries of molecular fragment configurations have previously been used as a basis for both equilibrium sampling (via library-based Monte Carlo) and for obtaining absolute free energies using a polymer-growth formalism. Here, we combine the two approaches to extend the size of systems for which free energies can be calculated. We study a series of all-atom poly-alanine systems in a simple dielectric solvent and find that precise free energies can be obtained rapidly. For instance, for 12 residues, less than an hour of single-processor time is required. The combined approach is formally equivalent to the annealed importance sampling algorithm; instead of annealing by decreasing temperature, however, interactions among fragments are gradually added as the molecule is grown. We discuss implications for future binding affinity calculations in which a ligand is grown into a binding site.

  19. Extended haplotypes in rheumatoid arthritis and preliminary evidence for an interaction with immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Puttick, A; Briggs, D; Welsh, K; Jacoby, R; Williamson, E; Jones, V

    1986-06-01

    The incidence of extended haplotypes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex was compared between 20 probands with RA, their unaffected family members, and 42 controls. One haplotype only, HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2, was significantly increased in the patient group, whereas HLA-B7 BfS C4A*3 C4B*1 DR2 GLO1, which was the most common haplotype in the control groups, was absent. The immunoglobulin allotype Glm(2) was significantly increased in frequency in the RA patients, and analysis showed that of the seven patients carrying Bw62-DR4, five were G1m(2) positive. Further, the increase in frequency of the phenotype Gm(1,2,17,21,3,5,23) was also significant and was carried by two of four probands with the extended haplotype HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2 and by one proband also bearing this haplotype but with a null allele at the C4A locus. The striking association of G1m(2) and Bw62 with DR4 in our patients suggests that in interaction of immunoglobulin genes with DR4 is stronger when DR4 is associated with particular haplotypes rather than with DR4 in general.

  20. MetaSee: An Interactive and Extendable Visualization Toolbox for Metagenomic Sample Analysis and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Song, Baoxing; Su, Xiaoquan; Xu, Jian; Ning, Kang

    2012-01-01

    The NGS (next generation sequencing)-based metagenomic data analysis is becoming the mainstream for the study of microbial communities. Faced with a large amount of data in metagenomic research, effective data visualization is important for scientists to effectively explore, interpret and manipulate such rich information. The visualization of the metagenomic data, especially multi-sample data, is one of the most critical challenges. The different data sample sources, sequencing approaches and heterogeneous data formats make robust and seamless data visualization difficult. Moreover, researchers have different focuses on metagenomic studies: taxonomical or functional, sample-centric or genome-centric, single sample or multiple samples, etc. However, current efforts in metagenomic data visualization cannot fulfill all of these needs, and it is extremely hard to organize all of these visualization effects in a systematic manner. An extendable, interactive visualization tool would be the method of choice to fulfill all of these visualization needs. In this paper, we have present MetaSee, an extendable toolbox that facilitates the interactive visualization of metagenomic samples of interests. The main components of MetaSee include: (I) a core visualization engine that is composed of different views for comparison of multiple samples: Global view, Phylogenetic view, Sample view and Taxa view, as well as link-out for more in-depth analysis; (II) front-end user interface with real metagenomic models that connect to the above core visualization engine and (III) open-source portal for the development of plug-ins for MetaSee. This integrative visualization tool not only provides the visualization effects, but also enables researchers to perform in-depth analysis of the metagenomic samples of interests. Moreover, its open-source portal allows for the design of plug-ins for MetaSee, which would facilitate the development of any additional visualization effects. PMID:23145044

  1. Mapping and Modeling the Extended Winds of the Massive Interacting Binary, Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Ted

    2010-01-01

    The combination HST/STIS high spatial and moderate spectral resolutions have revealed the massive interacting wind structure of Eta Carinae by forbidden lines of singly and doubly ionized elements. Throughout the 5.54-year period, lines of Fe++, Ne++, Ar++, S++ and N+ reveal the interacting wind structures, near critical electron densities of 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 7)cu cm, photoionized by the hot secondary, Eta Car B, Lines of Fe+ and Ni+ trace the denser (>10(exp 7)cu cm. less-ionized (< 8 eV) primary wind of Eta Car A as it wraps around the interacting binary stars. For 5 years of the 5.54 year period, the FUV radiation from Eta Car B escapes the orbital region, ionizing the boundaries of the expanding wind structures. But for three to six months, Eta Car B plunges into the primary wind approaching to within 1 to 2 AU, leading to cutoff of FUV and X-ray fluxes. The interacting wind structure, resolved out to 0.8", drops io ionization and then rebuilds as Eta Car B emerges from the primary wind envelope. Solid Particle Hydrodynamical(SPH) models have been developed extending out to 2000 AU and adapted to include FUV radiation effects of the winds. In turn, synthetic spectroimages of selected forbidden lines have been constructed and compared to the spectroimages recorded by the HST/STIS throughout 1998.0 to 2004.3, extending across the 1998 and 2003.5 minima. By this method, we show that the orbital axis of the binary system must bc within 15 degrees of the Homunculus axis of symmetry and that periastron occurs with Eta Car B passing on the far side of Eta Car B. This result ties the current binary orbit with the bipolar ejection with intervening skirt and leads to implications that the binary system influenced the mass ejection of the l840s and the lesser ejection of the 1890s.

  2. Extended LineSets: a visualization technique for the interactive inspection of biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biologists make use of pathway visualization tools for a range of tasks, including investigating inter-pathway connectivity and retrieving details about biological entities and interactions. Some of these tasks require an understanding of the hierarchical nature of elements within the pathway or the ability to make comparisons between multiple pathways. We introduce a technique inspired by LineSets that enables biologists to fulfill these tasks more effectively. Results We introduce a novel technique, Extended LineSets, to facilitate new explorations of biological pathways. Our technique incorporates intuitive graphical representations of different levels of information and includes a well-designed set of user interactions for selecting, filtering, and organizing biological pathway data gathered from multiple databases. Conclusions Based on interviews with domain experts and an analysis of two use cases, we show that our technique provides functionality not currently enabled by current techniques, and moreover that it helps biologists to better understand both inter-pathway connectivity and the hierarchical structure of biological elements within the pathways. PMID:26361500

  3. Extended Bose Hubbard model of interacting bosonic atoms in optical lattices: From superfluidity to density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzarella, G.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2006-01-15

    For systems of interacting, ultracold spin-zero neutral bosonic atoms, harmonically trapped and subject to an optical lattice potential, we derive an Extended Bose Hubbard (EBH) model by developing a systematic expansion for the Hamiltonian of the system in powers of the lattice parameters and of a scale parameter, the lattice attenuation factor. We identify the dominant terms that need to be retained in realistic experimental conditions, up to nearest-neighbor interactions and nearest-neighbor hoppings conditioned by the on-site occupation numbers. In the mean field approximation, we determine the free energy of the system and study the phase diagram both at zero and at finite temperature. At variance with the standard on site Bose Hubbard model, the zero-temperature phase diagram of the EBH model possesses a dual structure in the Mott insulating regime. Namely, for specific ranges of the lattice parameters, a density wave phase characterizes the system at integer fillings, with domains of alternating mean occupation numbers that are the atomic counterparts of the domains of staggered magnetizations in an antiferromagnetic phase. We show as well that in the EBH model, a zero-temperature quantum phase transition to pair superfluidity is, in principle, possible, but completely suppressed at the lowest order in the lattice attenuation factor. Finally, we determine the possible occurrence of the different phases as a function of the experimentally controllable lattice parameters.

  4. Roles of urea and TMAO on the interaction between extended non-polar peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhaoqian; Dias, Cristiano

    Urea and trimethylamine n-oxide (TMAO) are small molecules known to destabilize and stabilize, respectively, the structure of proteins when added to aqueous solution. To unravel the molecular mechanisms of these cosolvents on protein structure we perform explicit all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of extended poly-alanine and polyleucine dimers. We use an umbrella sampling protocol to compute the potential of mean force (PMF) of dimers at different concentrations of urea and TMAO. We find that the large non-polar side chain of leucine is affected by urea whereas backbone atoms and alanine's side chain are not. Urea is found to occupy positions between leucine's side chains that are not accessible to water. This accounts for extra Lennard-Jones bonds between urea and side chains that favors the unfolded state. These bonds compete with urea-solvent interactions that favor the folded state. The sum of these two energetic terms provide the enthalpic driving force for unfolding. We show here that this enthalpy correlate with the potential of mean force of poly-leucine dimers. Moreover, the framework developed here is general and may be used to provide insights into effects of other small molecules on protein interactions. The effect of the TMAO will be in the presentation. Department of Physics, University Heights, Newark, New Jersey, 07102-1982.

  5. Exact solutions to a spatially extended model of kinase-receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Piotr; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Kazmierczak, Bogdan

    2011-10-01

    B and Mast cells are activated by the aggregation of the immune receptors. Motivated by this phenomena we consider a simple spatially extended model of mutual interaction of kinases and membrane receptors. It is assumed that kinase activates membrane receptors and in turn the kinase molecules bound to the active receptors are activated by transphosphorylation. Such a type of interaction implies positive feedback and may lead to bistability. In this study we apply the Steklov eigenproblem theory to analyze the linearized model and find exact solutions in the case of non-uniformly distributed membrane receptors. This approach allows us to determine the critical value of receptor dephosphorylation rate at which cell activation (by arbitrary small perturbation of the inactive state) is possible. We found that cell sensitivity grows with decreasing kinase diffusion and increasing anisotropy of the receptor distribution. Moreover, these two effects are cooperating. We showed that the cell activity can be abruptly triggered by the formation of the receptor aggregate. Since the considered activation mechanism is not based on receptor crosslinking by polyvalent antigens, the proposed model can also explain B cell activation due to receptor aggregation following binding of monovalent antigens presented on the antigen presenting cell.

  6. Exact solutions to a spatially extended model of kinase-receptor interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Piotr; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Kazmierczak, Bogdan

    2011-10-01

    B and Mast cells are activated by the aggregation of the immune receptors. Motivated by this phenomena we consider a simple spatially extended model of mutual interaction of kinases and membrane receptors. It is assumed that kinase activates membrane receptors and in turn the kinase molecules bound to the active receptors are activated by transphosphorylation. Such a type of interaction implies positive feedback and may lead to bistability. In this study we apply the Steklov eigenproblem theory to analyze the linearized model and find exact solutions in the case of non-uniformly distributed membrane receptors. This approach allows us to determine the critical value of receptor dephosphorylation rate at which cell activation (by arbitrary small perturbation of the inactive state) is possible. We found that cell sensitivity grows with decreasing kinase diffusion and increasing anisotropy of the receptor distribution. Moreover, these two effects are cooperating. We showed that the cell activity can be abruptly triggered by the formation of the receptor aggregate. Since the considered activation mechanism is not based on receptor crosslinking by polyvalent antigens, the proposed model can also explain B cell activation due to receptor aggregation following binding of monovalent antigens presented on the antigen presenting cell.

  7. The search for extended infrared emission near interacting and active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleton, Philip N.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: the search for extended far IR emission; the search for extended emission in galaxy groups; a brief review of the flattening algorithm; the target groups; extended emission from groups and intergalactic HI clouds; and morphological image processing.

  8. Interactive computer programs for petrologic modeling with extended Q-mode factor analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miesch, A.T.

    1976-01-01

    An extended form of Q-mode factor analysis may be used if the row-sums of the data matrix are constant and can be helpful especially in developing and testing petrologic-mixing models for igneous systems. The first step is to represent the sample compositions as unit vectors in M-dimensional space and then to project them into space of fewer dimensions (m) as determined to be appropriate from a factor-variance diagram. Compositions thought to be those of possible end-members in the petrologic system then are represented as vectors in the M-dimensional space and projected into the same space as the sample vectors. If these vectors remain close to unity in length after projection, the corresponding compositions can serve as end-member compositions for the model. After m suitable end-member compositions have been identified, each sample composition is expressed as a mixture of the end-members by computation of the composition loadings. The interactive computer programs presented are useful in these procedures because of the trial-and-error nature of the modeling procedures. ?? 1976.

  9. Magnetization plateaus of an easy-axis kagome antiferromagnet with extended interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plat, X.; Alet, F.; Capponi, S.; Totsuka, K.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the properties in finite magnetic field of an extended anisotropic X X Z spin-1/2 model on the kagome lattice, originally introduced by Balents, Fisher, and Girvin [Phys. Rev. B 65, 224412 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.65.224412]. The magnetization curve displays plateaus at magnetization m =1 /6 and 1 /3 when the anisotropy is large. Using low-energy effective constrained models (quantum loop and quantum dimer models), we discuss the nature of the plateau phases, found to be crystals that break discrete rotation and/or translation symmetries. Large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations were carried out in particular for the m =1 /6 plateau. We first map out the phase diagram of the effective quantum loop model with an additional loop-loop interaction to find stripe order around the point relevant for the original model as well as a topological Z2 spin liquid. The existence of a stripe crystalline phase is further evidenced by measuring both standard structure factor and entanglement entropy of the original microscopic model.

  10. Empathic control through coordinated interaction of amygdala, theory of mind and extended pain matrix brain regions.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, Emile G; Jacoby, Nir; Saxe, Rebecca

    2015-07-01

    Brain regions in the "pain matrix", can be activated by observing or reading about others in physical pain. In previous research, we found that reading stories about others' emotional suffering, by contrast, recruits a different group of brain regions mostly associated with thinking about others' minds. In the current study, we examined the neural circuits responsible for deliberately regulating empathic responses to others' pain and suffering. In Study 1, a sample of college-aged participants (n=18) read stories about physically painful and emotionally distressing events during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), while either actively empathizing with the main character or trying to remain objective. In Study 2, the same experiment was performed with professional social workers, who are chronically exposed to human suffering (n=21). Across both studies activity in the amygdala was associated with empathic regulation towards others' emotional pain, but not their physical pain. In addition, psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis and Granger causal modeling (GCM) showed that amygdala activity while reading about others' emotional pain was preceded by and positively coupled with activity in the theory of mind brain regions, and followed by and negatively coupled with activity in regions associated with physical pain and bodily sensations. Previous work has shown that the amygdala is critically involved in the deliberate control of self-focused distress - the current results extend the central importance of amygdala activity to the control of other-focused empathy, but only when considering others' emotional pain. PMID:25913703

  11. Systematics of the first 2{sup +} excitation in spherical nuclei with the Skyrme quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.; Engel, J.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2008-10-15

    We use the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) and the Skyrme interactions SLy4 and SkM* to systematically calculate energies and transition strengths for the lowest 2{sup +} state in spherical even-even nuclei. The SkM* functional, applied to 178 spherical nuclei between Z=10 and 90, produces excitation energies that are on average 11% higher than experimental values, with residuals that fluctuate about the average by -35% to +55%. The predictions of SkM* and SLy4 have significant differences, in part because of differences in the calculated ground state deformations; SkM* performs better in both the average and dispersion of energies. Comparing the QRPA results with those of generator-coordinate-method (GCM) calculations, we find that the QRPA reproduces trends near closed shells better than the GCM, and that it overpredicts the energies less severely in general.

  12. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Thomas F; Dannatt, Hugh R W; Barrow, Nathan S; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P; Newton, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to (1)H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement. PMID:26867091

  13. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization enhanced NMR at 187 GHz/284 MHz using an Extended Interaction Klystron amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Thomas F; Dannatt, Hugh R W; Barrow, Nathan S; Watts, Anthony; Brown, Steven P; Newton, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2016-04-01

    A Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) NMR spectrometer which uses a 187 GHz (corresponding to (1)H NMR frequency of 284 MHz) Extended Interaction Klystron (EIK) amplifier as the microwave source is briefly described. Its performance is demonstrated for a biomolecule (bacteriorhodopsin), a pharmaceutical, and surface functionalised silica. The EIK is very compact and easily incorporated into an existing spectrometer. The bandwidth of the amplifier is sufficient that it obviates the need for a sweepable magnetic field, once set, for all commonly used radicals. The variable power (CW or pulsed) output from the EIK is transmitted to the DNP-NMR probe using a quasi-optic system with a high power isolator and a corrugated waveguide which feeds the microwaves into the DNP-NMR probe. Curved mirrors inside the probe project the microwaves down the axis of the MAS rotor, giving a very efficient system such that maximum DNP enhancement is achieved with less than 3 W output from the microwave source. The DNP-NMR probe operates with a sample temperature down to 90K whilst spinning at 8 kHz. Significant enhancements, in excess of 100 for bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane (bR in PM), are shown along with spectra which are enhanced by ≈25 with respect to room temperature, for both the pharmaceutical furosemide and surface functionalised silica. These enhancements allow hitherto prohibitively time consuming experiments to be undertaken. The power at which the DNP enhancement in bR in PM saturates does not change significantly between 90K and 170 K even though the enhancement drops by a factor of ≈11. As the DNP build up time decreases by a factor 3 over this temperature range, the reduction in T1n is presumably a significant contribution to the drop in enhancement.

  14. Solitons and black holes in a generalized Skyrme model with dilaton-quarkonium field

    SciTech Connect

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Stefanov, Ivan Zh.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2011-06-15

    Skyrme theory is among the viable effective theories which emerge from the low-energy limit of quantum chromodynamics. Many of its generalizations include also a dilaton. Here we find new self-gravitating solutions, both solitons and black holes, in a generalized Skyrme model in which a dilaton is present. The investigation of the properties of the solutions is done numerically. We find that the introduction of the dilaton in the theory does not change the picture qualitatively, only quantitatively. The model considered here has one free parameter more than the Einstein-Skyrme model which comes from the potential of the dilaton. We have applied also the turning point method to establish that one of the black-hole branches of solutions is unstable. The turning point method here is based on the first law of black-hole thermodynamics a detailed derivation of which is given in the Appendix of the paper.

  15. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions for synthesis of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ning; Scheid, Werner; Wu Xizhen; Liu Min; Li Zhuxia

    2006-10-15

    The Skyrme energy-density functional approach has been extended to study massive heavy-ion fusion reactions. Based on the potential barrier obtained and the parametrized barrier distribution the fusion (capture) excitation functions of a lot of heavy-ion fusion reactions are studied systematically. The average deviations of fusion cross sections at energies near and above the barriers from experimental data are less than 0.05 for 92% of 76 fusion reactions with Z{sub 1}Z{sub 2}<1200. For the massive fusion reactions, for example, the {sup 238}U-induced reactions and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, the capture excitation functions have been reproduced remarkably well. The influence of structure effects in the reaction partners on the capture cross sections is studied with our parametrized barrier distribution. By comparing the reactions induced by double-magic nucleus {sup 48}Ca and by {sup 32}S and {sup 35}Cl, the ''threshold-like'' behavior in the capture excitation function for {sup 48}Ca-induced reactions is explored and an optimal balance between the capture cross section and the excitation energy of the compound nucleus is studied. Finally, the fusion reactions with {sup 36}S, {sup 37}Cl, {sup 48}Ca, and {sup 50}Ti bombarding {sup 248}Cm, {sup 247,249}Bk, {sup 250,252,254}Cf, and {sup 252,254}Es, as well as the reactions leading to the same compound nucleus with Z=120 and N=182, are studied further. The calculation results for these reactions are useful for searching for the optimal fusion configuration and suitable incident energy in the synthesis of superheavy nuclei.

  16. Baryons with open beauty dynamically generated from meson-baryon interaction in the extended local hidden gauge approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei-Hong; Xiao, C. W.; Oset, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this talk we review the results about the interaction of B ¯N , B ¯Δ, B ¯*N and B ¯*Δ states with beauty B = 1, together with their coupled channels, using the extended local hidden gauge approach. The Λb(5912) and Λb(5920) observed in the experiment are dynamically generated from the meson-baryon interaction, and they couple mostly to B ¯*N , which are degenerate with the Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction. In addition, three more states with I = 0 and eight more states with I = 1 are predicted.

  17. Towards the establishment of nonlinear hidden symmetries of the Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Kanakoglou, K.; Paschalis, J. E.

    2006-09-25

    We present a preliminary attempt to establish the existence of hidden nonlinear symmetries of the SU(N) Skyrme model which could, in principle, lead to the further integration of the system. An explicit illustration is given for the SU(2) symmetry group.

  18. Preliminary design and optimization of a G-band extended interaction oscillator based on a pseudospark-sourced electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Y. E-mail: yinyong@uestc.edu.cn; He, W.; Zhang, L.; Yin, H.; Cross, A. W.

    2015-07-15

    The design and simulation of a G-band extended interaction oscillator (EIO) driven by a pseudospark-sourced electron beam is presented. The characteristic of the EIO and the pseudospark-based electron beam were studied to enhance the performance of the newly proposed device. The beam-wave interaction of the EIO can be optimized by choosing a suitable pseudospark discharging voltage and by widening the operating voltage region of the EIO circuit. Simulation results show that a peak power of over 240 W can be achieved at G-band using a pseudospark discharge voltage of 41 kV.

  19. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-01

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed by coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. The formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.

  20. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    DOE PAGES

    Shan, Tzu -Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-11

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed bymore » coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. Furthermore, the formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.« less

  1. Straw-thawing method interacts with sire and extender to influence sperm motility and conception rates of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    DeJarnette, J M; Marshall, C E

    2005-11-01

    Influence of interactions of straw-thawing method with sire and extender type (milk or egg yolk-based) on postthaw sperm motility and conception rates of dairy cows was assessed. In experiment 1, sperm from 10 Holstein sires were frozen in egg yolk citrate and heated whole-milk extenders using a split-ejaculate technique. Straws were thawed in a 37 degrees C water bath with or without 3 min of exposure to a 37 degrees C warming plate while wrapped in a paper towel (air-thaw). Percentage of motile sperm was assessed after 1 min and 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. In experiment 2, sperm from 3 Holstein sires were frozen in egg-yolk citrate and a nonheated whole milk extender using a split-ejaculate technique. Straws were thawed and motility was assessed as in experiment 1. Conception rates (n = 475) were compared in a single herd of Holstein cows after thawing straws in 35 degrees C water for 45 s or after air-thawing by wiping straws with a paper towel upon removal from the storage vessel and placing directly into the insemination gun. In each experiment, interactions between thaw method and sire, extender type, or both, indicated that conditions may be created that facilitate sperm tolerance of air-thaw procedures. When a significant thaw method effect was detected in either experiment, air-thaw was consistently associated with the lesser measure of sperm motility, conception, or both. In conclusion, although some sire x extender combinations seem to be tolerant of air-thaw procedures, other combinations are more sensitive, resulting in reduced postthaw sperm survival, conception rates of cows, or both, in response to air-thaw. PMID:16230692

  2. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Anders S. E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Elstner, Marcus

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  3. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anders S.; Elstner, Marcus; Cui, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets. PMID:26328834

  4. Attachment of bacteriophages MS2 and PhiX174 onto kaolinite and montmorillonite: extended-DLVO interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Syngouna, V. I.

    2012-04-01

    This study aims to gain insights into the interaction of virus particles with clay colloids. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model colloids. The experimental data obtained from batch experiments of MS2 and ΦX174 attachment onto KGa-1b and STx-1b suggested that virus attachment is adequately described by the Freundlich isotherm equation. Both MS2 and ΦX174 were attached in greater amounts onto KGa-1b than STx-1b with MS2 having greater affinity than ΦX174 for both clays. Furthermore, extended-DLVO interaction energy calculations explained that the attachment of viruses onto model clay colloids was primarily caused by hydrophobic interaction. The theoretical and experimental results of this study were found to be in good agreement with previous findings.

  5. Studying generalised dark matter interactions with extended halo-independent methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlhoefer, Felix; Wild, Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    The interpretation of dark matter direct detection experiments is complicated by the fact that neither the astrophysical distribution of dark matter nor the properties of its particle physics interactions with nuclei are known in detail. To address both of these issues in a very general way we develop a new framework that combines the full formalism of non-relativistic effective interactions with state-of-the-art halo-independent methods. This approach makes it possible to analyse direct detection experiments for arbitrary dark matter interactions and quantify the goodness-of-fit independent of astrophysical uncertainties. We employ this method in order to demonstrate that the degeneracy between astrophysical uncertainties and particle physics unknowns is not complete. Certain models can be distinguished in a halo-independent way using a single ton-scale experiment based on liquid xenon, while other models are indistinguishable with a single experiment but can be separated using combined information from several target elements.

  6. Calmodulin Adopts an Extended Conformation when Interacting with L-Selectin in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Putkey, John A.; Li, Renhao

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin, an intracellular calcium-binding protein, is thought to regulate ectodomain shedding of many membrane proteins, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Basing on a solution structure of calcium-loaded calmodulin in complex with a L-selectin fragment that contains a portion of its transmembrane domain, Gifford et al. (University of Calgary) recently suggested that calmodulin regulates L-selectin shedding by binding directly to a portion of the L-selectin transmembrane domain in a compact conformation. Using fluorescently labeled calmodulin, we show however that calmodulin adopts a distinctly different and much more extended conformation when it binds to the CLS peptide (i.e. the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin) reconstituted in the phosphatidylcholine liposome with micromolar dissociation constant and in a calcium-independent manner. Calmodulin adopts a similarly extended conformation in a ternary complex with the N-terminal FERM domain of moesin and CLS reconstituted in the phospholipid liposome that mimics the native membrane environment. These results indicate that calmodulin does not bind directly to the transmembrane domain of L-selectin. Understanding the association of calmodulin with L-selectin helps to shed light on the mechanisms underlying regulation of ectodomain shedding. PMID:23658780

  7. Outer satellite atmospheres: Their extended nature and planetary interactions. [sodium cloud of Io, hydrogen torus of Titan, and comet atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Highly developed numerical models are applied to interpret extended-atmosphere data for the sodium cloud of Io and the hydrogen torus of Titan. Solar radiation pressure was identified and verified by model calculations as the mechanism to explain two different east-west asymmetries observed in the sodium cloud. Analysis of sodium line profile data, suggesting that a Jupiter magnetospheric wind may be responsible for high speed sodium atoms emitted from Io, and preliminary modeling of the interaction of the Io plasma torus and Io's sodium cloud are also reported. Models presented for Titan's hydrogen torus are consistent both with the recent Pioneer 11 measurements and earlier Earth-orbiting observations by the Copernicus satellite. Progress is reported on developing models for extended gas and dust atmospheres of comets.

  8. Extended magnetic exchange interactions in the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi

    DOE PAGES

    Christianson, Andrew D.; Hahn, Steven E.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Parker, David S.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian C.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Williams, T. J.; Taylor, A. E.

    2016-05-09

    Here, the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi continues to receive attention as a candidate to replace rare-earth-containing permanent magnets in applications above room temperature. This is due to a high Curie temperature, large magnetic moments, and a coercivity that increases with temperature. The synthesis of MnBi also allows for crystals that are free of interstitial Mn, enabling more direct access to the key interactions underlying the physical properties of binary Mn-based ferromagnets. In this work, we use inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin waves of MnBi in order to characterize the magnetic exchange at low temperature. Consistent with the spin reorientationmore » that occurs below 140~K, we do not observe a spin gap in this system above our experimental resolution. A Heisenberg model was fit to the spin wave data in order to characterize the long-range nature of the exchange. It was found that interactions up to sixth nearest neighbor are required to fully parameterize the spin waves. Surprisingly, the nearest-neighbor term is antiferromagnetic, and the realization of a ferromagnetic ground state relies on the more numerous ferromagnetic terms beyond nearest neighbor, suggesting that the ferromagnetic ground state arises as a consequence of the long-ranged interactions in the system.« less

  9. Extended mathematical model for "in vivo" quantification of the interaction betweeen atazanavir and bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Roberto; Domeque, Nieves; Apesteguia, Alberto-Fermín

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the present work was to conduct an "in vivo" analysis of the atazanavir-bilirubin interaction. We developed a new mathematical approach to PK/PDPK models for competitive interaction based on the Michaelis-Menten equation, which was applied to patients with polymorphisms in the gene for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1). Atazanavir is known to induce concentration-dependent increases in bilirubin plasma levels. Thus, we employed our mathematical model to analyse rises in steady state atazanavir and bilirubin concentrations, ultimately plotting a nomogram for detection of suboptimal atazanavir exposure. Application of our model revealed that an absolute value or a steady state increase in bilirubin falling below 3.8Φ µmol/L (where Φ is a correction factor, =1 for UGT1A1 wild type and ≠1 for UGT1A1 variants) could be used to predict suboptimal atazanavir exposure and treatment failure. Thus, we have successfully established a new mathematical approach for pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic modelling of the interaction between atazanavir and bilirubin, as it relates to genetic variants of UGT1A1. Taken together, our findings indicate that bilirubin plasma levels represent a valuable marker of atazanavir exposure. PMID:24243081

  10. Interactions and dynamics of two extended conformation adapting phosphatidylcholines in model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Amirkavei, Mooud; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2016-02-01

    In order to obtain molecular level insight into the biophysics of the apoptosis promoting phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC) we studied its partitioning into different lipid phases by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). To aid the interpretation of these data for PazePC, we additionally characterized by both ITC and fluorescence spectroscopy the fluorescent phospholipid analog 1-palmitoyl-2-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]hexanoyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-C6-PC), which similarly to PazePC can adopt extended conformation in lipid bilayers. With the NBD-hexanoyl chain reversing its direction and extending into the aqueous space out of the bilayer, 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD) becomes accessible to the water soluble dithionite, which reduces to non-fluorescent product. Our results suggest that these phospholipid derivatives first partition and penetrate into the outer bilayer leaflet of liquid disordered phase liposomes composed of unsaturated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Upon increase up to 2 mol% PazePC and NBD-C6-PC of the overall content, flip-flop from the outer into the inner bilayer leaflet commences. Interestingly, the presence of 40 mol% cholesterol in POPC liposomes did not abrogate the partitioning of PazePC into the liquid ordered phase. In contrast, only insignificant partitioning of PazePC and NBD-C6-PC into sphingomyelin/cholesterol liposomes was evident, highlighting a specific membrane permeability barrier function of this particular lipid composition against oxidatively truncated PazePC, thus emphasizing the importance of detailed characterization of the biophysical properties of membranes found in different cellular organelles, in terms of providing barriers for lipid-mediated cellular signals in processes such as apoptosis. Our data suggest NBD-C6-PC to represent useful fluorescent probe to study the cellular dynamics of oxidized phospholipid

  11. Collective coordinate quantization and spin statistics of the solitons in the C PN Skyrme-Faddeev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amari, Yuki; Klimas, Paweł; Sawado, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    The C PN extended Skyrme-Faddeev model possesses planar soliton solutions. We consider quantum aspects of the solutions applying collective coordinate quantization in regime of rigid body approximation. In order to discuss statistical properties of the solutions we include an Abelian Chern-Simons term (the Hopf term) in the Lagrangian. Since Π3(C P1)=Z then for N =1 the term becomes an integer. On the other hand for N >1 it became perturbative because Π3(C PN) is trivial. The prefactor of the Hopf term (anyon angle) Θ is not quantized and its value depends on the physical system. The corresponding fermionic models can fix value of the angle Θ for all N in a way that the soliton with N =1 is not an anyon type whereas for N >1 it is always an anyon even for Θ =n π , n ∈Z . We quantize the solutions and calculate several mass spectra for N =2 . Finally we discuss generalization for N ≧3 .

  12. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  13. Synthesis, structure, characterization and fluorescent properties of Ag+ complexes with extended π⋯π interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Hong; Yan, Jie; Yang, Hu; Qiang, Liu; Du, Huai-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Two mixed-ligand Ag (I) complexes, [Ag2(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppe)]·CH3CN (1) and [Ag4(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppp)2](NO3)2·6H2O (2) (dppe = 1, 2-bis (diphenylphosphino) ethane, dppp = 1, 3-bis (diphenylphosphino) propane, Phterpy = 4‧-phenyl-2, 2‧:6‧, 2″-terpyridine), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by IR, 1H-NMR, 31P-NMR, elemental analysis and X-ray crystal structure analysis. Structural analysis reveals that the change of bridging ligands from dppe to dppp lead to the formation of centrosymmetric cations [Ag2(Phterpy)2(NO3)2(dppe)] and [Ag4(Phterpy)2 (NO3)2(dppp)2]2+, especially complex 2 containing two independent centrosymmetric tetramers with the central (obligate) Ag2O2 planes. Complexes 1 and 2 consist of the 1D infinite chains, with different variations in π-stacking patterns. Crystal structure of 1 contains 1D infinite chains constructed by π⋯π interactions between Phterpy, while 2 is built by π⋯π interaction of phenylene rings from dppp. All these reveal that the change of phosphine ligands might be the key of construction of different types of polynuclear structures and 1D π-stacking chain. Moreover, the solid-state emission spectra of complexes 1 and 2 display broad emission bands at 420-600 nm.

  14. LBQ2D, Extending the Line Broadened Quasilinear Model to TAE-EP Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Berk, Herbert

    2012-10-01

    The line broadened quasilinear model was proposed and tested on the one dimensional electrostatic case of the bump on tailfootnotetextH.L Berk, B. Breizman and J. Fitzpatrick, Nucl. Fusion, 35:1661, 1995 to study the wave particle interaction. In conventional quasilinear theory, the sea of overlapping modes evolve with time as the particle distribution function self consistently undergo diffusion in phase space. The line broadened quasilinear model is an extension to the conventional theory in a way that allows treatment of isolated modes as well as overlapping modes by broadening the resonant line in phase space. This makes it possible to treat the evolution of modes self consistently from onset to saturation in either case. We describe here the model denoted by LBQ2D which is an extension of the proposed one dimensional line broadened quasilinear model to the case of TAEs interacting with energetic particles in two dimensional phase space, energy as well as canonical angular momentum. We study the saturation of isolated modes in various regimes and present the analytical derivation and numerical results. Finally, we present, using ITER parameters, the case where multiple modes overlap and describe the techniques used for the numerical treatment.

  15. Fission Half Lives of Fermium Isotopes Within Skyrme Hartree-Fock Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.; Nazarewicz, W.

    Nuclear fission barriers, mass parameters and spontaneous fission half lives of fermium isotopes calculated in a framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model with the SkM* force are discussed. Zero-point energy corrections in the ground state are determined for each nucleus using the Gaussian overlap approximation of the generator coordinate method and in the cranking formalism. Results of spontaneous fission half lives are compared to experimental data.

  16. Towards Skyrmion stars: Large baryon configurations in the Einstein-Skyrme model

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Bernard M. A. G.; Probert, Gavin I.

    2007-06-15

    We investigate the large baryon number sector of the Einstein-Skyrme model as a possible model for baryon stars. Gravitating hedgehog skyrmions have been investigated previously and the existence of stable solitonic stars excluded due to energy considerations [P. Bizon and T. Chmaj, Phys. Lett. B 297, 55 (1992).]. However, in this paper we demonstrate that by generating gravitating Skyrmions using rational maps, we can achieve multibaryon bound states while recovering spherical symmetry in the limit where B becomes large.

  17. FISSION HALF LIVES OF FERMIUM ISOTOPES WITHIN SKYRME HARTREE-FOCK-BOGOLIUBOV THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, Andrzej; Nazarewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fission barriers, mass parameters and spontaneous fission half lives of fermium isotopes calculated in a framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model with the SkM* force are discussed. Zero-point energy corrections in the ground state are determined for each nucleus using the Gaussian overlap approximation of the generator coordinate method and in the cranking formalism. Results of spontaneous fission half lives are compared to experimental data.

  18. Co-evolution of multipartite interactions between an extended tmRNA tag and a robust Lon protease in Mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhiyun; Karzai, A Wali

    2009-12-01

    Messenger RNAs that lack in-frame stop codons promote ribosome stalling and accumulation of aberrant and potentially harmful polypeptides. The SmpB-tmRNA quality control system has evolved to solve problems associated with non-stop mRNAs, by rescuing stalled ribosomes and directing the addition of a peptide tag to the C-termini of the associated proteins, marking them for proteolysis. In Escherichia coli, the ClpXP system is the major contributor to disposal of tmRNA-tagged proteins. We have shown that the AAA+ Lon protease can also degrade tmRNA-tagged proteins, but with much lower efficiency. Here, we present a unique case of enhanced recognition and degradation of an extended Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) tmRNA tag by the MP-Lon protease. We demonstrate that MP-Lon can efficiently and selectively degrade MP-tmRNA-tagged proteins. Most significantly, our studies reveal that the larger (27 amino acids long) MP-tmRNA tag contains multiple discrete signalling motifs for efficient recognition and rapid degradation by Lon. We propose that higher-affinity multipartite interactions between MP-Lon and the extended MP-tmRNA tag have co-evolved from pre-existing weaker interactions, as exhibited by Lon in E. coli, to better fulfil the function of MP-Lon as the sole soluble cytoplasmic protease responsible for the degradation of tmRNA-tagged proteins.

  19. Nuclear charge and neutron radii and nuclear matter: Trend analysis in Skyrme density-functional-theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Radii of charge and neutron distributions are fundamental nuclear properties. They depend on both nuclear interaction parameters related to the equation of state of infinite nuclear matter and on quantal shell effects, which are strongly impacted by the presence of nuclear surface. Purpose: In this work, by studying the correlation of charge and neutron radii, and neutron skin, with nuclear matter parameters, we assess different mechanisms that drive nuclear sizes. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Skyrme functionals obtained by means of optimization protocols, which do not include any radius information. By performing the Monte Carlo sampling of reasonable functionals around the optimal parametrization, we scan all correlations between nuclear matter properties and observables characterizing charge and neutron distributions of spherical closed-shell nuclei 48Ca,208Pb, and 298Fl. Results: By considering the influence of various nuclear matter properties on charge and neutron radii in a multidimensional parameter space of Skyrme functionals, we demonstrate the existence of two strong relationships: (i) between the nuclear charge radii and the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter ρ0, and (ii) between the neutron skins and the slope of the symmetry energy L . The impact of other nuclear matter properties on nuclear radii is weak or nonexistent. For functionals optimized to experimental binding energies only, proton and neutron radii are found to be weakly correlated due to canceling trends from different nuclear matter characteristics. Conclusion: The existence of only two strong relations connecting nuclear radii with nuclear matter properties has important consequences. First, by requiring that the nuclear functional reproduces the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter practically fixes the charge (or proton) radii, and vice versa. This explains the recent results of ab initio calculations

  20. Collective Behaviors in Spatially Extended Systems with Local Interactions and Synchronous Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChatÉ, H.; Manneville, P.

    1992-01-01

    Assessing the extent to which dynamical systems with many degrees of freedom can be described within a thermodynamics formalism is a problem that currently attracts much attention. In this context, synchronously updated regular lattices of identical, chaotic elements with local interactions are promising models for which statistical mechanics may be hoped to provide some insights. This article presents a large class of cellular automata rules and coupled map lattices of the above type in space dimensions d = 2 to 6.Such simple models can be approached by a mean-field approximation which usually reduces the dynamics to that of a map governing the evolution of some extensive density. While this approximation is exact in the d = infty limit, where macroscopic variables must display the time-dependent behavior of the mean-field map, basic intuition from equilibrium statistical mechanics rules out any such behavior in a low-dimensional systems, since it would involve the collective motion of locally disordered elements.The models studied are chosen to be as close as possible to mean-field conditions, i.e., rather high space dimension, large connectivity, and equal-weight coupling between sites. While the mean-field evolution is never observed, a new type of non-trivial collective behavior is found, at odds with the predictions of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Both in the cellular automata models and in the coupled map lattices, macroscopic variables frequently display a non-transient, time-dependent, low-dimensional dynamics emerging out of local disorder. Striking examples are period 3 cycles in two-state cellular automata and a Hopf bifurcation for a d = 5 lattice of coupled logistic maps. An extensive account of the phenomenology is given, including a catalog of behaviors, classification tables for the celular automata rules, and bifurcation diagrams for the coupled map lattices.The observed underlying dynamics is accompanied by an intrinsic quasi-Gaussian noise

  1. Acid-Base Formalism Extended to Excited State for O-H···S Hydrogen Bonding Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Roy, Ved Prakash; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bond can be regarded as an interaction between a base and a proton covalently bound to another base. In this context the strength of hydrogen bond scales with the proton affinity of the acceptor base and the pKa of the donor, i.e., it follows the acid-base formalism. This has been amply demonstrated in conventional hydrogen bonds. Is this also true for the unconventional hydrogen bonds involving lesser electronegative elements such as sulfur atom? In our previous work, we had established that the strength of O-H···S hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction scales with the proton affinity (PA) of the acceptor. In this work, we have investigated the other counterpart, i.e., the H-bonding interaction between the photoacids with different pKa values with a common base such as the H2O and H2S. The 1:1 complexes of five para substituted phenols p-aminophenol, p-cresol, p-fluorophenol, p-chlorophenol, and p-cyanophenol with H2O and H2S were investigated experimentally and computationally. The investigations were also extended to the excited states. The experimental observations of the spectral shifts in the O-H stretching frequency and the S1-S0 band origins were correlated with the pKa of the donors. Ab initio calculations at the MP2 and various dispersion corrected density functional levels of theory were performed to compute the dissociation energy (D0) of the complexes. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), noncovalent interaction (NCI) method, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, and natural decomposition analysis (NEDA) were carried out for further characterization of HB interaction. The O-H stretching frequency red shifts and the dissociation energies were found to be lower for the O-H···S hydrogen bonded systems compared to those for the O-H···O H-bound systems. Despite being dominated by the dispersion interaction the O-H···S interaction in the H2S complexes also conformed to the acid-base formalism, i.e., the D0 and the O-H red shift

  2. Acid-Base Formalism Extended to Excited State for O-H···S Hydrogen Bonding Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Roy, Ved Prakash; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bond can be regarded as an interaction between a base and a proton covalently bound to another base. In this context the strength of hydrogen bond scales with the proton affinity of the acceptor base and the pKa of the donor, i.e., it follows the acid-base formalism. This has been amply demonstrated in conventional hydrogen bonds. Is this also true for the unconventional hydrogen bonds involving lesser electronegative elements such as sulfur atom? In our previous work, we had established that the strength of O-H···S hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction scales with the proton affinity (PA) of the acceptor. In this work, we have investigated the other counterpart, i.e., the H-bonding interaction between the photoacids with different pKa values with a common base such as the H2O and H2S. The 1:1 complexes of five para substituted phenols p-aminophenol, p-cresol, p-fluorophenol, p-chlorophenol, and p-cyanophenol with H2O and H2S were investigated experimentally and computationally. The investigations were also extended to the excited states. The experimental observations of the spectral shifts in the O-H stretching frequency and the S1-S0 band origins were correlated with the pKa of the donors. Ab initio calculations at the MP2 and various dispersion corrected density functional levels of theory were performed to compute the dissociation energy (D0) of the complexes. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), noncovalent interaction (NCI) method, natural bonding orbital (NBO) analysis, and natural decomposition analysis (NEDA) were carried out for further characterization of HB interaction. The O-H stretching frequency red shifts and the dissociation energies were found to be lower for the O-H···S hydrogen bonded systems compared to those for the O-H···O H-bound systems. Despite being dominated by the dispersion interaction the O-H···S interaction in the H2S complexes also conformed to the acid-base formalism, i.e., the D0 and the O-H red shift

  3. On the phase diagram of the extended Hubbard model with intersite density-density interactions in the atomic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapcia, Konrad Jerzy; Robaszkiewicz, Stanisław

    2016-11-01

    The charge ordering is a phenomenon associated with inhomogeneous distribution of electron density occurring mostly in strongly correlated materials such as transition metal oxides or organic conductors. The extended Hubbard model (EHM) is one of the simplest model for description of this phenomenon. The full phase diagram of the EHM with intersite density-density interactions W1 and W2 (nearest- and next-nearest-neighbour, respectively) in the atomic limit as a function of the chemical potential has been derived in the variational approach, which treats the on-site interaction exactly and the intersite interactions within mean-field approximation. The results for arbitrary values of model parameters (in the two-sublattice assumption) reveal that the diagram has very complex structure including various (multi-)critical points. A variety of the transitions between different phases, in particular with long-range charge-order, has been found to occur on the diagram. The results presented are rigorous ones in the high-dimension limit for any W1 and W2 ≤ 0.

