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Sample records for external anal sphincter

  1. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  2. Obstetrics anal sphincter injury and repair technique: a review.

    PubMed

    Temtanakitpaisan, Teerayut; Bunyacejchevin, Suvit; Koyama, Masayasu

    2015-03-01

    The Urogynecology Committee of the Asia and Oceania Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (AOFOG) has held seminars and workshops on various urogynecological problems in each country in the Asia-Oceania area in order to encourage young obstetricians and gynecologists. In 2013, we organized the operative seminar for obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in which we prepared porcine models to educate young physicians in a hands-on workshop at the 23rd Asian and Oceanic Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Bangkok, Thailand. Laceration of the anal sphincter mostly occurs during vaginal delivery and it can develop into anal sphincter deficiency, which causes fecal incontinence, if an appropriate suture is not performed. OASIS has become an important issue, especially in developing countries. The prevalence of OASIS of more than the third degree is around 5% in primary parous women and the frequency is higher when detected by ultrasonographic evaluation. Several risk factors, such as macrosomia, instrumental labor, perineal episiotomy and high maternal age, have been recognized. In a society where pregnant women are getting older, OASIS is becoming a more serious issue. An intrapartum primary appropriate stitch is important, but the 1-year outcome of a delayed operation after 2 weeks postpartum is similar. A randomized controlled study showed that overlapping suture of the external sphincter is better than that of end-to-end surgical repair. The Urogynecology Committee of the AOFOG would like to continue with educative programs about the appropriate therapy for OASIS.

  3. Obstetrical Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIS): Prevention, Recognition, and Repair.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Marie-Andrée; Pierce, Marianne; Alter, Jens-Erik W; Chou, Queena; Diamond, Phaedra; Epp, Annette; Geoffrion, Roxana; Harvey, Marie-Andrée; Larochelle, Annick; Maslow, Kenny; Neustaedter, Grace; Pascali, Dante; Pierce, Marianne; Schulz, Jane; Wilkie, David; Sultan, Abdul; Thakar, Ranee

    2015-12-01

    publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Avantages, désavantages et coûts : Parmi les avantages de la mise en œuvre de la présente directive clinique, on trouve : l’amélioration du diagnostic des LOSA, l’obtention d’issues fonctionnelles optimales à la suite de la réparation et l’offre de conseils reposant sur des données probantes aux femmes en ce qui concerne leurs futures grossesses. Déclarations sommaires 1. Les lésions obstétricales du sphincter anal mènent à des comorbidités considérables, dont l’incontinence anale, les fistules rectovaginales et la douleur. (II-2) 2. Les lésions obstétricales du sphincter anal sont plus souvent associées aux accouchements par forceps qu’aux accouchements par ventouse obstétricale. (II-2) 3. Réparation des lésions obstétricales du sphincter anal : a. L’utilisation de polyglactin 2-0 ou de polydioxanone 3-0 donne lieu, après six semaines, à des taux semblables de morbidité liée aux sutures. (I) b. La réparation du sphincter anal interne est recommandée puisque les femmes chez lesquelles la présence d’une anomalie affectant ce sphincter est révélée au cours de l’échographie postpartum sont plus susceptibles de connaître une incontinence anale. (III) c. La réparation du sphincter anal externe devrait englober la gaine fasciale. Le recours à la technique de suture « en paletot » (chevauchement) nécessite souvent une mobilisation et une dissection de plus

  4. Challenges faced in the clinical application of artificial anal sphincters*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-hui; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is an unresolved problem, which has a serious effect on patients, both physically and psychologically. For patients with severe symptoms, treatment with an artificial anal sphincter could be a potential option to restore continence. Currently, the Acticon Neosphincter is the only device certified by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, the clinical safety and efficacy of the Acticon Neosphincter are evaluated and discussed. Furthermore, some other key studies on artificial anal sphincters are presented and summarized. In particular, this paper highlights that the crucial problem in this technology is to maintain long-term biomechanical compatibility between implants and surrounding tissues. Compatibility is affected by changes in both the morphology and mechanical properties of the tissues surrounding the implants. A new approach for enhancing the long-term biomechanical compatibility of implantable artificial sphincters is proposed based on the use of smart materials. PMID:26365115

  5. Role of internal anal sphincter damage in the causation of idiopathic faecal incontinence: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Petros, Peter; Anderson, Jim

    2005-02-01

    This prospective study aimed to examine the relationship between internal anal sphincter (IAS) damage and 'idiopathic' faecal incontinence (FI) in 50 consecutive patients, using endoanal ultrasound examination. The external anal sphincter (EAS) was intact on direct and ultrasonic assessment in all patients. IAS damage was defined as complete rupture or attenuation, less than 2 mm thickness in some part of the sphincter. Complete rupture was found in one patient and damage in a further 17 (total 36%). All three nulliparous patients had normal IAS and EAS. IAS damage was only minimally associated with 'idiopathic' FI, suggesting IAS per se is unlikely to be a direct cause of FI in the 'idiopathic' group of FI patients. Its role might be analogous to the periurethral striated horse-shoe shape muscle in the urethra, which is thought to act as a mucosal sealant.

  6. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  7. Anal sphincter dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: an observation manometric study

    PubMed Central

    Marola, Silvia; Gibin, Enrico; Capobianco, Marco; Bertolotto, Antonio; Enrico, Stefano; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Destefano, Ines; Nano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence are frequent complaints in multiple sclerosis. The literature on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders is scant. Using anorectal manometry, we compared the anorectal function in patients with and without multiple sclerosis. 136 patients referred from our Center for Multiple Sclerosis to the Coloproctology Outpatient Clinic, between January 2005 and December 2011, were enrolled. The patients were divided into four groups: multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group A); multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group B); non-multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group C); non-multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group D). Anorectal manometry was performed to measure: resting anal pressure; maximum squeeze pressure; rectoanal inhibitory reflex; filling pressure and urge pressure. The difference between resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers was defined as the change in resting anal pressure calculated for each patient. Results Group A patients were noted to have greater sphincter hypotonia at rest and during contraction compared with those in group C (p=0.02); the rectal sensitivity threshold was lower in group B than in group D patients (p=0.02). No voluntary postcontraction sphincter relaxation was observed in either group A or group B patients (p=0.891 and p=0.939, respectively). Conclusions The decrease in the difference in resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers suggests post-contraction sphincter spasticity, indicating impaired pelvic floor coordination in multiple sclerosis patients. A knowledge of manometric alterations in such patients may be clinically relevant in the selection of patients for appropriate treatments and for planning targeted rehabilitation therapy. PMID:28352843

  8. Novel artificial anal sphincter system based on transcutaneous energy transmission system tested in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbing; Liu, Hua; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) for severe fecal incontinence. The AASS is composed of an artificial anal sphincter (AAS), an external transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS), and an external control device. The AAS is composed of a cuff, a micropump, a reservoir, and a remote control device. It is designed to be implanted into the body of the patient. The function of the AAS is to open and close the patient's natural anus. Patients suffering from loss of their natural sphincter lose rectal sensation and are thus unable to perceive imminent fecal incontinence. In order to restore rectal sensation, a pressure sensor in the AAS cuff is designed to detect pressure in the colon. The pressure reflects the present quantity of colon contents, allowing patients to control the AAS to open or close the anus according to the pressure. The TETS is designed to provide electrical energy to the implanted AAS without wire connections. The external control device is designed to receive the pressure information from the AAS and send the patient's command to the implanted device. This paper provides a thorough discussion of the design of the novel AASS and describes the performance of the AASS when tested in vivo on two Beagle dogs who were chosen to be the subjects for receiving the implant. The experimental results verified that the performance of the AASS met the functional requirements it was designed for; however, the trial also revealed some challenges to be further studied.

  9. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  10. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  11. 3D Topography of the Young Adult Anal Sphincter Complex Reconstructed from Undeformed Serial Anatomical Sections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Hagoort, Jaco; Shan, Jin-Lu; Tan, Li-Wen; Fang, Bin-Ji; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pelvic-floor anatomy is usually studied by artifact-prone dissection or imaging, which requires prior anatomical knowledge. We used the serial-section approach to settle contentious issues and an interactive 3D-pdf to make the results widely accessible. Method 3D reconstructions of undeformed thin serial anatomical sections of 4 females and 2 males (21–35y) of the Chinese Visible Human database. Findings Based on tendinous septa and muscle-fiber orientation as segmentation guides, the anal-sphincter complex (ASC) comprised the subcutaneous external anal sphincter (EAS) and the U-shaped puborectal muscle, a part of the levator ani muscle (LAM). The anococcygeal ligament fixed the EAS to the coccygeal bone. The puborectal-muscle loops, which define the levator hiatus, passed around the anorectal junction and inserted anteriorly on the perineal body and pubic bone. The LAM had a common anterior attachment to the pubic bone, but separated posteriorly into puborectal and “pubovisceral” muscles. This pubovisceral muscle was bilayered: its internal layer attached to the conjoint longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the rectococcygeal fascia, while its outer, patchy layer reinforced the inner layer. ASC contraction makes the ano-rectal bend more acute and lifts the pelvic floor. Extensions of the rectal longitudinal smooth muscle to the coccygeal bone (rectococcygeal muscle), perineal body (rectoperineal muscle), and endopelvic fascia (conjoint longitudinal and pubovisceral muscles) formed a “diaphragm” at the inferior boundary of the mesorectum that suspended the anorectal junction. Its contraction should straighten the anorectal bend. Conclusion The serial-section approach settled contentious topographic issues of the pelvic floor. We propose that the ASC is involved in continence and the rectal diaphragm in defecation. PMID:26305117

  12. Biochemical evaluation of an artificial anal sphincter made from shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjian; Luo, Yun; Higa, Masaru; Zhang, Xiumin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Severe anal incontinence is a socially incapacitating disorder and a major unresolved clinical problem that has a considerable negative impact on quality of life. In this study, we developed a new artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) in order to improve the quality of life of such patients and evaluated the influence of this sphincter on blood serum chemistry in animal experiments. The artificial anal sphincter was driven by two Ti-Ni SMA actuators sandwiching the intestine and was implanted in three female goats. Blood was collected from the jugular vein on days 1 and 4; at weeks 1 and 2; and at months 1, 2, and 3, postoperatively. Biochemical parameters including total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, aspartate amino-transferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and C-reactive protein were examined. The time courses of total bilirubin and aspartate amino transferase of the three goats were within the baseline levels after 1 week of implantation and remained normal, demonstrating no liver function complications. The blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels remained within the normal range, indicating no renal function complications. The total protein and albumin fluctuated within the normal range throughout the duration of this study. In these goats, it was also found that the level of C-reactive protein did not increase and that there was no stricture of the intestine where the artificial sphincter was attached. Our findings indicate that the artificial sphincter SMA demonstrated no adverse influence on blood serum chemistry and exhibited an effective system performance.

  13. Anal sphincter dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: an observation manometric study.

    PubMed

    Marola, Silvia; Ferrarese, Alessia; Gibin, Enrico; Capobianco, Marco; Bertolotto, Antonio; Enrico, Stefano; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Destefano, Ines; Nano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence are frequent complaints in multiple sclerosis. The literature on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders is scant. Using anorectal manometry, we compared the anorectal function in patients with and without multiple sclerosis. 136 patients referred from our Center for Multiple Sclerosis to the Coloproctology Outpatient Clinic, between January 2005 and December 2011, were enrolled. The patients were divided into four groups: multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group A); multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group B); non-multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group C); non-multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group D). Anorectal manometry was performed to measure: resting anal pressure; maximum squeeze pressure; rectoanal inhibitory reflex; filling pressure and urge pressure. The difference between resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers was defined as the change in resting anal pressure calculated for each patient.

  14. Biomechanical modeling of the rectum for the design of a novel artificial anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Yan, Guozheng; Liu, Hua; Yang, Banghua; Zhao, Yujuan; Luo, Nianting

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses biomechanical issues that are related to the option of a novel artificial anal sphincter around the human rectum. The prosthesis consists of a compression cuff system inside and a reservoir cuff system outside, which is placed around the debilitated sphincter muscle. The micropump shifts fluid between the cuffs and thus takes over the expansion and compression function of the sphincter muscle. However, the human rectum is not a rigid pipe, and motion in it is further complicated by the fact that the bowel is susceptible to damage. With the goal of engineering a safe and reliable machine, the biomechanical properties of the in-vivo porcine rectum are studied and the tissue ischemia is analyzed.

  15. Determining the shape of the turns-amplitude cloud during anal sphincter quantitative EMG.

    PubMed

    Gregory, W Thomas; Clark, Amanda L; Simmons, Kimberly; Lou, Jau-Shin

    2008-07-01

    We aimed to compare our normative data for quantitative interference pattern (IP) analysis of the anal sphincter to previously published data. In 28 nulliparous women, we performed IP analysis during quantitative concentric needle electromyography (QEMG) of the anal sphincter. At each sampling site, a 500-ms epoch was analyzed. The data were log transformed. Linear regression lines (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated from the log transformed variables "turns-second" and "amplitude-turn." These confidence intervals were then transformed back into the original parameters to yield scatterplots with confidence curves. The mean turns-second were 203 (SD 174). The mean amplitude (mcv)-turn was 266 (SD 87). The regression coefficients for the log-transformed variables are constant = 1.5, slope = 0.3, and resultant cloud of raw data has a convex upper boundary. These appear slightly different than previously published reports, potentially influencing the determination of normal and abnormal studies.

  16. Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter: A report of 82 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Zhao; Yu, Yong-Yang; Shu, Ye; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Li; Lei, Wen-Zhang; Wang, Tian-Cai

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (LTME) of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter. METHODS: From June 2001 to June 2003, 82 patients with low rectal cancer underwent laparoscopic total mesorectal excision with preservation of anal sphincter. The lowest edge of tumors was below peritoneal reflection and 1.5-7 cm from the dentate line (1.5-5 cm in 48 cases, 5-7 cm in 34 cases). RESULTS: LTME with anal sphincter preservation was performed on 82 randomized patients with low rectal cancer, and 100% sphincter preservation rate was achieved. There were 30 patients with laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) at the level of the anastomosis below peritoneal reflection and 2 cm above from the dentate line; 27 patients with laparoscopic ultralow anterior resection (LULAR) at the level of anastomoses 2 cm below from the dentate line; and 25 patients with laparoscopic coloanal anastomoses (LCAA) at the level of the anastomoses at or below the dentate line. No defunctioning ileostomy was created in any case. The mean operating time was 120 min (ranged from 110-220 min), and the mean operative blood loss was 20 mL (ranged from 5-120 mL). Bowel function was restored and diet was resumed on day 1 or 2 after operation. The mean hospital stay was 8 d (ranged from 5-14). Postoperative analgesics were used in 45 patients. After surgery, 2 patients had urinary retention, one had anastomotic leakage, and another 2 patients had local recurrence one year later. No interoperative complication was observed. CONCLUSION: LTME with preservation of anal sphincter is a feasible, safe and minimally invasive technique with less postoperative pain and rapid recovery, and importantly, it has preserved the function of the sphincter. PMID:12854145

  17. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Keaney, John F; Fogarty, Kevin E; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-04-22

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca(2+)]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca(2+)]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence.

  18. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M.; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Keaney Jr, John F.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca2+]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca2+]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  19. Assessment and in vitro experiment of artificial anal sphincter system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Jiang, Enyu; Wang, Hua

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel artificial anal sphincter (AAS) system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function is proposed to treat human fecal incontinence. The executive mechanism of the traditional AAS system was redesigned and integrated for a simpler structure and better durability. The novel executive mechanism uses a sandwich structure to simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter. To rebuild the lost rectal sensation function caused by fecal incontinence, we propose a novel method for rebuilding the rectal sensation function based on an Optimal Wavelet Packet Basis (OWPB) using the Davies-Bouldin (DB) index and a support vector machine (SVM). OWPB using a DB index is used for feature vector extraction, while a SVM is adopted for pattern recognition.Furthermore, an in vitro experiment with the AAS system based on rectal sensation function rebuilding was carried out. Experimental results indicate that the novel executive mechanism can simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter, and the proposed method is quite effective for rebuilding rectal sensation in patients.

  20. Design and assessment of novel artificial anal sphincter with adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Yan, Sheng; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the in vitro assessment of a novel elastic scaling artificial anal sphincter system (ES-AASS) with an adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) for treatment of severe faecal incontinence (FI). The proposed adaptive TETS has a phase control, which can maintain the output voltage at ∼7 V across the full range of the coupling coefficient variation (from 0.09-0.31) during the whole process of charging with a phase shift of 177.5° to 79.1°. A maximum surface temperature of 42.2 °C was measured above the secondary coil during an energy transmission of 3.5 W in air. The specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density analysis of the biological three-layers structure, including the skin, fat and muscle) surrounding the coil pair were analysed and the results of simulation analysis showed that the value of SAR and current density were very small at any given transmission condition compared with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In conclusion, in vitro experimental results showed that the ES-AASS can control simulated faecal behaviour effectively and the performance of TETS was validated.

  1. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process.

  2. Surgeons’ assessment of internal anal sphincter nerve supply during TaTME - inbetween expectations and reality

    PubMed Central

    Kneist, Werner; Hanke, Laura; Kauff, Daniel W.; Lang, Hauke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intraoperative identification of nerve fibers heading from the inferior rectal plexus (IRP) to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is challenging. The transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) is said to better preserve pelvic autonomic nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the nerve identification rates during TaTME by transanal visual and electrophysiological assessment. Material and methods: A total of 52 patients underwent TaTME for malignant conditions. The IRP with its posterior branches to the IAS and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN) were visually assessed in 20 patients (v-TaTME). Electrophysiological nerve identification was performed in 32 patients using electric stimulation under processed electromyography of IAS (e-TaTME). Results: The indication profile for TaTME was comparable between the v-TaTME and the e-TaTME group. The identification of IRP was more meaningful under electrophysiological assessment than under visual assessment for the left pelvic side (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.008) as well as the right pelvic side (78% vs. 45%, p = 0.016). The identification rates for PSN did not significantly differ between both groups, respectively (81% vs. 75%, p = 0.420 and 84% vs. 70%, p = 0.187). Conclusions: The transanal approach facilitated visual identification of IAS nerve supply. In combination with electrophysiological nerve assessment the identification rate almost doubled. For further insights functional data are needed. PMID:27333465

  3. COX-1 vs. COX-2 as a determinant of basal tone in the internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, Márcio A. F.; Rattan, Neeru; Rattan, Satish

    2009-01-01

    Prostanoids, produced endogenously via cyclooxygenases (COXs), have been implicated in the sustained contraction of different smooth muscles. The two major types of COXs are COX-1 and COX-2. The COX subtype involved in the basal state of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone is not known. To identify the COX subtype, we examined the effect of COX-1- and COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and rofecoxib, respectively, on basal tone in the rat IAS. We also determined the effect of selective deletion of COX-1 and COX-2 genes (COX-1−/− and COX-2−/− mice) on basal tone in murine IAS. Our data show that SC-560 causes significantly more efficacious and potent concentration-dependent decreases in IAS tone than rofecoxib. In support of these data, significantly higher levels of COX-1 than COX-2 mRNA were found in the IAS. In addition, higher levels of COX-1 mRNA and protein were expressed in rat IAS than rectal smooth muscle. In wild-type mice, IAS tone was decreased 41.4 ± 3.4% (mean ± SE) by SC-560 (1 × 10−5 M) and 5.4 ± 2.2% by rofecoxib (P < 0.05, n = 5). Basal tone was 0.172 ± 0.021 mN//mg in the IAS from wild-type mice and significantly less (0.080 ± 0.015 mN/mg) in the IAS from COX-1−/− mice (P < 0.05, n = 5). However, basal tone in COX-2−/− mice was not significantly different from that in wild-type mice. We conclude that COX-1-related products contribute significantly to IAS tone. PMID:19056763

  4. Electrical activity from smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Gonella, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The electrical activities of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area have been studied in the cat. 2. Electromyographic recordings were achieved with extracellular electrodes, in vivo on acute and chronic animals, and in vitro on the isolated organ. In addition, electrical and mechanical activities were recorded from muscle strips with the sucrose gap technique. 3. Circular muscle coat electrical activity consisted exclusively of slow variations of the membrane potential of the smooth muscle cells. Each slow potential variation was followed by a contraction. 4. The electrical activity and the concomitant contractions were tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). Both disappeared in Ca-free solution or in the presence of Mn ions (10(-3) M). 5. On circular muscle, noradrenaline (10(-8)-10(-7) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.1-0.15 mg/kg in vivo) had an excitatory effect consisting in an increase of slow potential frequency. The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by phentolamine (10(-6)-10(-5) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.2 mg/kg in vivo). 6. On circular muscle, acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.), used exclusively on muscle strips, did never produce any clear cut effect. 7. Longitudinal muscle coat electrical activity consisted of spike potentials superimposed on slow time course depolarizations which were never observed alone. Each spike was followed by a contraction. This electrical activity was tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). 8. Longitudinal muscle activity was abolished by noradrenaline (10(-6) g/ml.) and enhanced by acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.). The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by propranolol (0.2 mg/kg I.V.; 10(-6) g/ml.) and that of acetylcholine by atropine (10(-7) g/ml.). 9. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data indicate that electromechanical coupling is achieved (1) in circular muscle, through Ca dependent slow variations in membrane potential of the muscle cells and (2) in longitudinal muscle, through spike

  5. [Improvement of fecal incontinence with silicone implants in patients with internal anal sphincter injury: First report in North America].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Valdovinos-Díaz, M A; Hagerman-Ruiz Galindo, G; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Ruíz-Campos, M; Castillo-Machado, W

    2011-01-01

    The injection of bulking agents has been described as a useful treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence. Among them, silicone implants have shown benefits in patients with internal anal sphincter (IAS) injury. We describe two patients with a history of hemorrhoidectomy and IAS injuries, which underwent placement of silicone implants. The implants were inserted into the intersphincteric space and the IAS under ultrasound guidance. The Wexner continente score fell from 17 and 19 before treatment, to 6 and 8 at six months follow up, respectively. Patients had no postoperative complications or implants migration. In our patients, injection of silicone implants improved fecal continence score, without postoperative complications or implants migration at six month follow up.

  6. Pelvic nerve innervation of the external sphincter of urethra as suggested by urodynamic and horse-radish peroxidase studies.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Nishizawa, O; Noto, H; Tsuchida, S

    1984-03-01

    In view of the fact that the detrusor vesicae and external urethral sphincter perform closely synergic functions in micturition, experiments were conducted to explore the action of the pelvic efferent neurons on the external urethral sphincter. The pelvic efferent neurons are generally recognized, by urodynamic assessments and histochemical study with the technique of retrograde axonal transport of horse-radish peroxidase, to innervate the vesical detrusor. In 7 of 15 adult dogs studied, the external urethral sphincter continued to show a normal synergic electromyogram pattern with enhanced electrical activity on vesical distention and disappearance of discharges on vesical contraction even after bilateral transection of the pudendal nerves. The electrical discharges ceased in the sphincter only after subsequent bilateral pelvic neurotomy. Horse-radish peroxidase-positive cells were demonstrated in the intermediolateral and intermediomedial nuclei and in the Onuf nucleus of the sacral cord in approximately half the dogs whose pelvic nerve was injected with the plant peroxidase. The results suggest that the pelvic nerve may contain somatic fibers innervating the external urethral sphincter.

  7. Straddle injury with anal sphincter and rectal rupture in a young girl Case report.

    PubMed

    Pietroletti, Renato; Delreno, Federica; D'Orsi, Amalia; Caoci, Stefano; Carlei, Francesco

    2015-07-29

    Negli incidenti stradali o sportivi è possibile l’eventualità di lesioni traumatiche indicate come “straddle injury”, “trauma a cavalcioni”, per caduta o urto del perineo su un corpo solido a gambe divaricate. Per lo più si tratta di traumi chiusi di lieve-moderata entità, esitanti in ematomi ecchimosi o abrasioni. Il caso descritto riguarda una quattordicenne vittima in un incidente stradale di un trauma chiuso “a cavalcioni”. Alla presentazione lamentava dolore e sanguinamento perineale e all’esame obiettivo una ferita lacero contusa in sede perianale anteriore. La TC non risultava diagnostica. L’esame in anestesia documentava la rottura completa dello sfintere esterno a livello della commissura anale anteriore, in continuità con una rottura a tutto spessore del retto per un’estensione prossimale di circa 15 cm. Dopo lavaggio e sutura delle lesioni, la laparoscopia verificava assenza di lesioni nella pelvi e nella cavità addominale, e consentiva il confezionamento di una colostomia su bacchetta mediante allargamento dell’accesso laparoscopico. Decorso post-operatorio regolare e dimissione in VIII giornata. A sei mesi chiusura della colostomia previa verifica di normalità dei parametri di fisiologia anorettale. Al follow up recente assenti incontinenza o soiling. I traumi chiusi “a cavalcioni” coinvolgono per lo più il settore uro genitale, ma il coinvolgimento anorettale si riscontra in quelli di maggiore gravità e/o con meccanismo penetrante. Il caso descritto aveva comportato un’importante lesione anorettale pur trattandosi di un trauma chiuso perineale, verosimilmente per la dinamica dell’incidente e lo stato di sovrappeso. Essenziale è l’esame in anestesia generale, di valore superiore alla diagnostica per immagini, che è utile per escludere lesioni viscerali o ossee. L’approccio laparoscopico è utile anche per l’eventuale confezionamento di una colostomia di protezione.

  8. Relationship between interstitial cells of Cajal, fibroblast-like cells and inhibitory motor nerves in the internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Cobine, Caroline A; Hennig, Grant W; Kurahashi, Masaaki; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Keef, Kathleen D

    2011-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) have been shown to participate in nitrergic neurotransmission in various regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Recently, fibroblast-like cells, which are positive for platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα(+)), have been suggested to participate additionally in inhibitory neurotransmission in the GI tract. The distribution of ICC and PDGFRα(+) cell populations and their relationship to inhibitory nerves within the mouse internal anal sphincter (IAS) are unknown. Immunohistochemical techniques and confocal microscopy were therefore used to examine the density and arrangement of ICC, PDGFRα(+) cells and neuronal nitric-oxide-synthase-positive (nNOS(+)) nerve fibers in the IAS of wild-type (WT) and W/W ( v ) mice. Of the total tissue volume within the IAS circular muscle layer, 18% consisted in highly branched PDGFRα(+) cells (PDGFRα(+)-IM). Other populations of PDGFRα(+) cells were observed within the submucosa and along the serosal and myenteric surfaces. Spindle-shaped intramuscular ICC (ICC-IM) were present in the WT mouse IAS but were largely absent from the W/W ( v ) IAS. The ICC-IM volume (5% of tissue volume) in the WT mouse IAS was significantly smaller than that of PDGFRα(+)-IM. Stellate-shaped submucosal ICC (ICC-SM) were observed in the WT and W/W ( v ) IAS. Minimum surface distance analysis revealed that nNOS(+) nerve fibers were closely aligned with both ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM. An even closer association was seen between ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM. Thus, a close morphological arrangement exists between inhibitory motor neurons, ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM suggesting that some functional interaction occurs between them contributing to inhibitory neurotransmission in the IAS.

  9. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC(20) in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC(20), before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment.

  10. Fistulotomy or seton in anal fistula: a decisional algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cariati, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Fistula in ano is a common proctological disease. Several authors stated that internal and external anal sphincters preservation is in the interest of continence maintenance. The aim of the present study is to report our experience using a decisional algorithm on sphincter saving procedures that achieved us to obtain good results with low rate of complications. From 2008 to 2011, 206 patients underwent surgical treatment for anal fistula; 28 patients underwent perianal abscess drainage plus seton placement of trans-sphincteric or supra-sphincteric fistula (13.6 %), 41 patients underwent fistulotomy for submucosal or low inter-sphincteric or low trans-sphincteric anal fistula (19.9 %) and 137 patients underwent partial fistulectomy or partial fistulotomy (from cutaneous plan to external sphincter muscle plan) and cutting seton placement without internal sphincterotomy for trans-sphincteric anal fistula (66.50 %). Healing rates have been of 100 % and healing times ranged from 1 to 6 months in 97 % of patients treated by setons. Transient fecal soiling was reported by 19 patients affected by trans-sphincteric fistula (11.5 %) for 4-6 months and then disappeared or evolved in a milder form of flatus occasional incontinence. No major incontinence has been reported also after fistulotomy. Fistula recurred in five cases of trans-sphincteric fistula treated by seton placement (one with abscess) (1/28) (3.5 %) and four with trans-sphincteric fistula (4/137) (3 %). Our algorithm permitted us to reduce to 20 % sphincter cutting procedures without reporting postoperative major anal incontinence; it seems to open an interesting way in the treatment of anal fistula.

  11. A new concept of the anatomy of the anal sphincter mechanism and the physiology of defecation: mass contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated both anatomically and physiologically that the external anal (EAS) and urethral (EUS) sphincters and the bulbocavernosus muscle (BC) originate from the puborectalis muscle (PR). It is hypothesized that stimulation of any of these muscles would lead to contraction of all the others. Because the levator ani (pubococcygeus) muscle (LA) also has the same innervation as the above-mentioned muscles, it is further suggested that it, too, contracts reflexly upon stimulation of any of those muscles. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis. The study comprised 18 healthy volunteers (mean age 36.6 +/- 8.4 years; 10 men, 8 women). The EAS was stimulated and the response of the EUS, PR, LA and BC was determined. Each muscle was thereafter stimulated separately and the response of the other pelvic floor muscles registered. Stimulation of any of the pelvic floor muscles effected an increased EMG activity of the rest of the muscles. The muscle contraction was instantaneous with no latency in all the muscles except the LA EMG activity, which showed a mean latency of 21.3 +/- 6.6 ms. The pelvic floor muscles' response seems to be attributable to muscle stimulation both directly and indirectly through activation of pudendal nerve fibers in the muscles. The study demonstrated that the pelvic floor muscles behave as one muscle: they contract or relax en masse. This 'mass contraction' might explain some of the physiologic phenomena that occur during pelvic organ evacuation. However, besides this mass contraction, a voluntary 'selective' individual muscle activity exists by which each individual muscle acts independently of the others.

  12. Sphincter lesions observed on ultrasound after transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mora López, Laura; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the morphological impact of transanal endoscopic surgery on the sphincter apparatus using the modified Starck classification. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 118 consecutive patients undergoing Transanal Endoscopic Operation/Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEO/TEM) from March 2013 to May 2014 was performed. All the patients underwent an endoanal ultrasound prior to surgery and one and four months postoperatively in order to measure sphincter width, identify sphincter defects and to quantify them in terms of the level, depth and size of the affected anal canal. To assess the lesions, we used the “modified” Starck classification, which incorporates the variable “sphincter fragmentation”. The results were correlated with the Wexner incontinence questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 118 patients, twelve (sphincter lesions) were excluded. The results of the 106 patients were as follows after one month: 31 (29.2%) lesions found on ultrasound after one month, median overall Starck score of 4 (range 3-6); 10 (9.4%) defects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and 3 (2.8%) in the external anal sphincter (EAS); 17 patients (16%) had fragmentation of the sphincter apparatus with both sphincters affected in one case. At four months: 7 (6.6%) defects, all in the IAS, overall median Starck score of 4 (range 3-6). Mean IAS widths were 3.5 mm (SD 1.14) preoperatively, 4.38 mm (SD 2.1) one month postoperatively and 4.03 mm (SD 1.46) four months postoperatively. The only statistically significant difference in sphincter width in the IAS measurements was between preoperatively and one month postoperatively. No incontinence was reported, even in cases of ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSION: TEO/TEM may produce ultrasound abnormalities but this is not accompanied by clinical changes in continence. The modified Starck classification is useful for describing and managing these disorders. PMID:26674666

  13. Long-term recording of external urethral sphincter EMG activity in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats

    PubMed Central

    LaPallo, Brandon K.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2014-01-01

    The external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) plays an important role in urinary function and often contributes to urinary dysfunction. EUS study would benefit from methodology for longitudinal recording of electromyographic activity (EMG) in unanesthetized animals, but this muscle is a poor substrate for chronic intramuscular electrodes, and thus the required methodology has not been available. We describe a method for long-term recording of EUS EMG by implantation of fine wires adjacent to the EUS that are secured to the pubic bone. Wires pass subcutaneously to a skull-mounted plug and connect to the recording apparatus by a flexible cable attached to a commutator. A force transducer-mounted cup under a metabolic cage collected urine, allowing recording of EUS EMG and voided urine weight without anesthesia or restraint. Implant durability permitted EUS EMG recording during repeated (up to 3 times weekly) 24-h sessions for more than 8 wk. EMG and voiding properties were stable over weeks 2–8. The degree of EUS phasic activity (bursting) during voiding was highly variable, with an average of 25% of voids not exhibiting bursting. Electrode implantation adjacent to the EUS yielded stable EMG recordings over extended periods and eliminated the confounding effects of anesthesia, physical restraint, and the potential for dislodgment of the chronically implanted intramuscular electrodes. These results show that micturition in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats is usually, but not always, associated with EUS bursting. This methodology is applicable to studying EUS behavior during progression of gradually evolving disease and injury models and in response to therapeutic interventions. PMID:24990895

  14. Long-term recording of external urethral sphincter EMG activity in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    LaPallo, Brandon K; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Chen, Xiang Yang; Carp, Jonathan S

    2014-08-15

    The external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) plays an important role in urinary function and often contributes to urinary dysfunction. EUS study would benefit from methodology for longitudinal recording of electromyographic activity (EMG) in unanesthetized animals, but this muscle is a poor substrate for chronic intramuscular electrodes, and thus the required methodology has not been available. We describe a method for long-term recording of EUS EMG by implantation of fine wires adjacent to the EUS that are secured to the pubic bone. Wires pass subcutaneously to a skull-mounted plug and connect to the recording apparatus by a flexible cable attached to a commutator. A force transducer-mounted cup under a metabolic cage collected urine, allowing recording of EUS EMG and voided urine weight without anesthesia or restraint. Implant durability permitted EUS EMG recording during repeated (up to 3 times weekly) 24-h sessions for more than 8 wk. EMG and voiding properties were stable over weeks 2-8. The degree of EUS phasic activity (bursting) during voiding was highly variable, with an average of 25% of voids not exhibiting bursting. Electrode implantation adjacent to the EUS yielded stable EMG recordings over extended periods and eliminated the confounding effects of anesthesia, physical restraint, and the potential for dislodgment of the chronically implanted intramuscular electrodes. These results show that micturition in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats is usually, but not always, associated with EUS bursting. This methodology is applicable to studying EUS behavior during progression of gradually evolving disease and injury models and in response to therapeutic interventions.

  15. Anal Neuroendocrine Tumor Masquerading as External Hemorrhoids: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad; Dirweesh, Ahmed; Alvarez, Chikezie; Conaway, Herbert; Moser, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors in gastrointestinal (GI) tract are a rare source of GI malignancy with an estimated incidence of 2.5 - 5 per 100,000 people per year and the prevalence of 35 per 100,000. In the GI tract, they are located in decreasing order of frequency in appendix, ileum, rectum, stomach, and colon. Those found in the anal region represent just 1% of all malignancies of the anal canal. Their clinical presentation can be widely varying, sometimes being found incidentally with metastatic disease and an unknown primary source. We report a case of a 60-year-old male who presented with a 2-week history of intermittent bright red blood per rectum and anal pain. He was found to have a lesion in the perianal area which was subsequently diagnosed has a poorly differentiated large cell type neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) with hepatic metastasis. PMID:28270879

  16. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... bath 2 to 3 times a day. The water should cover only the hips and buttocks. If the anal fissures do not go away with home care methods, treatment may involve: Botox injections into the muscle in the anus (anal sphincter) ...

  17. Pelvic floor muscles and the external urethral sphincter have different responses to applied bladder pressure during continence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong; Salcedo, Levilester B.; Song, Bo; Damaser, Margot S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the functional innervation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and if there is PFM activity during an external pressure increase to the bladder in female rats. Methods Thirty-one female adult virgin Sprague Dawley rats received an external increase in bladder pressure until urinary leakage was noted while bladder pressure was recorded (leak point pressure; LPP) under urethane anesthesia. Six of the rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the levator ani nerve. Another 6 rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the pudendal nerve. Simultaneous recordings of PFM (pubo-/iliococcygeus muscles) electromyogram (EMG) and external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG were recorded during cystometry and LPP testing. Results Thirteen rats (42%) showed tonic PFM EMG activity during filling cystometry. Eighteen rats (58%) showed no tonic PFM EMG activity at baseline, but PFM EMG could be activated by pinching the perineal skin. This activity could be maintained unless voiding occurred. The external increase in bladder pressure caused significantly increased EUS EMG activity as demonstrated by increased amplitude and frequency. However, there was no such response in PFM EMG. LPP was not significantly different after levator ani nerve transection, but was significantly decreased after pudendal nerve transection. Conclusions PFM activity was not increased during external pressure increases to the bladder in female rats. Experimental designs using rats should consider this result. PMID:20206969

  18. Relation between rectal sensation and anal function in normal subjects and patients with faecal incontinence.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, W M; Read, N W; Miner, P B

    1990-01-01

    The relation between sensory perception of rapid balloon distension of the rectum and the motor responses of the rectum and external and internal anal sphincters in 27 normal subjects and 16 patients with faecal incontinence who had impaired rectal sensation but normal sphincter pressures was studied. In both patients and normal subjects, the onset and duration of rectal sensation correlated closely with the external anal sphincter electrical activity (r = 0.8, p less than 0.0001) and with rectal contraction (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001), but not with internal sphincter relaxation. All normal subjects perceived a rectal sensation within one second of rapid inflation of a rectal balloon with volumes of 20 ml or less air. Six patients did not perceive any rectal sensation until 60 ml had been introduced, while in the remaining nine patients the sensation was delayed by at least two seconds. Internal sphincter relaxation occurred before the sensation was perceived in three of 27 normal subjects and 11 of 16 patients (p less than 0.001), and could be associated with anal leakage, which stopped as soon as sensation was perceived. The lowest rectal volumes required to induce anal relaxation, to cause sustained relaxation, or to elicit sensations of a desire to defecate or pain were similar in patients and normal subjects. In conclusion, these results show the close association between rectal sensation and external anal sphincter contraction, and show that faecal incontinence may occur as a result of delayed or absent external anal sphincter contraction when the internal anal sphincter is relaxed. PMID:2210452

  19. Californium-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy alone for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma: A definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanli; Shan, Jinlu; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Kewei; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2017-01-17

    This study evaluated the 4-year results of 32 patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma treated solely with californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT). Patients were solicited into the study from January 2008 to June 2011. All the patients had refused surgery or surgery was contraindicated. The patients were treated with Cf-252 neutron ICBT using a novel 3.5-cm diameter off-axis 4-channel intrarectal applicator designed by the authors. The dose reference point was defined on the mucosa surface, with a total dose of 55-62 Gy-eq/4 f (13-16 Gy-eq/f/wk). All the patients completed the radiotherapy in accordance with our protocol. The rectal lesions regressed completely, and the acute rectal toxicity was mild (≤G2). The 4-year local control, overall survival, disease-free survival, and late complication (≥G2) rates were 96.9%, 90.6%, 87.5% and 15.6%, respectively. No severe late complication (≥G3) occurred. The mean follow-up was 56.1 ± 16.0 months. At the end of last follow-up, 29 patients remained alive. The mean survival time was 82.1 ± 2.7 months. Cf-252 neutron ICBT administered as the sole treatment (without surgery) for patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma is effective with acceptable late complications. Our study and method offers a definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma patients.

  20. Californium-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy alone for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma: A definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yanli; Shan, Jinlu; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Kewei; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the 4-year results of 32 patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma treated solely with californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT). Patients were solicited into the study from January 2008 to June 2011. All the patients had refused surgery or surgery was contraindicated. The patients were treated with Cf-252 neutron ICBT using a novel 3.5-cm diameter off-axis 4-channel intrarectal applicator designed by the authors. The dose reference point was defined on the mucosa surface, with a total dose of 55–62 Gy-eq/4 f (13–16 Gy-eq/f/wk). All the patients completed the radiotherapy in accordance with our protocol. The rectal lesions regressed completely, and the acute rectal toxicity was mild (≤G2). The 4-year local control, overall survival, disease-free survival, and late complication (≥G2) rates were 96.9%, 90.6%, 87.5% and 15.6%, respectively. No severe late complication (≥G3) occurred. The mean follow-up was 56.1 ± 16.0 months. At the end of last follow-up, 29 patients remained alive. The mean survival time was 82.1 ± 2.7 months. Cf-252 neutron ICBT administered as the sole treatment (without surgery) for patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma is effective with acceptable late complications. Our study and method offers a definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:28094790

  1. Anal Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Jennifer Sam; Shashidharan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Anal fissure (fissure-in-ano) is a very common anorectal condition. The exact etiology of this condition is debated; however, there is a clear association with elevated internal anal sphincter pressures. Though hard bowel movements are implicated in fissure etiology, they are not universally present in patients with anal fissures. Half of all patients with fissures heal with nonoperative management such as high fiber diet, sitz baths, and pharmacological agents. When nonoperative management fails, surgical treatment with lateral internal sphincterotomy has a high success rate. In this chapter, we will review the symptoms, pathophysiology, and management of anal fissures. PMID:26929749

  2. [Cryptoglandular anal fistulas].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Zeitoun, Jean-David; Bauer, Pierre; Atienza, Patrick

    2008-10-31

    Cryptoglandular anal fistulae are the most frequently occurring form of perianal sepsis. Characteristically they have an endoanal primary opening, a fistula track and an abscess and/or an external purulent opening. Antibiotic therapy is not of use in initial management except in special cases. Treatment of an abscess, if present, is required urgently and when possible, consists of its incision under local anaesthesia. Treating the fistula track occurs afterwards and aims to dry up the purulent discharge and avoid recurrence of the abscess by means of surgical fistulotomy. These techniques are very effective in terms of eradication of the problem but there is sometimes a risk of anal incontinence. This explains the increasing interest in sphincter preserving techniques using the advancement of a covering flap of rectal mucosa and the injection of fibrin glue.

  3. Effects of Larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) on Heart Rate and Electrically Evoked Electromyographic Response of the External Anal Sphincter in Cattle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norditerpenoid alkaloids of larkspur (Delphinium spp.) are competitive antagonists of nicotinic cholinergic receptors and poison cattle with, high mortality. Of the norditerpenoids, the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine type (MSAL-type) alkaloids are most toxic. This study tested the hyp...

  4. Ascending and descending reflex motor activity of recto-anal region-cholinergic and nitrergic implications in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, Radomir; Ivancheva, Christina; Brading, Alison F; Itzev, Dimitar; Rakovska, Angelina; Negrev, Negrin

    2009-04-29

    The implications of cholinergic and nitrergic transmissions in ascending and descending reflex motor pathways of recto-anal region in rat model were evaluated using: (i) electrical stimulation; (ii) triple organ bath; and (iii) morphological techniques. Electrical stimulation to anal canal induced simultaneous ascending contractile responses of longitudinal and circular muscles of proximal rectum, local contraction of anal canal or contraction followed by relaxation of internal anal sphincter when external sphincter was dissected off. The stimulation of proximal rectum elicited local contractions of both rectal layers and descending contractions of internal sphincter or anal canal. Tetrodotoxin (0.1 microM) prevented the electrically elicited events. The ascending excitatory responses and the local and ascending contractions of longitudinal muscle were more pronounced than those of circular muscle suggesting dominant role of ascending reflex pathways and of longitudinal muscle in rectal motor activity. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-containing fibres and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase-positive neurons were observed in myenteric ganglia of rectum and anal canal. NG-nitro-l-arginine (0.5mM) increased the contractile ascending and descending responses. During atropine (0.3 microM) treatment the ascending and descending contractions were suppressed but not abolished and a relaxation revealed in ascending response of circular muscle and in descending responses of internal anal sphincter and anal canal. The relaxation was decreased by NG-nitro-l-arginine and increased by l-arginine (0.5mM). The results suggest that cholinergic excitatory ascending and descending pathways and nitric oxide-dependent inhibitory ascending neurotransmission(s) to rectal circular muscle and inhibitory descending to internal anal sphincter and anal canal are involved in reflex circuitry controlling motor activity of recto-anal region.

  5. [Epidemiology of anal lesions (fissure and thrombosed external hemorroid) during pregnancy and post-partum].