  4. Rotational 2+ states of superheavy elements in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Staszczak, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations of the energies of first 2+ rotational states of deformed superheavy (SH) elements in the region of 108 ⩽ Z ⩽ 126 and 148 ⩽ N ⩽ 180 are reported. The results agree well in the case of fermium isotopes after a proper scaling of the moment of inertia. The scaling factor equals 1.3. The extension of the model to the region of SH elements gives a possibility of better estimation of the Q-values of α-decay, which is a dominant decay mode of SH elements.

  5. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 . PMID:26306875

  6. Description of elastic polarized-deuteron scattering in the optical model with Skyrme forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V. V.; Kuprikov, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    Microscopic deuteron-nucleus optical potential was constructed on the basis of the nucleon-nucleus optical potentials recently obtained by the authors from approximate calculations of the mass operator of the single-particle Green function using the Skyrme forces, which in general involve additional density- and momentum-dependent terms. Both the nucleon- and deuteron-nucleus elastic scattering processes are described in a self-consistent approach using the effective nucleon-nucleon forces, which simultaneously provide a satisfactory description of nuclear structure. The calculations performed using the Watanabe-type approximation have made it possible to obtain reasonable results for describing differential cross sections and polarization observables for the elastic deuteron scattering in a wide range of target-nucleus mass numbers at different incident deuteron energies, when using several Skyrme-force variants both from literature and proposed by the authors. Contributions to elastic deuteron-nucleus scattering cross sections coming from the effects of deuteron virtual breakup have been estimated in the continuum-discretized coupled channels approach.

  7. BioC-compatible full-text passage detection for protein–protein interactions using extended dependency graph

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a large growth in the number of biomedical publications that report experimental results. Many of these results concern detection of protein–protein interactions (PPI). In BioCreative V, we participated in the BioC task and developed a PPI system to detect text passages with PPIs in the full-text articles. By adopting the BioC format, the output of the system can be seamlessly added to the biocuration pipeline with little effort required for the system integration. A distinctive feature of our PPI system is that it utilizes extended dependency graph, an intermediate level of representation that attempts to abstract away syntactic variations in text. As a result, we are able to use only a limited set of rules to extract PPI pairs in the sentences, and additional rules to detect additional passages for PPI pairs. For evaluation, we used the 95 articles that were provided for the BioC annotation task. We retrieved the unique PPIs from the BioGRID database for these articles and show that our system achieves a recall of 83.5%. In order to evaluate the detection of passages with PPIs, we further annotated Abstract and Results sections of 20 documents from the dataset and show that an f-value of 80.5% was obtained. To evaluate the generalizability of the system, we also conducted experiments on AIMed, a well-known PPI corpus. We achieved an f-value of 76.1% for sentence detection and an f-value of 64.7% for unique PPI detection. Database URL: http://proteininformationresource.org/iprolink/corpora PMID:27170286

  8. Dynamics of the Extended String-Like Interaction of TFIIE with the p62 Subunit of TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Masahiko; Higo, Junichi; Komatsu, Tadashi; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Sugase, Kenji; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-01

    General transcription factor II E (TFIIE) contains an acid-rich region (residues 378-393) in its α-subunit, comprising 13 acidic and two hydrophobic (Phe387 and Val390) residues. Upon binding to the p62 subunit of TFIIH, the acidic region adopts an extended string-like structure on the basic groove of the pleckstrin homology domain (PHD) of p62, and inserts Phe387 and Val390 into two shallow pockets in the groove. Here, we have examined the dynamics of this interaction by NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although alanine substitution of Phe387 and/or Val390 greatly reduced binding to PHD, the binding mode of the mutants was similar to that of the wild-type, as judged by the chemical-shift changes of the PHD. NMR relaxation dispersion profiles of the interaction exhibited large amplitudes for residues in the C-terminal half-string in the acidic region (Phe387, Glu388, Val390, Ala391, and Asp392), indicating a two-site binding mode: one corresponding to the final complex structure, and one to an off-pathway minor complex. To probe the off-pathway complex structure, an atomically detailed free-energy landscape of the binding mode was computed by all-atom multicanonical MD. The most thermodynamically stable cluster corresponded to the final complex structure. One of the next stable clusters was the off-pathway structure cluster, showing the reversed orientation of the C-terminal half-string on the PHD groove, as compared with the final structure. MD calculations elucidated that the C-terminal half-acidic-string forms encounter complexes mainly around the positive groove region with nearly two different orientations of the string, parallel and antiparallel to the final structure. Interestingly, the most encountered complexes exhibit a parallel-like orientation, suggesting that the string has a tendency to bind around the groove in the proper orientation with the aid of Phe387 and/or Val390 to proceed smoothly to the final complex structure.

  9. Dynamics of the Extended String-Like Interaction of TFIIE with the p62 Subunit of TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Masahiko; Higo, Junichi; Komatsu, Tadashi; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Sugase, Kenji; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2016-09-01

    General transcription factor II E (TFIIE) contains an acid-rich region (residues 378-393) in its α-subunit, comprising 13 acidic and two hydrophobic (Phe387 and Val390) residues. Upon binding to the p62 subunit of TFIIH, the acidic region adopts an extended string-like structure on the basic groove of the pleckstrin homology domain (PHD) of p62, and inserts Phe387 and Val390 into two shallow pockets in the groove. Here, we have examined the dynamics of this interaction by NMR and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although alanine substitution of Phe387 and/or Val390 greatly reduced binding to PHD, the binding mode of the mutants was similar to that of the wild-type, as judged by the chemical-shift changes of the PHD. NMR relaxation dispersion profiles of the interaction exhibited large amplitudes for residues in the C-terminal half-string in the acidic region (Phe387, Glu388, Val390, Ala391, and Asp392), indicating a two-site binding mode: one corresponding to the final complex structure, and one to an off-pathway minor complex. To probe the off-pathway complex structure, an atomically detailed free-energy landscape of the binding mode was computed by all-atom multicanonical MD. The most thermodynamically stable cluster corresponded to the final complex structure. One of the next stable clusters was the off-pathway structure cluster, showing the reversed orientation of the C-terminal half-string on the PHD groove, as compared with the final structure. MD calculations elucidated that the C-terminal half-acidic-string forms encounter complexes mainly around the positive groove region with nearly two different orientations of the string, parallel and antiparallel to the final structure. Interestingly, the most encountered complexes exhibit a parallel-like orientation, suggesting that the string has a tendency to bind around the groove in the proper orientation with the aid of Phe387 and/or Val390 to proceed smoothly to the final complex structure. PMID:27602723

  10. Multidimensional Skyrme-density-functional study of the spontaneous fission of 238U

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, J.; Mazurek, K.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2015-01-01

    We determined the spontaneous fission lifetime of 238U by a minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional space of collective variables. Apart from the mass-distribution multipole moments Q20 (elongation) and Q30 (left–right asymmetry), we also considered the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 as a collective coordinate. The collective potential was obtained self-consistently using the Skyrme energy density functional SkM*. The inertia tensor was obtained within the nonperturbative cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach. As a result, the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 allowed us to control the pairing gap along the fission path, which significantly changed the spontaneous fission lifetime.

  11. Multidimensional Skyrme-density-functional study of the spontaneous fission of 238U

    DOE PAGES

    Sadhukhan, J.; Mazurek, K.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2015-01-01

    We determined the spontaneous fission lifetime of 238U by a minimization of the action integral in a three-dimensional space of collective variables. Apart from the mass-distribution multipole moments Q20 (elongation) and Q30 (left–right asymmetry), we also considered the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 as a collective coordinate. The collective potential was obtained self-consistently using the Skyrme energy density functional SkM*. The inertia tensor was obtained within the nonperturbative cranking approximation to the adiabatic time-dependent Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach. As a result, the pairing-fluctuation parameter λ2 allowed us to control the pairing gap along the fission path, which significantly changed the spontaneous fission lifetime.

  12. Fractional vortex molecules and vortex polygons in a baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

    2013-06-01

    We construct a molecule of fractional vortices with fractional topological lump charges as a baby Skyrmion with the unit topological lump charge in the antiferromagnetic (or XY) baby Skyrme model, that is, an O(3) sigma model with a four-derivative term and an antiferromagnetic or XY-type potential term quadratic in fields. We further construct configurations with topological lump charges Q≤7 and find that bound states of vortex molecules constitute regular polygons with 2Q vertices as vortices, where the rotational symmetry SO(2) in real space is spontaneously broken into a discrete subgroup ZQ. We also find metastable and arrayed bound states of fractional vortices for Q=5, 6. On the other hand, we find for Q=7 that the regular polygon is metastable and the arrayed bound state is stable. We calculate binding energies of all configurations.

  13. Asymmetric nuclear matter and neutron skin in an extended relativistic mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, B. K.

    2010-03-15

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, instrumental in understanding the behavior of the asymmetric nuclear matter, is investigated within the extended relativistic mean-field (ERMF) model, which includes the contributions from the self- and mixed-interaction terms for the scalar-isoscalar ({sigma}), vector-isoscalar ({omega}), and vector-isovector ({rho}) mesons up to the quartic order. Each of the 26 different parametrizations of the ERMF model employed is compatible with the bulk properties of the finite nuclei. The behavior of the symmetry energy for several parameter sets is found to be consistent with the empirical constraints on them as extracted from the analyses of the isospin diffusion data. The neutron-skin thickness in the {sup 208}Pb nucleus for these parameter sets of the ERMF model lies in the range of {approx}0.20-0.24 fm, which is in harmony with the thickness predicted by the Skyrme Hartree-Fock model. We also investigate the role of various mixed-interaction terms that are crucial for the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  14. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VI) HFODD (v2.40h): A new version of the program

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, Jacek; Satula, W.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, Nicolas F; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, Mario

    2009-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.40h) of the code hfodd which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented: (i) projection on good angular momentum (for the Hartree-Fock states), (ii) calculation of the GCM kernels, (iii) calculation of matrix elements of the Yukawa interaction, (iv) the BCS solutions for state-dependent pairing gaps, (v) the HFB solutions for broken simplex symmetry, (vi) calculation of Bohr deformation parameters, (vii) constraints on the Schiff moments and scalar multipole moments, (viii) the D{sub 2h}{sup T} transformations and rotations of wave functions, (ix) quasiparticle blocking for the HFB solutions in odd and odd-odd nuclei, (x) the Broyden method to accelerate the convergence, (xi) the Lipkin-Nogami method to treat pairing correlations, (xii) the exact Coulomb exchange term, (xiii) several utility options, and we have corrected three insignificant errors.

  15. Connecting with The Biggest Loser: an extended model of parasocial interaction and identification in health-related reality TV shows.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yan; Yoo, Jina H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates audience responses to health-related reality TV shows in the setting of The Biggest Loser. It conceptualizes a model for audience members' parasocial interaction and identification with cast members and explores antecedents and outcomes of parasocial interaction and identification. Data analysis suggests the following direct relationships: (1) audience members' exposure to the show is positively associated with parasocial interaction, which in turn is positively associated with identification, (2) parasocial interaction is positively associated with exercise self-efficacy, whereas identification is negatively associated with exercise self-efficacy, and (3) exercise self-efficacy is positively associated with exercise behavior. Indirect effects of parasocial interaction and identification on exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior are also significant. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. PMID:24579692

  16. Global description of β- decay in even-even nuclei with the axially-deformed Skyrme finite-amplitude method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustonen, M. T.; Engel, J.

    2016-01-01

    We use the finite-amplitude method for computing charge-changing Skyrme-quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) transition strengths in axially-deformed nuclei together with a modern Skyrme energy-density functional to fit several previously unconstrained parameters in the charge-changing time-odd part of the functional. With the modified functional we then calculate rates of β- decay for all medium-mass and heavy even-even nuclei between the valley of stability and the neutron drip line. We fit the Skyrme parameters to a limited set of β -decay rates, a set of Gamow-Teller resonance energies, and a set of spin-dipole resonance energies, in both spherical and deformed nuclei. Comparison to available experimental β -decay rates shows agreement at roughly the same level as in other global QRPA calculations. We estimate the uncertainty in our rates all the way to the neutron drip line through a construction that extrapolates the errors of known β -decay rates in nuclei with intermediate Q values to less stable isotopes with higher Q values.

  17. Space science education by Mathematica demonstrations: interactive conceptual design for foldable and extendable structures for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabai, S.; Berczi, Sz.

    2008-09-01

    By the interactive Mathematica Demonstrations of the Wolfram Research instrumentation [1], various mechanics and space motion operation simulations of any spacecraft was studied. The authors created great number of Mathematica demonstrations which are available from the Wolfram Demonstration site.

  18. Factor VIII Interacts with the Endocytic Receptor Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 via an Extended Surface Comprising "Hot-Spot" Lysine Residues.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madsen, Jesper J; Faber, Johan H; Zuurveld, Marleen G; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Olsen, Ole H; Stennicke, Henning R; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2015-07-01

    Lysine residues are implicated in driving the ligand binding to the LDL receptor family. However, it has remained unclear how specificity is regulated. Using coagulation factor VIII as a model ligand, we now study the contribution of individual lysine residues in the interaction with the largest member of the LDL receptor family, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and SPR interaction analysis on a library of lysine replacement variants as two independent approaches, we demonstrate that the interaction between factor VIII (FVIII) and LRP1 occurs over an extended surface containing multiple lysine residues. None of the individual lysine residues account completely for LRP1 binding, suggesting an additive binding model. Together with structural docking studies, our data suggest that FVIII interacts with LRP1 via an extended surface of multiple lysine residues that starts at the bottom of the C1 domain and winds around the FVIII molecule. PMID:25903134

  19. Factor VIII Interacts with the Endocytic Receptor Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 via an Extended Surface Comprising “Hot-Spot” Lysine Residues♦

    PubMed Central

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madsen, Jesper J.; Faber, Johan H.; Zuurveld, Marleen G.; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Olsen, Ole H.; Stennicke, Henning R.; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Lysine residues are implicated in driving the ligand binding to the LDL receptor family. However, it has remained unclear how specificity is regulated. Using coagulation factor VIII as a model ligand, we now study the contribution of individual lysine residues in the interaction with the largest member of the LDL receptor family, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and SPR interaction analysis on a library of lysine replacement variants as two independent approaches, we demonstrate that the interaction between factor VIII (FVIII) and LRP1 occurs over an extended surface containing multiple lysine residues. None of the individual lysine residues account completely for LRP1 binding, suggesting an additive binding model. Together with structural docking studies, our data suggest that FVIII interacts with LRP1 via an extended surface of multiple lysine residues that starts at the bottom of the C1 domain and winds around the FVIII molecule. PMID:25903134

  20. Root–root interactions: extending our perspective to be more inclusive of the range of theories in ecology and agriculture using in-vivo analyses

    PubMed Central

    Faget, Marc; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Walter, Achim; Herrera, Juan M.; Jahnke, Siegfried; Schurr, Ulrich; Temperton, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a large body of literature on competitive interactions among plants, but many studies have only focused on above-ground interactions and little is known about root–root dynamics between interacting plants. The perspective on possible mechanisms that explain the outcome of root–root interactions has recently been extended to include non-resource-driven mechanisms (as well as resource-driven mechanisms) of root competition and positive interactions such as facilitation. These approaches have often suffered from being static, partly due to the lack of appropriate methodologies for in-situ non-destructive root characterization. Scope Recent studies show that interactive effects of plant neighbourhood interactions follow non-linear and non-additive paths that are hard to explain. Common outcomes such as accumulation of roots mainly in the topsoil cannot be explained solely by competition theory but require a more inclusive theoretical, as well as an improved methodological framework. This will include the question of whether we can apply the same conceptual framework to crop versus natural species. Conclusions The development of non-invasive methods to dynamically study root–root interactions in vivo will provide the necessary tools to study a more inclusive conceptual framework for root–root interactions. By following the dynamics of root–root interactions through time in a whole range of scenarios and systems, using a wide variety of non-invasive methods, (such as fluorescent protein which now allows us to separately identify the roots of several individuals within soil), we will be much better equipped to answer some of the key questions in root physiology, ecology and agronomy. PMID:23378521

  1. In Silico, Experimental, Mechanistic Model for Extended-Release Felodipine Disposition Exhibiting Complex Absorption and a Highly Variable Food Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sean H. J.; Jackson, Andre J.; Hunt, C. Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and explore new, in silico experimental methods for deciphering complex, highly variable absorption and food interaction pharmacokinetics observed for a modified-release drug product. Toward that aim, we constructed an executable software analog of study participants to whom product was administered orally. The analog is an object- and agent-oriented, discrete event system, which consists of grid spaces and event mechanisms that map abstractly to different physiological features and processes. Analog mechanisms were made sufficiently complicated to achieve prespecified similarity criteria. An equation-based gastrointestinal transit model with nonlinear mixed effects analysis provided a standard for comparison. Subject-specific parameterizations enabled each executed analog’s plasma profile to mimic features of the corresponding six individual pairs of subject plasma profiles. All achieved prespecified, quantitative similarity criteria, and outperformed the gastrointestinal transit model estimations. We observed important subject-specific interactions within the simulation and mechanistic differences between the two models. We hypothesize that mechanisms, events, and their causes occurring during simulations had counterparts within the food interaction study: they are working, evolvable, concrete theories of dynamic interactions occurring within individual subjects. The approach presented provides new, experimental strategies for unraveling the mechanistic basis of complex pharmacological interactions and observed variability. PMID:25268237

  2. Search for the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock solutions for chiral rotation in N=75 isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Olbratowski, P.; Dobaczewski, J.; Dudek, J.

    2006-05-15

    A search for self-consistent solutions for the chiral rotational bands in the N=75 isotones {sup 130}Cs, {sup 132}La, {sup 134}Pr, and {sup 136}Pm is performed within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock cranking approach using SKM* and SLy4 parametrizations. The dependence of the solutions on the time-odd contributions in the energy functional is studied. From among the four isotones considered, self-consistent chiral solutions are obtained only in {sup 132}La. The microscopic calculations are compared with the {sup 132}La experimental data and with results of a classical model that contains all the mechanisms underlying the chirality of the collective rotational motion. Strong similarities between the Hartree-Fock and classical model results are found. The suggestion formulated earlier by the authors that the chiral rotation cannot exist below a certain critical frequency is further illustrated and discussed, together with the microscopic origin of a transition from planar to chiral rotation in nuclei. We also formulate the separability rule by which the tilted-axis-cranking solutions can be inferred from three independent principal-axis-cranking solutions corresponding to three different axes of rotation.

  3. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  4. Modeling of the Natural River-Aquifer Interactions -- A Simulation Extended to the Reclamation in Nantong City of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, P.; Chen, X.; You, J.; Cheng, C.; Liu, S.

    2009-12-01

    The competition for land uses in China intensified during the rapid development of the last two decades. The Jiangsu Province in the eastern China decided to develop a reclamation project in its coastal area in 2011. During the construction of highway and power plants, some geological and hydrological research work had been conducted but a lot of research questions about the tide-land interactions remain to be addressed. In China, researchers often use indoor experiments to simulate the coastal areas from river channel-aquifer interactions in laboratory. The dimensions of the experimental channels are, however, often limited to a small scale. In this study, we tried to use a natural river-aquifer system, with a relatively much larger scale compared to a laboratory channel-aquifer system, for simulation of the tide-land interactions. The study site is the Platte River near Kearney, Nebraska. An upstream reservoir released water cyclically and this water cycle is similar to the tidal process. Our study included direct-push techniques for permeameter tests to obtain the hydraulic conductivity of the streambed, monitoring the groundwater levels responding to daily changes of stream stages regulated by the upstream reservoir, and numerical modeling of the river-aquifer interactions. The soil layer and soil parameter analysis shows that the soil type and hydraulic conductivity at the study site are similar to the reclamation area in Nantong City of China. Thus the results from the Platte River site are applicable for simulating the flow dynamics and the groundwater level fluctuations caused by daily changes of tide level in the reclamation area. Other suggestions for dredger fill were put forward through the numerical simulation in the reclamation area.

  5. Diverse antimicrobial interactions of halophilic archaea and bacteria extend over geographical distances and cross the domain barrier.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Nina S; Pietilä, Maija K; Oksanen, Hanna M

    2013-10-01

    The significance of antimicrobial substances, halocins, produced by halophilic archaea and bacteria thriving in hypersaline environments is relatively unknown. It is suggested that their production might increase species diversity and give transient competitive advances to the producer strain. Halocin production is considered to be common among halophilic archaea, but there is a lack of information about halocins produced by bacteria in highly saline environments. We studied the antimicrobial activity of 68 halophilic archaea and 22 bacteria isolated from numerous geographically distant hypersaline environments. Altogether 144 antimicrobial interactions were found between the strains and aside haloarchaea, halophilic bacteria from various genera were identified as halocin producers. Close to 80% of the interactions were detected between microorganisms from different genera and in few cases, even across the domain boundary. Several of the strains produced halocins with a wide inhibitory spectrum as has been observed before. Most of the antimicrobial interactions were found between strains from distant sampling sites indicating that hypersaline environments around the world have similar microorganisms with the potential to produce wide activity range antimicrobials.

  6. A Rearrangement of the Guanosine-Binding Site Establishes an Extended Network of Functional Interactions in the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme Active Site†

    PubMed Central

    Forconi, Marcello; Sengupta, Raghuvir N.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Protein enzymes appear to use extensive packing and hydrogen-bonding interactions to precisely position catalytic groups within active sites. Due to their inherent backbone flexibility and limited side chain repertoire, RNA enzymes face additional challenges relative to proteins in precisely positioning substrates and catalytic groups. Here, we use the group I ribozyme to probe the existence, establishment, and functional consequences of an extended network of interactions in an RNA active site. The group I ribozyme catalyzes a site-specific attack of guanosine on an oligonucleotide substrate. We previously determined that the hydrogen bond between the exocyclic amino group of guanosine and the 2′-hydroxyl group at position A261 of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme contributes to overall catalysis. We now use functional data, aided by double-mutant cycles, to probe this hydrogen bond in the individual reaction steps of the catalytic cycle. Our results indicate that this hydrogen bond is not formed upon guanosine binding to the ribozyme but instead forms at a later stage of the catalytic cycle. Formation of this hydrogen bond is correlated to other structural rearrangements in the ribozyme's active site that are promoted by docking of the oligonucleotide substrate into the ribozyme's active site, and disruption of this interaction has deleterious consequences for the chemical transformation within the ternary complex. These results, combined with earlier results, provide insight into the nature of the multiple conformational steps used by the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme to achieve its active structure and reveal an intricate, extended network of interactions that is used to establish catalytic interactions within this RNA's active site. PMID:20175542

  7. The region of antithrombin interacting with full-length heparin chains outside the high-affinity pentasaccharide sequence extends to Lys136 but not to Lys139.

    PubMed

    Arocas, V; Turk, B; Bock, S C; Olson, S T; Björk, I

    2000-07-25

    The interaction of a well-defined pentasaccharide sequence of heparin with a specific binding site on antithrombin activates the inhibitor through a conformational change. This change increases the rate of antithrombin inhibition of factor Xa, whereas acceleration of thrombin inhibition requires binding of both inhibitor and proteinase to the same heparin chain. An extended heparin binding site of antithrombin outside the specific pentasaccharide site has been proposed to account for the higher affinity of the inhibitor for full-length heparin chains by interacting with saccharides adjacent to the pentasaccharide sequence. To resolve conflicting evidence regarding the roles of Lys136 and Lys139 in this extended site, we have mutated the two residues to Ala or Gln. Mutation of Lys136 decreased the antithrombin affinity for full-length heparin by at least 5-fold but minimally altered the affinity for the pentasaccharide. As a result, the full-length heparin and pentasaccharide affinities were comparable. The reduced affinity for full-length heparin was associated with the loss of one ionic interaction and was caused by both a lower overall association rate constant and a higher overall dissociation rate constant. In contrast, mutation of Lys139 affected neither full-length heparin nor pentasaccharide affinity. The rate constants for inhibition of thrombin and factor Xa by the complexes between antithrombin and full-length heparin or pentasaccharide were unaffected by both mutations, indicating that neither Lys136 nor Lys139 is involved in heparin activation of the inhibitor. Together, these results show that Lys136 forms part of the extended heparin binding site of antithrombin that participates in the binding of full-length heparin chains, whereas Lys139 is located outside this site. PMID:10913257

  8. Cocrystal Structures of Primed Side-Extending α-Ketoamide Inhibitors Reveal Novel Calpain-Inhibitor Aromatic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qian,J.; Cuerrier, D.; Davies, P.; Li, Z.; Powers, J.; Campbell, R.

    2008-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular cysteine proteases that catalyze the cleavage of target proteins in response to Ca2+ signaling. When Ca2+ homeostasis is disrupted, calpain overactivation causes unregulated proteolysis, which can contribute to diseases such as postischemic injury and cataract formation. Potent calpain inhibitors exist, but of these many cross-react with other cysteine proteases and will need modification to specifically target calpain. Here, we present crystal structures of rat calpain 1 protease core ({mu}I-II) bound to two a-ketoamide-based calpain inhibitors containing adenyl and piperazyl primed-side extensions. An unexpected aromatic-stacking interaction is observed between the primed-side adenine moiety and the Trp298 side chain. This interaction increased the potency of the inhibitor toward {mu}I-II and heterodimeric m-calpain. Moreover, stacking orients the adenine such that it can be used as a scaffold for designing novel primed-side address regions, which could be incorporated into future inhibitors to enhance their calpain specificity.

  9. Chloride-selective electrodes based on "two-wall" aryl-extended calix[4]pyrroles: combining hydrogen bonds and anion-π interactions to achieve optimum performance.

    PubMed

    Sabek, Jad; Adriaenssens, Louis; Guinovart, Tomàs; Parra, Enrique J; Rius, F Xavier; Ballester, Pablo; Blondeau, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The performance of chloride-selective electrodes based on "two-wall" aryl-extended calix[4]pyrroles and multiwall carbon nanotubes is presented. The calix[4]pyrrole receptors bear two phenyl groups at opposite meso-positions. When the meso-phenyl groups are decorated with strong electron-withdrawing substituents, attractive anion-π interactions may exist between the receptor's aromatic walls and the sandwiched anion. These anion-π interactions are shown to significantly affect the selectivity of the electrodes. Calix[4]pyrrole, bearing a p-nitro withdrawing group on each of the meso-phenyl rings, afforded sensors that display anti-Hofmeister behavior against the lipophilic salicylate and nitrate anions. Based on the experimental data, a series of principles that help in predicting the suitability of synthetic receptors for use as anion-specific ionophores is discussed. Finally, the sensors deliver excellent results in the direct detection of chloride in bodily fluids.

  10. Competing magnetic interactions in the extended Kagome system YBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7}.

    SciTech Connect

    Chapon, L. C.; Radaelli, P. G.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Materials Science Division; Rutherford Appleton Lab.-CCLRC; Univ. College London

    2006-11-01

    YBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} belongs to a new class of geometrically frustrated magnets like the pyrochlores, in which Co spins occupy corners of tetrahedra. The structure can be viewed as an alternating stacking of Kagome and triangular layers. Exactly half of the triangular units of the Kagome plane are capped by Co ions to form columns running perpendicular to the Kagome sheets. Neutron powder diffraction reveals a broad temperature range of diffuse magnetic scattering, followed by long-range magnetic ordering below 110 K. A unique low-temperature magnetic structure simultaneously satisfies an S=0 arrangement in the uncapped triangular units and antiferromagnetic coupling along the columns. A spin reorientation above 30 K tracks the relative strengths of the in-plane and out-of-plane interactions.

  11. Competing magnetic interactions in the extended Kagome system YBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Chapon, L. C.; Radaelli, P. G.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.

    2006-11-01

    YBaCo{sub 4}O{sub 7} belongs to a new class of geometrically frustrated magnets like the pyrochlores, in which Co spins occupy corners of tetrahedra. The structure can be viewed as an alternating stacking of Kagome and triangular layers. Exactly half of the triangular units of the Kagome plane are capped by Co ions to form columns running perpendicular to the Kagome sheets. Neutron powder diffraction reveals a broad temperature range of diffuse magnetic scattering, followed by long-range magnetic ordering below 110 K. A unique low-temperature magnetic structure simultaneously satisfies an S=0 arrangement in the uncapped triangular units and antiferromagnetic coupling along the columns. A spin reorientation above 30 K tracks the relative strengths of the in-plane and out-of-plane interactions.

  12. Extending Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for Early Childhood Internalizing Problems: New Advances for an Overlooked Population

    PubMed Central

    Puliafico, Anthony C.; Kurtz, Steven M. S.; Pincus, Donna B.; Comer, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Although efficacious psychological treatments for internalizing disorders are now well established for school-aged children, until recently there have regrettably been limited empirical efforts to clarify indicated psychological intervention methods for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders presenting in early childhood. Young children lack many of the developmental capacities required to effectively participate in established treatments for mood and anxiety problems presenting in older children, making simple downward extensions of these treatments for the management of preschool internalizing problems misguided. In recent years, a number of research groups have successfully adapted and modified parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT), originally developed to treat externalizing problems in young children, to treat various early internalizing problems with a set of neighboring protocols. As in traditional PCIT, these extensions target child symptoms by directly reshaping parent–child interaction patterns associated with the maintenance of symptoms. The present review outlines this emerging set of novel PCIT adaptations and modifications for mood and anxiety problems in young children and reviews preliminary evidence supporting their use. Specifically, we cover (a) PCIT for early separation anxiety disorder; (b) the PCIT-CALM (Coaching Approach behavior and Leading by Modeling) Program for the full range of early anxiety disorders; (c) the group Turtle Program for behavioral inhibition; and (d) the PCIT-ED (Emotional Development) Program for preschool depression. In addition, emerging PCIT-related protocols in need of empirical attention—such as the PCIT-SM (selective mutism) Program for young children with SM—are also considered. Implications of these protocols are discussed with regard to their unique potential to address the clinical needs of young children with internalizing problems. Obstacles to broad dissemination are addressed, and we consider

  13. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XII. Stiffness and stability of neutron-star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2010-09-15

    We construct three new Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled HFB-19, HFB-20, and HFB-21, with unconventional Skyrme forces containing t{sub 4} and t{sub 5} terms, i.e., density-dependent generalizations of the usual t{sub 1} and t{sub 2} terms, respectively. The new forces underlying these models are fitted respectively to three different realistic equations of state of neutron matter for which the density dependence of the symmetry energy ranges from the very soft to the very stiff, reflecting thereby our present lack of complete knowledge of the high-density behavior of nuclear matter. All unphysical instabilities of nuclear matter, including the transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated with the new forces. At the same time the new models fit essentially all the available mass data with rms deviations of 0.58 MeV and give the same high-quality fits to measured charge radii that we obtained in earlier models with conventional Skyrme forces. Being constrained by neutron matter, these new mass models, which all give similar extrapolations out to the neutron drip line, are highly appropriate for studies of the r process and the outer crust of neutron stars. Moreover, the underlying forces, labeled BSk19, BSk20 and BSk21, respectively, are well adapted to the study of the inner crust and core of neutron stars. The new family of Skyrme forces thus opens the way to a unified description of all regions of neutron stars.

  14. Exploiting translational stalling peptides in an effort to extend azithromycin interaction within the prokaryotic ribosome nascent peptide exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Washington, Arren Z; Tapadar, Subhasish; George, Alex; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2015-08-15

    The ribosome is the primary protein synthesis machine in the cell and is a target for treatment of a variety of diseases including bacterial infection and cancer. The ribosomal peptide exit tunnel, the route of egress for the nascent peptide, is an inviting site for drug design. Toward a rational engagement of the nascent peptide components for the design of small molecule inhibitors of ribosome function, we designed and disclosed herein a set of N-10 indole functionalized azithromycin analogs. The indole moiety of these compounds is designed to mimic the translation stalling interaction of SecM W155 side-chain with the prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) ribosome A751 residue. Many of these N-10 functionalized compounds have enhanced translation inhibition activities against E. coli ribosome relative to azithromycin while a subset inhibited the growth of representative susceptible bacteria strains to about the same extent as azithromycin. Moreover, the inclusion of bovine serum in the bacterial growth media enhanced the anti-bacterial potency of the N-10 functionalized azithromycin analogs by as high as 10-fold. PMID:26037612

  15. Exploiting translational stalling peptides in an effort to extend azithromycin interaction within the prokaryotic ribosome nascent peptide exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Washington, Arren Z; Tapadar, Subhasish; George, Alex; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2015-08-15

    The ribosome is the primary protein synthesis machine in the cell and is a target for treatment of a variety of diseases including bacterial infection and cancer. The ribosomal peptide exit tunnel, the route of egress for the nascent peptide, is an inviting site for drug design. Toward a rational engagement of the nascent peptide components for the design of small molecule inhibitors of ribosome function, we designed and disclosed herein a set of N-10 indole functionalized azithromycin analogs. The indole moiety of these compounds is designed to mimic the translation stalling interaction of SecM W155 side-chain with the prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) ribosome A751 residue. Many of these N-10 functionalized compounds have enhanced translation inhibition activities against E. coli ribosome relative to azithromycin while a subset inhibited the growth of representative susceptible bacteria strains to about the same extent as azithromycin. Moreover, the inclusion of bovine serum in the bacterial growth media enhanced the anti-bacterial potency of the N-10 functionalized azithromycin analogs by as high as 10-fold.

  16. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  17. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-12-01

    We calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd-even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using the EDF modelling.

  18. Structure of a novel dodecaheme cytochrome c from Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals an extended 12 nm protein with interacting hemes.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Duke, N. E. C.; Pessanha, M.; Yang, X.; Orshonsky, V.; Orshonsky, L.; Erickson, J.; Zagyansky, Y.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.

    2011-04-01

    Multiheme cytochromes c are important in electron transfer pathways in reduction of both soluble and insoluble Fe(III) by Geobacter sulfurreducens. We determined the crystal structure at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution of the first dodecaheme cytochrome c (GSU1996) along with its N-terminal and C-terminal hexaheme fragments at 2.6 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The macroscopic reduction potentials of the full-length protein and its fragments were measured. The sequence of GSU1996 can be divided into four c{sub 7}-type domains (A, B, C and D) with homology to triheme cytochromes c{sub 7}. In cytochromes c{sub 7} all three hemes are bis-His coordinated, whereas in c{sub 7}-type domains the last heme is His-Met coordinated. The full-length GSU1996 has a 12 nm long crescent shaped structure with the 12 hemes arranged along a polypeptide to form a 'nanowire' of hemes; it has a modular structure. Surprisingly, while the C-terminal half of the protein consists of two separate c{sub 7}-type domains (C and D) connected by a small linker, the N-terminal half of the protein has two c{sub 7}-type domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. This is also observed in the AB fragment. There is an unexpected interaction between the hemes at the interface of domains A and B, which form a heme-pair with nearly parallel stacking of their porphyrin rings. The hemes adjacent to each other throughout the protein are within van der Waals distance which enables efficient electron exchange between them. For the first time, the structural details of c{sub 7}-type domains from one multiheme protein were compared.

  19. Adaptive switching of interaction potentials in the time domain: an extended Lagrangian approach tailored to transmute force field to QM/MM simulations and back.

    PubMed

    Böckmann, Marcus; Doltsinis, Nikos L; Marx, Dominik

    2015-06-01

    An extended Lagrangian formalism that allows for a smooth transition between two different descriptions of interactions during a molecular dynamics simulation is presented. This time-adaptive method is particularly useful in the context of multiscale simulation as it provides a sound recipe to switch on demand between different hierarchical levels of theory, for instance between ab initio ("QM") and force field ("MM") descriptions of a given (sub)system in the course of a molecular dynamics simulation. The equations of motion can be integrated straightforwardly using the usual propagators, such as the Verlet algorithm. First test cases include a bath of harmonic oscillators, of which a subset is switched to a different force constant and/or equilibrium position, as well as an all-MM to QM/MM transition in a hydrogen-bonded water dimer. The method is then applied to a smectic 8AB8 liquid crystal and is shown to be able to switch dynamically a preselected 8AB8 molecule from an all-MM to a QM/MM description which involves partition boundaries through covalent bonds. These examples show that the extended Lagrangian approach is not only easy to implement into existing code but that it is also efficient and robust. The technique moreover provides easy access to a conserved energy quantity, also in cases when Nosé-Hoover chain thermostatting is used throughout dynamical switching. A simple quadratic driving potential proves to be sufficient to guarantee a smooth transition whose time scale can be easily tuned by varying the fictitious mass parameter associated with the auxiliary variable used to extend the Lagrangian. The method is general and can be applied to time-adaptive switching on demand between two different levels of theory within the framework of hybrid scale-bridging simulations. PMID:26575543

  20. Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel. 2: Application to the interaction of Na(+), Na(+)(aq.), Mg(+)-2(aq.) with adenine and thymine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Macelroy, R.; Chang, S.

    1980-01-01

    Modified Iterative Extended Hueckel, which includes explicit effective internuclear and electronic interactions, is applied to the study of the energetics of Na(+),Mg(+), Na(+) (aqueous), and Mg(+2) (aqueous) ions approaching various possible binding sites on adenine and thymine. Results for the adenine + ion and thymine + ion are in good qualitative agreement with ab initio work on analogous systems. Energy differences between competing sites are in excellent agreement. Hydration appears to be a critical factor in determining favorable binding sites. That the adenine Nl and N3 sites cannot displace a water molecule from the hydrated cation indicates that they are not favorable binding sites in aqueous media. Of those sites investigated, 04 was the most favorable binding site on the thymine for the bare Na(+). However, the 02 site was the most favorable binding site for either hydrated cation.

  1. Characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi ortholog of the SBDS protein reveals an intrinsically disordered extended C-terminal region showing RNA-interacting activity.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Castilho, Beatriz A; Sforça, Mauricio L; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Guimarães, Beatriz G; Zanchin, Nilson I T

    2009-04-01

    The human SBDS gene and its yeast ortholog SDO1 encode essential proteins that are involved in ribosome biosynthesis. SDO1 has been implicated in recycling of the ribosomal biogenesis factor Tif6p from pre-66S particles as well as in translation activation of 60S ribosomes. The SBDS protein is highly conserved, containing approximately 250 amino acid residues in animals, fungi and Archaea, while SBDS orthologs of plants and a group of protists contain an extended C-terminal region. In this work, we describe the characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi SBDS ortholog (TcSBDS). TcSBDS co-fractionates with polysomes in sucrose density gradients, which is consistent with a role in ribosome biosynthesis. We show that TcSBDS contains a C-terminal extension of 200 amino acids that displays the features of intrinsically disordered proteins as determined by proteolytic, circular dichroism and NMR analyses. Interestingly, the C-terminal extension is responsible for TcSBDS-RNA interaction activity in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This finding suggests that Trypanosomatidae and possibly also other organisms containing SBDS with extended C-terminal regions have evolved an additional function for SBDS in ribosome biogenesis.