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, L; Batallan, A

    2003-06-01

    Thrombosed external hemorrhoids (TEH) and anal fissure (AF) are 2 frequent sources of anal pains during childbirth. We are going to define their incidences as available in publications and in our experience in Bichat hospital. Then we will define their risk factors. According to Martin's and Corby's studies, AF was observed in 10% of the delivered women. In Bichat hospital we performed a proctological assessment to 165 pregnant women during the last third of pregnancy and within the 2 months following delivery. We observed 2 AF (1,2%) during the first period and 25 (15,2%) during the second. Rouillon et al. reported an incidence of TEH in 12,2% (20/164), while Pradel and al. reported 34% (18/52) of it. In Bichat hospital, 13 women (7,9%) were presenting with TEH during the last third of pregnancy and 33 (20%) in post-partum period. Two studies looked for a statistical correlation between AF and obstetrical, foetal or maternal factors. Corby et al. only pointed the role of constipation. In our study, terminal constipation was the most important risk factor for AF with 5.7 (2.7-12), odds ratio (95% confidence intervals). Rouillon et al. observed more TEH among women with a prolonged first stage labor and a big baby. In our study, a big baby and mother little lips tears were observed more often among women with TEH (P <0,05). Also, we observed only one TEH among the 25 women with caesarean section (4%). Finally, observation that TEH arise immediately after delivery is another argument to support the role of traumatic delivery. We also demonstrated the role of terminal constipation as risk factor for TEH after delivery. To conclude, 1/3 of pregnant women develop AF or TEH after delivery. These 2 pathologies are strongly correlated to terminal constipation. TEH seems equally furthered by traumatic delivery.

  6. HDR brachytherapy for anal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Gyoergy

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of treating anal cancer is to preserve the anal sphincter function while giving high doses to the tumor and sparing the organ at risk. For that reason there has been a shift from radical surgical treatment with colostomy to conservative treatment. Radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy has an important role in the treatment of anal cancer patients. New techniques as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have shown reduced acute toxicity and high rates of local control in combination with chemotherapy compared to conventional 3-D radiotherapy. Not only external beam radio-chemotherapy treatment (EBRT) is an established method for primary treatment of anal cancer, brachytherapy (BT) is also an approved method. BT is well known for boost irradiation in combination with EBRT (+/– chemotherapy). Because of technical developments like modern image based 3D treatment planning and the possibility of intensity modulation in brachytherapy (IMBT), BT today has even more therapeutic potential than it had in the era of linear sources. The combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and BT allows the clinician to deliver higher doses to the tumor and to reduce dose to the normal issue. Improvements in local control and reductions in toxicity therefore become possible. Various BT techniques and their results are discussed in this work. PMID:24982770

  7. Anal Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  8. Stages of Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  9. Electromagnetic assessment of embedded micro antenna for a novel sphincter in the human body.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Ai, Yutao; Jiang, Enyu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a wireless, miniaturized, bi-directional telemetric artificial anal sphincter system that can be used for controlling patients' anal incontinence. The artificial anal sphincter system is mainly composed of an executive mechanism, a wireless power supply system and a wireless communication system. The wireless communication system consists of an internal RF transceiver, an internal RF antenna, a data transmission pathway, an external RF antenna and an external RF control transceiver. A micro NMHA (Normal Mode Helical Antenna) has been used for the transceiver of the internal wireless communication system and a quarter wave-length whip antenna of 7.75 cm has been used for the external wireless communication system. The RF carrier frequency of wireless communication is located in a license-free 433.1 MHz ISM (Industry, Science, and Medical) band. The radiation characteristics and SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) are evaluated using the finite difference time-domain method and 3D human body model. Results show that the SAR values of the antenna satisfy the ICNIRP (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection) limitations.

  10. Application of YAG laser technique in the treatment of anal fistula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-xun; Zhang, Xinrong

    1993-03-01

    The method of treating anal fistula with YAG laser technique is described in this essay. One-hundred-twenty patients have been treated successfully with this method and no recurrence was found in our series. Anal fistula is a common disorder in the anus and rectum. The tunnel of fistula zigzags around the external or internal sphincters. If the drainage is poor, and the skin around the external opening grows rapidly, false healing may occur and cause recurrent abscess. In this case, a fistula can not be cured except by operation.

  11. [Genital and sphincter disorders].

    PubMed

    Joseph, P A; de Sèze, M

    2001-09-01

    Symptomatic bladder dysfunction occurs at some time in most patients with multiple sclerosis. Detrusor hypereflexia and sphincter dyssynergia are the main dysfunctions. Anticholinergic medication is currently the most effective and the most common treatment of overactive bladder with reduced bladder capacity and uninhibited detrusor contractions. Desmopressin, surgery, permanent indwelling catheter or external device are used in some cases. Nevertheless essential to bladder management is understanding to what extent the patient has incomplete emptying while complaining predominantly of symptoms of detrusor overactivity: frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence. Intravesical capsaicin and botulinum toxin injected into the detrusor seems promising means of treating intractable bladder hyperreflexia. If the post-micturition residual volume is raised, intermittent self-catheterization is the most adequate method to achieve bladder emptying of patients with MS. Physical and cognitive disability as well as patients motivation can reduce their ability to perform catheterization. In such situation, alphablockers show moderate efficacy and botulinum toxin urethral sphincter injection or surgical solution may be discussed. Disturbed anorectal physiology is common in MS, but there are as yet few specific treatments. The efficacy of oral sildenafil for treatment of neurogenic erectile failure increases the range of treatment available for men with sexual dysfunction. In women, mechanical remedies, treatment of motor and sensory loss are effective for dyspareunia. Patients of both sexes are likely to welcome to discuss their problem, and counselling or psychotherapy may be of use.

  12. Modern management of anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-07

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of

  13. [German Artificial Sphincter System--GASS. Development and in vitro evaluation of a novel, fully-implantable, highly integrated sphincter prosthesis for therapy of high-grade fecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schrag, Hans J; Padilla, Federico F; Doll, A; Goldschmidtböing, Frank; Woias, Peter; Hopt, Ulrich T

    2004-10-01

    No highly integrated sphincter prosthesis for therapy of major fecal incontinence exists. Therefore, we developed a novel neosphincter, made of polyurethane. The GASS consists of a support ring (SR) which includes a fluid reservoir, fixed on the outer diameter of the SR, and a multi-chamber occluding cuff (C(int)) on the inside diameter. The total inflation volume of C(int) is about 23 cc. The integrated micropump based on piezotechnology measures 30x13x1 mm3 (flowrate 1.4 cc/min, max. backpressure 40,000 Pa) . GASS was evaluated around the external sphincter of isolated porcine anal canals. The threshold of continence was defined as the inflating volume which water ceased to leak through the area occluded by C(int) under an induced rectal pressure of 150 cm H2O. Minimal filling volumes maintained continence for liquids against high luminal pressures. A low intraanal resting pressure (delta p(anal)) induced by activated GASS indicates a little risk of ischemic injury of the anal canal in vivo (median delta p(anal) 24.1 mm hg:15 cc vs 46.9 mm hg:21 cc). In summary, a highly integrated and efficient high-tech neosphincter for the therapy of major fecal incontinence could be realized.

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  15. Inflatable artificial sphincter - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100115.htm Inflatable artificial sphincter - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  16. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  17. Diagnostic imaging features of normal anal sacs in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yechan; Jeong, Eunseok; Park, Sangjun; Jeong, Jimo; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Namsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to provide normal reference features for canine and feline anal sacs using ultrasound, low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiograph contrast as diagnostic imaging tools. A total of ten clinically normal beagle dogs and eight clinically normally cats were included. General radiography with contrast, ultrasonography and low-field MRI scans were performed. The visualization of anal sacs, which are located at distinct sites in dogs and cats, is possible with a contrast study on radiography. Most surfaces of the anal sacs tissue, occasionally appearing as a hyperechoic thin line, were surrounded by the hypoechoic external sphincter muscle on ultrasonography. The normal anal sac contents of dogs and cats had variable echogenicity. Signals of anal sac contents on low-field MRI varied in cats and dogs, and contrast medium using T1-weighted images enhanced the anal sac walls more obviously than that on ultrasonography. In conclusion, this study provides the normal features of anal sacs from dogs and cats on diagnostic imaging. Further studies including anal sac evaluation are expected to investigate disease conditions. PMID:26645338

  18. Cryptoglandular anal fistula.

    PubMed

    de Parades, V; Zeitoun, J-D; Atienza, P

    2010-08-01

    Fistula arising from the glands of the anal crypts is the most common form of anoperineal sepsis. It is characterized by a primary internal orifice in the anal canal, a fistulous tract, and an abscess and/or secondary perineal orifice with purulent discharge. Antibiotics are not curative. The treatment of an abscess is urgent and consists, whenever possible, of incision and drainage under local anesthesia. Definitive treatment of the fistulous tract can await a second stage. The primary aim is to control infection without sacrificing anal continence. Fistulotomy is the basis for all treatments but the specific technique depends on the height of the fistula in relation to the sphincteric mechanism. Overall results of fistulotomy are excellent but there is some risk of anal incontinence. This explains the growing interest in sphincter sparing techniques such as the mucosal advancement flap, the injection of fibrin glue, and the plug procedure. However, results of these procedures are not yet good enough and leave much room for improvement.

  19. Treatment of non-IBD anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Lilli; Hagen, Kikke; Christensen, Peter; Buntzen, Steen; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Andersen, Jens; Krupa, Marek; Qvist, Niels

    2015-05-01

    The course of the fistula tract in relation to the anal sphincter is identified by clinical examination under general anaesthesia using a fistula probe and injection of fluid into the external fistula opening. In the event of a complex fistula or in the case of fistula recurrence, this should be supplemented with an endoluminal ultrasound scan and/or an MRI scan. St. Mark's fistula chart should be used for the description. Simple fistulas are amenable to fistulotomy, whereas treatment of complex fistulas requires special expertise and management of all available treatment modalities to tailor the right operation to the individual patient. The given levels of evidence and grades of recommendations are according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (www.cemb.net).

  20. [Surgical treatment of anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiandong; Zhang, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Anal fistula is a common disease. It is also quite difficult to be solved without recurrence or damage to the anal sphincter. Several techniques have been described for the management of anal fistula, but there is no final conclusion of their application in the treatment. This article summarizes the history of anal fistula management, the current techniques available, and describes new technologies. Internet online searches were performed from the CNKI and Wanfang databases to identify articles about anal fistula management including seton, fistulotomy, fistulectomy, LIFT operation, biomaterial treatment and new technology application. Every fistula surgery technique has its own place, so it is reasonable to give comprehensive individualized treatment to different patients, which may lead to reduced recurrence and avoidance of damage to the anal sphincter. New technologies provide promising alternatives to traditional methods of management. Surgeons still need to focus on the invention and improvement of the minimally invasive techniques. Besides, a new therapeutic idea is worth to explore that the focus of surgical treatment should be transferred to prevention of the formation of anal fistula after perianal abscess.

  1. [Perianal fistula and anal fissure].

    PubMed

    Heitland, W

    2012-12-01

    CRYPTOGLANDULAR ANAL FISTULA: Perianal abscesses are caused by cryptoglandular infections. Not every abscess will end in a fistula. The formation of a fistula is determined by the anatomy of the anal sphincter and perianal fistulas will not heal on their own. The therapy of a fistula is oriented between a more aggressive approach (operation) and a conservative treatment with fibrin glue or a plug. Definitive healing and the development of incontinence are the most important key points. ANAL FISSURES: Acute anal fissures should be treated conservatively by topical ointments, consisting of nitrates, calcium channel blockers and if all else fails by botulinum toxin. Treatment of chronic fissures will start conservatively but operative options are necessary in many cases. Operation of first choice is fissurectomy, including excision of fibrotic margins, curettage of the base and excision of the sentinel pile and anal polyps. Lateral internal sphincterotomy is associated with a certain degree of incontinence and needs critical long-term observation.

  2. Anal Health Care Basics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason; McLemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy. The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate. Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area. Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases. In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists. PMID:27723447

  3. Anal Health Care Basics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason; Mclemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy.The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate.Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area.Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases.In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists.

  4. New techniques for treating an anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Song, Kee Ho

    2012-02-01

    Surgery for an anal fistula may result in recurrence or impairment of continence. The ideal treatment for an anal fistula should be associated with low recurrence rates, minimal incontinence and good quality of life. Because of the risk of a change in continence with conventional techniques, sphincter-preserving techniques for the management complex anal fistulae have been evaluated. First, the anal fistula plug is made of lyophilized porcine intestinal submucosa. The anal fistula plug is expected to provide a collagen scaffold to promote tissue in growth and fistula healing. Another addition to the sphincter-preserving options is the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure. This technique is based on the concept of secure closure of the internal opening and concomitant removal of infected cryptoglandular tissue in the intersphincteric plane. Recently, cell therapy for an anal fistula has been described. Adipose-derived stem cells have two biologic properties, namely, ability to suppress inflammation and differentiation potential. These properties are useful for the regeneration or the repair of damaged tissues. This article discusses the rationales for, the estimated efficacies of, and the limitations of new sphincter-preserving techniques for the treatment of anal fistulae.

  5. Anal fistula: intraoperative difficulties and unexpected findings.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zeid, Ahmed A

    2011-07-28

    Anal fistula surgery is a commonly performed procedure. The diverse anatomy of anal fistulae and their proximity to anal sphincters make accurate preoperative diagnosis essential to avoid recurrence and fecal incontinence. Despite the fact that proper preoperative diagnosis can be reached in the majority of patients by simple clinical examination, endoanal ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging, on many occasions, unexpected findings can be encountered during surgery that can make the operation difficult and correct decision-making crucial. In this article we discuss the difficulties and unexpected findings that can be encountered during anal fistula surgery and how to overcome them.

  6. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  7. Conformal Therapy Improves the Therapeutic Index of Patients with Anal Canal Cancer Treated with Combined Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vuong, Te . E-mail: te.vuong@muhc.mcgill.ca; Kopek, Neil; Ducruet, Thierry; Portelance, Lorraine; Faria, Sergio; Bahoric, Boris; Devic, Slobodan

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with anal canal cancer, in terms of local control (LC), freedom from relapse (FFR), and overall survival (OS) rates, and to estimate long-term toxicity data. Methods and Materials: Sixty historical patients, treated with conventional radiation techniques (C-RT), were used as controls, and 62 consecutive patients were treated with 3D-CRT. Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 54 Gy in 30 fractions delivered continuously, compared with 45-58.9 Gy (median dose, 54 Gy) in a split course in patients treated with C-RT. Chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil with either mitomycin-C or cis-platinum given concurrently with radiation. Survival curves were performed using the Kaplan-Meier model, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis of risk factors. Results: No differences in stage and age distribution were observed between the two groups. Patients treated with 3D-CRT and C-RT had an actuarial 5-year LC rate of 85.1% and 61.1%, respectively (p = 0.0056); the FFR rate was 70.2% and 46.1% (p = 0.0166), and the OS rate was 80.7% and 53.9% (p = 0.0171). In multivariate analysis, factors of significance for LC were nodal (N) status (p < 0.001); for OS, 3D-CRT (p = 0.038), N status (p 0.011), and T status (p = 0.012); and for FFR, 3D-CRT (p = 0.024) and N status (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The use of 3D-CRT allows patients with anal canal cancer to complete radiation and chemotherapy without interruption for toxicity, with significant improvements in LC, FFR, and OS.

  8. The anal reflex elicited by cough and sniff: validation of a neglected clinical sign

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C; Ponsford, S; Swash, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether contraction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) following a voluntary cough is an integral component of the cough response itself, or a reflex response to the abdominal and pelvic floor dynamics induced by the cough. Clinical experience suggests a reflex origin for this response. Objective: To compare motor latencies for intercostal, abdominal, and EAS muscle contraction after transcranial magnetic stimulation with those following voluntary coughing and sniffing. Methods: A needle electrode inserted into the EAS measured responses, which were confirmed by tonic electromyographic recording. Direct motor latencies from the cerebral cortex to the intercostal, rectus abdominis and EAS muscles were obtained using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sniff and cough induced responses were also recorded in these muscles. Results: The results suggest that EAS responses following a voluntary cough or sniff represent a polysynaptic reflex. Conclusions: As the cough induced anal reflex response is consistent and easily elicited, its use in clinical neurological examination is appropriate. PMID:15377694

  9. [Pay attention to the imaging diagnosis of complex anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiyang

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of complex anal fistula has been a significant challenge. Unwise incision and excessive exploration will lead to the secondary branch, sinus and perforation. A simple fistula may become a surgical problem and result in disastrous consequences. Preoperative accurate diagnosis of anal fistula, including in the internal opening, primary track and location of the fistula, extensions and abscess, is important for anal fistula treatment. In the diagnosis of anal fistula, imaging examination, especially MRI plays a crucial role. Localization and demarcation of anal fistula and the relationship with sphincter are important. MRI has been an indispensable confirmatory imaging examination.

  10. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - anus; Squamous cell carcinoma - anal; HPV - anal cancer ... cancer and the human papillomavirus or HPV infection. HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that has been linked to other cancers as well. Other major risk factors include: HIV ...

  11. Normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangdong; Liu, Tieyan; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Jingyi; Chen, Yuefeng; Sun, Pengyu; Wang, Xuesong; Liu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this research, the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males has been studied. Methods: The sagittal, coronal, and axial T2-weighted non-fat suppressed fast spin-echo images of pelvic cavities of 86 Chinese young males were studied. Result: Urethral sphincter complex threaded through the prostate and divided it into 2 parts: transition zone (TZ), periurethral glands internal to the urethral sphincter and peripheral zone (PZ), central zone (CZ), anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFS) zone external to the urethral sphincter. The length of urethral striated sphincter is 12.26-20.94 mm (mean 16.59 mm) at membranous urethra. Conclusions: In this paper, we summarized the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males with no urinary control problems. PMID:26629244

  12. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12%) to after childbirth (21 and 28%) in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women. PMID:20696633

  13. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma presenting as a peri-anal abscess.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Hasanga; Gorissen, Kym; Francis, Leo; Chow, Carina

    2014-06-04

    A non-healing peri-anal abscess can be difficult to manage and is often attributed to chronic disease. This case documents a male in his seventh decade who presented with multiple peri-anal collections. The abscess cavity had caused necrosis of the internal sphincter muscles resulting in faecal incontinence. Biopsies were conclusive for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A de-functioning colostomy was performed and the patient was initiated on CHOP-R chemotherapy. Anal lymphoma masquerading as a peri-anal abscess is rare. A high degree of suspicion must be maintained for an anal abscess which does not resolve with conservative management.

  14. [Colo-anal anastomosis. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Morlino, A; Tramutola, G; Rossi, M T; Scutari, F

    2009-03-01

    The aim of study is to report the results of our experience about ultra-low rectum carcinomas treated with anterior resection and colo-anal anastomosis. The surgery still represents the treatment of choice for the cancer of the rectum. The problems concern the conservation of the sphincter functions (anal and urethral), and sexual function and the reduction of the locoregional recurrences. From 2005 to 2007, 33 patients underwent surgery for low and ultralow rectal carcinoma (30 treated with neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy, and 3 only with surgery). In 16 of these we have performed a colo-anal anastomosis, in 11 an ultralow colorectal anastomosis and in 7 a Miles resection. We report our updated results.

  15. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-05-01

    The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging.Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT-) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT- group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed.One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT- groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma.PCRT had no beneficial

  16. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT–) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT– group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed. One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT− groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma. PCRT had

  17. Interstitial curietherapy in the conservative treatment of anal and rectal cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Papillon, J.; Montbarbon, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Chassard, J.L.; Ardiet, J.M. )

    1989-12-01

    Conservative treatment has become a valid alternative to radical surgery in most cases of cancer of the anal canal and in selected cases of cancer of the low rectum. In this strategy interstitial curietherapy has an appreciable role to play. The results of a series of 369 patients followed more than 3 years indicate that implantation of Iridium-192 is effective not as sole treatment but as a booster dose 2 months after a course of external beam or intracavitary irradiation. The dose delivered did not exceed 20 to 30 Gy and the implantations were always performed in one plane using either a plastic template or a steel fork. Three groups of cases must be considered: (a) among 221 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal, the rate of death related to treatment failures was 20% and among the patients cured more than 90% retained normal sphincter function. (b) In 90 patients with T1-T2 invasive adenocarcinoma of the rectum, Iridium-192 was carried out after four applications of contact X ray therapy. The rate of control was 84%. (c) In 62 elderly, poor risk patients with T2-T3 tumor of the low rectum initially suitable for an abdomino-perineal resection, a tentative extension of the field of conservation was made using a split-course protocol combining a short course of external beam irradiation at a dose of 30-35 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days and an Iridium-192 implant. The rate of death due to treatment failures was 14.5% and among the patients controlled 97% had a normal anal function. These results show that implantations of Iridium-192 may contribute to the control of anal and rectal cancers and may spare many patients a permanent colostomy, but the treatment requires great care in patient selection, treatment protocol, technical details, and follow-up. This treatment policy must be conceived as a team work of radiation oncologists and surgeons.

  18. Anal erogeneity: the goose and the rat.

    PubMed

    Shengold, L

    1982-01-01

    A case is presented in which the patient's traumatically derived intense anal erogeneity (associated with traumatic anxiety as well as with castration anxiety) inhibited his phallic sensations and potency and also his power to sustain productive thought. His passive cravings were disguised and reacted against in his compulsive-exhibitionistically phallic role of a Don Juan. He described at least two levels of anal feelings: a dangerous but exciting, tolerable or even pleasurable tension associated with the imago of the goose; and an unbearable, terrifying overcharged level embodied in the imago of the rat. (He had read of, and had felt himself identified with, Freud's Rat Man.) Contrasts are presented with François Rabelais' account of the instinctual development and anal training of Gargantua, in which the connotations of the goose lead to a happy anal, phallic and intellectual control. Generalizations are ventured about the crucial attainment of command over the anal sphincter for the taming of 'primal affect'(Fliess). With early psychopathology there is a defensive overcathexis of anal control (and of anal mechanisms and character traits) to try to contain over-stimulation. In contrast true anal mastery contributes to the acquisition of optimal genital feelings and functioning and to the capacity for sustaining integrative thinking so necessary for 'owning' one's affects and impulses, and therefore for a feeling of identity. Finally, some remarks of Freud on Rabelais are reviewed in relation to levels of urethral erogeneity, seen as developmental way stations between the anal and the phallic, and partaking of both.

  19. Videourodynamic and sphincter motor unit potential analyses in Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, R; Hattori, T; Uchiyama, T; Yamanishi, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Urinary dysfunction is a prominent autonomic feature in Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), which is not only troublesome but also a cause of morbidity in these disorders. Recent advances in investigative uroneurology offer a better insight into the underlying pathophysiology and appropriate management for urinary dysfunction.
METHODS—twenty one patients with PD (15 men, six women, mean age 64 (49-76), mean disease duration 4 years (1-8 years), median Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 (1-4), all taking 300 mg/day of levodopa (100-500 mg)) and 15 with MSA (eight men, seven women, mean age 59 (48-72), mean disease duration 3 years (0.5-6 years)) were recruited. Videourodynamic and sphincter motor unit potential analyses in the patients with PD and MSA were carried out, looking for distinguishing hallmarks that might be useful in the differential diagnosis of these two diseases.
RESULTS—Urinary symptoms were found in 72% of patients with PD and in 100% with MSA. Filling phase abnormalities in the videourodynamic study included detrusor hyperreflexia in 81% of patients with PD and 56% with MSA, and uninhibited external sphincter relaxation in 33% of patients with PD and 33% of those with MSA. However, open bladder neck at the start of filling was not seen in patients with PD but was present in 53% of those with MSA, suggestive of internal sphincter denervation. Sphincter motor unit potential analysis showed neurogenic motor unit potentials in 5% of patients with PD and in 93% of those with MSA, suggestive of external sphincter denervation. On voiding, detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia was not seen in patients with PD but was present in 47% of those with MSA. Pressure-flow analysis showed that the Abrams-Griffiths number, a grading of urethral obstruction (outflow obstruction >40), in PD (40 in women and 43 in men) was larger than that in MSA (12 in women and 28 in men). Weak detrusor in PD (66% of women and 40% of men) was less

  20. [Choice of surgical procedure and management of postoperative incision for anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaowen; Peng, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Anal fistula is a common disease in general surgery. It is difficult to heal without intervention and surgical treatment is the major treatment. Method of surgical treatment and management of postoperative incision are based on features and classifications of anal fistula. Choosing the appropriate approach in accordance with specific conditions of patients can obtain effective healing and proper protection against anal sphincter, along with the improvement of life quality. Comprehensive evaluation on methods of surgical treatment and managements of postoperative incision for anal fistula is presented in this paper.

  1. Treatment of anal fistula and abscess.

    PubMed

    Pigot, F

    2015-04-01

    The glands of Hermann and Desfosses, located in the thickness of the anal canal, drain into the canal at the dentate line. Infection of these anal glands is responsible for the formation of abscesses and/or fistulas. When this presents as an abscess, emergency drainage of the infected cavity is required. At the stage of fistula, treatment has two sometimes conflicting objectives: effective drainage and preservation of continence. These two opposing constraints explain the existence of two therapeutic concepts. On one hand the laying-open of the fistulous tract (fistulotomy) in one or several operative sessions remains the treatment of choice because of its high cure rates. On the other hand surgical closure with tract ligation or obturation with biological components preserves sphincter function but suffers from a higher failure rate.

  2. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  3. [Application and development of suture-dragging therapy for anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Yao, Yibo; Dong, Qingjun; Liang, Hongtao; Guo, Xiutian; Cao, Yongqing; Lu, Jingen

    2015-12-01

    Traditional Chinese surgical treatment "suture-dragging" therapy is based on medical thread therapy and tight seton drainage in combination of minimal invasive surgical principle. It can preserve the integrity of anal sphincter musculature involved in fistulous tract or abscess and maintain anal function. This article not only describes in detail about the operation points and mechanisms of "suture-dragging" therapy of anorectal fistula, but also reviews the application and modification of anorectal disease.

  4. Reducing the incidence of Obstetric Sphincter Injuries using a hands-on technique: an interventional quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Ole Bredahl; Yding, Annika; Anh Ø, Jacob; Sander Andersen, Charlotte; Boris, Jane

    2016-01-01

    A main concern for women giving birth is the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. In our department the incidence of sphincter injuries was around 8 % among vaginally delivering first time mothers. We aimed to halve the incidence to 4 % or less. A prospective interventional program was instituted. We implemented a hands-on technique with four elements in a bundle of care together with a certification process for all staff on the delivery ward. The incidence of episiotomies served as a balancing indicator. The adherence to three of the four elements of the care bundle rose significantly while the all-or-nothing indicator leveled around 80 %. The median number of deliveries between cases with a sphincter injury increased from 9.5 in the baseline period to 20 during the intervention period. This corresponded with a reduction in the incidence from 7.0 % to 3.4 %. The rate of episiotomy remained low at 8.4 % in this group. By implementing the hands-on technique, we halved the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. Our data suggest that further improvement may be anticipated. The study has demonstrated how implementation of a hands-on technique can be carried out within a quality improvement framework with rapid and sustainable results. PMID:28074131

  5. Controlling anal incontinence in women by performing anal exercises with biofeedback or loperamide (CAPABLe) trial: Design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Jelovsek, J. Eric; Markland, Alayne D.; Whitehead, William E.; Barber, Matthew D.; Newman, Diane K.; Rogers, Rebecca G.; Dyer, Keisha; Visco, Anthony; Sung, Vivian W.; Sutkin, Gary; Meikle, Susan F.; Gantz, Marie G.

    2015-01-01

    The goals of this trial are to determine the efficacy and safety of two treatments for women experiencing fecal incontinence. First, we aim to compare the use of loperamide to placebo and second, to compare the use of anal sphincter exercises with biofeedback to usual care. The primary outcome is the change from baseline in the St. Mark's (Vaizey) Score 24 weeks after treatment initiation. As a Pelvic Floor Disorders Network (PFDN) trial, subjects are enrolling from eight PFDN clinical centers across the United States. A centralized data coordinating center supervises data collection and analysis. These two first-line treatments for fecal incontinence are being investigated simultaneously using a two-by-two randomized factorial design: a medication intervention (loperamide versus placebo) and a pelvic floor strength and sensory training intervention (anal sphincter exercises with manometry-assisted biofeedback versus usual care using an educational pamphlet). Interventionists providing the anal sphincter exercise training with biofeedback have received standardized training and assessment. Symptom severity, diary, standardized anorectal manometry and health-related quality of life outcomes are assessed using validated instruments administered by researchers masked to randomized interventions. Cost effectiveness analyses will be performed using prospectively collected data on care costs and resource utilization. This article describes the rationale and design of this randomized trial, focusing on specific research concepts of interest to researchers in the field of female pelvic floor disorders and all other providers who care for patients with fecal incontinence. PMID:26291917

  6. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  7. Premalignant Lesions of the Anal Canal and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Juan Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) is a rare tumor. However, its incidence has been increasing in men and women over the past 25 years worldwide. Risk factors associated with this cancer are those behaviors that predispose individuals to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and immunosuppression. Anal cancer is generally preceded by high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), which is most prevalent in human immunodeficiency virus-positive men who have sex with men. High-risk patients may benefit from screening. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding, which is present in nearly 50% of patients. Twenty percent of patients have no symptoms at the time of presentation. Clinical staging of anal cancer requires a digital rectal exam and a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Endorectal/endoanal ultrasound appears to add more-specific staging information when compared with digital rectal examination alone. Treatment of anal cancer prior to the 1970s involved an abdominoperineal resection. However, the current standard of care for localized anal cancer is concurrent chemoradiation therapy, primarily because of its sphincter-saving and colostomy-sparing potential. Studies have addressed alternative chemoradiation regimens to improve the standard protocol of fluorouracil, misogynic, and radiation, but no alternative regimen has proven superior. Surgery is reserved for those patients with residual disease or recurrence. PMID:22942800

  8. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction: A Perplexing Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Din, Sana Ahmad; Naimi, Iman; Beg, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is caused by stenosis or dyskinesia of the sphincter of Oddi, leading to blockage of bile drainage from the common bile duct. We present the case of a 16-year-old female with chronic abdominal pain who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis but continued to experience abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting along with persistently elevated ALT and AST levels. Postoperative abdominal ultrasound was nondiagnostic. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed mild reflux esophagitis and mild chronic Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis. Omeprazole was started, but it did not decrease the frequency and severity of the abdominal symptoms. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography did not reveal any pathology. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with manometry confirmed an elevated biliary sphincter pressure. Biliary sphincterotomy was performed, and the symptoms improved. PMID:28100991

  9. Obstetric Sphincter Injury Interacts with Diarrhea and Urgency to Increase the Risk of Fecal Incontinence in Women with IBS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Barbara L.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Palsson, Olafur S; Geller, Elizabeth; Turner, Marsha; Parnell, Brent; Crane, Andrea; Jannelli, Mary; Wells, Ellen; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Lin, Feng-Chang; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To confirm that fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for fecal incontinence (FI), to identify obstetrical risk factors associated with FI in women with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), and to determine whether obstetric anal sphincter injuries interact with diarrhea or urgency to explain the occurrence of FI. Methods The study is a supplement to a diary study of bowel symptoms in 164 female patients with IBS. Subjects completed daily bowel symptom diaries for 90 consecutive days and rated each bowel movement (BM) for stool consistency and presence of urgency, pain, and FI. All female participants from the parent study were invited to complete a telephone-administered 33-item bowel symptom and obstetric history questionnaire which included the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Results Out of 164 women in the parent study, 115 (70.1%) completed the interview. Seventy-four (45.1%) reported FI on their diary including 34 (29.6%) who reported at least one episode per month, 112 (97.4%) reported episodes of urgency, and 106 (92.2%) reported episodes of diarrhea. The mean FISI score was 13.9±9.7. Upon multivariable analysis, FI was significantly associated with parity (p=0.007), operative vaginal delivery (p=0.049), obstetrical sphincter lacerations (p=0.007), fecal urgency (p=0.005), diarrhea (p=0.008), and hysterectomy (p=0.004), but was not associated with episiotomy, pelvic organ prolapse, or urinary incontinence. The synergistic interactions of obstetric anal sphincter laceration with urgency (p=0.002) and diarrhea (p=0.004) were significant risk factors for FI. Conclusion Fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for FI, and they interact with obstetric anal sphincter laceration to amplify the risk of FI. PMID:23321658

  10. Sphincter-saving surgeries for rectal cancer: A single center study from Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Shabeer Ahmed; Chowdri, Nisar A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Mir, Parvez Ahmed; Bashir, Yasir; Nafae, Muntakhab

    2013-01-01

    Summary and Background Data: The goals in the treatment of rectal cancer are cure, local control, and preservation of sphincter, bladder and sexual function. Surgical resection using sharp mesorectal dissection is important for achieving these goals. Objectives: The current treatment of choice for carcinoma rectum is sphincter saving procedures, which have practically replaced the previously done abdominoperineal resection. We performed a study in our institute to evaluate the surgical outcome and complications of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: This prospectivestudy included 117 patients, treated for primary rectal cancer by low anterior resection (LAR) from May 2007 to December 2010. All patients underwent standard total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by restoration of continuity. Results: The peri-operative mortality rate was 2.5% (3/117). Post-operative complications occurred in 32% of the patients. After a median follow up of 42 months, local recurrences developed in 6 (5%) patients and distant metastasis in 5 (4.2%). The survival rate was 93%. Conclusion: The concept of total mesorectal excision (TME), advances in stapling technology and neoadjuvant therapy have made it possible to preserve the anal sphincter in most of the patients. Rectal cancer needs to be managed especially in a specialized unit for better results. PMID:24455643

  11. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  12. Why do we have so much trouble treating anal fistula?

    PubMed

    Dudukgian, Haig; Abcarian, Herand

    2011-07-28

    Anal fistula is among the most common illnesses affecting man. Medical literature dating back to 400 BC has discussed this problem. Various causative factors have been proposed throughout the centuries, but it appears that the majority of fistulas unrelated to specific causes (e.g. Tuberculosis, Crohn's disease) result from infection (abscess) in anal glands extending from the intersphincteric plane to various anorectal spaces. The tubular structure of an anal fistula easily yields itself to division or unroofing (fistulotomy) or excision (fistulectomy) in most cases. The problem with this single, yet effective, treatment plan is that depending on the thickness of sphincter muscle the fistula transgresses, the patient will have varying degrees of fecal incontinence from minor to total. In an attempt to preserve continence, various procedures have been proposed to deal with the fistulas. These include: (1) simple drainage (Seton); (2) closure of fistula tract using fibrin sealant or anal fistula plug; (3) closure of primary opening using endorectal or dermal flaps, and more recently; and (4) ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT). In most complex cases (i.e. Crohn's disease), a proximal fecal diversion offers a measure of symptomatic relief. The fact remains that an "ideal" procedure for anal fistula remains elusive. The failure of each sphincter-preserving procedure (30%-50% recurrence) often results in multiple operations. In essence, the price of preservation of continence at all cost is multiple and often different operations, prolonged disability and disappointment for the patient and the surgeon. Nevertheless, the surgeon treating anal fistulas on an occasional basis should never hesitate in referring the patient to a specialist. Conversely, an expert colorectal surgeon must be familiar with many different operations in order to selectively tailor an operation to the individual patient.

  13. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome.

  14. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure.

  15. [Some critical issues in the diagnosis and treatment of complex anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Ren, Donglin; Zhang, Heng

    2015-12-01

    In the past thirty years, colorectal surgeons have made great progress regarding the diagnosis and treatment of complex anal fistula, including the improvement of the accuracy of the preoperative evaluation of complex anal fistula, the improvement and standardization of the diagnosis and treatment of perianal fistulising Crohn's disease, the application of various "sphincter-sparing" procedures. However, complex anal fistula continues to prove a formidable challenge with a high recurrence rate and high incontinence rate. The variety of the surgical treatment also means that there is still no established "golden standard" with respect to that of the complex anal fistula. According to recent relevant literatures and personal experience, some critical issues in the diagnosis and treatment of complex anal fistula, including the approach to the accurate diagnosis, the value and significance of seton technique, the individual algorithm between the minimal invasive and extensive surgical treatments, the value of biopsy, are discussed in this article.

  16. Modifications to installed Sphincter design gloveports

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, S.S.; Gilkison, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of alternative methods for replacing Sphincter designed gloveports in gloveboxes. In addition, the paper discusses modifications that are required on metal glovebox wall panels to allow replacement of the Sphincter gloveports. A review of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) maintenance records showed that gloveports manufactured by Central Research, Incorporated, provide the lowest risk for failure. This assessment is based on the records of glove-to-port seal life and air in-leakage. These records also indicate the glove changes are made in shorter times with fewer workers than required by alternate gloveport designs studied. These attributes culminate in a significant decrease in radiation exposure and assimilation risk of maintenance personnel replacing gloves. Further, the Central Research design reduces the number of expandable hardware parts required to achieve a glove replacement. This reduction in expendable materials can result in a significant reduction in contaminated waste volume generated during a glove replacement.

  17. Ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT) to treat anal fistula: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, K D; Kang, S; Kalaskar, S; Wexner, S D

    2014-08-01

    Sphincter-preserving approaches to treat anal fistula do not jeopardize continence; however, healing rates are suboptimal. In this context, ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT) can be considered promising offering high success rates and a relatively simple procedure. This review aimed to investigate the outcomes of LIFT to treat anal fistula. We conducted a systematic review of the Pubmed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases, to retrieve all relevant scientific original articles and scientific abstracts (Web of Science) related to the LIFT procedure for anal fistula between January 2007 and March 2013. The search yielded 24 original articles including 1,110 patients; these included one randomized controlled study, three case control studies, and 20 case series. Most studies included patients with trans-sphincteric or complex fistula, not amenable to fistulotomy. During a pooled mean 10.3 months of follow-up, the mean success, incontinence, intraoperative, and postoperative complication rates were 76.4, 0, 0, and 5.5%, respectively. A sensitivity analysis showed that the impact on success in terms of follow-up duration, study size, and combining other procedures was limited. There was no association between pre-LIFT drainage seton and success of LIFT. Ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract appears to be an effective and safe treatment for trans-sphincteric or complex anal fistula. Combining other procedures and a pre-LIFT drainage seton does not seem to confer any added benefit in terms of success. However, given the lack of prospective randomized trials, interpretation of these data must be cautious. Further trials are mandatory to identify predictive factors for success, and true effectiveness of the LIFT compared to other sphincter-preserving procedures to treat anal fistula.

  18. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  19. Amoebic anal fistula: new insight into an old disease.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vivek; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Mishra, Kiran; Mohanty, Debajyoti

    2014-04-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman underwent fistulectomy for low trans-sphincteric anal fistula along with curettage for an associated abscess extending proximally for half a centimeter into the intersphincteric plane. The roof of the cavity became clearly visible after satisfactory culmination of the surgical procedure. Histopathological examination of the fistulous tract and the curetted granulation tissue revealed presence of multiple trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica exhibiting erythrophagocytosis in the background of mixed inflammatory infiltrate. This case report provides the outlook that yields the novel insight into the possible role of Entamoeba histolytica in the pathogenesis and persistence of the fistulous tract.

  20. Anal abscess and fistula.

    PubMed

    Sneider, Erica B; Maykel, Justin A

    2013-12-01

    Benign anorectal diseases, such as anal abscesses and fistula, are commonly seen by primary care physicians, gastroenterologists, emergency physicians, general surgeons, and colorectal surgeons. It is important to have a thorough understanding of the complexity of these 2 disease processes so as to provide appropriate and timely treatment. We review the pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment options for both anal abscesses and fistulas.

  1. Pathology of Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paulo M; Coudry, Renata; Moniz, Camila Motta Venchiarutti

    2017-01-01

    Anal canal cancer is rather an uncommon disease but its incidence is increasing. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most frequent primary anal neoplasm and can encompass a variety of morphologies. HPV infection has a key role in precancerous lesions and cancer development by the production of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Anal squamous precancerous lesions are now classified according to the same criteria and terminology as their cervical counterparts. The p16 expression by immunohistochemistry is a surrogate marker for human papilloma virus (HPV). Many other tumor types can arise in the anal canal, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, malignant melanomas, lymphomas and various types of mesenchymal tumors. For differential diagnosis, immunostaining markers such as CK5/6 and p63 can be used to distinguish SCC and CK7 for adenocarcinoma. Other classical panels can also be applied as in other locations. Currently, there are no biomarkers able to predict prognosis or response to treatment in clinical practice.

  2. Contractility of sphincter pharyngoplasty: Relevance to speech outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Bradley A; Rice, Gale; Muzaffar, Arshad R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sphincter pharyngoplasty has demonstrated time-tested results as a surgical treatment for velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI). However, controversy surrounding the contractility of the transposed muscles persists. Completely unaddressed in the literature is whether the dynamism of the sphincter affects speech outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether active sphincter contraction following sphincter pharyngoplasty influences velopharyngeal closure, nasal emission and hypernasality. METHODS: A prospective analysis of patients with VPI after cleft palate repair undergoing sphincter pharyngoplasty by a single surgeon was performed. Video nasendoscopy and videofluoroscopy were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at three and 12 months. Eighteen consecutive patients with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and VPI were reviewed. The average age of the patients at initial evaluation was 7.3 years, with a range of three to 19 years. Dynamicity of sphincter pharyngoplasty, velar closing ratio (VCR), and lateral wall movement (LWM) were assessed by nasendoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Nasal emission and hypernasality were assessed by perceptual speech examination. RESULTS: For longitudinal comparison, three groups were created: dynamic at three and 12 months (n=12); adynamic at three months and dynamic at 12 months (n=4); and adynamic at three and 12 months (n=2). Perceived hypernasality scores significantly improved at three months (P=0.0001) and showed continued improvement at 12 months (P=0.03), despite no change in VCR and LWM from three to 12 months. There were no significant differences among the three groups at any time point. DISCUSSION: Sphincter pharyngoplasty effectively treats VPI in appropriately selected patients. Although the VCR and LWM remained stable between three months and one year, four of six adynamic sphincters became dynamic. Considering all patients, hypernasality showed continued improvement from three months to one year

  3. Velopharyngeal sphincter physiology in deaf individuals.

    PubMed

    Ysunza, A; Vazquez, M C

    1993-03-01

    Fifty-three deaf subjects with a history of prelingual profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, similar language habilitation with hearing aids, and normal velopharyngeal structures underwent a study protocol including speech evaluation, behavioral pure-tone audiometry, videonasopharyngoscopy, multiview videofluoroscopy, and electromyography of the velopharyngeal muscles. Subjects were divided into two groups: the first group included 13 subjects with normal nasal resonance or mild hypernasality (four normals and nine with mild hypernasality); the second group had subjects with severe hypernasality and severe articulation deficits. Pure-tone thresholds, velopharyngeal closure patterns, and electromyographic activity of velopharyngeal muscles were similar for both groups of subjects. However, in subjects with severe hypernasality, despite normal muscle activity as observed by electromyography, velopharyngeal valving activity lacked rhythm and strength during speech. It is concluded that deaf subjects may present a functional disorder of the velopharyngeal sphincter related to absence of auditory regulation during phonation. Visual biofeedback using videonasopharyngoscopy may be useful for treating this disorder.

  4. OnabotulinumtoxinA Urethral Sphincter Injection as Treatment for Non-neurogenic Voiding Dysfunction – A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chung-Cheng; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction including dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity caused by a spastic or non-relaxing external urethral sphincter can theoretically be treated by injections of botulinum A toxin into the external urethral sphincter. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injections in patients with dysfunctional voiding or detrusor underactivity. Patients with medically refractory dysfunctional voiding (n = 31) or detrusor underactivity (n = 31) were randomly allocated in a 2:1 ratio to receive either onabotulinumtoxinA (100 U) (n = 38) or placebo (normal saline) (n = 24). There were no significant differences in subjective or objective parameters between patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA and those who received saline injection therapy, and the overall success rate was 43.5% (reduction in Patient perception of Bladder Condition by ≥2: onabotulinumtoxinA 36.8% vs placebo 54.2%, p = 0.114). The results were similar between the dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity subgroups; however, a significant reduction in detrusor voiding pressure was only observed in dysfunctional voiding patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA. Repeat urethral sphincter onabotulinumtoxinA injections offered greater therapeutic effects in both dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity patients. For patients with non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction, the success rate of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injection was not superior to placebo. PMID:27958325

  5. Sphincter-saving procedures for distal carcinoma of the rectum.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, T J; Bland, K I

    1989-01-01

    Methods of sphincter preservation were developed more than a century ago. Combining these techniques with adequate anterior resection has permitted the resurrection of sphincter-saving procedures that are currently being applied in the therapy of cancer at every level of the rectum. Although Miles' abdominoperineal resection still remains the "gold standard" for the treatment of low rectal neoplasms, restorative resection may now be possible with equivalent oncologic disease control and survival. Further, current trends also suggest that the abdominoperineal resection is being used less frequently in the treatment of most rectal cancers and is being replaced with sphincter-preserving techniques that afford excellent functional results. In this review, the pertinent anorectal anatomy, current issues, and sphincter-saving surgical techniques presently available for the treatment of distal cancers of the rectum are presented. PMID:2642688

  6. Translational and clinical perspectives on sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kyanam Kabir Baig, Kondal Rao; Wilcox, Charles Melbern

    2016-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is a complex pathophysiologic entity that is associated with significant morbidity causing abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. The purpose of this review is to describe the anatomy and physiology of the sphincter of Oddi, to understand the pathologic mechanisms thought to be responsible for symptomatology, review recent major studies, explore endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies and their efficacy, and to explore future research avenues. PMID:27555792

  7. Rectal atresia and anal stenosis: the difference in the operative technique for these two distinct congenital anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Lane, V A; Wood, R J; Reck, C; Skerritt, C; Levitt, M A

    2016-04-01

    Rectal atresia and anal stenosis are rare forms of anorectal malformations. The aim of the definitive surgical repair in such cases is to preserve the anal canal, the dentate line, and the sphincter complex. We present a case of rectal atresia and anal stenosis to demonstrate the differences in the operative repair. The techniques described leave the anterior wall of the very distal anal canal untouched in both rectal stenosis and anal atresia; however, the dissection of the rectum differs. The atretic rectum in rectal atresia is mobilized and sutured to the anal canal circumferentially. In anal stenosis, the posterior rectum is mobilized in the form of rectal advancement, and the posterior 180° is anastomosed directly to the skin (as in a standard PSARP) with preservation of the anal canal as the anterior 180° of the final anoplasty. These patients have an excellent prognosis for bowel control and fecal continence, and therefore, complete mobilization and resection of the anal canal must be avoided.

  8. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-07-15

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery.

  9. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  10. Anal fissure - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100154.htm Anal fissure - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  11. [Acute anal pain].

    PubMed

    Pittet, O; Demartines, N; Hahnloser, D

    2014-03-05

    Anal pain is a common reason for consultation, whose etiology is varied and should not be limited to the hemorrhoidal disease. The purpose of this article is to conduct a review of the literature on anorectal pathologies most frequently encountered and make recommendations regarding their management.

  12. [Effects of alpha-1-blocking agent in the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia].

    PubMed

    Gotoh, M; Yoshikawa, Y; Otani, T; Kato, T; Kobayashi, M; Kato, K; Saito, M; Kondo, A; Miyake, K

    1990-12-01

    Effects of adrenergic alpha-1-blocking agent, prazosin, in the treatment of detrusor external-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) were evaluated in both experimental and clinical aspects. Experimentally, in the urethral pressure profile in dogs, the maximum urethral closing pressure was depressed after intravenous injection of 1 mg prazosin. When experimental DSD was obtained in dogs by stimulating electrically the unilateral 2nd sacral root, intra-venous injection of 1 mg prazosin inhibited contraction of the external urethral sphincter. Clinically, 74 patients with DSD based on neurogenic bladder from cerebral vascular attack (CVA) (13 cases) and spinal cord injury (61 cases) were retrospectively surveyed in terms of therapeutical effects of prazosin for DSD. Spinal cord injury was subdivided to 4 groups for clinical evaluation; cervical cord injury (C) with complete paralysis, thoracic cord injury (Th) with complete paralysis, lumbar cord injury (L) with complete paralysis and spinal cord injury with incomplete paralysis. Patients with CVA and spinal cord injury with incomplete paralysis showed good response rates in subjective improvement, 69% and 60% respectively. However, those with spinal cord injury with complete paralysis showed a poor response (28% for C, 23% for Th and 14% for L). The amount of residual urine significantly decreased after treatment, in all the groups except that of lumbar cord injury with complete paralysis. In all the groups, however, even after the drug treatment the amount of residual urine ranged from 80 to 170 ml and the rates of needing clean intermittent catheterization unchanged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Artificial urinary sphincter for post-prostatectomy incontinence: a review.

    PubMed

    James, Mary H; McCammon, Kurt A

    2014-06-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. The AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA) is the most commonly implanted artificial urinary sphincter. Having been on the market for almost 40 years, there is an abundance of literature regarding its use, but no recent review has been published. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes and complications of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. A PubMed search was carried out for articles on the artificial urinary sphincter from 1995 to present. The review was centered on articles related to the use of the AMS 800 for stress urinary incontinence in males after prostatectomy. Relevant articles were reviewed. The majority of patients will achieve social continence (1 pad per day) after artificial urinary sphincter implantation; however, rates of total continence (no pad usage) are significantly lower. Patient satisfaction outcomes average greater than 80% in most series. Potential complications requiring reoperation include infection (0.5-10.6%) and urethral erosion (2.9-12%). Revision surgeries are most commonly as a result of urethral atrophy, which ranges from 1.6 to 11.4%. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from reoperation ranges from 50 to 79%, while the 10-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from mechanical failure is 64%. The artificial urinary sphincter is a reliable device with good outcomes. As expected with any prosthetic device, complications including mechanical failure, infection, erosion and recurrent incontinence remain significant concerns. Despite known complications, the patient satisfaction rates after artificial urinary sphincter implantation remain high. Appropriate patient counseling and adherence to surgical principles are imperative.

  14. A new possibility for repairing the anal dysfunction by promoting regeneration of the reflex pathways in the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Katsui, Renta; Kojima, Yu; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Shimizu, Juichiro; Koyama, Fumikazu; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Takaki, Miyako

    2008-04-01

    Moderate rectal distension elicits recto-rectal reflex contractions and simultaneous recto-internal anal sphincter reflex relaxations that together comprise the defecation reflex. Both reflexes are controlled by 1) pelvic nerves, 2) lumbar colonic nerves, and 3) enteric nervous system. The aim of the present study was to explore a novel approach to repairing the defecation reflex dysfunction by using the plasticity of enteric nervous pathways. Experiments were performed in anesthetized guinea pigs with ethyl carbamate. The rectum 30 mm oral from the anal verge was transected without damage to extrinsic nerves, and subsequent end-to-end one-layer anastomosis was performed. Recovery of the defecation reflex and associated reflex pathways were evaluated. Eight weeks after sectioning of intrinsic reflex nerve pathways in the rectum, the defecation reflex recovered to the control level, accompanied with regeneration of reflex pathways. The 5-HT(4)-receptor agonist mosapride (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced the recovered defecation reflex 8 wk after surgery. Two weeks after local treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF: 10(-6) g/ml) at the rectal anastomotic site, the recto-internal anal sphincter reflex relaxations recovered and some bundles of fine nerve fibers were shown to interconnect the oral and anal ends of the myenteric plexus. These results suggested a possibility for repairing the anal dysfunction by promoting regeneration of the reflex pathways in the enteric nervous system with local application of BDNF.

  15. Vagal control of lower oesophageal sphincter motility in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Gonella, J.; Niel, J. P.; Roman, C.

    1977-01-01

    1. The effects of vagal efferent fibre stimulation on the smooth muscle of the lower oesophageal sphincter have been studied on the anaesthetized animal and on the isolated and perfused organ. 2. In both muscle layers (longitudinal and circular) vagal stimulation elicits two types of electromyographic (e.m.g.) potentials: (a) excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) where there is a depolarization of the smooth muscle fibres. E.j.p.s can give rise to spike potentials inducing a contraction of the sphincter; (b) inhibitory junction potentials (i.j.p.s) where there is hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle fibres, often followed by a transient depolarization which may initiate spikes (post-inhibitory rebound). 3. Pure i.j.p.s are observed after atropine treatment which suppresses e.j.p.s. Under these conditions, a long lasting vagal stimulation induces a long duration hyperpolarization concomitant with an opening of the lower oesophageal sphincter followed after the cessation of stimulation by a powerful rebound leading to a strong contraction which closes the sphincter. 4. Several arguments, pharmacological (action of acetylcholine (ACh), atropine and hexamethonium) and physiological (threshold and latency of responses) lead to the following conclusions. Preganglionic vagal fibres are cholinergic and they activate (a) intramural excitatory cholinergic neurones; (b) intramural non-adrenergic inhibitory neurones (purinergic neurones). Preganglionic fibres leading to inhibition have a higher threshold than those leading to excitation. Both excitatory and inhibitory pathways are interconnected inside the intramural network. In particular, activation of intramural inhibitory neurones, by relaxing the oesophagus orally to the lower oesophageal sphincter, inhibits intramural excitatory neurones and subsequently blocks vagal excitatory responses. 5. Two functions may be attributed to the vagal extrinsic innervation: (a) closure of the lower oesophageal sphincter by

  16. Control of belching by the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wyman, J B; Dent, J; Heddle, R; Dodds, W J; Toouli, J; Downton, J

    1990-06-01

    The mechanism that controls venting of gas from the stomach into the oesophagus was studied manometrically in 14 healthy subjects. The stomach was distended abruptly with one litre of carbon dioxide. Gas reflux was characterised by an abrupt increase in basal oesophageal body pressure to intragastric pressure. Reflux of gas from the stomach into the oesophagus occurred during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations that generally had a pattern distinctly different from swallow-induced lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation. Thus, at the onset of an episode of gas reflux lower oesophageal sphincter pressure had relaxed to 3 mmHg, or less, in 96% of instances. After gas loading of the stomach the prevalence of gas reflux was significantly less when the subjects were supine (1.2/10 min) than when they were sitting (6.8/10 min) (p less than 0.001). The lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations associated with most episodes of gas reflux had a distinctive pattern that resembled those of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations associated with acid gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  17. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  18. [Anatomy of the urethral sphincteric vesico-prostatic complex].

    PubMed

    Gadda, F; Carmignani, L; Favini, P; Acquati, P; Avogadro, A; Rocco, F

    2001-09-01

    As 27 different names have been proposed for the components of the urethral sphincter, it is difficult to build a clear anatomical model of it. Starting from a review of the literature and from some personal observations of surgical anatomy, our aim is to draw a vision as much organic as possible of the anatomy of the urethral sphincter. The components of the urethral sphincter are: the bladder neck (preprostatic sphincter), the smooth muscle urethral sphincter, the rhabdosphincter and levator ani muscle. Recently the rhabdosphincter has been proposed as a vertical structure that extends from the pelvic cavity (bladder base) to the perineal cavity. It can be round-shaped or omega-shaped. The anterior insertions are along the anterolateral aspect of the prostate (superiorly) and on the perineal fascia (inferiorly). The posterior insertions are on the Denonvilliers fascia and posterior aspect of the prostatic apex (superiorly) and on the central perineal tendon (inferiorly). The rhabdosphincter has strong means of fixations: anteriorly it is fixed to the pubis by the pubo-urethral ligaments, posteriorly it is supported by the medial fibrous raphe of the perineum. The anteromedial fibres of levator ani muscle are involved in the continence mechanism by their strong relation with the rhabdosphincter and the prostate.

  19. Overview of anal fistula and systematic review of ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT).

    PubMed

    Alasari, S; Kim, N K

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistula management has long been a challenge for surgeons. Presently, no technique exists that is ideal for treating all types of anal fistula, whether simple or complex. A higher incidence of poor sphincter function and recurrence after surgery has encouraged the development of a new sphincter-sparing procedure, ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT), first described by Van der Hagen et al. in 2006. We assessed the safety, feasibility, success rate, and continence of LIFT as a sphincter-saving procedure. A literature search of articles in electronic databases published from January 2006 to August 2012 was performed. Analysis followed Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews recommendations. All LIFT-related articles published in the English language were included. We excluded case reports, abstracts, letters, non-English language articles, and comments. The procedure was described in detail as reported by Rojanasakul. Thirteen original studies, including 435 patients, were reviewed. The most common fistula procedure type was transsphincteric (92.64 %). The overall median operative time was 39 (±20.16) min. Eight authors performed LIFT as a same-day surgery, whereas the others admitted patients to the hospital, with an overall median stay of 1.25 days (range 1-5 days). Postoperative complications occurred in 1.88 % of patients. All patients remained continent postoperatively. The overall mean length of follow-up was 33.92 (±17.0) weeks. The overall mean healing rate was 81.37 (±16.35) % with an overall mean healing period of 8.15 (±5.96) weeks. Fistula recurrence occurred in 7.58 % of patients. LIFT represents a new, easy-to-learn, and inexpensive sphincter-sparing procedure that provides reasonable results. LIFT is safe and feasible, with favorable short- and long-term outcomes. However, additional prospective randomized studies are required to confirm these findings.

  20. Management of patients with biliary sphincter of Oddi disorder without sphincter of Oddi manometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The paucity of controlled data for the treatment of most biliary sphincter of Oddi disorder (SOD) types and the incomplete response to therapy seen in clinical practice and several trials has generated controversy as to the best course of management of these patients. In this observational study we aimed to assess the outcome of patients with biliary SOD managed without sphincter of Oddi manometry. Methods Fifty-nine patients with biliary SOD (14% type I, 51% type II, 35% type III) were prospectively enrolled. All patients with a dilated common bile duct were offered endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy whereas all others were offered medical treatment alone. Patients were followed up for a median of 15 months and were assessed clinically for response to treatment. Results At follow-up 15.3% of patients reported complete symptom resolution, 59.3% improvement, 22% unchanged symptoms, and 3.4% deterioration. Fifty-one percent experienced symptom resolution/improvement on medical treatment only, 12% after sphincterotomy, and 10% after both medical treatment/sphincterotomy. Twenty percent experienced at least one recurrence of symptoms after initial response to medical and/or endoscopic treatment. Fifty ERCP procedures were performed in 24 patients with an 18% complication rate (16% post-ERCP pancreatitis). The majority of complications occurred in the first ERCP these patients had. Most complications were mild and treated conservatively. Age, gender, comorbidity, SOD type, dilated common bile duct, presence of intact gallbladder, or opiate use were not related to the effect of treatment at the end of follow-up (p > 0.05 for all). Conclusions Patients with biliary SOD may be managed with a combination of endoscopic sphincterotomy (performed in those with dilated common bile duct) and medical therapy without manometry. The results of this approach with regards to symptomatic relief and ERCP complication rate are comparable

  1. Anal involvement in pemphigus vularis.

    PubMed

    Khezri, Somayeh; Mahmoudi, Hamid-Reza; Masoom, Seyedeh Nina; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Balighi, Kamran; Hosseini, S Hamed; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucosa. Anal mucosa may be involved in PV, but the frequency and clinical profile are not fully ascertained. Objective. The aim was to investigate the involvement of the anal area in newly diagnosed PV patients. Patients and Methods. A total of 168 consecutive newly diagnosed PV patients were enrolled. Anal symptoms and signs, involvement of other body sites, and severity of disease were recorded. Results. A total of 47 out of 168 patients (27.9%) had involvement of the anal area. Anal involvement was significantly associated with PV lesions in ophthalmic (P = 0.03), nasal (P = 0.02), and genital mucosa (P < 0.001) but not the oral cavity (P = 0.24). There was a significant association between number of involved mucosal sites and anal involvement (P < 0.001). Anal involvement was associated with oral severity (P = 0.02). Constipation was the most frequent symptom (73.8%) followed by pain on defecation (50%). Seventeen patients (36%) were symptom-free. Erosion was the most frequent sign (91.5%). Conclusion. Anal involvement in PV seems to be more frequent than previously assumed. Routine anal examination is recommended even in asymptomatic patients as anal involvement appears to correlate with the severity of PV.

  2. Anal anatomy and normal histology.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Priti

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this article is the anatomy and histology of the anal canal, and its clinical relevance to anal cancers. The article also highlights the recent histological and anatomical changes to the traditional terminology of the anal canal. The terminology has been adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, separating the anal region into the anal canal, the perianal region and the skin. This paper describes the gross anatomy of the anal canal, along with its associated blood supply, venous and lymphatic drainage, and nerve supply. The new terminology referred to in this article may assist clinicians and health care providers to identify lesions more precisely through naked eye observation and without the need for instrumentation. Knowledge of the regional anatomy of the anus will also assist in management decisions.

  3. A new technique for measuring lower oesophageal sphincter competence in patients.

    PubMed

    Byrne, P J; Stuart, R C; Lawlor, P; Walsh, T N; Hennessy, T P

    1993-09-01

    Oesophageal sphincter measurements were carried out on 80 patients using the stationary pull through technique; Normals (n = 21), Nutcracker (n = 12), Refluxers (n = 21), and Barrett's (n = 26). Sphincter pressure (LOSP), abdominal length of sphincter, and overall sphincter length were measured. The Sphincter Function Index (SFI) was calculated as the product of sphincter pressure and percentage sphincter length (AL) exposed to abdominal pressure. Patients also had routine endoscopy and 24 hour pHmetry. SFI values discriminated between all four groups. LOSP was significantly different for Barrett's (p < 0.01) and Nutcracker (p < 0.01) compared to normals. AL was significant for Refluxers (p < 0.001) and Barrett's (p < 0.001) compared to normals. SFI gives better discrimination than LOSP or AL alone and may be useful in evaluating the response to treatment.

  4. Management of Complex Anal Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Bubbers, Emily J.; Cologne, Kyle G.

    2016-01-01

    Complex anal fistulas require careful evaluation. Prior to any attempts at definitive repair, the anatomy must be well defined and the sepsis resolved. Several muscle-sparing approaches to anal fistula are appropriate, and are often catered to the patient based on their presentation and previous repairs. Emerging technologies show promise for fistula repair, but lack long-term data. PMID:26929751

  5. Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal pouch

    MedlinePlus

    Restorative proctocolectomy; Ileal-anal resection; Ileal-anal pouch; J-pouch; S-pouch; Pelvic pouch; Ileal-anal pouch; Ileal ... RD, Mahmoud N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau J. Colon and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, ...

  6. Efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perianal hidradenitis suppurativa, complicated by anal fistulae: A report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Hirotoshi; Kazama, Shinsuke; Tanoue, Yusuke; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Miyagawa, Takuya; Yamada, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Perianal hidradenitis suppurativa (PHS) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease of the apocrine glands present in the skin and soft tissue adjacent to the anus. It is often misdiagnosed or treatment is delayed, resulting in the formation of an abscess or, in the worst case, leading to sepsis. It is difficult to treat perianal lesions merged with fistulae completely due to its high recurrence rate. Therefore, we should diagnose it correctly and treat it with appropriate methods. Presentation of case We report two cases of PHS with anal fistulae that were examined preoperatively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and treated safely by surgery without any recurrence. Discussion The anal sphincter area cannot be visualized and evaluated directly by fistulography. Also CT has only limited resolution, making it difficult to distinguish between soft tissues and inflammatory streaks. Endosonography is not suitable for the examination of supra-sphincteric or extra-sphincteric extensions, as it is limited by insufficient penetration of the ultrasonic beams. MRI can demonstrate the entire course of the fistulae owing to its high contrast resolution. Conclusion Our findings support the idea that PHS with complicated anal fistulae can be diagnosed accurately using MRI and treated safely and completely with surgery. PMID:26339787

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, H J; DeMeester, T R; Naspetti, R; Jamieson, J; Perry, R E

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the lower esophageal sphincter to reflux of gastric juice is determined by the integrated effects of radial pressures exerted over the entire length of the sphincter. This can be quantitated by three-dimensional computerized imaging of sphincter pressures obtained by a pullback of radially oriented pressure transducers and by calculating the volume of this image, in other words, the sphincter pressure vector volume. Validation studies showed that sphincter imaging based on a stepwise pullback of a catheter with four or eight radial side holes is superior to a rapid motorized pullback. Compared with 50 healthy volunteers, the total and abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume was lower in 150 patients with increased esophageal acid exposure (p less than 0.001) and decreased with increasing esophageal mucosal damage (p less than 0.01). Calculation of the sphincter pressure vector volume was superior to standard techniques in identifying a mechanically defective sphincter as the cause of increased esophageal acid exposure, particularly in patients without mucosal damage. The Nissen and Belsey fundoplication increased the total and intra-abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume (p less than 0.001) and normalized the three-dimensional sphincter image. Failure to do so was associated with recurrent or persistent reflux. These data indicate that three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter improves the identification of patients who would benefit from an antireflux procedure. Analysis of the three-dimensional sphincter pressure profile should become the standard for evaluation of the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:1953093

  8. [Recurrent pancreatitis secondary to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: case report].

    PubMed

    Calzadilla, Jeannette; Sanhueza, Natalia; Farías, Solange; González, Félix

    2016-10-21

    Dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi is a rare disease that causes about 20% of recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis. In order to suspect its existence, it is mandatory to have ruled out all other causes of acute pancreatitis. Then, the disease needs to be classified by degree of dysfunction and have a manometry performed as it is considered the gold standard of diagnosis. Manometry is used to guide treatment and its method of choice is usually an endoscopic sphincterotomy. In this article a case of recurrent pancreatitis is discussed, which after a thorough study that ruled out other etiologies, was diagnosed as a pancreatic-type dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi. The dysfunction was resolved by endoscopic sphincterotomy and the patient had a favorable course without any recurrence of symptoms.

  9. Transduodenal sphincteroplasty and transampullary septectomy for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Tzovaras, George; Rowlands, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and management of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are controversial issues. Both surgical and endoscopic series report modest success in the treatment of this condition. There is evidence from endoscopic series that the Milwaukee classification could predict the clinical outcome after sphincterotomy. We reviewed our long-term results of surgical sphincter ablation for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, in order to correlate outcome with underlining pathology (biliary versus pancreatic) and Milwaukee biliary group classification. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During a 10 year period (1987-1996), 36 patients with either biliary (n = 26) or pancreatic (n = 10) presentation of suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction were selected for surgery according to a standard protocol of investigation and management. All patients were classified according to the Milwaukee classification for the biliary group or its version for the pancreatic group and had transduodenal sphincteroplasty and transampullary septectomy. RESULTS: Despite a trend towards a better outcome in the biliary group (good result 62%, moderate 23%, poor 15%) compared to the pancreatic (good result 40%, moderate 40%, poor 20%) the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.48). Milwaukee classification for the biliary group correlated well with a favourable outcome (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The modest outcome despite careful patient selection for surgery emphasises the need for more objective diagnostic tools. Milwaukee classification appears to be of good predictive value, and a good result can be anticipated in type I or even type II patients. The trend towards a better outcome in the biliary group may reflect the weakness of a drainage procedure to treat patients with parenchymal pancreatic disease. PMID:11890620

  10. Functional coupling between motor and sensory nerves through contraction of sphincters in the pudendal area of the female cat.

    PubMed

    Lagunes-Córdoba, Roberto; Hernández, Pablo Rogelio; Raya, José Guadalupe; Muñoz-Martínez, E J

    2010-01-01

    The question of whether skin receptors might help in the perception of muscle contraction and body movement has not been settled. The present study gives direct evidence of skin receptor firing in close coincidence with the contraction of the vaginal and anal sphincters. The distal stump of the sectioned motor pudendal nerve was stimulated. Single shocks induced a wavelike increase in the lumen pressure of the distal vagina and the anal canal, as well as constriction of the vaginal introitus and the anus. The constriction pulls on and moves the surrounding skin, which was initially detected visually. In the present experiments, a thin strain gauge that pressed on the skin surface detected its displacement. Single shocks to the motor nerve induced a wave of skin movement with maximal amplitude at 5 mm from the anus and propagated with decrement beyond 35 mm. The peripheral terminals of the sensory pudendal nerve and the posterior femoral nerve supply the skin that moves. Sensory axons from both nerves fired in response to both tactile stimulation and the skin movement produced by the constriction of the orifices (motor-sensory coupling). In cats with all nerves intact, a single shock to the sensory nerves induced reflex waves of skin movement and lumen pressure (sensory-motor coupling). Both couplings provide evidence for a feedforward action that might help to maintain the female posture during mating and to the perception of muscle contraction.

  11. Minimally Invasive Anal Fistula Treatment (MAFT)-An Appraisal of Early Results in 416 Patients.

    PubMed

    Chowbey, P K; Khullar, R; Sharma, A; Soni, V; Najma, K; Baijal, M

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive anal fistula treatment (MAFT) was introduced to minimize early postoperative morbidity, preserve sphincter continence, and reduce recurrence. We report our early experience with MAFT in 416 patients. Preoperative MRI was performed in 150 patients initially and subsequently thereafter. The technique involves fistuloscope-aided localization of internal fistula opening, examination and fulguration of all fistula tracks, and secure stapled closure of internal fistula opening within anal canal/rectum. MAFT was performed as day-care procedure in 391 patients (93.9 %). During surgery, internal fistula opening could not be located in 100 patients (24 %). Seven patients required readmission to hospital. Mean visual analog scale scores for pain on discharge and at 1 week were 3.1 (1-6) and 1.6 (0-3), respectively. Mean duration for return to normal activity was 3.2 days (2-11 days). Fistula recurrence was observed in 35/134 patients (26.1 %) at 1 year follow-up. MAFT may be performed as day-care procedure with benefits of less pain, absence of perianal wounds, faster recovery, and preservation of sphincter continence. However, long-term results from more centers are needed especially for recurrence.

  12. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  13. The interaction of glucagon and pentagastrin on the lower oesophageal sphincter in man and dog

    PubMed Central

    Jennewein, H. M.; Waldeck, F.; Siewert, R.; Weiser, F.; Thimm, R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of glucagon on the pressure inside the lower oesophageal sphincter in conscious human subjects and anaesthetized dogs was investigated using the continuous withdrawal method. Glucagon causes a decrease in sphincteric resting pressure in both man and dog and antagonizes the pentagastrin-induced pressure increase of the lower oesophageal sphincter. In experiments on isolated muscle strips of the lower oesophageal sphincter of dogs glucagon decreases the tension and antagonizes the increase in tension induced by pentagastrin. The elevated pressure in patients suffering from achalasia is significantly reduced by glucagon. PMID:4761605

  14. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  15. Risk Factors Associated With Sphincter-Preserving Resection in Patients With Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Liang-Hao; Xing, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Chuan-Gang; Yu, En-Da; Zhong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resection (APR) and sphincter-preserving resection (SPR) are the two primary surgical options for rectal cancer. Retrospectively we collected rectal cancer patients for SPR and APR observation between 2005 and 2007. The patient-related, tumor-related, and surgery-related variables of the SPR and APR groups were analyzed by using logistic regression techniques. The mean distance from the anal verge (DAV) of cancer is significantly higher in SPR than that in APR (P < 0.001). In cancers with DAV <40 mm (SPR, 40 versus APR, 110), multivariate analysis shows that surgeon procedure volume (odds ratio [OR] = 0.244; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.077–0.772; P = 0.016) and neoadjuvant radiotherapy (OR = 0.031; 95% CI: 0.002–0.396; P = 0.008) are factors influencing SPR. In cancers with DAV ranging from 40 mm to 59 mm (SPR 190 versus APR 50), analysis shows that patient age (OR = 2.139; 95% CI: 1.124–4.069; P = 0.021), diabetes (OR = 2.657; 95% CI: 0.872–8.095; P = 0.086), and colorectal surgeon (OR = 0.122, 95% CI: 0.020–0.758; P = 0.024), are influencing factors for SPR. The local recurrence and disease-free survival reveal no significant difference. A significant difference exists in DAV, surgeon specialization, procedure volume, age, diabetes, and neoadjuvant radiotherapy between SPR and APR. PMID:25058761

  16. PERFACT procedure to treat supralevator fistula-in-ano: A novel single stage sphincter sparing procedure

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively perform the PERFACT procedure in supralevator anal fistula/abscess. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging was done preoperatively in all the patients. Proximal cauterization around the internal opening, emptying regularly of fistula tracts and curettage of tracts (PERFACT) was done in all patients with supralevator fistula or abscess. All types of anal fistula and/or abscess with supralevator extension, whether intersphincteric or transsphincteric, were included in the study. The internal opening along with the adjacent mucosa was electrocauterized. The resulting wound was left open to heal by secondary intention so as to heal (close) the internal opening by granulation tissue. The supralevator tract/abscess was drained and thoroughly curetted. It was regularly cleaned and kept empty in the postoperative period. The primary outcome parameter was complete fistula healing. The secondary outcome parameters were return to work and change in incontinence scores (Vaizey objective scoring system) assessed preoperatively and at 3 mo after surgery. RESULTS: Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled and followed for a median of 13 mo (range 5-21 mo). Mean age was 41.1 ± 13.4 years, M:F - 15:2. Fourteen (82.4%) had a recurrent fistula, 8 (47.1%) had an associated abscess, 14 (82.4%) had multiple tracts and 5 (29.4%) had horseshoe fistulae. Infralevator part of fistula was intersphincteric in 4 and transsphincteric in 13 patients. Two patients were excluded. Eleven out of fifteen (73.3%) were cured and 26.7% (4/15) had a recurrence. Two patients with recurrence were reoperated on with the same procedure and one was cured. Thus, the overall healing rate was 80% (12/15). All the patients could resume normal work within 48 h of surgery. There was no deterioration in incontinence scores (Vaizey objective scoring system). This is the largest series of supralevator fistula-in-ano (SLF) published to date. CONCLUSION: PERFACT procedure is an effective single

  17. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  18. Anal fistula. Past and present.

    PubMed

    Zubaidi, Ahmad M

    2014-09-01

    Anal fistula is a common benign condition that typically describes a miscommunication between the anorectum and the perianal skin, which may present de novo, or develop after acute anorectal abscess. Athough anal fistulae are benign, the condition can still negatively influence a patient's quality of life by causing minor pain, social hygienic embarrassment, and in severe cases, frank sepsis. Despite its long history and prevalence, anal fistula management remains one of the most challenging and controversial topics in colorectal surgery today. The end goals of treatment include draining the local infection, eradicating the fistulous tract, and minimizing recurrence and incontinence rates. The goal of this review is to ensure surgeons and physicians are aware of the different imaging and treatment choices available, and to report expected outcomes of the various surgical modalities so they may select the most suitable treatment. 

  19. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery: The Interim Report of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome.Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection.Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups.BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829).

  20. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome. Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection. Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups. BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829). PMID:27149496

  1. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cantril, S.T.; Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  2. Frequencies and cyclical pattern of the human sphincter of Oddi phasic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Torsoli, A; Corazziari, E; Habib, F I; De Masi, E; Biliotti, D; Mazzarella, R; Giubilei, D; Fegiz, G

    1986-01-01

    Basal frequency of sphincter of Oddi phasic contractility has been repeatedly measured during endoscopic manometry and reported to range, in control subjects, from (M +/- SE) 3.0 +/- 0.6 to 7.5 +/- 0.7 c/min. Recently, high frequency (greater than 8 c/min) phasic contractions or absence of phasic activity were recorded in patients with postcholecystectomy or pancreatic complaints, possibly suggesting a sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. In the present study, sphincter of Oddi (biliary tract) phasic contractility was measured by perendoscopic manometry in 13 subjects without specific clinical symptoms of biliopancreatic disease and with a normal common bile and pancreatic duct at ERCP. Four T-tube patients with no evidence of common bile duct stones or papillary stenosis were studied for comparison (transductal sphincter of Oddi manometry). Basal frequency was found to range from 0 to 7 c/min (M +/- SE: 2.99 +/- 0.46) in perendoscopic manometry (85 min of recording time) and from 0 to 12 c/min (2.0 +/- 0.3) in transductal manometry (2546 min of recording time). Long lasting transductal recordings also showed that frequency of activity derived from the sphincter area varied cyclically in close relation with the duodenal migrating motor complex. It is concluded that the sphincter of Oddi in man is likely to participate in the interdigestive gastrointestinal motor activity and that short perendoscopic recordings may not be representative of the overall sphincter of Oddi activity. PMID:3957107

  3. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26035487

  4. Sphincter of Oddi Function and Risk Factors for Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Afghani, Elham; Lo, Simon K.; Covington, Paul S.; Cash, Brooks D.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    The sphincter of Oddi (SO) is a smooth muscle valve regulating the flow of biliary and pancreatic secretions into the duodenum, initially described in 1887 by the Italian anatomist, Ruggero Oddi. SO dysfunction (SOD) is a broad term referring to numerous biliary, pancreatic, and hepatic disorders resulting from spasms, strictures, and relaxation of this valve at inappropriate times. This review brings attention to various factors that may increase the risk of SOD, including but not limited to: cholecystectomy, opiates, and alcohol. Lack of proper recognition and treatment of SOD may be associated with clinical events, including pancreatitis and biliary symptoms with hepatic enzyme elevation. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches are discussed to help recognize, prevent, and treat SOD. Future studies are needed to assess the treatment benefit of agents such as calcium-channel blockers, glyceryl trinitrate, or tricyclic antidepressants in patients with SOD. PMID:28194398

  5. Sphincter of Oddi Function and Risk Factors for Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Elham; Lo, Simon K; Covington, Paul S; Cash, Brooks D; Pandol, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    The sphincter of Oddi (SO) is a smooth muscle valve regulating the flow of biliary and pancreatic secretions into the duodenum, initially described in 1887 by the Italian anatomist, Ruggero Oddi. SO dysfunction (SOD) is a broad term referring to numerous biliary, pancreatic, and hepatic disorders resulting from spasms, strictures, and relaxation of this valve at inappropriate times. This review brings attention to various factors that may increase the risk of SOD, including but not limited to: cholecystectomy, opiates, and alcohol. Lack of proper recognition and treatment of SOD may be associated with clinical events, including pancreatitis and biliary symptoms with hepatic enzyme elevation. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches are discussed to help recognize, prevent, and treat SOD. Future studies are needed to assess the treatment benefit of agents such as calcium-channel blockers, glyceryl trinitrate, or tricyclic antidepressants in patients with SOD.

  6. Treatment of gastrointestinal sphincters spasms with botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-05-29

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes reduced in lower esophageal sphincter of patients with achalasia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Zheng, Z; Wang, T; Zhao, C; Zhou, G; Jin, H; Wang, B

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of achalasia remains largely unknown. Considerable evidence reveals that the lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction is due to the lack of inhibitory neurotransmitter, secondary to esophageal neuronal inflammation or loss. Recent studies suggest hydrogen sulfide may act as an inhibitory transmitter in gastrointestinal tract, but study about hydrogen sulfide in human esophagus still lack. The aim of the study was to investigate if hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes could be detected in human esophagus and if the synthesis of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide could be affected in achalasia patients. Tissue samples in cardia, lower esophageal sphincter, 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from achalasia patients undergoing peroral endoscopic myotomy. Control tissues in lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from esophageal carcinoma patients. Expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients and control were detected by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were compared among different parts of esophagus in achalasia patients. Compared with control, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients was significantly reduced (χ(2) = 11.429, P = 0.010). The expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were lower in lower esophageal sphincter than that in 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter, respectively (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, the expression of hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes, cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase, can be detected in human esophagus and is reduced in patients with achalasia, which implicates the involvement of the two hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes in the pathophysiology of achalasia.

  9. The relationship of the sphincter of Oddi to the stomach, duodenum and gall-bladder

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, A. P.

    1967-01-01

    Flow through the sphincter of Oddi was studied by a constant-pressure perfusion apparatus, and by using a constant rate of infusion and measuring pressure changes just proximal to the sphincter. Pressure changes from balloons placed in the gastric antrum and duodenum were recorded. Despite considerable variation in activity and behaviour, the following conclusions were reached. 1. The sphincter of Oddi appears to be partially autonomous but is readily affected by changes in duodenal tone. 2. Reflex inhibition of the sphincter of Oddi is seen on electrical and mechanical stimulation of the gall-bladder but not with passive pressure changes within the gall-bladder. 3. This reflex is relayed through the coeliac ganglion. 4. There is a definite relationship between gastric antral activity and flow through the sphincter of Oddi. This is more obvious when food is present in the stomach. 5. Mechanical or electrical stimulation of the stomach, duodenum, or upper small bowel influences the tone of the sphincter of Oddi. PMID:6065875

  10. Surveillance of Anal Canal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is most frequently a locoregional disease that is amenable to curative therapy in a majority of fit patients. Complete response rates after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) are good, with up to 75% of patients with no evidence of relapse on surveillance. Relapse is most frequently locoregional and is often amendable to salvage surgery with curative intent. Effective surveillance attempts to improve outcomes by identifying recurrent or persistent disease early, managing both acute and late toxicities, and offering reassurance to patients. This article explores the rationale and evidence for surveillance programs after definitive CRT.

  11. Function of upper esophageal sphincter during swallowing: the grabbing effect.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Kahrilas, P J

    1997-05-01

    This study investigated deglutitive axial force developed within the pharynx, upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and cervical esophagus. Position and deglutitive excursion of the UES were determined using combined manometry and videofluoroscopy in eight healthy volunteers. Deglutitive clearing force was quantified with a force transducer to which nylon balls of 6- or 8-mm diameter were tethered and positioned within the oropharynx, hypopharynx, UES, and cervical esophagus. Axial force recordings were synchronized with videofluoroscopic imaging. Clearing force was dependent on both sphere diameter (P < 0.05) and location, with greater force exhibited in the hypopharynx and UES compared with the oropharynx and esophagus (P < 0.05). Within the UES, the onset of traction force coincided with passage of the pharyngeal clearing wave but persisted well beyond this. On videofluoroscopy, the persistent force was associated with the aboral motion of the ball caught within the UES. Force abated with gradual slippage of the UES around the ball. The force attributable to the combination of UES contraction and laryngeal descent was named the grabbing effect. The grabbing effect functions to transfer luminal contents distal to the laryngeal inlet at the end of the pharyngeal swallow, presumably acting to prevent regurgitation and/or aspiration of swallowed material.

  12. The impact of androgen deprivation on artificial urinary sphincter outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, George C.; Linder, Brian J.; Rivera, Marcelino E.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Rangel, Laureano J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) causes systemic tissue atrophy. It is unclear if this tissue atrophy adversely impacts artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) outcomes. We sought to evaluate the effect of ADT on adverse AUS outcomes. Methods We retrospectively identified 518 men undergoing primary AUS placement at our institution between 1998 and 2014. Rates of device explant for infection/erosion, mechanical failure, and urethral atrophy in men with >6 months of ADT use within 2 years prior to AUS placement were compared to ADT naive men. Results Fifty of the patients (50/518, 9.7%) had >6 months of ADT use within 2 years prior to AUS placement while 442 were ADT naive. Multivariable survival analysis of AUS events by competing risks failed to show any effect of ADT on device explantation for infection/erosion (HR 1.12, P=0.68), replacement for mechanical failure (HR 0.92, P=0.77), or urethral atrophy (HR 0.77, P=0.46). Conclusions This study did not show evidence supporting differences in adverse AUS outcomes between men with ADT use and ADT naive men. PMID:27785433

  13. Spinal stimulation of the upper lumbar spinal cord modulates urethral sphincter activity in rats after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Abud, Edsel M; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Havton, Leif A; Chang, Huiyi H

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), the neurogenic bladder is observed to develop asynchronous bladder and external urethral sphincter (EUS) contractions in a condition known as detrusor-sphincter dyssnergia (DSD). Activation of the EUS spinal controlling center located at the upper lumbar spinal cord may contribute to reduce EUS dyssynergic contractions and decrease urethral resistance during voiding. However, this mechanism has not been well studied. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of epidural stimulation (EpS) over the spinal EUS controlling center (L3) in combination with a serotonergic receptor agonist on EUS relaxation in naive rats and chronic (6-8 wk) T8 SCI rats. Cystometrogram and EUS electromyography (EMG) were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of 5HT-1A receptor agonist and antagonist. The latency, duration, frequency, amplitude, and area under curve of EpS-evoked EUS EMG responses were analyzed. EpS on L3 evoked an inhibition of EUS tonic contraction and an excitation of EUS intermittent bursting/relaxation correlating with urine expulsion in intact rats. Combined with a 5HT-1A receptor agonist, EpS on L3 evoked a similar effect in chronic T8 SCI rats to reduce urethral contraction (resistance). This study examined the effect of facilitating the EUS spinal controlling center to switch between urine storage and voiding phases by using EpS and a serotonergic receptor agonist. This novel approach of applying EpS on the EUS controlling center modulates EUS contraction and relaxation as well as reduces urethral resistance during voiding in chronic SCI rats with DSD.

  14. Characterization of ionic currents of circular smooth muscle cells of the canine pyloric sphincter.

    PubMed

    Vogalis, F; Sanders, K M

    1991-05-01

    1. The ionic currents of circular muscle cells from canine pyloric sphincter were characterized using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. 2. Subpopulations of circular muscle cells from the myenteric and submucosal halves of the circular layer were isolated and studied separately to determine whether differences in the currents expressed by these cells could explain differences in electrical behaviour observed in situ. 3. Resting potentials of isolated cells were about 20 mV positive to cells in intact muscles. Polarization under current clamp to the level of tissue resting potentials caused spontaneous discharge of action potentials in many cells. 4. Outward current measured under voltage clamp could be divided into a voltage-dependent component and a voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent component. The latter was affected by manipulations of external [Ca2+], nifedipine and dialysis of cells with EGTA. 5. A few cells exhibited a channel that was activated with hyperpolarization. These channels produced inward current at potentials positive to the potassium reversal potential, EK, and reversed at -13 mV. 6. Inward currents, recorded from Cs(+)-loaded cells, were characterized by a transient phase and a sustained phase that persisted throughout the test depolarization. The inward current was reduced by nifedipine but in some cells a nifedipine-resistant component was observed. 7. There were no fundamental differences in the ionic currents recorded from circular muscle cells from the myenteric and submucosal regions, suggesting that the electrical activity of the tissue must be dependent upon structural characteristics (i.e. electrical coupling, fibre bundle dimensions, etc.) of the tissue. 8. The ionic conductance characterized can be related to many of the excitable events recorded from pyloric muscles.

  15. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; Dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs.

  16. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs. PMID:27279406

  17. Comparative study of glyceryl trinitrate ointment versus surgical management of chronic anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Leo Francis; Shindhe, Vittal V; Aithala, P Sathyamoorthy; Martis, John J S; Shenoy, H Divakar

    2011-08-01

    Chronic Anal Fissure (CAF) is common perineal condition and well-known painful entity. Standard surgical treatment even though available, may require long hospital stay and sometimes have worrying complications like anal incontinence. So non-surgical treatment, Glyceryl Trinitrate has been shown to be an effective for chronic anal fissure. It decreases anal tone and ultimately heals the anal fissure. The present study is the attempt to know the efficacy of 0.2% Glyceryl Trinitrate ointment in the treatment of chronic anal fissure and to compare the effectiveness of 0.2% Glyceryl Trinitrate ointment (GTN) versus fissurectomy with lateral internal sphincterotomy (LIS) and fissurectomy with posterior internal sphincterotomy (PIS) in the management of chronic anal fissure. This is a prospective comparative study of management of chronic anal fissure done in our hospital during the period of one and half year from October 2005 to March 2007. Thirty patients treated with 0.2% Glyceryl Trinitrate ointment and 30 patients treated with fissurectomy and lateral internal sphincterotomy and 30 patients treated with posterior internal sphincterotomy, for chronic anal fissure were selected for study. A single brand of 0.2% Glyceryl Trinitrate ointment (Nitrogesic) used for trial arm. Dose of administration was 1.5 cm to 2 cm in the anal canal with device provided by manufacturers of the proprietary preparation and applied twice a daily for 12 weeks. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks and thereafter evaluated for relief of symptoms in all three groups. Observations were recorded at 2 weeks; 6 weeks and 12 weeks of follow up period, regarding symptoms like pain and bleeding during defecation, healing of CAF and also for side effects like headache in GTN group and flatus, fecal incontinence in surgical groups. Data collected in proforma and analyzed. Study revealed CAF was more in male 59 patients (66%) than the female 31 patients (34%), the ratio being 1: 0.52. The

  18. Gastrointestinal hormones and motility of the human sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Suzuki, H; Hada, R; Sasaki, M; Endoh, M

    1985-07-01

    We investigated the mechanism of humoral control of bile discharge into the duodenum. The actions of the GB, SO and duodenum were monitered by cinecholecystocholangiogrphy combined with manometry of the SO area using a hydraulic-capillary infusion system or MIKRO-TIP, and these were correlated with the plasma concentrations of GI hormones. We concluded that one of the most significant roles of the sphincter of Oddi is to limit bile flow. This postulation was favored by the observation of so-called 'spasm' of the SO where 8 to 10 contractions per min., in contrast to 'normal' contraction of 2 to 4 per min., were seen. On this special occasion, no discharge of the contrast material into the duodenum was noticed. Exogenous or endogenous CCK causes a coordinated action of the GB contraction, the SO relaxation and relaxation of the adjacent segment of the duodenum, resulting in an effective discharge of bile into the duodenum. The effect of Pancreozymin on bile discharge revealed by endoscopic cinematography was that Pancreozymin first made the orifice of the papilla of Vater widely open with a profuse bile flow and following this, caused a repeated shuttering action of the orifice with minimal discharge of bile. This observation opposes the opinion that active SO contractile activity is necessary to bile flow into the duodenum. Caerulein or CCK-33 caused no 'post-inhibition' enhancement of the SO activity that was seen in case of Pancreozymin administration. Motilin, calcium or other substances contained in Pancreozymin (Boots) might be causative for this enhancement.