  2. Properties of nuclei in the nobelium region studied within the covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny energy density functionals

    DOE PAGES

    Dobaczewski, J.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Bender, M.; Robledo, L. M.; Shi, Yue

    2015-07-29

    In this study, we calculate properties of the ground and excited states of nuclei in the nobelium region for proton and neutron numbers of 92 ≤ Z ≤ 104 and 144 ≤ N ≤ 156, respectively. We use three different energy-density-functional (EDF) approaches, based on covariant, Skyrme, and Gogny functionals, each with two different parameter sets. A comparative analysis of the results obtained for quasiparticle spectra, odd–even and two-particle mass staggering, and moments of inertia allows us to identify single-particle and shell effects that are characteristic to these different models and to illustrate possible systematic uncertainties related to using themore » EDF modelling.« less

  3. New Development of Self-Interaction Corrected DFT for Extended Systems Applied to the Calculation of Native Defects in 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Gao, Fei

    2006-05-01

    We recently have developed a framework for implementing a scaled self-interaction corrected density functional theory (DFT-SIC) into pseudopotential plane-wave DFT. The technique implements the original method due to Perdew and Zunger by direct minimization of the DFT-SIC total energy functional. By using maximally localized Wannier functions, DFT-SIC calculation can be carried out efficiently even for extended systems. Using this new development the formation energies of defects in 3C-SiC were calculated and compared to more standard DFT calculations. Differences of up to 1eV were seen between DFT and DFT-SIC calculations of the formation energies. When compared to DFT, DFT-SIC produced less stable vacancies and silicon interstials, more stable antisites and carbon interstitials. The most favorable interstitials were found to be C interstitials in a C+-C<100> dumbbell configuration, with the formation energy of 5.91eV with DFT and 5.65 eV with DFT-SIC. Si interstitials were not as stable as C interstitials. The most favorable Si interstitial was found to be Si tetrahedral surrounded by four C atoms, with a formation energy of 7.65eV with DFT and 8.71eV with DFT-SIC.

  4. Rotational properties of nuclei around No254 investigated using a spectroscopic-quality Skyrme energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Dobaczewski, J.; Greenlees, P. T.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Nuclei in the Z ≈100 mass region represent the heaviest systems where detailed spectroscopic information is experimentally available. Although microscopic-macroscopic and self-consistent models have achieved great success in describing the data in this mass region, a fully satisfying precise theoretical description is still missing. Purpose: By using fine-tuned parametrizations of the energy density functionals, the present work aims at an improved description of the single-particle properties and rotational bands in the nobelium region. Such locally optimized parametrizations may have better properties when extrapolating towards the superheavy region. Methods: Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov and Lipkin-Nogami methods were used to calculate the quasiparticle energies and rotational bands of nuclei in the nobelium region. Starting from the most recent Skyrme parametrization, UNEDF1, the spin-orbit coupling constants and pairing strengths have been tuned, so as to achieve a better agreement with the excitation spectra and odd-even mass differences in 251Cf and 249Bk. Results: The quasiparticle properties of 251Cf and 249Bk were very well reproduced. At the same time, crucial deformed neutron and proton shell gaps open up at N =152 and Z =100, respectively. Rotational bands in Fm, No, and Rf isotopes, where experimental data are available, were also fairly well described. To help future improvements towards a more precise description, small deficiencies of the approach were carefully identified. Conclusions: In the Z ≈100 mass region, larger spin-orbit strengths than those from global adjustments lead to improved agreement with data. Puzzling effects of particle-number restoration on the calculated moment of inertia, at odds with the experimental behavior, require further scrutiny.

  5. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunck, N.; Dobaczewski, J.; McDonnell, J.; Satuła, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-90 Computer: Intel Pentium-III, Intel Xeon, AMD-Athlon, AMD-Opteron, Cray XT4, Cray XT5 Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, Windows XP Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI RAM: 10 Mwords Word size: The code is written in single-precision for the use on a 64-bit processor. The compiler option -r8 or +autodblpad (or equivalent) has to be used to promote all real and complex single-precision floating-point items to double precision when the code is used on a 32-bit machine. Classification: 17.22 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADFL_v2_2 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2361 External routines: The user must have access to the NAGLIB subroutine f02axe, or LAPACK subroutines zhpev, zhpevx, zheevr, or zheevd, which diagonalize complex hermitian matrices, the LAPACK subroutines dgetri and dgetrf which invert arbitrary real matrices, the LAPACK subroutines dsyevd, dsytrf and dsytri which compute eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of real symmetric matrices, the LINPACK subroutines zgedi and zgeco, which invert arbitrary complex matrices and calculate determinants, the BLAS routines dcopy, dscal, dgeem and dgemv for double-precision linear algebra and zcopy, zdscal, zgeem and zgemv for complex linear algebra, or provide another set of subroutines that can perform such tasks. The BLAS and LAPACK subroutines can be obtained from the Netlib Repository at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville: http://netlib2.cs.utk.edu/. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The nuclear mean field and an analysis of its symmetries in realistic cases are the main ingredients of a description of nuclear states. Within the Local Density Approximation, or for a zero-range velocity-dependent Skyrme interaction, the nuclear mean field is local and velocity dependent. The locality allows for an effective and fast solution of the self

  6. Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear mass formulas: crossing the 0.6 MeV accuracy threshold with microscopically deduced pairing.

    PubMed

    Goriely, S; Chamel, N; Pearson, J M

    2009-04-17

    We present a new Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear-mass model in which the contact-pairing force is constructed from microscopic pairing gaps of symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter calculated from realistic two- and three-body forces, with medium-polarization effects included. With the pairing being treated more realistically than in any of our earlier models, the rms deviation with respect to essentially all the available mass data falls to 0.581 MeV, the best value ever found within the mean-field framework. Since our Skyrme force is also constrained by the properties of pure neutron matter, this new model is particularly well suited for application to astrophysical problems involving a neutron-rich environment, such as the elucidation of the r process of nucleosynthesis, and the description of supernova cores and neutron-star crusts. PMID:19518625

  7. Extended BCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhionero, Franco; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Amendola, Luca

    1999-05-01

    We propose a new inflationary toy model that produces two episodes of phase transitions. With the first one, super-horizon-sized bubbles are nucleated, which are seen from inside as open universes, thereby reconciling inflation with the recent observations of a low Ω0. With the second transition, a distribution of sub-horizon voids, of sizes typically around 10-100 Mpc/h are generated inside the open universes. These primordial voids can be the seeds of the present large scale voids that are detected in redshift surveys, and provide a non-Gaussian signal on the microwave background. The model realizes this sequence along the same slow-rolling path, by modulating the energy difference between the vacuum states. In this model, that we call extended Bubbly CDM, openness and bubblyness, rather than flatness and homogeneity, are the main products of inflation.

  8. Space Science Education by Mathematica Demonstrations: Interactive Design of Moving Space Probe Elements Mechanics by Foldable and Extendable Structures for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabai, S.; Bérczi, Sz.

    2010-03-01

    By the interactive Mathematica Demonstrations of the Wolfram Research several mechanics for space probe operation and motion simulations were studied as space robotics and science educational program.

  9. Synthesis, structures and properties of Ag+ complexes containing polyphosphine ligands with extended Ag⋯C, N-O⋯π and C-H⋯π interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ting-Hong; Yang, Hu; Yang, Guo; Li, Yanfen; Huang, Li-Li

    2016-08-01

    Based on ligands of N,N-bis((diphenylphosphino)methyl)benzenamine (pba), 4-(4-(bis((diphenylphosphino)methyl)amino)benzyl)-N-((diphenylphosphino)methyl)benzenamine (dptp) and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis((diphenylphosphino)methyl)benzene-1,4-diamine (pbaa), three new silver(I) complexes [Ag(pba)2]ClO4 (1), [Ag2(dptp)2](ClO4)2·2DMF (2) and [Ag4(pbaa)(NO3)4]n (3), have been synthesized and characterized. Structural analysis reveals that all of these complexes contain the 1D infinite chains, with different variations in the weak interactions. Complexes 1 and 2 are interconnected by intermolecular C-H⋯π interactions to form 1D infinite chains and 2D networks, and the ordered-layer-lattic ClO4- and DMF in 2 are between 2D networks. For 3, the pbaa ligand adopts a tetradentate coordination mode to link two adjacent stair-like [Ag4O4] cores resulting in a 1D chain, respectively, with Ag⋯C, N-O⋯π and C-H⋯π interactions. All these show that phosphine ligands play an important role in the construction of interesting topological structures with different types of the weak interactions.

  10. The Integrability of an Extended Fifth-Order KdV Equation in 2+1 Dimensions: Painlevé Property, Lax Pair, Conservation Laws, and Soliton Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gui-qiong; Deng, Shu-fang

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we apply the singularity structure analysis to test an extended 2+1-dimensional fifth-order KdV equation for integrability. It is proven that the generalized equation passes the Painlevé test for integrability only in three distinct cases. Two of those cases are in agreement with the known results, and a new integrable equation is first given. Then, for the new integrable equation, we employ the Bell polynomial method to construct its bilinear forms, bilinear Bäcklund transformation, Lax pair, and infinite conversation laws systematically. The N-soliton solutions of this new integrable equation are derived, and the propagations and collisions of multiple solitons are shown by graphs.

  11. Influence of counter-rotating interaction on quantum phase transition in Dicke-Hubbard lattice: an extended coherent-state approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongchuan; Wang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the ground-state behavior of the Dicke-Hubbard model including counter-rotating terms. By generalizing an extended coherent-state approach within mean-field theory, we self-consistently obtain the ground-state energy and delocalized order parameter. Localization-delocalization quantum phase transition of photons is clearly observed by breaking the parity symmetry. Particularly, Mott lobes are fully suppressed, and the delocalized order parameter shows monotonic enhancement by increasing qubit-cavity coupling strength, in sharp contrast to the Dicke-Hubbard model under rotating-wave approximation. Moreover, the corresponding phase boundaries are stabilized by decreasing photon hopping strength, compared to the Rabi-Hubbard model.

  12. Influence of counter-rotating interaction on quantum phase transition in Dicke-Hubbard lattice: an extended coherent-state approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongchuan; Wang, Chen

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the ground-state behavior of the Dicke-Hubbard model including counter-rotating terms. By generalizing an extended coherent-state approach within mean-field theory, we self-consistently obtain the ground-state energy and delocalized order parameter. Localization-delocalization quantum phase transition of photons is clearly observed by breaking the parity symmetry. Particularly, Mott lobes are fully suppressed, and the delocalized order parameter shows monotonic enhancement by increasing qubit-cavity coupling strength, in sharp contrast to the Dicke-Hubbard model under rotating-wave approximation. Moreover, the corresponding phase boundaries are stabilized by decreasing photon hopping strength, compared to the Rabi-Hubbard model.

  13. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis.. (VI) HFODD (v2.40h): A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Satuła, W.; Carlsson, B. G.; Engel, J.; Olbratowski, P.; Powałowski, P.; Sadziak, M.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, M.; Zalewski, M.; Zduńczuk, H.

    2009-11-01

    We describe the new version (v2.40h) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme-Hartree-Fock or Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented: (i) projection on good angular momentum (for the Hartree-Fock states), (ii) calculation of the GCM kernels, (iii) calculation of matrix elements of the Yukawa interaction, (iv) the BCS solutions for state-dependent pairing gaps, (v) the HFB solutions for broken simplex symmetry, (vi) calculation of Bohr deformation parameters, (vii) constraints on the Schiff moments and scalar multipole moments, (viii) the DT2h transformations and rotations of wave functions, (ix) quasiparticle blocking for the HFB solutions in odd and odd-odd nuclei, (x) the Broyden method to accelerate the convergence, (xi) the Lipkin-Nogami method to treat pairing correlations, (xii) the exact Coulomb exchange term, (xiii) several utility options, and we have corrected three insignificant errors. New version program summaryProgram title: HFODD (v2.40h) Catalogue identifier: ADFL_v2_2 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADFL_v2_2.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 618 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 372 548 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN-77 and Fortran-90 Computer: Pentium-III, AMD-Athlon, AMD-Opteron Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, Windows XP Has the code been

  14. Zasp52, a Core Z-disc Protein in Drosophila Indirect Flight Muscles, Interacts with α-Actinin via an Extended PDZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuo An; González-Morales, Nicanor

    2016-01-01

    Z-discs are organizing centers that establish and maintain myofibril structure and function. Important Z-disc proteins are α-actinin, which cross-links actin thin filaments at the Z-disc and Zasp PDZ domain proteins, which directly interact with α-actinin. Here we investigate the biochemical and genetic nature of this interaction in more detail. Zasp52 is the major Drosophila Zasp PDZ domain protein, and is required for myofibril assembly and maintenance. We show by in vitro biochemistry that the PDZ domain plus a C-terminal extension is the only area of Zasp52 involved in the interaction with α-actinin. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of 5 amino acid residues in the N-terminal part of the PDZ domain, within the PWGFRL motif, abolish binding to α-actinin, demonstrating the importance of this motif for α-actinin binding. Rescue assays of a novel Zasp52 allele demonstrate the crucial importance of the PDZ domain for Zasp52 function. Flight assays also show that a Zasp52 mutant suppresses the α-actinin mutant phenotype, indicating that both proteins are core structural Z-disc proteins required for optimal Z-disc function. PMID:27783625

  15. Coherent interaction of laser pulses in a resonant optically dense extended medium under the regime of strong field-matter coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, V.S.; Lebedev, V.N.; Mekhov, I.B.; Moroshkin, P.V.; Chekhonin, I.A.; Bagayev, S.N.

    2004-03-01

    The nonstationary pump-probe interaction between short laser pulses propagating in a resonant optically dense coherent medium is considered. Special attention is paid to the case where the density of two-level particles is high enough that a considerable part of the energy of relatively weak external laser fields can be coherently absorbed and reemitted by the medium. Thus, the field of the medium reaction plays a key role in the interaction processes, which leads to collective behavior of an atomic ensemble in the strongly coupled light-matter system. Such behavior results in fast excitation interchanges between the field and a medium in the form of optical ringing, which is analogous to polariton beating in solid-state optics. This collective oscillating response, which can be treated as successive beats between light wave packets of different group velocities, is shown to significantly affect the propagation and amplification of the probe field under its nonlinear interaction with a nearly copropagating pump pulse. Depending on the probe-pump time delay, the probe transmission spectra show the appearance of either a specific doublet or coherent dip. The widths of these features are determined by the density-dependent field-matter coupling coefficient and increase during the propagation. Besides that, the widths of the coherent features, which appear close to resonance in the broadband probe spectrum, exceed the absorption-line width, since under the strong-coupling regime, the frequency of optical ringing exceeds the rate of incoherent relaxation. Contrary to stationary strong-field effects, the density- and coordinate-dependent transmission spectra of the probe manifest the importance of collective oscillations and cannot be obtained in the framework of a single-atom model.

  16. The Bactofilin Cytoskeleton Protein BacM of Myxococcus xanthus Forms an Extended β-Sheet Structure Likely Mediated by Hydrophobic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kefang; Engelhardt, Harald; Bosch, Jürgen; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are novel cytoskeleton proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Myxococcus xanthus, an important predatory soil bacterium, possesses four bactofilins of which one, BacM (Mxan_7475) plays an important role in cell shape maintenance. Electron and fluorescence light microscopy, as well as studies using over-expressed, purified BacM, indicate that this protein polymerizes in vivo and in vitro into ~3 nm wide filaments that further associate into higher ordered fibers of about 10 nm. Here we use a multipronged approach combining secondary structure determination, molecular modeling, biochemistry, and genetics to identify and characterize critical molecular elements that enable BacM to polymerize. Our results indicate that the bactofilin-determining domain DUF583 folds into an extended β-sheet structure, and we hypothesize a left-handed β-helix with polymerization into 3 nm filaments primarily via patches of hydrophobic amino acid residues. These patches form the interface allowing head-to-tail polymerization during filament formation. Biochemical analyses of these processes show that folding and polymerization occur across a wide variety of conditions and even in the presence of chaotropic agents such as one molar urea. Together, these data suggest that bactofilins are comprised of a structure unique to cytoskeleton proteins, which enables robust polymerization. PMID:25803609

  17. Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy T.; Caito, Samuel W.; Zackert, William E.; West, James D.; Zhu, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension. PMID:27514077

  18. Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy T; Caito, Samuel W; Zackert, William E; West, James D; Zhu, Shijun; Aschner, Michael; Fessel, Joshua P; Roberts, L Jackson

    2016-08-01

    Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension.

  19. Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy T; Caito, Samuel W; Zackert, William E; West, James D; Zhu, Shijun; Aschner, Michael; Fessel, Joshua P; Roberts, L Jackson

    2016-08-01

    Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension. PMID:27514077

  20. Drug-Drug Interaction Studies of Paliperidone and Divalproex Sodium Extended-Release Tablets in Healthy Participants and Patients with Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Remmerie, Bart; Ariyawansa, Jay; De Meulder, Marc; Coppola, Danielle; Berwaerts, Joris

    2016-06-01

    The objective of these 2 phase 1, open-label, 2-treatment, single-sequence studies was to evaluate the effect of repeated oral doses of divalproex sodium extended-release (ER) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a single dose of paliperidone ER in healthy participants (study 1), and the effect of multiple doses of paliperidone ER on the steady-state PK of valproic acid (VPA) in patients with psychiatric disorders (study 2), respectively. In study 1 healthy participants received, in a fixed sequential order, treatment A, paliperidone ER 12 mg (day 1); treatment B, VPA 1000 mg (2 × 500 mg divalproex sodium ER) once daily (days 5 to 18) and paliperidone ER 12 mg (day 15). In study 2 patients received treatment A, VPA (days 1-7); treatment B, VPA + paliperidone ER 12 mg (days 8-12). Divalproex sodium ER doses (study 2) were individualized such that systemic therapeutic VPA exposure from prior treatment was maintained on entry into the study. PK assessments were performed at prespecified time points (paliperidone days 1 and 15 [study 1]; VPA days 7 and 12 [study 2]). The oral bioavailability of paliperidone was increased by an estimated 51% (Cmax ) and 51%-52% (AUCs) when coadministered with divalproex sodium ER. No effect on the steady-state plasma concentration of VPA was observed following repeated coadministration with paliperidone ER: the 90%CI around the VPA exposure ratios for the 2 treatments was within the 80%-125% bioequivalence criteria for Cmax,ss and AUCτ . Both VPA and paliperidone ER were well tolerated, and no new safety concerns were identified. PMID:26412032

  1. Isopiestic Determination of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of NaCl + SrCl2 + H2O at 298.15 K, and Representation with an Extended Ion-Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, S L; Rard, J A; Miller, D G

    2004-11-09

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were made at 298.15 K for aqueous NaCl + SrCl{sub 2} solutions, using NaCl(aq) as the reference standard. The measurements for these ternary solutions were made at NaCl ionic strength fractions of y{sub 1} = 0.17066, 0.47366, and 0.82682 for the water activity range 0.9835 {ge} a{sub w} {ge} 0.8710. Our results, and those from two previous isopiestic studies, were combined and used with previously determined parameters for NaCl(aq) and those for SrCl{sub 2}(aq) determined here to evaluate the mixing parameters{sup S}{Theta}{sub Na,Sr} = (0.0562 {+-} 0.0007) kg {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and {Psi}{sub Na,Sr,Cl} = -(0.00705 {+-} 0.00017) kg{sup 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -2} for an extended form of Pitzer's ion-interaction model. These model parameters are valid for ionic strengths of I {le} 7.0 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}, where higher-order electrostatic effects have been included in the mixture model. If the fitting range is extended to the saturated solution molalities, then {sup S}{Theta}{sub Na,Sr} = (0.07885 {+-} 0.00195) kg {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and {Psi}{sub Na,Sr,Cl} = -(0.01230 {+-} 0.00033) kg{sup 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -2}. The extended ion-interaction model parameters obtained from available isopiestic data for SrCl{sub 2}(aq) at 298.15 K yield recommended values of the water activities and osmotic and activity coefficients.

  2. Extended Ewald summation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylänpää, Ilkka; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-09-01

    We present a technique to improve the accuracy and to reduce the computational labor in the calculation of long-range interactions in systems with periodic boundary conditions. We extend the well-known Ewald method by using a linear combination of screening Gaussian charge distributions instead of only one. This enables us to find faster converging real-space and reciprocal space summations. The combined simplicity and efficiency of our method is demonstrated, and the scheme is readily applicable to large-scale periodic simulations, classical as well as quantum. Moreover, apart from the required a priori optimization the method is straightforward to include in most routines based on the Ewald method within, e.g., density-functional, molecular dynamics, and quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

  3. Magnetic Interactions in the Copper Complex (L-Aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) Hydrate. An Exchange-Coupled Extended System with Two Dissimilar Copper Ions.

    PubMed

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Calvo, Rafael; Atria, Ana María; Spodine, Evgenia; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Peña, Octavio

    1997-07-01

    We report EPR measurements in single-crystal samples at the microwave frequencies 9.8 and 34.3 GHz and magnetic susceptibility measurements in polycrystalline samples for the ternary complex of copper with aspartic acid and phenanthroline, (L-aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) hydrate. The crystal lattice of this compound is composed of two dissimilar copper ions identified as Cu(A) and Cu(B), which are in two types of copper chains called A and B, respectively, running parallel to the b crystal axis. The copper ions in the A chains are connected by the aspartic acid molecule, and those in the B chains by a chemical path that involves a carboxylate bridge and a hydrogen bond. Both chains are held together by a complex network of hydrogen bonds and by hydrophobic interactions between aromatic amines. Magnetic susceptibility data indicate a Curie-Weiss behavior in the studied temperature range (2-300 K). The EPR spectra at 9.8 GHz display a single exchange collapsed resonance for any magnetic field orientation, in the so-called strong exchange regime. Those at 34.3 GHz are within the so-called weak exchange regime and display two resonances which belong to each type of copper ion chain. The decoupling of the spectra at 34.3 GHz using a theory based on Anderson's model for the case of two weakly exchange coupled spins S = (1)/(2) allows one to obtain the angular variation of the squares of the g-factor and the peak-to-peak line width of each resonance. This model also allows one to evaluate the exchange parameter |J(AB)/k| = 2.7(6) mK associated with the chemical path connecting dissimilar copper ions. The line width data obtained for each component of the spectra at 34.3 GHz are analyzed in terms of a model based on Kubo and Tomita's theory, to obtain the exchange parameters |J(A)/k| = 0.77(2) K and |J(B)/k| = 1.44(2) K associated with the chemical paths connecting the similar copper ions of types A and B, respectively.

  4. Gene expression profiling in susceptible interaction of grapevine with its fungal pathogen Eutypa lata: Extending MapMan ontology for grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Rotter, Ana; Camps, Céline; Lohse, Marc; Kappel, Christian; Pilati, Stefania; Hren, Matjaž; Stitt, Mark; Coutos-Thévenot, Pierre; Moser, Claudio; Usadel, Björn; Delrot, Serge; Gruden, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    with Affymetrix or Operon microarrays. MapMan was first validated on an already published dataset and later used to obtain an overview of transcriptional changes in a susceptible grapevine – Eutypa lata interaction at the time of symptoms development, where we showed that the responsive genes belong to families known to be involved in the plant defence towards fungal infection (PR-proteins, enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway). PMID:19656401

  5. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIFff14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bi...

  6. Axially deformed solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations using the transformed harmonic oscillator basis (II) HFBTHO v2.00d: A new version of the program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoitsov, M. V.; Schunck, N.; Kortelainen, M.; Michel, N.; Nam, H.; Olsen, E.; Sarich, J.; Wild, S.

    2013-06-01

    of the transformed harmonic oscillator, which allows for an accurate description of deformation effects and pairing correlations in nuclei arbitrarily close to the particle drip lines. Solution method: The program uses the axial Transformed Harmonic Oscillator (THO) single- particle basis to expand quasi-particle wave functions. It iteratively diagonalizes the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Hamiltonian based on generalized Skyrme-like energy densities and zero-range pairing interactions until a self-consistent solution is found. A previous version of the program was presented in: M.V. Stoitsov, J. Dobaczewski, W. Nazarewicz, P. Ring, Comput. Phys. Commun. 167 (2005) 43-63. Reasons for new version: Version 2.00d of HFBTHO provides a number of new options such as the optional breaking of reflection symmetry, the calculation of axial multipole moments, the finite temperature formalism for the HFB method, optimized multi-constraint calculations, the treatment of odd-even and odd-odd nuclei in the blocking approximation, and the framework for generalized energy density with arbitrary density-dependences. It is also the first version of HFBTHO to contain threading capabilities. Summary of revisions: The modified Broyden method has been implemented, Optional breaking of reflection symmetry has been implemented, The calculation of all axial multipole moments up to λ=8 has been implemented, The finite temperature formalism for the HFB method has been implemented, The linear constraint method based on the approximation of the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) matrix for multi-constraint calculations has been implemented, The blocking of quasi-particles in the Equal Filling Approximation (EFA) has been implemented, The framework for generalized energy density functionals with arbitrary density-dependence has been implemented, Shared memory parallelism via OpenMP pragmas has been implemented. Restrictions: Axial- and time-reversal symmetries are assumed. Unusual features: The user must

  7. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, André M; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Quail, Peter H; Margarida Oliveira, M; Saibo, Nelson J M

    2016-02-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  8. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of Phytochrome B

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A.; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Quail, Peter H.; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2016-01-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a Phytochrome Interacting Factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  9. Physical nature of interactions in Zn(II) complexes with 2,2'-bipyridyl: quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), interacting quantum atoms (IQA), noncovalent interactions (NCI), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV) comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; de Lange, Jurgens H; Mitoraj, Mariusz

    2014-01-23

    In the present account factors determining the stability of ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3 complexes (L = bpy, 2,2′-bipyridyl) were characterized on the basis of various techniques: the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), energy decomposition schemes based on interacting quantum atoms (IQA), and extended transition state coupled with natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). Finally, the noncovalent interactions (NCI) index was also applied. All methods consistently indicated that the strength of the coordination bonds, Zn–O and Zn–N, decreases from ZnL to ZnL3. Importantly, it has been identified that the strength of secondary intramolecular heteropolar hydrogen bonding interactions, CH···O and CH···N, increases when going from ZnL to ZnL3. A similar trend appeared to be valid for the π-bonding as well as electrostatic stabilization. In addition to the above leading bonding contributions, all techniques suggested the existence of very subtle, but non-negligible additional stabilization from the CH···HC electronic exchange channel; these interactions are the weakest among all considered here. From IQA it was found that the local diatomic interaction energy, Eint(H,H), amounts at HF to −2.5, −2.7, and −2.9 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL, ZnL2, and ZnL3, respectively (−2.1 kcal mol(–1) for ZnL at MP2). NOCV-based deformation density channels showed that formation of CH--HC contacts in Zn complexes causes significant polarization of σ(C–H) bonds, which accordingly leads to charge accumulation in the CH···HC bay region. Charge depletion from σ(C–H) bonds was also reflected in the calculated spin–spin (1)J(C–H) coupling constants, which decrease from 177.06 Hz (ZnL) to 173.87 Hz (ZnL3). This last result supports our findings of an increase in the local electronic CH···HC stabilization from ZnL to ZnL3 found from QTAIM, IQA, and ETS-NOCV. Finally, this work unites for the first time the results from four methods that are widely

  10. Increasing the binding affinity of VEGFR-2 inhibitors by extending their hydrophobic interaction with the active site: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 1-substituted-4-(4-methoxybenzyl)phthalazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; El Kerdawy, Ahmed M; Ayyad, Rezk R; Hamdy, Abdallah M; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Ali, Mamdouh M; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2016-05-01

    A series of anilinophthalazine derivatives 4a-j was initially synthesized and tested for its VEGFR-2 inhibitory activity where it showed promising activity (IC50 = 0.636-5.76 μM). Molecular docking studies guidance was used to improve the binding affinity for series 4a-j towards VEGFR-2 active site. This improvement was achieved by increasing the hydrophobic interaction with the hydrophobic back pocket of the VEGFR-2 active site lined with the hydrophobic side chains of Ile888, Leu889, Ile892, Val898, Val899, Leu1019 and Ile1044. Increasing the hydrophobic interaction was accomplished by extending the anilinophthalazine scaffold with a substituted phenyl moiety through an uriedo linker which should give this extension the flexibility required to accommodate itself deeply into the hydrophobic back pocket. As planned, the designed uriedo-anilinophthalazines 7a-i showed superior binding affinity than their anilinophthalazine parents (IC50 = 0.083-0.473 μM). In particular, compounds 7g-i showed IC50 of 0.086, 0.083 and 0.086 μM, respectively, which are better than that of the reference drug sorafenib (IC50 = 0.09 μM).

  11. Review of the Thermodynamic Properties of Mg(NO3)2(ap), and Their Representation with the Standard and Extended Ion-Interaction (Pitzer) Models at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J A; Wijesinghe, A M; Wolery, T J

    2004-03-30

    Published thermodynamic data yielding the osmotic coefficients, relative apparent molar enthalpies, and apparent molar heat capacities of Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq) have been collected, recalculated consistently, and critically assessed. The more reliable of these data have been used to evaluate the parameters of the standard three-parameter form of Pitzer's ion-interaction model to higher molalities than previously available, along with the parameters of Archer's four-parameter, extended ion-interaction model, at 298.15 K. Published experimental thermodynamic data were essentially represented equally well by these two models, provided that the exponential coefficient {alpha}{sub 1} of the standard Pitzer model is fixed at the optimum value of {alpha}{sub 1} = 1.55 kg{sup -1/2} x mol{sup -1/2} rather than the traditional value of {alpha}{sub 1} = 2.0 kg{sup -1/2} x mol{sup -1/2} The use of the standard Pitzer model with this modified {alpha}{sub 1} value is recommended for Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq). In addition, an empirical equation is given for the variation of the water activity of a saturated solution with temperature, from 273.54 to 328.20 K, with Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq) x 6H{sub 2}O(s) as the solid phase.

  12. Deformation properties with a finite-range simple effective interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B.; Viñas, X.; Routray, T. R.; Robledo, L. M.; Centelles, M.; Pattnaik, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    Deformed and spherical even-even nuclei are studied using a finite-range simple effective interaction within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field approach. Different parameter sets of the interaction, corresponding to different incompressibility, are constructed by varying the exponent γ of the density in the traditional density-dependent term. Ten of the 12 parameters of these interactions are determined from properties of asymmetric nuclear matter and spin-polarized pure neutron matter. The two remaining parameters are fitted to reproduce the experimental binding energies known in 620 even-even nuclei using several variants of the rotational energy correction. The rms deviations for the binding energy depend on the value of γ and the way the rotational energy correction is treated but they can be as low as 1.56 MeV, a value competitive with other renowned effective interactions of Skyrme and Gogny type. Charge radii are compared to the experimental values of 313 even-even nuclei and the rms deviation is again comparable and even superior to the one of popular Skyrme and Gogny forces. Emphasis is given to the deformation properties predicted with these interactions by analyzing the potential energy surfaces for several well deformed nuclei and the fission barriers of some nuclei. Comparison of the results with the experimental information, where available, as well as with the results of the Gogny D1S force, shows satisfactory agreement.

  13. Microscopic Theory of Heavy-Ion Interaction Potentials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoot, Mohammad Walid

    Heavy-ion interaction potentials are calculated in a realistic, fully microscopic theory. The theory is based on the nonrelativistic quantum theory of many-body systems and is formulated in the language of second quantization; it utilizes a molecular set of basis states (two-center shell model) rather than selfconsistent wavefunctions. These basis states depend on two collective parameters: internuclear distance and fragment deformation. In constructing the ground state of the interacting many-body system, we assume, for simplicity, that the nucleons remain in the lowest possible molecular energy levels throughout the reaction. This adiabaticity assumption appears to be justified at bombarding energies near the Coulomb barrier. For computational reasons, the effective nucleon -nucleon interaction is described by a Skyrme force without spin-orbit coupling. The 5 parameters of the Skyrme interaction are fitted to measured binding energies. Heavy-ion interaction potentials are calculated for the following systems: ('28)Si + ('28)Si, ('40)Ca + ('40)Ca, ('90)Zr + ('90)Zr and ('238)U + ('238)U. At large internuclear distances, our theory approaches the double -folding model, which reproduces elastic and inelastic scattering data. However, at smaller distances, it is much more realistic than these phenomenological models, because (a) exchange energy and kinetic energy contributions are calculated consistently and (b) shell effects are taken into account. Possible improvements of the theory are discussed in the last chapter.

  14. Solution of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov equations in the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. (VII) HFODD (v2.49t): A new version of the program

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, Nicolas F; McDonnell, J.; Sheikh, J. A.; Staszczak, A.; Stoitsov, Mario; Dobaczewski, J.; Toivanen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the new version (v2.49t) of the code HFODD which solves the nuclear Skyrme Hartree-Fock (HF) or Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) problem by using the Cartesian deformed harmonic-oscillator basis. In the new version, we have implemented the following physics features: (i) the isospin mixing and projection, (ii) the finite temperature formalism for the HFB and HF+BCS methods, (iii) the Lipkin translational energy correction method, (iv) the calculation of the shell correction. A number of specific numerical methods have also been implemented in order to deal with large-scale multi-constraint calculations and hardware limitations: (i) the two-basis method for the HFB method, (ii) the Augmented Lagrangian Method (ALM) for multi-constraint calculations, (iii) the linear constraint method based on the approximation of the RPA matrix for multi-constraint calculations, (iv) an interface with the axial and parity-conserving Skyrme-HFB code HFBTHO, (v) the mixing of the HF or HFB matrix elements instead of the HF fields. Special care has been paid to using the code on massively parallel leadership class computers. For this purpose, the following features are now available with this version: (i) the Message Passing Interface (MPI) framework, (ii) scalable input data routines, (iii) multi-threading via OpenMP pragmas, (iv) parallel diagonalization of the HFB matrix in the simplex breaking case using the ScaLAPACK library. Finally, several little significant errors of the previous published version were corrected.

  15. Modeling nuclear 'pasta' and the transition to uniform nuclear matter with the 3D Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method at finite temperature: Core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, W. G.; Stone, J. R.

    2009-05-15

    The first results of a new three-dimensional, finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS study of the properties of inhomogeneous nuclear matter at densities and temperatures leading to the transition to uniform nuclear matter are presented. Calculations are carried out in a cubic box representing a unit cell of the locally periodic structure of the matter. A constraint is placed on the two independent components of the quadrupole moment of the neutron density to investigate the dependence of the total energy density of matter on the geometry of the nuclear structure in the unit cell. This approach allows self-consistent modeling of effects such as (i) neutron drip, resulting in a neutron gas external to the nuclear structure; (ii) shell effects of bound and unbound nucleons; (iii) the variety of exotic nuclear shapes that emerge, collectively termed nuclear pasta; and (iv) the dissolution of these structures into uniform nuclear matter as density and/or temperature increase. In Part I of this work the calculation of the properties of inhomogeneous nuclear matter in the core collapse of massive stars is reported. Emphasis is on exploring the effects of the numerical method on the results obtained; notably, the influence of the finite cell size on the nuclear shapes and energy-density obtained. Results for nuclear matter in {beta} equilibrium in cold neutrons stars are the subject of Part II. The calculation of the band structure of unbound neutrons in neutron star matter, yielding thermal conductivity, specific heat, and entrainment parameters, is outlined in Part III. Calculations are performed at baryon number densities of n{sub b}=0.04-0.12 fm{sup -3}, a proton fraction of y{sub p}=0.3 and temperatures in the range 0-7.5 MeV. A wide variety of nuclear shapes are shown to emerge. It is suggested that thermodynamical properties change smoothly in the pasta regime up to the transition to uniform matter; at that transition, thermodynamic properties of the matter

  16. Extending the extended V-Y flap.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Phoebe; Morton, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    This case report demonstrates a modification of the so-called 'Extended V-Y Flap' used to simultaneously reconstruct a defect involving the upper lip, floor of nose and alar rim following tumour excision. We hope that this case serves as a reminder of the versatility of the V-Y flap in the nasolabial region, and its considerable capacity for augmentation. PMID:22018837

  17. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  18. Extended or Restricted Childhood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Colin

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Government's proposals for "extended" primary schools, an important element in the recently-published five-year plan for education. The author expresses concern that extended primary schools will not provide a variety of experiences, including "play" experiences for young children.

  19. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  20. Self-consistent calculation of nuclear photoabsorption cross sections: Finite amplitude method with Skyrme functionals in the three-dimensional real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inakura, Tsunenori; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2009-10-01

    The finite amplitude method (FAM), which we have recently proposed [T. Nakatsukasa, T. Inakura, and K. Yabana, Phys. Rev. C 76, 024318 (2007)], significantly simplifies the fully self-consistent calculation of the random-phase approximation (RPA). This article presents a computational scheme of FAM suitable for systematic investigation and shows its performance for realistic Skyrme energy functionals. We adopt the mixed representation in which the forward and backward RPA amplitudes are represented by index of hole orbitals and of the spatial grid points for the three-dimensional real space. We solve a linear algebraic problem with a sparse non-Hermitian matrix, using an iterative method. We show results of the dipole response for selected spherical and deformed nuclei. The calculated peak energies of the giant dipole resonance well agree with experiments for heavy nuclei. However, they are systematically underestimated for light nuclei. We also discuss the width of the giant dipole resonance in the fully self-consistent RPA calculation.

  1. Crystal Structure of the Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase PER-2 and Insights into the Role of Specific Residues in the Interaction with β-Lactams and β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Melina; Kerff, Frédéric; Herman, Raphaël; Sapunaric, Frédéric; Galleni, Moreno; Gutkind, Gabriel; Charlier, Paulette; Sauvage, Eric

    2014-01-01

    PER-2 belongs to a small (7 members to date) group of extended-spectrum β-lactamases. It has 88% amino acid identity with PER-1 and both display high catalytic efficiencies toward most β-lactams. In this study, we determined the X-ray structure of PER-2 at 2.20 Å and evaluated the possible role of several residues in the structure and activity toward β-lactams and mechanism-based inhibitors. PER-2 is defined by the presence of a singular trans bond between residues 166 to 167, which generates an inverted Ω loop, an expanded fold of this domain that results in a wide active site cavity that allows for efficient hydrolysis of antibiotics like the oxyimino-cephalosporins, and a series of exclusive interactions between residues not frequently involved in the stabilization of the active site in other class A β-lactamases. PER β-lactamases might be included within a cluster of evolutionarily related enzymes harboring the conserved residues Asp136 and Asn179. Other signature residues that define these enzymes seem to be Gln69, Arg220, Thr237, and probably Arg/Lys240A (“A” indicates an insertion according to Ambler's scheme for residue numbering in PER β-lactamases), with structurally important roles in the stabilization of the active site and proper orientation of catalytic water molecules, among others. We propose, supported by simulated models of PER-2 in combination with different β-lactams, the presence of a hydrogen-bond network connecting Ser70-Gln69-water-Thr237-Arg220 that might be important for the proper activity and inhibition of the enzyme. Therefore, we expect that mutations occurring in these positions will have impacts on the overall hydrolytic behavior. PMID:25070104

  2. Isopiestic Determination of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of Li2SO4(aq) at T = 298.15 and 323.15 K, and Representation with an Extended Ion-interaction (Pitzer) model

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J A; Clegg, S L; Palmer, D A

    2007-01-03

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were made for Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) from 0.1069 to 2.8190 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} at 298.15 K, and from 0.1148 to 2.7969 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} at 323.15 K, with NaCl(aq) as the reference standard. Published thermodynamic data for this system were reviewed, recalculated for consistency, and critically assessed. The present results and the more reliable published results were used to evaluate the parameters of an extended version of Pitzer's ion-interaction model with an ionic-strength dependent third virial coefficient, as well as those of the standard Pitzer model, for the osmotic and activity coefficients at both temperatures. Published enthalpies of dilution at 298.15 K were also analyzed to yield the parameters of the ion-interaction models for the relative apparent molar enthalpies of dilution. The resulting models at 298.15 K are valid to the saturated solution molality of the thermodynamically stable phase Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O(cr). Solubilities of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O(cr) at 298.15 K were assessed, and the selected value of m(sat.) = 3.13 {+-} 0.04 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} was used to evaluate the thermodynamic solubility product K{sub s}(Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = (2.62 {+-} 0.19) and a CODATA-compatible standard molar Gibbs energy of formation {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o} (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = -(1564.6 {+-} 0.5) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}.

  3. Extending mine life

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    Mine layouts, new machines and techniques, research into problem areas of ground control and so on, are highlighted in this report on extending mine life. The main resources taken into account are coal mining, uranium mining, molybdenum and gold mining.

  4. Extending earthquakes' reach through cascading.

    PubMed

    Marsan, David; Lengliné, Olivier

    2008-02-22

    Earthquakes, whatever their size, can trigger other earthquakes. Mainshocks cause aftershocks to occur, which in turn activate their own local aftershock sequences, resulting in a cascade of triggering that extends the reach of the initial mainshock. A long-lasting difficulty is to determine which earthquakes are connected, either directly or indirectly. Here we show that this causal structure can be found probabilistically, with no a priori model nor parameterization. Large regional earthquakes are found to have a short direct influence in comparison to the overall aftershock sequence duration. Relative to these large mainshocks, small earthquakes collectively have a greater effect on triggering. Hence, cascade triggering is a key component in earthquake interactions.

  5. Extended lifetime railgap switch

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D.B.; Mendoza, P.J.

    1988-02-02

    In a railgap switch of the type having an elongate blade electrode made of conductive material, an elongate housing made of insulating material for supporting the blade electrode and plate electrode in opposed relation extending in the same direction with the blade centered over the plate and separated therefrom by a gap, and a gas filling the housing and the gap, the gas being selected to breakdown and switch from a highly insulative state to a highly conductive state upon application of a high voltage across the blade and plate electrodes, the improvement is described comprising: forming the blade with laterally extending transverse wing portions at the edge of the blade and adjacent the gap so as to extend in spaced parallel relation to the surface of the plate, the blade generally following the contour thereof to form an inverted T-shape structure with the wing portions extending transversely of the elongate dimension of the blade. The wing portions terminating in a pair of spaced parallel edges extending along the elongate direction of the blade to thereby create two spaced elongate edges along which arcs form serving to divide the erosion effects of discharge between them, the current through each edge being one-half of that in single-edge devices with ablation wear reduced accordingly to give significantly larger switch lifetime. The blade and wing portions limiting ablation erosion of the edges in a direction generally align with the plate contour so that the edge-to-plate separation remains substantially constant.