  19. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Anal Cancer About Anal Cancer What’s New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... cancer cells is expected to help scientists develop new drugs to fight this disease. Early detection Ongoing ...

  20. Effects of ethanol on the sphincter of Oddi: an endoscopic manometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Viceconte, G

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ethanol, given either intragastrically or intravenously, on the sphincter of Oddi was evaluated by endoscopic manometry. In 12 subjects intragastric ethanol (150 ml of 32%) was given over 10 minutes. In five control subjects saline solution (150 ml of 0.9%) was given intragastrically instead of ethanol. In five other subjects ethanol was infused intravenously (6 ml/kg of 10%) for 36 minutes. Ethanol given intragastrically produced a significant inhibitory effect on sphincter of Oddi pressure. Peak pressure fell from a control value of 75.7 +/- 26.35 mmHg to 39 +/- 15.39 mmHg (p less than 0.001) at 35 minutes. Basal pressure fell from a control value of 30.17 +/- 19.47 mmHg to 11.83 +/- 6.35 mmHg (p less than 0.01) at 35 minutes. Wave height fell from a control value of 41.33 +/- 15.4 mmHg to 27.16 +/- 11.25 mmHg (p less than 0.02) at 35 minutes. No effects on sphincter of Oddi wave frequency were observed. No significant modifications of sphincter motor activity were observed after intragastric saline infusion. Ethanol given intravenously also produced an appreciable inhibitory effect on sphincter of Oddi pressure, without affecting its wave frequency. PMID:6848429

  1. [Internal and external haemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Schuurman, J P; Go, P M N Y H

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present 3 cases of patients with different types of haemorrhoidal disease. The first patient is a 27-year-old woman who had been experiencing incidental rectal blood loss without pain during defecation for 3 months. The second patient is a 76-year-old woman who had been bothered by varying degrees of pain from a swelling nearby the anus for 1 year. The third case involves a 31-year-old man who had had continuous severe pain in the anal area for 3 consecutive days. The first patient appeared to have internal hemorrhoids, whereas different forms of external hemorrhoids affected the patients in the other 2 cases. Internal haemorrhoids develop from the intraluminal corpus cavernosum recti; external haemorrhoids from the perianal marginal veins. Patients with internal haemorrhoids present with symptoms that include blood loss and prolaps feeling during defecation. In patients with external haemorrhoids pain is the prominent symptom. Internal haemorrhoids are treated either conservatively or surgically, depending upon their severity. Considering external haemorrhoidal disease surgical treatment provides the most rapid and persistent relief of symptoms.

  2. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  3. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  4. Action of cholecystokinin and caerulein on the rabbit sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Sarles, J C; Bidart, J M; Devaux, M A; Echinard, C; Castagnini, A

    1976-01-01

    The action of cholecystokinin (CCK) and caerulein upon the rabbit sphincter of Oddi was investigated by electromyography, manometry and measuring of the flow. Intravenous injection of CCK resulted in a marked rise of the sphincter activity with a maximum at the 1st min and return to the basal level at the 10th min. Injection of increasing doses of hormone showed that the effect was proportional to the logarithm of the dose. The same results were obtained with caerulein. Parallely, CCK provoked a rise of the biliary pressure also proportional to the logarithm of the dose and a reduction to the biliary flow. The discrepancies between these results and some other experiments are discussed. It is concluded that, in the rabbit, CCK increases the activity of the sphincter of Oddi.

  5. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-02

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer.

  6. Anal melanosis diagnosed by reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cinotti, Elisa; Chol, Christelle; Perrot, Jean Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Forest, Fabien; Cambazard, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    Until now, in vivo reflectance-mode confocal microscopy (IVCM) has been applied only to pigmented lesions of the vulvar and oral mucosa, but not to anal mucosa lesions. We present the first case in which IVCM has been used to diagnose anal melanosis. Clinical and dermoscopic features were of concern while IVCM found the draped pattern already described for genital melanosis. IVCM adds information to the clinical and dermatoscopic examination and allows skin biopsies to be avoided. Further studies are needed to define the IVCM features of anal melanosis and to compare the performance of IVCM with the findings of histological examinations.

  7. Motor function of the opossum sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed Central

    Toouli, J; Dodds, W J; Honda, R; Sarna, S; Hogan, W J; Komarowski, R A; Linehan, J H; Arndorfer, R C

    1983-01-01

    We studied the opossum sphincter of Oddi (SO) because in this species the SO is approximately 3 cm in length and its extraduodenal location permits recording of motor activity with negligible interference from duodenal motor activity. The SO segment of 120 animals was evaluated by one or more of the following: (a) intraluminal manometry; (b) electromyography; (c) common bile duct (CBD) flow monitored by a drop counter; (d) cineradiography of intraductal contrast medium; and (e) histologic examination. SO pull-throughs using an infused catheter of 0.6-mm o.d. invariably showed a high pressure zone (HPZ) of 18 +/- 3 SE mm Hg in the terminal 4-5 mm of the SO segment. This HPZ had a narrow lumen, 0.5-0.7 mm in diam, and prominent circular muscle. The HPZ in the terminal SO had both active and passive components. HPZ with minimal amplitude and a paucity of underlying smooth muscle were present inconstantly at the junction of the SO segment with the CBD and pancreatic duct, respectively. The dominant feature of the SO segment was rhythmic peristaltic contractions that originated in the proximal SO and propagated toward the duodenum. These contractions occurred spontaneously at a rate of 2-8/min, ranged up to 200 mm Hg in magnitude, had a duration of approximately 5 s and were not abolished by tetrodotoxin. Concurrent myoelectric and manometric recordings showed that each phasic contraction was immediately preceded by an electrical spike burst. Simultaneous recordings of cineradiography, CBD inflow of contrast medium, SO manometry, and SO electromyography indicated that rhythmic peristaltic contractions stripped contrast medium from the SO into the duodenum. During SO systole, CBD emptying was transiently interrupted, whereas SO filling occurred during the diastolic interval between SO peristaltic contractions. SO distention increased the frequency of SO peristalsis. We conclude that (a) the dominant feature of the opossum SO is rhythmic peristaltic contractions that

  8. [Laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Takashi; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with anal fistula 50 years previously. He complained of mucous and bloody stools. He was diagnosed with a carcinoma associated with anal fistula after biopsy. Image examination showed that the tumor was filled with mucinous substances and that it had invaded the levator ani muscle, with left external iliac and left inguinal lymph node metastases. Therefore, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cancer was administered. After chemoradiotherapy, the tumor and metastatic lymph nodes reduced in size. We performed laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection. Histopathologically, the tumor was revealed as a mucinous adenocarcinoma, but no cancer cells were present on the surgical margin. This case suggested that preoperative chemoradiotherapy could be effective for locally advanced carcinoma associated with anal fistula.

  9. Assessment of long-term quality of life in patients with anal carcinomas treated by radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Allal, A S; Sprangers, M A G; Laurencet, F; Reymond, M A; Kurtz, J M

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess long-term Quality of Life (QOL) in patients treated by radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for anal carcinomas. Patients with a maximum age of 80 years, and who were alive at least 3 years following completion of treatment with a functioning anal sphincter and without active disease, were selected for this study. Of 52 such patients identified, 41 (79%) were evaluable. There were 35 females and six males with a median age of 71 years (55–80). The median follow-up interval was 116 months (range 37–218). QOL was assessed using two self-rating questionnaires developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer: one for cancer-specific QOL (EORTC QLQ-C30) and one for site-specific QOL (EORTC QLQ-CR38). For the function scales a higher score represents a higher level of functioning (100 being the best score), whereas for the symptom scales a higher score indicates a higher level of symptomatology/problems (0 being the best score). For the QLQ-C30, the functional scale scores ranged from 71 (global quality of life) to 85 (role function) and the symptom scale scores from 6 (nausea-vomiting) to 28 (diarrhoea). For the QLQ-CR38 module the functional scale scores ranged from 13 (sexual functioning) to 74 (body image) and for the symptom scale scores from 5 (weight loss) to 66 (sexual dysfunction in males). None of the functional and symptom scale scores seemed to be better in patients with longer follow-up. In patients treated with sphincter conservation for anal carcinomas, long-term QOL as measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 appears to be acceptable, with the exception of diarrhoea and perhaps sexual function. Moreover, the subset of patients who presented with severe complications and/or anal dysfunction showed poorer scores in most scales. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408404

  10. Sphincter of Oddi Manometry: Reproducibility of Measurements and Effect of Sphincterotomy in the EPISOD Study

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Alejandro L; Pauls, Qi; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie; Cotton, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The reproducibility of sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) measurements and results of SOM after sphincterotomy has not been studied sufficiently. The aim of our study is to evaluate the reproducibility of SOM and completeness of sphincter ablation. Methods The recently published Evaluating Predictors and Interventions in sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (EPISOD) study included 214 subjects with post-cholecystectomy pain, and fit the criteria of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction type III. They were randomized into 3 arms, irrespective of manometric findings: sham (no sphincterotomy), biliary sphincterotomy, and dual (biliary and pancreatic). Thirty-eight subjects had both biliary and pancreatic manometries performed twice, at baseline and at repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after 1–11 months. Sham arm was examined to assess the reproducibility of manometry, and the treatment arms to assess whether the sphincterotomies were complete (elevated pressures were normalized). Results Biliary and pancreatic measurements were reproduced in 7/14 (50%) untreated subjects. All 12 patients with initially elevated biliary pressures in biliary and dual sphincterotomy groups normalized after biliary sphincterotomy. However, 2 of 8 subjects with elevated pancreatic pressures in the dual sphincterotomy group remained abnormal after pancreatic sphincterotomy. Paradoxically, normal biliary pressures became abnormal in 1 of 15 subjects after biliary sphincterotomy, and normal pancreatic pressures became abnormal in 5 of 15 patients after biliary sphincterotomy, and in 1 of 9 after pancreatic sphincterotomy. Conclusions Our data suggest that SOM measurements are poorly reproducible, and question whether we could adequately perform pancreatic sphincterotomy. PMID:26951046

  11. Dilated common duct sign. A potential indicator of a sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    DeRidder, P.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1984-05-01

    The cholescintigraphic findings of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia (SOD) in a 45-year-old woman with persistent right upper quadrant pain and biliary colic are reported. After an overnight fast, the patient was injected with 5 mCi of Tc-99 disofenin and .02 micrograms/kg of cholecystokinin (CCK) post maximal gallbladder filling. Pre and postcholescintiscans were obtained and gallbladder ejection fractions determined. The hepatobiliary scan was normal, except for a delay in biliary-bowel transit. The gallbladder responded normally to CCK, however, the Sphincter of Oddi responded abnormally, as there was a paradoxical response to CCK manifested by a marked dilatation of the common bile duct. It was postulate that this dilatation (the dilated common duct sign) was due to an inappropriate response of the smooth muscle of the Sphincter of Oddi (contraction vs relaxation) to CCK and was the cause of this patient's biliary colic. The dilated common duct sign should alert the physician to the possibility of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia.

  12. Muscle-Derived Cells for Treatment of Iatrogenic Sphincter Damage and Urinary Incontinence in Men

    PubMed Central

    Gerullis, H.; Eimer, C.; Georgas, E.; Homburger, M.; El-Baz, A. G.; Wishahi, M.; Borós, M.; Ecke, T. H.; Otto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of injection of autologous muscle-derived cells into the urinary sphincter for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence in men and to characterize the injected cells prior to transplantation. Methods. 222 male patients with stress urinary incontinence and sphincter damage after uroloical procedures were treated with transurethral injection of autologous muscle-derived cells. The transplanted cells were investigated after cultivation and prior to application by immunocytochemistry using different markers of myogenic differentiation. Feasibility and functionality assessment was achieved with a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Of the 222 treated patients, 120 responded to therapy of whom 26 patients (12%) were continent, and 94 patients (42%) showed improvement. In 102 (46%) patients, the therapy was ineffective. Clinical improvement was observed on average 4.7 months after transplantation and continued in all improved patients. The cells injected into the sphincter were at least ~50% of myogenic origin and representative for early stages of muscle cell differentiation. Conclusions. Transurethral injection of muscle-derived cells into the damaged urethral sphincter of male patients is a safe procedure. Transplanted cells represent different phases of myogenic differentiation. PMID:22919359

  13. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  14. Recurrent anal fistulae: Limited surgery supported by stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Olmo, Damian; Guadalajara, Hector; Rubio-Perez, Ines; Herreros, Maria Dolores; de-la-Quintana, Paloma; Garcia-Arranz, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the results of stem-cell therapy under a Compassionate-use Program for patients with recurrent anal fistulae. METHODS: Under controlled circumstances, and approved by European and Spanish laws, a Compassionate-use Program allows the use of stem-cell therapy for patients with very complex anal fistulae. Candidates had previously undergone multiple surgical interventions that had failed to resolve the fistulae, and presented symptomatic recurrence. The intervention consisted of limited surgery (with closure of the internal opening), followed by local implant of stem cells in the fistula-tract wall. Autologous expanded adipose-derived stem cells were the main cell type selected for implant. The first evaluation was performed on the 8th postoperative week; outcome was classified as response or partial response. Evaluation one year after the intervention confirmed if complete healing of the fistula was achieved. RESULTS: Ten patients (8 male) with highly recurrent and complex fistulae were treated (mean age: 49 years, range: 28-76 years). Seven cases were non-Crohn’s fistulae, and three were Crohn’s-associated fistulae. Previous surgical attempts ranged from 3 to 12. Two patients presented with preoperative incontinence (Wexner scores of 12 and 13 points). After the intervention, six patients showed clinical response on the 8th postoperative week, with a complete cessation of suppuration from the fistula. Three patients presented a partial response, with an evident decrease in suppuration. A year later, six patients (60%) remained healed, with complete reepithelization of the external opening. Postoperative Wexner Scores were 0 in six cases. The two patients with previous incontinence improved their scores from 12 to 8 points and from 13 to 5 points. No adverse reactions or complications related to stem-cell therapy were reported during the study period. CONCLUSION: Stem cells are safe and useful for treating anal fistulae. Healing can be achieved in

  15. Orthognathic Consequences of Sphincter Pharyngoplasty in Cleft Patients: A 2-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikane, Frances; Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K.; Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.; Wilson, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term sequelae of cleft treatment is paramount in the refinement of treatment algorithms to accomplish optimized immediate and long-term outcomes. In this study, we reviewed sphincter pharyngoplasties as a method of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) treatment in relationship to orthognathic surgery. Methods: Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients, 15 years of age and older, were reviewed for demographics, VPI surgery, revisions, and subsequent orthognathic surgery at 2 institutions. Chi-square test, Student’s t test, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In 214 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.5 years), 61.7% were male, 18.2% had isolated cleft palate, 61.2% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 20.6% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. A total of 33.6% were diagnosed with VPI and received a sphincter pharyngoplasty (mean age, 11.9 years). When subsequent orthognathic surgery was examined, sphincter pharyngoplasty was not associated with maxillary advancement (P = 0.59) but did correlate with an increase in mandibular surgery from 2.8% to 11.1% (P = 0.02). The indications for mandibular surgery in the pharyngoplasty population were related to congenital micrognathia. When cephalometric analyses were evaluated, sphincter pharyngoplasty resulted in a decreased sella-to-nasion-to-B point angle (mean, 79.0–76.3 degrees, P = 0.02) and a higher incidence of normal to class II maxillomandibular relationships as defined by A point-to-nasion-to-B point angles >0.5 (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Sphincter pharyngoplasty decreases anterior mandibular growth and the discrepancy between maxillomandibular skeletal relationships because of the frequent predisposition of cleft patients to maxillary hypoplasia. In patients with congenital mandibular micrognathia, a small increase in mandibular surgeries may occur. PMID:27200238

  16. Utility of a combined test of anorectal manometry, electromyography, and sensation in determining the mechanism of 'idiopathic' faecal incontinence.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, W M; Donnelly, T C; Read, N W

    1992-01-01

    Combined tests of anorectal manometry, sphincter electromyography and rectal sensation were carried out in 302 patients with faecal incontinence (235 women, 67 men). The results obtained were compared with 65 normal subjects (35 women, 30 men). A mechanism for incontinence was identified in all and the majority of patients had more than one abnormality. Two hundred and seventy eight patients (92%) had a weak external anal sphincter, 185 of these (67%, mostly women) also showed abnormal perineal descent, and 14 women showed clinical evidence of sphincter damage as a result of obstetric trauma. Ten per cent of patients with impaired external anal sphincter contraction showed associated evidence of spinal disease (impaired rectal sensation plus attenuated or enhanced reflex external anal sphincter activity). Unlike the other groups, the 'spinal' group contained equal numbers of men and women. Ninety seven patients (32%) had evidence of a weak internal anal sphincter. The external sphincter was also very weak and 92% of these patients also had perineal descent. Eighty two patients (27%) showed an unstable internal sphincter, characterised by prolonged 'spontaneous' anal relaxation under resting conditions and an abnormal reduction in anal pressure after conscious contraction of the sphincter or an increase in intraabdominal pressure. One hundred and forty two patients (47%) had a hypersensitive rectum associated with enhanced anorectal responses to rectal distension. All these patients had an abnormally weak external sphincter, suggesting that the hypersensitive or 'irritable' rectum should not be regarded as a cause of faecal incontinence unless accompanied by external sphincter weakness. Twenty four patients (8%) showed a normal basal and squeeze pressures and impaired rectal sensation; six showed giant rectal contractions during rectal distension. The results show that idiopathic faecal incontinence is not caused by a single abnormality, and it is suggested that

  17. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  18. Effects of substance P on the isolated iris sphincter muscle of the albino rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, A; Mochizuki, M; Masuda, K

    1982-01-01

    Effects of substance P on the isolated iris sphincter muscle of the albino rabbit were studied. The muscle was incubated in an organ bath containing Krebs' physiologic solution and the muscle tension was recorded with an isometric transducer. Substance P induced dose-dependent muscle contraction in the concentration range from 3 x 10(-11) to 3 x 10(-7) M and ED50 was estimated to be 3.7 x 10(-9) M. The muscle contraction was not antagonized by tropicamide, phentolamine, propranolol, chlorpheniramine, cimetidine, methysergide or baclofen. Tetrodotoxin (3 x 10(-7) g/ml) pretreatment did not change the muscle contraction induced by substance P. A retrobulbar capsaicin injection did not cause supersensitivity in the muscle response to substance P. These results indicate that the iris sphincter muscle contraction caused by substance P is not mediated by cholinergic-, adrenergic-, histamine- or serotonine-recepters and suggests that its action on the muscle is direct.

  19. Analysis of anal secretions from phlaeothripine thrips.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Haga, Kazuo; Tsutsumi, Tadaaki; Matsuyama, Shigeru

    2004-02-01

    The anal secretions of 16 phlaeothripine thrips species (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae) were studied, including a reinvestigation of three species previously reported. A total of 37 components were detected, including hydrocarbons, acetates, terpenes, carboxylic acids, a quinone, an aromatic compound, and a pyranone compound. The secretions of all species were composed of some of these components, with Xylaplothrips inquilinus possessing as many as 11 components. Of these components, (Z)-9-octadecene, (Z)-9-nonadecene, nonadecadiene, octanoic acid, decanoic acid, geranial, neral, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, caryophyllene, 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde, and two unidentified monoterpenes [UK-I (M+136) and UK-II (M+168)] were detected for the first time. The chemicals were species-specific; four Liothrips species and three Holothrips species could be distinguished from each other and their congeners by the GC profiles of the ether extracts of their anal secretions. The anal secretions of gall-inducing thrips commonly contained terpenes. of which citral (a mixture of geranial and neral) and beta-acaridial repelled ants or had antifungal activity. The findings suggest that these terpenes play a defensive role and prevent galls from fungal infestation. 3-Butanoyl-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2H-pyran-2-one, found from three Holothrips spp., caused paralysis in ants. Chemical analysis of anal secretion components is a useful method for the classification of tubuliferan species that are difficult to distinguish on the basis of morphological characters.

  20. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Anal Intercourse Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; McKinney, Molly; Ward, Britney

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of anal intercourse and its associated risk behaviors in a sample of Midwestern, predominantly white rural adolescents. Most of the research on this activity has been local or regional studies, with urban East and West Coast racial and ethnic minority adolescents. Methods: A…

  1. What Are the Risk Factors for Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... uncircumcised male. For more information about HPV and HPV vaccines, see HPV Vaccines . Anal warts Anal warts (also known as condyloma acuminata ) are caused by infection with certain types of HPV – usually different types from those most likely to ...

  2. [Factors influencing physiologic pressure variations of the lower esophageal sphincter in healthy probands].

    PubMed

    Bilic, A; Vuckovic, B; Pilas, V; Bakula, B; Hrgovic, Z; Kesselman-Evans, Z; Radosevic, J

    1990-01-01

    Manometric characteristics of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in 59 healthy persons have been investigated. The aim of the investigation was to find out possible physiological changes of LES pressures considering posture, part of the day, maximal inspiration and expiration, empty or partially full stomach and abdominal compression. It has been proved that the minimal value of lower esophageal sphincter pressure in all the investigated patients was 1.77 kPA (13.3 mm Hg) while the maximal one was 4.53 kPa (34.0 mm Hg). The absolute difference between the lowest and the highest measured lower esophageal sphincter pressure was 1.43 kPa (10.77 mm Hg). The mean value of all pressures was 2.99 kPa (22.4 mm Hg). It seems that the posture during pressure measuring is irrelevant. The pressure does not vary more significantly considering neither the time of the day nor any exertion of the examinee.

  3. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  4. Comparative Relaxant Effects of Ataciguat and Zaprinast on Sheep Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Erol; Yönem, Özlem; Saraç, Bülent; Parlak, Mesut; Çelik, Cumali; Ataseven, Hilmi; Bağcivan, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Relaxing the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is an important process during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This issue suggests that the easier the sphincterotomy and cannulation, the more post-ERCP complications decrease. Aims: To compare the relaxant effects of ataciguat (a novel soluble guanylyl cyclase activator) and zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5) on sheep SO in vitro, thus testing whether they can be used during ERCP. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Sheep SO rings were placed in tissue baths and their isometric tension to ataciguat and zaprinast were tested. We also tested their isometric tension against ataciguat in the presence of 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazole (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) which is a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Results: Ataciguat and zaprinast both triggered concentration addicted relaxation on sheep SO rings (p=0.0018, p=0.0025 respectively) but the relaxation of the ataciguat was significantly greater than that of zaprinast at all concentrations (p=0.0024). It was observed that decreased relaxation responses were initiated by ataciguat in the presence of ODQ (p=0.0012). Conclusion: Ataciguat and zaprinast both have relaxing effects on sphincter of Oddi, although that of zaprinast is lower. We believe that ataciguat and zaprinast can be used in ERCP procedures in order to relax the sphincter of Oddi and thus can be used locally in order to decrease complications. PMID:27606143

  5. Introducing the operation method for curing anal fistula by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bingzhi

    1993-03-01

    The key to the treatment of anal fistula lies in scavenging the infected anal gland thoroughly, which is the source of anal fistula infection. The fistula tract at the internal orifice of the anal fistula is cut 1 cm using laser with the infectious source completely degenerated and the wound gassified and scanned. The residual distal fistula softens and disappears upon the action of organic fibrinolysin.

  6. Teaching Men's Anal Pleasure: Challenging Gender Norms with "Prostage" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branfman, Jonathan; Ekberg Stiritz, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To help students critique sex/gender norms, sexuality educators should address men's anal pleasure. Men's anal receptivity blurs accepted binaries like male/female, masculine/feminine, and straight/queer. By suppressing men's receptivity, the taboo against men's anal pleasure helps legitimize hegemonic sex/gender beliefs--and the sexism,…

  7. Dysregulation of Autophagy Contributes to Anal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carchman, Evie H.; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Meske, Louise; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process that removes and recycles unnecessary/dysfunctional cellular components, contributing to cellular health and survival. Autophagy is a highly regulated cellular process that responds to several intracellular signals, many of which are deregulated by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection through the expression of HPV-encoded oncoproteins. This adaptive inhibitory response helps prevent viral clearance. A strong correlation remains between HPV infection and the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus, particularly in HIV positive and other immunosuppressed patients. We hypothesize that autophagy is inhibited by HPV–encoded oncoproteins thereby promoting anal carcinogenesis (Fig 1). Materials and Methods HPV16 transgenic mice (K14E6/E7) and non-transgenic mice (FVB/N), both of which do not spontaneously develop anal tumors, were treated topically with the chemical carcinogen, 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), to induce anal cancer. The anuses at different time points of treatment (5, 10, 15 and 20 weeks) were analyzed using immunofluorescence (IF) for two key autophagy marker proteins (LC3β and p62) in addition to histological grading. The anuses from the K14E6/E7 mice were also analyzed for visual evidence of autophagic activity by electron microscopy (EM). To see if there was a correlation to humans, archival anal specimens were assessed histologically for grade of dysplasia and then analyzed for LC3β and p62 protein content. To more directly examine the effect of autophagic inhibition on anal carcinogenesis, nontransgenic mice that do not develop anal cancer with DMBA treatment were treated with a known pharmacologic inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine, and examined for tumor development and analyzed by IF for autophagic proteins. Results Histologically, we observed the progression of normal anoderm to invasive SCC with DMBA treatment in K14E6/E7 mice but not in nontransgenic

  8. HIV– positive anal cancer: an update for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Dandapani, Savita V; Eaton, Michael; Pagnini, Paul G

    2010-01-01

    Anal cancer used to be a rare cancer traditionally associated with elderly women. There are approximately 5260 cases per year in the U.S. (1). The onslaught of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) virus has led to a change in anal cancer demographics. Anal cancer is on the rise in the U.S and the number of anal cases documented has quadrupled in the past 20 yrs correlating with the rise of the HIV epidemic. The incidence of anal cancer is 40 to 80 fold higher in the HIV positive (HIV+) population when compared to the general population (2). With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV+ patients are living longer as less are progressing to AIDS. As a consequence non AIDS defining cancers such as anal cancer are on the rise. Factors implicated in the etiology of anal cancer in HIV+ patients include (Human papillomavirus) HPV virus status, sexual habits, and a history of smoking. HPV 16 and receptive anal intercourse (RAI) increase the risk of anal cancer by 33% over the general population. In the general population, the rate of anal cancer is approximately 0.9 cases per 100,000. In patients with a history of RAI, the rate approaches 35 cases per 100,000 which is equivalent to the prevalence of cervical cancer (3). Smokers are eight times more likely to develop anal cancer. There has been much discussion about tailoring treatment decisions in HIV+ patients with anal cancer. This review focuses on squamous cell carcinomas of the anal canal which comprise 80 to 90% of all anal cancers diagnosed and highlight key issues in the management of HIV+ anal cancer patients including recent clinical trials. PMID:22811803

  9. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  10. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and anal HPV-related disorders in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Sebring, Meagan C; Mendez, Audrey E; Ba, Fatimata S; Trimble, Debra D; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the findings of publications addressing the epidemiology of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and anal cancer in women. We conducted a systematic review among publications published from Jan. 1, 1997, to Sept. 30, 2013, to limit to publications from the combined antiretroviral therapy era. Three searches were performed of the National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the following search terms: women and anal HPV, women anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and women and anal cancer. Publications were included in the review if they addressed any of the following outcomes: (1) prevalence, incidence, or clearance of anal HPV infection, (2) prevalence of anal cytological or histological neoplastic abnormalities, or (3) incidence or risk of anal cancer. Thirty-seven publications addressing anal HPV infection and anal cytology remained after applying selection criteria, and 23 anal cancer publications met the selection criteria. Among HIV-positive women, the prevalence of high-risk (HR)-HPV in the anus was 16-85%. Among HIV-negative women, the prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection ranged from 4% to 86%. The prevalence of anal HR-HPV in HIV-negative women with HPV-related pathology of the vulva, vagina, and cervix compared with women with no known HPV-related pathology, varied from 23% to 86% and from 5% to 22%, respectively. Histological anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater) was found in 3-26% of the women living with HIV, 0-9% among women with lower genital tract pathology, and 0-3% for women who are HIV negative without known lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-infected women ranged from 3.9 to 30 per 100,000. Among women with a history of cervical cancer or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3, the incidence rates of anal cancer ranged from 0.8 to 63.8 per 100,000 person-years, and in

  11. Management of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in a male dog with laparoscopic-guided deferentopexy.

    PubMed

    Salomon, J F; Cotard, J P; Viguier, E

    2002-11-01

    Urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence is uncommon in the male dog. Diagnosis is made on the basis of the history (full bladder intermittent incontinence with persistence of normal micturitions), clinical examination and by exclusion of other causes of incontinence, such as prostatic disease, lower urinary tract abnormalities and cystitis. This report describes a case in an 11-year-old male poodle in which positive contrast urethrocystography showed no anatomical abnormalities. Surgical treatment by fixation of both ductus deferens to the abdominal wall under laparoscopic guidance with cranial displacement of the urinary bladder improved the incontinence.

  12. Androgen dependent development of a modified anal fin, gonopodium, as a model to understand the mechanism of secondary sexual character expression in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yukiko; Katoh, Hironori; Yamada, Gen

    2004-09-24

    Male external genitalia show structural variations among species. Androgenic hormones are essential for the morphological specification of male type copulatory organs, while little is known about the developmental mechanisms of such secondary sexual characters. Western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis may offer a clue to the sexual differentiation researches, because they show a prominent masculine sexual character for appendage development, anal fin to gonopodium (GP) transition, and its formation could be induced in early juvenile fry by exogenously supplied androgens. We show that GP development is promoted by androgen dependent augmentation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression. Two AR cDNAs were cloned and identified as ARalpha and ARbeta from western mosquitofish. Both ARs were predominantly expressed in the distal region of outgrowing anal fin rays. Exposure of fry to androgen caused anal fin outgrowth concomitant with the Shh induction in the distal anal fin ray epithelium. When AR signaling was inhibited by its antagonist flutamide in fry, the initial induction of the Shh was suppressed accompanying retarded anal fin outgrowth. Similar suppression of anal fin outgrowth was induced by treatment with cyclopamine, an inhibitor of Shh signaling. These observations indicate that androgen dependent Shh expression is required for anal fin outgrowth leading to the formation of a genital appendage, the GP in teleost fishes. Androgen-induced GP formation may provide insights into the expression mechanism regulating the specification of sexual features in vertebrates.

  13. [The anal fistula disease and abscess].

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    There are two forms of anal fistulas arising from its pathogenesis: the acute stage is the abscess, whereas the chronic stage is the fistula in ano. The classification of the fistula in ano is named after Parks. Pathogenesis and classification are explained. For complete cure, every abscess needs precise examination to be able to show the course and shape of the fistula. The surgical procedure depends on the fistula tract. Most fistulas can be operated by means of a fistulotomy or fistulectomy. Recovery depends on locating the total fistula tract.

  14. Management of rare, low anal anterior fistula exception to Goodsall's rule with Kṣārasūtra

    PubMed Central

    Shindhe, Pradeep S.

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistula (bhagandara) is a chronic inflammatory condition, a tubular structure opening in the ano-rectal canal at one end and surface of perineum/peri-anal skin on the other end. Typically, fistula has two openings, one internal and other external associated with chronic on/off pus discharge on/off pain, pruritis and sometimes passing of stool from external opening. This affects predominantly male patients due to various etiologies viz., repeated peri-anal infections, Crohn's disease, HIV infection, etc., Complex and atypical variety is encountered in very few patients, which require special treatment for cure. The condition poses difficulty for a surgeon in treating due to issues like patient hesitation, trouble in preparing kṣārasūtra, natural and routine infection with urine, stool etc., and dearth of surgical experts and technique. We would like to report a complex and atypical, single case of anterior, low anal fistula with tract reaching to median raphe of scrotum, which was managed successfully by limited application of kṣārasūtra. PMID:25538355

  15. Electrical and mechanical activity in the human lower esophageal sphincter during diaphragmatic contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, R K; Rochester, D F; McCallum, R W

    1988-01-01

    To determine the effect of contraction of the diaphragm on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, we studied eight healthy volunteers during spontaneous breathing, maximal inspiration, and graded inspiratory efforts against a closed airway (Muller's maneuver). Electrical activity of the crural diaphragm (DEMG) was recorded from bipolar esophageal electrodes, transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) was calculated as the difference between gastric and esophageal pressures, and LES pressure was recorded using a sleeve device. During spontaneous breathing, phasic inspiratory DEMG was accompanied by phasic increases in Pdi and LES pressure. With maximal inspiration, DEMG increased 15-20-fold compared with spontaneous inspiration, and LES pressure rose from an end-expiratory pressure of 21 to 90 mmHg. Similar values were obtained during maximal Muller's maneuvers. LES pressure fell promptly when the diaphragm relaxed. Graded Muller's maneuver resulted in proportional increases in the Pdi, LES pressure, and DEMG. The LES pressure was always greater than Pdi and correlated with it in a linear fashion (P less than 0.001). We conclude that the contraction of the diaphragm exerts a sphincteric action at the LES, and that this effect is an important component of the antireflux barrier. PMID:3350968

  16. Effects of prostaglandins and thromboxane analogues on bullock and dog iris sphincter preparations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y J; Jones, R L

    1982-05-01

    1 The bullock iris sphincter was contracted by low concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 16, 16-dimethyl PGE2 and 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-p-chlorophenoxy PGE2. Other compounds with thromboxane-like actions, for example 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2, were also potent spasmogens, ZK 36374, a stable carbacyclin, was a partial agonist on the PGE-sensitive system of this tissue. 2 The thromboxane antagonist, EP 045, had little effect on the action of PGE2 and 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 on the bullock iris. 3 The dog iris sphincter was sensitive to PGF2 alpha but not to PGE2 and 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2. 4 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 had very low activity on the dog iris in contrast to its high activity on the bullock iris. The reverse was found with the 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-m-trifluoromethylphenoxy analogue of PGF2 alpha (ICI 81008). This indicates a considerable selectivity of action of the two analogues. 5 The results are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge of prostanoid receptors.

  17. Effects of prostaglandins and thromboxane analogues on bullock and dog iris sphincter preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Y. J.; Jones, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    1 The bullock iris sphincter was contracted by low concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 16, 16-dimethyl PGE2 and 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-p-chlorophenoxy PGE2. Other compounds with thromboxane-like actions, for example 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2, were also potent spasmogens, ZK 36374, a stable carbacyclin, was a partial agonist on the PGE-sensitive system of this tissue. 2 The thromboxane antagonist, EP 045, had little effect on the action of PGE2 and 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 on the bullock iris. 3 The dog iris sphincter was sensitive to PGF2 alpha but not to PGE2 and 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2. 4 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 had very low activity on the dog iris in contrast to its high activity on the bullock iris. The reverse was found with the 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-m-trifluoromethylphenoxy analogue of PGF2 alpha (ICI 81008). This indicates a considerable selectivity of action of the two analogues. 5 The results are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge of prostanoid receptors. PMID:6177369

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sacs in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Mellett, S; Verganti, S; Murphy, S; Bowlt, K

    2015-03-01

    Anal sac squamous cell carcinoma is rare in dogs. Five cases have been previously reported, treatment of which involved surgery alone. This report describes three further cases of canine anal sac squamous cell carcinoma which underwent medical (meloxicam) management alone, resulting in survival of up to seven months. No metastases were identified. Squamous cell carcinoma, although extremely uncommon, should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis when a dog is presented for investigation of an anal sac mass.

  19. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: A review of diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joseph R; Siekas, Lacey L; Kaz, Andrew M

    2017-01-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a premalignant lesion of the anal mucosa that is a precursor to anal cancer. Although anal cancer is relatively uncommon, rates of this malignancy are steadily rising in the United States, and among certain high risk populations the incidence of anal cancer may exceed that of colon cancer. Risk factors for AIN and anal cancer consist of clinical factors and behaviors that are associated with the acquisition and persistence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The strongest HPV-associated risk factors are HIV infection, receptive anal intercourse, and high risk sexual behavior. A history of HPV-mediated genital cancer, which suggests infection with an oncogenic HPV strain, is another risk factor for AIN/anal cancer. Because progression of AIN to anal cancer is known to occur in some individuals over several years, screening for AIN and early anal cancer, as well as treatment of advanced AIN lesions, is reasonable in certain high-risk populations. Although randomized controlled trials evaluating screening and treatment outcomes are lacking, experts support routine screening for AIN in high risk populations. Screening is performed using anal cytological exams, similar to those performed in cervical cancer screening programs, along with direct tissue evaluation and biopsy via high resolution anoscopy. AIN can be treated using topical therapies such as imiquimod, 5-flurouracil, and trichloroacetic acid, as well as ablative therapies such as electrocautery and laser therapy. Reductions in AIN and anal cancer rates have been shown in studies where high-risk populations were vaccinated against the oncogenic strains of HPV. Currently, the CDC recommends both high-risk and average-risk populations be vaccinated against HPV infection using the quadrivalent or nonavalent vaccines. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with AIN and the role of HPV vaccination, particularly in high risk populations. PMID:28255426

  20. The Dose-Effect Safety Profile of Skeletal Muscle Precursor Cell Therapy in a Dog Model of Intrinsic Urinary Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Eckman, Delrae; Dean, Ashley; Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Allickson, Julie; Cline, J. Mark; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Locally injected skeletal muscle precursor cells (skMPCs) integrate into and restore the muscle layers, innervation, vasculature, and function of the sphincter complex in animal models of intrinsic urinary sphincter deficiency (ISD). The goal of the present study was to test the dose-effect safety profile of skMPC therapy in a dog model of ISD. Sphincter deficiency was created in 20 adult female dogs by surgically removing the skeletal muscle layer of the urinary sphincter complex. skMPCs isolated from the hind leg were expanded in culture and injected 4 weeks later into the sphincter complex at a dose of 25 million cells (n = 5), 50 million cells (n = 5), or 100 million cells (n = 5) per milliliter in a 2-ml volume. Five dogs received no sphincter injection. The measures of maximal sphincter pressure, complete blood count, and blood chemistry were performed monthly until their sacrifice at 9 months. At that point, full necropsy was performed to assess the safety of the skMPC injections. Injection of different doses of cells had no effects on the body weight, blood cell count, or kidney or liver function test results (p > .05 among the skMPC doses). Some incidental pathologic features were found in the lower urinary tract in all groups and were most likely associated with repeat catheterization. The maximal urinary sphincter pressure was higher in the 50 million cells per milliliter treatment group than in the other experimental groups (p < .05). The findings of the present study have confirmed that urinary sphincter injection of skMPCs results in no significant local or systemic pathologic features within the dose range that improves sphincter pressures. PMID:25637189

  1. Anal atresia, abnormal genitalia, and absent thumb: congenital malformations associated with mosaic ring chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Z; Ozlu, T; Vural, M

    2013-01-01

    Because of the deletion of a segment of the chromosome during the formation of a ring, several clinical findings may be associated with ring chromosomes. Ring chromosome 13 is one of such disorders in which the genotype-phenotype correlation is stronger by virtue of the accumulating literature. It can be associated with multiple congenital abnormalities and severe mental retardation. We report a case with mosaic ring chromosome 13 whose prenatal ultrasound revealed bilateral ventriculomegaly. Anal atresia, unidentifiable external genitalia, and an absent thumb were observed in the postmortem examination.

  2. [Clinical to target volume margins determination in radiotherapy for anal cancers].

    PubMed

    Libois, V; Mahé, M-A; Rio, E; Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    There are very few data on the expansion from the clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) in the anal cancer treatment. This article aims to collect the different elements needed for the construction of a PTV from scientific data based on a literature analysis. We reviewed the articles published in the medical literature from the last 20years. They concerned setup errors and internal organ mobility of the different volumes of patients treated by conformational radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (anal canal, meso-rectum, common, intern and extern, inguinal and pre-sacral lymph nodes). CTV to PTV margins admitted in the guidelines and atlas of consensus groups (SFRO, RTOG, AGITG) are from 0.7 to 1cm in all directions, based on expert's opinions but not on scientific data. There are no specific studies on the canal anal mobility. Most of the data are from other pelvis cancers (gynecologic, rectum and prostate). Setup errors can be reduced by daily imaging. Patient repositioning and immobilization modalities are mostly local habits rather than scientific consensus. A three-dimensional 1cm margin is generally admitted. Margins reduction must be careful and has to be assessed.

  3. Towards a Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Regeneration of the Sphincter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.; Stallkamp, Jan; Klünder, Mario; Ederer, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver; Vaegler, Martin; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl D.; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a significant social, medical, and economic problem. It is caused, at least in part, by degeneration of the sphincter muscle controlling the tightness of the urinary bladder. This muscular degeneration is characterized by a loss of muscle cells and a surplus of a fibrous connective tissue. In Western countries approximately 15% of all females and 10% of males are affected. The incidence is significantly higher among senior citizens, and more than 25% of the elderly suffer from incontinence. When other therapies, such as physical exercise, pharmacological intervention, or electrophysiological stimulation of the sphincter fail to improve the patient’s conditions, a cell-based therapy may improve the function of the sphincter muscle. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge on stem cells suitable for therapy of urinary incontinence: mesenchymal stromal cells, urine-derived stem cells, and muscle-derived satellite cells. In addition, we report on ways to improve techniques for surgical navigation, injection of cells in the sphincter muscle, sensors for evaluation of post-treatment therapeutic outcome, and perspectives derived from recent pre-clinical studies. PMID:26237258

  4. Prolonged esophagitis after primary dysfunction of the pyloric sphincter in the rat and therapeutic potential of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Dobric, Ivan; Drvis, Petar; Petrovic, Igor; Shejbal, Drazen; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Batelja, Lovorka; Sever, Marko; Kokic, Neven; Tonkic, Ante; Zoricic, Ivan; Mise, Sandro; Staresinic, Mario; Radic, Bozo; Jakir, Ana; Babel, Jaksa; Ilic, Spomenko; Vuksic, Tihomir; Jelic, Ivan; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2007-05-01

    Seven or fourteen days or twelve months after suturing one tube into the pyloric sphincter (removed by peristalsis by the seventh day), rats exhibit prolonged esophagitis with a constantly lowered pressure not only in the pyloric, but also in the lower esophageal sphincter and a failure of both sphincters. Throughout the esophagitis experiment, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) is given intraperitoneally once a day (10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg, last application 24 h before assessment), or continuously in drinking water at 0.16 microg/ml, 0.16 ng/ml (12 ml/rat per day), or directly into the stomach 5 min before pressure assessment (a water manometer connected to the drainage port of a Foley catheter implanted into the stomach either through an esophageal or duodenal incision). This treatment alleviates i) the esophagitis (macroscopically and microscopically, at either region or interval), ii) the pressure in the pyloric sphincter, and iii) the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (cmH2O). In the normal rats it increases lower esophageal sphincter pressure, but decreases the pyloric sphincter pressure. Ranitidine, given using the same protocol (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, once daily; 0.83 mg/ml in drinking water; 50 mg/kg directly into the stomach) does not have an effect in either rats with esophagitis or in normal rats.

  5. [Surgical management of urinary and fecal incontinence in neurological sphincter disorders of children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Lemelle, J L; Barthelme, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-01-01

    The management of urinary and fecal incontinence in children and adolescents with neurogenic disorders related to congenital or acquired conditions was frequently considered to be of secondary importance compared with orthopaedic complications. The improvement of artificial urinary sphincter and continent urinary diversion techniques allowed to establish for each case an individual plan considering overall, abilities and voiding dysfunction as well as renal complications. Antegrade colonic enema has greatly improved the quality of life of children with fecal incontinence or intractable constipation. Surgical management requires a large contribution by the patients and their closest relatives and complete information about goals, advantages and obligations of surgical management. Surgical principles for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and continent urinary diversion are presented and discussed according to data in the recent literature and the author's clinical experience.