  6. Extending quantum mechanics entails extending special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravinda, S.; Srikanth, R.

    2016-05-01

    The complementarity between signaling and randomness in any communicated resource that can simulate singlet statistics is generalized by relaxing the assumption of free will in the choice of measurement settings. We show how to construct an ontological extension for quantum mechanics (QMs) through the oblivious embedding of a sound simulation protocol in a Newtonian spacetime. Minkowski or other intermediate spacetimes are ruled out as the locus of the embedding by virtue of hidden influence inequalities. The complementarity transferred from a simulation to the extension unifies a number of results about quantum non-locality, and implies that special relativity has a different significance for the ontological model and for the operational theory it reproduces. Only the latter, being experimentally accessible, is required to be Lorentz covariant. There may be certain Lorentz non-covariant elements at the ontological level, but they will be inaccessible at the operational level in a valid extension. Certain arguments against the extendability of QM, due to Conway and Kochen (2009) and Colbeck and Renner (2012), are attributed to their assumption that the spacetime at the ontological level has Minkowski causal structure.

  7. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, Mark

    1991-01-01

    A pipe crawler having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by "inchworm"-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward.

  8. Extendable pipe crawler

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.

    1991-05-28

    A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

  9. An Extended Duopoly Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Illustrates how principles and intermediate microeconomic students can gain an understanding for strategic price setting by playing a relatively large oligopoly game. Explains that the game extends to a continuous price space and outlines appropriate applications. Offers the Mathematica code to instructors so that the assumptions of the game can…

  10. Towards Extended Vantage Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaz, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of Vantage Theory (VT), a model of (colour) categorization, to linguistic data largely depends on the modifications and adaptations of the model for the purpose. An attempt to do so proposed here, called Extended Vantage Theory (EVT), slightly reformulates the VT conception of vantage by capitalizing on some of the entailments of…

  11. Modelling extended chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the concept that the warm, partially ionized plasma (presently called chromosphere) associated with such stars as Alpha Boo and Rho Per extends outwards at least several photospheric radii. Calculations are presented for the Mg II K line in light of two input model atmospheres. Specific predictions are deduced from the results obtained by each of the two models.

  12. Extended artistic appreciation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert A

    2013-04-01

    I propose that in at least some cases, objects of artistic appreciation are best thought of not simply as causes of artistic appreciation, but as parts of the cognitive machinery that drives aesthetic appreciation. In effect, this is to say that aesthetic appreciation operates via extended cognitive systems.

  13. Propelling Extended Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humbert, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A force acting on just part of an extended object (either a solid or a volume of a liquid) can cause all of it to move. That motion is due to the transmission of the force through the object by its material. This paper discusses how the force is distributed to all of the object by a gradient of stress or pressure in it, which creates the local…

  14. Dicyanometallates as Model Extended Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the structures of eight new dicyanometallate frameworks containing molecular extra-framework cations. These systems include a number of hybrid inorganic–organic analogues of conventional ceramics, such as Ruddlesden–Popper phases and perovskites. The structure types adopted are rationalized in the broader context of all known dicyanometallate framework structures. We show that the structural diversity of this family can be understood in terms of (i) the charge and coordination preferences of the particular metal cation acting as framework node, and (ii) the size, shape, and extent of incorporation of extra-framework cations. In this way, we suggest that dicyanometallates form a particularly attractive model family of extended frameworks in which to explore the interplay between molecular degrees of freedom, framework topology, and supramolecular interactions. PMID:27057759

  15. Generic constraints on the relativistic mean-field and Skyrme-Hartree-Fock models from the pure neutron matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, F. J.; Newton, W. G.; Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2012-08-01

    We study the nuclear symmetry energy S(ρ) and related quantities of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics predicted generically by relativistic mean-field (RMF) and Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) models. We establish a simple prescription for preparing equivalent RMF and SHF parametrizations starting from a minimal set of empirical constraints on symmetric nuclear matter, nuclear binding energy, and charge radii, enforcing equivalence of their Lorenz effective masses, and then using the pure neutron matter (PNM) equation of state obtained from ab initio calculations to optimize the pure isovector parameters in the RMF and SHF models. We find that the resulting RMF and SHF parametrizations give broadly consistent predictions of the symmetry energy J and its slope parameter L at saturation density within a tight range of ≲2 and ≲6 MeV, respectively, but that clear model dependence shows up in the predictions of higher-order symmetry energy parameters, leading to important differences in (a) the slope of the correlation between J and L from the confidence ellipse, (b) the isospin-dependent part of the incompressibility of nuclear matter Kτ, (c) the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities, and (d) the predicted neutron star radii. The model dependence can lead to about 1-2 km difference in predictions of the neutron star radius given identical predicted values of J and L and symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) saturation properties. Allowing the full freedom in the effective masses in both models leads to constraints of 30≲J≲31.5 MeV, 35≲L≲60 MeV, and -330≲Kτ≲-216 MeV for the RMF model as a whole and 30≲J≲33 MeV, 28≲L≲65 MeV, and -420≲Kτ≲-325 MeV for the SHF model as a whole. Notably, given PNM constraints, these results place RMF and SHF models as a whole at odds with some constraints on Kτ inferred from giant monopole resonance and neutron skin experimental results.

  16. Extended Testability Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin; Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool is a software application that supports fault management (FM) by performing testability analyses on the fault propagation model of a given system. Fault management includes the prevention of faults through robust design margins and quality assurance methods, or the mitigation of system failures. Fault management requires an understanding of the system design and operation, potential failure mechanisms within the system, and the propagation of those potential failures through the system. The purpose of the ETA Tool software is to process the testability analysis results from a commercial software program called TEAMS Designer in order to provide a detailed set of diagnostic assessment reports. The ETA Tool is a command-line process with several user-selectable report output options. The ETA Tool also extends the COTS testability analysis and enables variation studies with sensor sensitivity impacts on system diagnostics and component isolation using a single testability output. The ETA Tool can also provide extended analyses from a single set of testability output files. The following analysis reports are available to the user: (1) the Detectability Report provides a breakdown of how each tested failure mode was detected, (2) the Test Utilization Report identifies all the failure modes that each test detects, (3) the Failure Mode Isolation Report demonstrates the system s ability to discriminate between failure modes, (4) the Component Isolation Report demonstrates the system s ability to discriminate between failure modes relative to the components containing the failure modes, (5) the Sensor Sensor Sensitivity Analysis Report shows the diagnostic impact due to loss of sensor information, and (6) the Effect Mapping Report identifies failure modes that result in specified system-level effects.

  17. Extended Wordsearches in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, Simon

    1998-04-01

    Students can be encouraged to develop their factual knowledge by use of puzzles. One strategy described here is the extended wordsearch, where the wordsearch element generates a number of words or phrases from which the answers to a series of questions are selected. The wordsearch can be generated with the aid of computer programs, though in order to make them suitable for students with dyslexia or other learning difficulties, a simpler form is more appropriate. These problems can be employed in a variety of contexts, for example, as topic tests and classroom end-of-lesson fillers. An example is provided in the area of calcium chemistry. Sources of suitable software are listed.

  18. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  19. Reduced Extended MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Abdelhamid, H. M.; Grasso, D.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Lingam, M.; Tassi, E.

    2015-11-01

    Over the years various reduced fluid models have been obtained for modeling plasmas, with the goal of capturing important physics while maintaining computability. Such models have included the physics contained in various generalizations of Ohm's law, including Hall drift and electron inertia. In a recent publication it was shown that full 3D extended MHD is a Hamiltonian system by finding its noncanonical Poisson bracket. Subsequently, this bracket was shown to be derivable from that for Hall MHD by a series of remarkable transformations, which greatly simplifies the proof of the Jacobi identity and allows one to immediately obtain generalizations of the helicity and cross helicity. In this poster we use this structure to obtain exact reduced fluid models with the effects of full two-fluid theory. Results of numerical computations of collisionless reconnection using an exact reduced 4-field model will be presented and analytical comparisons of mode structure of previous reduced models will be made.

  20. Stars with Extended Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2002-12-01

    This Workshop consisted of a full-day meeting of the Working Group "Sterren met Uitgebreide Atmosferen" (SUA, Working Group Stars with Extended Atmospheres), a discussion group founded in 1979 by Kees de Jager, Karel van der Hucht and Pik Sin The. This loose association of astronomers and astronomy students working in the Dutch-speaking part of the Low Countries (The Netherlands and Flanders) organised at regular intervals one-day meetings at the Universities of Utrecht, Leiden, Amsterdam and Brussels. These meetings consisted of the presentation of scientific results by junior as well as senior members of the group, and by discussions between the participants. As such, the SUA meetings became a forum for the exchange of ideas, and for asking questions and advice in an informal atmosphere. Kees de Jager has been chairman of the WG SUA from the beginning in 1979 till today, as the leading source of inspiration. At the occasion of Prof. Kees de Jager's 80th birthday, we decided to collect the presented talks in written form as a Festschrift in honour of this well-respected and much beloved scientist, teacher and friend. The first three papers deal with the personality of Kees de Jager, more specifically with his role as a supervisor and mentor of young researchers and as a catalyst in the research work of his colleagues. And also about his remarkable role in the establishment of astronomy education and research at the University of Brussels. The next presentation is a very detailed review of solar research, a field in which Cees was prominently active for many years. Then follow several papers dealing with stars about which Kees is a true expert: massive stars and extended atmospheres.

  1. Extended chameleon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Tamanini, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    We extend the chameleon models by considering scalar-fluid theories where the coupling between matter and the scalar field can be represented by a quadratic effective potential with density-dependent minimum and mass. In this context, we study the effects of the scalar field on Solar System tests of gravity and show that models passing these stringent constraints can still induce large modifications of Newton's law on galactic scales. On these scales we analyze models which could lead to a percent deviation of Newton's law outside the virial radius. We then model the dark matter halo as a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and explicitly find that the fifth force can give large contributions around the galactic core in a particular model where the scalar field mass is constant and the minimum of its potential varies linearly with the matter density. At cosmological distances, we find that this model does not alter the growth of large scale structures and therefore would be best tested on galactic scales, where interesting signatures might arise in the galaxy rotation curves.

  2. Giotto Extended Mission (GEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, D. E. B.; Grensemann, M.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the Giotto Extended Mission (GEM), are to determine the composition and physical state of the Grigg Skjellerup Comet's nucleus; to determine the processes that govern the composition and distribution of neutral and ionized species in the cometary atmosphere. Giotto consists of a single European Space Agency (ESA) spacecraft that was launched in 1985 from Center Spatial Guyanis in French Guiana on an Ariane launch vehicle. After a successful launch into geostationary orbit and a heliocentric transfer trajectory, the spacecraft successfully encountered Halley's Comet in 1986. One month after encountering Halley's Comet, Mar. 1986, the spacecraft was placed in hibernation in a heliocentric orbit slightly less than 1 AU. Between Feb. and Jul. 1990 the spacecraft was successfully reactivated, checked out, and placed on a trajectory course to intercept comet Grigg Skjellerup. The spacecraft has been in hibernation since Jul. 1990. Information is presented in tabular form in the following areas: coverage goals, Deep Space Network Support, frequency assignments, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  3. An Extended Lagrangian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing

    1995-01-01

    A unique formulation of describing fluid motion is presented. The method, referred to as 'extended Lagrangian method,' is interesting from both theoretical and numerical points of view. The formulation offers accuracy in numerical solution by avoiding numerical diffusion resulting from mixing of fluxes in the Eulerian description. The present method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) method have a similarity in spirit-eliminating the cross-streamline numerical diffusion. For this purpose, we suggest a simple grid constraint condition and utilize an accurate discretization procedure. This grid constraint is only applied to the transverse cell face parallel to the local stream velocity, and hence our method for the steady state problems naturally reduces to the streamline-curvature method, without explicitly solving the steady stream-coordinate equations formulated a priori. Unlike the Lagrangian method proposed by Loh and Hui which is valid only for steady supersonic flows, the present method is general and capable of treating subsonic flows and supersonic flows as well as unsteady flows, simply by invoking in the same code an appropriate grid constraint suggested in this paper. The approach is found to be robust and stable. It automatically adapts to flow features without resorting to clustering, thereby maintaining rather uniform grid spacing throughout and large time step. Moreover, the method is shown to resolve multi-dimensional discontinuities with a high level of accuracy, similar to that found in one-dimensional problems.

  4. Effective Interactions for Nuclear Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoracci, Angelo

    Experimental interest in nuclei far from stability, especially due to proposed advancements in rare isotope facilities, has stimulated improvements in theoretical predictions of exotic isotopes. However, standard techniques developed for nuclear structure calculations, Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods, lack either the generality or the accuracy necessary for reliable calculations away from stability. Hybrid methods, which combine Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods in order to exploit their beneficial properties, are currently under investigation for improved theoretical capabilities. A new technique to produce nuclear Hamiltonians has been developed, implementing renormalization group methods, many-body perturbative techniques, and Energy Density Functional methods. Connection to the underlying physics is a primary focus, limiting the number of free parameters necessary in the procedure. The main benefit of this approach is the improvement in the quality of effective interactions outside of standard model spaces. In the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure developed in this dissertation, Skyrme energy density functionals provide a realistic single particle basis that accounts for the long tail of loosely bound orbits, especially significant for valence orbits of exotic isotopes. A microscopic nucleon-nucleon potential is softened with renormalization group techniques to eliminate the hard core of the nuclear interaction. Many-body perturbative techniques, in the form of Rayleigh-Schrodinger theory, implement the realistic basis to convert the low-momentum interaction into a model space of interest. The basis is an important ingredient in the renormalization and greatly affects the results obtained with the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure, specifically through the single particle energies derived from Skyrme functionals. A comparison of the standard harmonic oscillator basis and the realistic

  5. Hybrid functionals applied to extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsman, M.; Paier, J.; Stroppa, A.; Kresse, G.

    2008-02-01

    We present an overview of the description of structural, thermochemical, and electronic properties of extended systems using several well known hybrid Hartree-Fock/density-functional-theory functionals (PBE0, HSE03, and B3LYP). In addition we address a few aspects of the evaluation of the Hartree-Fock exchange interactions in reciprocal space, relevant to all methods that employ a plane wave basis set and periodic boundary conditions.

  6. Postpartum Early and Extended Contact: Quality, Quantity or Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, John B.; Vietze, Peter M.

    This study examined the effects of early vs. extended mother-infant contact on infant, maternal and interactional outcomes in the lying-in period for 104 lower class mother-infant dyads. The early contact treatment consisted of placing the mother and neonate together for 10 to 45 minutes within the first 3 postpartum hours. The extended contact…

  7. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  8. Thermodynamic studies of saccharide binding to artocarpin, a B-cell mitogen, reveals the extended nature of its interaction with mannotriose [3,6-Di-O-(alpha-D-mannopyranosyl)-D-mannose].

    PubMed

    Rani, P G; Bachhawat, K; Misquith, S; Surolia, A

    1999-10-15

    The thermodynamics of binding of various saccharides to artocarpin, from Artocarpus integrifolia seeds, a homotetrameric lectin (M(r) 65, 000) with one binding site per subunit, was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry measurements at 280 and 293 K. The binding enthalpies, DeltaH(b), are the same at both temperatures, and the values range from -10.94 to -47.11 kJ mol(-1). The affinities of artocarpin as obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry are in reasonable agreement with the results obtained by enzyme-linked lectin absorbent essay, which is based on the minimum amount of ligand required to inhibit horseradish peroxidase binding to artocarpin in enzyme-linked lectin absorbent essay (Misquith, S., Rani, P. G., and Surolia, A. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 30393-30401). The interactions are mainly enthalpically driven and exhibit enthalpy-entropy compensation. The order of binding affinity of artocarpin is as follows: mannotriose>Manalpha3Man>GlcNAc(2)Man(3)>MealphaMan>Man>M analpha6Man> Manalpha2Man>MealphaGlc>Glc, i.e. 7>4>2>1.4>1>0.4>0.3>0.24>0.11. The DeltaH for the interaction of Manalpha3Man, Manalpha6Man, and MealphaMan are similar and 20 kJ mol(-1) lower than that of mannotriose. This indicates that, while Manalpha3Man and Manalpha6Man interact with the lectin exclusively through their nonreducing end monosaccharide with the subsites specific for the alpha1,3 and alpha1,6 arms, the mannotriose interacts with the lectin simultaneously through all three of its mannopyranosyl residues. This study thus underscores the distinction in the recognition of this common oligosaccharide motif in comparison with that displayed by other lectins with related specificity.

  9. Symbolic computation of the Hartree-Fock energy from a chiral EFT three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremariam, B.; Bogner, S. K.; Duguet, T.

    2010-06-01

    We present the first of a two-part Mathematica notebook collection that implements a symbolic approach for the application of the density matrix expansion (DME) to the Hartree-Fock (HF) energy from a chiral effective field theory (EFT) three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO. The final output from the notebooks is a Skyrme-like energy density functional that provides a quasi-local approximation to the non-local HF energy. In this paper, we discuss the derivation of the HF energy and its simplification in terms of the scalar/vector-isoscalar/isovector parts of the one-body density matrix. Furthermore, a set of steps is described and illustrated on how to extend the approach to other three-nucleon interactions. Program summaryProgram title: SymbHFNNN Catalogue identifier: AEGC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 96 666 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 378 083 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 7.1 Computer: Any computer running Mathematica 6.0 and later versions Operating system: Windows Xp, Linux/Unix RAM: 256 Mb Classification: 5, 17.16, 17.22 Nature of problem: The calculation of the HF energy from the chiral EFT three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO involves tremendous spin-isospin algebra. The problem is compounded by the need to eventually obtain a quasi-local approximation to the HF energy, which requires the HF energy to be expressed in terms of scalar/vector-isoscalar/isovector parts of the one-body density matrix. The Mathematica notebooks discussed in this paper solve the latter issue. Solution method: The HF energy from the chiral EFT three-nucleon interaction at N 2LO is cast into a form suitable for an automatic simplification of

  10. NAIF Toolkit - Extended

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, Charles H., Jr.; Bachman, Nathaniel J.; Semenov, Boris V.; Wright, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    The Navigation Ancillary Infor ma tion Facility (NAIF) at JPL, acting under the direction of NASA s Office of Space Science, has built a data system named SPICE (Spacecraft Planet Instrument Cmatrix Events) to assist scientists in planning and interpreting scientific observations (see figure). SPICE provides geometric and some other ancillary information needed to recover the full value of science instrument data, including correlation of individual instrument data sets with data from other instruments on the same or other spacecraft. This data system is used to produce space mission observation geometry data sets known as SPICE kernels. It is also used to read SPICE kernels and to compute derived quantities such as positions, orientations, lighting angles, etc. The SPICE toolkit consists of a subroutine/ function library, executable programs (both large applications and simple utilities that focus on kernel management), and simple examples of using SPICE toolkit subroutines. This software is very accurate, thoroughly tested, and portable to all computers. It is extremely stable and reusable on all missions. Since the previous version, three significant capabilities have been added: Interactive Data Language (IDL) interface, MATLAB interface, and a geometric event finder subsystem.

  11. From Self-Organized to Extended Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Lovecchio, Elisa; Allegrini, Paolo; Geneston, Elvis; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    We address the issue of criticality that is attracting the attention of an increasing number of neurophysiologists. Our main purpose is to establish the specific nature of some dynamical processes that although physically different, are usually termed as “critical,” and we focus on those characterized by the cooperative interaction of many units. We notice that the term “criticality” has been adopted to denote both noise-induced phase transitions and Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) with no clear connection with the traditional phase transitions, namely the transformation of a thermodynamic system from one state of matter to another. We notice the recent attractive proposal of extended criticality advocated by Bailly and Longo, which is realized through a wide set of critical points rather than emerging as a singularity from a unique value of the control parameter. We study a set of cooperatively firing neurons and we show that for an extended set of interaction couplings the system exhibits a form of temporal complexity similar to that emerging at criticality from ordinary phase transitions. This extended criticality regime is characterized by three main properties: (i) In the ideal limiting case of infinitely large time period, temporal complexity corresponds to Mittag-Leffler complexity; (ii) For large values of the interaction coupling the periodic nature of the process becomes predominant while maintaining to some extent, in the intermediate time asymptotic region, the signature of complexity; (iii) Focusing our attention on firing neuron avalanches, we find two of the popular SOC properties, namely the power indexes 2 and 1.5 respectively for time length and for the intensity of the avalanches. We derive the main conclusion that SOC emerges from extended criticality, thereby explaining the experimental observation of Plenz and Beggs: avalanches occur in time with surprisingly regularity, in apparent conflict with the temporal complexity of physical

  12. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  13. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  14. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  15. Extended Relativistic Configuration Interaction and Many-body Perturbation Calculations of Spectroscopic Data for the N ≤ 6 Configurations in Ne-like Ions between Cr xv and Kr xxvii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Chen, Z. B.; Si, R.; Jönsson, P.; Ekman, J.; Guo, X. L.; Li, S.; Long, F. Y.; Dang, W.; Zhao, X. H.; Hutton, R.; Chen, C. Y.; Yan, J.; Yang, X.

    2016-10-01

    Level energies, wavelengths, electric dipole, magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic quadrupole transition rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths from combined relativistic configuration interaction and many-body perturbation calculations are reported for the 201 fine-structure states of the 2{s}22{p}6, 2{s}22{p}53l, 2s2{p}63l, 2{s}22{p}54l, 2s2{p}64l, 2{s}22{p}55l, and 2{s}22{p}56l configurations in all Ne-like ions between Cr xv and Kr xxvii. Calculated level energies and transition data are compared with experiments from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and CHIANTI databases, and other recent benchmark calculations. The mean energy difference with the NIST experiments is only 0.05%. The present calculations significantly increase the amount of accurate spectroscopic data for the n > 3 states in a number of Ne-like ions of astrophysical interest. A complete data set should be helpful for analyzing new observations from solar and other astrophysical sources, and is also likely to be useful for modeling and diagnosing a variety of plasmas, including astronomical and fusion plasma.

  16. Odd-even staggering in the neutron-proton interaction and nuclear mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we study odd-even staggering of the empirical neutron-proton interaction between the last neutron and the last proton, denoted as δ V1 n -1 p , and its consequence in the Garvey-Kelson mass relations (GKs) and nuclear mass models. The root-mean-squared deviations of predicted masses respectively for even-A and odd-A nuclei by using two combinatorial GKs suggest a large odd-even staggering of δ V1 n -1 p between even-odd and odd-even nuclei, while the odd-even difference of δ V1 n -1 p between even-even and odd-odd nuclei is much smaller. The contribution of the odd-even staggering of δ V1 n -1 p between even-A and odd-A nuclei in deviations of theoretical δ V1 n -1 p values of the Duflo-Zuker model and the improved Weizs a ̈cker -Skyrme model are well represented by an isospin-dependent term. The consideration of this odd-even staggering improves our description of binding energies and one-neutron separation energies in both the Duflo-Zuker model and the improved Weizs a ̈cker -Skyrme model.

  17. The Extended Mind: Coupling Environment and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrobel, Susie

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes embodiment and cognitive extension as examples of strong anticipation as defined by Dubois. Clark and Chalmers formulated a thesis which states that parts of the environment, if coupled successfully, can become part of the extended mind. This coupling, be it deliberate or unintentional, shifts the observer-world boundary outwards when the observer encompasses parts of his environment. The resulting extended observer forms a new systemic whole, which consists of both the assimilated context and the recalibrated version of the original observer. Recalibration occurs when conditioning and adaptation lead to corresponding changes on the neural level, for instance, when an agent compensates for delays in a control loop. Plasticity is a prerequisite for any successful incorporation of external structures. However, uncoupled parts of the observer must remain inviolate in order to preserve the boundary. Neither the extended mind nor the core observer are absolute concepts. Depending on whether we focus on local-scale interactions or on large-scale behaviour, boundaries are formed at different interfacial cuts, which lead to either an endo- or an exo-perspective or endo- or exo-anticipation, respectively. For biological extended agents which undergo a transition from exo- to endo-states, a tell-tale sign of a successful exo-endo transition is invisibility. This invisibility occurs when the agent is no longer aware of the delay originally introduced into the control loop by the assimilated part of the environment. Explaining the world in terms of effective causality is not sufficient to account for extended minds. The latter require explanations in terms of final causation. For extended minds, this ordering principle comes in the shape of nested hierarchical layers. The interfaces of these layers may have merged for an endo-observer, whereas an exo-observer can make out the detailed structure, including artificially introduced delays. A sufficient

  18. THE EXTENDED OPTICAL DISK OF M101

    SciTech Connect

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Spengler, Chelsea E.; Rudick, Craig S.; Feldmeier, John J. E-mail: paul.harding@case.edu E-mail: craig.rudick@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-01-10

    We have used deep, wide-field optical imaging to study the faint outskirts of the luminous spiral galaxy M101 (NGC 5457) as well as its surrounding environment. Over 6 deg{sup 2}, our imaging has a limiting surface brightness of {mu} {sub B} {approx} 29.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}, and has revealed the stellar structure of M101's disk out to nearly 25' (50 kpc), 3 times our measured R {sub 25} isophotal size of the optical disk. At these radii, the well-known asymmetry of the inner disk slews 180 Degree-Sign , resulting in an asymmetric plume of light at large radius which follows the very extended H I disk to the northeast of M101. This plume has very blue colors (B - V {approx} 0.2), suggesting that it is the somewhat more evolved (few hundred Myr to {approx}1 Gyr) counterpart of the young far-ultraviolet emitting population traced by Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging. We also detect another, redder spur of extended light to the east of the disk, and both structures are reminiscent of features produced during fly-by galaxy interactions. However, we see no evidence of very extended tidal tails around M101 or any of its companions which might be expected from a recent encounter with a massive companion. We consider the properties of M101's outer disk in light of possible past interactions with the nearby companion galaxies NGC 5477 and NGC 5474. The detection of optical starlight at such large radii gives us the ability to study star formation histories and stellar populations in outer disks over longer timescales than those traced by the UV or H{alpha} emitting populations. Our data suggest an ongoing buildup of M101's outer disk due to encounters in the group environment triggering extended star formation and tidal heating of existing disk populations.

  19. Cognitive Transformations and Extended Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menary, Richard; Kirchhoff, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expertise is extended by becoming immersed in cultural practices. We look at an example of mathematical expertise in which immersion in cognitive practices results in the transformation of expert performance.

  20. Topological defects in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Kolb, Edward W.; Liddle, Andrew R.

    1990-01-01

    The production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models was considered. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large scale structure via cosmic strings.

  1. Slow-roll extended quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Siino, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-04-15

    We derive the slow-roll conditions for a nonminimally coupled scalar field (extended quintessence) during the radiation/matter dominated era extending our previous results for thawing quintessence. We find that the ratio {phi}e/3H{phi} becomes constant but negative, in sharp contrast to the ratio for the minimally coupled scalar field. We also find that the functional form of the equation of state of the scalar field asymptotically approaches that of the minimally coupled thawing quintessence.

  2. Extender for securing a closure

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, II, Patrick A.

    2012-10-02

    An apparatus for securing a closure such as door or a window that opens and closes by movement relative to a fixed structure such as a wall or a floor. Many embodiments provide a device for relocating a padlock from its normal location where it secures a fastener (such as a hasp) to a location for the padlock that is more accessible for locking and unlocking the padlock. Typically an extender is provided, where the extender has a hook at a first end that is disposed through the eye of the staple of the hasp, and at an opposing second end the extender has an annulus, such as a hole in the extender or a loop or ring affixed to the extender. The shackle of the padlock may be disposed through the annulus and may be disposed through the eye of a second staple to secure the door or window in a closed or open position. Some embodiments employ a rigid sheath to enclose at least a portion of the extender. Typically the rigid sheath has an open state where the hook is exposed outside the sheath and a closed state where the hook is disposed within the sheath.

  3. Extended Bose-Hubbard models with ultracold magnetic atoms.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Mark, M J; Petter, D; Aikawa, K; Chomaz, L; Cai, Z; Baranov, M; Zoller, P; Ferlaino, F

    2016-04-01

    The Hubbard model underlies our understanding of strongly correlated materials. Whereas its standard form only comprises interactions between particles at the same lattice site, extending it to encompass long-range interactions is predicted to profoundly alter the quantum behavior of the system. We realize the extended Bose-Hubbard model for an ultracold gas of strongly magnetic erbium atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Controlling the orientation of the atomic dipoles, we reveal the anisotropic character of the onsite interaction and hopping dynamics and their influence on the superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition. Moreover, we observe nearest-neighbor interactions, a genuine consequence of the long-range nature of dipolar interactions. Our results lay the groundwork for future studies of exotic many-body quantum phases. PMID:27124454

  4. Extended cognition in science communication.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, David

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a methodological externalism that takes knowledge about science to be partly constituted by the environment. My starting point is the debate about extended cognition in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science. Externalists claim that human cognition extends beyond the brain and can be partly constituted by external devices. First, I show that most studies of public knowledge about science are based on an internalist framework that excludes the environment we usually utilize to make sense of science and does not allow the possibility of extended knowledge. In a second step, I argue that science communication studies should adopt a methodological externalism and accept that knowledge about science can be partly realized by external information resources such as Wikipedia.

  5. An Extended Keyword Extraction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bao; Zhen, Deng

    Among numerous Chinese keyword extraction methods, Chinese characteristics were shortly considered. This phenomenon going against the precision enhancement of the Chinese keyword extraction. An extended term frequency based method(Extended TF) is proposed in this paper which combined Chinese linguistic characteristics with basic TF method. Unary, binary and ternary grammars for the candidate keyword extraction as well as other linguistic features were all taken into account. The method establishes classification model using support vector machine. Tests show that the proposed extraction method improved key words precision and recall rate significantly. We applied the key words extracted by the extended TF method into the text file classification. Results show that the key words extracted by the proposed method contributed greatly to raising the precision of text file classification.

  6. Complex-extended Bohmian mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Chun; Wyatt, Robert E

    2010-04-01

    Complex-extended Bohmian mechanics is investigated by analytically continuing the wave function in polar form into the complex plane. We derive the complex-extended version of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation and the continuity equation in Bohmian mechanics. Complex-extended Bohmian mechanics recovers the standard real-valued Bohmian mechanics on the real axis. The trajectories on the real axis are in accord with the standard real-valued Bohmian trajectories. The trajectories launched away from the real axis never intersect the real axis, and they display symmetry with respect to the real axis. Trajectories display hyperbolic deflection around nodes of the wave function in the complex plane. PMID:20387916

  7. A novel extended state observer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shaofeng; Wang, Weihong; Liu, Xiaodong; Chen, Zengqiang; Wang, Sen

    2015-09-01

    A novel extended state observer, which feeds back the output estimation error via both nonlinear and switching terms, is put forward for the first time in this paper. No longer neglecting the lumped uncertainty׳s first time derivative, the problem of disturbance observer design is transformed into the problem of state observer design in the presence of external disturbance. The switching term of the output estimation error is employed to counteract the adverse effect of external disturbance. The newly developed extended state observer provides an attractive solution to the issue of high precision motion control system. Both numerical simulation and experimentation on a speed turntable with temperature box are implemented to verify the performance of the proposed newly developed extended state observer. PMID:26275404

  8. Constrained Stochastic Extended Redundancy Analysis.

    PubMed

    DeSarbo, Wayne S; Hwang, Heungsun; Stadler Blank, Ashley; Kappe, Eelco

    2015-06-01

    We devise a new statistical methodology called constrained stochastic extended redundancy analysis (CSERA) to examine the comparative impact of various conceptual factors, or drivers, as well as the specific predictor variables that contribute to each driver on designated dependent variable(s). The technical details of the proposed methodology, the maximum likelihood estimation algorithm, and model selection heuristics are discussed. A sports marketing consumer psychology application is provided in a Major League Baseball (MLB) context where the effects of six conceptual drivers of game attendance and their defining predictor variables are estimated. Results compare favorably to those obtained using traditional extended redundancy analysis (ERA). PMID:24327066

  9. Adjustable extender for instrument module

    DOEpatents

    Sevec, J.B.; Stein, A.D.

    1975-11-01

    A blank extender module used to mount an instrument module in front of its console for repair or test purposes has been equipped with a rotatable mount and means for locking the mount at various angles of rotation for easy accessibility. The rotatable mount includes a horizontal conduit supported by bearings within the blank module. The conduit is spring-biased in a retracted position within the blank module and in this position a small gear mounted on the conduit periphery is locked by a fixed pawl. The conduit and instrument mount can be pulled into an extended position with the gear clearing the pawl to permit rotation and adjustment of the instrument.

  10. Constrained Stochastic Extended Redundancy Analysis.

    PubMed

    DeSarbo, Wayne S; Hwang, Heungsun; Stadler Blank, Ashley; Kappe, Eelco

    2015-06-01

    We devise a new statistical methodology called constrained stochastic extended redundancy analysis (CSERA) to examine the comparative impact of various conceptual factors, or drivers, as well as the specific predictor variables that contribute to each driver on designated dependent variable(s). The technical details of the proposed methodology, the maximum likelihood estimation algorithm, and model selection heuristics are discussed. A sports marketing consumer psychology application is provided in a Major League Baseball (MLB) context where the effects of six conceptual drivers of game attendance and their defining predictor variables are estimated. Results compare favorably to those obtained using traditional extended redundancy analysis (ERA).

  11. WFRC patrners: our extended family

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, Lyman

    2007-01-01

    For more than five decades the Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) has worked with partners to provide research findings to managers of aquatic resources. Those partners form an extended family, a network of clients, colleagues, co-investigators, and customers. Our partners include numerous clients in other Department of Interior bureaus such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, and the National Park Service. But there is much more--we have partners in other federal agencies, state agencies, and universities. The extended family includes tribal governments, and non-government organizations such as the Nature Conservancy and the Lower Columbia River Estuary Program.

  12. Outer satellite atmospheres: Their extended nature and planetary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Model calculations for the brightness of the sodium cloud in Region A were performed to clarify the role played by the plasma torus sink in producing the east-west intensity asymmetry observed in the sodium D-lines. It was determined that the east-west electric field, proposed by Barbosa and Kievelson (1983) and Ip and Goertz (1983) to explain the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the torus ion emissions measured by the Voyager UVS instrument, could also produce the east-west sodium intensity asymmetry discovered earlier by Bergstralh et al. (1975, 1977). Model results for the directional features of the sodium cloud are also reported. The completion of the development of the Io potassium cloud model, progress in improving the Titan hydrogen torus model, and efforts in developing our model for hydrogen cometary atmospheres are also discussed.

  13. Outer satellite atmospheres: Their extended nature and planetary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    Significant progress in model analysis of data for the directional features of the Io sodium cloud is reported and appears to provide some support for a satellite emission mechanism that is driven by a magnetospheric wind. A number of model calculations for the two dimensional intensity morphology of the Io sodium (region B) cloud are compared with six observations. Results of this comparison support tentative conclusions regarding the satellite emission conditions, the role of the plasma torus and the sodium atom escape flux. Progress in updating the Titan hydrogen torus model is also discussed.

  14. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

  15. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, John L.; Brandt, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

  16. Engage, Enhance, and Extend Learning!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keren-Kolb, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Educators often say that technology is more than a gimmick or add-on, and that it should engage, enhance, or extend learning in ways that traditional tools do not. Yet they seldom stop to define these terms, and they can be confusing, especially for teachers and preservice teachers. Recently, while collaborating on an English language arts and…

  17. Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Pool, S. L.; Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    The Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO) program addresses a need for more time to perform experiments and other tasks during Space Shuttle missions. As a part of this program, the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) has been instituted to obtain information about physiologic effects of extending mission duration and the effectiveness of countermeasures against factors that might compromise crew health, safety, or performance on extended-duration missions. Only those investigations that address and characterize operational problems, develop countermeasures, or evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures will be pursued. The EDOMP investigations will include flight-associated Detailed Supplementary Objectives as well as ground-based studies simulating the influence of microgravity. Investigator teams have been formed in the following areas: biomedical physiology, cardiovascular and fluid/electrolyte physiology, environmental health, muscle and exercise physiology, and neurophysiology. Major operational questions must be answered in each of these areas, and investigations have been designed to answer them. The EDO program will proceed only after countermeasures have been shown to be effective in preventing or mitigating the adverse changes they have been designed to attenuate. The program is underway and will continue on each Shuttle flight as the manifest builds toward a 16-day orbital flight.

  18. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  19. Extended mind and after: socially extended mind and actor-network.

    PubMed

    Kono, Tetsuya

    2014-03-01

    The concept of extended mind has been impressively developed over the last 10 years by many philosophers and cognitive scientists. The extended mind thesis (EM) affirms that the mind is not simply ensconced inside the head, but extends to the whole system of brain-body-environment. Recently, some philosophers and psychologists try to adapt the idea of EM to the domain of social cognition research. Mind is socially extended (SEM). However, EM/SEM theory has problems to analyze the interactions among a subject and its surroundings with opposition, antagonism, or conflict; it also tends to think that the environment surrounding the subject is passive or static, and to neglect the power of non-human actants to direct and regulate the human subject. In these points, actor-network theory (ANT) proposed by Latour and Callon is more persuasive, while sharing some important ideas with EM/SEM theory. Actor-network is a hybrid community which is composed of a series of heterogeneous elements, animate and inanimate for a certain period of time. I shall conclude that EM/SEM could be best analyzed as a special case of actor-network. EM/SEM is a system which can be controlled by a human agent alone. In order to understand collective behavior, philosophy and psychology have to study the actor-network in which human individuals are situated.

  20. Extended recency effect extended: blocking, presentation mode, and retention interval.

    PubMed

    Glidden, L M; Pawelski, C; Mar, H; Zigman, W

    1979-07-01

    The effect of blocking of stimulus items on the free recall of EMR adolescents was examined. In Experiment 1 a multitrial free-recall list of 15 pictures was presented either simultaneously in groups of 3, or sequentially, one at a time. Consistent ordering was used in both conditions, so that on each trial, each item in each set of 3 pictures was presented contiguously with the other 2 items from that set. In addition, recall came immediately or after a filled or unfilled delay of 24.5 seconds. Results showed that simultaneous presentation led to higher recall, subjective organization, and clustering than did sequential presentation, but analysis of serial-position curves showed a much reduced extended recency effect in comparison with previous studies. Experiment 2 was designed to determine whether the cause of the reduced extended recency was the use of pictures rather than words as stimuli. Stimuli were presented either as pictures, as pictures with auditory labels, or as words with auditory labels, with both simultaneous and consistent ordering for all conditions. Results indicated a strong extended recency effect for all groups, eliminating presentation mode as a causal factor in the data of Experiment 1. We concluded that blocking leads to increased organization and recall over a variety of presentation modes, rates, and block sizes.

  1. Extended GTST-MLD for aerospace system safety analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chiming; Gong, Shiyu; Tan, Lin; Guo, Bo

    2012-06-01

    The hazards caused by complex interactions in the aerospace system have become a problem that urgently needs to be settled. This article introduces a method for aerospace system hazard interaction identification based on extended GTST-MLD (goal tree-success tree-master logic diagram) during the design stage. GTST-MLD is a functional modeling framework with a simple architecture. Ontology is used to extend the ability of system interaction description in GTST-MLD by adding the system design knowledge and the past accident experience. From the level of functionality and equipment, respectively, this approach can help the technician detect potential hazard interactions. Finally, a case is used to show the method.

  2. Extended treatment of older cigarette smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sharon M.; Humfleet, Gary L.; Muñoz, Ricardo F.; Reus, Victor I.; Robbins, Julie A.; Prochaska, Judith J.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Tobacco dependence treatments achieve abstinence rates of 25–30% at 1 year. Low rates may reflect failure to conceptualize tobacco dependence as a chronic disorder. The aims of the present study were to determine the efficacy of extended cognitive behavioral and pharmacological interventions in smokers ≥ 50 years of age, and to determine if gender differences in efficacy existed. Design Open randomized clinical trial. Setting A free-standing, smoking treatment research clinic. Participants A total of 402 smokers of ≥ 10 cigarettes per day, all 50 years of age or older. Intervention Participants completed a 12-week treatment that included group counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and bupropion. Participants, independent of smoking status, were then assigned randomly to follow-up conditions: (i) standard treatment (ST; no further treatment); (ii) extended NRT (E-NRT; 40 weeks of nicotine gum availability); (iii) extended cognitive behavioral therapy (E-CBT; 11 cognitive behavioral sessions over a 40-week period); or (iv) E-CBT plus E-NRT (E-combined; 11 cognitive behavioral sessions plus 40 weeks nicotine gum availability). Measurements Primary outcome variable was 7-day point prevalence cigarette abstinence verified biochemically at weeks 24, 52, 64 and 104. Findings The most clinically important findings were significant main effects for treatment condition, time and the treatment × time interaction. The E-CBT condition produced high cigarette abstinence rates that were maintained throughout the 2-year study period [(week 24 (58%), 52 (55%), 64 (55%) and 104 (55%)], and was significantly more effective than E-NRT and ST across that period. No other treatment condition was significantly different to ST. No effects for gender were found. Conclusions Extended cognitive behavioral treatments can produce high and stable cigarette abstinence rates for both men and women. NRT does not add to the efficacy of extended CBT, and may hamper its efficacy

  3. FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-01

    FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) I - Extended Time Observations were conducted in Utah. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Home Page SCAR-B Block:  ...