  6. Can endoscopic papillary balloon dilation really preserve sphincter of Oddi function?

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, I; Tomita, E; Enya, M; Kato, T; Moriwaki, H

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD) is assumed to preserve sphincter of Oddi function because it causes little trauma to the papilla. However, few studies have addressed this issue specifically. In this study, we investigated whether EPBD can preserve sphincter function, and evaluated whether or not such preservation has clinical significance.
METHODS—Seventy patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones were randomly assigned to EPBD or endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Sphincter of Oddi (SO) function was measured by endoscopic manometry before, one week after, and one year after treatment. Incidence of pneumobilia and later complications were compared between the two groups at one year. Series manometric data were compared within each group and between the two groups. For a more detailed analysis of the cumulative incidence of later complications, retrospective cohorts were added to the study groups, giving a total number of 235 patients in the EPBD group and 126 in the EST group.
RESULTS—Baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between the 35 EPBD and 35 EST patients. CBD stones were discharged successfully in all cases. CBD pressure, SO basal and peak pressures, and contraction frequency decreased significantly at one week in both groups. The damage was more severe in the EST group, and SO contraction completely disappeared in 23 patients in this group. The incidence of pneumobilia was significantly lower in the EPBD group than in the EST group (p<0.01) whereas CBD stones recurred and cholecystitis appeared at a similar rate in both groups at one year. A complete series of manometric data up to one year was obtained in 55 patients; 28 in the post-EPBD and 27 in post-EST groups. In the post-EPBD group, SO basal and peak pressures significantly recovered at one year compared with data at one week but these measures still remained significantly lower than those before EPBD (p< 0.01). In the post-EST group, SO

  7. Lower Esophageal Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation for Persistent Reflux After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Largacha, Juan A; Hess, Donald T; Litle, Virginia R; Fernando, Hiran C

    2016-02-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a good option for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the obese population. However, some patients have significant reflux despite this procedure, and their treatment might be challenging. Laparoscopic lower esophageal magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) has been introduced into clinical practice with encouraging results. Currently, MSA is only approved for patients with hiatal hernias that are less than 3 cm and without history of antireflux procedures. We present two cases of MSA for the treatment of persistent GERD after LRYGB. Since this is an off-label use of this procedure, both patients underwent extensive evaluation before proceeding with surgery. Excellent results were obtained with a significant improvement in symptoms as well as their GERD Health-Related Quality of Life scores.

  8. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  9. Distension of the esophagogastric junction augments triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Michiel P; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Dent, John; Benninga, Marc A; Davidson, Geoffrey P; Omari, Taher I

    2011-10-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease show an increase in esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility and in frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESR) induced by gastric distension. The objective was to study the effect of localized EGJ distension on triggering of TLESR in healthy volunteers. An esophageal manometric catheter incorporating an 8-cm internal balloon adjacent to a sleeve sensor was developed to enable continuous recording of EGJ pressure during distension of the EGJ. Inflation of the balloon doubled the cross-section of the trans-sphincteric portion of the catheter from 5 mm OD (round) to 5 × 11 mm (oval). Ten healthy subjects were included. After catheter placement and a 30-min adaptation period, the EGJ was randomly distended or not, followed by a 45-min baseline recording. Subjects consumed a refluxogenic meal, and recordings were made for 3 h postprandially. A repeat study was performed on another day with EGJ distension status reversed. Additionally, in one subject MRI was performed to establish the exact position of the balloon in the inflated state. The number of TLESR increased during periods of EGJ distension with the effect being greater after a meal [baseline: 2.0(0.0-4.0) vs. 4.0(1.0-11.0), P=0.04; postprandial: 15.5(10.0-33.0) vs. 22.0(17.0-58.0), P=0.007 for undistended and distended, respectively]. EGJ distension augments meal-induced triggering of TLESR in healthy volunteers. Our data suggest the existence of a population of vagal afferents located at sites in/around the EGJ that may influence triggering of TLESR.

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Tanja; Hart, Melanie; Patarroyo, Manuel; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM) which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521) showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells. PMID:26406476

  11. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction and the Formation of Adult Choledochal Cyst Following Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong-Tian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Liang, Bin; Zeng, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the causes underlying the formation of adult choledochal cyst. Anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction is the most widely accepted theory regarding the etiology of choledochal cyst. However, choledochal cysts have been found in patients in the absence of this anomaly. Because the number of adult patients with choledochal cyst is increasing, it is important to address this controversy. Bile amylase levels in the cysts of 27 patients (8 males and 19 females) who had undergone cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated. The average age of the 27 patients was 45.8 ± 10.1 years and the majority (85.2%) were diagnosed with Todani type I cysts. None of the patients had dilatation of the common bile duct prior to surgery. There were 6 (22.2%) patients with anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. However, amylase levels did not significantly differ between patients with and without this anomaly (P = 0.251). According to bile amylase levels, pancreatobiliary reflux was present in 21 (77.8%) patients. The mean amylase level significantly differed in patients with pancreatobiliary reflux (23,462 ± 11,510 IU/L) and those without (235 ± 103 IU/L) (P < 0.001). In patients with pancreatobiliary reflux, only 4 patients had anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. That is, the majority of patients (17/21, 81%) having pancreatobiliary reflux did not have an anomalous junction of the pancreatic and biliary ducts. Since the only explanation for pancreatobiliary reflux in patients with a normal pancreaticobiliary junction is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, we proposed that the formation of adult choledochal cyst is mainly due to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. PMID:26632721

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Tanja; Hart, Melanie; Patarroyo, Manuel; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Klein, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM) which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521) showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells.

  13. Histomorphology and immunohistochemistry of the lower esophageal sphincter of the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S; Khamas, Wael; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical and histopathological changes in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease have gained interest. The least shrew is able to vomit in response to emetogens and provides a good model to study the histology of this phenomenon relative to the published reports in the commonly used but vomit-incompetent laboratory species. The LES is located at the junction of the esophagus and stomach. It typically closes at rest and opens in response to swallowing. Our findings demonstrate that the least shrew does not have a well-defined LES, lacks esophageal glands and has a mucosal valve-like projection from the terminal end of the esophagus before joining the gastric epithelium at the lesser curvature. In addition, the least shrew has thoracic and abdominal components prior to joining the gastric epithelium. The mucosal lining of the esophagus is folded, becoming clearly convoluted and forming a bucket-like structure at the level of the esophageocardiac junction (ECJ). No significant differences are to be found between the structure and thickness of the wall before and after the ECJ. Thus, the ECJ forming the LES is relatively less complex than those of other mammals including man. The distribution of enterochromaffin (EC) cells is confined to the lamina propria of the junction and is not associated with the cardiac glands, suggesting its functional involvement with the smooth muscle in and around the ECJ. In conclusion, the least shrew's anatomical sphincter appears ill-defined and is replaced by a less sturdy valve-like mucosal flap.

  14. Approaches to driving the evolving understanding of lower oesophageal sphincter mechanical function.

    PubMed

    Dent, John

    2007-02-01

    This article reviews and places into context the development of lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) manometry, the key technique for researching the mechanics of this region. The first of two major challenges, being able to record sphincter pressure accurately with generally available equipment, was solved by the advent of perfused manometry in the 1960s. The other main challenge was to achieve reliable, continuous recording of LOS pressure, despite the constant movements of the LOS relative to the manometric catheter. Though well documented, this challenge is still poorly understood and prioritised, as many clinical/diagnostic and research manometric studies use methods for LOS manometry that are invalidated by LOS movement. There are two techniques that can record continuously from the LOS, despite its movements: high resolution manometry (HRM), which uses multiple point pressure sensors spaced at 1 cm interval or less, and the sleeve, which is a single long sensor. HRM provides valuable additional information on the varied topography of pressure patterns across the gastro-oesophageal junction and how this can change in an individual, second to second. HRM especially, but also sleeve manometry continue to advance understanding of the mechanics of gastro-oesophageal reflux, to unravel the mysteries of the mechanics of hiatus hernia and the diaphragmatic hiatus, to define why antireflux surgery fails or causes dysphagia, to recognise patients with dysphagia due to isolated defects of LOS relaxation and to test novel therapies for reflux disease directed at LOS function. Ample evidence now exists that accurate monitoring of LOS and gastro-oesophageal junction pressures is important for the diagnostic assessment of many patients and for advancing research into several aspects of the mechanical function of the LOS and its surrounding structures. This evidence now needs to be better reflected in the methods used for routine clinical practice and research.

  15. An experimental model of prolonged esophagitis with sphincter failure in the rat and the therapeutic potential of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Igor; Dobric, Ivan; Drvis, Petar; Shejbal, Drazen; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Batelja, Lovorka; Kokic, Neven; Tonkic, Ante; Mise, Stjepan; Baotic, Tomislav; Staresinic, Mario; Radic, Bozo; Jakir, Ana; Vuksic, Tihomir; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-11-01

    We report a simple novel rat model that combines prolonged esophagitis and parallel sphincters failure. The anti-ulcer gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, which was found to be stable in gastric juice, and is being evaluated in inflammatory bowel disease trials, is an anti-esophagitis therapy that recovers failed sphincters. Twelve or twenty months after the initial challenge (tubes sutured into sphincters for one week and then spontaneously removed by peristalsis), rats exhibit prolonged esophagitis (confluent hemorrhagic and yellowish lesions, thinner epithelium and superficial corneal layer, with stratification derangement); constantly lowered pressure of both sphincters (assessed by using a water manometer connected to the drainage port of a Foley catheter implanted into the stomach either through esophageal or duodenal incision); and both lower esophageal and pyloric sphincter failure. Throughout the esophagitis experiment, BPC 157 was given at either 10 micro g/kg, i.p., once a day (last application 24 h before assessment) or alternatively, it was given continuously in drinking water at 0.16 micro g/ml (12 ml/rat). This treatment recovers i) esophagitis (macroscopically and microscopically, at either region or investigated time period) and ii) pressure in both sphincters (cmH2O). In addition, BPC 157 (10 micro g/kg) or saline (1 ml/rat, 5 ml/kg) was specifically given directly into the stomach; pressure assessment was performed at 5 min thereafter. The effect of BPC 157 is specific because in normal rats, it increases lower esophageal sphincter-pressure, but decreases pyloric sphincter-pressure. Ranitidine, given as the standard drug using the same protocol (50 mg/kg, i.p., once daily; 0.83 mg/ml in drinking water; or 50 mg/kg directly into the stomach) had no effect.

  16. The Role of the Velopharyngeal Sphincter in the Speech of Patients with Cleft Palate or Cleft Lip and Palate Using Perceptual Methods

    PubMed Central

    Georgievska-Jancheska, Tatjana; Gjorgova, Juliana; Popovska, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The velopharyngeal sphincter (VPS) plays the main role in speech formation. The cleft palate, due to the damage of the soft palate, leads to dysfunction of the velopharyngeal sphincter thus causing speech disorder. AIM: To establish a link between the nasal air escape and the perceptual symptoms in the speech of patients with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate using auditory-visual perceptual procedures for determining the influence the velopharyngeal dysfunction has on speech. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with speech disorders, out of which 10 have cleft palate or cleft lip and palate (experimental group), participated in the perceptual assessment by means of Czermak mirror fogging test for assessing the nasal air escape and Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scale (PWSS) for assessing the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. RESULTS: The respondents with a considerable nasal air escape have a higher velopharyngeal inability, that is, probably incompetent nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. There is a strong correlation between the nasal air escape and the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter (the coefficient of linear correlation r = 0.9756). The calculated p-value is p = 0.000002. CONCLUSION: The perceptual speech symptoms and the nasal air escape provide unique insight into the state and role the velopharyngeal sphincter has in speech. PMID:28028412

  17. Prolonged manometric recordings of oesophagus and lower oesophageal sphincter in achalasia patients

    PubMed Central

    van Herwaarden, M A; Samsom, M; Smout, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Conventional short term manometry is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of achalasia but the technique may fail to detect intermittent motor events. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) and oesophageal pressures during prolonged recording in patients with achalasia.
METHODS—Eleven patients with idiopathic achalasia were studied. Prolonged combined oesophageal pH and manometric recordings of the pharynx, LOS, and stomach were performed using a pH glass electrode and a multiple lumen assembly incorporating a Dent sleeve connected to a portable water perfused manometric system.
RESULTS—LOS pressure varied during the day. Postprandial LOS pressures were lower than those recorded preprandially (1.2 v 1.8 kPa; p=0.005) and basal LOS pressures were significantly higher during phase III of the migrating motor complex than during the subsequent phase I (3.3 v 1.8 kPa; p=0.028). Complete LOS relaxations were occasionally observed in seven patients (0.48/h). Complete LOS relaxations were longer in duration than incomplete LOS relaxations (10.8 v 2.8 s; p=0.01) and 57% of complete relaxations fulfilled the criteria of a transient LOS relaxation (TLOSR). Complete LOS relaxations were associated with oesophageal pressure waves with higher amplitudes and longer durations. In addition, a higher proportion of these oesophageal pressure waves were spontaneous (55.6% v 0%; p<0.02) and multipeaked (72.7% v 0%). During prolonged manometry, high amplitude oesophageal pressure waves (>10 kPa) were recorded in six patients and retrograde oesophageal pressure waves in four, phenomena which were not observed during short term manometry.
CONCLUSION—In contrast with short term stationary manometry, prolonged manometry in achalasia patients revealed the occurrence of complete LOS relaxations, TLOSRs, variations in LOS pressure associated with a meal or phase III, and high amplitude and retrograde

  18. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities are strongly predictive of treatment response in patients with achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Simon C; Ciarleglio, Maria; Chavez, Yamile Haito; Clarke, John O; Stein, Ellen; Chander Roland, Bani

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities achalasia treatment METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 41 consecutive patients referred for high resolution esophageal manometry with a final manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients were sub-divided by presence or absence of Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) abnormality, and clinical and manometric profiles were compared. Correlation between UES abnormality and sub-type (i.e., hypertensive, hypotensive or impaired relaxation) and a number of variables, including qualitative treatment response, achalasia sub-type, co-morbid medical illness, psychiatric illness, surgical history, dominant presenting symptom, treatment type, age and gender were also evaluated. RESULTS: Among all 41 patients, 24 (58.54%) had a UES abnormality present. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age, gender or any other clinical or demographic profiles. Among those with UES abnormalities, the majority were either hypertensive (41.67%) or had impaired relaxation (37.5%) as compared to hypotensive (20.83%), although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.42). There was no specific association between treatment response and treatment type received; however, there was a significant association between UES abnormalities and treatment response. In patients with achalasia and concomitant UES abnormalities, 87.5% had poor treatment response, while only 12.5% had favorable response. In contrast, in patients with achalasia and no UES abnormalities, the majority (78.57%) had good treatment response, as compared to 21.43% with poor treatment response (P = 0.0001). After controlling for achalasia sub-type, those with UES abnormality had 26 times greater odds of poor treatment response than those with no UES abnormality (P = 0.009). Similarly, after controlling for treatment type, those with UES abnormality had 13.9 times greater odds of poor treatment response

  19. Anal fistula with foot extension—Treated by kshara sutra (medicated seton) therapy: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, P. Bhat

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION An ‘anal’ fistula is a track which communicates anal canal or rectum and usually is in continuity with one or more external openings. Distant communication from rectum is rare. It is a challenging disease because of its recurrence especially, with high level and distant communications. Ksharasutra (medicated seton) therapy is being practiced in India with high success rate (recurrence of 3.33%) in the management of complicated anal fistula. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 56 year old man presented with recurrent boils in the left lower limb at different places from thigh to foot. He underwent repeated incision and drainage at different hospitals. Examination revealed sinus with discharge and multiple scars on left lower limb from thigh up to foot. Suspecting anal fistula, MRI was advised which revealed a long cutaneous fistula from rectum to left lower limb. Patient was treated with Ksharasutra therapy. Within 6 months of treatment whole tract was healed completely. DISCUSSION Sushrutha (500BC) was the first to explain the role of surgical excision and use of kshara sutra for the management of anal fistula. Ksharasutra therapy showed least recurrence. Fistula from rectum to foot is of extremely rare variety. Surgical treatment of anal fistula requires hospitalization, regular post-operative care, is associated with a significant risk of recurrence (0.7–26.5%) and a high risk of impaired continence (5–40%). CONCLUSION Rectal fistula communicating till foot may be a very rare presentation in proctology practice. Kshara sutra treatment was useful in treating this condition, with minimal surgical intervention with no recurrence. PMID:23702360

  20. Treating anal fistula with the anal fistula plug: case series report of 12 patients

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Reza Bagherzadeh; Tizmaghz, Adnan; Ajeka, Somar; Karami, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent and complex high fistulas remain a surgical challenge. This paper reports our experience with the anal fistula plug in patients with complex fistulas. Methods Data were collected prospectively and analyzed from consecutive patients undergoing insertion of a fistula plug from January 2011 through April 2014 at Hazrat-e-Rasoul Hospital in Tehran. We ensured that sepsis had been eradicated in all patients prior to placement of the plug. During surgery, a conical shaped collagen plug was pulled through the fistula tract. Results Twelve patients were included in this case study. All patients had previously undergone failed surgical therapy to cure their fistula and had previously-placed Setons. There were eight males and four females with an average age of 44 who were treated for complex fistulas. At a median time of follow-up of 22.7 months, 10 of the 12 patients had healed (83.3%). One patient developed an abscess that was noted on the sixth postoperative day, and there was one recurrence during follow-up. Conclusions Fistula plugs are effective for the long-term closure of complex anal fistulas. Success of treatment with the fistula plug depends on the eradication of sepsis prior to plug placement. PMID:27280009

  1. Effect of halothane, isoflurane and desflurane on lower oesophageal sphincter tone.

    PubMed

    Chassard, D; Tournadre, J P; Berrada, K R; Bryssine, B; Bouletreau, P

    1996-12-01

    We have studied the effects of volatile anaesthetics on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) tone in three groups of eight pigs allocated randomly to receive end-tidal concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 MAC of desflurane, isoflurane or halothane for 15 min. LOS and oesophageal barrier pressures (BrP = LOSP - gastric pressure) were measured using a manometric method. The decrease in BrP paralleled the decrease in LOS pressure and was significant at 0.5 MAC for isoflurane and at 1.0 MAC for halothane. At 1.5 MAC, BrP values were approximately 62% of baseline values for halothane, 37% for isoflurane and 83% for desflurane. Inter-group comparisons showed that BrP did not differ at baseline and at 0.5 MAC. At 1.0 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.001) and halothane (P < 0.02) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. At 1.5 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.01) and halothane (P < 0.05) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. We conclude that desflurane maintained BrP and this may be clinically important in patients at high risk of regurgitation.

  2. Patterns of esophageal inhibition during swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and transient LES relaxation. Lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, Philippe; Verdier, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and esophageal body inhibition co-occur during esophageal peristalsis but not necessarily during pharyngeal stimulation or transient LES relaxation (tLESR). This study examined these relationships and the impact on reflux. Nine young volunteers were studied. An artificial high-pressure zone (HPZ) was established, and pH was recorded 8 and 5 cm proximal to the LES. Pharyngeal stimulation was by water injection and gastric distension with liquid or gas. Peristalsis, pharyngeal stimulation, and spontaneous events were recorded. Swallowing relaxed the LES in 100% of trials (the HPZ in 80%) and caused no reflux. Pharyngeal stimulation relaxed the LES in two-thirds of trials, had no effect on the HPZ, and caused no reflux. Gastric distension was associated with 117 tLESRs, 48% with acid reflux, and 32% with gas reflux; there was no effect on the HPZ. We conclude that LES relaxation is a necessary but not sufficient condition for reflux. LES relaxation and esophageal body inhibition are independent events that may be concurrent (swallowing) or dissociated (tLESR).

  3. Brachytherapy and Local Excision for Sphincter Preservation in T1 and T2 Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grimard, Laval Stern, Hartley; Spaans, Johanna N. M.Sc.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of brachytherapy after local excision (LE) in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancer at risk of recurrence due to residual subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2007, 32 patients undergoing LE and brachytherapy were followed prospectively for a mean of 6.2 years. Estimates of local recurrence (LR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were generated. Treatment-related toxicity and the effect of known prognostic factors were determined. Results: There were 8 LR (3 T1, 5 T2), of which 5 were salvaged surgically. Median time to the 8 LR was 14 months, and the 5-year rate of local control was 76%. Although there have been 9 deaths to date, only 5 were from disease. Five-year DSS and OS rates were 85% and 78%, respectively. There were 4 cases of Grade 2-3 radionecrosis and 1 case of mild stool incontinence. The sphincter was preserved in 27 of 32 patients. Conclusion: Local excision and adjuvant brachytherapy for T1 and T2 rectal cancer is an appealing treatment alternative to immediate radical resection, particularly in the frail and elderly who are unable to undergo major surgery, as well as for patients wanting to avoid a permanent colostomy.

  4. Surgical treatment of tumors of the distal rectum with sphincter preservation.

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, T M; Oh, C; Steinhagen, R M; Greenstein, A J; Perez, C; Aufses, A H

    1992-01-01

    One hundred one patients with villous adenoma or invasive carcinoma of the distal rectum treated with local excision or coloanal anastomosis were studied. Twenty-three (45%) of the 51 patients with villous adenomas had transanal excision, another 23 (45%) had a posterior proctotomy, and five (10%) had a coloanal anastomosis. Only two patients with a villous adenoma developed a recurrence requiring repeat local excision. Fifteen (30%) of the 50 patients with invasive cancer were treated by transanal excision. All had tumors confined to the submucosa or superficial muscularis. Eighteen (85%) of 21 patients having posterior proctotomy also had tumors with similar depth of invasion. Six (43%) of the 14 patients having coloanal anastomosis had Dukes' B tumors, six (43%) were Dukes' C, and another two (14%) underwent palliative resection. The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 77%. Only four patients treated by transanal excision or posterior proctotomy died of metastatic disease. In the coloanal group, two of 12 patients undergoing curative resection died of recurrent cancer, and another has a pelvic recurrence. Villous adenomas of the distal rectum and selected carcinomas may be treated with local excision and coloanal anastomosis with preservation of sphincter function with good results. PMID:1417192

  5. A synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog, alprostadil alfadex, relaxes sphincter of Oddi in humans.

    PubMed

    Koshitani, Tatsuya; Kodama, Tadashi; Sato, Hideki; Takaaki, Junpei; Imamura, Yoichi; Kato, Keimei; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Tokita, Kazuhiko; Mitsufuji, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that prostaglandins (PGs) exert potent pharmacological actions on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle, although their effects on the sphincter of Oddi (SO) remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PGE1 on motility of the human SO. Twenty patients appearing for routine endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) examination were studied. Each patient was randomly allocated to receive an intravenous infusion of normal saline (six patients), or alprostadil alfadex, a synthetic PGE1 analog, at a dose of either 0.05 or 0.1 microg/kg/min (seven patients for each condition). Endoscopic biliary manometry was done with a recording of basal SO pressure, amplitude of SO phasic contractions, and phasic contractile frequency before and 5 min after intravenous infusions, using a 4-French microtransducer catheter. There was no significant change in SO motor variables following application of normal saline. Alprostadil alfadex significantly decreased basal SO pressure at a dose of 0.05 microg/kg/min, and significantly decreased all parameters at a dose of 0.1 microg/kg/min. A synthetic PGE1 analog, alprostadil alfadex, effectively inhibits motility of the human SO. This drug may be of clinical application as a SO-relaxing agent.

  6. Risk Factors for Erosion of Artificial Urinary Sphincters: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Brant, William O.; Erickson, Bradley A.; Elliott, Sean P.; Powell, Christopher; Alsikafi, Nejd; McClung, Christopher; Myers, Jeremy B.; Voelzke, Bryan B.; Smith, Thomas G.; Broghammer, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the short- to medium-term outcomes after artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) placement from a large, multi-institutional, prospective, follow-up study. We hypothesize that along with radiation, patients with any history of a direct surgery to the urethra will have higher rates of eventual AUS explantation for erosion and/or infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective outcome analysis was performed on 386 patients treated with AUS placement from April 2009 to December 2012 at 8 institutions with at least 3 months of follow-up. Charts were analyzed for preoperative risk factors and postoperative complications requiring explantation. RESULTS Approximately 50% of patients were considered high risk. High risk was defined as patients having undergone radiation therapy, urethroplasty, multiple treatments for bladder neck contracture or urethral stricture, urethral stent placement, or a history of erosion or infection in a previous AUS. A total of 31 explantations (8.03%) were performed during the follow-up period. Overall explantation rates were higher in those with prior radiation and prior UroLume. Men with prior AUS infection or erosion also had a trend for higher rates of subsequent explantation. Men receiving 3.5-cm cuffs had significantly higher explantation rates than those receiving larger cuffs. CONCLUSION This outcomes study confirms that urethral risk factors, including radiation history, prior AUS erosion, and a history of urethral stent placement, increase the risk of AUS explantation in short-term follow-up. PMID:25109562

  7. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction Type III: New studies suggest new approaches are needed.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C Mel

    2015-05-21

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) has been classified into three types based upon the presence or absence of objective findings including liver test abnormalities and bile duct dilatation. Type III is the most controversial and is classified as biliary type pain in the absence of any these objective findings. Many prior studies have shown that the clinical response to endoscopic therapy is higher based upon the presence of these objective criteria. However, there has been variable correlation of the manometry findings to outcome after endoscopic therapy. Nevertheless, manometry and sphincterotomy has been recommended for Type III patients given the overall response rate of 33%, although the reported response rates are highly variable. However, all of the prior data was non-blinded and non-randomized with variable follow-up. The evaluating predictors in SOD study - a prospective randomized blinded sham controlled one year outcome study showed no correlation between manometric findings and outcome after sphincterotomy. Furthermore, patients receiving sham therapy had a statistically significantly better outcome than those undergoing biliary or dual sphincterotomy. This study calls into question the whole concept of SOD Type III and, based upon prior physiologic studies, one can suggest that SOD Type III likely represents a right upper quadrant functional abdominal pain syndrome and should be treated as such.

  8. Predicting the activation states of the muscles governing upper esophageal sphincter relaxation and opening

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Corinne A.; Hammer, Michael J.; Cock, Charles; Dinning, Philip; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Costa, Marcello; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation and deactivation of neural inputs to these muscles, including the intrinsic cricopharyngeus (CP) and extrinsic submental (SM) muscles, results in their mechanical activation or deactivation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure, and ultimately reduces or promotes flow of content. By measuring the changes in diameter, using intraluminal impedance, and the concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure, it is possible to determine when the muscles are passively or actively relaxing or contracting. From these “mechanical states” of the muscle, the neural inputs driving the specific motor behaviors of the UES can be inferred. In this study we compared predictions of UES mechanical states directly with the activity measured by electromyography (EMG). In eight subjects, pharyngeal pressure and impedance were recorded in parallel with CP- and SM-EMG activity. UES pressure and impedance swallow profiles correlated with the CP-EMG and SM-EMG recordings, respectively. Eight UES muscle states were determined by using the gradient of pressure and impedance with respect to time. Guided by the level and gradient change of EMG activity, mechanical states successfully predicted the activity of the CP muscle and SM muscle independently. Mechanical state predictions revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. Derivation of “activation state” maps may allow better physiological and pathophysiological interpretations of UES function. PMID:26767985

  9. Mechanism of the noradrenergic motor control on the lower oesophageal sphincter in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Gonella, J; Niel, J P; Roman, C

    1980-01-01

    1. The release of labelled acetylcholine has been measured on lower oesophageal sphincter (l.o.s.) muscular strips previously loaded with tritiated choline. 2. This release was greatly increased by noradrenaline 10(-5) g/ml. and unaffected by atropine 10(-6) g/ml., but it was practically abolished if hemicholinium 5.2 X 10(-4) M was added to the incubating bath containing the tritiated choline. 3. A radioautographic study of sections of l.o.s. strips loaded with tritiated choline showed that the radioactivity was mainly located in the nervous cells of the enteric plexuses and that the muscular cells were very poorly labelled. 4. The increased release of acetylcholine induced by noradrenaline did not occur in a Ca2+-free or in a hypermagnesic Tyrode (12 mM). 5. Tetrodotoxin 10(-6) G/ml. had no effect on the increased release of acetylcholine induced by noradrenaline. In addition, sucrose gap recordings showed that the depolarizing effect of noradrenaline on l.o.s. muscular strips was unaffected by tetrodotoxin 10(-6) g/ml. 6. It is concluded that acetylcholine released in the l.o.s. under the action of noradrenaline originated from the synaptic endings of the cholinergic intramural neurones. Images Plate 1 PMID:7463362

  10. Endogenous cholecystokinin in postprandial lower esophageal sphincter function and fundic tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, F; Bruley Des Varannes, S; Scarpignato, C; Leray, V; D'Amato, M; Rozé, C; Galmiche, J P

    1998-12-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations (TLESRs) are the main underlying mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Although CCK acts through CCK-A receptors to increase the TLESRs induced by gastric distension, the respective roles of endogenous CCK and fundic tone in triggering postprandial TLESRs remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the CCK-A receptor antagonist, loxiglumide, on postprandial LES function and fundic tone in humans. LES motor events and fundic tone were simultaneously monitored in two groups of healthy volunteers. Recordings were performed during fasting and for 3 h after a liquid meal (200 ml/200 kcal) administered either orally or intraduodenally at a rate mimicking gastric emptying. Each subject received loxiglumide (10 mg. kg-1. h-1) or saline (control) in randomized order, which was started 40 min before the meal and maintained for 3 h thereafter. After the oral meal, loxiglumide significantly reduced TLESRs (P = 0.002) without significantly affecting LES pressure and fundic tone. After duodenal infusion of the meal, loxiglumide totally abolished the increase in TLESRs, reduced LES pressure fall (P < 0.02), and strongly inhibited fundic relaxation (P = 0.0001). We concluded that endogenous CCK is involved in the postprandial control of both LES function and fundic tone through activation of CCK-A receptors.

  11. Effect of amino acids on lower esophageal sphincter characteristics and gastroesophageal reflux in humans.

    PubMed

    Gielkens, H A; Lamers, C B; Masclee, A A

    1998-04-01

    The effect of a commercially available mixed amino acids solution, when given either intravenously or intragastrically, on lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, frequency of transient LES relaxations (TLESRs) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) was investigated in six healthy volunteers. LES pressure and esophageal pH were simultaneously recorded on three separate occasions 1 hr before (basal) and 3 hr during intravenous or intragastric infusion of amino acids (250 mg protein/kg/hr) or saline (control). No significant changes in LES pressure were seen in the control experiment. Intravenous amino acids caused a rapid and sustained (P < 0.01) decrease in LES pressure whereas intragastric amino acids decreased LES pressure only gradually and temporarily (P < 0.01). In the three experiments no significant differences were observed in TLESR frequency, the number of GER episodes, the mechanism of reflux, or duration of acid exposure. In healthy subjects both intragastric and, especially, intravenous infusion of amino acids significantly decrease LES pressure but do not affect the frequency of TLESRs or GER episodes during a continuous liquid gastric load.

  12. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Bhargava, Valmik

    2015-09-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR.

  13. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR. PMID:26045610

  14. Lubrication Theory Model to Evaluate Surgical Alterations in Flow Mechanics of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip K.; Brasseur, James G.; Zaki, Tamer; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2003-11-01

    Surgery is commonly used to rebuild a weak lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and reduce reflux. Because the driving pressure (DP) is proportional to muscle tension generated in the esophagus, we developed models using lubrication theory to evaluate the consequences of surgery on muscle force required to open the LES and drive the flow. The models relate time changes in DP to lumen geometry and trans-LES flow with a manometric catheter. Inertial effects were included and found negligible. Two models, direct (opening specified) and indirect (opening predicted), were combined with manometric pressure and imaging data from normal and post-surgery LES. A very high sensitivity was predicted between the details of the DP and LES opening. The indirect model accurately captured LES opening and predicted a 3-phase emptying process, with phases I and III requiring rapid generation of muscle tone to open the LES and empty the esophagus. Data showed that phases I and III are adversely altered by surgery causing incomplete emptying. Parametric model studies indicated that changes to the surgical procedure can positively alter LES flow mechanics and improve clinical outcomes.

  15. Anatomic dilatation of the cardia and competence of the lower esophageal sphincter: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Korn, O; Csendes, A; Burdiles, P; Braghetto, I; Stein, H J

    2000-01-01

    Anatomic and clinical data suggest that the gastroesophageal junction or cardia in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD) may be dilated. We hypothesized that anatomic dilatation of the cardia induces a lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction that may be corrected by narrowing the gastroesophageal junction (i.e., calibration of the cardia). We measured the perimeter of the cardia during surgery in control subjects and patients with GERD and Barrett's esophagus. We then tested our hypothesis in a mechanical model. The model was based on a pig gastroesophageal specimen with perpendicularly placed elastic bands around the cardia simulating the action of the "sling" and "clasp" fibers. "Dilatation" of the cardia was induced by displacing the sling band laterally and decreasing its tension. "Calibration" of the cardia was performed by reapproximation of the sling band toward the esophagus but maintaining the same tension as the dilated model. In the "basal," "dilated," and "calibrated" states, the perimeter of the cardia was noted and rapid mechanized pullback manometry with a water-perfused catheter was performed. The opening pressure was determined, and three-dimensional sphincter pressure images were analyzed. The average cardia perimeter was 6.3 cm in control subjects, 8.9 cm in GERD patients, and 13.8 cm in patients with Barrett's esophagus. The arrangement of the bands in the experimental model generated a manometric high-pressure zone similar to that in the human lower esophageal sphincter. Dilatation of the cardia resulted in a decrease in the resting pressure, length, and vector volume of the high -pressure zone, and reduced the opening pressure. Calibration restored the resting and opening pressure, and normalized the three-dimensional pressure image. In patients with GERD and Barrett's esophagus, the cardia is dilated. Our model supports the hypothesis that lower esophageal sphincter function is compromised by anatomic dilatation of the cardia and

  16. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  17. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  18. The External Degree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Cyril O.

    This book examines the external degree in relation to the extremes of attitudes, myths, and data. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the American external degree, foreign external-degree programs, the purpose of the external degree, the current scene, institutional issues, and problems of general policy. (MJM)

  19. Similar outcomes for anti-tumor necrosis factor-α antibody and immunosuppressant following seton drainage in patients with Crohn's disease-related anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xutao; Fan, Dejun; Cai, Zerong; Lian, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Zhi, Min; Wu, Xiaojian; He, Xiaosheng; Lan, Ping

    2016-09-01

    Anal fistula is common in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and leads to significant morbidity. The efficacy of seton drainage combined with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody (anti-TNF-α) or immunosuppressant in the treatment of CD-related anal fistula remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy between seton drainage combined with anti-TNF-α and seton drainage combined with immunosuppressant postoperatively on the treatment of CD-related anal fistula. A total of 65 patients with CD-related anal fistula who had received seton drainage combined with postoperative medication were divided into an antibiotics only group, anti-TNF-α group and immunosuppressant group; all patients were treated with antibiotics. Fistula closure, external orifice exudation rate and recurrence rate were assessed among these patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 3 to 84 months with an average of 25.3 months. There were 11 (16.9%) cases of recurrence after seton drainage, 9 of which underwent a second seton drainage. In the total study group, 34 (52.3%) cases achieved complete fistula closure, and 10 (15.4%) cases showed external orifice exudation. No significant difference was found among these three groups, regarding fistula closure rate, closure time of fistula and recurrence rate. The external orifice exudation rate was significantly higher in the anti-TNF-α group compared with the antibiotics only group and immunosuppressant group (P=0.004 and P=0.026, respectively). Seton drainage is an effective treatment for CD-related anal fistula. The efficacy is similar whether combined with anti-TNF-α or immunosuppressant.

  20. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  1. The Anal Pap Smear: Cytomorphology of squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Arain, Shehla; Walts, Ann E; Thomas, Premi; Bose, Shikha

    2005-02-16

    BACKGROUND: Anal smears are increasingly being used as a screening test for anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASILs). This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness and limitations of anal smears in screening for ASILs. METHODS: The cytomorphological features of 200 consecutive anal smears collected in liquid medium from 198 patients were studied and findings were correlated with results of surgical biopsies and/or repeat smears that became available for 71 patients within six months. RESULTS: Adequate cellularity was defined as an average of 6 or more nucleated squamous cells/hpf. A glandular/transitional component was not required for adequacy. Dysplastic cells, atypical parakeratotic cells and bi/multinucleated cells were frequent findings in ASIL while koilocytes were infrequent. Smears from LSIL cases most frequently showed mildly dysplastic and bi/multinucleate squamous cells followed by parakeratotic cells (PK), atypical parakeratotic cells (APK), and koilocytes. HSIL smears contained squamous cells with features of moderate/severe dysplasia and many APKs. Features of LSIL were also found in most HSIL smears. CONCLUSIONS: In this study liquid based anal smears had a high sensitivity (98%) for detection of ASIL but a low specificity (50%) for predicting the severity of the abnormality in subsequent biopsy. Patients with cytologic diagnoses of ASC-US and LSIL had a significant risk (46-56%) of HSIL at biopsy. We suggest that all patients with a diagnosis of ASC-US and above be recommended for high resolution anoscopy with biopsy.

  2. All's Well That Ends Well: Shakespeare's treatment of anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Cosman, B C

    1998-07-01

    Textual and contextual evidence suggests that the French king's fistula, a central plot device in Shakespeare's play All's Well That Ends Well, is a fistula-in-ano. Anal fistula was known to the lay public in Shakespeare's time. In addition, Shakespeare may have known of the anal fistula treatise of John Arderne, an ancestor on Shakespeare's mother's side. Shakespeare's use of anal fistula differs from all previous versions of the story, which first appeared in Boccaccio's Decameron and from its possible historical antecedent, the fistula of Charles V of France. This difference makes sense given the conventions of Elizabethan comedy, which included anal humor. It is also understandable when one looks at what wounds in different locations mean in European legend. In this light, it is not surprising that subsequent expurgations treat Boccaccio's and Shakespeare's fistulas differently, censoring only Shakespeare's. This reading has implications for the staging of All's Well That Ends Well, and for our view of the place of anal fistulas in cultural history.

  3. [A case of primary carcinoma associated with anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    A 47-year-old man with no history of anal fistula was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of perianal pain. Computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed perianal abscess. Incision and drainage were performed under spinal anesthesia. Ten months after drainage, magnetic resonance imaging revealed anal fistula on the left side of the anus. Subsequently, core-out and seton procedures were performed for ischiorectalis type III anal fistula. Pathological examination of the resected specimen of anal fistula revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, leading to the diagnosis of carcinoma associated with anal fistula. No distant metastases or enlarged lymph nodes were observed on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. We performed abdominoperineal resection with wide resection of ischiorectalis fat tissue. The pathology results were tub2, A, ly0, v0, n0, PM0, DM0, RM0, H0, P0, M0, Stage II. Negative pressure wound therapy was performed for perineum deficiency, after which rapid wound healing was observed. Left inguinal lymph node recurrence was detected 8 months after surgery, for which radiotherapy was administered. Distant metastasis was detected 11 months after surgery. The patient died 21 months after surgery.

  4. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria da Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices. PMID:28124538

  5. Artificial urinary sphincter urethral erosions: Temporal patterns, management, and incidence of preventable erosions

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Deepak K.; Linder, Brian J.; Elliott, Daniel S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is the mainstay of surgical treatment for male stress urinary incontinence. Although urethral erosions are a known complication, their temporal distribution and optimal management have not been well characterized. We seek to evaluate the timing, etiologies, and management of urethral erosions in primary AUS implantations. Materials and Methods: 1802 male patients underwent AUS procedure at Mayo Clinic (Rochester) from 1983 to 2011, including 1082 primary placements. Of primary placements, 63 had a urethral erosion of their device requiring explanation and were included in our analysis. All cases of urethral erosion were confirmed at the time of explantation through cystoscopy and direct visualization. At our institution, explantation is typically performed without primary urethral repair. Results: There were 63 cases (5.8%) of urethral erosions of primary AUS devices during the study time frame. The median age at AUS implantation was 74 years (interquartile range [IQR] 68–77 years) and median time to explantation was 21 months (IQR 5–59 months). The temporal trend of AUS erosions demonstrates a peak in the 1st year, with a gradual tapering of cases thereafter, persisting beyond 10 years. Three of 36 (8.3%) patients with follow-up developed a urethral stricture. Overall, 32/63 patients (51%) underwent salvage AUS reimplantation at a median of 7.1 months (IQR 3.1–12.9 months). Conclusions: Urethral erosions tend to occur early (within 1–2 years), with gradual tapering over time. However, continued vigilance is needed after AUS placement to decrease late erosions. These data can be used for counseling and to help guide follow-up care of patients with AUS. PMID:28197026

  6. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares Dos; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  7. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  8. The hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter: a motility disorder with manometric features of outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Ines; Lord, Reginald V N; Bremner, Cedric G; Crookes, Peter F; Hamrah, Pedram; DeMeester, Tom R

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the clinical presentation, motility characteristics, and prevalence and patterns of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES). HTLES was defined by a resting pressure measured at the respiratory inversion point on stationary manometry of greater than 26 mm Hg (ninety-fifth percentile of normal). One hundred consecutive patients (80 women, 20 men; mean age 54.7 years, range 23 to 89 years), diagnosed with HTLES at our institution between September 1996 and October 1999, were studied. Patients with achalasia or other named esophageal motility disorders or history of foregut surgery were excluded, but patients with both HTLES and "nutcracker esophagus" were included. The most common symptoms in patients with HTLES were regurgitation (75%), heartburn (71%), dysphagia (71%), and chest pain (49%). The most common primary presenting symptoms were heartburn and dysphagia. The intrabolus pressure, which is a manometric measure of outflow obstruction, was significantly higher in patients with HTLES compared to normal volunteers. The residual pressure measured during LES relaxation induced by a water swallow was also significantly higher than in normal persons. There were no significant associations between any of the relaxation parameters studied (residual pressure, nadir pressure, duration of relaxation, time to residual pressure) and either the presence or severity of any symptoms or the presence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure. Seventy-three patients underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 26% had increased distal esophageal acid exposure. Compared to a cohort of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease but no HTLES (n=300), the total and supine periods of distal esophageal acid exposure were significantly lower in the patients with HTLES and abnormal acid exposure. Patients with HTLES frequently present with moderately severe dysphagia and typical reflux symptoms. Approximately one

  9. Quantitative cholescintigraphy with fatty meal in the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction and acalculous cholecystopathy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Arun, Sasikumar; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the role of quantitative cholescintigraphy with fatty meal in the management of biliary dyskinesia and to describe the findings according to Sostre score (SS) criteria in patients with gallbladder (GB) in-situ and biliary pain. We performed a retrospective analysis of the hepatobiliary (HIDA) studies (n = 35) performed for evaluation of biliary dyskinesia either due to biliary pain, opioid induced sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), recurrent pancreatitis (RP) or post cholecystectomy syndrome (PCS). Gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF) was calculated from the post fatty meal HIDA images (excluding PCS patients). Studies with GBEF ≤40 % and SS >4 were considered to have cholecystopathy and SOD respectively. Three of the 13 patients with PCS had SS of 6 each, suggestive of SOD. Delayed biliary visualization (>15 min) and activity in common bile duct 60 min > liver 15 min were the specific features in these cases. Opioid induced SOD patients had SS >4 with retrograde refilling of GB in one patient and normalization of the SS parameters after nifedipine challenge in the other patient. Patients with RP and biliary pain were stratified into four groups, normal (GBEF >40 % and SS ≤4), cholecystopathy (GBEF ≤40 % and SS ≤4), normal with SOD (GBEF >40 % and SS >4) and cholecystopathy with SOD (GBEF ≤40 % and SS >4). Four patients with intact GB had cholecystopathy with scintigraphic features of SOD. Quantitative cholescintigraphy with fatty meal and SS scoring identified biliary dyskinesia and SOD in patients with biliary pain, recurrent pancreatitis and post-cholecystectomy syndrome.