  4. Extended-Synaptotagmins (E-Syts); the extended story.

    PubMed

    Herdman, Chelsea; Moss, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The Extended-Synaptotagmin (E-Syt) membrane proteins were only recently discovered, but have already been implicated in a range of interrelated cellular functions, including calcium and receptor signaling, and membrane lipid transport. However, despite their evolutionary conservation and detailed studies of their molecular actions, we still have little idea of how and when these proteins are required in cellular and organism physiology. Here we review our present understanding of the E-Syts and discuss the molecular functions and in vivo requirements for these proteins. PMID:26926095

  5. VideoANT: Extending Online Video Annotation beyond Content Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosack, Bradford

    2010-01-01

    This paper expands the boundaries of video annotation in education by outlining the need for extended interaction in online video use, identifying the challenges faced by existing video annotation tools, and introducing Video-ANT, a tool designed to create text-based annotations integrated within the time line of a video hosted online. Several…

  6. Effects of tensor interaction on pseudospin energy splitting and shell correction

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J. M.; Zuo, W.; Gu, J. Z.; Wang, Y. Z.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cao, L. G.

    2011-07-15

    In the framework of a Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach combined with Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) method, the role of the tensor force on the pseudospin energy splitting for tin isotope chain is investigated. The tensor force turns out to obviously affect the pseudospin energy splitting of the spin-unsaturated nuclei. Since the tensor force shifts the single-particle levels, it modifies the single-particle level density and the shell correction energy thereof. The influence of the tensor interaction on shell correction energy is considerable according to our analysis taking a magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn as well as a superheavy nucleus {sup 298}114 as examples. This modification of the shell correction energy due to the tensor component affects the stability of the superheavy nuclei.

  7. Electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Renton, P.

    1990-01-01

    The central part of the book consists of a comprehensive discussion of many scattering and decay processes involving electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. A list of topics includes electron-proton scattering, Compton scattering, muon decay, electron-positron annihilation, photon and hadron structure functions, neutrino-nucleus scattering, Cabibbo theory, tau-lepton decays, W and Z boson decays, mixing phenomena and many others. For most processes, the author presents the appropriate Feynman diagrams, first-order matrix elements and the resulting cross sections or decay rates. The last section of Electroweak Interactions discusses some of the open or unanswered questions in the standard model, including the undiscovered top quark, the Higgs mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and detailed tests involving radiative effects. The book concludes with a brief account of ideas that extend beyond the standard model, such as left-right symmetric models, grand unified theories, compositeness, supersymmetry and string theory.

  8. Conversion and optimization of the parameters from an extended form of the ion-interaction model for Ca(NO3)2(aq) and NaNO3(aq) to those of the standard Pitzer model, and an assessment of the accuracy of the parameter temperature representations

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, A M; Rard, J A

    2004-12-21

    The electrolytes Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq) and NaNO{sub 3}(aq) are both extremely soluble but differ in several important respects. Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq) has complex behavior at low ionic strengths and forms several thermodynamically stable and metastable solid phases, whereas NaNO{sub 3}(aq) forms only an anhydrous solid phase. The thermodynamic properties of both have previously been modeled using extended Pitzer ion-interaction models that include higher-order virial terms, in addition to those of the standard Pitzer model. The parameters of the original Pitzer model, however, are often needed for thermodynamic modeling calculations. In this paper we convert the parameters of the extended ion-interaction models for Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq) and NaNO{sub 3}(aq) to the standard Pitzer model using an extension of the methodology previously described by Rard and Wijesinghe [J. Chem. Thermodynamics 35 (2003) 439.473]. In this variant, the exponential coefficient {alpha}{sub 1}{sup P} of Pitzer's model is also optimized to yield the most accurate overall representation of the osmotic coefficients {phi} over the ionic strength and temperature ranges of interest. The optimal values of {alpha}{sub 1}{sup P} = 0.87 kg{sup 1/2} {center_dot} mol{sup -1/2} for Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq) and {alpha}{sub 1}{sup P} = 1.43 kg{sup 1/2} {center_dot} mol{sup -1/2} for NaNO{sub 3}(aq) are smaller than the value {alpha}{sub 1}{sup P} = 2.00 kg{sup 1/2} {center_dot} mol{sup -1/2} normally used for electrolytes of these valence types. In both cases, the accuracy of the osmotic coefficients predicted by the standard Pitzer model was nearly equal to that of the extended Pitzer model up to the solubility limit for T = (298.15 to 423.15) K. This result is consistent with the findings of Rard, Wijesinghe, and Wolery [J. Chem. Eng. Data 49 (2004) 1127-1140] who obtained a substantial improvement in model accuracy for Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(aq) at T = 298.15 K by optimizing this parameter. The

  9. Renormalization of Extended QCD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Hidenori; Yamamura, Ryo

    2015-10-01

    Extended QCD (XQCD), proposed by Kaplan [D. B. Kaplan, arXiv:1306.5818], is an interesting reformulation of QCD with additional bosonic auxiliary fields. While its partition function is kept exactly the same as that of original QCD, XQCD naturally contains properties of low-energy hadronic models. We analyze the renormalization group flow of 2D (X)QCD, which is solvable in the limit of a large number of colors N_c, to understand what kind of roles the auxiliary degrees of freedom play and how the hadronic picture emerges in the low-energy region.

  10. 38 CFR 21.57 - Extended evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Extended evaluation. 21... Initial and Extended Evaluation § 21.57 Extended evaluation. (a) Purpose. The purpose of an extended evaluation for a veteran with a serious employment handicap is to determine the current feasibility of...

  11. Extended suicide with a pet.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases. PMID:24051598

  12. Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, Charles F. (Editor); Taylor, Gerald R. (Editor); Smith, Wanda L. (Editor); Brown, J. Travis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Biomedical issues have presented a challenge to flight physicians, scientists, and engineers ever since the advent of high-speed, high-altitude airplane flight in the 1940s. In 1958, preparations began for the first manned space flights of Project Mercury. The medical data and flight experience gained through Mercury's six flights and the Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab projects, as well as subsequent space flights, comprised the knowledge base that was used to develop and implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The EDOMP yielded substantial amounts of data in six areas of space biomedical research. In addition, a significant amount of hardware was developed and tested under the EDOMP. This hardware was designed to improve data gathering capabilities and maintain crew physical fitness, while minimizing the overall impact to the microgravity environment. The biomedical findings as well as the hardware development results realized from the EDOMP have been important to the continuing success of extended Space Shuttle flights and have formed the basis for medical studies of crew members living for three to five months aboard the Russian space station, Mir. EDOMP data and hardware are also being used in preparation for the construction and habitation of International Space Station. All data sets were grouped to be non-attributable to individuals, and submitted to NASA s Life Sciences Data Archive.

  13. Implications of Extended Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Davis, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of periodicity in the solar cycle, the historical record of sunspot number has been carefully examined, attempting to make predictions about the next cycle. Much emphasis has been on predicting the maximum amplitude and length of the next cycle. Because current space-based and suborbital instruments are designed to study active phenomena, there is considerable interest in estimating the length and depth of the current minimum. We have developed criteria for the definition of a minimum and applied it to the historical sunspot record starting in 1749. In doing so, we find that 1) the current minimum is not yet unusually long and 2) there is no obvious way of predicting when, using our definition, the current minimum may end. However, by grouping the data into 22- year cycles there is an interesting pattern of extended minima that recurs every fourth or fifth 22-year cycle. A preliminary comparison of this pattern with other records, suggests the possibility of a correlation between extended minima and lower levels of solar irradiance.

  14. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Schreiber, Jeffery G.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    2004-01-01

    A high-efficiency 110 W Stirling Radioisotope Generator 110 (SRG110) is being developed for potential NASA exploration missions. The SRG system efficiency is greater than 20%, making it an attractive candidate power system for deep space missions and unmanned rovers. The Department of Energy SRG110 Project team consists of the System Integrator, Lockheed Martin (LM), Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). One of the GRC roles is to provide Independent Verification and Validation of the Stirling TDC s. At the request of LM, a part of this effort includes the Extended Operation of the TDC s in the dynamically balanced dual-opposed configuration. Performance data of Stirling Convertors over time is required to demonstrate that an SRG110 can meet long-duration mission requirements. A test plan and test system were developed to evaluate TDC s #13 and #14 steady-state performance for a minimum of 5000 hours. Hardware, software and TDC preparation processes were developed to support this test and insure safe, round-the-clock operation of the TDC s. This paper will discuss the design and development, and status of the Extended Operation Test.

  15. Extended Operation of Stirling Convertors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    2004-01-01

    A high-efficiency 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator 110 (SRG110) is being developed for potential NASA exploration missions. The SRG system efficiency is greater than 20%, making it an attractive candidate power system for deep space missions and unmanned rovers. The Department of Energy SRG110 Project team consists of the System Integrator, Lockheed Martin (LM), Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). One of the GRC roles is to provide Independent Verification and Validation of the Stirling TDC's. At the request of LM, a part of this effort includes the extended operation of the TDC's in the dynamically balanced dual-opposed configuration. Performance data of the Stirling Converters over time is required to demonstrate that an SRG110 can meet long-duration mission requirements. A test plan and test system were developed to evaluate TDC's #13 and #14 steady-state performance for a minimum of 5000 hours and insure safe, round-the-clock operation of the TDC's. This paper will discuss the design and development, and status of the Extended Operation Test.

  16. Reasoning over Extended ER Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artale, A.; Calvanese, D.; Kontchakov, R.; Ryzhikov, V.; Zakharyaschev, M.

    We investigate the computational complexity of reasoning over various fragments of the Extended Entity-Relationship (EER) language, which includes a number of constructs: isa between entities and relationships, disjointness and covering of entities and relationships, cardinality constraints for entities in relationships and their refinements as well as multiplicity constraints for attributes. We extend the known ExpTime-completeness result for UML class diagrams [5] and show that reasoning over EER diagrams with isa between relationships is ExpTime-complete even without relationship covering. Surprisingly, reasoning becomes NP-complete when we drop isa between relationships (while still allowing all types of constraints on entities). If we further omit disjointness and covering over entities, reasoning becomes polynomial. Our lower complexity bound results are proved by direct reductions, while the upper bounds follow from the correspondences with expressive variants of the description logic DL-Lite, which we establish in this paper. These correspondences also show the usefulness of DL-Lite as a language for reasoning over conceptual models and ontologies.

  17. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  18. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  19. Hamiltonian dynamics of extended objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capovilla, R.; Guven, J.; Rojas, E.

    2004-12-01

    We consider relativistic extended objects described by a reparametrization-invariant local action that depends on the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the object as it evolves. We provide a Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics of such higher derivative models which is motivated by the ADM formulation of general relativity. The canonical momenta are identified by looking at boundary behaviour under small deformations of the action; the relationship between the momentum conjugate to the embedding functions and the conserved momentum density is established. The canonical Hamiltonian is constructed explicitly; the constraints on the phase space, both primary and secondary, are identified and the role they play in the theory is described. The multipliers implementing the primary constraints are identified in terms of the ADM lapse and shift variables and Hamilton's equations are shown to be consistent with the Euler Lagrange equations.

  20. Extending Medicare immunosuppressive medication coverage.

    PubMed

    Beaubrun, Anne Christine

    2012-02-01

    African Americans and the poor are at a high risk of suffering from kidney disease and are at an extreme disadvantage when it comes to obtaining the resources needed to maintain a functioning kidney post-transplant. Medicare currently covers 80% of the cost of immunosuppressive therapy for up to three years following a Medicare-covered transplant for patients whose Medicare entitlement was based solely on their end-stage renal disease diagnosis. Adequate insurance coverage has the potential to prevent graft failure and retransplantation resulting from cost-related immunosuppressive medication nonadherence. Given the multifactorial nature of medication nonadherence, extending insurance coverage in an attempt to reduce graft failures should be coupled with intensive interventions to prevent the socioeconomic and various other factors associated with medication nonadherence. Lifetime Medicare coverage for all kidney-transplant recipients, coupled with medication adherence promotion, has the potential to minimize poor outcomes associated with graft failure, especially among minorities and the impoverished.

  1. Extended uncertainty from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Filho, Raimundo N.; Braga, João P. M.; Lira, Jorge H. S.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-04-01

    A translation operator acting in a space with a diagonal metric is introduced to describe the motion of a particle in a quantum system. We show that the momentum operator and, as a consequence, the uncertainty relation now depend on the metric. It is also shown that, for any metric expanded up to second order, this formalism naturally leads to an extended uncertainty principle (EUP) with a minimum momentum dispersion. The Ehrenfest theorem is modified to include an additional term related to a tidal force arriving from the space curvature introduced by the metric. For one-dimensional systems, we show how to map a harmonic potential to an effective potential in Euclidean space using different metrics.

  2. Extended mission life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrone, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    Extended manned space missions which include interplanetary missions require regenerative life support systems. Manned mission life support considerations are placed in perspective and previous manned space life support system technology, activities and accomplishments in current supporting research and technology (SR&T) programs are reviewed. The life support subsystem/system technologies required for an enhanced duration orbiter (EDO) and a space operations center (SOC), regenerative life support functions and technology required for manned interplanetary flight vehicles, and future development requirements are outlined. The Space Shuttle Orbiters (space transportation system) is space cabin atmosphere is maintained at Earth ambient pressure of 14.7 psia (20% O2 and 80% N2). The early Shuttle flights will be seven-day flights, and the life support system flight hardware will still utilize expendables.

  3. Learning Extended Finite State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassel, Sofia; Howar, Falk; Jonsson, Bengt; Steffen, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present an active learning algorithm for inferring extended finite state machines (EFSM)s, combining data flow and control behavior. Key to our learning technique is a novel learning model based on so-called tree queries. The learning algorithm uses the tree queries to infer symbolic data constraints on parameters, e.g., sequence numbers, time stamps, identifiers, or even simple arithmetic. We describe sufficient conditions for the properties that the symbolic constraints provided by a tree query in general must have to be usable in our learning model. We have evaluated our algorithm in a black-box scenario, where tree queries are realized through (black-box) testing. Our case studies include connection establishment in TCP and a priority queue from the Java Class Library.

  4. Extended MHD Simulations of Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear extended MHD simulations of a spheromak in a cylindrical flux conserver are performed using the NIMROD code (JCP 195, 2004). An idealized series of simulations starting from a Grad-Shafranov equilibrium and small non-axisymmetric perturbations are performed to model the sustained decay phase. The resulting confinement leads to steep resistivity gradients. Strong current gradients develop, driving tearing modes that dominate the evolution of the spheromak. Absent in these simulations are the remains of n=1 fluctuations created during the formation process. A second series of simulations start from vacuum fields and model the full spheromak evolution, including the formation process where the n=1 fluctuations dominate. To understand the role of pressure driven instabilities in the evolution of the spheromak, a numerical diagnostic is developed to calculate the Mercier stability criterion from the axisymmetric fields.

  5. Stellar structures in Extended Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar structures are investigated by considering the modified Lané-Emden equation coming out from Extended Gravity. In particular, this equation is obtained in the Newtonian limit of f ( R) -gravity by introducing a polytropic relation between the pressure and the density into the modified Poisson equation. The result is an integro-differential equation, which, in the limit f ( R) → R , becomes the standard Lané-Emden equation usually adopted in the stellar theory. We find the radial profiles of gravitational potential by solving for some values of the polytropic index. The solutions are compatible with those coming from General Relativity and could be physically relevant in order to address peculiar and extremely massive objects.

  6. Extended Klein edges in graphene.

    PubMed

    He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Sungwoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do; Warner, Jamie H

    2014-12-23

    Graphene has three experimentally confirmed periodic edge terminations, zigzag, reconstructed 5-7, and arm-chair. Theory predicts a fourth periodic edge of graphene called the extended Klein (EK) edge, which consists of a series of single C atoms protruding from a zigzag edge. Here, we confirm the existence of EK edges in both graphene nanoribbons and on the edge of bulk graphene using atomic resolution imaging by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The formation of the EK edge stems from sputtering and reconstruction of the zigzag edge. Density functional theory reveals minimal energy for EK edge reconstruction and bond distortion both in and out of plane, supporting our TEM observations. The EK edge can now be included as the fourth member of observed periodic edge structures in graphene.

  7. THE EXTENDED VIRGO CLUSTER CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Chung, Jiwon; Pak, Mina; Yi, Wonhyeong; Lee, Woong; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Sung, Eon-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We present a new catalog of galaxies in the wider region of the Virgo cluster, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog (EVCC) covers an area of 725 deg{sup 2} or 60.1 Mpc{sup 2}. It is 5.2 times larger than the footprint of the classical Virgo Cluster Catalog (VCC) and reaches out to 3.5 times the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We selected 1324 spectroscopically targeted galaxies with radial velocities less than 3000 km s{sup –1}. In addition, 265 galaxies that have been overlooked in the SDSS spectroscopic survey but have available redshifts in the NASA Extragalactic Database are also included. Our selection process secured a total of 1589 galaxies, 676 of which are not included in the VCC. The certain and possible cluster members are defined by means of redshift comparison with a cluster infall model. We employed two independent and complementary galaxy classification schemes: the traditional morphological classification based on the visual inspection of optical images and a characterization of galaxies from their spectroscopic features. SDSS u, g, r, i, and z passband photometry of all EVCC galaxies was performed using Source Extractor. We compare the EVCC galaxies with the VCC in terms of morphology, spatial distribution, and luminosity function. The EVCC defines a comprehensive galaxy sample covering a wider range in galaxy density that is significantly different from the inner region of the Virgo cluster. It will be the foundation for forthcoming galaxy evolution studies in the extended Virgo cluster region, complementing ongoing and planned Virgo cluster surveys at various wavelengths.

  8. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  9. Isopiestic Determination of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of Li2SO4(aq) at T=298.15 and 323.15 K, and Representation with an Extended Ion-Interaction (Pitzer) Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, Joseph A.; Clegg, Simon L.; Palmer, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were made for Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) from 0.1069 to 2.8190 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} at 298.15 K, and from 0.1148 to 2.7969 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} at 323.15 K, with NaCl(aq) as the reference standard. Published thermodynamic data for this system were reviewed, recalculated for consistency, and critically assessed. The present results and the more reliable published results were used to evaluate the parameters of an extended version of Pitzer's ion-interaction model with an ionic-strength dependent third-virial coefficient, as well as those of the standard Pitzer model, for the osmotic and activity coefficients at both temperatures. Published enthalpies of dilution at 298.15 K were also analyzed to yield the parameters of the ion-interaction models for the relative apparent molar enthalpies of dilution. The resulting models at 298.15 K are valid to the saturated solution molality of the thermodynamically stable phase Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O(cr). Solubilities of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O(cr) at 298.15 K were assessed and the selected value of m(sat.)=3.13{+-}0.04 mol{center_dot}kg{sup -1} was used to evaluate the thermodynamic solubility product K {sub s}(Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = (2.62{+-}0.19) and a CODATA-compatible standard molar Gibbs energy of formation {Delta}{sub f} G m{sup 0}(Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = -(1564.6{+-}0.5) kJ{center_dot}mol{sup -1}.

  10. Bioconvection in spatially extended domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, A.; Paul, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    We numerically explore gyrotactic bioconvection in large spatially extended domains of finite depth using parameter values from available experiments with the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas nivalis. We numerically integrate the three-dimensional, time-dependent continuum model of Pedley [J. Fluid Mech.10.1017/S0022112088002393 195, 223 (1988)] using a high-order, parallel, spectral-element approach. We explore the long-time nonlinear patterns and dynamics found for layers with an aspect ratio of 10 over a range of Rayleigh numbers. Our results yield the pattern wavelength and pattern dynamics which we compare with available theory and experimental measurement. There is good agreement for the pattern wavelength at short times between numerics, experiment, and a linear stability analysis. At long times we find that the general sequence of patterns given by the nonlinear evolution of the governing equations correspond qualitatively to what has been described experimentally. However, at long times the patterns in numerics grow to larger wavelengths, in contrast to what is observed in experiment where the wavelength is found to decrease with time.

  11. Earth Observing-1 Extended Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Since November 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission has demonstrated the capabilities of a dozen spacecraft sensor and communication innovations. Onboard the EO-1 spacecraft are two land remote sensing instruments. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) acquires data in spectral bands and at resolutions similar to Landsat. The Hyperion instrument, which is the first civilian spaceborne hyperspectral imager, acquires data in 220 10-nanometer bands covering the visible, near, and shortwave-infrared bands. The initial one-year technology demonstration phase of the mission included a detailed comparison of ALI with the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument. Specifications for the Operational Land Imager (OLI), the planned successor to ETM+, were formulated in part from performance characteristics of ALI. Recognizing the remarkable performance of the satellite's instruments and the exceptional value of the data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA agreed in December 2001 to share responsibility for operating EO-1. The extended mission continues, on a cost-reimbursable basis, as long as customer sales fully recover flight and ground operations costs. As of May 2005, more than 17,800 scenes from each instrument have been acquired, indexed, archived, and made available to the public.

  12. Earth Observing-1 Extended Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2003-01-01

    From its beginning in November 2000, the NASA Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission demonstrated the feasibility and performance of a dozen innovative sensor, spacecraft, and operational technologies. The 1-year mission tested a variety of technologies, some of which may be included on the planned 2007 Landsat Data Continuity Mission. Onboard the spacecraft are two land remote sensing instruments: the Advanced Land Imager (ALI), which acquires data in spectral bands and at resolutions similar to Landsat, and Hyperion, which acquires data in 220 10-nanometer-wide bands covering the visible, near-, and shortwave-infrared bands. Recognizing the remarkable performance of the satellite's instruments and the exceptional value of the data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA agreed in December 2001 to share responsibility for operating EO-1 on a cost-reimbursable basis as long as customer sales are sufficient to recover flight and ground operations costs. The EO-1 extended mission operates within constraints imposed by its technology-pioneering origins, but it also provides unique and valuable capabilities. The spacecraft can acquire a target scene three times in a 16-day period. The ALI instrument has additional spectral coverage and greater radiometric dynamic range compared with the sensors on Landsat 7. Hyperion is the first civilian spaceborne hyperspectral imager. As of January 2003, more than 5,000 scenes had been acquired, indexed, and archived.

  13. The Extended Mission Rover (EMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, W.; Halecki, Anthony; Chung, Manh; Clarke, Ken; Frankle, Kevin; Kassemkhani, Fariba; Kuhlhoff, John; Lenzini, Josh; Lobdell, David; Morgan, Sam

    A key component in ensuring America's status as a leader in the global community is its active pursuit of space exploration. On the twentieth anniversary of Apollo 11, President George Bush challenged the nation to place a man on the moon permanently and to conduct human exploration of Mars in the 21st century. The students of the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering hope to make a significant contribution to this challenge, America's Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), with their participation in the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program. The project selected by the 1991/1992 Aerospace Design group is the design of an Extended Mission Rover (EMR) for use on the lunar surface. This vehicle will serve as a mobile base to provide future astronauts with a 'shirt-sleeve' living and working environment. Some of the proposed missions are planetary surface exploration, construction and maintenance, hardware setup, and in situ resource experimentation. This vehicle will be put into use in the 2010-2030 time frame.

  14. Extended attention span training system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Alan T.; Bogart, Edward H.

    1991-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a behavioral disorder characterized by the inability to sustain attention long enough to perform activities such as schoolwork or organized play. Treatments for this disorder include medication and brainwave biofeedback training. Brainwave biofeedback training systems feed back information to the trainee showing him how well he is producing the brainwave pattern that indicates attention. The Extended Attention Span Training (EAST) system takes the concept a step further by making a video game more difficult as the player's brainwaves indicate that attention is waning. The trainee can succeed at the game only by maintaining an adequate level of attention. The EAST system is a modification of a biocybernetic system that is currently being used to assess the extent to which automated flight management systems maintain pilot engagement. This biocybernetic system is a product of a program aimed at developing methods to evaluate automated flight deck designs for compatibility with human capabilities. The EAST technology can make a contribution in the fields of medical neuropsychology and neurology, where the emphasis is on cautious, conservative treatment of youngsters with attention disorders.

  15. The Extended Mission Rover (EMR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, W.; Halecki, Anthony; Chung, Manh; Clarke, Ken; Frankle, Kevin; Kassemkhani, Fariba; Kuhlhoff, John; Lenzini, Josh; Lobdell, David; Morgan, Sam

    1992-01-01

    A key component in ensuring America's status as a leader in the global community is its active pursuit of space exploration. On the twentieth anniversary of Apollo 11, President George Bush challenged the nation to place a man on the moon permanently and to conduct human exploration of Mars in the 21st century. The students of the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering hope to make a significant contribution to this challenge, America's Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), with their participation in the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program. The project selected by the 1991/1992 Aerospace Design group is the design of an Extended Mission Rover (EMR) for use on the lunar surface. This vehicle will serve as a mobile base to provide future astronauts with a 'shirt-sleeve' living and working environment. Some of the proposed missions are planetary surface exploration, construction and maintenance, hardware setup, and in situ resource experimentation. This vehicle will be put into use in the 2010-2030 time frame.

  16. 38 CFR 21.74 - Extended evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Extended evaluation. 21... Duration of Rehabilitation Programs § 21.74 Extended evaluation. (a) General. An extended evaluation may be... evaluation are listed in § 21.57(b) of this part. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3105(a), 3106(a)) (b) Duration....

  17. Spin transport in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions as a probe of in-medium spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yin; Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An; Shen, Wen-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The spin up-down splitting of collective flows in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions as a result of the nuclear spin-orbit interaction is investigated within a spin- and isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model SIBUU12. Using a Skyrme-type spin-orbit coupling quadratic in momentum, we found that the spin splittings of the directed flow and elliptic flow are largest in peripheral Au+Au collisions at beam energies of about 100-200 MeV/nucleon, and the effect is considerable even in smaller systems especially for nucleons with high transverse momenta. The collective flows of light clusters of different spin states are also investigated using an improved dynamical coalescence model with spin. Our study can be important in understanding the properties of in-medium nuclear spin-orbit interactions once the spin-dependent observables proposed in this work can be measured.

  18. Extended MHD Study of Interchange Modes in Spheromaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Eric C.

    Extended MHD effects on pressure driven interchange modes are studied in decaying spheromak equilibria. Equilibria at conditions relevant to high temperature SSPX [Hooper et al., Nucl. Fus. 1999] discharges are ideal interchange unstable. Extended MHD introduces drifts which have a stabilizing effect, reducing the linear growth rate, on the high-n modes. However, extended MHD has a mixed effect on the low-n modes. The low- n modes have the greatest impact on confinement. In some cases extended MHD is destabilizing, increasing the growth rate, while in other cases extended MHD is stabilizing. A cylindrical screw-pinch model that approximates decaying spheromaks, is studied to better understand the lack of stabilization on the low- n modes. The extended MHD effects reduce the growth rate at small Hall parameter, but a second instability exists at finite Hall parameter. The second mode grows at a rate comparable to the MHD interchange mode. The diamagnetic heat flux has an important stabilizing effect, delaying the onset of the second mode. In calculations that neglect the diamagnetic heat flux, the second mode is dominant at experimentally relevant Hall parameters, and its growth rate exceeds the MHD growth rate. However, including the diamagnetic heat flux delays the onset of the second mode. Here significant stabilization is observed at experiential conditions for Suydam parameters D s<1. This is four times the marginal ideal stable condition. An extended MHD dispersion relation for the gravitational interchange mode [Zhu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008] is analyzed to understand the nature of the second instability. The inclusion of the two-fluid Ohm's law introduces an ion drift wave. The ion drift wave can interact with the gravitational interchange mode producing a second instability.

  19. Extended season for northern butterflies.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Butterflies are like all insects in that they are temperature sensitive and a changing climate with higher temperatures might effect their phenology. Several studies have found support for earlier flight dates among the investigated species. A comparative study with data from a citizen science project, including 66 species of butterflies in Sweden, was undertaken, and the result confirms that most butterfly species now fly earlier during the season. This is especially evident for butterflies overwintering as adults or as pupae. However, the advancement in phenology is correlated with flight date, and some late season species show no advancement or have even postponed their flight dates and are now flying later in the season. The results also showed that latitude had a strong effect on the adult flight date, and most of the investigated species showed significantly later flights towards the north. Only some late flying species showed an opposite trend, flying earlier in the north. A majority of the investigated species in this study showed a general response to temperature and advanced their flight dates with warmer temperatures (on average they advanced their flight dates by 3.8 days/°C), although not all species showed this response. In essence, a climate with earlier springs and longer growing seasons seems not to change the appearance patterns in a one-way direction. We now see butterflies on the wings both earlier and later in the season and some consequences of these patterns are discussed. So far, studies have concentrated mostly on early season butterfly-plant interactions but also late season studies are needed for a better understanding of long-term population consequences.

  20. Introduction to low-momentum effective interactions with Brown-Rho scaling and three-nucleon forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T. T. S.; Holt, J. W.; Osnes, E.

    2016-03-01

    Model-space effective interactions V eff derived from free-space nucleon-nucleon interactions V NN are reviewed. We employ a double decimation approach: first we extract a low-momentum interaction {V}{low-k} from V NN using a T-matrix equivalence decimation method. Then V eff is obtained from {V}{low-k} by way of a folded-diagram effective interaction method. For decimation momentum {{Λ }}≃ 2 {{fm}}-1, the {V}{low-k} interactions derived from different realistic V NN models are nearly model independent, and so are the resulting shell-model effective interactions. For nucleons in a low-density nuclear medium like valence nucleons near the nuclear surface, such effective interactions derived from free-space V NN are satisfactory in reproducing experimental nuclear properties. But it is not so for nucleons in a nuclear medium with density near or beyond nuclear matter saturation density. In this case it may be necessary to include the effects from Brown-Rho (BR) scaling of hadrons and/or three-nucleon forces V 3N , effectively changing the free-space V NN into a density-dependent one. The density-dependent effects from BR scaling and V 3N are compared with those from empirical Skyrme effective interactions.

  1. On the interaction meteor complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajchl, J.

    An approach to the problem of a meteoric complex called the interaction meteor complex (IMC) is applied and discussed, generalizing the idea of the interaction layer (Rajchl 1969). The role of an extended interaction of meteoroids is emphasized, both with planet surfaces and/or their satellites and with planet atmospheres, elastic or inelastic in form. The dissipation and related formative aspect are joined in one complex and compared with a topological compact. Examples of these types of interaction are presented.

  2. Extend{trademark} customization -- Experiences and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.Y.

    1997-12-09

    Extend{trademark} simulation software is a dynamic modeling package developed by Imagine That Incorporated. The Technology Modeling and Analysis group (TSA-7) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has used Extend extensively over the past few years as one of various tools employed to perform simulation modeling and analysis. Development efforts over much of this period have made Extend a more effective and efficient tool through block customization. TSA-7 has taken advantage of the built-in capability in Extend to allow users to create new or modify existing functional blocks from which simulation models are constructed. As a result, Extend is much more effective and efficient for the group`s applications. This paper summarizes block customization and simulation model development that markedly improved the utilization of the Extend software package. The material covered herein includes some background information on Extend, which is necessary for understanding the balance of the paper. Following the background, the paper addresses Extend block customization efforts, including advantages and disadvantages to customizing, and the impact customization has had on Extend modeling efforts in TSA-7. Brief descriptions of many customized blocks developed by the author are presented in the appendix.

  3. Standardizing Interaction Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomassen, Aukje; Ozcan, Oguzhan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to which extend the didactic format of studio-based group-work is applicable for creating a common-ground for Interaction Design Education in European Perspective. The current debate on design education shows us a landscape of different initiatives. So far difficulties have arisen in the area of accreditation and…

  4. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  5. Extended Neural Metastability in an Embodied Model of Sensorimotor Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Miguel; Bedia, Manuel G.; Barandiaran, Xabier E.

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that brain organization is based on mechanisms of metastable synchronization in neural assemblies has been popularized during the last decades of neuroscientific research. Nevertheless, the role of body and environment for understanding the functioning of metastable assemblies is frequently dismissed. The main goal of this paper is to investigate the contribution of sensorimotor coupling to neural and behavioral metastability using a minimal computational model of plastic neural ensembles embedded in a robotic agent in a behavioral preference task. Our hypothesis is that, under some conditions, the metastability of the system is not restricted to the brain but extends to the system composed by the interaction of brain, body and environment. We test this idea, comparing an agent in continuous interaction with its environment in a task demanding behavioral flexibility with an equivalent model from the point of view of “internalist neuroscience.” A statistical characterization of our model and tools from information theory allow us to show how (1) the bidirectional coupling between agent and environment brings the system closer to a regime of criticality and triggers the emergence of additional metastable states which are not found in the brain in isolation but extended to the whole system of sensorimotor interaction, (2) the synaptic plasticity of the agent is fundamental to sustain open structures in the neural controller of the agent flexibly engaging and disengaging different behavioral patterns that sustain sensorimotor metastable states, and (3) these extended metastable states emerge when the agent generates an asymmetrical circular loop of causal interaction with its environment, in which the agent responds to variability of the environment at fast timescales while acting over the environment at slow timescales, suggesting the constitution of the agent as an autonomous entity actively modulating its sensorimotor coupling with the world. We

  6. Evaluation of Kentucky's Extended School Services Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Schumacher, Debbie; Hauser, Brenda

    The Extended School Services (ESS) program was established in 1990 as part of the Kentucky Education Reform Act. The program extends the school day, week, or year for students at risk of academic failure, providing them with additional instructional time to help them meet academic goals. An evaluation of ESS in 2001 utilized statewide surveys and…

  7. 38 CFR 21.74 - Extended evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Duration of Rehabilitation Programs § 21.74 Extended evaluation. (a) General. An extended evaluation may be... concurrence of the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Officer before approving the extension of...

  8. ADD, LD and Extended Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolzenberg, J. B.; Cherkes-Julkowski, M.

    This study examines executive function and its relationship to attention dysfunction and working memory. It attempts to document the manifestations of executive function problems in school-related extended processing tasks, such as verbal problem-solving in math and reading of extended passages. Subjects (in grades 1-12) included 49 children with…

  9. Extended, Embodied Cognition and Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight

    2010-01-01

    A "cognitivist" approach to cognition has traditionally dominated second language acquisition (SLA) studies. In this article, I examine two alternative approaches--"extended cognition" and "embodied cognition"--for how they might help us conceptualize SLA. More specifically, I present: (i) summaries of extended and embodied cognition, followed by…

  10. Report on Extended Campus Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickler, Sally Ann; And Others

    This report presents the results of a study of the Extended Campus Library Services program at Western Kentucky University (WKU), which was conducted by a committee appointed by the Director of University Libraries. A description of the program's goals and objectives is followed by a review of the extended campus programs in relation to similar…

  11. 42 CFR 488.720 - Extended surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extended surveys. 488.720 Section 488.720 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Home Health Agencies § 488.720 Extended surveys. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  12. 42 CFR 488.720 - Extended surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extended surveys. 488.720 Section 488.720 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Home Health Agencies § 488.720 Extended surveys. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  13. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  14. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  15. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  16. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  17. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  18. Extend School Day and Year for NCLB?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chmelynski, Carol

    2006-01-01

    This article highlights the extended-day program adopted by many schools. With so much material being crammed into the curriculum--and with so much time during the school day being devoted to the matter of test preparation--many schools have been looking at the possibility of extending the school day. Several schools are experimenting with longer…

  19. Teaching the Extended Modifier: A Transformational Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Offers a practical model for teaching the extended modifier that is economical and linguistically sound, based on the insights and methodology of transformational generative grammar. Five transformational rules are given for generating extended modifiers from relative clauses. Examples of transformations and two class exercises in German are also…

  20. Effects of Extended-Release Niacin and Extended-Release Niacin/Laropiprant on the Pharmacokinetics of Simvastatin in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Lauring, Brett; Dishy, Victor; De Kam, Pieter-Jan; Crumley, Tami; Wenning, Larissa; Liu, Fang; Sisk, Christine; Wagner, John; Lai, Eseng

    2015-01-01

    The use of multiple lipid-modifying agents with different mechanisms of action is often required to regulate lipid levels in patients with dyslipidemia. During combination therapy, alterations in the pharmacokinetics of any of the drugs used and their metabolites may occur. Three separate open-label, randomized, crossover studies evaluated the potential for pharmacokinetic interaction between extended-release niacin (with and without concomitant laropiprant) and simvastatin in healthy subjects. Study 1 used single doses of extended-release niacin and simvastatin; study 2 used multiple-dose coadministration of extended-release niacin/laropiprant and simvastatin in healthy subjects; and study 3 used single doses of both extended-release niacin and the coadministration of extended-release niacin/laropiprant and simvastatin in healthy Chinese subjects. During each treatment period, plasma samples were collected predose and at prespecified postdose time points for pharmacokinetic analyses. The safety and tolerability of simvastatin with and without coadministered extended-release niacin (or extended-release niacin/laropiprant) were assessed by clinical evaluation of adverse experiences. In 2 studies in healthy subjects, modest increases in exposure to simvastatin acid (by ∼60%) by extended-release niacin and extended-release niacin/laropiprant were observed. Based on the clinical experience with simvastatin, these effects are not believed to be clinically meaningful. In the third study on healthy Chinese subjects, no statistically meaningful increases in exposure to simvastatin by extended-release niacin and extended-release niacin/laropiprant were observed. In all populations examined in these studies, the coadministration of extended-release niacin and simvastatin was generally well tolerated.

  1. Microscopic formulation of the interacting boson model for rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Kosuke; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Guo, Lu

    2011-04-15

    We propose a novel formulation of the interacting boson model (IBM) for rotational nuclei with axially symmetric, strong deformation. The intrinsic structure represented by the potential-energy surface (PES) of a given multinucleon system has a certain similarity to that of the corresponding multiboson system. Based on this feature, one can derive an appropriate boson Hamiltonian, as already reported. This prescription, however, has a major difficulty in the rotational spectra of strongly deformed nuclei: the bosonic moment of inertia is significantly smaller than the corresponding nucleonic one. We present that this difficulty originates in the difference between the rotational response of a nucleon system and that of the corresponding boson system, and could arise even if the PESs of the two systems were identical. We further suggest that the problem can be solved by implementing the L{center_dot}L term into the IBM Hamiltonian, with the coupling constant derived from the cranking approach of Skyrme mean-field models. The validity of the method is confirmed for rare-earth and actinoid nuclei, as their experimental rotational yrast bands are reproduced nicely.

  2. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  3. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model.

    PubMed

    Rau, Jeffrey G; Gingras, Michel J P

    2016-01-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed. PMID:27470199

  4. Spin slush in an extended spin ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new classical spin liquid on the pyrochlore lattice by extending spin ice with further neighbour interactions. We find that this disorder-free spin model exhibits a form of dynamical heterogeneity with extremely slow relaxation for some spins, while others fluctuate quickly down to zero temperature. We thus call this state spin slush, in analogy to the heterogeneous mixture of solid and liquid water. This behaviour is driven by the structure of the ground-state manifold which extends the celebrated two-in/two-out ice states to include branching structures built from three-in/one-out, three-out/one-in and all-in/all-out tetrahedra defects. Distinctive liquid-like patterns in the magnetic correlations serve as a signature of this intermediate range order. Possible applications to materials as well the effects of quantum tunnelling are discussed.

  5. Shock wave refraction enhancing conditions on an extended interface

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.

    2013-04-15

    We determined the law of shock wave refraction for a class of extended interfaces with continuously variable gradients. When the interface is extended or when the gas parameters vary fast enough, the interface cannot be considered as sharp or smooth and the existing calculation methods cannot be applied. The expressions we derived are general enough to cover all three types of the interface and are valid for any law of continuously varying parameters. We apply the equations to the case of exponentially increasing temperature on the boundary and compare the results for all three types of interfaces. We have demonstrated that the type of interface can increase or inhibit the shock wave refraction. Our findings can be helpful in understanding the results obtained in energy deposition experiments as well as for controlling the shock-plasma interaction in other settings.

  6. The symmetric extendibility of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Marcin L.

    2016-09-01

    Studies on the symmetric extendibility of quantum states have become particularly important in the context of the analysis of one-way quantum measures of entanglement, and the distillability and security of quantum protocols. In this paper we analyze composite systems containing a symmetric extendible part, with particular attention devoted to the one-way security of such systems. Further, we introduce a new one-way entanglement monotone based on the best symmetric approximation of a quantum state and the extendible number of a quantum state. We underpin these results with geometric observations about the structures of multi-party settings which posses substantial symmetric extendible components in their subspaces. The impossibility of reducing the maximal symmetric extendibility by means of the one-way local operations and classical communication method is pointed out on multiple copies. Finally, we state a conjecture linking symmetric extendibility with the one-way distillability and security of all quantum states, analyzing the behavior of a private key in the neighborhood of symmetric extendible states.

  7. Supersymmetric descendants of self-adjointly extended quantum mechanical Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hashimi, M.H.; Salman, M.; Shalaby, A.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-10-15

    We consider the descendants of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians in supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a half-line, on an interval, and on a punctured line or interval. While there is a 4-parameter family of self-adjointly extended Hamiltonians on a punctured line, only a 3-parameter sub-family has supersymmetric descendants that are themselves self-adjoint. We also address the self-adjointness of an operator related to the supercharge, and point out that only a sub-class of its most general self-adjoint extensions is physical. Besides a general characterization of self-adjoint extensions and their supersymmetric descendants, we explicitly consider concrete examples, including a particle in a box with general boundary conditions, with and without an additional point interaction. We also discuss bulk-boundary resonances and their manifestation in the supersymmetric descendant. -- Highlights: •Self-adjoint extension theory and contact interactions. •Application of self-adjoint extensions to supersymmetry. •Contact interactions in finite volume with Robin boundary condition.

  8. Apparatus and methods for a human extender

    DOEpatents

    Jansen, John F.

    2001-01-01

    A human extender controller for interface between a human operator and a physical object through a physical plant. The human extender controller uses an inner-feedback loop to increase the equivalent damping of the operating system to stabilize the system when it contacts with the environment and reduces the impact of the environment variation by utilizing a high feedback gain, determined by a root locus sketch. Because the stability of the human extender controller of the present invention is greatly enhanced over that of the prior art, the present invention is able to achieve a force reflection ratio 500 to 1 and capable of handling loads above the two (2) ton range.

  9. Extended Hamiltonian approach to continuous tempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbo, Gianpaolo; Leimkuhler, Benedict J.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce an enhanced sampling simulation technique based on continuous tempering, i.e., on continuously varying the temperature of the system under investigation. Our approach is mathematically straightforward, being based on an extended Hamiltonian formulation in which an auxiliary degree of freedom, determining the effective temperature, is coupled to the physical system. The physical system and its temperature evolve continuously in time according to the equations of motion derived from the extended Hamiltonian. Due to the Hamiltonian structure, it is easy to show that a particular subset of the configurations of the extended system is distributed according to the canonical ensemble for the physical system at the correct physical temperature.

  10. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2006-08-22

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  11. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2005-05-10

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  12. Extending applicability of terahertz spectroscopy for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Ramakrishnan

    Terahertz (THz) vibrational resonance spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising technique for fingerprinting biological molecules. Absorption spectra in this frequency range (0.1-10 THz) reflect molecular internal vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds and/or non-bonded interactions, which are species specific. Of prime importance is improving detection sensitivity of molecules with low absorption characteristics in the THz gap. Also of importance is the characterization of biological molecules in the THz gap (10-25 cm-1) by physical parameters (refractive index and absorption coefficient) rather than sample dependent parameters (transmission, reflection) and extending spectroscopy to the low THz range where remote sensing is most viable. To address the sensitivity issue, it is shown that periodic arrays of rectangular slots with subwavelength width provide for local electromagnetic field enhancements due to edge effects in the low frequency range of interest, 10-25 cm-1 (300-750 GHz). Periodic structures of Au, doped Si and InSb were studied. InSb is confirmed to offer the highest results with the local power enhancements on the order of 1100 at frequency 14 cm -1. InSb and Si have large skin depths in the frequency range of interest and so the analysis of their structures was done through the Fourier expansion method of field diffracted from gratings. Au however has small skin depths at these frequencies compared to the thickness. Surface impedance boundary conditions were employed to model the Au structure, for which the Fourier expansion method was unsuitable owing to the huge magnitude of Au permittivity. The applications possibly include development of novel bio-sensors, with the strongly enhanced local electromagnetic fields leading to increased detection sensitivity, and monitoring biophysical processes such as DNA denaturation. Transmission and reflection data from parallel, independent experiments are utilized in the Interference

  13. Generalized Laplace Transforms and Extended Heaviside Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Michael A. B.

    2008-01-01

    An extended Heaviside calculus proposed by Peraire in a recent paper is similar to a generalization of the Laplace transform proposed by the present author. This similarity will be illustrated by analysis of an example supplied by Peraire.

  14. Extended Adjuvant Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on findings from a recent clinical trial which showed that extending adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor can have important benefits for some women with early-stage cancer.

  15. Extending the Transdiagnostic Model of Attachment and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Ein-Dor, Tsachi; Viglin, Dina; Doron, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that high levels of attachment insecurities that are formed through interactions with significant others are associated with a general vulnerability to mental disorders. In the present paper, we extend Ein-Dor and Doron’s (2015) transdiagnostic model linking attachment orientations with internalizing and externalizing symptoms, to include thought disorder spectrum symptoms. Specifically, we speculate on the processes that mediate the linkage between attachment insecurities and psychosis and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms, and indicate the different contexts that might set a trajectory of one individual to one set of symptoms while another individual to a different set of symptoms. PMID:27064251

  16. Extended service 5w-40 motor oil

    SciTech Connect

    Schiemen, R.D.

    1983-09-06

    An extended drain 5W-40 motor oil composition for internal combustion engines comprises a base oil component of one or more solvent extracted mineral oils and a high refractory mineral oil, a V.I. improver, and preferably other suitable lube oil additives. The finished oil formulation has characteristics of minimal viscosity at low temperatures, low volatility at higher temperatures, and stable viscosity over extended use.

  17. eXtended MetaData Registry

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  18. An extended duration hybrid powered hexcopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winningham, Jason D.

    This work attempts to extend the flight time of a UAS to allow for longer ranges, extended time on station, and larger payloads by adding lift capacity for an auxiliary power unit that generates electrical power using an internal combustion engine. The UAS is instrumented to examine power consumption during flights with various payload masses. Safety aspects of the larger UAS are examined, including a safety analysis of the flight control software.

  19. Supradiaphragmatic bronchogenic cyst extending into the retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Jo, Won-Min; Shin, Jae Seung; Lee, In Sung

    2006-01-01

    We experienced a case of bronchogenic cyst located on the left lower pleural space extending into the retroperitoneum in a 33-year-old man with left chest pain. Preoperative imaging studies and operative findings showed a broad-based cystic mass on the left lower posterior pleura and diaphragmatic pleura extending into the retroperitoneal region across the diaphragm. Histologic studies proved this mass to be a bronchogenic cyst.

  20. Extended-release methylphenidate (Ritalin LA).

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2002-01-01

    An extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (Ritalin LA), a CNS stimulant that inhibits dopamine and noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake into presynaptic neurons, has been developed for use in patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In children with ADHD and healthy male adults, extended-release methylphenidate 20mg was rapidly absorbed and demonstrated two distinct peak plasma concentrations approximately 4 hours apart. The absorption pharmacokinetics of extended-release methylphenidate 20mg, which closely mimics those of immediate-release methylphenidate 10mg given in two doses 4 hours apart, permits once-daily administration. In a 2-week randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 134 evaluable children aged 6 to 12 years with ADHD, symptoms improved to a significantly greater extent with extended-release methylphenidate 10 to 40mg once daily than with placebo. Extended-release methylphenidate improved both inattention and hyperactivity symptoms and was effective in children with combined- (inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive) type or predominantly inattentive-type ADHD. In clinical trials, the safety and tolerability profiles of extended-release methylphenidate were consistent with that of the immediate-release formulation.

  1. Extended van Hove singularity and superconducting instability in doped graphene.

    PubMed

    McChesney, J L; Bostwick, Aaron; Ohta, Taisuke; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; González, J; Rotenberg, Eli

    2010-04-01

    We have investigated the effects of doping on a single layer of graphene using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We show that many-body interactions severely warp the Fermi surface, leading to an extended van Hove singularity (EVHS) at the graphene M point. The ground state properties of graphene with such an EVHS are calculated, analyzing the competition between a magnetic instability and the tendency towards superconductivity. We find that the latter plays the dominant role as it is enhanced by the strong modulation of the interaction along the Fermi line, leading to an energy scale for the onset of the pairing instability as large as 1 meV when the Fermi energy is sufficiently close to the EVHS. PMID:20481902

  2. Movement of elongation factor G between compact and extended conformations.

    PubMed

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Netter, Zoe; Dann, Jillian; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2015-01-30

    Previous structural studies suggested that ribosomal translocation is accompanied by large interdomain rearrangements of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we follow the movement of domain IV of EF-G relative to domain II of EF-G using ensemble and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. Our results indicate that ribosome-free EF-G predominantly adopts a compact conformation that can also, albeit infrequently, transition into a more extended conformation in which domain IV moves away from domain II. By contrast, ribosome-bound EF-G predominantly adopts an extended conformation regardless of whether it is interacting with pretranslocation ribosomes or with posttranslocation ribosomes. Our data suggest that ribosome-bound EF-G may also occasionally sample at least one more compact conformation. GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by EF-G does not affect the relative stability of the observed conformations in ribosome-free and ribosome-bound EF-G. Our data support a model suggesting that, upon binding to a pretranslocation ribosome, EF-G moves from a compact to a more extended conformation. This transition is not coupled to but likely precedes both GTP hydrolysis and mRNA/tRNA translocation.

  3. Movement of Elongation Factor G between Compact and Extended Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Salsi, Enea; Farah, Elie; Netter, Zoe; Dann, Jillian; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous structural studies suggested that ribosomal translocation is accompanied by large interdomain rearrangements of elongation factor G (EF-G). Here, we follow the movement of domain IV of EF-G relative to domain II of EF-G using ensemble and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Our results indicate that ribosome-free EF-G predominantly adopts a compact conformation that can also, albeit infrequently, transition into a more extended conformation in which domain IV moves away from domain II. By contrast, ribosome-bound EF-G predominantly adopts an extended conformation regardless of whether it is interacting with pre- or posttranslocation ribosomes. Our data suggest that ribosome-bound EF-G may also occasionally sample at least one more compact conformation. GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by EF-G does not affect the relative stability of the observed conformations in ribosome-free and ribosome-bound EF-G. Our data support a model suggesting that, upon binding to a pretranslocation ribosome, EF-G moves from a compact to a more extended conformation. This transition is not coupled to, but likely precedes both GTP hydrolysis and mRNA/tRNA translocation. PMID:25463439

  4. The Extended Ionized Halos and Bridge of the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnarao, Dhanesh; Smart, Brianna; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen; Madsen, Gregory J.; Hill, Alex S.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has revealed ubiquitous ionized emission throughout the gas complexes formed by the dynamic history of the Magellanic Clouds. We present an overview of the immediate environment around the galaxies themselves, including ionized halos of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC & LMC) as well as the bridge of material between them. Using WHAM, Barger et al. (2013) found Hα emission extending throughout and beyond H I in the Bridge. We add these new maps of the SMC and LMC to provide the first complete view of the diffuse ionized gas near the interacting system. At R ~ 30,000, WHAM can cleanly separate diffuse emission at Magellanic velocities from the Milky Way and terrestrial sources to the limit of atmospheric line confusion (~ 10s of mR). We find that ionized gas extends at least 5° beyond the traditional boundary of the SMC when compared to recent deep-imaging surveys (e.g., MCELS; Smith et al. 2005). The diffuse ionized emission extent is similar to the neutral gas extent as traced by 21 cm emission. We compare the kinematic signatures between the neutral and ionized components throughout the region. Comprehensive multi-wavelength surveys are also underway to examine how physical parameters and ionization processes vary in these extended systems. WHAM research and operations are supported through NSF Award AST-1108911.

  5. Extended Moment Formation in Monolayer WS2 Doped with 3d Transition-Metals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nirpendra; Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2016-09-14

    First-principles calculations with onsite Coulomb interaction and spin-orbit coupling are used to investigate the electronic structure of monolayer WS2 doped substitutionally with 3d transition-metals. While neither W vacancies nor strain induce spin polarization, we demonstrate an unprecedented tendency to extended moment formation under doping. The extended magnetic moments are characterized by dopant-specific spin density patterns with rich structural features involving the nearest neighbor W and S atoms. PMID:27571717

  6. [Ischemic cholangiopathy induced by extended burns].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Laurence; Angot, Emilie; Goria, Odile; Koning, Edith; François, Arnaud; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2013-04-01

    Ischemic cholangiopathy is a recently described entity occurring mainly after hepatic grafts. Very few cases after intensive care unit (ICU) for extended burn injury were reported. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman consulting in an hepatology unit, for a jaundice appearing during a hospitalisation in an intensive care unit and increasing from her leaving from ICU, where she was treated for an extended burn injury. She had no pre-existing biological features of biliary disease. Biological tests were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of biliary tracts pointed out severe stenosing lesions of diffuse cholangiopathy concerning intrahepatic biliary tract, mainly peri-hilar. Biopsie from the liver confirmed the diagnosis, showing a biliary cirrhosis with bile infarcts. This case is the fourth case of ischemic cholangiopathy after extended burn injury, concerning a patient without a prior history of hepatic or biliary illness and appearing after hospitalisation in intensive care unit.

  7. Remarkable connections between extended magnetohydrodynamics models

    SciTech Connect

    Lingam, M. Morrison, P. J. Miloshevich, G.

    2015-07-15

    Through the use of suitable variable transformations, the commonality of all extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models is established. Remarkable correspondences between the Poisson brackets of inertialess Hall MHD and inertial MHD (which has electron inertia, but not the Hall drift) and extended MHD (which has both effects) are established. The helicities (two in all) for each of these models are obtained through these correspondences. The commonality of all the extended MHD models is traced to the existence of two Lie-dragged 2-forms, which are closely associated with the canonical momenta of the two underlying species. The Lie-dragging of these 2-forms by suitable velocities also leads to the correct equations of motion. The Hall MHD Poisson bracket is analyzed in detail, the Jacobi identity is verified through a detailed proof, and this proof ensures the Jacobi identity for the Poisson brackets of all the models.

  8. Extended inflation from higher dimensional theories

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.; Kolb, E.W.; Vadas, S.L.; Wang, Yun.

    1990-04-01

    The possibility is considered that higher dimensional theories may, upon reduction to four dimensions, allow extended inflation to occur. Two separate models are analayzed. One is a very simple toy model consisting of higher dimensional gravity coupled to a scalar field whose potential allows for a first-order phase transition. The other is a more sophisticated model incorporating the effects of non-trivial field configurations (monopole, Casimir, and fermion bilinear condensate effects) that yield a non-trivial potential for the radius of the internal space. It was found that extended inflation does not occur in these models. It was also found that the bubble nucleation rate in these theories is time dependent unlike the case in the original version of extended inflation.

  9. Extended inflation from higher-dimensional theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.; Vadas, Sharon L.; Wang, Yun

    1991-02-01

    We consider the possibility that higher-dimensional theories may, upon reduction to four dimensions, allow extended inflation to occur. We analyze two separate models. One is a very simple toy model consisting of higher-dimensional gravity coupled to a scalar field whose potential allows for a first-order phase transition. The other is a more sophisticated model incorporating the effects of nontrivial field configurations (monopole, Casimir, and fermion bilinear condensate effects) that yield a nontrivial potential for the radius of the internal space. We find that extended inflation does not occur in these models. We also find that the bubble nucleation rate in these theories is time dependent unlike the case in the original version of extended inflation.

  10. Overview of the Cassini Extended Mission Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, Brent; Strange, Nathan; Smith, John

    2008-01-01

    Due to the highly successful execution of the Cassini-Huygens prime mission and the estimated propellant remaining at the conclusion of the prime mission, NASA Headquarters allocated funding for the development of a 2-year long Cassini extended mission. The resultant extended mission, stemming from 1.5 years of development, includes an additional 26 targeted Titan flybys, 9 close flybys of icy satellites, and 60 orbits about Saturn. This paper describes, in detail, the different phases of the Cassini extended mission and the associated design methodology, which attempted to maximize the number and quality of high-priority scientific objectives while minimizing the total delta v expenditure and adhering to mission-imposed constraints.

  11. Extended inflation from higher dimensional theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.; Vadas, Sharon L.; Wang, Yun

    1990-01-01

    The possibility is considered that higher dimensional theories may, upon reduction to four dimensions, allow extended inflation to occur. Two separate models are analayzed. One is a very simple toy model consisting of higher dimensional gravity coupled to a scalar field whose potential allows for a first-order phase transition. The other is a more sophisticated model incorporating the effects of non-trivial field configurations (monopole, Casimir, and fermion bilinear condensate effects) that yield a non-trivial potential for the radius of the internal space. It was found that extended inflation does not occur in these models. It was also found that the bubble nucleation rate in these theories is time dependent unlike the case in the original version of extended inflation.

  12. Extended range radiation dose-rate monitor

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    An extended range dose-rate monitor is provided which utilizes the pulse pileup phenomenon that occurs in conventional counting systems to alter the dynamic response of the system to extend the dose-rate counting range. The current pulses from a solid-state detector generated by radiation events are amplified and shaped prior to applying the pulses to the input of a comparator. The comparator generates one logic pulse for each input pulse which exceeds the comparator reference threshold. These pulses are integrated and applied to a meter calibrated to indicate the measured dose-rate in response to the integrator output. A portion of the output signal from the integrator is fed back to vary the comparator reference threshold in proportion to the output count rate to extend the sensitive dynamic detection range by delaying the asymptotic approach of the integrator output toward full scale as measured by the meter.

  13. Extending Double Optical Gating to the Midinfrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Timothy; Camper, Antoine; Agostini, Pierre; Dimauro, Louis

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade there has been great interest in creating broadband isolated attosecond pulses (IAPs). Primarily these IAPs have been generated using Ti:Sapphire 800nm short pulses, namely through spatiotemporal gating with the attosecond lighthouse technique, amplitude gating, polarization gating, and double optical gating (DOG). Here we present theoretical calculations and experimental investigations into extending DOG to using a 2 μm driving wavelength, the benefits of which include extended harmonic cutoff and longer input driving pulse durations. It is proposed that broadband IAPs with cutoffs extending up to 250 eV can be generated in Argon by using >30 fs pulses from the passively-CEP stabilized 2 μm idler out of an optical parametric amplifier combined with a collinear DOG experimental setup.

  14. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  15. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  16. Extending the ADM formalism to Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, A. B.; Almeida, T. S.; Romero, C.

    2015-03-01

    In order to treat quantum cosmology in the framework of Weyl spacetimes we take the first step of extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formalism to Weyl geometry. We then obtain an expression of the curvature tensor in terms of spatial quantities by splitting spacetime in (3+l)-dimensional form. We next write the Lagrangian of the gravitation field based in Weyl-type gravity theory. We extend the general relativistic formalism in such a way that it can be applied to investigate the quantum cosmology of models whose spacetimes are endowed with a Weyl geometrical structure.

  17. NASA Orbiter Extended Nose Landing Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Steven R.; Jensen, Scott A.; Hansen, Christopher P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the design, development, test, and evaluation of a prototype Extended Nose Landing Gear (ENLG) for NASA's Space Shuttle orbiters. The ENLG is a proposed orbiter modification developed in-house at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) by a joint government/industry team. It increases the orbiter's nose landing gear (NLG) length, thereby changing the vehicle's angle of attack during rollout, which lowers the aerodynamic forces on the vehicle. This, in combination with a dynamic elevon change, will lower the loads on the orbiter's main landing gear (MLG). The extension is accomplished by adding a telescoping section to the current NLG strut that will be pneumatically extended during NLG deployment.

  18. Weak Lie symmetry and extended Lie algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Goenner, Hubert

    2013-04-15

    The concept of weak Lie motion (weak Lie symmetry) is introduced. Applications given exhibit a reduction of the usual symmetry, e.g., in the case of the rotation group. In this context, a particular generalization of Lie algebras is found ('extended Lie algebras') which turns out to be an involutive distribution or a simple example for a tangent Lie algebroid. Riemannian and Lorentz metrics can be introduced on such an algebroid through an extended Cartan-Killing form. Transformation groups from non-relativistic mechanics and quantum mechanics lead to such tangent Lie algebroids and to Lorentz geometries constructed on them (1-dimensional gravitational fields).

  19. Extending the ADM formalism to Weyl geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto, A. B.; Almeida, T. S.; Romero, C.

    2015-03-26

    In order to treat quantum cosmology in the framework of Weyl spacetimes we take the first step of extending the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formalism to Weyl geometry. We then obtain an expression of the curvature tensor in terms of spatial quantities by splitting spacetime in (3+l)-dimensional form. We next write the Lagrangian of the gravitation field based in Weyl-type gravity theory. We extend the general relativistic formalism in such a way that it can be applied to investigate the quantum cosmology of models whose spacetimes are endowed with a Weyl geometrical structure.

  20. Extending Program Resources: Meeting Necessity with Invention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuston, Judith; Hargens, Mark

    This document describes collaborative strategies used by one school guidance department that allow counselors to complete their designated work without extending their school day. One strategy involves pairing mentors with first-year counselors to help answer their questions. Another uses retired counselors as "substitutes" when regular counselors…

  1. Extended Learning Institute. Policies and Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Larry

    This manual describes the Extended Learning Institute (ELI) at John Tyler Community College in Virginia. The ELI is a comprehensive program of instruction using alternative delivery systems (e.g., television, print-based, radio, and newspapers). General procedures and policies are delineated in section I, including registration and student and…

  2. Some Remarks on the Extended Galilean Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Daniel M.

    1979-01-01

    The extended Galilean transformation carries an inertial frame into a rigid frame with uniform spatial, but arbitrary translational acceleration. Besides being useful in discussing the equivalence principle, this transformation provides a physical interpretation for the theorem in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, that we cannot coherently…

  3. Robotic extended pyelolithotomy for complete staghorn calculus.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Rene; Astigueta, Juan Carlos; Giedelman, Camilo; de Andrade, Robert; Carmona, Oswaldo; Ramirez, Daniel; Clavijo, Rafael

    2010-08-01

    Staghorn stones represent a therapeutic challenge to urologists. We present our experience with laparoscopic extended pyelolithotomy for treatment of staghorn and complex renal calculi in highly selected cases. This approach provides the principles of open surgery with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. We describe our experience with robot-assisted extended pyelolithotomy for complex coralliform calculi. Since January 2007, robotic extended pyelolithotomy has been performed by transperitoneal approach in two patients with complete coralliform lithiasis (calculi average size 8 cm). One patient had history of percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Demographic and operative data were collected. All procedures were technically successful without need for open conversion. Mean estimated blood loss was 175 ml (range 50-300 ml), and mean operative time was 150 min (range 120-150 min). A perinephric drain was employed in one patient with duration of 5 days. Postoperative imaging confirmed complete stone clearance. Robotic extended pyelolithotomy is a feasible and reproducible procedure for removal of complete and partial staghorn calculi in selected patients with complex nephrolithiasis. This approach might limit the role of open surgery for these calculi, but further publications with more cases are necessary to further define its utility.

  4. On energy conservation in extended magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-08-15

    A systematic study of energy conservation for extended magnetohydrodynamic models that include Hall terms and electron inertia is performed. It is observed that commonly used models do not conserve energy in the ideal limit, i.e., when viscosity and resistivity are neglected. In particular, a term in the momentum equation that is often neglected is seen to be needed for conservation of energy.

  5. Extended School Year. Information Capsule. Volume 0910

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2010-01-01

    Extended school years are being considered by districts around the country as educators search for new ways to raise student achievement. The addition of time to the school calendar is also supported by President Barack Obama, who recently stated that American students do not spend enough time in school. This Information Capsule addresses research…

  6. The Extended Family and Children's Educational Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Mads Meier

    2012-01-01

    Research on family background and educational success focuses almost exclusively on two generations: parents and children. This study argues that the extended family contributes significantly to the total effect of family background on educational success. Analyses using the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study show that, net of family factors shared by…

  7. Sulfur extended asphalt pavement evaluation: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    This summary report overviews two previously issued study reports. One report assesses The availability and pricing of sulfur with respect to sulfur extended asphalt (SEA) paving mixture is assessed. A laboratory oriented testing program which was principally used to examine the durability and aging characteristics of SEA paving mixtures is reported.

  8. Extending School Hours: A Capital Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John Hodge

    1995-01-01

    The Murfreesboro, Tennessee, City Schools have doubled the amount of time schools are open without raising taxes. Instead of going home to empty houses, kids participate in an extended school program offering over 100 courses in recreation, academics, arts, and life skills. Parents and organizations foot the costs; no child is excluded for…

  9. Extended Learning: What Are the States Doing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia G.

    2001-01-01

    The standards movement and family work schedules are major factors underpinning the expansion of extended learning opportunities. A recent report by the Council of Chief State School Officials details the development of afterschool and other programs in California, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Texas. (MLH)

  10. Extending Transitional Services to Former Foster Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerman, Ben; Barth, Richard P.; Wildfire, Judy

    2004-01-01

    This article describes what a private agency expended while addressing the transitional needs of former long-term foster youth and examines the association between expenditures and adult outcomes. Not all young adults accepted supports extended to them. In the sample, 41% of the young adults incurred expenses after age 19. Of those using supports,…

  11. Extendible column can be stowed on drum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtz, G. M.; Howard, E. A.

    1965-01-01

    Column formed from a series of segments held together by an internal spring or cable can be coiled on a drum or extended into a rigid structure. This storable coil is useful in boring for soil samples and supporting electrical and optical sensors.

  12. Fullerton Junior College Extended-Day Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meservy, Royal R.

    This paper describes in detail the administrative and operational organization of a program for 4,000 night students and 2,000 extended-day students. It outlines the duties of the Administrative Assistant in Instruction, who is responsible to the Dean of Instruction, Liberal Arts and to the Dean of Instruction, Technical Arts. It also gives a…

  13. Extended Learning Time: Research and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelow, Shawn; Holland, Jenifer Gager; Jackson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    In recent years policymakers have increasingly looked to Extended Learning Time (ELT) as a means of improving student outcomes. As a result, some school districts have increased academic time for students by adding time to the school day or days to the school year. In other communities, schools and community-based organizations have partnered to…

  14. Integrable extended van der Waals model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Francesco; Landolfi, Giulio; Moro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the recent developments in the study of the thermodynamics of van der Waals fluids via the theory of nonlinear conservation laws and the description of phase transitions in terms of classical (dissipative) shock waves, we propose a novel approach to the construction of multi-parameter generalisations of the van der Waals model. The theory of integrable nonlinear conservation laws still represents the inspiring framework. Starting from a macroscopic approach, a four parameter family of integrable extended van der Waals models is indeed constructed in such a way that the equation of state is a solution to an integrable nonlinear conservation law linearisable by a Cole-Hopf transformation. This family is further specified by the request that, in regime of high temperature, far from the critical region, the extended model reproduces asymptotically the standard van der Waals equation of state. We provide a detailed comparison of our extended model with two notable empirical models such as Peng-Robinson and Soave's modification of the Redlich-Kwong equations of state. We show that our extended van der Waals equation of state is compatible with both empirical models for a suitable choice of the free parameters and can be viewed as a master interpolating equation. The present approach also suggests that further generalisations can be obtained by including the class of dispersive and viscous-dispersive nonlinear conservation laws and could lead to a new type of thermodynamic phase transitions associated to nonclassical and dispersive shock waves.

  15. The inflation sector of extended inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. Chicago Univ., IL )

    1990-11-01

    In extended inflation the inflationary era is brought to a close by the process of percolation of true vacuum bubbles produced in a first-order phase transition. In this paper I discuss several effects that might obtain if the Universe undergoes an inflationary first-order phase transition. 17 refs.

  16. The inflation sector of extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    In extended inflation, the inflationary era is brought to a close by the process of percolation of true vacuum bubbles produced in a first-order phase transition. This paper discusses several effects that might obtain if the universe undergoes an inflationary first-order phase transition.

  17. Adult Day Care--Extended Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This pamphlet describes a multi-purpose day-care center for the elderly in Abilene, Texas which is intended to fill the "extended family" role of offering companionship, medical attention, and other aspects of concern to older persons in the community. The goals of the program are as follows: (1) to keep individuals out of institutions as long as…

  18. Robotic extended pyelolithotomy for complete staghorn calculus.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Rene; Astigueta, Juan Carlos; Giedelman, Camilo; de Andrade, Robert; Carmona, Oswaldo; Ramirez, Daniel; Clavijo, Rafael

    2010-08-01

    Staghorn stones represent a therapeutic challenge to urologists. We present our experience with laparoscopic extended pyelolithotomy for treatment of staghorn and complex renal calculi in highly selected cases. This approach provides the principles of open surgery with the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. We describe our experience with robot-assisted extended pyelolithotomy for complex coralliform calculi. Since January 2007, robotic extended pyelolithotomy has been performed by transperitoneal approach in two patients with complete coralliform lithiasis (calculi average size 8 cm). One patient had history of percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Demographic and operative data were collected. All procedures were technically successful without need for open conversion. Mean estimated blood loss was 175 ml (range 50-300 ml), and mean operative time was 150 min (range 120-150 min). A perinephric drain was employed in one patient with duration of 5 days. Postoperative imaging confirmed complete stone clearance. Robotic extended pyelolithotomy is a feasible and reproducible procedure for removal of complete and partial staghorn calculi in selected patients with complex nephrolithiasis. This approach might limit the role of open surgery for these calculi, but further publications with more cases are necessary to further define its utility. PMID:27628774

  19. Q-Method Extended Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; Ainscough, Thomas; Christian, John; Spanos, Pol D.

    2012-01-01

    A new algorithm is proposed that smoothly integrates non-linear estimation of the attitude quaternion using Davenport s q-method and estimation of non-attitude states through an extended Kalman filter. The new method is compared to a similar existing algorithm showing its similarities and differences. The validity of the proposed approach is confirmed through numerical simulations.

  20. Extended Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segawa, Eisuke; Emery, Sherry; Curry, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized linear latent and mixed modeling (GLLAMM framework) includes many models such as hierarchical and structural equation models. However, GLLAMM cannot currently accommodate some models because it does not allow some parameters to be random. GLLAMM is extended to overcome the limitation by adding a submodel that specifies a…

  1. 14 CFR 1274.207 - Extended agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extended agreements. 1274.207 Section 1274.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH..., period of performance and funding levels; therefore, new proposals, certifications, and...

  2. 14 CFR 1274.207 - Extended agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Extended agreements. 1274.207 Section 1274.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH..., period of performance and funding levels; therefore, new proposals, certifications, and...

  3. 14 CFR 1274.207 - Extended agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Extended agreements. 1274.207 Section 1274.207 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH..., period of performance and funding levels; therefore, new proposals, certifications, and...

  4. Interpolation of the Extended Boolean Retrieval Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Daniel Z.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interpolation theorem for an extended Boolean information retrieval model. Results show that whenever two or more documents are similarly ranked at any two points for a query containing exactly two terms, then they are similarly ranked at all points in between; and that results can fail for queries with more than two terms. (Author/LRW)

  5. Trigeminal schwannoma extending into the parapharyngeal space.

    PubMed

    Yumuşakhuylu, Ali Cemal; Sari, Murat; Topuz, Muhammet Fatih; Bağlam, Tekin; Binnetoğlu, Adem

    2014-07-01

    Parapharyngeal space tumors are very rarely seen, and surgical approach to these tumors has not been well established. Most of these tumors are benign and originated from salivary glands and neurogenic in nature. In this case, we report a patient who has a trigeminal schwannoma extending into the deep parapharyngeal space and explain our surgical approach.

  6. A Model for E-Education: Extended Teaching Spaces and Extended Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Insung; Latchem, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes a model for e-education in instruction, training, initiation and induction based upon the concept of extended teaching spaces involving execution, facilitation and liberation, and extended learning spaces used for acquisition, application and construction cemented by dialogue and reflection. The proposed model is based upon…

  7. Elaborated Odor Test for Extended Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Henry, Emily J.; Mast, Dion J.; Harper, Susana A.; Beeson, Harold D.; Tapia, Alma S.

    2016-01-01

    Concerns were raised when incidental exposure to a proprietary bonding material revealed the material had an irritating odor. The NASA-STD-6001B document describes a supplemental test method option for programs to evaluate materials with odor concerns (Test 6, Odor Assessment). In addition to the supplemental standard odor assessment with less than 10 seconds of exposure, the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Materials Flight Acceptance Testing section was requested to perform an odor test with an extended duration to evaluate effects of an extended exposure and to more closely simulate realistic exposure scenarios. With approval from the NASA Johnson Space Center Industrial Hygienist, WSTF developed a 15-minute odor test method. WSTF performed this extended-duration odor test to evaluate the odor and physical effects of the bonding material configured between two aluminum plates, after the safety of the gas was verified via toxicity analysis per NASA-STD-6001B Test 7, Determination of Offgassed Products. During extended-duration testing, odor panel members were arranged near the test material in a small room with the air handlers and doors closed to minimize dilution. The odor panel members wafted gas toward themselves and recorded their individual assessments of odor and physical effects at various intervals during the 15-minute exposure and posttest. A posttest interview was conducted to obtain further information. Testing was effective in providing data for comparison and selection of an optimal offgassing and odor containment configuration. The developed test method for extended exposure is proposed as a useful tool for further evaluating materials with identified odors of concern if continued use of the material is anticipated.

  8. Critical evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of aqueous calcium chloride. 1: Osmotic and activity coefficients of 0--10.77 mol/kg aqueous calcium chloride solutions at 298.15 K and correlation with extended Pitzer ion-interaction models

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J.A.; Clegg, S.L.

    1997-09-01

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were performed at 298.15 K for CaCl{sub 2}(aq) solutions at 66 molalities from (4.3235 to 10.253) mol/kg, using H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) as the reference standard, with emphasis given to the accurate characterization of the osmotic coefficients near and above saturation. Published isopiestic molalities, direct vapor pressures, and emf results for CaCl{sub 2}(aq) have been critically reevaluated and recalculated in an internally consistent manner. This critically-assessed database was used to evaluate the parameters of Pitzer`s equations and various extended forms at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa. Neither the standard equations nor empirically extended versions were able to represent the thermodynamic results over more than part of the molality range without large cyclic systematic deviations. It was possible, however, to obtain essentially quantitative agreement between experiment and model over the full molality range if (1) the presence of CaCl{sup +}(aq) ion pairs was included explicitly and (2) higher-order virial terms were included. One such quantitative model is presented here in detail. Without these higher-order virial terms the same model is able to represent the {phi}(CaCl{sub 2}) fairly well only to about 8 mol/kg. The osmotic coefficient of CaCl{sub 2}(aq) goes through a minimum around 0.11 mol/kg, which is followed by a regular increase with molality to a broad maximum in the supersaturated molality region where {phi}(CaCl{sub 2}) is nearly constant at 3.169--3.173 from about (8.5 to 9.5) mol/kg. It then decreases slightly by about 0.3% at higher molalities.

  9. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  10. Planning for Extended Hours: A Survey of Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Despines, Janine

    2001-01-01

    Discusses extended hours of operation for school library media centers and describes how to plan for them. Considers benefits of extended hours; planning questions; staffing, including volunteers; costs and funding; security; and patron use of extended hours. (LRW)

  11. Extending resolution limits of EUV resist materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysak, Marie; Leeson, Michael; Han, Eungnak; Blackwell, James; Harlson, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology continues to progress and remains a viable candidate for next generation lithography1, which drives the need for EUV resists capable of high resolution with high sensitivity and low LWR. While chemically amplified resists (CARs) have demonstrated the ability to pattern 12nm half-pitch features2, pattern collapse continues to limit their ultimate resolution. We have taken multiple approaches to extend resist capabilities past these limits. Recent results in pattern collapse mitigation using a resist encapsulation and etch back strategy will be discussed. We continue to investigate EUV patterning of semi-inorganic resists to simultaneously increase EUV photon absorption and extend mechanical strength beyond CAR capabilities. The limitations of metal oxide-based nanoparticle photoresists have been investigated, and have provided key insights to further understanding the mechanism of this class of materials.

  12. Synchronization in networks of spatially extended systems

    SciTech Connect

    Filatova, Anastasiya E.; Hramov, Alexander E.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2008-06-15

    Synchronization processes in networks of spatially extended dynamical systems are analytically and numerically studied. We focus on the relevant case of networks whose elements (or nodes) are spatially extended dynamical systems, with the nodes being connected with each other by scalar signals. The stability of the synchronous spatio-temporal state for a generic network is analytically assessed by means of an extension of the master stability function approach. We find an excellent agreement between the theoretical predictions and the data obtained by means of numerical calculations. The efficiency and reliability of this method is illustrated numerically with networks of beam-plasma chaotic systems (Pierce diodes). We discuss also how the revealed regularities are expected to take place in other relevant physical and biological circumstances.

  13. Extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yimin; Meng, Huadong; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Xiqin

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive waveform design for extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks. A closed-loop active target recognition radar system is extended to the case of a centralized cognitive radar network, in which a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) framework is employed. Using Doppler velocities measured by multiple radars, the target aspect angle for each radar is calculated. The joint probability of each target hypothesis is then updated using observations from different radar line of sights (LOS). Based on these probabilities, a minimum correlation algorithm is proposed to adaptively design the transmit waveform for each radar in an amplitude fluctuation situation. Simulation results demonstrate performance improvements due to the cognitive radar network and adaptive waveform design. Our minimum correlation algorithm outperforms the eigen-waveform solution and other non-cognitive waveform design approaches.

  14. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sáez-Gómez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  15. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky and reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond the Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is assembled from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's All-Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog,; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The colors represent how the many galaxies appear at three distinct wavelengths of infrared light (blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns). Quite evident are the many galactic clusters and superclusters, as well as some streamers composing the large-scale structure of the nearby universe. The blue overlay represents the very close and bright stars from our own Milky Way galaxy. In this projection, the bluish Milky Way lies predominantly toward the upper middle and edges of the image.

  16. Extended Lagrangian free energy molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Steneteg, Peter; Bock, Nicolas

    2011-10-28

    Extended free energy Lagrangians are proposed for first principles molecular dynamics simulations at finite electronic temperatures for plane-wave pseudopotential and local orbital density matrix-based calculations. Thanks to the extended Lagrangian description, the electronic degrees of freedom can be integrated by stable geometric schemes that conserve the free energy. For the local orbital representations both the nuclear and electronic forces have simple and numerically efficient expressions that are well suited for reduced complexity calculations. A rapidly converging recursive Fermi operator expansion method that does not require the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the construction of the fractionally occupied density matrix is discussed. An efficient expression for the Pulay force that is valid also for density matrices with fractional occupation occurring at finite electronic temperatures is also demonstrated.

  17. Spectral Mapping Reconstruction of Extended Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. D. T.; Armus, L.; Dale, D. A.; Roussel, H.; Sheth, K.; Buckalew, B. A.; Jarrett, T. H.; Helou, G.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

    2007-10-01

    Three-dimensional spectroscopy of extended sources is typically performed with dedicated integral field spectrographs. We describe a method of reconstructing full spectral cubes, with two spatial and one spectral dimension, from rastered spectral mapping observations employing a single slit in a traditional slit spectrograph. When the background and image characteristics are stable, as is often achieved in space, the use of traditional long slits for integral field spectroscopy can substantially reduce instrument complexity over dedicated integral field designs, without loss of mapping efficiency-particularly compelling when a long-slit mode for single unresolved source follow-up is separately required. We detail a custom flux-conserving cube reconstruction algorithm, discuss issues of extended-source flux calibration, and describe CUBISM, a tool that implements these methods for spectral maps obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph.

  18. Charged local defects in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter A.

    2000-03-01

    The conventional approach to treating charged defects in extended systems in first principles calculations is via the supercell approximation using a neutralizing jellium background charge. I explicitly demonstrate shortcomings of this standard appoach and show that the resulting errors in the electrostatic potential energy surface are comparable to band gaps energies, for supercell sizes typically used in defect calculations. I present an alternate scheme, generalized from the local moment counter-charge method [P.A. Schultz, Phys. Rev. B 60, 1551 (1999)], that gives the correct electrostatic potential in the vicinity of a defect, via a mixed boundary condition approach. As examples, I present results of first principles calculations for charged defects in extended systems.

  19. Extended ion pumped vacuum friction test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Boundary layer friction data under ion pumped vacuum was taken for sixteen material couples. The test series was an extension of a previous study of the effects of modified ion pumped environments. Sliding distances imposed in the present effort greatly exceeded any studied in the previous contiguous, flight or ground tests. Wear out of specific couples, in particular, thin film lubricants was noted. The behavior of the test hardware including wear out of the mechanisms was noted. As a result, the impact of test interruption was observed for several test couples. Recovery of the friction upon re-establishing sliding in vacuum was generally rapid. The results of the extended sliding study reinforce the previous conclusion that sliding distance (mechanical history) is the primary factor in establishing the force limiting boundary layer friction. General friction value under the extended sliding confirm those observed in previous orbital and the related ground test studies.

  20. Optimizing Extender Code for NCSX Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    M. Richman, S. Ethier, and N. Pomphrey

    2008-01-22

    Extender is a parallel C++ code for calculating the magnetic field in the vacuum region of a stellarator. The code was optimized for speed and augmented with tools to maintain a specialized NetCDF database. Two parallel algorithms were examined. An even-block work-distribution scheme was comparable in performance to a master-slave scheme. Large speedup factors were achieved by representing the plasma surface with a spline rather than Fourier series. The accuracy of this representation and the resulting calculations relied on the density of the spline mesh. The Fortran 90 module db access was written to make it easy to store Extender output in a manageable database. New or updated data can be added to existing databases. A generalized PBS job script handles the generation of a database from scratch

  1. Extended hydrogen-bonded structures of phosphatidylethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Sen, A; Yang, P W; Mantsch, H H; Hui, S W

    1988-06-01

    The structure of phosphatidylethanolamine in pure dry hexane was studied. Viscosity measurements show that the hexane solution of PE has a very high viscosity, while freeze fracture electron microscopy revealed extensive fibre-like structures. These extended structures are disrupted by the addition of small amounts of water or organic solvents which are capable of hydrogen-bonding. The Fourier transform infrared spectra of the lipid solutions in dry and hydrated hexane show considerable differences in the phosphate and ethanolamine absorption bands, and demonstrate that the viscous fibre-like structures formed by phosphatidylethanolamine in dry hexane consist of extended intermolecular hydrogen-bonds, similar to those found in the solid lipid, with the ammonium group as the hydrogen-donor and the phosphate group as the hydrogen-acceptor. The high viscosity is not observed in hexane solution of phosphatidylcholine.

  2. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources.

  3. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  4. Analytical satellite theory in extended phase space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, V.; Broucke, R.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a satellite theory, based on extended phase space and on the true anomaly, was introduced by Scheifele (1970). In the present paper a simple canonical transformation is shown that makes the transition from the classical Delaunay elements to the Scheifele variables. It is stressed that neither spherical coordinates nor Hamilton-Jacobi theory is used. Finally, attention is given to the meaning of the new variables, especially the use of the true anomaly as one of the variables.