  10. In vitro effect of pantoprazole on lower esophageal sphincter tone in rats

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Mustafa; Özer, Mahmut; Reyhan, Enver; Demirci, Yeliz; Atıcı, Ali E; Dalgıç, Tahsin; Bostancı, Erdal B; Genç, Ece

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vitro effects of pantoprazole on rat lower esophageal sphincter (LES) tone. METHODS: Rats weighing 250-300 g, provided by the Yeditepe University Experimental Research Center (YÜDETAM), were used throughout the study. They were anesthetized before decapitation. LES tissues whose mucosal lining were removed were placed in a standard 30-mL organ bath with a modified Krebs solution and continuously aerated with 95% oxygen-5% carbon dioxide gas mixture and kept at room temperature. The tissues were allowed to stabilize for 60 min. Subsequently, the contractile response to 10-6 mol/L carbachol was obtained. Different concentrations of freshly prepared pantoprazole were added directly to the tissue bath to generate cumulative concentrations of 5 × 10-6 mol/L, 5 × 10-5 mol/L, and 1.5 × 10-4 mol/L. Activities were recorded on an online computer via a 4-channel transducer data acquisition system using the software BSL PRO v 3.7, which also analyzed the data. RESULTS: Pantoprazole at 5 × 10-6 mol/L caused a small, but statistically insignificant, relaxation in the carbachol-contracted LES (2.23% vs 3.95%). The 5 × 10-5 mol/L concentration, however, caused a significant relaxation of 10.47% compared with the control. 1.5 × 10-4 mol/L concentration of pantoprazol caused a 19.89% relaxation in the carbachol contracted LES (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate that pantoprazole has a relaxing effect in isolated LESs. These results might have significant clinical implications for the subset of patients using proton pump inhibitors who do not receive full symptomatic alleviation from gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:22171145

  11. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reflex kinetics: effects of peristaltic reflexes and maturation in human premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Pena, Eneysis M; Parks, Vanessa N; Peng, Juan; Fernandez, Soledad A; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Shaker, Reza; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2010-12-01

    We defined the sensory-motor characteristics of the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (LESR) (stimulus threshold volume, response onset, and relaxation period, relaxation magnitude, nadir) during maturation in human neonates. We hypothesized that LESR kinetics differs during maturation and with peristaltic reflex type. Basal and adaptive esophageal motility testing was performed (N = 20 premature neonates) at 34.7 and 39.1 wk (time 1 and time 2). Effects of midesophageal provocation with graded stimuli (N = 1,267 stimuli, air and liquids) on LESR kinetics during esophagodeglutition response (EDR) and secondary peristalsis (SP) were analyzed by mixed models. Frequency of LESR with basal primary peristalsis were different during maturation (P = 0.03). During adaptive responses with maturation, 1) the frequencies of peristaltic reflexes and LESR were similar; 2) liquid stimuli resulted in a shorter LESR response latency and LESR nadir and greater LESR magnitude (all P < 0.05); 3) media differences were noted with LESR response latency (air vs. liquids, P < 0.02); and 4) infusion flow rate-LESR were different (P < 0.01 for air and liquids). Mechanistically, 1) frequency of LESR was greater during peristaltic reflexes at both times (vs. none, P < 0.0001); 2) LESR response latency, duration, and time to complete LESR were longer with EDR (all P < 0.05, vs. SP at time 2); and 3) graded stimulus volume LESR were different for air and liquids (P < 0.01). In conclusion, sensory-motor characteristics of LESR depend on the mechanosensitive properties of the stimulus (media, volume, flow), type of peristaltic reflex, and postnatal maturation. Maturation modulates an increased recruitment of inhibitory pathways that favor LESR.

  12. The Utility of Post-Void Residual Volume versus Sphincter Electromyography to Distinguish between Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Asahina, Masato; Yamanaka, Yoshitaka; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Shigeki; Fuse, Miki; Koga, Yasuko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of sphincter electromyography (EMG) and post-void residual urine volume (PVR) during a free-flow study and a pressure-flow study (PFS) for distinguishing multiple system atrophy (MSA) from Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 241 case records; both urodynamic study and sphincter EMG were performed in patients with MSA (n = 147) and PD (n = 94). Results There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01) in the mean PVR during the free-flow study (113.1 ± 7.5 mL in MSA and 40.4 ± 3.8 mL in PD), mean PVR during PFS (230.1 ± 12.6 mL in MSA and 71.7 ± 6.6 mL in PD), and mean duration of MUP for sphincter EMG (9.3 ± 0.1 ms in MSA and 7.7 ± 0.1 ms in PD). The area under the curve used for differentiating MSA from PD was 0.79 and 0.73 for PVR during PFS and the free-flow study, respectively. There was a mean duration of 0.69 ms for the sphincter EMG. Conclusions The present results suggested that PVR was more appropriate than sphincter EMG for differentiating MSA from PD. PMID:28060892

  13. Anal carcinoma and HIV infection: is it time for screening?

    PubMed

    Herranz-Pinto, P; Sendagorta-Cudós, E; Bernardino-de la Serna, J I; Peña-Sánchez de Rivera, J M

    2014-03-01

    A 38-year-old white man had a 10-year history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (A3), with no episodes of opportunistic diseases and in good immunologic recovery (CD4 cell count: 450 and indetectable HIV viral load) while on HAART. He presented with a two-month history of mild anal symptoms, including pruritus and episodic bleeding. He referred past episodes of anal warts, self-treated with several topical compounds, all proven unsuccessful. Perianal examination showed erythema and scratching. A 0.5cm sized tumor, with infiltration at the base was detected on digital exam, located at 15mm from the anal margin. Local biopsy driven by high-resolution anuscopy (AAR) yielded a final diagnosis of infiltrative epidermoid carcinoma. Might that neoplasia have been prevented?

  14. Treatment of peri-anal fistula in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Giuseppe S; Di Carlo, Sara; Tema, Giorgia; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Maggi, Giulia; Biancone, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistulas are a common manifestation of Crohn’s disease (CD). The first manifestation of the disease is often in the peri-anal region, which can occur years before a diagnosis, particularly in CD affecting the colon and rectum. The treatment of peri-anal fistulas is difficult and always multidisciplinary. The European guidelines recommend combined surgical and medical treatment with biologic drugs to achieve best results. Several different surgical techniques are currently employed. However, at the moment, none of these techniques appear superior to the others in terms of healing rate. Surgery is always indicated to treat symptomatic, simple, low intersphincteric fistulas refractory to medical therapy and those causing disabling symptoms. Utmost attention should be paid to correcting the balance between eradication of the fistula and the preservation of fecal continence. PMID:25309057

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Esplin, D G; Wilson, S R; Hullinger, G A

    2003-05-01

    Tumors of the perianal area of dogs are common and include multiple tumor types. Whereas perianal adenomas occur often, adenocarcinomas of the apocrine glands of the anal sac occur less frequently. A review of the literature revealed no reports of squamous cell carcinomas arising from the epithelial lining of the anal sac. Squamous cell carcinomas originating from the lining of the anal sac were diagnosed in five dogs. Microscopically, the tumors consisted of variably sized invasive nests and cords of epithelial cells displaying squamous differentiation. Four of the five dogs were euthanatized because of problems associated with local infiltration by the tumors. In the fifth dog, there was no evidence of tumor 7 months after surgical removal, but further follow up was not available.

  16. [Management of complications in anal and transanal tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Sailer, M; Eisoldt, S; Möllmann, C

    2015-08-01

    Anal and transanal tumor operations are safe and are associated with a very low morbidity. Perianal and anal lesions as well as low rectal tumors can be excised by direct exposure using an anal retractor. For lesions situated in the middle or upper third of the rectum, special instrumentation, such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) and transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) should be used to avoid unnecessary R1 resections. Fatal complications are extremely rare and most complications, such as urinary retention or temporary subfebrile temperatures, are minor. Suture line dehiscences are usually clinically unremarkable. Major complications comprise significant hemorrhage and opening of the peritoneal cavity. The latter must be recognized intraoperatively and can usually be managed by primary suturing. Infections, abscess formation, rectovaginal fistula, injury of the prostate or even urethra are extremely rare complications.

  17. Volatile compounds from anal glands of the wolverine, Gulo gulo.

    PubMed

    Wood, William F; Terwilliger, Miranda N; Copeland, Jeffrey P

    2005-09-01

    Dichloromethane extracts of wolverine (Gulo gulo, Mustelinae, Mustelidae) anal gland secretion were examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The secretion composition was complex and variable for the six samples examined: 123 compounds were detected in total, with the number per animal ranging from 45 to 71 compounds. Only six compounds were common to all extracts: 3-methylbutanoic acid, 2-methylbutanoic acid, phenylacetic acid, alpha-tocopherol, cholesterol, and a compound tentatively identified as 2-methyldecanoic acid. The highly odoriferous thietanes and dithiolanes found in anal gland secretions of some members of the Mustelinae [ferrets, mink, stoats, and weasels (Mustela spp.) and zorillas (Ictonyx spp.)] were not observed. The composition of the wolverine's anal gland secretion is similar to that of two other members of the Mustelinae, the pine and beech marten (Martes spp.).

  18. Treatment of peri-anal fistula in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Sica, Giuseppe S; Di Carlo, Sara; Tema, Giorgia; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Maggi, Giulia; Biancone, Livia

    2014-10-07

    Anal fistulas are a common manifestation of Crohn's disease (CD). The first manifestation of the disease is often in the peri-anal region, which can occur years before a diagnosis, particularly in CD affecting the colon and rectum. The treatment of peri-anal fistulas is difficult and always multidisciplinary. The European guidelines recommend combined surgical and medical treatment with biologic drugs to achieve best results. Several different surgical techniques are currently employed. However, at the moment, none of these techniques appear superior to the others in terms of healing rate. Surgery is always indicated to treat symptomatic, simple, low intersphincteric fistulas refractory to medical therapy and those causing disabling symptoms. Utmost attention should be paid to correcting the balance between eradication of the fistula and the preservation of fecal continence.

  19. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  20. [Anal verruciform xanthoma in a transplant background for primary hyperoxaluria. Anal verruciform xanthoma after a combined hepato-renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Moktefi, Anissa; De Parades, Vincent; Fléjou, Jean-François

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of anal verruciform xanthoma in a patient who underwent a combined liver and kidney transplantation for primary hyperoxaluria. Verruciform xanthoma is a rare and benign lesion arising in oral cavity and genital mucosa. It is characterized pathologically by papillary epithelial hyperplasia and aggregates of foamy macrophages in connective tissue papillae. This condition, whose pathogenesis remains unclear, has been reported in immunosuppressive background or associated with underlying dermatosis. We report here the second case of anal verruciform xanthoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of verruciform xanthoma in association with primary hyperoxaluria.

  1. [Development of external medicine and dermatology of TCM in the Republican period].

    PubMed

    He, Zhongjun; Wang, Li

    2015-05-01

    The inheritance of the theory in external medicine in the Republican period was mainly derived from Wai ke zheng zong (Orthodox Manual of External Medicine) and Yi zong jin jian (Golden Mirror of Medicine) and the sorting out of medical plasters, pills, and powders from Wai ke shi san fang (Thirteen Recipes of External Medicine). Zhang Shanlei's Yang ke gang yao (Guidelines for Ulcerations), based on the five-year experience of Zhu's family, offers new experience and ideas for syndrome differentiation; Ding Ganren's diagnosis for external medicine is exquisite with many well known formulae prescribed by himself; Monographs on leprosy and syphilis were published by famous physicians. Departments of external medicine and anal diseases, and classes on external medicine and dermatology and venereal diseases were set up in TCM schools in Guangdong and Zhejiang provinces with teaching materials compiled. All these mark the development of external medicine in modern age.

  2. Longitudinal comparison of quality of life in patients undergoing laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication versus magnetic sphincter augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonitta, Gianluca; Lovece, Andrea; Lazzari, Veronica; Bonavina, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Only a minority of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are offered a surgical option. This is mostly due to the fear of potential side effects, the variable success rate, and the extreme alteration of gastric anatomy with the current gold standard, the laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. It has been reported that laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) and laparoscopic sphincter augmentation using a magnetic device (LINX) can treat reflux more physiologically and with a lower incidence of side-effects and reoperation rate. We present the first comparing quality of life in patients undergoing LTF versus LINX. Observational cohort study. Consecutive patients undergoing LTF or LINX over the same time period were compared by using the propensity score full matching method and generalized estimating equation. Criteria of exclusion were >3 cm hiatal hernia, grade C–D esophagitis, ineffective esophageal motility, body mass index >35, and previous upper abdominal surgery. The primary study outcome was quality of life measured with the Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease-Health Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes were proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use, presence of gas-related symptoms or dysphagia, and reoperation-free probability. Between March 2007 and July 2014, 238 patients with GERD met the criteria of inclusion in the study. Of these, 103 underwent an LTF and 135 a LINX procedure. All patients had a minimum 1-year follow-up. Over time, patients in both groups had similar GERD-HRQL scores (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, confidence interval [CI] 0.89–1.27; P = 0.578), PPI use (OR 1.18, CI 0.81–1.70; P = 0.388), gas-related symptoms (OR 0.69, CI 0.21–2.28; P = 0.542), dysphagia (OR 0.62, CI 0.26–1.30; P = 0.241), and reoperation-free probability (stratified log-rank test = 0.556). In 2 concurrent cohorts of patients with early stage GERD undergoing LTF or LINX and matched by propensity score

  3. Upper esophageal sphincter mechanical states analysis: a novel methodology to describe UES relaxation and opening.

    PubMed

    Omari, Taher I; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Dinning, Philip; Costa, Marcello; Rommel, Nathalie; Cock, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation of neural inputs to these muscles, the intrinsic cricopharyngeus muscle and extrinsic suprahyoid muscles, results in their contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to calculate the "mechanical states" of the muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Diseases that alter the neural pathways to these muscles can result in weakening the muscle contractility and/or decreasing the muscle compliance, all of which can cause dysphagia. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle is difficult and as the current interpretation of UES motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during swallow can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the UES and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern the timing and extent of UES opening during swallowing. To achieve this we initially analyzed swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and UES pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen when compared to videofluoroscopy. Then using a database of pressure-impedance studies, recorded from young and aged healthy controls and patients with motor neuron disease, we calculated the UES mechanical states in relation to a standardized swallowed bolus volume, normal aging and dysphagia pathology. Our results indicated that eight different

  4. Effects of sphincter of Oddi motility on the formation of cholesterol gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Zhong-Hou; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Wang, Xin-Xing; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Ma, Bang-Zhen; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Zhang, Zhen-Hai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms and effects of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility on cholesterol gallbladder stone formation in guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups, the control group (n = 10) and the cholesterol gallstone group (n = 24), which was sequentially divided into four subgroups with six guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice. The guinea pigs in the cholesterol gallstone group were fed a cholesterol lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9, and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity were obtained by a multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCKAR) expression levels in SO smooth muscle were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin, and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at each stage in the process of cholesterol gallstone formation. RESULTS: The gallstone formation rate was 0%, 0%, 16.7%, and 83.3% in the 3, 6, 9, and 12 wk groups, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity in the 9 wk group, the amplitude of myoelectric activity in the 9 and 12 wk groups, and the amplitude and the frequency of SO in the 9 wk group were all significantly decreased compared to the control group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased markedly in the 12 wk group, and the CCKAR expression levels increased in the 6 and 12 wk groups compared to the control group. Serum VIP was elevated significantly in the 9 and 12 wk groups and gastrin decreased significantly in the 3 and 9 wk groups. There was no difference in serum CCK-8 between the groups. CONCLUSION: A cholesterol gallstone-causing diet can induce SO dysfunction. The increasing tension of the SO along with its decreasing activity may play an important role in cholesterol gallstone formation. Expression changes of CCKAR in SO smooth muscle and serum

  5. [Anal abscess with a tuberculous origin: report of two cases and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Romelaer, Charlotte; Abramowitz, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tuberculosis represents 1% of extrapulmonary tuberculoses and only sporadic cases of anal tuberculosis have been reported in the literature. We report two cases of tuberculous anal abscess and a review of the literature for diagnosis and treatment.

  6. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Cancer.gov

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  7. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  8. Patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation: a study using intraluminal electrical impedance

    PubMed Central

    Sifrim, D; Silny, J; Holloway, R; Janssens, J

    1999-01-01

    Background—Belching has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects. However, the presence of oesophageal gas has not been measured directly but only inferred from manometry. 
Aims—To investigate, using intraluminal electrical impedance, the patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations, the main mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects. 
Methods—Impedance changes associated with the passage of gas were studied in vitro, and in vivo in cats. Oesophageal manometry, pH, and intraluminal electrical impedance measurements were performed in 11 normal subjects after a meal. 
Results—Gas reflux caused a sudden increase in impedance that propagated rapidly to the proximal oesophagus whereas liquid reflux induced a retrogressively propagated fall in impedance. Impedance showed gas or liquid reflux during most (102/141) transient LOS relaxations. When acid reflux occurred, impedance showed evidence of intraoesophageal retrograde flow of liquid in the majority (78%) of events. Evidence of gas retroflow was found in almost half (47%) of acid reflux episodes. When present together, however, liquid preceded gas on 44% of occasions. Overall, gas reflux occurred as the initial event in only 25% of acid reflux episodes. 
Conclusions—These findings suggest that in upright normal subjects, although belching can precipitate acid reflux, most acid reflux occurs as a primary event. 

 Keywords: belching; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; oesophageal manometry; intraluminal electrical impedance; lower oesophageal sphincter PMID:9862825

  9. Synthesis of Facial Image with Expression Based on Muscular Contraction Parameters Using Linear Muscle and Sphincter Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seonju; Ozawa, Shinji

    We aim to synthesize individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. We have proposed a method of calculating the muscular contraction parameters from arbitrary face image without using learning for each individual. As a result, we could generate not only individual facial expression, but also the facial expressions of various persons. In this paper, we propose the muscle-based facial model; the facial muscles define both the linear and the novel sphincter. Additionally, we propose a method of synthesizing individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. First, the individual facial model with expression is generated by fitting using the arbitrary face image. Next, the muscular contraction parameters are calculated that correspond to the expression displacement of the input face image. Finally, the facial expression is synthesized by the vertex displacements of a neutral facial model based on calculated muscular contraction parameters. Experimental results reveal that the novel sphincter muscle can synthesize facial expressions of the facial image, which corresponds to the actual face image with arbitrary and mouth or eyes expression.

  10. Use of GDNF-Releasing Nanofiber Nerve Guide Conduits for the Repair of Conus Medullaris/Cauda Equina Injury in the Non-Human Primate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    carrying cage using a chute. This is followed by the introduction of the treadmill environment, which is enclosed by a plexi - glass cage. Animals are...external anal sphincter muscle in rhesus macaques (n=6 subjects). A glass probe is inserted into the rectum as a stimulus. The evoked response typically...duration of the evoked responses vary depending on the size of the glass probe inserted into the rectum to gently stretch the sphincter muscle (10

  11. Hidrosadenoma of the anal canal: a case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vainer, B; Bille Brahe, N E; Horn, T

    2003-02-01

    Hidrosadenoma of the anal canal is an extremely rare tumour. Only nine cases with similar histologic structure have been described in the literature, most representing tumours resected from the anal or rectal mucosa. We present a case of anal hidrosadenoma with immunohistochemical staining features identifying it as a true sweat gland tumour.

  12. External radiation surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  13. Role of Brachytherapy in the Boost Management of Anal Carcinoma With Node Involvement (CORS-03 Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Ortholan, Cecile; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Teissier, Eric; Cowen, Didier; Salem, Nagi; Lemanski, Claire; Ellis, Steve; Resbeut, Michel

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess retrospectively the clinical outcome in anal cancer patients, with lymph node involvement, treated with split-course radiation therapy and receiving a boost through external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2005, among 229 patients with invasive nonmetastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma, a selected group of 99 patients, with lymph node involvement, was studied. Tumor staging reported was T1 in 4 patients, T2 in 16 patients, T3 in 49 patients, T4 in 16 patients, and T unknown in 14 patients and as N1 in 67 patients and N2/N3 in 32 patients. Patients underwent a first course of EBRT (mean dose, 45.1 Gy) followed by a boost (mean dose, 18 Gy) using EBRT (50 patients) or BCT (49 patients). All characteristics of patients and tumors were well balanced between the BCT and EBRT groups. Prognostic factors of cumulative rate of local recurrence (CRLR), cumulative rate of distant (including nodal) recurrence (CRDR), colostomy-free survival (CFS) rate, and overall survival (OS) rate were analyzed for the overall population and according to the nodal status classification. Results: The median follow-up was 71.5 months. The 5-year CRLR, CRDR, CFS rate, and OS rate were 21%, 19%, 63%, and 74.4%, respectively. In the overall population, the type of node involvement (N1 vs N2/N3) was the unique independent prognostic factor for CRLR. In N1 patients, by use of multivariate analysis, BCT boost was the unique prognostic factor for CRLR (4% for BCT vs 31% for EBRT; hazard ratio, 0.08; P=.042). No studied factors were significantly associated with CRDR, CFS, and OS. No difference with regard to boost technique and any other factor studied was observed in N2/N3 patients for any kind of recurrence. Conclusion: In anal cancer, even in the case of initial perirectal node invasion, BCT boost is superior to EBRT boost for CRLR, without an influence on OS, suggesting that N1 status should not be a contraindication to

  14. Involved-Field, Low-Dose Chemoradiotherapy for Early-Stage Anal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Paul; Cooper, Rachel; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To report the results of patients with early-stage anal cancer treated using a low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2006, 21 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions within 3 weeks) and concurrent chemotherapy (bolus mitomycin-C 12 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 to a maximum of 20 mg followed by infusion 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h on Days 1-4). Of the 21 patients, 18 underwent small-volume, involved-field radiotherapy and 3 were treated with anteroposterior-posteroanterior parallel-opposed pelvic fields. Of the 21 patients, 17 had had lesions that were excised with close (<1 mm) or involved margins, 1 had had microinvasive disease on biopsy, and 3 had had macroscopic tumor <2 cm in diameter (T1). All were considered to have Stage N0 disease radiologically. Results: After a median follow-up of 42 months, only 1 patient (4.7%) had experienced local recurrence and has remained disease free after local excision. No distant recurrences or deaths occurred. Only 1 patient could not complete treatment (because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity). Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (9.5%). No significant late toxicity was identified. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that for patients with anal carcinoma who have residual microscopic or very-small-volume disease, a policy of low-dose, reduced-volume, involved-field chemoradiotherapy produces excellent local control and disease-free survival, with low rates of acute and late toxicity.

  15. Obesity is a negative predictor of success after surgery for complex anal fistula

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It was the aim of this study to compare the outcome of surgery for complex anal fistulas in obese and non-obese patients. Methods All patients with complex anorectal fistulas who underwent fistulectomy and/or rectal advancement flap repair were prospectively recorded. Surgery was performed in a standardized technique. Body mass index (BMI [kg/m2]) was used as objective measure to indicate morbid obesity. Patients with a BMI greater than 30 were defined as obese, and patients with a BMI below 30 were defined as non-obese. The parameters analyzed related to BMI included success or failure, and reoperation rate due to recurrent abscess. Success was defined as closure of both internal and external openings, absence of drainage without further intervention, and absence of abscess formation. Results Within two years, 220 patients underwent advancement flap repair and met the inclusion criteria. 55% of patients were females, mean age was 39 (range 18-76) years, and the majority of fistulas were located at the posterior site. 69% of patients (152/220) were non-obese (BMI < 30), whereas 31% (68/220) were obese (BMI > 30). After a median follow-up of 6 months, primary healing rate ("success") for the whole collective was 82% (180/220). Success was significantly different between non-obese and obese patients: In non-obese patients, recurrence rate was significantly lower than in obese patients (14% vs. 28%; p < 0.01). Moreover, reoperation rate due to recurrent abscess with the need for seton drainage in the failure groups was significantly higher in obese patients when compared to non-obese patients (73% vs. 52%; p < 0.01). Using multivariate analysis, obesity was identified as independent predictive factor of success or failure (p < 0.02). Conclusion Obese patients are at higher risk for failure after surgery for complex anal fistula. PMID:21605391

  16. Managing faecal incontinence or leakage: the Peristeen Anal Plug.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Willie

    Incontinence can be a devastating problem to many individuals. It is embarrassing and limiting socially, and prevents those with the problem from going about their day-to-day activities. People adopt coping strategies to manage the problem and those with urinary incontinence often look for containment products such as disposable pads or nappy-style products. These products have been developed using different absorbent materials and are accessible to sufferers in local supermarkets. Absorbency of the products has improved so that once wetted, they hold urine more easily. However, the same cannot be said for faecal incontinence management products and there are few that can be called upon to manage this devastating condition. The Peristeen Anal Plug, developed originally as the Conveen Anal Plug, stands alone in the search for a device to manage faecal incontinence or leakage.

  17. Identification of gender in yellow perch by external morphology: validation in four geographic strains and effects of estradiol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    External morphological criteria that enable the rapid determination of gender have been developed for yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Criteria are based upon 1) shape of the urogenital papilla (UGP), 2) relative size of the UGP to the anal (AN) opening, and 3) coloration of the UGP. In females, t...

  18. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    D'Ugo, S; Stasi, E; Gaspari, A L; Sileri, P

    2015-12-01

    Perianal disease is a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It includes different conditions from more severe and potentially disabling ones, such as abscesses and fistulas, to more benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, skin tags and fissures. Most literature has been focused on anal sepsis and fistulae, as they carry the majority of disease burden and often alter the natural course of the disease. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with IBD have been overlooked, although they can represent a challenging problem. The management of hemorrhoids and fissures in IBD patients may be difficult and may significantly differ compared to the non-affected population. Historically surgery was firmly obstructed, and hemorrhoidectomy or sphincterotomy in patients with associated diagnosis of IBD was considered harmful, although literature data is scant and based on small series. Various authors reported an incidence of postoperative complications higher in IBD than in the general populations, with potential severe events. Considering that a spontaneous healing is possible, the first line management should be a medical therapy. In patients non-responding to conservative measures it is possible a judicious choice of surgical options on a highly selective basis; this can lead to acceptable results, but the risk of possible complications needs to be considered. In this review it is analyzed the current literature on the incidence, symptoms and treatment options of hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  19. Screening, Surveillance, and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kevin C.; Menon, Raman; Bastawrous, Amir; Billingham, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia has been increasing, especially in high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men, human immunodeficiency virus positive patients, and those who are immunosuppressed. Several studies with long-term follow-up have suggested that rate of progression from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to invasive anal cancer is ∼ 5%. This number is considerably higher for those at high risk. Anal cytology has been used to attempt to screen high-risk patients for disease; however, it has been shown to have very little correlation to actual histology. Patients with lesions should undergo history and physical exam including digital rectal exam and standard anoscopy. High-resolution anoscopy can be considered as well, although it is of questionable time and cost–effectiveness. Nonoperative treatments include expectant surveillance and topical imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil. Operative therapies include wide local excision and targeted ablation with electrocautery, infrared coagulation, or cryotherapy. Recurrence rates remain high regardless of treatment delivered and surveillance is paramount, although optimal surveillance regimens have yet to be established. PMID:26929753

  20. External approach to rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Wilfred S; Charbonneau, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    The technique of external rhinoplasty is outlined. Having reviewed 74 cases, its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Reluctance to use this external approach seems to be based on emotional rather than radical grounds, for its seems to be the procedure of choice for many problems.

  1. [The importance of x-ray cinematography of deglutition for indicating the need for myotomy of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter].

    PubMed

    Augustiny, N; Schmid, H; Brühlmann, W F

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients were examined one to four years after cricopharyngeal myotomy that had been carried out because of dysfunction of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter. Twelve patients were examined radiologically. Eleven of the 14 patients were clinically improved or cured. In two patients who were not improved, the underlying condition was a polymyositis. The other patients suffered from an idiopathic dysfunction. Because of the small numbers involved, no detailed statistical analysis was carried out. Nevertheless, our results indicate that: Cricopharyngeus myotomy produces marked improvement or cure in patients with idiopathic dysfunction. Weak propulsive peristalsis of the pharyngeal constrictors is a prognostic factor indicating a poor clinical result of surgery. There is little chance of clinical improvement in patients with polymyositis.

  2. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI.

  3. Clinical evaluation of a single daily dose of phenylpropanolamine in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Stéphanie; Rustichelli, Frederico; Noël, Stéphanie; Hamaide, Annick

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to determine the efficacy of a single daily oral dose of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) in bitches. Nine bitches diagnosed with USMI were treated with a single daily dose [1.5 mg/kg body weight (BW)] of PPA for at least 1 month. Urethral pressure profiles (UPP) were performed in 7 dogs before treatment and repeated in 4 of them after treatment. Treatment with PPA resulted in long-term continence in 8/9 bitches. One dog did not respond to PPA and was treated surgically later. Recheck UPPs showed a significant increase in maximal urethral closure pressure in the 4 bitches after treatment with PPA compared to before treatment. In conclusion, long-term continence can be achieved in bitches affected with USMI after administration of a single daily dose of PPA (1.5 mg/kg BW).

  4. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated.

  5. Endourethral prosthesis for treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia: impact on quality of life for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Joseph, A C; Juma, S; Niku, S D

    1994-12-01

    Neurogenic bladders with detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) are common in persons with spinal cord injury and with multiple sclerosis. Treatment options such as sphincterotomy, urethral foley and suprapubic catheters are not without complications or failure; however, they are recommended for patients who are unable to do intermittent catheterization. An endourethral prosthesis for DSD has been developed for experimental use in the United States. We report one year results of the clinical trials with endourethral prostheses implanted in ten patients. Initial subjective and objective results show an 80% success rate. At present, preliminary data show that an endourethral prosthesis, which is simple to insert and has few complications, appears to offer an alternative to conventional treatment. A key to success is to prepare for changes in life style that impact the patient's quality of life. Both patient and staff education are necessary pre-operatively to achieve successful outcomes post-operatively.

  6. Inhibition of sphincter of Oddi function by the nitric oxide carrier S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine in rabbits and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Slivka, A; Chuttani, R; Carr-Locke, D L; Kobzik, L; Bredt, D S; Loscalzo, J; Stamler, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitor of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Model systems of the gut predict the NO will complex with biological thiol (SH) groups, yielding S-nitrosothiols (RS-NO), which may limit the propensity to form mutagenic nitrosamines. The inhibitory effects of NO and its biologically relevant adducts on sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility have been inferred from animal studies; however, their importance in regulating human SO is not known. The objectives of this study were to (a) provide histologic confirmation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in human SO; (b) characterize the pharmacology of S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine (SNAC), an exemplary S-nitrosothiol, on SO motility in a rabbit model; and (c) study the effects of topical SNAC on SO motility in humans. Immunocytochemical and histochemical identification of NOS was performed in human SO. The pharmacologic response of SNAC was defined in isolated rabbit SO using a standard bioassay. Topical SNAC was then applied to the duodenal papilla in patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and biliary manometry. NOS was localized to nerve fibers and bundles of the SO in rabbits and humans. SNAC inhibited spontaneous motility (frequency and amplitude) as well as acetylcholine-induced elevations in SO basal pressure in the rabbit model. In patients undergoing ERCP and biliary manometry, topical SNAC inhibited SO contraction freqency, basal pressure, and duodenal motility. NOS is localized to neural elements in human SO, implicating a role for NO in regulating SO function. Supporting this concept, SNAC is an inhibitor of SO and duodenal motility when applied topically to humans during ERCP. Our data suggest a novel clinical approach using local NO donors to control gastrointestinal motility and regulate sphincteric function. Images PMID:7525649

  7. The efficacy of balloon dilation in achalasia is the result of stretching of the lower esophageal sphincter, not muscular disruption.

    PubMed

    Borhan-Manesh, F; Kaviani, M J; Taghavi, A R

    2016-04-01

    Pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in achalasia is a major palliative treatment. It is generally believed, although never substantiated, that therapeutic efficacy of ballooning in achalasia is the result of the disruption and tearing of the muscular layers of the LES. To clarify this issue, we investigated the frequency of muscular disruption at the LES, 24 hours after PD, by employing the endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), in a group of 43 consented patients with achalasia. Between July 2009 and March2012, 51 consecutive adult patients with tentative diagnosis of achalasia, some with recurrence of symptoms after an earlier treatment with balloon dilation, were evaluated and underwent PD, using Rigiflex balloon without major adverse effect. Out of the 51 evaluated, 43 eligible and consenting patients who underwent EUS, 24 hours after PD, using Olympus GF-UE 160 echoendoscope and an Aloka Prosound probe at 7.5 MHZ, are the subjects of this study. The EUS in 43 eligible patients revealed an intact LES in 36 (83.7%), small area of muscular disruption in 5 (11.6%) and small hematoma in 2 patients (4.6%). Our data convincingly demonstrate that the clinical effectiveness of balloon dilation in achalasia is not the result of muscular disruption, but of circumferential stretching of the LES. Our findings on the mechanism of action of PD in achalasia could result in modifying the current method of dilation for a safer procedure, by slowing the rate of inflation and allowing the sphincter to slowly stretch itself to the distending balloon.

  8. Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalences and Factors Associated with Abnormal Anal Cytology in HIV-Infected Women in an Urban Cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Lake, Jordan E.; Levi, José Eduardo; Coutinho, José Ricardo; de Andrade, Angela; Heinke, Thais; Derrico, Mônica; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identifying factors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, associated with abnormal anal cytology in HIV-infected women have implications for anal squamous cell cancer (SCC) prevention in HIV-infected women. Anal and cervical samples were collected for cytology, and tested for high-(HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes in a cross-sectional analysis of the IPEC Women's HIV Cohort (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Multivariate log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios for factors associated with abnormal anal cytology [≥atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, (ASC-US)]. Characteristics of the 863 participants included: median age 42 years, 57% non-white, 79% current CD4+ T-cell count >350 cells/mm3, 53% HIV-1 viral load <50 copies/mL, median ART duration 5.8 years. Fifty-one percent of anal specimens contained ≥1 HR-HPV genotype; 31% had abnormal anal cytology [14% ASC-US, 11% low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion, (LSIL); 2% atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H); 4% high-grade SIL/cancer (HSIL+)]. In multivariate analysis, cervical LSIL+, nadir CD4+ T-cell count ≤50 cells/mm3, HIV-1 viral load ≥50 copies/mL, and anal HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 33, 45, 52, 56, and 58 were associated with ≥anal ASC-US (p<0.05). Abnormal anal cytology and HR-HPV prevalences were high. HIV-infected women with cervical LSIL+, low nadir CD4+ counts, or detectable HIV-1 viral loads should be a particular focus for enhanced anal SCC screening efforts. PMID:25361401

  9. Future of External Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    This chapter builds on prior chapters and focuses on higher education trends on the horizon and the resulting impact on external reporting for institutional researchers. Three practical recommendations and examples for institutional researchers are also presented.

  10. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  11. Externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Urban, Cordula; Urban, Alexander S; Charron, Heather; Joshi, Amit

    2013-08-01

    Externally modulated nanoparticles comprise a rapidly advancing class of cancer nanotherapeutics, which combine the favorable tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, with external spatio-temporal control on therapy delivery via optical, magnetic, or ultrasound modalities. The local control on therapy enables higher tumor treatment efficacy, while simultaneously reducing off-target effects. The nanoparticle interactions with external fields have an additional advantage of frequently generating an imaging signal, and thus such agents provide theranostic (both diagnostic and therapeutic) capabilities. In this review, we classify the emerging externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles according to the mode of external control and describe the physiochemical mechanisms underlying the external control of therapy, and illustrate the major embodiments of nanoparticles in each class with proven biological efficacy: (I) electromagnetic radiation in visible and near-infrared range is being exploited for gold based and carbon nanostructures with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer, photochemistry based manipulations are employed for light sensitive liposomes and porphyrin based nanoparticles; (II) Magnetic field based manipulations are being developed for iron-oxide based nanostructures for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetothermal therapy; (III) ultrasound based methods are primarily being employed to increase delivery of conventional drugs and nanotherapeutics to tumor sites.

  12. Externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Cordula; Urban, Alexander S.; Charron, Heather; Joshi, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Externally modulated nanoparticles comprise a rapidly advancing class of cancer nanotherapeutics, which combine the favorable tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, with external spatio-temporal control on therapy delivery via optical, magnetic, or ultrasound modalities. The local control on therapy enables higher tumor treatment efficacy, while simultaneously reducing off-target effects. The nanoparticle interactions with external fields have an additional advantage of frequently generating an imaging signal, and thus such agents provide theranostic (both diagnostic and therapeutic) capabilities. In this review, we classify the emerging externally modulated theranostic nanoparticles according to the mode of external control and describe the physiochemical mechanisms underlying the external control of therapy, and illustrate the major embodiments of nanoparticles in each class with proven biological efficacy: (I) electromagnetic radiation in visible and near-infrared range is being exploited for gold based and carbon nanostructures with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer, photochemistry based manipulations are employed for light sensitive liposomes and porphyrin based nanoparticles; (II) Magnetic field based manipulations are being developed for iron-oxide based nanostructures for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetothermal therapy; (III) ultrasound based methods are primarily being employed to increase delivery of conventional drugs and nanotherapeutics to tumor sites. PMID:24834381

  13. Unexpected Anal Squamous Cells Carcinoma after Open Hemorrhoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Navarra; Valentina, Abruzzese; Federico, Sista; Renato, Pietroletti

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of unexpected anal squamous cells carcinoma found in hemorrhoidectomy specimen. The patient had a 3-year history of prolapsing hemorrhoids. A prolapsing hemorrhoid was present at eleven o'clock in lithotomy. Milligan-Morgan was performed and gross examination of the specimen was unremarkable. Histopathologic evaluation showed noninvasive squamous cells carcinoma. The present case report evidences the opportunity of routine histopathologic analysis of hemorrhoidal specimens particularly in case of long-standing prolapse. Questions arise in the option of those techniques where no specimens are collected or tissue is excised far from deceased area. PMID:25922781

  14. A rare case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; FIUMARA, P.F.; VILLARI, L.; MARCHESE, S.; CACCIOLA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor composed of myeloblasts occurring at an extramedullary site. It may develop in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic syndrome, sometimes preceding onset of the systemic disease. Frequent sites of myeloid sarcoma are bones or various soft tissues. Gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report a unique case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as a painful anal fissure, in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis was achieved by a surgical excisional biopsy and immunoistochemical staining. PMID:26712260

  15. The hero, the anima and the claustrum: anality and idealization.

    PubMed

    Meredith-Owen, William

    2012-04-01

    Joe Redfearn's (1979) classic paper 'The captive, the treasure, the hero and the anal stage of development' is recognized as seminal to the development of Jungian thought about anality, particularly its integration with mainstream (Freudian, Kleinian) psychoanalytic perspectives. This paper develops such an approach through drawing on contributions from Meltzer, Green, Bion, Chasseguet-Smirgel and Kernberg. More specifically, it is argued that over-investment in hero and anima archetypal configurations may represent an attempt to replace the resource of the internal parental couple that, at the level of unconscious phantasy, has been destroyed by the aggrieved child's attack on the primal scene. Unless this usually dissociated sadism can be integrated, the creative epistemophilic instinct may remain blunted, giving rise, through projective identification, to the adoption of a pseudo-adult identity based on appropriation or assertion. This in turn may lead to manic attempts to reach authentic ('animating') experience through the (often erotized) excitement of heroic endeavour. Consideration of both Redfearn's and the author's own clinical material demonstrates how close attention to process as well as content is fundamental to revealing and addressing such likely-to-be dissociated scenarios.

  16. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Condition, Viscosity, and Volume on Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Pressure and Temporal Measurements during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Susan G.; Stuart, Andrew; Castell, Donald; Russell, Gregory B.; Koch, Kenneth; Kemp, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trial (i.e., Trial 1 vs. Trial 2); viscosity (i.e., saliva, thin, nectar-thick, honey-thick, and pudding-thick water); volume (i.e., 5 mL vs. 10 mL); age (i.e., young vs. older adults); and gender on pharyngeal (i.e., upper and lower) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures,…

  17. Human Papillomavirus Positivity in the Anal Canal in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Men Who Have Anal Sex with Men in Guangzhou, China: Implication for Anal Exams and Early Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xuqi; Ke, Wujian; Yang, Ligang; Huang, Shujie; Qin, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology of HPV in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Guangzhou, China, had not been reported previously. Methods. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected MSM were recruited from a Guangzhou-based MSM clinic in 2013. Sociodemographic characteristics and sexual behaviors were collected. An anal cytological sample was taken for HPV testing. Results. We recruited 79 HIV-infected and 85 HIV-uninfected MSM. The median age was 26 years in both groups. The positivities of anal HPV of any type (81.0% versus 48.2%), any high risk type (50.6% versus 27.1%), any low risk type (55.7% versus 31.8%), and any 9-valent vaccine type (74.7% versus 36.5%) were all significantly higher among HIV-infected compared to that among HIV-negative MSM (p for all < 0.05). The great majority of HPV-infected MSM were infected with 9-valent vaccine types (59 out of 64 HIV-infected and 31 out of 41 HIV-uninfected). Anal bacterial infections were associated with higher anal HPV positivity and greater number of anal HPV types. Conclusion. Sexually active MSM in Guangzhou, especially those infected with HIV, had high and multiple HPV detections. The majority of these cases were potentially preventable by HPV vaccine. Regular anal exams and early HPV vaccination are warranted in this population. PMID:28133605

  18. Characterization of functional biliary pain and dyspeptic symptoms in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: Effect of papillotomy

    PubMed Central

    Madácsy, László; Fejes, Roland; Kurucsai, Gábor; Joó, Ildikó; Székely, András; Bertalan, Viktória; Szepes, Attila; Lonovics, János

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize functional biliary pain and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in postcholecystectomy syndrome (PCS) patients with and without sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) proved by endoscopic sphincter of Oddi manometry (ESOM), and to assess the post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) outcome. METHODS: We prospectively investigated 85 cholecystectomized patients referred for ERCP because of PCS and suspected SOD. On admission, all patients completed our questionnaire. Physical examination, laboratory tests, abdominal ultrasound, quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy (QHBS), and ERCP were performed in all patients. Based on clinical and ERCP findings 15 patients had unexpected bile duct stone disease and 15 patients had SOD biliary typeI. ESOM demonstrated an elevated basal pressure in 25 patients with SOD biliary-type III. In the remaining 30 cholecystectomized patients without SOD, the liver function tests, ERCP, QHBS and ESOM were all normal. As a control group, 30 ‘asymptomatic’ cholecystectomized volunteers (attended to our hospital for general cardiovascular screening) completed our questionnaire, which is consisted of 50 separate questions on GI symptoms and abdominal pain characteristics. Severity of the abdominal pain (frequency and intensity) was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS). In 40 of 80 patients having definite SOD (i.e. patients with SOD biliary typeIand those with elevated SO basal pressure on ESOM), an EST was performed just after ERCP. In these patients repeated questionnaires were filled at each follow-up visit (at 3 and 6 mo) and a second look QHBS was performed 3 mo after the EST to assess the functional response to EST. RESULTS: The analysis of characteristics of the abdominal pain demonstrated that patients with common bile duct stone and definite SOD had a significantly higher score of symptomatic agreement with previously determined biliary-like pain features than patient groups of PCS without SOD and controls

  19. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  20. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Elizabeth; Cray, Alison; Haworth, Annette; Chander, Sarat; Lin, Robert; Subramanian, Brindha; Ng, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives.

  1. MITHRA – multiparametric MR/CT image adapted brachytherapy (MR/CT-IABT) in anal canal cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Manfrida, Stefania; Barbaro, Brunella; Colangione, Maria Maddalena; Masiello, Valeria; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Placidi, Elisa; Autorino, Rosa; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Chiesa, Silvia; Mantini, Giovanna; Kovács, György; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to test a novel multiparametric imaging guided procedure for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in anal canal cancer, in order to evaluate the feasibility and safety. Material and methods For this analysis, we considered all consecutive patients who underwent magnetic resonance/computed tomography image adapted brachytherapy (MR/CT-IABT) treated from February 2012 to July 2014. To conduct this project, we formed a working group that established the procedure and identified the indicators and benchmarks to evaluate the feasibility and safety. We considered the procedure acceptable if 90% of the indicators were consistent with the benchmarks. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast and diffusion weighted imaging were performed with an MRI-compatible dummy applicator in the anus to define the position of the clinical target volume disease and biological information. A pre-implantation treatment planning was created in order to get information on the optimal position of the needles. Afterwards, the patient underwent a simulation CT and the definite post-implantation treatment planning was created. Results We treated 11 patients (4 men and 7 women) with MR/CT-IABT and we performed a total of 13 procedures. The analysis of indicators for procedure evaluation showed that all indicators were in agreement with the benchmark. The dosimetric analysis resulted in a median of V200, V150, V100, V90, V85, respectively of 24.6%, 53.4%, 93.5%, 97.6%, and 98.7%. The median coverage index (CI) was 0.94, the median dose homogeneity index (DHI) was 0.43, the median dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR) resulted 0.56, the median overdose volume index (ODI) was 0.27. We observed no episodes of common severe acute toxicities. Conclusions Brachytherapy is a possible option in anal cancer radiotherapy to perform the boost to complete external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance can also have biological advantages compared to the US. Our results suggest that

  2. Lateral Anal Sphincterotomy for Chronic Anal Fissures- A Comparison of Outcomes and Complications under Local Anaesthesia Versus Spinal Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Tarun; Benjamin, Santosh; Kirishnan, Sumonth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fissure-in-Ano is one of the common and most painful anorectal conditions encountered in surgical practice. Inspite of several conservative treatment options, surgical treatment in the form of Lateral Anal Spincterotomy (LAS) remains the gold standard of treatment for Chronic Anal Fissures (CAF). However, LAS is often done under spinal or general anaesthesia incurring huge treatment costs and hospital stay. Aim To study if LAS can be treated with Local Anaesthesia (LA) thereby, reducing the costs and the anaesthetic risk to patients with no significant change in the surgical ease or clinical outcome. Materials and Methods A total of 79 patients with chronic fissure underwent randomized allocation to two treatment arms – The first to undergo LAS under LA and the second under Spinal Anaesthesia (SA). The primary outcome variables studied were complications like post-operative pain, infections, healing rate of fissure and incontinence rates. Secondary outcome variables studied were cost, hospital stay and need for additional anaesthetic. Results A total of 79 patients underwent LAS procedure. A total of 42 patients had LA and 39 patients had SA. There was no statistically significant difference in the healing rate, pain, infection and incontinence rates between the two groups. Moreover, the LA group incurred lower cost, reduced hospital stay and reduced risk of anaesthesia. Conclusions LAS can be satisfactorily performed under local anaesthesia with no increased risk of pain or complications, and is best suited for resource-poor surgical settings.