  5. Analytical satellite theory in extended phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, V.; Broucke, R.

    1980-05-01

    It is noted that a satellite theory, based on extended phase space and on the true anomaly, was introduced by Scheifele (1970). In the present paper a simple canonical transformation is shown that makes the transition from the classical Delaunay elements to the Scheifele variables. It is stressed that neither spherical coordinates nor Hamilton-Jacobi theory is used. Finally, attention is given to the meaning of the new variables, especially the use of the true anomaly as one of the variables.

  6. Rugged, Tunable Extended-Cavity Diode Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Donald; Brinza, David; Seidel, David; Klipstein, William; Choi, Dong Ho; Le, Lam; Zhang, Guangzhi; Iniguez, Roberto; Tang, Wade

    2007-01-01

    A rugged, tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed to satisfy stringent requirements for frequency stability, notably including low sensitivity to vibration. This laser is designed specifically for use in an atomic-clock experiment to be performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lasers of similar design would be suitable for use in terrestrial laboratories engaged in atomic-clock and atomic-physics research.

  7. Astrophysical constraints on extended gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Lambiase, Gaetano; Stabile, Antonio; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Stabile, Arturo E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk E-mail: arturo.stabile@gmail.com

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the propagation of gravitational waves in the context of fourth order gravity nonminimally coupled to a massive scalar field. Using the damping of the orbital period of coalescing stellar binary systems, we impose constraints on the free parameters of extended gravity models. In particular, we find that the variation of the orbital period is a function of three mass scales which depend on the free parameters of the model under consideration; we can constrain these mass scales from current observational data.

  8. Extended Corannulenes: Aromatic Bowl/Sheet Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Amit K; Linden, Anthony; Zoppi, Laura; Baldridge, Kim K; Siegel, Jay S

    2015-09-01

    Among sheet/sheet polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) hybrids, a buckybowl-graphene hybrid has been used as a model to explore the effects of physical properties of PAHs with distinct planar and bowl regions. Activation of a C(Ar)-F bond was used to synthesize this corannulene/graphenic hybrid. Photophysical and voltammetric studies together with high-level computations revealed curvature and extended π-effects on the properties of these materials. PMID:26216746

  9. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources. PMID:26802012

  10. Extended Temperature Solar Cell Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Rafaelle, Ryne

    2004-01-01

    Future NASA missions will require solar cells to operate both in regimes closer to the sun, and farther from the sun, where the operating temperatures will be higher and lower than standard operational conditions. NASA Glenn is engaged in testing solar cells under extended temperature ranges, developing theoretical models of cell operation as a function of temperature, and in developing technology for improving the performance of solar cells for both high and low temperature operation.

  11. Photovoltaic device having an extended PN junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Aiello, Robert Vincent (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A photovoltaic device having essentially only a body of semiconductor material having a first region of one conductivity type in contact with a second region of the opposite conductivity type, forming a portion of the device PN junction therebetween. A plurality of pocket regions of the same conductivity type as the first region extend into the second region thereby further defining a portion of the PN junction in the second region.

  12. Extended Decentralized Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    2000-01-01

    A straightforward extension of a solution to the decentralized linear-Quadratic-Gaussian problem is proposed that allows its use for commonly encountered classes of problems that are currently solved with the extended Kalman filter. This extension allows the system to be partitioned in such a way as to exclude the nonlinearities from the essential algebraic relationships that allow the estimation and control to be optimally decentralized.

  13. Relic gravitational waves and extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Wilczek, Frank

    1990-01-01

    In extended inflation, a new version of inflation where the transition from an inflationary to a radiation-dominated universe is accomplished by bubble nucleation, bubble collisions supply a potent - and potentially detectable - source of gravitational waves. The energy density in relic gravitons from bubble collisions is expected to be about 0.00005 of closure density. Their characteristic wavelength depends on the reheating temperature. If black holes are produced by bubble collisions, they will evaporate, producing shorter-wavelength gravitons.

  14. Origin of density fluctuations in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Salopek, David S.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The density fluctuations (both curvature and isocurvature) that arise due to quantum fluctuations in a simple model of extended inflation based upon the Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory are calculated. Curvature fluctuations arise due to quantum fluctuations in the Brans-Dicke field, in general have a nonscale-invariant spectrum, and can have an amplitude that is cosmologically acceptable and interesting without having to tune any coupling constant to a very small value. The density perturbations that arise due to the inflation field are subdominant. If there are other massless fields in the theory, e.g., an axion or an ilion, then isocurvature fluctuations arise in these fields too. Production of gravitational waves and the massless particles associated with excitations of the Brans-Dicke field are also discussed. Several attempts at more realistic models of extended inflation are also analyzed. The importance of the Einstein conformal frame in calculating curvature fluctuations is emphasized. When viewed in this frame, extended inflation closely resembles slow-rollover inflation with an exponential potential and the usual formula for the amplitude of curvature perturbations applies.

  15. Extending the ICRF to Higher Radio Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Jones, D. L.; Lanyi, G. E.; Lowe, S. T.; Naudet, C. J.; Resch, G. M.; Steppe, J. A.; Zhang, L. D.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    The ICRF forms the basis for all astrometry including use as the inertial coordinate system for navigating deep space missions. This frame was defined using S/X-band observations over the past 20+ years. In January 2002, the VLBA approved our proposal for observing time to extend the ICRF to K-band (24 GHz) and Q-band (43 GHz). The first step will be observations at K- and Q-bands on a subset of ICRF sources. Eventually, K- and Q-band multi-epoch observations will be used to estimate positions, flux density and source structure for a large fraction of the current S/X-band ICRF source list. This work will benefit the radio astronomy community by extending the VLBA calibrator list at these bands. In the longer term, we would also like to extend the ICRF to Ka-band (32 GHz). A celestial reference frame will be needed at this frequency to support deep space navigation. A navigation demonstration is being considered for NASA's Mars 2005 mission. The initial K- and Q-band work will serve to identify candidate sources at Ka-band for use with that mission.

  16. On extended thermonuclear functions through pathway model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    when α → 1. The beauty of the result is that these different families of three different functional forms are covered through the pathway parameter α. In a physical set up if f (x) in (3) is the stable or limiting form, the Maxwell-Boltzmann approach to thermonuclear functions, then f (x) in (1) and (2) will contain a large variety of unstable or chaotic situations which will all tend to (3) in the limit. Thus we get a clear idea of all the stable and unstable situations around the Maxwell-Boltzmann approach. Thus the current theory is given a mathematical extension and physical interpretations can be found to situations in (1) and (2). Incidently Tsallis statistics is a special case of (1) for γ = 0, a = 1, δ = 1, η = 1. The Beck-Cohen superstatistics, discussed in current statistical mechanics literature is a special case of (2) for a = 1, η = 1, α > 1. The main purpose of the present paper is to investigate in some more detail, mathematically, the extended thermonuclear functions for Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics and in the cut-off case. The extended thermonuclear functions will be evaluated in closed form for all convenient values of the parameter by means of residue calculus. A comparison of the standard thermonuclear functions with the extended thermonuclear functions is also done. The results and derivations in this paper are new and these will be of interest to physicists, mathematicians, probabilists, and statisticians.

  17. Inviscid Analysis of Extended Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kless, James; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Ning, Simeon Andrew; Nemec, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Flying airplanes in extended formations, with separation distances of tens of wingspans, significantly improves safety while maintaining most of the fuel savings achieved in close formations. The present study investigates the impact of roll trim and compressibility at fixed lift coefficient on the benefits of extended formation flight. An Euler solver with adjoint-based mesh refinement combined with a wake propagation model is used to analyze a two-body echelon formation at a separation distance of 30 spans. Two geometries are examined: a simple wing and a wing-body geometry. Energy savings, quantified by both formation drag fraction and span efficiency factor, are investigated at subsonic and transonic speeds for a matrix of vortex locations. The results show that at fixed lift and trimmed for roll, the optimal location of vortex impingement is about 10% inboard of the trailing airplane s wing-tip. Interestingly, early results show the variation in drag fraction reduction is small in the neighborhood of the optimal position. Over 90% of energy benefits can be obtained with a 5% variation in transverse and 10% variation in crossflow directions. Early results suggest control surface deflections required to achieve trim reduce the benefits of formation flight by 3-5% at subsonic speeds. The final paper will include transonic effects and trim on extended formation flight drag benefits.

  18. Extended Empirical Orthogonal Teleconnection (EEOT) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, R.; Wu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Earth System Science (ESS) is particularly concerned with understanding coupled earth systems. With the advent of the Earth Observing System, empirical analysis of coupled systems is now greatly facilitated. However, the conventional means of spectral decomposition through Extended EOF (EEOF) is highly susceptible to the determination of components that mix the character of underlying factors. In this paper we present Extended Empirical Orthogonal Teleconnection (EEOT) analysis as a means to address this issue. EEOT is an extension of Empirical Orthogonal Teleconnection analysis - a regression-based form of spectral decomposition that offers the advantage of a natural and automatic form of rotation. In this extended form where multiple image times series are analyzed simultaneously, EEOT provides an opportunity to search for coupled sources of variability. The technique is illustrated through an analysis of the relationship between anomalies in detrended sea surface temperature, middle tropospheric temperature and lower stratospheric temperature for the 30-year period from 1982-2011. One of the predominant patterns found is a pan-tropical Atmospheric Bridge effect whereby ENSO ocean forcing is propagated throughout the tropical troposphere with feedbacks to the Atlantic and Indian ocean basins.

  19. Formalising Interaction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, Paolo; Guerra, Esther; de Lara, Juan

    The use of patterns as a way to refer to common solutions in the field of interface design is becoming widespread. However, contrary to the situation for software patterns, definitions of interaction patterns do not enjoy a common standard yet. Moreover, patterns are developed for design aspects as diverse as: user experience, layout, action coordination, or specification of entire widgets, reflecting the complexity of the field. As a consequence, research on formalisation of interaction patterns is not developed, and few attempts have been made to extend techniques developed for design pattern formalisation. We show here how an extension to an approach to pattern formalisation recently proposed by the authors can be usefully employed to formalize some classes of interaction patterns, to express relations like subtyping and composition, and to detect conflicts.

  20. Baryon Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sinya

    2010-05-12

    We report on new attempt to investigate baryon interactions in lattice QCD. From the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) wave function, we have successfully extracted the nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials in quenched QCD simulations, which reproduce qualitative features of modern NN potentials. The method has been extended to obtain the tensor potential as well as the central potential and also applied to the hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions, in both quenched and full QCD.

  1. Astrocytic mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization following extended oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Korenić, Andrej; Boltze, Johannes; Deten, Alexander; Peters, Myriam; Andjus, Pavle; Radenović, Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extended OGD exposure. Here, we subjected primary mouse astrocytes to glucose deprivation (GD), OGD and combinations of both conditions varying in duration and sequence. Changes in Δψ(m), visualized by change in the fluorescence of JC-1, were investigated within one hour after reconstitution of oxygen and glucose supply, intended to model in vivo reperfusion. In all experiments, astrocytes showed resilience to extended periods of OGD, which had little effect on Δψ(m) during reperfusion, whereas GD caused a robust Δψ(m) negativation. In case no Δψ(m) negativation was observed after OGD, subsequent chemical oxygen deprivation (OD) induced by sodium azide caused depolarization, which, however, was significantly delayed as compared to normoxic group. When GD preceded OD for 12 h, Δψ(m) hyperpolarization was induced by both GD and subsequent OD, but significant interaction between these conditions was not detected. However, when GD was extended to 48 h preceding OGD, hyperpolarization enhanced during reperfusion. This implicates synergistic effects of both conditions in that sequence. These findings provide novel information regarding the role of the two main substrates of electron transport chain (glucose and oxygen) and their hyperpolarizing effect on Δψ(m) during substrate deprivation, thus shedding new light on mechanisms of astrocyte resilience to prolonged ischemic injury. PMID:24587410

  2. Extended image differencing for change detection in UAV video mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, Günter; Krüger, Wolfgang; Schumann, Arne

    2014-03-01

    Change detection is one of the most important tasks when using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for video reconnaissance and surveillance. We address changes of short time scale, i.e. the observations are taken in time distances from several minutes up to a few hours. Each observation is a short video sequence acquired by the UAV in near-nadir view and the relevant changes are, e.g., recently parked or moved vehicles. In this paper we extend our previous approach of image differencing for single video frames to video mosaics. A precise image-to-image registration combined with a robust matching approach is needed to stitch the video frames to a mosaic. Additionally, this matching algorithm is applied to mosaic pairs in order to align them to a common geometry. The resulting registered video mosaic pairs are the input of the change detection procedure based on extended image differencing. A change mask is generated by an adaptive threshold applied to a linear combination of difference images of intensity and gradient magnitude. The change detection algorithm has to distinguish between relevant and non-relevant changes. Examples for non-relevant changes are stereo disparity at 3D structures of the scene, changed size of shadows, and compression or transmission artifacts. The special effects of video mosaicking such as geometric distortions and artifacts at moving objects have to be considered, too. In our experiments we analyze the influence of these effects on the change detection results by considering several scenes. The results show that for video mosaics this task is more difficult than for single video frames. Therefore, we extended the image registration by estimating an elastic transformation using a thin plate spline approach. The results for mosaics are comparable to that of single video frames and are useful for interactive image exploitation due to a larger scene coverage.

  3. Dark energy and extended dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    The cosmological mean matter (dark and baryonic) density measured in the units of the critical density is Ωm = 0.27. Independently, the local mean density is estimated to be Ωloc = 0.08-0.23 from recent data on galaxy groups at redshifts up to z = 0.01-0.03 (as published by Crook et al. 2007, ApJ, 655, 790 and Makarov & Karachentsev 2011, MNRAS, 412, 2498). If the lower values of Ωloc are reliable, as Makarov & Karachentsev and some other observers prefer, does this mean that the Local Universe of 100-300 Mpc across is an underdensity in the cosmic matter distribution? Or could it nevertheless be representative of the mean cosmic density or even be an overdensity due to the Local Supercluster therein. We focus on dark matter halos of groups of galaxies and check how much dark mass the invisible outer layers of the halos are able to host. The outer layers are usually devoid of bright galaxies and cannot be seen at large distances. The key factor which bounds the size of an isolated halo is the local antigravity produced by the omnipresent background of dark energy. A gravitationally bound halo does not extend beyond the zero-gravity surface where the gravity of matter and the antigravity of dark energy balance, thus defining a natural upper size of a system. We use our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy to estimate the maximal sizes and masses of the extended dark halos. Using data from three recent catalogs of galaxy groups, we show that the calculated mass bounds conform with the assumption that a significant amount of dark matter is located in the invisible outer parts of the extended halos, sufficient to fill the gap between the observed and expected local matter density. Nearby groups of galaxies and the Virgo cluster have dark halos which seem to extend up to their zero-gravity surfaces. If the extended halo is a common feature of gravitationally bound systems on scales of galaxy groups and clusters, the Local Universe could be typical or even

  4. Extended Brueckner-Hartree-Fock Theory with Pionic Correlation and Chiral Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yoko; Toki, Hiroshi

    2011-10-21

    We present a nuclear many-body theory with explicit treatment of strong tensor correlation induced by the pion-exchange interaction. For this purpose, the Hartree-Fock variational model space is extended to include 2-particle 2-hole (2p-2h) states, which are able to handle the tensor correlation with high momentum components originating from pseudo-scalar nature of the pion. We take a variational principle of the total energy, and obtain an extended Brueckner-Hartree-Fock equation with inclusion of the effect of the pion exchange and short-range repulsive interaction. This framework has a similar structure as the Brueckner theory and we call this framework extended Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory.

  5. Interactive Group Modeling: Part 2. An Interactive Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vian, Kathleen Spangler; And Others

    This is the second of four reports of the Interactive Group Modeling project--an undertaking designed to extend group communication through computers to support the more task-focused communication required by those building computer models. The report focuses on the HUB system--a system that facilitates communication in four modes: computer…

  6. Gibberellin Signaling in Plants – The Extended Version

    PubMed Central

    Schwechheimer, Claus

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone gibberellin (GA) controls major aspects of plant growth such as germination, elongation growth, flower development, and flowering time. In recent years, a number of studies have revealed less apparent roles for GA in a surprisingly broad set of developmental as well as cell biological processes. The identification of GA receptor proteins on the one end of the signaling cascade, DELLA proteins as central repressors of the pathway and transcription regulators such as the phytochrome interacting factors and the GATA-type transcription factors GNC and CGA1/GNL on the current other end of the signaling cascade have extended our knowledge about how GA and DELLAs regulate a diverse set of plant responses. PMID:22645560

  7. Time extended production of neutrons during a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Dubrunner, H.; Flueckiger, E. O.; Cooper, J. F.; Kanbach, G.; Reppin, C.; Share, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The most energetic neutral emissions expected from solar flares are gamma rays (10 MeV) from relativistic primary and secondary electron bremsstrahlung,from approx 0 meson decay, and from neutrons ( 50 MeV). Bremsstrahlung photon energies extend to that of the highest energy electron present, but the shape of the pi sup 0 gamma ray spectrum, peaking at 69 MeV, does not depend strongly on the proton spectrum above threshold, which is approx. 292 MeV for meson production on protons. The highest energy neutrons observed indicate directly the highest energy ions which interact at the Sun, and the presence or absence of anergy cutoff in the acceleration process. The high-energy proton spectrum shape can be determined from the neutron spectrum.

  8. Generalized slave-particle method for extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a set of generalized slave-particle models for extended Hubbard models that treat localized electronic correlations using slave-boson decompositions. Our models automatically include two slave-particle methods of recent interest, the slave-rotor and slave-spin methods, as well as a ladder of new intermediate models where one can choose which of the electronic degrees of freedom (e.g., spin or orbital labels) are treated as correlated degrees of freedom by the slave bosons. In addition, our method removes the aberrant behavior of the slave-rotor model, where it systematically overestimates the importance of electronic correlation effects for weak interaction strength, by removing the contribution of unphysical states from the bosonic Hilbert space. The flexibility of our formalism permits one to separate and isolate the effect of correlations on the key degrees of freedom.

  9. Extending Learning Communities: New Technologies, Multiple Literacies, and Culture Blind Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Michelle G.; Dixon, Iris R.; Norton, Nadjwa E. L.; Bentley, Courtney

    2004-01-01

    Technologies such as videoconferencing used for distance education are creating ways for high schools to extend their learning communities to connect youth with professional communities of practice in ways that approximate the face-to-face interactions in traditional classrooms. These technologies are often touted as a way to augment course…

  10. Extended Gravity: State of the Art and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozziello, Salvatore; de Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2015-01-01

    Several issues coming from Cosmology, Astrophysics and Quantum Field Theory suggest to extend the General Relativity in order to overcome several shortcomings emerging at conceptual and experimental level. From one hand, standard Einstein theory fails as soon as one wants to achieve a full quantum description of space-time. In fact, the lack of a final self-consistent Quantum Gravity Theory can be considered one of the starting points for alternative theories of gravity. Specifically, the approach based on corrections and enlargements of the Einstein scheme, have become a sort of paradigm in the study of gravitational interaction. On the other hand, such theories have acquired great interest in cosmology since they "naturally" exhibit inflationary behaviours which can overcome the shortcomings of standard cosmology. From an astrophysical point of view, Extended Theories of Gravity do not require to find candidates for dark energy and dark matter at fundamental level; the approach starts from taking into account only the "observed" ingredients (i.e., gravity, radiation and baryonic matter); it is in full agreement with the early spirit of General Relativity but one has to relax the strong hypothesis that gravity acts at same way at all scales. Several scalar-tensor and f(R)-models agree with observed cosmology, extragalactic and galactic observations and Solar System tests, and give rise to new effects capable of explaining the observed acceleration of cosmic fluid and the missing matter effect of self-gravitating structures. Despite these preliminary results, no final model addressing all the open issues is available at the moment, however the paradigm seems promising in order to achieve a complete and self-consistent theory working coherently at all interaction scales.

  11. Extended space charge in concentration polarization.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2010-09-15

    This paper is concerned with ionic currents from an electrolyte solution into a charge-selective solid, such as, an electrode, an ion-exchange membrane or an array of nano-channels in a micro-fluidic system, and the related viscous fluid flows on the length scales varying from nanometers to millimeters. All systems of this kind have characteristic voltage-current curves with segments in which current nearly saturates at some plateau values due to concentration polarization--formation of solute concentration gradients under the passage of a DC current. A number of seemingly different phenomena occurring in that range, such as anomalous rectification in cathodic copper deposition from a copper sulfate solution, super-fast vortexes near an ion-exchange granule, overlimiting conductance in electrodialysis and the recently observed non-equilibrium electroosmotic instability, result from the formation of an additional extended space charge layer next to that of a classical electrical double layer at the solid/liquid interface. In this paper we review the peculiar features of the non-equilibrium electric double layer and extended space charge and the possibility of their direct probing by harmonic voltage/current perturbations through a linear and non-linear system's response, by the methods of electrical impedance spectroscopy and via the anomalous rectification effect. On the relevant microscopic scales the ionic transport in the direction normal to the interface is dominated by drift-diffusion; hence, the extended space charge related viscous flows remain beyond the scope of this paper. PMID:20619824

  12. Fixed provisional restorations for extended prosthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Amet, E M; Phinney, T L

    1995-01-01

    During extensive and extended prosthodontic treatment, there is need for a durable esthetic fixed provisional restoration that can be easily modified as treatment is completed and that is cost-effective. The needed strength of provisional restorations can be underestimated, and the management of complex treatment is then more difficult and the prosthetic results less predictable. Knowledge of the criteria for treatment restorations and the adequacies of their construction is essential for the prevention of catastrophic failures, patient management problems, and compromised results. Many times in complex prosthodontic treatment, changes are needed in esthetics, the plane of occlusion, incisal edge position, lip support, and type of occlusion, or the soft and/or hard tissues need to be altered or grafted surgically. In addition, after first- and second-stage implant surgery and extractions, there is a need for immediate tooth replacement with extended time between prosthodontic treatments. These prosthodontic changes and challenges can be addressed with reinforced acrylic provisional restorations that are adequately cemented and retained during the interim stage of healing and treatment. In addition, the provisional restoration should serve as a guide for the final restoration while esthetics and phonetics are evaluated for patient acceptance. This article describes the materials used with an indirect technique for fabrication of an extended-treatment acrylic provisional restoration that uses an internal cast metal support system for strength. This support system consists of metal bands or copings with extensions into edentulous areas and that have been opaqued to neutralize the metallic color. A matrix of vinyl polysiloxane made from the diagnostic wax-up simplifies construction of the acrylic, resulting in a strong, ridged, yet esthetic result.

  13. Implementing extended observing at the JCMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Craig; Dempsey, Jessica; Campbell, Ian

    2014-08-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) is the largest single dish submillimetre telescope in the world. Recently the Joint Astronomy Centre (JAC) has learned that the JCMT will no longer receive financial support from its original supporting agencies after September 2014. There is significant pressure to complete some surveys that have been in progress at the JCMT for many years now. With the goal of completing a higher percentage of these surveys it was decided to take advantage of the hours between when the telescope operator leaves the telescope and when the day crew arrives. These hours generally have reasonable seeing and low column integrated water vapor, so they are good for observing. This observing is being performed remotely, in Hilo, without staff at the telescope, by staff members who do not have telescope operation as part of their job descriptions. This paper describes the hardware changes necessary to implement remote observing at JCMT. It also describes the software needed for remote, fail safe, operation of the telescope. The protocols and rules for passing the control of the telescope between the various groups are discussed. Since these Extended Operators are not expert telescope operators, the system was simplified as much as possible, but some training was necessary and proper checklists are essential. Due to the success of the first phase of Extending Observing at the JCMT, the hours when the weather is good and no one is at the telescope, but no day crew is on the way, are also now being utilized. Extended Observing has already yielded a considerable amount of science observing time.

  14. Extending "color constancy" outside the visible region.

    PubMed

    Ratnasingam, Sivalogeswaran; Collins, Steve; Hernández-Andrés, Javier

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the results of an investigation of the possibility of extending "color constancy" to obtain illuminant-invariant reflectance features from data in the near-ultraviolet (UV) and near-infrared (IR) wavelength regions are reported. These features are obtained by extending a blackbody-model-based color constancy algorithm proposed by Ratnasingam and Collins [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A27, 286 (2010)] to these additional wavelengths. Ratnasingam and Collins applied the model-based algorithm in the visible region to extract two illuminant-invariant features related to the wavelength-dependent reflectance of a surface from the responses of four sensors. In this paper, this model-based algorithm is extended to extract two illuminant-invariant reflectance features from the responses of sensors that cover the visible and either the near-UV or near-IR wavelength. In this investigation, test reflectance data sets are generated using the goodness-fitness coefficient (GFC). The appropriateness of the GFC for generating the test data sets is demonstrated by comparing the results obtained with these data with those obtained from data sets generated using the CIELab distance. Results based upon the GFC are then presented that suggest that the model-based algorithm can extract useful features from data from the visible and near-IR wavelengths. Finally, results are presented that show that, although the spectrum of daylight in the near UV is very different from a blackbody spectrum, the algorithm can be modified to extract useful features from visible and near-UV wavelengths. PMID:21478947

  15. Improving epidemic control strategies by extended detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Paweł; Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Kleczkowski, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Majority of epidemics eradication programs work in preventive responsive way. The lack of exact information about epidemiological status of individuals makes responsive actions less efficient. Here, we demonstrate that additional tests can significantly increase the efficiency of "blind" treatment (vaccination or culling). Eradication strategy consisting of "blind" treatment in very limited local neighborhood supplemented by extra tests in a little bit larger neighborhood is able to prevent invasion of even highly infectious diseases and to achieve this at a cost lower than for the "blind" strategy. The effectiveness of the extended strategy depends on such parameters as the test efficiency and test cost.

  16. Extended moment arm anti-spin device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A device which corrects aerodynamic spin is provided in which a collapsible boom extends an aircraft moment arm and an anti-spin parachute force is exerted upon the end of the moment arm to correct intentional or inadvertent aerodynamic spin. This configuration effects spin recovery by means of a parachute whose required diameter decreases as an inverse function of the increasing length of the moment arm. The collapsible boom enables the parachute to avoid the aircraft wake without mechanical assistance, retracts to permit steep takeoff, and permits a parachute to correct spin while minimizing associated aerodynamic, structural and in-flight complications.

  17. Extending quantum coherence of superconducting flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Kamal, Archana; Orlando, Terry; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William; Engineering Quantum Systems, MIT Team

    We present the design of a superconducting qubit with multiple Josephson junctions. The design starts with a capacitively shunted flux qubit, and it incorporates particular junction parameter choices for the purpose of simultaneously optimizing over transition frequency, anharmonicity, flux- and charge-noise sensitivity around flux degeneracy. By studying the scaling properties with design parameters, we identify directions to extend coherence substantially. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  18. The extended SMAS approach to neck rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Stephen W; Waters, Heather H

    2014-05-01

    Jowling, submental lipoptosis, and platysmal banding can affect self-image and reduce quality of life, leading one to seek facial and neck rejuvenation. With realistic expectations, a facelift can provide the desired improvement in appearance and sense of well-being. Before any intervention, a detailed history, focused examination, communication of expected outcomes with the assistance of preoperative digital imaging, and discussion of perioperative instructions are of utmost importance. Although many techniques exist, the modified deep plane extended superficial muscular aponeurotic system rhytidectomy with submentoplasty reliably delivers a significant improvement with lasting results. PMID:24745387

  19. Praxair extending hydrogen pipeline in Southeast Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-24

    This paper reports that Praxair Inc., an independent corporation created by the spinoff of Union Carbide Corp.'s Linde division, is extending its high purity hydrogen pipeline system from Channelview, Tex., to Port Arthur, Tex. The 70 mile, 10 in. extension begins at a new pressure swing adsorption (PSA) purification unit next to Lyondell Petrochemical Co.'s Channelview plant. The PSA unit will upgrade hydrogen offgas from Lyondell's methanol plant to 99.99% purity hydrogen. The new line, advancing at a rate of about 1 mile/day, will reach its first customer, Star Enterprise's 250,000 b/d Port Arthur refinery, in September.

  20. Extended Scaling Relations for Planar Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benfatto, G.; Falco, P.; Mastropietro, V.

    2009-12-01

    It is widely believed that the critical properties of several planar lattice systems, like the Eight Vertex or the Ashkin-Teller models, are well described by an effective continuum fermionic theory obtained as a formal scaling limit. On the basis of this assumption several extended scaling relations among their indices were conjectured. We prove the validity of some of them, among which the ones predicted by Kadanoff (Phys Rev Lett 39:903-905, 1977) and by Luther and Peschel (Phys Rev B 12:3908-3917, 1975).

  1. Extending the applicability of multigrid methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brannick, J; Brezina, M; Falgout, R; Manteuffel, T; McCormick, S; Ruge, J; Sheehan, B; Xu, J; Zikatanov, L

    2006-09-25

    Multigrid methods are ideal for solving the increasingly large-scale problems that arise in numerical simulations of physical phenomena because of their potential for computational costs and memory requirements that scale linearly with the degrees of freedom. Unfortunately, they have been historically limited by their applicability to elliptic-type problems and the need for special handling in their implementation. In this paper, we present an overview of several recent theoretical and algorithmic advances made by the TOPS multigrid partners and their collaborators in extending applicability of multigrid methods. Specific examples that are presented include quantum chromodynamics, radiation transport, and electromagnetics.

  2. Three-Dimensional Extended Bargmann Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Rosseel, Jan

    2016-06-01

    We show that three-dimensional general relativity, augmented with two vector fields, allows for a nonrelativistic limit, different from the standard limit leading to Newtonian gravity, that results in a well-defined action which is of the Chern-Simons type. We show that this three-dimensional "extended Bargmann gravity," after coupling to matter, leads to equations of motion allowing a wider class of background geometries than the ones that one encounters in Newtonian gravity. We give the supersymmetric generalization of these results and point out an important application in the context of calculating partition functions of nonrelativistic field theories using localization techniques.

  3. Extended ultrahigh-Q-cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhenda; Liang, Wei; Savchenkov, Anatoliy A; Lim, Jinkang; Burkhart, Jan; McDonald, Mickey; Zelevinsky, Tanya; Ilchenko, Vladimir S; Matsko, Andrey B; Maleki, Lute; Wong, Chee Wei

    2015-06-01

    We report on a study of a 698 nm extended cavity semiconductor laser with intracavity narrowband optical feedback from a whispering gallery mode resonator. This laser comprises an ultrahigh-Q (>10(10)) resonator supporting stimulated Rayleigh scattering, a diffraction grating wavelength preselector, and a reflective semiconductor amplifier. Single longitudinal mode lasing is characterized with sub-kilohertz linewidth and a 9 nm coarse tuning range. The laser has a potential application for integration with the 1S0-3P0 strontium transition to create compact precision atomic clocks. PMID:26030566

  4. Three-Dimensional Extended Bargmann Supergravity.

    PubMed

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Rosseel, Jan

    2016-06-24

    We show that three-dimensional general relativity, augmented with two vector fields, allows for a nonrelativistic limit, different from the standard limit leading to Newtonian gravity, that results in a well-defined action which is of the Chern-Simons type. We show that this three-dimensional "extended Bargmann gravity," after coupling to matter, leads to equations of motion allowing a wider class of background geometries than the ones that one encounters in Newtonian gravity. We give the supersymmetric generalization of these results and point out an important application in the context of calculating partition functions of nonrelativistic field theories using localization techniques. PMID:27391712

  5. Topologically massive gravity with extended supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauf, Frederik; Sachs, Ivo

    2016-09-01

    We describe the construction of 2 +1 -dimensional toplogically massive anti-de Sitter gravity with N -extended supersymmetry in superspace by means of introducing a compensating hypermultiplet for the super-Weyl invariance. For N ≥3 , the scalar multiplet must be on shell and the potential for the scalar compensator is completely determined by the geometry. As a consequence, the resulting massive theory has no free parameter for N ≥4 . For N =4 , we show that this leads to topologically massive gravity at the chiral point and construct the corresponding off-shell component action.

  6. Proving refinement transformations using extended denotational semantics

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, V.L.; Boyle, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    TAMPR is a fully automatic transformation system based on syntactic rewrites. Our approach in a correctness proof is to map the transformation into an axiomatized mathematical domain where formal (and automated) reasoning can be performed. This mapping is accomplished via an extended denotational semantic paradigm. In this approach, the abstract notion of a program state is distributed between an environment function and a store function. Such a distribution introduces properties that go beyond the abstract state that is being modeled. The reasoning framework needs to be aware of these properties in order to successfully complete a correctness proof. This paper discusses some of our experiences in proving the correctness of TAMPR transformations.

  7. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  8. Thermal stabilized vegetable oil extended diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, W.M.; Lachowicz, D.R.

    1986-03-11

    A middle distillate fuel composition is described comprising: (a) a major portion of a middle distillate containing a hydrocarbon boiling in the middle distillate boiling range; (b) an extending portion of a vegetable oil; and (c) an effective thermal-stabilizing amount of a nitrogen-containing polymer prepared by reacting an ethylene/propylene copolymer with maleic anhydride, thereby forming a succinic anhydride, reacting the succinic anhydride, with an alcohol, thereby forming a succinate ester while leaving a portion of the succinic anhydride unreacted, and, reacting the succinate ester and the unreacted succinic anhydride with dimethylaminopropylamine, thereby forming a nitrogen-containing polymer.

  9. Simulating futures in extended common LISP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1988-01-01

    Stack-groups comprise the mechanism underlying implementation of multiprocessing in Extended Common LISP, i.e., running multiple quasi-simultaneous processes within a single LISP address space. On the other hand, the future construct of MULTILISP, an extension of the LISP dialect scheme, deals with parallel execution. The source of concurrency that future exploits is the overlap between computation of a value and use of the value. Described is a simulation of the future construct by an interpreter utilizing stack-group extensions to common LISP.

  10. Levomilnacipran extended release: first global approval.

    PubMed

    Hair, Philip; Cameron, Fiona; Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2013-09-01

    Pierre Fabre and Forest Laboratories are developing levomilnacipran extended release (ER) [FETZIMA™], an enantiomer of milnacipran, for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). In addition, Pierre Fabre (the originator of the compound) is developing the drug to improve recovery in patients with ischaemic stroke. Levomilnacipran ER exerts its effects by selectively inhibiting the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin (two neurotransmitters known to play an essential role in regulating mood) without directly affecting the uptake of dopamine or other neurotransmitters. The agent is being developed as an extended-release capsule formulation for once-daily dosing. Levomilnacipran ER is approved and launched in the US for the treatment of MDD; phase III development in this indication was completed in the US and Canada. In Europe, a phase II trial for MDD was completed, and development is in progress for improving functional recovery of patients with ischaemic stroke. A completed phase II trial in the US investigated levomilnacipran ER for the treatment of fatigue associated with MDD. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of levomilnacipran ER leading to the first approval for major depressive disorder.

  11. Extended arrays for nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2016-01-01

    This study implements nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) with multifrequency intermodulation and phase encoding. An imaging grid was constructed of cylindrical wells of 3.5-mm diameter and 4.2-mm height on a hexagonal two-dimensional 61-voxel pattern with 5-mm spacing. Patterns of sample wells were filled with 40-μl volumes of Fe3O4 starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm and a concentration of 25 mg/ml. The imaging hardware was configured with three excitation coils and three detection coils in anticipation that a larger imaging system will have arrays of excitation and detection coils. Hexagonal and bar patterns of mNP were successfully imaged (R2 > 0.9) at several orientations. This SMI demonstration extends our prior work to feature a larger coil array, enlarged field-of-view, effective phase encoding scheme, reduced mNP sample size, and more complex imaging patterns to test the feasibility of extending the method beyond the pilot scale. The results presented in this study show that nonlinear SMI holds promise for further development into a practical imaging system for medical applications. PMID:26124044

  12. Choice mechanisms for past, temporally extended outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Martin D; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-07-01

    Accurate retrospection is critical in many decision scenarios ranging from investment banking to hedonic psychology. A notoriously difficult case is to integrate previously perceived values over the duration of an experience. Failure in retrospective evaluation leads to suboptimal outcome when previous experiences are under consideration for revisit. A biologically plausible mechanism underlying evaluation of temporally extended outcomes is leaky integration of evidence. The leaky integrator favours positive temporal contrasts, in turn leading to undue emphasis on recency. To investigate choice mechanisms underlying suboptimal outcome based on retrospective evaluation, we used computational and behavioural techniques to model choice between perceived extended outcomes with different temporal profiles. Second-price auctions served to establish the perceived values of virtual coins offered sequentially to humans in a rapid monetary gambling task. Results show that lesser-valued options involving successive growth were systematically preferred to better options with declining temporal profiles. The disadvantageous inclination towards persistent growth was mitigated in some individuals in whom a longer time constant of the leaky integrator resulted in fewer violations of dominance. These results demonstrate how focusing on immediate gains is less beneficial than considering longer perspectives. PMID:26063841

  13. Spatially Extended Memory Models of Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jeffrey; Riccio, Mark; Hua, Fei; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gilmour, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Beat-to-beat alternation of cardiac electrical properties (alternans) commonly occurs during rapid periodic pacing. Although alternans is generally associated with a resititution curve with slope >=1, recent studies by Gauthier and co-workers reported the absence of alternans in frog heart tissue with a restitution curve of slope >=1. These experimental findings were understood in terms of a memory model in which the duration D of an action potential depends on the preceding rest interval I as well as a memory variable M that accumulates during D and dissipates during I. We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a spatially extended 1-d fiber using an ionic model that exhibits memory effects. We find that while a single cell can have a restitution slope >=1 and not show alternans (because of memory), the spatially extended system exhibits alternans. To understand the dynamical mechanism of this behavior, we study a coupled maps memory model both numerically and analytically. These results illustrate that spatial effects and memory effects can play a significant role in determining the dynamics of wave propagation in cardiac tissue.

  14. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; Li, Jack; Reed, Sean A; Xiao, Han; Young, Travis S; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-05-24

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. Here we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a library of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ∼9 °C was identified. This result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes.

  15. NASA's extended duration orbiter medical program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, Sam Lee; Sawin, Charles F.

    1992-01-01

    The physiological issues involved in safely extending Shuttle flights from 10 to 16 days have been viewed by some as academic. After all, they reasoned, humans already have lived and worked in space for periods exceeding even 28 days in the United States Skylab Program and onboard the Russian space stations. The difference in the Shuttle program is in the physical position of the astronauts as they reenter the Earth's atmosphere. Crewmembers in the earlier Apollo, Skylab, and Russian programs were returned to Earth in the supine position. Space Shuttle crewmembers, in contrast, are seated upright during reentry and landing; reexperiencing the Earth's g forces in this position has far more pronounced effects on the crewmember's physiological functions. The goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO) Medical Project (EDOMP) has been to ensure that crewmembers maintain physiological reserves sufficient to perform entry, landing, and egress safely. Early in the Shuttle Program, it became clear that physiological deconditioning during space flight could produce significant symptoms upon return to Earth. The signs and symptoms observed during the entry, landing, and egress after Shuttle missions have included very high heart rates and low blood pressures upon standing. Dizziness, 'graying out,' and fainting have occurred on ambulation or shortly thereafter. Other symptoms at landing have included headache, light-headedness, nausea and vomitting, leg cramping, inability to stand for several minutes after wheel-stop, and unsteadiness of gait.

  16. Thermoplastic Polyurethanes with Isosorbide Chain Extender

    SciTech Connect

    Javni, Ivan; Bilic, Olivera; Bilic, Nikola; Petrovic, Zoran; Eastwood, Eric; Zhang, Fan; Ilavsky, Jan

    2015-12-15

    Isosorbide, a renewable diol derived from starch, was used alone or in combination with butane diol (BD) as the chain extender in two series of thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) with 50 and 70% polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG) soft segment concentration (SSC), respectively. In the synthesized TPUs, the hard segment composition was systematically varied in both series following BD/isosorbide molar ratios of 100 : 0; 75 : 25; 50 : 50; 25 : 75, and 0 : 100 to examine in detail the effect of chain extenders on properties of segmented polyurethane elastomers with different morphologies. We found that polyurethanes with 50% SSC were hard elastomers with Shore D hardness of around 50, which is consistent with assumed co-continuous morphology. Polymers with 70% SSC displayed lower Shore A hardness of 74–79 (Shore D around 25) as a result of globular hard domains dispersed in the soft matrix. Insertion of isosorbide increased rigidity, melting point and glass transition temperature of hard segments and tensile strength of elastomers with 50% SSC. These effects were weaker or non-existent in 70% SSC series due to the short hard segments and low content of isosorbide. We also found that the thermal stability was lowered by increasing isosorbide content in both series.

  17. An extended synthesis for evolutionary biology.

    PubMed

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2009-06-01

    Evolutionary theory is undergoing an intense period of discussion and reevaluation. This, contrary to the misleading claims of creationists and other pseudoscientists, is no harbinger of a crisis but rather the opposite: the field is expanding dramatically in terms of both empirical discoveries and new ideas. In this essay I briefly trace the conceptual history of evolutionary theory from Darwinism to neo-Darwinism, and from the Modern Synthesis to what I refer to as the Extended Synthesis, a more inclusive conceptual framework containing among others evo-devo, an expanded theory of heredity, elements of complexity theory, ideas about evolvability, and a reevaluation of levels of selection. I argue that evolutionary biology has never seen a paradigm shift, in the philosophical sense of the term, except when it moved from natural theology to empirical science in the middle of the 19th century. The Extended Synthesis, accordingly, is an expansion of the Modern Synthesis of the 1930s and 1940s, and one that--like its predecessor--will probably take decades to complete.