  3. Working with External Evaluators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Lauren; Burg, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Hiring an external evaluator is not right for every museum or every project. Evaluations are highly situational, grounded in specific times and places; each one is unique. The museum and the evaluator share equal responsibility in an evaluation's success, so it is worth investing time and effort to ensure that both are clear about the goals,…

  4. External College Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Ben K.

    This report presents the results of a community survey which attempted to determine the demand for another college in the Los Angeles Community College District. The function of this "community campus" or "external college" would be to serve members of the community who are not already served by the eight existing colleges. Questionnaires received…

  5. External Interest Group Impingements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Richard M.

    The history of the interrelation among state approval, accreditation, and institutional eligibility is considered. It is suggested that faculty and college administrators can be either an internal or external group in relationship to the planning process. The federal government, or the state government, passes legislation that may have both…

  6. Salvia miltiorrhiza Induces Tonic Contraction of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter in Rats via Activation of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Chang, Li-Ching; Huang, Shih-Che; Tey, Shu-Leei; Hsu, Wen-Li; Su, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Tong-Rong

    2015-08-11

    Up to 40% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) suffer from proton pump inhibitor refractory GERD but clinically the medications to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to avoid irritating reflux are few in number. This study aimed to examine whether Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) extracts induce tonic contraction of rat LES ex vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To investigate the mechanism underlying the SM extract-induced contractile effects, rats were pretreated with atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist), tetrodotoxin (a sodium channel blocker), nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker), and Ca(2+)-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), followed by administration of cumulative dosages of SM extracts. SM extracts induced dose-related tonic contraction of the LES, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, atropine, or nifedipine. However, the SM extract-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by Ca(2+)-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with EGTA. Next, SM extracts significantly induce extracellular Ca(2+) entry into primary LES cells in addition to intracellular Ca(2+) release and in a dose-response manner. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the SM extracts consistently induced significant extracellular Ca(2+) influx into primary LES cells in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, SM extracts could induce tonic contraction of LES mainly through the extracellular Ca(2+) influx pathway.

  7. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of the Pharynx and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Motility in Patients with Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2015-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is still poorly understood. It is also unclear if the motility of this area may be compromised in patients with achalasia. This study aims to evaluate the motility of the pharynx, UES, and proximal esophagus in patients with esophageal achalasia. Sixty patients with achalasia underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) (52 % females, mean age 54 years). Esophageal dilatation was classified according to the radiologic diameter in Type I (<4 cm): 6 %; Type II (4-7 cm): 36 %; Type III (7-10 cm): 34 %; and Type IV (>10 cm): 24 %. HRM classified 43 % of the patients as Chicago Type I and 57 % as Type II. Manometric parameters were compared to normal values obtained from a previous study in volunteers. The motility of the velopharynx showed short, premature, and hypertonic contraction. The epiglottis also showed hypertonic contraction. The UES had increased residual pressure. Chicago classification Type II patients had higher UES residual pressure (p = 0.03). The degree of esophageal dilatation did not correlate with manometric parameters. Achalasia may affect the motility of the pharyngo-upper esophageal area. The changes observed may represent functional alterations to prevent aspiration, especially in patients with Chicago classification Type II achalasia.

  8. Increase of lower esophageal sphincter pressure after osteopathic intervention on the diaphragm in patients with gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R C V; de Sá, C C; Pascual-Vaca, Á O; de Souza Fontes, L H; Herbella Fernandes, F A M; Dib, R A; Blanco, C R; Queiroz, R A; Navarro-Rodriguez, T

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be clinical or surgical. The clinical consists basically of the use of drugs; however, there are new techniques to complement this treatment, osteopathic intervention in the diaphragmatic muscle is one these. The objective of the study is to compare pressure values in the examination of esophageal manometry of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) before and immediately after osteopathic intervention in the diaphragm muscle. Thirty-eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease - 16 submitted to sham technique and 22 submitted osteopathic technique - were randomly selected. The average respiratory pressure (ARP) and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) of the LES were measured by manometry before and after osteopathic technique at the point of highest pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney, and magnitude of the technique proposed was measured using the Cohen's index. Statistically significant difference in the osteopathic technique was found in three out of four in relation to the group of patients who performed the sham technique for the following measures of LES pressure: ARP with P= 0.027. The MEP had no statistical difference (P= 0.146). The values of Cohen d for the same measures were: ARP with d= 0.80 and MEP d= 0.52. Osteopathic manipulative technique produces a positive increment in the LES region soon after its performance.

  9. Optimal stimulus intensity and reliability of air stimulation technique for elicitation of laryngo-upper esophageal sphincter contractile reflex.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Osamu; Easterling, Caryn; Rittmann, Tanya; Hofmann, Candy; Shaker, Reza

    2005-03-01

    To determine the optimal air stimulus intensity and duration for elicitation of the laryngo-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex, we studied 37 healthy volunteers 20 to 81 years of age. A sleeve device monitored the UES pressure. For laryngeal stimulation, we used an air stimulator unit (Pentax AP-4000) that incorporated a nasolaryngeal endoscope. The arytenoids and interarytenoid areas were stimulated at least three times by three different stimuli: 6-mm Hg air pulse with 50-ms duration, 10-mm Hg air pulse with 50-ms duration, and 6-mm Hg air pulse with 2-second duration. Of 1,165 air stimulations, 1,041 resulted in mucosal deflections. Of these, 451 resulted in an abrupt increase in UES pressure. The response/deflection ratio for 6-mm Hg stimulation with 2-second duration was significantly higher than those for air pulses with 50-ms duration (p < .001). We conclude that although the laryngo-UES contractile reflex can be elicited by an air pulse with 50-ms duration, this ultrashort stimulation is not reliable. Using longer-duration pulses (at least 2 seconds) improves the reliability of elicitation of the laryngo-UES contractile reflex.

  10. Resisting the "Condom Every Time for Anal Sex" Health Education Message

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeffery; Neville, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ensuring men who have sex with men (MSM) adopt and maintain condom use for anal sex is a challenging health education goal. In order to inform the development of social marketing practices to encourage safe-sex practices, the views of MSM about a key HIV health education message ("using a condom every time for anal sex") were…

  11. Adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland—Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Konishi, Fumio; Yoshida, Takayoshi; Yoshinaga, Yasuo; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Lefor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland is extremely rare. Most anal canal cancers are squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma is infrequently diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria and the standard treatment for adenocarcinoma of the anal canal have not been clearly defined, in part because of the rarity of this lesion. PRESENTATION OF CASE An 84-year-old man who presented with a piece of tissue prolapsing from the anus. An incisional biopsy showed adenocarcinoma, and an abdomino-perineal resection was then performed. Cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 19 (CK19) stained positive in the specimen, suggesting that the tumor developed from an anal gland. The patient was discharged after surgery without any complications. DISCUSSION Exact diagnostic criteria for adenocarcinoma of the anal canal have not been previously described. In the present case, CK7 and CK19 were stained, and the tumor showed positivity for both of these markers, which is compatible with the staining patterns of anal gland origin cancer. Radical resection is recommended rather than local resection, because of the tumor's high recurrence rate. Some authors recommend combined modality treatment with preoperative or postoperative chemoradiotherapy because of the high rate of distant recurrence. CONCLUSION The preoperative diagnosis of adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland is not easily established. However, it may be possible to suspect an anal glandular adenocarcinoma based on a meticulous physical examination, appropriate diagnostic studies and pathological findings on biopsy. PMID:24705191

  12. Cervical and Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection in Adult Women in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Ka’opua, Lana S.; Scanlan, Luana; Ah Ching, John; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Zhu, Xuemei; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Tofaeono, Jennifer; Williams, Victor Tofaeono

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cervical and anal human papillomavirus (HPV) and risk factors associated with infections were evaluated in a cross-sectional study of 211 adult women in American Samoa. Overall, 53% of women reported ever having a Pap smear. Cervical and anal HPV was detected in 10% and 16% of women, respectively; 4% of women had concurrent cervical and anal HPV. The most common cervical genotypes were HPV 6, HPV 16, and HPV 53. Cutaneous HPV types were detected in 40% of anal infections. Cervical HPV infection was associated with anal HPV (age-adjusted odds ratio = 3.32, 1.10–10.00). After age adjustment, cervical HPV was associated with being unmarried, postsecondary education, hot running water at home, multiple sexual partners, nulliparity, condom use, and other contraceptive methods. In multivariate analyses, only age remained associated with cervical HPV and anal HPV. Cervical and anal HPV was more prevalent among younger women; only anal HPV was detected in older women. PMID:22652246

  13. Biomarkers in anal cancer: from biological understanding to stratified treatment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Goh, Vicky; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Gilbert, Duncan C

    2017-01-17

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus and anal canal represent a model of a cancer and perhaps the first where level 1 evidence supported primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in treating locoregional disease with curative intent. The majority of tumours are associated with infection with oncogenic subtypes of human papilloma virus and this plays a significant role in their sensitivity to treatment. However, not all tumours are cured with CRT and there remain opportunities to improve outcomes in terms of oncological control and also reducing late toxicities. Understanding the biology of ASCC promises to allow a more personalised approach to treatment, with the development and validation of a range of biomarkers and associated techniques that are the focus of this review.

  14. Biomarkers in anal cancer: from biological understanding to stratified treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher M; Goh, Vicky; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Gilbert, Duncan C

    2017-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus and anal canal represent a model of a cancer and perhaps the first where level 1 evidence supported primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in treating locoregional disease with curative intent. The majority of tumours are associated with infection with oncogenic subtypes of human papilloma virus and this plays a significant role in their sensitivity to treatment. However, not all tumours are cured with CRT and there remain opportunities to improve outcomes in terms of oncological control and also reducing late toxicities. Understanding the biology of ASCC promises to allow a more personalised approach to treatment, with the development and validation of a range of biomarkers and associated techniques that are the focus of this review. PMID:27923035

  15. Externally heated thermal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracchia, Louis; Vetter, Ronald F.; Rosenlof, Darwin

    1991-04-01

    A thermal battery activated by external heat comprising an anode (e.g., composed of a lithium-aluminum alloy), a cathode (e.g., composed of iron disulfide), and an electrolyte (e.g., a lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic) with the electrolyte inactive at ambient temperature but activated by melting at a predetermined temperature when exposed to external heating is presented. The battery can be used as a sensor or to ignite pyrotechnic and power electronic devices in a system for reducing the hazard of ordnance exposed to detrimental heating. A particular application is the use of the battery to activate a squib to function in conjunction with one or more other components to vent an ordnance case in order to prevent its explosion in a fire.

  16. Externally triggered microcapsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Disclosed are microcapsules comprising a polymer shell enclosing one or more immiscible liquid phases in which a drug or drug precursor are contained in a liquid phase. The microparticles also contain magnetic particles that can be heated by application of an external magnetic field and thus heated to a predetermined Curie temperature. Heating of the particles melts the polymer shell and releases the drug without causing heating of surrounding tissues.

  17. Failed Deglutitive Upper Esophageal Sphincter Relaxation Is a Risk Factor for Aspiration in Stroke Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taeheon; Park, Jung Ho; Sohn, Chongil; Yoon, Kyung Jae; Lee, Yong-Taek; Park, Jung Hwan; Jung, Il Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims We attempted to examine the relationship between abnormal findings on high-resolution manometry (HRM) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and to identify the risk factors for aspiration. Methods We performed VFSS and HRM on the same day in 36 ischemic stroke patients (mean age, 67.5 years) with dysphagia. Pressure (basal, median intra bolus, and nadir), relaxation time interval of the UES, and mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal contractility (as a contractile integral) were examined using HRM. The parameters of VFSS were vallecular residue, pyriform sinus residue, vallecular overflow, penetration, and aspiration. The association between the parameters of VFSS and HRM was analyzed by the Student’s t test. Results Three (8.3%) and 4 (11.1%) stroke patients with dysphagia had pyriform sinus residue and vallecular sinus residue, respectively, and 5 (13.8%) patients showed aspiration. Mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal contractile integrals in patients with residue in the pyriform sinus were significantly lower than those in patients without residue in the pyriform sinus (P < 0.05). Relaxation time intervals in patients with aspiration were significantly shorter than those in patients without aspiration (P < 0.05), and multivariate regression analysis revealed a shorter relaxation time interval as the main risk factor for aspiration (OR, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.01–0.65; P < 0.05). Conclusions Manometric measurements of the pharynx and UES were well correlated with abnormal findings in the VFSS, and a shorter relaxation time interval of the UES during deglutition is an important parameter for the development of aspiration. PMID:27510474

  18. Stent placement above the sphincter of Oddi permits implementation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with initially unresectable Klatskin tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kensuke; Hasegawa, Sho; Iwasaki, Akito; Sato, Takamitsu; Fujita, Yuji; Hosono, Kunihiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Endo, Itaru

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may lead to a successful margin-negative resection in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced Klatskin tumor (IULAKT). Use of removable plastic stents is preferable for the safe implementation of NAC in patients with IULAKT to reduce the risk of recurrent cholangitis. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy associated with the use of plastic stents placed across the stenosis and above the papilla (above stent) during NAC. Patients and methods: In this study, we stratified the patients into two groups chronologically with respect to the period of stent placement: above stent group (n = 17) and across stent group (n = 23) (plastic stent across the sphincter of Oddi). Results: The median stent patency period was 99 days in the above stent group and 31 days in the across stent group (P < 0.0001). The number of stents (P = 0.017) and the rate of emerging undrained cholangitis areas (P = 0.025) were significantly reduced in the above stent group than the counterpart. Regarding time to recurrent biliary obstruction, the above stent group had a longer duration than the across stent group (log rank test, P = 0.004). Length of hospital stay was significantly shorter for the above stent group than the across stent group (P = 0.0475). Multivariate analysis revealed that above stent placement (odds ratio = 33.638, P = 0.0048) was significantly associated with stent patency over a period of 90 days. Conclusions: Above stent placement should be considered for the relief of biliary obstruction and potentially reduces the cost for patients with IULAKT scheduled to receive NAC. PMID:27092322

  19. Correlates of Heterosexual Anal Intercourse Among At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Christopher D.; Brown, Larry K.; Doherty, Glenn; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Fernandez, M. Isabel; Pugatch, David; Schlenger, William E.; Silver, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to learn what factors are associated with anal intercourse among adolescents and young adults. We examined demographic, behavioral, relationship context, attitudinal, substance use, and mental health correlates of recent heterosexual anal intercourse among adolescents and young adults who reported engaging in recent unprotected sex. Methods. Among 1348 at-risk adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 21 years in 3 US cities, we assessed sexual risk behavior with each sexual partner in the past 90 days. Data were collected from 2000 to 2001. Results. Recent heterosexual anal intercourse was reported by 16% of respondents. Females who engaged in anal intercourse were more likely to be living with a sexual partner, to have had 2 or more partners, and to have experienced coerced intercourse. For males, only a sexual orientation other than heterosexual was a significant predictor of engaging in heterosexual anal intercourse. Conclusions. Our findings document the prevalence of heterosexual anal intercourse among adolescents and young adults who had recent unprotected sex. Among females, the variables associated with anal intercourse relate to the context and power balance of sexual relationships. Different influences for males and females suggest different foci for interventions. PMID:19008522

  20. Morphology of the epithelium of the lower rectum and the anal canal in the adult human.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Noguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Kaoruko; Akashi, Yuichi; Kawahara, Katsunobu; Shimada, Tatsuo

    2012-06-01

    The anal canal is an important body part clinically. However, there is no agreement about the epithelium of the anal canal, the anal transitional zone (ATZ) epithelium in particular. The aim of this study is to clarify the structure of the epithelium of the human lower rectum and anal canal. Intact rectum and anus obtained from patients who underwent surgery for rectal carcinoma were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy (LM and SEM). By LM, three types of epithelium were observed in the anal canal: simple columnar epithelium, stratified squamous epithelium, and stratified columnar epithelium. The lower rectum was composed of simple columnar epithelium. SEM findings showed stratified squamous epithelium that consisted of squamous cells with microridges, changing to simple columnar epithelium consisting of columnar cells with short microvilli at the anorectal line. LM and SEM observations in a one-to-one ratio revealed that the area of stratified columnar epithelium based on LM corresponded to the anal crypt and sinus. In conclusion, the epithelium of the human anal canal was fundamentally composed of simple columnar epithelium and stratified squamous epithelium. We found no evidence of the ATZ.

  1. An integrative review of guidelines for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Thomas, Tami; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-07-01

    HIV-infected individuals are 28 times more likely than the general population to be diagnosed with anal cancer. An integrative review of recommendations and guidelines for anal cancer screening was performed to provide a succinct guide to inform healthcare clinicians. The review excluded studies that were of non-HIV populations, redundant articles or publications, non-English manuscripts, or nonclinical trials. The review found no formal national or international guidelines exist for routine screening of anal cancer for HIV-infected individuals. To date, no randomized control trial provides strong evidence supporting efficaciousness and effectiveness of an anal cancer screening program. The screening recommendations from seven international-, national-, and state-based reports were reviewed and synthesized in this review. These guidelines suggest anal cancer screening, albeit unproven, may be beneficial at decreasing the incidence of anal cancer. This review highlights the paucity of screening-related research and is an area of need to provide clear direction and to define standard of care for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

  2. External Ballistics. Part 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-11

    clcsely related with aezodyzasics, ky gzavtaetry and the thecry cf the figure of Earth , by metecrology. Ballistic calculatica Sives all the bamic data...external tallistics. %he conteaFcrary state of the sciemce of the action cf rcckets and artillery ste]l cf different t)pes is such, that many of the e...height. L- 14near distance ovX tOf surface of thq Earth . ol - crbital velocity. V-1 - escape velocity. 2v_ - range angle. S- eaight of projqctile. Q

  3. External split field generator

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas George [Knoxville, TN; Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Vass, Arpad Alexander [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  4. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  5. Retrospective Audit of the Management of Anal Insertion of Foreign Bodies: A Holistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Ahmed; Chukwuma, Jude

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with voluntary anal insertion of a foreign body (IFB) present to the emergency department and are then managed by the surgical team. This report reviews the medical literature on IFB and includes results of a chart review of operative logged interventions and clinically coded procedures for anal IFBs at a single acute hospital in the United Kingdom between May 2009 and September 2013. The objective was to establish the current practice in the management of anal IFB and update a framework for the initial workup, surgical procedure, and appropriate mental health intervention. PMID:27247831

  6. Successful hepatectomy for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal—a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tercia Tarciane; Belotto, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Despite rare, metastatic anal carcinoma confers a poor prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced disease while the role of biologics and/or surgical resection of metastatic disease are anecdotal. Compared to isolated liver colorectal or neuroendocrine cancer liver metastases, there is far less experience with resection or nonsurgical local ablative procedures for patients with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver who was successfully treated with liver resection and remains free of relapse more than one year later. PMID:28078133

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Immuno-Magnetically Sorted Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Restoring Urethral Sphincter Function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Green, Morgaine; Wen, Yan; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Wang, Zhe; Reijo Pera, Renee; Chen, Bertha

    2017-04-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based cell therapy holds promise for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). However, safety concerns, especially tumorgenic potential of residual undifferentiated cells in hiPSC derivatives, are major barriers for its clinical translation. An efficient, fast and clinical-scale strategy for purifying committed cells is also required. Our previous studies demonstrated the regenerative effects of hiPSC-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) on the injured urethral sphincter in SUI, but the differentiation protocol required fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) which is not practical for autologous clinical applications. In this study, we examined the efficacy and safety of hiPSC-derived pSMC populations sorted by FDA-approved magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) using cell-surface marker CD34 for restoring urethral sphincter function. Although the heterogeneity of MACS-sorted pSMCs was higher than that of FACS-sorted pSMCs, the percentage of undifferentiated cells dramatically decreased after directed differentiation in vitro. In vivo studies demonstrated long-term cell integration and no tumor formation of MACS-sorted pSMCs after transplantation. Furthermore, transplantation of MACS-sorted pSMCs into immunodeficient SUI rats was comparable to transplantation with FACS-sorted pSMCs for restoration of the extracellular matrix metabolism and function of the urethral sphincter. In summary, purification of hiPSC derivatives using MACS sorting for CD34 expression represent an efficient approach for production of clinical-scale pSMCs for autologous stem cell therapy for regeneration of smooth muscle tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1158-1167.

  8. Placebo controlled, randomised, double blind study of the effects of botulinum A toxin on detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallien, P; Reymann, J; Amarenco, G; Nicolas, B; de Seze, M; Bellissant, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum A toxin in the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in multiple sclerosis patients. Methods: This was a multicentre, placebo controlled, randomised, double blind study. Patients with chronic urinary retention were included if they had post-voiding residual urine volume between 100 and 500 ml. They received a single transperineal injection of either botulinum A toxin (100 U Allergan) or placebo in the sphincter and also 5 mg slow release alfuzosin bid over 4 months. Main endpoint was post-voiding residual urine volume assessed 1 month after injection. Follow up duration was 4 months. Statistical analysis was performed using a sequential method, the triangular test. Results: The study was stopped after the fourth analysis (86 patients had been included: placebo: 41, botulinum A toxin: 45). At inclusion, there was no significant difference between groups whichever variable was considered. Mean (standard deviation) post-voiding residual urine volume was 217 (96) and 220 (99) ml in placebo and botulinum A toxin groups, respectively. One month later, post-voiding residual urine volume was 206 (145) and 186 (158) ml (p = 0.45) in placebo and botulinum A toxin groups, respectively. However, compared to placebo, botulinum A toxin significantly increased voiding volume (+54%, p = 0.02) and reduced pre-micturition (–29%, p = 0.02) and maximal (–21%, p = 0.02) detrusor pressures. Other secondary urodynamic endpoints and tolerance were similar in the two groups. Conclusions: In multiple sclerosis patients with detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, a single injection of botulinum A toxin (100 U Allergan) does not decrease post-voiding residual urine volume. PMID:16291892

  9. Swimming in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Holger

    2016-11-01

    Microswimmers move autonomously but are subject to external fields, which influence their swimming path and their collective dynamics. With three concrete examples we illustrate swimming in external fields and explain the methodology to treat it. First, an active Brownian particle shows a conventional sedimentation profile in a gravitational field but with increased sedimentation length and some polar order along the vertical. Bottom-heavy swimmers are able to invert the sedimentation profile. Second, active Brownian particles interacting by hydrodynamic flow fields in a three-dimensional harmonic trap can spontaneously break the isotropic symmetry. They develop polar order, which one can describe by mean-field theory reminiscent to Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, and thereby pump fluid. Third, a single microswimmer shows interesting non-linear dynamics in Poiseuille flow including swinging and tumbling trajectories. For pushers, hydrodynamic interactions with bounding surfaces stabilize either straight swimming against the flow or tumbling close to the channel wall, while pushers always move on a swinging trajectory with a specific amplitude as limit cycle.

  10. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    PubMed

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    2017-01-01

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  11. Evaluation of the motor and sensory components of the pudendal nerve.

    PubMed

    Loening-Baucke, V; Read, N W; Yamada, T; Barker, A T

    1994-02-01

    Extensive neurophysiological investigations consisting of different techniques to evaluate the efferents and afferents of the pudendal nerve were carried out in 27 healthy subjects. These investigations included motor evoked potential recordings from the external anal sphincter in response to magnetic stimulation of the cortex and lumbosacral roots, measurement of sacral reflex latency to magnetic and electrical stimulation, and cortical sensory evoked potential recording after stimulation of the dorso-genital nerve and anal canal. Motor latencies after transcranial magnetic stimulation to the anal sphincter were 25.1 +/- 2.9 msec at rest and 20.9 +/- 2.0 msec with voluntary sphincter contraction (facilitation). Motor latency after lumbosacral root stimulation was 3.7 +/- 1.0 msec. Mean sacral reflex latency after magnetic stimulation was 43.8 +/- 11.2 msec and was significantly longer than after electrical stimulation (37.0 +/- 7.2 msec; P < 0.05). P1 latency of the sensory evoked potentials after dorso-genital nerve stimulation was 40 +/- 3 msec and was significantly shorter than after anal stimulation 46 +/- 3 msec (P < 0.01). Evoked potential recording allows us to study both upper and lower motor neuron components to the anal sphincter. The present study paves the way for the combined application of these tests in the evaluation of disorders of the pelvic floor.

  12. High-Dose Split-Course Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: Outcome Analysis Regarding the Boost Strategy (CORS-03 Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Ortholan, Cecile; Resbeut, Michel; Teissier, Eric; Ronchin, Philippe; Cowen, Didier; Zaccariotto, Audrey; Benezery, Karen; Francois, Eric; Salem, Naji; Ellis, Steve; Azria, David; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with split-course radiation therapy and boosted through external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to December 2004, a selected group (162 patients) with invasive nonmetastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma was studied. Tumor staging reported was T1 = 31 patients (19%), T2 = 77 patients (48%), T3 = 42 patients (26%), and T4= 12 patients (7%). Lymph node status was N0-1 (86%) and N2-3 (14%). Patients underwent a first course of EBRT: mean dose 45.1 Gy (range, 39.5-50) followed by a boost: mean dose 17.9 Gy (range, 8-25) using EBRT (76 patients, 47%) or BCT (86 patients, 53%). All characteristics of patients and tumors were well balanced between the BCT and EBRT groups. Results: The mean overall treatment time (OTT) was 82 days (range, 45-143) and 67 days (range, 37-128) for the EBRT and BCT groups, respectively (p < 0.001). The median follow-up was 62 months (range, 2-108). The 5-year cumulative rate of local recurrence (CRLR) was 21%. In the univariate analysis, the prognostic factors for CRLR were as follows: T stage (T1-2 = 15% vs. T3-4 = 36%, p = 0.03), boost technique (BCT = 12% vs. EBRT = 33%, p = 0.002) and OTT (OTT <80 days = 14%, OTT {>=}80 days = 34%, p = 0.005). In the multivariate analysis, BCT boost was the unique prognostic factor (hazard ratio = 0.62 (0.41-0.92). In the subgroup of patients with OTT <80 days, the 5-year CRLR was significantly increased with the BCT boost (BC = 9% vs. EBRT = 28%, p = 0.03). In the case of OTT {>=}80 days, the 5-year CRLR was not affected by the boost technique (BCT = 29% vs. EBRT = 38%, p = 0.21). Conclusion: In anal cancer, when OTT is <80 days, BCT boost is superior to EBRT boost for CRLR. These results suggest investigating the benefit of BCT boost in prospective trials.

  13. Bevalac external beamline optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, J.G.; Krebs, G.F.; Tekawa, M.M.; Alonso, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    This handbook is intended as an aid for tuning the external particle beam (EPB) lines at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. The information contained within will be useful to the Bevalac's Main Control Room and experimenters alike. First, some general information is given concerning the EPB lines and beam optics. Next, each beam line is described in detail: schematics of the beam line components are shown, all the variables required to run a beam transport program are presented, beam envelopes are given with wire chamber pictures and magnet currents, focal points and magnifications. Some preliminary scaling factors are then presented which should aid in choosing a given EPB magnet's current for a given central Bevalac field. Finally, some tuning hints are suggested.

  14. External Measures of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Cairό, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    The human brain is undoubtedly the most impressive, complex, and intricate organ that has evolved over time. It is also probably the least understood, and for that reason, the one that is currently attracting the most attention. In fact, the number of comparative analyses that focus on the evolution of brain size in Homo sapiens and other species has increased dramatically in recent years. In neuroscience, no other issue has generated so much interest and been the topic of so many heated debates as the difference in brain size between socially defined population groups, both its connotations and implications. For over a century, external measures of cognition have been related to intelligence. However, it is still unclear whether these measures actually correspond to cognitive abilities. In summary, this paper must be reviewed with this premise in mind. PMID:22065955

  15. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. External Community Review Committee:

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maureen A.; Kaufman, Nancy J.; Dearlove, Andrea J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Major gaps exist between what we know and what we do in clinical practice and community health programs and narrowing this gap will require substantive partnerships between academic researchers and the communities they serve. Objectives: We describe a research pilot award program that makes a unique commitment to community engagement through the addition of an External Community Review Committee to the typical research review process that gives external stakeholders decision-making power over research funding. Methods: Whereas engaging community reviewers in discussion and rating of research proposals is not novel, the ICTR ECRC review process is distinct in that it is subsequent to peer review and uses different criteria and methodology. This method of engagement allows for the community review panel to re-rank scientifically meritorious proposals—such that proposals funded do not necessarily follow the rank order from scientific peer review. The approach taken by UW ICTR differs from those discussed in the literature that present a model of community-academic co-review. Results: This article provides guidance for others interested in this model of community engagement and reviews insights gained during the evolution of this strategy; including how we addressed conflict, how the committee was able to change the pilot award program over time, and individual roles that were crucial to the success of this approach. Conclusions: The advantages of this approach include success through traditional academic metrics while achieving an innovative shared-power mechanism for community engagement which we believe is critical for narrowing the gap between knowledge and practice. PMID:24056512

  17. Anal human papillomavirus infection: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of related lesions.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Maria; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Ravenda, Paola Simona; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is mostly asymptomatic, but may also have many diverse clinical signs encompassing benign ano-genital lesions, and carcinomas. Recently, interest has also particularly focused on anal cancer since, over the last decades, its incidence has been greatly increasing in developed countries, both in women and men and is drastically higher in specific risk groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-1 infected individuals. Approximately 88% of anal cancer cases worldwide are associated with HPV infection. This review summarizes our current understanding of anal HPV infection, discussing its epidemiology and risk factors in various populations, and the state of the art in the detection of anal HPV infection and its related lesions through both cytology and histology. Finally, we discuss the clinical management and therapy for these lesions.

  18. Treating High-grade Lesions to Prevent Anal Cancer in HIV-infected People

    Cancer.gov

    This study, called the ANCHOR trial, will investigate whether screening and prevention methods similar to those used to prevent cervical cancer can help prevent anal cancer in HIV-infected men and women.

  19. Correlates of anal sex roles among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Derek T; Gravitt, Patti; Rompalo, Anne M; Tai, Raymond; Lim, Sin How

    2016-03-01

    Identifying roles for anal sex is an important issue for populations of MSM. We describe the prevalence of identifying as being 'top', 'bottom', 'versatile', or 'don't know/not applicable' among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and behavioural outcomes according to these labels for sexual role identity. Data analysis was conducted on a survey administered during weekly outreach throughout Kuala Lumpur in 2012. Pearson's Chi square tests were used to compare demographic and behavioural characteristics of MSM who reported roles for anal sex. Binary logistic regression was used to explore the odds of behavioural outcomes among MSM who identified as 'bottom', 'versatile,' and 'don't know' compared to MSM who reported that 'top' was their sexual role. Labels for anal sex roles were significantly associated with condom use for last anal sex. Among MSM who used labels for anal sex roles, MSM who identified as 'bottom' had highest level of not using condoms for last anal sex (24.1%, p = .045). In binary logistic regression model, identifying as 'top' was significantly associated with reporting using a condom during last anal sex and reported consistent condom use for anal sex in the past six months (p = .039 and .017, respectively). With regard to sexual role identity, some MSM may be a part of a special subgroup of at-risk men to be targeted. Future research should evaluate the origins, meanings, and perceptions of these labels, and the developmental process of how these MSM identify with any of these categories. Research should also uncover condom use decision making with regard to these labels for sexual positioning.

  20. Impact of hypothyroidism on primary anal malignant melanoma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Siddharth; Verma, Satyajeet; Kala, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Primary melanoma of the anal canal is rare and highly malignant condition, which is 1% of all invasive tumors in this site. This condition is often mistaken for benign conditions as either hemorrhoids or rectal polyp. Thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulation causes high proliferation of malignant melanoma. The association of hypothyroidism with primary malignant melanoma of anal canal is very rare. We are reporting such a very rare case.

  1. Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asa, C.S.; Peterson, E.K.; Seal, U.S.; Mech, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves was investigated by a labelling technique using protein-bound iodine125 and food dye. Wolves deposited secretions on some but not all scats. Adult males, especially the alpha male, deposited anal-sac secretions more frequently while defecating than did females or juveniles. Secretions sometimes also were deposited independently of defecation, suggesting a dual role in communication by these substances.

  2. An analysis of survival and treatment failure following abdominoperineal and sphincter-saving resection in Dukes' B and C rectal carcinoma. A report of the NSABP clinical trials. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

    PubMed Central

    Wolmark, N; Fisher, B

    1986-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resections for rectal carcinoma are being performed with decreasing frequency in favor of sphincter-saving resections. It remains, however, to be unequivocally demonstrated that sphincter preservation has not resulted in compromised local disease control, disease-free survival, and survival. Accordingly, it is the specific aim of this endeavor to compare local recurrence, disease-free survival, and survival in patients with Dukes' B and C rectal cancer undergoing curative abdominoperineal resection or sphincter-saving resection. For the purpose of this study, 232 patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and 181 subjected to sphincter-saving resections were available for analysis from an NSABP randomized prospective clinical trial designed to ascertain the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in rectal carcinoma (protocol R-01). The mean time on study was 48 months. Analyses were carried out comparing the two operations according to Dukes' class, the number of positive nodes, and tumor size. The only significant differences in disease-free survival and survival were observed for the cohort characterized by greater than 4 positive nodes and were in favor of patients treated with sphincter-saving resections. A patient undergoing sphincter-saving resection was 0.62 times as likely to sustain a treatment failure as a similar patient undergoing abdominoperineal resection (p = 0.07) and 0.49 times as likely to die (p = 0.02). The inability to demonstrate an attenuated disease-free survival and survival for patients treated with sphincter-saving resection was in spite of an increased incidence of local recurrence (anastomotic and pelvic) observed for the latter operation when compared to abdominoperineal resection (13% vs. 5%). A similar analysis evaluating the length of margins of resection in patients undergoing sphincter-preserving operations indicated that treatment failure and survival were not significantly different in patients whose distal resection

  3. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2016-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai'i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger's focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being "on the radar" of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through "real talk" (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai'i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales.

  4. Treatment of Complete Anal Stricture after Diverting Colostomy for Fournier's Gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Tadao; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Mizokami, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Background. Anal stenosis is a rare but serious complication of anorectal surgery. Severe anal stenosis is a challenging condition. Case Presentation. A 70-year-old Japanese man presented with a ten-hour history of continuous anal pain due to incarcerated hemorrhoids. He had a history of reducible internal hemorrhoids and was followed for 10 years. He had a fever and nonreducible internal hemorrhoids surrounding necrotic soft tissues. He was diagnosed as Fournier's gangrene and treated with debridement and diverting colostomy. He needed temporary continuous renal replacement therapy and was discharged on postoperative day 39. After four months, severe anal stenosis was found on physical examination, and total colonoscopy showed a complete anal stricture. The patient was brought to the operating room and underwent colostomy closure and anoplasty. He recovered without any complications. Conclusion. We present a first patient with a complete anal stricture after diverting colostomy treated with anoplasty and stoma closure. This case reminds us of the assessment of distal bowel conduit and might suggest that anoplasty might be considered in the success of the colostomy closure. PMID:28255493

  5. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ka‘opua, Lana Sue I.; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L.; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai‘i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger’s focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being “on the radar” of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through “real talk” (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai‘i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales. PMID:26630979

  6. Anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma: report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ang; Mei, Zubing; Cui, Long

    2015-01-01

    Trichilemmoma is a rare type of benign cutaneous neoplasm, which derives from outer sheath of hair follicle. It barely develops malignant progression and has rarely been reported in anal cancer. In this article, we report a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented to the outer-patient department with complaints of a ruptured and longstanding anal phyma. All the appearances were atypical. Blood routine examination showed that neutrophilic granulocyte percentage was elevated and suggest it was a simple inflammation response. No evidence of malignancy was detected upon the laboratory examinations. Then we performed an abscess incision drainage for the patient. A few days later, the biopsy pathological report suggested the specimen is a malignant proliferative trichilemmoma. We decided to perform a wide local excision instead of an extended radical operation in order to preserve anus. After the surgery, we chose not to give chemoradio-treatment for fear of side effects and complications. Careful follow-up indicates that peri-anal malignant proliferative trichilemmoma may have a good prognosis and our treatment is a good choice for the patients with this tumor. Because of the low occurrence rate of anal cancer, especially malignant trichilemmoma, any clinical manifestation and experience are valuable. On one hand, our case may help to take the consideration of the diagnosis of malignant trichilemmoma in case of longtime-suffered peri-anal mass, on the other hand it propose a different treatment method from other anal cancers for clinical doctors.

  7. An Electronic Daily Diary Study of Anal Intercourse in Drug-Using Women

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Women (N = 138) with histories of illicit drug use were recruited into an electronic diary study that used Android smartphones for data collection. The diary was to be completed each day for 12 weeks using an “app” created in HTML5 and accessed over the Internet via smartphone. Data collection included information on sexual behaviors with up to 10 partners per day and contextual factors surrounding sexual behavior such as drug use before/after, type of sexual behavior (oral, vaginal, anal), and other activities such as using condoms for vaginal and anal intercourse and use of sexual lubricants. The sample was predominantly African American (58 %); 20 % Latina, 20 % White and 2 % reported as Other. Most women reported either less than a high school education (33 %) or having a high school diploma (33 %). The mean age was 39 years (SD = 11.78). Anal intercourse occurred on days when women also reported using illicit drugs, specifically methamphetamine and cocaine. Anal intercourse was not an isolated sexual activity, but took place on days when vaginal intercourse and giving and receiving oral sex also occurred along with illicit drug use. Anal intercourse also occurred on days when women reported they wanted sex. HIV prevention interventions must address the risks of anal intercourse for women, taking into account concurrent drug use and sexual pleasure that may reduce individual harm-reduction behaviors. PMID:25835461

  8. An Electronic Daily Diary Study of Anal Intercourse in Drug-Using Women.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Grace L; Fisher, Dennis G; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Women (N = 138) with histories of illicit drug use were recruited into an electronic diary study that used Android smartphones for data collection. The diary was to be completed each day for 12 weeks using an "app" created in HTML5 and accessed over the Internet via smartphone. Data collection included information on sexual behaviors with up to 10 partners per day and contextual factors surrounding sexual behavior such as drug use before/after, type of sexual behavior (oral, vaginal, anal), and other activities such as using condoms for vaginal and anal intercourse and use of sexual lubricants. The sample was predominantly African American (58 %); 20 % Latina, 20 % White and 2 % reported as Other. Most women reported either less than a high school education (33 %) or having a high school diploma (33 %). The mean age was 39 years (SD = 11.78). Anal intercourse occurred on days when women also reported using illicit drugs, specifically methamphetamine and cocaine. Anal intercourse was not an isolated sexual activity, but took place on days when vaginal intercourse and giving and receiving oral sex also occurred along with illicit drug use. Anal intercourse also occurred on days when women reported they wanted sex. HIV prevention interventions must address the risks of anal intercourse for women, taking into account concurrent drug use and sexual pleasure that may reduce individual harm-reduction behaviors.

  9. Quality of Life in the Late Follow-Up of Ulcerative Colitis Patients Submitted to Restorative Proctocolectomy with Sphincter Preservation Over Ten Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Alberto Luiz Monteiro; Teixeira, Magaly Gêmeo; de Almeida, Maristela Gomes; Kiss, Desidério Roberto; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate, by means of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ), the quality of life of ulcerative colitis patients submitted to proctocolectomy with sphincter preservation using J-pouch reconstruction over ten years ago. METHODS The study consisted of 36 patients interviewed using the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire. The score scale, resulting from the addition of each answer, ranged from 32 to 224, where the highest score indicates the best quality of life. The chi square test was used to verify the existence of meaningful differences between the results of the questionnaire and age, and gender proportion. For each section, as well as for all of them combined, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to verify if there were differences in the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire scores among the groups in relation to the proportions. RESULTS After applying the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, it was determined that quality of life was considered excellent for 9 (25%), good for 11 (30.6%), regular for 13 (36.1%), and bad for 3 (8.3%) patients. In our study, we determined that 85% of the patients were pleased with and thankful for the surgery that they underwent. CONCLUSION We can conclude that the possibility of sphincter preservation should always be taken into account, since patients remain clinically stable and have a high quality of life even after long periods. PMID:19759881

  10. Therapeutic management of anal eczema: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Havlickova, B; Weyandt, G H

    2014-01-01

    Aim To conduct a systematic review of treatments for anal eczema (AE). Methods We conducted a Medline search for clinical trial data for the treatment of perianal diseases including AE, including papers not published in the English language. We assessed the study reports using the system recommended by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. No meta-analysis was attempted. Results The evidence base for topical treatments used to treat AE is very poor: there are very few studies and many of those that exist are of poor quality. The best evidence was found for medications that are yet to be licensed for AE. Among products with existing licences for the treatment of eczema, our assessment found some evidence to support the continued use of mild-to-moderate corticosteroids first line in most patients. Discussion Features of the perianal region, and the fact that it is almost always occluded, mean that not all medications recommended in the general treatment guidelines for eczema are appropriate for AE. However, there are no specific treatment guidelines for these patients. This may in part be because of the lack of high-quality evidence-based medicine in this therapy area. Many frequently prescribed medications were developed and licensed many years ago, in an era when clinical trial design was not expected to be as rigorous as it is today. Conclusion This review highlights the need to conduct more high-quality clinical trials in patients with AE in order that specific guidelines for the management of this difficult proctological condition can be prepared. PMID:24898365

  11. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche human papillomavirus (HPV) linear array for HPV genotyping in anal swab samples.

    PubMed

    Low, Huey Chi; Silver, Michelle I; Brown, Brandon J; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M; Gravitt, Patti E; Woo, Yin Ling

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's χ(2) tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (κ = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (κ = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (κ < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance.

  12. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    MedlinePlus

    ... wall repair Urethral bulking with artificial material Retropubic suspension Tension-free vaginal tape Description This procedure may ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 145. Chapple CR. Retropubic suspension surgery for incontinence in women. In: Wein AJ, ...

  13. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes episodes of severe abdominal pain. Doctor-Patient Communication Doctors often consider SOD in patients who experience ... with a long-term digestive disorder. Doctor–Patient Communication How to Help Your Doctor Help You How ...

  14. Externalities of oil imports revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, R.

    1980-09-01

    A re-analysis of the externalities associated with oil imports reaffirms the major findings of an earlier study: (1) The current externalities of oil imports are large even after several favorable assumptions are made, including the existence of a large buffer stock and enlightened monetary and fiscal policy. (2) The large externalities of oil imports call for increased domestic supplies, including conservation, if they are cost-effective and based on marginal social costs. (3) A corrective public policy could involve oil-import taxes and the subsidization of new domestic energy sources without large government externalities. 20 references.

  15. Optical modulation goes external

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loni, A.