  18. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view of the entire sky reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond our Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is constructed from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's Extended Source Catalog; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The image is a representation of the relative brightnesses of these million-plus galaxies, all observed at a wavelength of 2.2 microns.

    The brightest and nearest galaxies are represented in blue, and the faintest, most distant ones are in red. This color scheme gives insights into the three dimensional large-scale structure of the nearby universe with the brightest, closest clusters and superclusters showing up as the blue and bluish-white features. The dark band in this image shows the area of the sky where our Milky Way galaxy blocks our view of distant objects, which, in this projection, lies predominantly along the edges of the image.

  19. Extended kinetic theory applied to snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauter, Matthias; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Fellin, Wolfgang; Kofler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In this work we apply the extended kinetic theory, a three-dimensional rheological model for rapid granular flows, to the two-dimensional, depth-averaged shallow water framework, used in snow avalanche simulations. Usually, empirical relations are used to determine the basal friction, which represents the material behavior in the avalanche. Here we present an energy equivalent basal friction relation which accounts for energy dissipating processes in the avalanche body as predicted by the extended kinetic theory. The obtained relation is compared to traditional basal friction relations, e.g. the Voellmy model by conducting numerical simulations with both approaches. As reference, field measurements of runout, affected area and velocity are compared to the simulation results. Two avalanche events, that occurred at the Vallée de la Sionne and Ryggfonn test sites, are evaluated with this method. It is shown that the kinetic theory delivers a physically based explanation for the structure of phenomenological friction relations. However, the new form of the frictional terms explicitly takes the flow depth into account. As consequence, improvements in finding unified parameter sets for various observation variables and events of different sizes could be achieved.

  20. Agents in grid extended to clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasielewska, K.; Ganzha, M.; Paprzycki, M.; Bǎdicǎ, C.; Ivanovic, M.; Lirkov, I.; Fidanova, S.

    2016-10-01

    The presented work is an attempt to extend considerations from the Agents in Grid (AiG) project to the Clouds. The AiG project is aimed at the development of an agent-semantic infrastructure for efficient resource management in the grid. Decision support within the AIG system helps the user, without in-depth knowledge, to choose optimal algorithm and/or resource to solve a problem from a given domain, and later to choose the best contract defining terms of collaboration with the provider of a resource used to solve the problem. Cloud computing refers to an architecture, in which groups of remote servers are networked, to allow online access to computer services or resources. The general vision is the same as in the case of computational grids, i.e., to reduce cost of computing, as well as to increase flexibility and reliability of the infrastructure. However, there are also important differences. It is relatively easy to notice that solutions considered in the context of the AiG system can be easily extended to computational clouds that evolved from computational grids. As it was shown in the case of grids, integrating software agents, semantics and cloud computing could enable highly efficient, intelligent systems, making clouds even more flexible, autonomic and usable.

  1. Levomilnacipran extended release: first global approval.

    PubMed

    Hair, Philip; Cameron, Fiona; Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2013-09-01

    Pierre Fabre and Forest Laboratories are developing levomilnacipran extended release (ER) [FETZIMA™], an enantiomer of milnacipran, for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). In addition, Pierre Fabre (the originator of the compound) is developing the drug to improve recovery in patients with ischaemic stroke. Levomilnacipran ER exerts its effects by selectively inhibiting the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin (two neurotransmitters known to play an essential role in regulating mood) without directly affecting the uptake of dopamine or other neurotransmitters. The agent is being developed as an extended-release capsule formulation for once-daily dosing. Levomilnacipran ER is approved and launched in the US for the treatment of MDD; phase III development in this indication was completed in the US and Canada. In Europe, a phase II trial for MDD was completed, and development is in progress for improving functional recovery of patients with ischaemic stroke. A completed phase II trial in the US investigated levomilnacipran ER for the treatment of fatigue associated with MDD. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of levomilnacipran ER leading to the first approval for major depressive disorder. PMID:24000002

  2. Choice mechanisms for past, temporally extended outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Martin D.; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Accurate retrospection is critical in many decision scenarios ranging from investment banking to hedonic psychology. A notoriously difficult case is to integrate previously perceived values over the duration of an experience. Failure in retrospective evaluation leads to suboptimal outcome when previous experiences are under consideration for revisit. A biologically plausible mechanism underlying evaluation of temporally extended outcomes is leaky integration of evidence. The leaky integrator favours positive temporal contrasts, in turn leading to undue emphasis on recency. To investigate choice mechanisms underlying suboptimal outcome based on retrospective evaluation, we used computational and behavioural techniques to model choice between perceived extended outcomes with different temporal profiles. Second-price auctions served to establish the perceived values of virtual coins offered sequentially to humans in a rapid monetary gambling task. Results show that lesser-valued options involving successive growth were systematically preferred to better options with declining temporal profiles. The disadvantageous inclination towards persistent growth was mitigated in some individuals in whom a longer time constant of the leaky integrator resulted in fewer violations of dominance. These results demonstrate how focusing on immediate gains is less beneficial than considering longer perspectives. PMID:26063841

  3. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the extended forward sensitivity analysis as a method to help uncertainty qualification. By including time step and potentially spatial step as special sensitivity parameters, the forward sensitivity method is extended as one method to quantify numerical errors. Note that by integrating local truncation errors over the whole system through the forward sensitivity analysis process, the generated time step and spatial step sensitivity information reflect global numerical errors. The discretization errors can be systematically compared against uncertainties due to other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty qualification. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other interested physical parameters, the simulation is allowed to run at optimized time and space steps without affecting the confidence of the physical parameter sensitivity results. The time and space steps forward sensitivity analysis method can also replace the traditional time step and grid convergence study with much less computational cost. Two well-defined benchmark problems with manufactured solutions are utilized to demonstrate the method.

  4. Choice mechanisms for past, temporally extended outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Martin D; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-07-01

    Accurate retrospection is critical in many decision scenarios ranging from investment banking to hedonic psychology. A notoriously difficult case is to integrate previously perceived values over the duration of an experience. Failure in retrospective evaluation leads to suboptimal outcome when previous experiences are under consideration for revisit. A biologically plausible mechanism underlying evaluation of temporally extended outcomes is leaky integration of evidence. The leaky integrator favours positive temporal contrasts, in turn leading to undue emphasis on recency. To investigate choice mechanisms underlying suboptimal outcome based on retrospective evaluation, we used computational and behavioural techniques to model choice between perceived extended outcomes with different temporal profiles. Second-price auctions served to establish the perceived values of virtual coins offered sequentially to humans in a rapid monetary gambling task. Results show that lesser-valued options involving successive growth were systematically preferred to better options with declining temporal profiles. The disadvantageous inclination towards persistent growth was mitigated in some individuals in whom a longer time constant of the leaky integrator resulted in fewer violations of dominance. These results demonstrate how focusing on immediate gains is less beneficial than considering longer perspectives.

  5. Extended arrays for nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Bradley W; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G

    2015-10-01

    This study implements nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) with multifrequency intermodulation and phase encoding. An imaging grid was constructed of cylindrical wells of 3.5-mm diameter and 4.2-mm height on a hexagonal two-dimensional 61-voxel pattern with 5-mm spacing. Patterns of sample wells were filled with 40-μl volumes of Fe3O4 starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm and a concentration of 25 mg/ml. The imaging hardware was configured with three excitation coils and three detection coils in anticipation that a larger imaging system will have arrays of excitation and detection coils. Hexagonal and bar patterns of mNP were successfully imaged (R2>0.9) at several orientations. This SMI demonstration extends our prior work to feature a larger coil array, enlarged field-of-view, effective phase encoding scheme, reduced mNP sample size, and more complex imaging patterns to test the feasibility of extending the method beyond the pilot scale. The results presented in this study show that nonlinear SMI holds promise for further development into a practical imaging system for medical applications. PMID:26124044

  6. Fundamentals of Physics, Extended 7th Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    No other book on the market today can match the 30-year success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! Fundamentals of Physics, 7th Edition and the Extended Version, 7th Edition offer a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, helping readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving, in a breezy, easy-to-understand style. A unique combination of authoritative content and stimulating applications. * Numerous improvements in the text, based on feedback from the many users of the sixth edition (both instructors and students) * Several thousand end-of-chapter problems have been rewritten to streamline both the presentations and answers * 'Chapter Puzzlers' open each chapter with an intriguing application or question that is explained or answered in the chapter * Problem-solving tactics are provided to help beginning Physics students solve problems and avoid common error * The first section in every chapter introduces the subject of the chapter by asking and answering, "What is Physics?" as the question pertains to the chapter * Numerous supplements available to aid teachers and students The extended edition provides coverage of developments in Physics in the last 100 years, including: Einstein and Relativity, Bohr and others and Quantum Theory, and the more recent theoretical developments like String Theory.

  7. Extended Glauber Model of Antiproton-Nucleus Annihilation for All Energies and Mass Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Previous analytical formulas in the Glauber model for high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions developed by Wong are utilized and extended to study Antiproton-nucleus annihilations for both high and low energies, after taking into account the effects of Coulomb and nuclear interactions, and the change of the antiproton momentum inside a nucleus. The extended analytical formulas capture the main features of the experimental antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross sections for all energies and mass numbers. At high antiproton energies, they exhibit the granular property for the lightest nuclei and the black-disk limit for the heavy nuclei. At low antiproton energies, they display the effect of the antiproton momentum increase due to the nuclear interaction for the light nuclei, and the effect of the magnification due to the attractive Coulomb interaction for the heavy nuclei.

  8. Mapping Transcription Factors on Extended DNA: A Single Molecule Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenstein, Yuval; Gassman, Natalie; Weiss, Shimon

    The ability to determine the precise loci and distribution of nucleic acid binding proteins is instrumental to our detailed understanding of cellular processes such as transcription, replication, and chromatin reorganization. Traditional molecular biology approaches and above all Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) based methods have provided a wealth of information regarding protein-DNA interactions. Nevertheless, existing techniques can only provide average properties of these interactions, since they are based on the accumulation of data from numerous protein-DNA complexes analyzed at the ensemble level. We propose a single molecule approach for direct visualization of DNA binding proteins bound specifically to their recognition sites along a long stretch of DNA such as genomic DNA. Fluorescent Quantum dots are used to tag proteins bound to DNA, and the complex is deposited on a glass substrate by extending the DNA to a linear form. The sample is then imaged optically to determine the precise location of the protein binding site. The method is demonstrated by detecting individual, Quantum dot tagged T7-RNA polymerase enzymes on the bacteriophage T7 genomic DNA and assessing the relative occupancy of the different promoters.

  9. Intrinsic chemical sensor fibers for extended-length chlorine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Steven R.; Ruiz, David; Huang, Weijie; Cohen, Leonard G.; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2004-12-01

    A fiber optic chlorine sensor having its entire length as the sensing element is reported here. The fiber consists of a silica core and a chlorine-sensitive cladding. Upon exposure to chlorine, the cladding very rapidly changes color resulting in attenuation of the light throughput of the fiber. A two-meter portion of sensor fiber responds to 10-ppm chlorine in milliseconds and to 1 ppm in several seconds. Furthermore, response to 100 ppb chlorine is realized in minutes. The high sensitivity suggests that the propagating modes of the light interact strongly with the cladding, and that these interactions are massively increased (Beers Law) due to the extended sensor length. The sensitivity to 1 ppm chlorine gas as a function of the length of fiber exposed between 0.3-30 meters is presented. The sensitivity to concentrations of chlorine from 0.1ppm-10ppm has been determined for a fixed 2 meter length of fiber. Pre-exposure fiber attenuation measures 70 dB/km (@ 633 nm) making it possible to detect chlorine on a continuous length of fiber on the scale of one hundred meters or more using standard detection methods (e.g. laser and photodetectors). This will replace the need of having a collection of point-detectors to cover large areas.

  10. Ongoing Mars Missions: Extended Mission Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Richard; Diniega, Serina; Crisp, Joy; Fraeman, Abigail; Golombek, Matt; Jakosky, Bruce; Plaut, Jeff; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie; Thompson, Thomas W.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.

    2016-10-01

    Many key scientific discoveries in planetary science have been made during extended missions. This is certainly true for the Mars missions both in orbit and on the planet's surface. Every two years, ongoing NASA planetary missions propose investigations for the next two years. This year, as part of the 2016 Planetary Sciences Division (PSD) Mission Senior Review, the Mars Odyssey (ODY) orbiter project submitted a proposal for its 7th extended mission, the Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B) Opportunity submitted for its 10th, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) for its 4th, and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MVN) orbiter for their 2nd extended missions, respectively. Continued US participation in the ongoing Mars Express Mission (MEX) was also proposed. These missions arrived at Mars in 2001, 2004, 2006, 2012, 2014, and 2003, respectively. Highlights of proposed activities include systematic observations of the surface and atmosphere in twilight (early morning and late evening), building on a 13-year record of global mapping (ODY); exploration of a crater rim gully and interior of Endeavour Crater, while continuing to test what can and cannot be seen from orbit (MER-B); refocused observations of ancient aqueous deposits and polar cap interiors, while adding a 6th Mars year of change detection in the atmosphere and the surface (MRO); exploration and sampling by a rover of mineralogically diverse strata of Mt. Sharp and of atmospheric methane in Gale Crater (MSL); and further characterization of atmospheric escape under different solar conditions (MVN). As proposed, these activities follow up on previous discoveries (e.g., recurring slope lineae, habitable environments), while expanding spatial and temporal coverage to guide new detailed observations. An independent review panel evaluated these proposals, met with project representatives in May, and made recommendations to NASA in June 2016. In this

  11. Modeling extended fluid objects in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Conrad

    The purpose of this dissertation is to introduce and explore the notion of modeling extended fluid objects in numerical general relativity. These extended fluid objects, called Fat Particles, are proxies for compact hydrodynamic objects. Unlike full hydrodynamic models, we make the approximation that the details of the matter distribution are riot as important as the gross motion of the Fat Particles center of mass and its contribution to the gravitational field. Thus we provide a semi-analytic model of matter for numerical simulations of Einstein's equations, which may help in modeling gravitational radiation from candidate sources. Our approach to carrying out these investigations is to begin with a continuum variational principle, which yields the desired hydrodynamic and gravitational equations for ideal fluids. Following our analysis of the related numerical technique, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), we apply a set of discretization and smoothing rules to obtain a discrete action. Subsequent variations yield the Fat Particle equations. Our analysis of a classical ideal fluid demonstrated that a Newtonian Fat Particle is capable of remaining at rest while generating its own gravitational field. We then developed analogous principles for describing relativistic ideal fluids in both covariant and ADM 3+1 forms. Using these principles, we developed analytic and numerical results from relativistic Fat Particle theory. We began with the Subscribe Only model, in which a Fat Particle of negligible mass moves in a fixed background metric. Corrections to its motion due to the extended nature of the Fat Particle, are obtained by summing metric contributions over its volume. We find a universal scaling law that describes the phase shift, relative to a test particle, that is independent of its size, shape, and distribution. We then show that finite-size effects eventually dominate radiation damping effects in describing the motion of a white dwarf around a more

  12. Cynophobic Fear Adaptively Extends Peri-Personal Space

    PubMed Central

    Taffou, Marine; Viaud-Delmon, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Peri-personal space (PPS) is defined as the space immediately surrounding our bodies, which is critical in the adaptation of our social behavior. As a space of interaction with the external world, PPS is involved in the control of motor action as well as in the protection of the body. The boundaries of this PPS are known to be flexible but so far, little is known about how PPS boundaries are influenced by unreasonable fear. We hypothesized that unreasonable fear extends the neural representation of the multisensory space immediately surrounding the body in the presence of a feared object, with the aim of expanding the space of protection around the body. To test this hypothesis, we explored the impact of unreasonable fear on the size of PPS in two groups of non-clinical participants: dog-fearful and non-fearful participants. The sensitivity to cynophobia was assessed with a questionnaire. We measured participants’ PPS extent in the presence of threatening (dog growling) and non-threatening (sheep bleating) auditory stimuli. The sound stimuli were processed through binaural rendering so that the virtual sound sources were looming toward participants from their rear hemi-field. We found that, when in the presence of the auditory dog stimulus, the PPS of dog-fearful participants is larger than that of non-fearful participants. Our results demonstrate that PPS size is adaptively modulated by cynophobia and suggest that anxiety tailors PPS boundaries when exposed to fear-relevant features. Anxiety, with the exception of social phobia, has rarely been studied as a disorder of social interaction. These findings could help develop new treatment strategies for anxious disorders by involving the link between space and interpersonal interaction in the approach of the disorder. PMID:25232342

  13. Relic gravitational waves and extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.; Wilczek, Frank

    1990-01-01

    In extended inflation, a new version of inflation where the transition from the false-vacuum phase to a radiation-dominated Universe is accomplished by bubble nucleation and percolation, bubble collisions supply a potent-and potentially detectable-source of gravitational waves. The present energy density in relic gravity waves from bubble collisions is expected to be about 10(exp -5) of closure density-many orders of magnitude greater than that of the gravity waves produced by quantum fluctuations. Their characteristic wavelength depends upon the reheating temperature T(sub RH): lambda is approximately 10(exp 4) cm (10(exp 14) GeV/T(sub RH)). If large numbers of black holes are produced, a not implausible outcome, they will evaporate producing comparable amounts of shorter wavelength waves, lambda is approximately 10(exp -6) cm (T(sub RH)/10(exp 14) GeV).

  14. Extended performance technology study 30-cm thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    The extended performance technology study was an investigation of advanced discharge chambers and thruster components that were designed to operate under conditions which result in an increase in the thrust and thrust to power ratio of the state of the art J-series thruster. The high level of performance was achieved by a discharge chamber that employs a ring cusp magnetic confinement arrangement and a three grid ion extraction assembly. It is shown that the ring cusp magnetic field geometry confines the plasma to the volume immediately adjacent to the ion extraction assembly. A high emission current hollow cathode that demonstrated operation at an emission current as high as J sub E = 40 A, and measurements which show the breakdown voltage of individual sections of the J-series propellant flow electrical isolator is about 340 V per section are investigated.

  15. Affordances and the musically extended mind

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Joel

    2014-01-01

    I defend a model of the musically extended mind. I consider how acts of “musicking” grant access to novel emotional experiences otherwise inaccessible. First, I discuss the idea of “musical affordances” and specify both what musical affordances are and how they invite different forms of entrainment. Next, I argue that musical affordances – via soliciting different forms of entrainment – enhance the functionality of various endogenous, emotion-granting regulative processes, drawing novel experiences out of us with an expanded complexity and phenomenal character. I argue that music therefore ought to be thought of as part of the vehicle needed to realize these emotional experiences. I appeal to different sources of empirical work to develop this idea. PMID:24432008

  16. Extended magnetic reconnection across the dayside magnetopause.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, M W; Zhang, Q-H; Bogdanova, Y V; Lockwood, M; Pu, Z; Hasegawa, H; Wang, J; Taylor, M G G T; Berchem, J; Lavraud, B; Eastwood, J; Volwerk, M; Shen, C; Shi, J-K; Constantinescu, D; Frey, H; Fazakerley, A N; Sibeck, D; Escoubet, P; Wild, J A; Liu, Z-X

    2011-07-01

    The extent of where magnetic reconnection (MR), the dominant process responsible for energy and plasma transport into the magnetosphere, operates across Earth's dayside magnetopause has previously been only indirectly shown by observations. We report the first direct evidence of X-line structure resulting from the operation of MR at each of two widely separated locations along the tilted, subsolar line of maximum current on Earth's magnetopause, confirming the operation of MR at two or more sites across the extended region where MR is expected to occur. The evidence results from in-situ observations of the associated ion and electron plasma distributions, present within each magnetic X-line structure, taken by two spacecraft passing through the active MR regions simultaneously. PMID:21797615

  17. Do we need an extended evolutionary synthesis?

    PubMed

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2007-12-01

    The Modern Synthesis (MS) is the current paradigm in evolutionary biology. It was actually built by expanding on the conceptual foundations laid out by its predecessors, Darwinism and neo-Darwinism. For sometime now there has been talk of a new Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES), and this article begins to outline why we may need such an extension, and how it may come about. As philosopher Karl Popper has noticed, the current evolutionary theory is a theory of genes, and we still lack a theory of forms. The field began, in fact, as a theory of forms in Darwin's days, and the major goal that an EES will aim for is a unification of our theories of genes and of forms. This may be achieved through an organic grafting of novel concepts onto the foundational structure of the MS, particularly evolvability, phenotypic plasticity, epigenetic inheritance, complexity theory, and the theory of evolution in highly dimensional adaptive landscapes. PMID:17924956

  18. The DS1 hyper-extended mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J.; Brinza, D.; Polk, J.; Henry, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Primary Mission for Deep Space (DS1) was to demonstrate 12 new technologies one of which was the Ion Propulsion System (IPS). After successfully completing its primary mission, DS1 was given a new mission. The objective of this Extended Mission was to fly by the Comet Borrelly. After the successful Borrelly encounter, the ion thruster on DS1 had to be operated for more than 14,000 hours in space. This provided a unique opportunity to investigate the condition of the thruster after long-term operation in space and determine, to the extent possible, if the thruster wear in space is consistent with that observed in long-duration ground tests.

  19. Do we need an extended evolutionary synthesis?

    PubMed

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2007-12-01

    The Modern Synthesis (MS) is the current paradigm in evolutionary biology. It was actually built by expanding on the conceptual foundations laid out by its predecessors, Darwinism and neo-Darwinism. For sometime now there has been talk of a new Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES), and this article begins to outline why we may need such an extension, and how it may come about. As philosopher Karl Popper has noticed, the current evolutionary theory is a theory of genes, and we still lack a theory of forms. The field began, in fact, as a theory of forms in Darwin's days, and the major goal that an EES will aim for is a unification of our theories of genes and of forms. This may be achieved through an organic grafting of novel concepts onto the foundational structure of the MS, particularly evolvability, phenotypic plasticity, epigenetic inheritance, complexity theory, and the theory of evolution in highly dimensional adaptive landscapes.

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Extended mission/lunar rover, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The design project selected to be undertaken by the 1991/92 Aerospace Design Group was that of conceptually designing an Extended Mission Rover for use on the Lunar Surface. This vehicle would serve the function as a mobile base of sorts, and be able to provide future astronauts with a mobile 'shirt-sleeve' self-sufficient living and working environment. Some of the proposed missions would be planetary surface exploration, construction and maintenance, hardware set-up and in-situ resource experimentation. The need for this type of vehicle has already been declared in the Stafford Group's report on the future of America's Space Program, entitled 'America at the Threshold: America's Space Exploration Initiative'. In the four architectures described within the report, the concept of a pressurized vehicle occurred multiple times. The approximate time frame that this vehicle would be put into use is 2010-2030.

  2. Preparing Cassini Uplink Operations for Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Jennifer L.; McCullar, Michelle L.; Conner, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn and Titan, a joint venture between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency, is conducting a four-year, prime mission exploring the Saturnian system, including its atmosphere, rings, magnetosphere, moons and icy satellites. Launched in 1997, Cassini began its prime mission in 2004. Cassini is now preparing for a new era, a two-year extended mission to revisit many of the highlights and new discoveries made during the prime mission. Because of the light time delay from Earth to Saturn, and the time needed to coordinate the complicated science and engineering activities that take place on the spacecraft, commanding on Cassini is done in approximately 40-day intervals known as sequences. The Cassini Uplink Operations team is responsible for the final development and validation of the pointing profile and instrument and spacecraft commands that are contained in a sequence. During this final analysis prior to uplink to the spacecraft, thorough and exact evaluation is necessary to ensure there are no mistakes during commanding. In order to perform this evaluation, complete and refined processes and procedures are fundamental. The Uplink Operations team is also responsible for anomaly response during sequence execution, a process in which critical decisions often are made in real-time. Recent anomalies on other spacecraft missions have highlighted two major risks in the operations process: (1) personnel turnover and the retirement of critical knowledge and (2) aging, outdated operations procedures. If other missions are a good barometer, the Cassini extended mission will be presented with a high personnel turnover of the Cassini flight team, which could lead to a loss of expertise that has been essential to the success of the prime mission. In order to prepare the Cassini Uplink Operations Team for this possibility and to continue to develop and operate safe science and

  3. Spherical Target Temperature by Extended CFAST Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C W

    2009-05-05

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature at the surface of a spherical target made of polyethylene during a room fire. The current calculation is separated into 2 steps: (1) CFAST code calculation--Calculate the air temperature; radiation flux to the target from the fire, surrounding air, and walls; convection flux; and target temperature. (2) Extended model calculation--Calculate the temperature of the target sphere taking into account the density, heat capacity, heat conductivity, and the spherical geometry of the target by solving the coupled finite difference equations. The second step calculation utilizes the air temperature and radiation flux determined by the CFAST code calculation in the first step.

  4. Extended Performance 8-cm Mercury Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    A slightly modified 8-cm Hg ion thruster demonstrated significant increase in performance. Thrust was increased by almost a factor of five over that of the baseline thruster. Thruster operation with various three grid ion optics configurations; thruster performance as a function of accelerator grid open area, cathode baffle, and cathode orifice size; and a life test of 614 hours at a beam current of 250 mA (17.5 mN thrust) are discussed. Highest thruster efficiency was obtained with the smallest open area accelerator grid. The benefits in efficiency from the low neutral loss grids were mitigated, however, by the limitation such grids place on attainable ion beam current densities. The thruster components suffered negligible weight losses during a life test, which indicated that operation of the 8-cm thruster at extended levels of thrust and power is possible with no significant loss of lifetime.

  5. Extended SQL for manipulating clinical warehouse data.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S B; Chatziantoniou, D

    1999-01-01

    Health care institutions are beginning to collect large amounts of clinical data through patient care applications. Clinical data warehouses make these data available for complex analysis across patient records, benefiting administrative reporting, patient care and clinical research. Data gathered for patient care purposes are difficult to manipulate for analytic tasks; the schema presents conceptual difficulties for the analyst, and many queries perform poorly. An extension to SQL is presented that enables the analyst to designate groups of rows. These groups can then be manipulated and aggregated in various ways to solve a number of useful analytic problems. The extended SQL is concise and runs in linear time, while standard SQL requires multiple statements with polynomial performance. The extensions are extremely powerful for performing aggregations on large amounts of data, which is useful in clinical data mining applications.

  6. Extended Magnetic Reconnection Across the Dayside Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlop, M. W.; Zhang, Q.-H.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Lockwood, M.; Pu, Z.; Hasegawa, H.; Wang, J.; Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Berchem, J.; Lavraund, B.; Eastwood, J.; Volwerk, M.; Shen, C.; Shi, J.-K.; Constantinescu, D.; Frey, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Sibeck, D.; Escoubet, P.; Wild, J. A.; Liu, Z.-X.

    2011-01-01

    The extent of where magnetic reconnection (MR), the dominant process responsible for energy and plasma transport into the magnetosphere, operates across Earth's dayside magnetopause has previously been only indirectly shown by observations. We report the first direct evidence of X-line structure resulting from the operation of MR at each of two widely separated locations along the tilted, subsolar line of maximum current on Earth's magnetopause, confirming the operation of MR at two or more sites across the extended region where MR is expected to occur. The evidence results from in-situ observations of the associated ion and electron plasma distributions, present within each magnetic X-line structure, taken by two spacecraft passing through the active MR regions simultaneously.

  7. Action principles for extended magnetohydrodynamic models

    SciTech Connect

    Keramidas Charidakos, I.; Lingam, M.; Morrison, P. J.; White, R. L.; Wurm, A.

    2014-09-15

    The general, non-dissipative, two-fluid model in plasma physics is Hamiltonian, but this property is sometimes lost or obscured in the process of deriving simplified (or reduced) two-fluid or one-fluid models from the two-fluid equations of motion. To ensure that the reduced models are Hamiltonian, we start with the general two-fluid action functional, and make all the approximations, changes of variables, and expansions directly within the action context. The resulting equations are then mapped to the Eulerian fluid variables using a novel nonlocal Lagrange-Euler map. Using this method, we recover Lüst's general two-fluid model, extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall MHD, and electron MHD from a unified framework. The variational formulation allows us to use Noether's theorem to derive conserved quantities for each symmetry of the action.

  8. An extended cure model and model selection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yingwei; Xu, Jianfeng

    2012-04-01

    We propose a novel interpretation for a recently proposed Box-Cox transformation cure model, which leads to a natural extension of the cure model. Based on the extended model, we consider an important issue of model selection between the mixture cure model and the bounded cumulative hazard cure model via the likelihood ratio test, score test and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC). Our empirical study shows that AIC is informative and both the score test and the likelihood ratio test have adequate power to differentiate between the mixture cure model and the bounded cumulative hazard cure model when the sample size is large. We apply the tests and AIC methods to leukemia and colon cancer data to examine the appropriateness of the cure models considered for them in the literature.

  9. Extending the viability of acute brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Buskila, Yossi; Breen, Paul P.; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André; Barton, Matthew; Morley, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The lifespan of an acute brain slice is approximately 6–12 hours, limiting potential experimentation time. We have designed a new recovery incubation system capable of extending their lifespan to more than 36 hours. This system controls the temperature of the incubated artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF) while continuously passing the fluid through a UVC filtration system and simultaneously monitoring temperature and pH. The combination of controlled temperature and UVC filtering maintains bacteria levels in the lag phase and leads to the dramatic extension of the brain slice lifespan. Brain slice viability was validated through electrophysiological recordings as well as live/dead cell assays. This system benefits researchers by monitoring incubation conditions and standardizing this artificial environment. It further provides viable tissue for two experimental days, reducing the time spent preparing brain slices and the number of animals required for research. PMID:24930889

  10. Cosmological perturbations in extended massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümrükçüoğlu, A. Emir; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Lin, Chunshan; Mukohyama, Shinji; Trodden, Mark

    2013-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations around self-accelerating solutions to two extensions of nonlinear massive gravity: the quasi-dilaton theory and the mass-varying theory. We examine stability of the cosmological solutions, and the extent to which the vanishing of the kinetic terms for scalar and vector perturbations of self-accelerating solutions in massive gravity is generic when the theory is extended. We find that these kinetic terms are in general nonvanishing in both extensions, though there are constraints on the parameters and background evolution from demanding that they have the correct sign. In particular, the self-accelerating solutions of the quasi-dilaton theory are always unstable to scalar perturbations with wavelength shorter than the Hubble length.

  11. Autopoiesis + extended cognition + nature = can buildings think?

    PubMed Central

    Dollens, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    To incorporate metabolic, bioremedial functions into the performance of buildings and to balance generative architecture's dominant focus on computational programming and digital fabrication, this text first discusses hybridizing Maturana and Varela's biological theory of autopoiesis with Andy Clark's hypothesis of extended cognition. Doing so establishes a procedural protocol to research biological domains from which design could source data/insight from biosemiotics, sensory plants, and biocomputation. I trace computation and botanic simulations back to Alan Turing's little-known 1950s Morphogenetic drawings, reaction-diffusion algorithms, and pioneering artificial intelligence (AI) in order to establish bioarchitecture's generative point of origin. I ask provocatively, Can buildings think? as a question echoing Turing's own, "Can machines think?" PMID:26478784

  12. Silylated carbodiimides in molecular and extended structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Peter; Riedel, Ralf; Hoffmann, Roald

    1999-08-01

    This work studies the ternary Si-C-N phases SiC2N4 and Si2CN4,exploiting an analogy between the NCN and O groups. Starting from the molecular model of N,N'-bis(trimethylsilyl)-carbodiimide and proceeding to extended models, we calculate that the energy hypersurface associated with the Si-N=C bond angle φN is very shallow, for both molecular and extended structures. We propose a crystal structure for the low-temperature modification α-SiC2N4 in space group P4322 (95), which is 40 meV (~4 kJ/mol) lower in energy than an ideal cubic arrangement in space group Pn3¯m.A second structure, β-SiC2N4 [space group P4¯n2 (118)], is slightly higher in energy than α-SiC2N4,but still more stable than the cubic structure, and may be the high-temperature structure of SiC2N4.Both variants of SiC2N4 show a small bulk modulus of about 8 GPa (~0.13 Mbar),suggesting a high compressibility of these nonoxide covalently bonded materials. For Si2CN4 we refined the crystal structure of the compound within the experimentally determined space group Aba2 (41). We also found a second candidate nearly equal in energy, with space group Cmc21,differing only in the connection pattern of the SiN2 layered sheets. Both ternary compounds appear to be thermodynamically unstable with respect to decomposition into Si3N4,C, and molecular N2.

  13. Reconnection in compressible plasmas: Extended conversion region

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.; Zenitani, S.

    2011-11-15

    The classical Sweet-Parker approach to steady-state magnetic reconnection is extended into the regime of large resistivity (small magnetic Reynolds or Lundquist number) when the aspect ratio between the outflow and inflow scale, {delta} = d/L, approaches unity. In a previous paper [Paper I, Hesse et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 042104 (2011)], the vicinity of the dissipation site (''diffusion region'') was investigated. In this paper, the approach is extended to cover larger sites, in which the energy transfer and conversion is not confined to the diffusion region. Consistent with the results of Paper I, we find that increasing aspect ratio {delta} is associated with increasing compression, increasing reconnection rate for low {beta}, but slightly decreasing rate for higher {beta}, decreasing outflow speed, and increasing outflow magnetic field. These trends are stronger for lower {beta}. Deviations from the traditional Sweet-Parker limit {delta}{yields} 0 become significant for R{sub m}<{approx}10, where R{sub m} is the magnetic Reynolds number (Lundquist number) based on the half-thickness of the current layer responsible for the Ohmic dissipation. They are also more significant for small {gamma}, that is, for increasing compressibility. In contrast to the results of Paper I, but consistent with earlier results for {delta}<<1, we find that in this limit the outflow speed is given by the Alfven speed {nu}{sub A} in the inflow region and the energy conversion is given by an even split of Poynting flux into enthalpy flux and bulk kinetic energy flux. However, with increasing {delta} the conversion to enthalpy flux becomes more and more dominant.

  14. Biosimulation of Acute Phonotrauma: an Extended Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nicole YK; Vodovotz, Yoram; Kim, Kevin H; Mi, Qi; Hebda, Patricia A; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2012-01-01

    Objectives/ Hypothesis Personalized, pre-emptive and predictive medicine is a central goal of contemporary medical care. The central aim of the present study is to investigate the utility of mechanistic computational modeling of inflammation and healing in order to address personalized therapy for patients with acute phonotrauma. Study Design Computer simulation. Methods Previously reported agent-based models (ABMs) of acute phonotrauma were extended with additional inflammatory mediators as well as extracellular matrix components. The models were calibrated with empirical data for a panel of biomarkers – interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and matrix metalloproteinase-8, from individual subjects following experimentally induced phonotrauma and a randomly assigned voice treatment namely voice rest, resonant voice exercise and spontaneous speech. The models’ prediction accuracy for biomarker levels was tested for a 24-hr follow-up time point. Results The extended ABMs reproduced and predicted trajectories of biomarkers seen in experimental data. The simulation results also agreed qualitatively with various known aspects of inflammation and healing. Model prediction accuracy was generally better following individual-based calibration as compared to population-based calibration. Simulation results also suggested that the special form of vocal fold oscillation in resonant voice may accelerate acute vocal fold healing. Conclusions The calibration of inflammation/healing ABMs with subject-specific data appears to optimize the models’ prediction accuracy for individual subjects. This translational application of biosimulation might be used to predict individual healing trajectories, the potential effects of different treatment options, and most importantly, provide new understanding of health and healing in the larynx and possibly in other organs and tissues as well. Level of Evidence N/A PMID:22020892

  15. Extended Driving Impairs Nocturnal Driving Performances

    PubMed Central

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Taillard, Jacques; Åkerstedt, Torbjorn; Bayon, Virginie; Espié, Stéphane; Chaumet, Guillaume; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3–5am, 1–5am and 9pm–5am) on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [±SD] = 23.4 [±1.7] years) participated Inappropriate line crossings (ILC) in the last hour of driving of each session, sleep variables, self-perceived fatigue and sleepiness were measured. Compared to the short (3–5am) driving session, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings increased by 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P<.05) for the intermediate (1–5am) driving session and by 4.0 (CI, 1.7 to 9.4; P<.001) for the long (9pm–5am) driving session. Compared to the reference session (9–10pm), the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings were 6.0 (95% CI, 2.3 to 15.5; P<.001), 15.4 (CI, 4.6 to 51.5; P<.001) and 24.3 (CI, 7.4 to 79.5; P<.001), respectively, for the three different durations of driving. Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness scores were both positively correlated to driving impairment in the intermediate and long duration sessions (P<.05) and increased significantly during the nocturnal driving sessions compared to the reference session (P<.01). At night, extended driving impairs driving performances and therefore should be limited. PMID:18941525

  16. Beyond six parameters: Extending Λ CDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Cosmological constraints are usually derived under the assumption of a six-parameter Λ CDM theoretical framework or simple one-parameter extensions. In this paper we present, for the first time, cosmological constraints in a significantly extended scenario, varying up to 12 cosmological parameters simultaneously, including the sum of neutrino masses, the neutrino effective number, the dark energy equation of state, the gravitational wave background and the running of the spectral index of primordial perturbations. Using the latest Planck 2015 data release (with polarization), we found no significant indication for extensions to the standard Λ CDM scenario, with the notable exception of the angular power spectrum lensing amplitude, Alens , which is larger than the expected value at more than 2 standard deviations, even when combining the Planck data with BAO and supernovae type Ia external data sets. In our extended cosmological framework, we find that a combined Planck+BAO analysis constrains the value of the rms density fluctuation parameter to σ8=0.781-0.063+0.065 at 95 % C.L., helping to relieve the possible tensions with the CFHTlenS cosmic shear survey. We also find a lower value for the reionization optical depth τ =0.058-0.043+0.040 at 95 % C.L. with respect to the one derived under the assumption of Λ CDM . The scalar spectral index nS is now compatible with a Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum to within 2.5 standard deviations. Combining the Planck data set with the Hubble Space Telescope prior on the Hubble constant provides a value for the equation of state w <-1 at more than 2 standard deviations, while the neutrino effective number is fully compatible with the expectations of the standard three neutrino framework.

  17. The extended Estabrook-Wahlquist method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, S. Roy; Russo, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Variable Coefficient Korteweg de Vries (vcKdV), modified Korteweg de Vries (vcMKdV), and nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equations have a long history dating from their derivation in various applications. A technique based on extended Lax Pairs has been devised recently to derive time-and-space-dependent-coefficient generalizations of various such Lax-integrable NLPDE hierarchies, which are thus more general than almost all cases considered earlier via methods such as the Painlevé Test, Bell Polynomials, and similarity methods. However, this technique, although operationally effective, has the significant disadvantage that, for any integrable system with spatiotemporally varying coefficients, one must 'guess' a generalization of the structure of the known Lax Pair for the corresponding system with constant coefficients. Motivated by the somewhat arbitrary nature of the above procedure, we embark in this paper on an attempt to systematize the derivation of Lax-integrable systems with variable coefficients. We consider the Estabrook-Wahlquist (EW) prolongation technique, a relatively self-consistent procedure requiring little prior information. However, this immediately requires that the technique be significantly generalized in several ways, including solving matrix partial differential equations instead of algebraic ones as the structure of the Lax Pair is systematically computed, and also in solving the constraint equations to deduce the explicit forms for various 'coefficient' matrices. The new and extended EW technique which results is illustrated by algorithmically deriving generalized Lax-integrable versions of the NLS, generalized fifth-order KdV, MKdV, and derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equations. We also show how this method correctly excludes the existence of a nontrivial Lax pair for a nonintegrable NLPDE such as the variable-coefficient cubic-quintic NLS.

  18. Developing a general interaction potential for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Røyne, Anja; Kristiansen, Kai; Rapp, Michael V; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Lee, Dong Woog; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2015-02-24

    We review direct force measurements on a broad class of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. These measurements have enabled the development of a general interaction potential per unit area, W(D) = -2γ(i)Hy exp(-D/D(H)) in terms of a nondimensional Hydra parameter, Hy, that applies to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between extended surfaces. This potential allows one to quantitatively account for additional attractions and repulsions not included in the well-known combination of electrostatic double layer and van der Waals theories, the so-called Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The interaction energy is exponentially decaying with decay length D(H) ≈ 0.3-2 nm for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, with the exact value of D(H) depending on the precise system and conditions. The pre-exponential factor depends on the interfacial tension, γ(i), of the interacting surfaces and Hy. For Hy > 0, the interaction potential describes interactions between partially hydrophobic surfaces, with the maximum hydrophobic interaction (i.e., two fully hydrophobic surfaces) corresponding to Hy = 1. Hydrophobic interactions between hydrophobic monolayer surfaces measured with the surface forces apparatus (SFA) are shown to be well described by the proposed interaction potential. The potential becomes repulsive for Hy < 0, corresponding to partially hydrophilic (hydrated) interfaces. Hydrated surfaces such as mica, silica, and lipid bilayers are discussed and reviewed in the context of the values of Hy appropriate for each system.

  19. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  20. Extended trigonometric Cherednik algebras and nonstationary Schrödinger equations with delta-potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, J. T.; Stokman, J. V.

    2013-02-01

    We realize an extended version of the trigonometric Cherednik algebra as affine Dunkl operators involving Heaviside functions. We use the quadratic Casimir element of the extended trigonometric Cherednik algebra to define an explicit nonstationary Schrödinger equation with delta-potential. We use coordinate Bethe ansatz methods to construct solutions of the nonstationary Schrödinger equation in terms of generalized Bethe wave functions. It is shown that the generalized Bethe wave functions satisfy affine difference Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations as functions of the momenta. The relation to the vector valued root system analogs of the quantum Bose gas on the circle with delta-function interactions is indicated.