    1995-02-01

    Digital or analog modulation of continuous-wave laser sources forms the basis of encoding and transmitting of information through optical fiber link systems. In digital systems, data are formatted in a simple periodic two-bit configuration, represented by high or low light intensities, whereas in analog systems data are represented by selective portions of a time-varying electronic waveform applied to the optical carrier. High speed optical communications and the distribution of cable television (CATV) signals are just two examples of digital and analog systems, respectively, that involve the transmission of data, voice and video over fiber networks. The basic layout of a fiber-optic link system is presented. The optical source wavelength is determined by the characteristics of the optical fiber. If the optical sources used is a semiconductor laser diode, information can be imprinted on the optical output by directly modulating the laser drive current with a radio frequency (RF) signal. In digital systems, the low (off) state generally corresponds to a position just below the lasing threshold on the characteristic intensity-current curve of the diode. This position is preferred to the zero current locus because the turn-on delays are then minimized. Analog systems require a bias current in addition to the threshold current in order to push the modulation into the linear region of the power-current curve. The main disadvantages associated with the direct modulation approach are discussed. The main disadvantage of the solid-state approach is its inability to modulate directly the laser at the data rates nominally entailed in optical communications. This inability causes further limitations associated with the inherently long excited state lifetime of the lasing species. External modulation overcomes this drawback by modulating the optical output from the laser rather than the material properties of the laser itself, and consequently, is set to play an increasingly

  16. Health-related quality of life in patients with anal fissure: effect of type D personality

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Edip Erdal; Canan, Fatih; Yildirim, Osman; Cetin, Mehmet Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is a significant factor in describing the burden of illness and the impact of treatment in patients with gastrointestinal disease. Type D (distressed) personality is defined as the co-occurrence of negative affect and social inhibition. Aim To assess the prevalence of type D personality in patients with anal fissure and to investigate whether the presence of a type D personality would affect HRQL in patients with anal fissure. Material and methods One hundred outpatients with anal fissure with no psychiatric comorbidity were consecutively enrolled, along with 100 healthy controls. Type D Scale (DS14) and General Health Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36) were used in the collection of data. Results Patients with anal fissure scored lower on physical roles and bodily pain dimensions of SF-36 than healthy subjects (p < 0.05). Thirty-three patients with anal fissure (33%) and 16 controls (16%) had scored above the cut-off score of the DS14 (p < 0.05). Patients with a type D personality were found to score lower on bodily pain and social roles domains of HRQL than patients without a type D personality. Conclusions Type D personality was associated with increased perceived bodily pain and social roles in patients with anal fissure. Type D personality construct may be an important consideration when assessing HRQL outcomes. A multidimensional approach may be valuable in the assessment of patients presenting with anal fissure, because a subgroup with type-D personality might benefit from psychological therapies. PMID:25061489

  17. Effect of electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients refractory to proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Edy; Rodríguez, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gómez, Beatriz; Neto, Manoel G; Crowell, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of lower esophageal sphincter (LES)-electrical stimulation therapy (EST) in a subgroup of patients that reported only partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy, compared to a group of patient with complete response. METHODS: Bipolar stitch electrodes were laparoscopically placed in the LES and connected to an implantable pulse generator (EndoStim BV, the Hague, the Netherlands), placed subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. Stimulation at 20 Hz, 215 μsec, 3-8 mAmp in 30 min sessions was delivered starting on day 1 post-implant. Patients were evaluated using gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-HRQL, symptom diaries; esophageal pH and esophageal manometry before and up to 24 mo after therapy and results were compared between partial and complete responders. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with GERD on LES-EST were enrolled and received continuous per-protocol stimulation through 12 mo and 21 patients completed 24 mo of therapy. Of the 23 patients, 16 (8 male, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years) had incomplete response to PPIs prior to LES-EST, while 7 patients (5 male, mean age 52.7 ± 4.7) had complete response to PPIs. In the sub-group with incomplete response to PPIs, median (IQR) composite GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 9.5 (9.0-10.0) at baseline on-PPI and 24.0 (20.8-26.3) at baseline off-PPI to 2.5 (0.0-4.0) at 12-mo and 0.0 (0.0-2.5) at 24-mo follow-up (P < 0.05 compared to on-and off-PPI at baseline). Median (IQR) % 24-h esophageal pH < 4.0 at baseline in this sub-group improved significantly from 9.8% (7.8-11.5) at baseline to 3.0% (1.9-6.3) at 12 mo (P < 0.001) and 4.6% (2.0-5.8) at 24 mo follow-up (P < 0.01). At their 24-mo follow-up, 9/11 patients in this sub-group were completely free of PPI use. These results were comparable to the sub-group that reported complete response to PPI therapy at baseline. No unanticipated implantation or stimulation-related adverse events, or any untoward sensation

  18. External Examining: Fit for Purpose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Sue; Price, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In a context of international concern about academic standards, the practice of external examining is widely admired for its role in defending standards. Yet a contradiction exists between this faith in examining and continuing concerns about standards. This article argues that external examining rests on assumptions about standards which are…

  19. Choosing a Truly External Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Marilyn

    2006-01-01

    This scenario discusses a situation in which a proposal has been published by a consortium of foundations for an "external" evaluator to evaluate a replication at two new sites of a program they have been funding for many years. A proposal is received from Dr. Porto-Novo, who has been the external evaluator of the initial program for about 10…

  20. Wide disparities in attitudes and practices regarding Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: a survey of expert U.S. endoscopists

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rabindra R.; Klapman, Jason; Komanduri, Srinadh; Shah, Janak N.; Wani, Sachin; Muthusamy, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) is recommended in the evaluation of suspected Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD2), though its utility is uncertain. Little is known about the practice of expert endoscopists in the United States regarding SOD2. Methods: An anonymous electronic survey was distributed to 128 expert biliary endoscopists identified from U.S. advanced endoscopy training programs. Results: The response rate was 46.1 % (59/128). Only 55.6 % received training in SOM, and 49.2 % currently perform SOM. For biliary SOD2, 33.3 % routinely obtain SOM, 33.3 % perform empiric sphincterotomy, and 26.3 % perform single session endoscopic ultrasound/endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (EUS/ERCP). In contrast, an equal number (35.1 %) favor SOM or single session EUS/ERCP for suspected acute idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis, while 19.3 % would perform empiric sphincterotomy. Those who perform SOM believe it to be important in predicting response to treatment compared with those who do not (71.8 % vs 23.1 %, P = 0.01). Yet only 51.7 % of this group performs SOM for suspected SOD2. Most (78.6 %) believe that < 50 % of patients report improvement in symptoms after sphincterotomy. Common reasons for not obtaining SOM included unreliable results (50 %), and procedure-related risks (39.3 %). Most (59.3 %) believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder; only 3.7 % felt SOD is a legitimate disorder of the sphincter of Oddi. Conclusions: Our survey of U.S. expert endoscopists suggests that SOM is not routinely performed for SOD2 and concerns regarding its associated risks and validity persist. Most endoscopists believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder that will not respond to sphincterotomy in the majority of cases. PMID:27652298

  1. Perianal and Vulvar Extramammary Paget Disease: A Report of Six Cases and Mapping Biopsy of the Anal Canal

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Sinsuke; Yamada, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Takuya; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Masui, Yuri; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Kadono, Takafumi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of perianal and vulvar extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), rare intraepithelial malignancies, is often challenging because of its potential to spread into the anal canal. However, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal resection margin within the anal canal. Between 2004 and 2014, six patients (three with perianal EMPD and three with vulvar EMPD) in which the spread of Paget cells into the anal canal was highly suspected were referred to our department. To evaluate the disease extent within the anal canal, preoperative mapping biopsy of the anal canal was performed in five out of six patients. Two patients were positive for Paget cells within the anal canal (one at the dentate line and the other at 0.5 cm above the dentate line), whereas in three patients, Paget cell were present only in the skin of the anal verge. Using 1 cm margin within the anal canal from the positive biopsy sites, we performed anal-preserving wide local excision (WLE), and negative resection margins within the anal canal were confirmed in all five patients. The remaining one patient with perianal EMPD did not undergo mapping biopsy of the anal canal because preoperative colonoscopy revealed that the Paget cells had spread into the lower rectum. Therefore, WLE with abdominoperineal resection was performed. During the median follow-up period of 37.3 months, no local recurrence was observed in all patients. Our small case series suggest the usefulness of mapping biopsy of the anal canal for the treatment of perianal and vulvar EMPD. PMID:27746643

  2. Perianal and Vulvar Extramammary Paget Disease: A Report of Six Cases and Mapping Biopsy of the Anal Canal.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuzo; Kazama, Sinsuke; Yamada, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Takuya; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Masui, Yuri; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Kadono, Takafumi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of perianal and vulvar extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), rare intraepithelial malignancies, is often challenging because of its potential to spread into the anal canal. However, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal resection margin within the anal canal. Between 2004 and 2014, six patients (three with perianal EMPD and three with vulvar EMPD) in which the spread of Paget cells into the anal canal was highly suspected were referred to our department. To evaluate the disease extent within the anal canal, preoperative mapping biopsy of the anal canal was performed in five out of six patients. Two patients were positive for Paget cells within the anal canal (one at the dentate line and the other at 0.5 cm above the dentate line), whereas in three patients, Paget cell were present only in the skin of the anal verge. Using 1 cm margin within the anal canal from the positive biopsy sites, we performed anal-preserving wide local excision (WLE), and negative resection margins within the anal canal were confirmed in all five patients. The remaining one patient with perianal EMPD did not undergo mapping biopsy of the anal canal because preoperative colonoscopy revealed that the Paget cells had spread into the lower rectum. Therefore, WLE with abdominoperineal resection was performed. During the median follow-up period of 37.3 months, no local recurrence was observed in all patients. Our small case series suggest the usefulness of mapping biopsy of the anal canal for the treatment of perianal and vulvar EMPD.

  3. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  4. Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP)

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    class I; 35% are in class II; 25%, class III; and 5%, class IV. Surveys (8) suggest that from 5% to 15% of patients with HF have persistent severe symptoms, and that the remainder of patients with HF is evenly divided between those with mild and moderately severe symptoms. To date, the diagnosis and management of chronic HF has concentrated on patients with the clinical syndrome of HF accompanied by severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Major changes in treatment have resulted from a better understanding of the pathophysiology of HF and the results of large clinical trials. Treatment for chronic HF includes lifestyle management, drugs, cardiac surgery, or implantable pacemakers and defibrillators. Despite pharmacologic advances, which include diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, spironolactone, and digoxin, many patients remain symptomatic on maximally tolerated doses. (6) The Technology Patients are typically treated by a trained technician in a medically supervised environment for 1 hour daily for a total of 35 hours over 7 weeks. The procedure involves sequential inflation and deflation of compressible cuffs wrapped around the patient’s calves, lower thighs and upper thighs. In addition to 3 sets of cuffs, the patient has finger plethysmogram and electrocardiogram (ECG) attachments that are connected to a control and display console. External counterpulsation was used in the United States to treat cardiogenic shock after acute myocardial infarction. (9;10) More recently, an enhanced version namely “enhanced external counterpulsation” (EECP) was introduced as a noninvasive procedure for outpatient treatment of patients with severe, uncontrollable cardiac ischemia. EECP is said to increase coronary perfusion pressure and reduce the myocardial oxygen demand. Currently, EECP is not applicable for all patients with refractory angina pectoris. For example, many patients are considered ineligible for therapy due to co

  5. Anal heterosex among young people and implications for health promotion: a qualitative study in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Marston, C; Lewis, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore expectations, experiences and circumstances of anal sex among young people. Design Qualitative, longitudinal study using individual and group interviews. Participants 130 men and women aged 16–18 from diverse social backgrounds. Setting 3 contrasting sites in England (London, a northern industrial city, rural southwest). Results Anal heterosex often appeared to be painful, risky and coercive, particularly for women. Interviewees frequently cited pornography as the ‘explanation’ for anal sex, yet their accounts revealed a complex context with availability of pornography being only one element. Other key elements included competition between men; the claim that ‘people must like it if they do it’ (made alongside the seemingly contradictory expectation that it will be painful for women); and, crucially, normalisation of coercion and ‘accidental’ penetration. It seemed that men were expected to persuade or coerce reluctant partners. Conclusions Young people's narratives normalised coercive, painful and unsafe anal heterosex. This study suggests an urgent need for harm reduction efforts targeting anal sex to help encourage discussion about mutuality and consent, reduce risky and painful techniques and challenge views that normalise coercion. PMID:25122073

  6. Salinity responsive aquaporins in the anal papillae of the larval mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Hina; Misyura, Lidiya; Bui, Phuong; Donini, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The larvae of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti normally inhabit freshwater (FW) where they face dilution of body fluids by osmotic influx of water. In response, the physiological actions of the anal papillae result in ion uptake while the Malpighian tubules and rectum work in concert to excrete excess water. In an apparent paradox, the anal papillae express aquaporins (AQPs) and are sites of water permeability which, if AQPs are expressed by the epithelium, apparently exaggerates the influx of water from their dilute environment. Recently, naturally breeding populations of A. aegypti were found in brackish water (BW), an environment which limits the osmotic gradient. Given that salinization of FW is an emerging environmental issue and that these larvae would presumably need to adjust to these changing conditions, this study investigates the expression of AQPs in the anal papillae and their response to rearing in hypo-osmotic and near isosmotic conditions. Transcripts of all six Aedes AQP homologs were detectable in the anal papillae and the transcript abundance of three AQP homologs in the papillae was different between rearing conditions. Using custom made antibodies, expression of two of these AQP homologs (AQP4 and AQP5) was localized to the syncytial epithelium of the anal papillae. Furthermore, the changes in transcript abundance of these two AQPs between the rearing conditions, were manifested at the protein level. Results suggest that AQP4 and AQP5 play an important physiological role in larval responses to changes in environmental salinity.

  7. Comparison of Topical Nifedipine With Oral Nifedipine for Treatment of Anal Fissure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Golfam, Farzaneh; Golfam, Parisa; Golfam, Babak; Pahlevani, Puyan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical sphincterotomy has gained popularity as a treatment for anal fissure. Calcium channel blockers in topical forms could also be appropriate with low adverse effects. Objectives: This was a prospective randomized controlled trial to compare topical and oral nifedipine in the treatment of chronic anal fissure. Patients and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted at two centers of Shahed University. One hundred and thirty patients with chronic anal fissure aged 18 to 60 years managed in our clinics were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. Sixty-five patients received topical nifedipine (TN) and the same number received oral nifedipine (ON). Results: Ulcer healing occurred in 43 (73.33%) of topical nifedipine group compared to 29 (49.5%) patients in oral nifedipine, which was significantly different (P < 0.05). Side effects such as headache and flushing in oral nifedipine group were more prevalent than topical nifedipine, which was statistically different. Recurrence rates were the same after six months of follow-up. Conclusions: Although oral nifedipine can reduce symptom and signs of anal fissure, topical nifedipine has a superior role for anal fissure treatment with higher healing rate and lower side effects. PMID:25389477

  8. [A case report of metastatic anal fistula cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiro; Takatsuka, Satoshi; Shinkawa, Hiroji; Kaizaki, Ryoji; Hori, Takaaki; Ikehara, Teruyuki

    2014-11-01

    A 69-year-old man with perianal pain was diagnosed with an anal fistula and a rectal tumor by magnetic resonance imaging and pulmonary tuberculosis by computed tomography. A colonoscopy confirmed the presence of a circular mass in the rectum 6 cm from the anal verge. Histological examination revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Initially, seton drainage was used to improve the perianal pain. After 2 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy, the patient underwent low anterior resection for the rectal cancer. Six months after surgery, a perianal tumor was detected at the postoperative site of the anal fistula. Biopsy of the tumor revealed adenocarcinoma. Because the histological appearance of the second tumor was identical to the rectal cancer, it was diagnosed as a metastatic anal fistula cancer. The tumor shrunk after 3 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX) plus bevacizumab and there was no evidence of distant metastasis. Local resection of the anal fistula cancer was performed. Six months postoperatively, the patient is doing well and shows no sign of recurrence.

  9. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection Among Young Healthy Women in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe A.; Quint, Wim; Gonzalez, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Herrero, Rolando; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; DelVecchio, Corey; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), yet little is known about anal HPV infection among healthy young women. Methods. A total of 2017 sexually active women in the control arm of an HPV-16/18 vaccine trial had a single anal specimen collected by a clinician at the 4-year study visit. Samples were tested for HPV by SPF10 PCR/DEIA/LiPA25, version 1. Results. A total of 4% of women had HPV-16, 22% had oncogenic HPV, and 31% had any HPV detected in an anal specimen. The prevalence of anal HPV was higher among women who reported anal intercourse, compared with those who did not (43.4% vs 28.4%; P < .001). Among women who reported anal intercourse, cervical HPV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.4–8.2]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.2 [95% CI, 1.1–4.6] for ≥4 partners), and number of anal intercourse partners (aOR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.1–3.3] for ≥2 partners) were independent risk factors for anal HPV detection. Among women who reported no anal intercourse, cervical HPV (aOR, 4.7 [95% CI, 3.7–5.9]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.4 [95% CI, 1.7–3.4] for ≥4 partners), and report of anal fissures (aOR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1–4.8]) were associated with an increased odds of anal HPV detection. Conclusion. Anal HPV is common among young women, even those who report no anal sex, and was associated with cervical HPV infection. Anal fissures in women who report never having had anal intercourse may facilitate HPV exposure. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00128661. PMID:22850119

  10. Has Clinton made externalities extraneous

    SciTech Connect

    Haites, E.

    1993-08-01

    Over the past several years state utility regulators have become increasingly concerned with the environmental externalities associated with electricity generation. Currently, 26 states have requirements in place, although these vary considerably in scope and complexity. The vast majority apply only to the selection of new resources; the most detailed specify a monetary value for each discharge to the environment. Regulatory concern with environmental externalities stems from the desire to minimize the cost of electricity service to society. Externalities requirements focus on the residual discharges after environmental regulations are complied with. Ignoring externalities leads to inefficient use of resources and environmental damage beyond with may be called a [open quotes]socially optimal[close quotes] level of pollution. Adjusting to the cost options for environmental externalities should lead utilities to select a combination of resources that is closer to the socially optimal mix. President Bill Clinton's recent announcement that the United States will limit its emissions of carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) to 1990 levels by 2000 may make externalities regulation superfluous. National limits on sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]), nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]), and CO[sub 2] emissions by utilities will likely be in effect by 2000. It will not be possible to comply with emissions limits solely through changes to the mix of resource additions, even though consideration of environmental externalities in resource addition decisions can reduce incremental emissions. Other strategies to reduce the emissions of existing generating stations, as well as new sources, will be needed.

  11. Extrapulmonary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Joshua M.; Brown, Karen; Lo, Shelly; Nagda, Suneel; Yong, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma affecting the anal canal is a rare and poorly understood entity which can, in its early stages, masquerade as benign anorectal disease such as hemorrhoids. Methods. We report a case of this rare malignancy which initially presented with hematochezia and anal pain. We also review the literature with regard to previously described cases and management strategies including the role of surgery. Results. Despite aggressive multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemotherapy and radiation, the disease progressed rapidly with dissemination occurring only three months after completion of treatment. Because of the aggressive nature of this tumor, the treatment options for this almost universally fatal malignancy are often palliative in nature. Conclusion. Chemoradiotherapy is likely the most reasonable approach to extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal given its aggressiveness. PMID:22454644

  12. Bacteriological comparison of low anal fistula operated by ordinary methods and laser methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanrong; Xiong, Yigai

    1996-09-01

    Since 1989, 42 cases with low anal fistula were operated with laser and ordinary methods respectively. During the operation, secreted or charred tissues were extracted from the surface of the wound for bacteria culture. Experimental group (laser method): no bacteria were found in 24 cases operated by laser method. Control group (ordinary method): bacterial were found in 16 out of 18 cases operated by ordinary methods. The results of two different group showed that they had statistical difference for P < 0.001. So, CO2 laser is proved to be a definitely practical tool in surgical use for its bacteria killing power. While the anal fistula were operated by the laser, the neurotic carboatomic tissue can block blood vessel and prevent infection from spreading. The high temperature produced by the carboatomic action have enough ability to kill directly the bacteria living in the anal fistula.

  13. Summary of emerging targets in anal cancer: the case for an immunotherapy based-approach

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Van

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) remains a less common gastrointestinal malignancy despite a continued increase in the annual incidence in the United States and globally. The vast majority of all cases are attributed to persistent infection and integration into host cell DNA by human papillomavirus (HPV). For patients with metastatic anal cancer, there is currently no accepted consensus standard of care. Given the viral etiology associated with the oncogenesis of this tumor, great interest exists for the development of immunotherapy as a novel approach to improving clinical outcomes for patients afflicted with this disease. This review highlights various immunotherapies under investigation in the treatment of advanced human malignancies and discusses their potential as future treatments for metastatic anal cancer. PMID:27747086

  14. Combined radical radiation therapy and chemotherapy for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, B.J.; Rider, W.D.; Harwood, A.R.; Keane, T.J.; Thomas, G.M.; Erlichman, C.; Fine, S.

    1982-03-01

    Radical radiation therapy (5000 rads in 20 fractions in 4 weeks) combined with iv mitomycin (10 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1000 mg/m2/24 hours for 4 days) was used to treat 13 patients with locally advanced but operable squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. All patients achieved local control and retained anal continence, and none developed metastases. The patients were followed from 4 to 34 months (median, 12). Severe acute gastrointestinal toxic effects were seen in three patients; the same patients had significant thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. Treatment with this combined program may allow conservative management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and should be considered as an alternative to abdominoperineal resection.

  15. Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions and HPV Among Young Black Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Keglovitz, Kristin; Lancki, Nicola; Walsh, Tim; Schneider, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Limited data are available on anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASILs) and anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in young, Black populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of and relationships between ASILs and high-risk HPV infection in a young (<30 years of age), predominantly Black, men who have sex with men (MSM) population. Methods: Results of anal cytology and HPV DNA were gathered for 83 individuals. Results: Forty-two percent of individuals (35) had atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and 33% (27) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion by cytology. Only 9% tested positive for both high-risk HPV subtypes 16 and 18. Conclusion: Low rates of infection with both HPV types 16 and 18 may provide further evidence that we should continue to vaccinate young, Black MSM against HPV. PMID:27673362

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Malignancies: A Preliminary Toxicity and Disease Outcomes Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepek, Joseph M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicities associated with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. This study reports the results of using IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with anal malignancies treated with IMRT at Duke University were reviewed. Acute toxicity was graded using the NCI CTCAEv3.0 scale. Overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), local-regional control (LRC) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Forty-seven patients with anal malignancy (89% canal, 11% perianal skin) were treated with IMRT between August 2006 and September 2008. Median follow-up was 14 months (19 months for SCC patients). Median radiation dose was 54 Gy. Eight patients (18%) required treatment breaks lasting a median of 5 days (range, 2-7 days). Toxicity rates were as follows: Grade 4: leukopenia (7%), thrombocytopenia (2%); Grade 3: leukopenia (18%), diarrhea (9%), and anemia (4%); Grade 2: skin (93%), diarrhea (24%), and leukopenia (24%). The 2-year actuarial overall OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 85%, 78%, 90% and 82%, respectively. For SCC patients, the 2-year OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 100%, 100%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer results in significant reductions in normal tissue dose and acute toxicities versus historic controls treated without IMRT, leading to reduced rates of toxicity-related treatment interruption. Early disease-related outcomes seem encouraging. IMRT is emerging as a standard therapy for anal cancer.

  17. Diversity of human papillomavirus in the anal canal of men: The HIM study

    PubMed Central

    Sichero, Laura; Nyitray, Alan G.; Nunes, Emily Montosa; Nepal, Bal; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with development of anogenital lesions in men. There are no reports describing the distribution of non-alpha HPV types in the anal canal of a sexually diverse men group. The HIM (HPV in Men) Study is a multicenter study of the natural history of HPV infection in Brazil, Mexico and USA. At baseline, 12% of anal canal specimens PCR HPV-positive were not typed by the Roche Linear Array and were considered unclassified. Our goal was characterizing HPVs among these unclassified specimens at baseline and assess associations with participant socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics. Unclassified HPVs were typed by sequencing amplified PGMY09/11 products or cloning of PGMY/GP+ nested amplicons followed by sequencing. Further analysis was conducted using FAP primers. Of men with unclassified HPV at the anal canal, most (89.1%) were men who have sex with women (MSW). Readable sequences were produced for 62.8% of unclassified specimens, of which 75.2% were characterized HPV types. A total of 18, 26, and 3 different α-, β- and γ-HPV types were detected, respectively. Compared to older men (45-70 years), α-HPVs were more commonly detected among young men (18-30 years) whereas β-HPVs were more frequent among mid-adult men (31-44 years). β-HPVs were more common among heterosexual men (85.0%) than non-heterosexual men. β2-HPV types composed all β-HPVs detected among non-heterosexual men. The high prevalence of β-HPV in the anal canal of men who do not report receptive anal sex is suggestive of other forms of transmission that do not involve penile-anal intercourse. PMID:25698660

  18. Locomotion of free-swimming ghost knifefish: anal fin kinematics during four behaviors.

    PubMed

    Youngerman, Eric D; Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V

    2014-10-01

    The maneuverability demonstrated by the weakly electric ghost knifefish (Apteronotus albifrons) is a result of its highly flexible ribbon-like anal fin, which extends nearly three-quarters the length of its body and is composed of approximately 150 individual fin rays. To understand how movement of the anal fin controls locomotion we examined kinematics of the whole fin, as well as selected individual fin rays, during four locomotor behaviors executed by free-swimming ghost knifefish: forward swimming, backward swimming, heave (vertical) motion, and hovering. We used high-speed video (1000 fps) to examine the motion of the entire anal fin and we measured the three-dimensional curvature of four adjacent fin rays in the middle of the fin during each behavior to determine how individual fin rays bend along their length during swimming. Canonical discriminant analysis separated all four behaviors on anal fin kinematic variables and showed that forward and backward swimming behaviors contrasted the most: forward behaviors exhibited a large anterior wavelength and posterior amplitude while during backward locomotion the anal fin exhibited both a large posterior wavelength and anterior amplitude. Heave and hover behaviors were defined by similar kinematic variables; however, for each variable, the mean values for heave motions were generally greater than for hovering. Individual fin rays in the middle of the anal fin curved substantially along their length during swimming, and the magnitude of this curvature was nearly twice the previously measured maximum curvature for ray-finned fish fin rays during locomotion. Fin rays were often curved into the direction of motion, indicating active control of fin ray curvature, and not just passive bending in response to fluid loading.

  19. Anal Canal Carcinoma in a Child With Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Horikawa, Reiko; Masaki, Hidekazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal in children is rare. To date, the etiology and outcome of this condition have been not fully understood. Here, we report an 11-year-old child with anal canal cancer who had concomitant disorders of sex development. Radiotherapy followed by salvage surgery achieved disease-free survival of 3 years. Since overexpression of cell cycle regulatory protein p16 was immunohistochemically evident in tumor tissue, human papillomavirus infection was considered as a causative factor in the carcinogenesis.

  20. Human Papillomavirus at Multiple Sites Associated with Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in HIV-Seropositive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Eleanore; Lim, Eunjung; Milne, Cris; Zhu, Xuemei; Agsalda, Melissa; Killeen, Jeffrey; Miller, F DeWolfe; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Shiramizu, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-Seropositive patients have higher risk of HPV infection even on anti-retroviral therapy. Infection with high-risk HPV genotypes can cause dysplasia leading to cancer. This study assessed HPV at different anatomical sites in HIV-seropositive individuals and factors associated with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL). Methods Specimens were obtained from multiple anatomical sites for each participant in conjunction with routine screening for anal dysplasia. Female specimens included cervical and anal cytologies and oral wash. Male specimens included anal cytologies, oral wash, and exfoliated cells from penile head, penile shaft, scrotum, and from uncircumcised subjects, inner foreskin. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Following DNA extraction, HIV DNA copy was assessed by qPCR; HPV was genotyped. Statistical analyses included calculation of odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), t-tests or Mann-Whitney tests. Results Males were more likely to have ASIL: 29/50 (58%) compared to 1/11 females (9%) (OR=13.81, 95% CI: 1.64–116.32). HPV 6 or 11 in anal specimens was significantly associated with ASIL (OR= 6.29, 95% CI: 1.49–26.44). Number of HPV genotypes in anal specimens was also significant: ASIL+ (3.4 ± 3.1) versus ASIL− (1.6 ± 3.1) (p=0.009). Among 44 males, HPV was detected from at least one anatomical site for 33 participants (75%): 27 anus (61%), 19 oral wash (44%), 17 penile shaft (39%), 11 scrotum (26%), 10 penile head (23%), 0 foreskin. Detection of HPV in penile shaft specimens was significantly associated with ASIL (OR=6.79, 95% CI: 1.57–29.36) as was number of HPV genotypes in penile shaft specimens: ASIL+ (2.4 ± 4.0) versus ASIL− (0.6 ± 1.7) (p=0.025). Only 1/11 females had ASIL; only 1/11 females had cervical dysplasia: OR was not estimable due to small numbers. Conclusions Males were more prone to ASIL than females. HPV at anal as well as non-anal sites may be indicative of ASIL. PMID

  1. Factors Associated With Emotional Satisfaction During First Anal Intercourse in a Sample of YMSM.

    PubMed

    Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Matson, Pamela; Novak, David S; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2016-07-01

    We sought to determine, in a sample of 2,813 HIV seronegative young men who had sex with other men age 18-24, whether physical satisfaction would explain emotional satisfaction during first anal intercourse and whether emotional satisfaction would impact having sex with a partner a second time. Emotional satisfaction was explained mostly by physical satisfaction during the event, but partner type also had direct impact on emotional satisfaction. Our findings suggest that first anal intercourse experiences in young men are both emotionally and physically satisfying and may impact subsequent sexual behavior and partner decision-making.

  2. Macrophage density in pharyngeal and laryngeal muscles greatly exceeds that in other striated muscles: an immunohistochemical study using elderly human cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sunki; Kitamura, Kei; Masaaki, Kasahara; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in aging-related muscle atrophy (i.e., sarcopenia). We examined macrophage density in six striated muscles (cricopharyngeus muscle, posterior cricoarytenoideus muscle, genioglossus muscle, masseter muscle, infraspinatus muscle, and external anal sphincter). We examined 14 donated male cadavers and utilized CD68 immunohistochemistry to clarify macrophage density in muscles. The numbers of macrophages per striated muscle fiber in the larynx and pharynx (0.34 and 0.31) were 5–6 times greater than those in the tongue, shoulder, and anus (0.05–0.07) with high statistical significance. Thick muscle fibers over 80 µm in diameter were seen in the pharynx, larynx, and anal sphincter of two limited specimens. Conversely, in the other sites or specimens, muscle fibers were thinner than 50 µm. We did not find any multinuclear muscle cells suggestive of regeneration. At the beginning of the study, we suspected that mucosal macrophages might have invaded into the muscle layer of the larynx and pharynx, but we found no evidence of inflammation in the mucosa. Likewise, the internal anal sphincter (a smooth muscle layer near the mucosa) usually contained fewer macrophages than the external sphincter. The present result suggest that, in elderly men, thinning and death of striated muscle fibers occur more frequently in the larynx and pharynx than in other parts of the body. PMID:27722010

  3. Handedness is a biomarker of variation in anal sex role behavior and Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity among gay men

    PubMed Central

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A.; Monks, D. Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P.

    2017-01-01

    Developmental theories of the biological basis of sexual orientation suggest that sexually differentiated psychological and behavioural traits should be linked with sexual orientation. Subgroups of gay men delineated by anal sex roles differ according to at least one such trait: gender expression. The present study assessed the hypothesis that handedness, a biologically determined sexually differentiated trait, corresponds to differences in subgroups of gay men based on anal sex role. Furthermore, it assessed whether handedness mediates the association between gender nonconformity and male sexual orientation. Straight and gay men (N = 333) completed the Edinburgh Inventory of Handedness and the Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity Scale. Gay men also completed measures of anal sex role preference. As in previous studies, gay men showed greater non-right-handedness and gender nonconformity than straight men. Also, among gay men, bottoms/versatiles (i.e., gay men who take a receptive anal sex role, or who take on both a receptive and insertive anal sex role) were more gender-nonconforming than tops (i.e., gay men who take an insertive anal sex role). In support of the hypothesis, bottoms/versatiles were more non-right-handed than tops and handedness mediated the male sexual orientation and anal sex role differences in Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity. Together, these findings suggest that developmental processes linked to handedness underpin variation among men in sexual orientation and gender nonconformity as well as variation among subgroups of gay men that are delineated by anal sex roles. PMID:28234947

  4. Handedness is a biomarker of variation in anal sex role behavior and Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity among gay men.

    PubMed

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A; Monks, D Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2017-01-01

    Developmental theories of the biological basis of sexual orientation suggest that sexually differentiated psychological and behavioural traits should be linked with sexual orientation. Subgroups of gay men delineated by anal sex roles differ according to at least one such trait: gender expression. The present study assessed the hypothesis that handedness, a biologically determined sexually differentiated trait, corresponds to differences in subgroups of gay men based on anal sex role. Furthermore, it assessed whether handedness mediates the association between gender nonconformity and male sexual orientation. Straight and gay men (N = 333) completed the Edinburgh Inventory of Handedness and the Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity Scale. Gay men also completed measures of anal sex role preference. As in previous studies, gay men showed greater non-right-handedness and gender nonconformity than straight men. Also, among gay men, bottoms/versatiles (i.e., gay men who take a receptive anal sex role, or who take on both a receptive and insertive anal sex role) were more gender-nonconforming than tops (i.e., gay men who take an insertive anal sex role). In support of the hypothesis, bottoms/versatiles were more non-right-handed than tops and handedness mediated the male sexual orientation and anal sex role differences in Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity. Together, these findings suggest that developmental processes linked to handedness underpin variation among men in sexual orientation and gender nonconformity as well as variation among subgroups of gay men that are delineated by anal sex roles.

  5. Gracilis muscle transposition as a workhorse flap for anal incontinence: Quality of life and functional outcome in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Guru Dayal Singh; Sharma, Amit Kumar; Shende, Kaustubh Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Anal incontinence is one of the most psychologically and socially debilitating conditions in an otherwise healthy individual. It can lead to social isolation, loss of self-esteem, self-confidence and depression. This study is devoted to the problem of anal incontinence in the adult patients. The aim of our study is to analyse the results of gracilis muscle transposition for anal incontinence and improvement in quality of life (QOL) of patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 18 patients with complaint of anal incontinence were enrolled in this study. All patients were treated with gracilis muscle transposition. Results: All patients are continent, and there is an improvement in their QOL. Conclusion: Gracilis muscle transposition is a good option for patients of anal incontinence who are not treated by non-surgical means. PMID:28216815

  6. Salvage abdominoperineal resection and perineal wound healing in local recurrent or persistent anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferenschild, Floris T J; Vermaas, Maarten; Hofer, Stefan O; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M M; de Wilt, Johannes H W

    2005-11-01

    The primary treatment for anal cancer is chemoradiation (CRT). Failures after CRT are potentially curable with an abdominoperineal resection (APR). A major problem of surgery in the anal area is poor healing of the perineal wound. Between 1985 and 2000, 129 patients treated for anal cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 24 patients with local failure, 18 patients were treated with an APR. The aim of this study was to review the results and long-term outcome after salvage APR, with special emphasis on perineal wound healing. Mean age at diagnosis was 59 (range: 41-83) years. After a median of 16 months, only 2 patients developed a local recurrence. The 5-year overall survival was 30%. In 11 patients the perineal wound was closed primarily, in 3 patients the perineal wound was left open, and in 4 patients a vertical rectus abdominus musculocutaneous (VRAM) flap was used. Perineal wound breakdown occurred in 5 of the 14 patients (36%) not treated with primary muscle reconstruction. In all patients treated with a VRAM flap the perineal wound healed primarily. In the present study salvage APR in recurrent or persistent anal cancer results in good local control and 5-year overall survival of 30%. When performing an APR a VRAM flap reconstruction should be considered to prevent disabling perineal wound complications.

  7. A liquid-film forming acrylate cream for the treatment of anal pruritus.

    PubMed

    Tomi, Nordwig; Weiser, Rudolf; Strohal, Robert; Mittlboeck, Martina

    Pruritus ani is a hidden but frequently occurring clinical condition, with a large impact on patients' quality of life. Currently, therapeutic options are scarce, offering mainly limited success. The authors performed a prospective, open-label, two-centre pilot study to analyse the efficacy and safety of a liquid-film forming acrylate cream for the treatment of pruritus ani and peri-anal skin irritation. A total of 28 patients were included and applied the cream to the cleansed anal and peri-anal skin once daily for a study period of 3-4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the reduction of pruritis ani, comparing day 0 to day 28 results. For this purpose, a visual analog scale (VAS) was used. Secondary parameters included the physician global assessment score (PGA) of peri-anal skin condition, assessment of patients' quality of life using a specifically designed quality of life scoring tool, and patient satisfaction with the treatment regimen. The application of the acrylate skin protection cream resulted in a fast and substantial improvement of all study parameters, with a high score for patient satisfaction. The cream was well tolerated without any adverse events noted during the study period. The authors' pilot study has generated initial evidence that the acrylate skin protection cream may be effective for the treatment of pruritus ani. However, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the authors' findings.

  8. Treatment of anal human papillomavirus-associated disease: a long term outcome study.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M; Hickey, N; Mayuranathan, L; Vowler, S L; Singh, N

    2008-07-01

    Treatment for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal canal disease has been unsatisfactory. The objective of our study was to determine the treatment outcome in our cohort with anal HPV disease. Overall, 181 patients were evaluated over a median period of 19.1 months (range = 2.8-125.5). Eighty-eight patients (48.6%) with high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and 82 patients (45.3%) with low-grade AIN underwent treatment. One hundred and forty-one patients (77.9%) received laser ablative treatment as an outpatient procedure. The treatment yielded cure, defined as a disease-free state at 12 months after treatment, in 63.0% (114/181). Median time to cure for the cohort was 31.5 months (95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.0). Treatment outcome showed no evidence of being affected by age, sexual preference, history of smoking or presence of high-grade disease. Median time to cure was significantly affected by a positive HIV status (P = 0.02) and the extent (volume) of the disease (P = 0.01). Contrary to the current view that treatment of HPV-related anal disease is difficult, unrewarding due to recurrences and may lead to substantial morbidity, we demonstrate that effective treatment is possible for both low- and high-grade AIN. These findings should help with the general desire to introduce screening for AIN for at-risk groups.

  9. Anal extrusion of migrated ventriculo-peritoneal shunt catheter: An unusual complication and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Avijit; Borkar, Sachin A.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Authors present an unusual case of anal extrusion of peritoneal end of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt in a 2-year-old male child. Pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this rare complication of a very commonly performed neurosurgical procedure. PMID:27695576

  10. Relationship between heterosexual anal sex, injection drug use and HIV infection among black men and women.

    PubMed

    Risser, J M H; Padgett, P; Wolverton, M; Risser, W L

    2009-05-01

    US blacks carry a disproportionate risk of heterosexually transmitted HIV. This study aimed to evaluate the association between self-reported heterosexual anal intercourse and HIV. Using respondent-driven sampling (RDS), we recruited and interviewed 909 blacks from areas of high poverty and HIV prevalence in Houston, Texas, and who reported heterosexual sex in the last year. All individuals were tested for HIV. Weighted prevalence values were calculated to account for non-random recruitment associated with RDS. The weighted population prevalence of HIV infection was 2.4% and 2.5% among men and women, respectively. Education, employment status, income and crack cocaine use were not associated with HIV infection. Lifetime injection drug use (odds ratio [OR] 3.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-8.33%) and heterosexual anal intercourse (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.02-5.73%) were associated with HIV infection. Individuals who reported both injection drug use and heterosexual anal intercourse had 6.21 increased odds of HIV (95% CI 2.47-15.61%). Our results suggest that heterosexual anal sex may be a vector for HIV transmission, especially in the context of injection drug use. Prevention strategies directed at curbing the HIV epidemic among black heterosexuals require that we correctly identify the risks so that appropriate interventions can be developed.

  11. Aedes aegypti Rhesus glycoproteins contribute to ammonia excretion by larval anal papillae.

    PubMed

    Durant, Andrea C; Chasiotis, Helen; Misyura, Lidiya; Donini, Andrew

    2017-02-15

    In larval Aedes aegypti, transcripts of the Rhesus-like glycoproteins AeRh50-1 and AeRh50-2 have been detected in the anal papillae, sites of ammonia (NH3/NH4(+)) excretion; however, these putative ammonia transporters have not been previously localized or functionally characterized. In this study, we show that the AeRh50s co-immunolocalize with apical V-type H(+)-ATPase as well as with basal Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the epithelium of anal papillae. The double-stranded RNA-mediated knockdown of AeRh50-1 and AeRh50-2 resulted in a significant reduction in AeRh50 protein abundance in the anal papillae, and this was coupled to decreased ammonia excretion. The knockdown of AeRh50-1 resulted in decreased hemolymph [NH4(+)] and pH whereas knockdown of AeRh50-2 had no effect on these parameters. We conclude that the AeRh50s are important contributors to ammonia excretion at the anal papillae of larval A. aegypti, which may be the basis for their ability to inhabit areas with high ammonia levels.

  12. HPV in genital cancers (at the exception of cervical cancer) and anal cancers.

    PubMed

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bruni, Laia; Alemany, Laia

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been firmly established as a central and necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer and it has been etiologically linked to other anogenital (vulva, vagina, anus and penis) and head and neck cancers, particularly oropharyngeal. Although being rare, the incidence of some of these cancers in some countries has increased in the last decades. HPV-related anogenital tumors share many risk factors with cervical cancer. The HPV aetiological contribution differs in each anatomical location reflecting differences in the natural history and viral tissue tropism. The highest prevalence of HPV DNA in cancers other than cervix has been described for anal, followed by vagina, penile and vulvar cancers. HPV16 has been described as the most common type detected in all cancer sites with different contributions being the highest in anal carcinoma (around 80% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers) and the lowest in vaginal cancers with a contribution similar to that found in cervical cancers (around 60%). Current HPV vaccines have already demonstrated their efficacy in preventing anogenital pre-neoplastic lesions caused by vaccine HPV types. HPV-based prevention tools like HPV vaccination and to a lesser extend screening (e.g. for anal cancer) can be useful measures for reducing the burden of these anogenital cancers.

  13. Characterization and virulence of Beauveria bassiana associated with auger beetle (Sinoxylon anale) infesting allspice (Pimenta dioica).

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, C M; Jacob, T K; Devasahayam, S; D'Silva, Sharon; Nandeesh, P G

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of auger beetle, Sinoxylon anale Lesne (Bostrichidae: Coleoptera), a destructive pest of cosmopolitan occurrence is reported for the first time on allspice trees, Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. in Kerala, India. The insects bored through the basal region of fresh twigs resulting in dieback symptoms. Morphological characterization and sequencing of a partially amplified fragment of the mitochondrial CO1 gene (696bp) revealed the insect to be Sinoxylon anale. An entomopathogenic fungus was isolated from infected cadavers of S. anale that was identified as Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill., sensu stricto (s.s.) (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) based on morphological and molecular studies. The partial sequences of the ITS, TUB, TEF and Bloc gene regions were sequenced. The fungus grew well in ambient room temperature conditions (28-32±2°C; 60-70% relative humidity) and the infection process on the insect was documented by scanning electron microscopy. Bioassay studies with the isolate indicated that the fungus was virulent against adult beetles as evidenced by the LC50 (3.6×10(6)conidia/ml) and ST50 values (6.8days at a dose of 1×10(7)conidia/ml and 5.8days at a dose of 1×10(8)conidia/ml, respectively). This is the first record of B. bassiana naturally infecting S. anale and the fungus holds promise to be developed as a mycoinsecticide.

  14. Patterns of Vaginal, Oral, and Anal Sexual Intercourse in an Urban Seventh-Grade Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Christine M.; Peskin, Melissa Fleschler; Addy, Robert C.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Tortolero, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examines the prevalence of vaginal, oral, and anal intercourse among a population of urban, public middle school students, the characteristics of early sexual initiators, and the sequence of sexual initiation. Such data are limited for early adolescents. Methods: A total of 1279 seventh-grade students (57.3% female, 43.6%…

  15. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Ricardi, Umberto; Milanesi, Enrica; Cassoni, Paola; Baccega, Massimo; Filippini, Claudia; Racca, Patrizia; Lesca, Adriana; Munoz, Fernando H.; Fora, Gianluca; Skanjeti, Andrea; Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  16. Squamous-cell Carcinoma of the Anus and Anal Canal: An Analysis of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, W. B.

    1941-01-01

    The analysis is of 55 cases admitted into St. Mark's Hospital from 1922 to 1940. The incidence was 3.35% of all cases of cancer of the rectum, anal canal and anus admitted during this period. Sex distribution—27 males and 28 females. The average age (61.7 years) is higher than that of columnar-cell carcinoma of the rectum (57.4 years). Histology.—The cases have been graded into three grades of malignancy—low grade, medium grade, and high grade. Low grade squamous carcinoma is twice as frequent in men as in women, and generally originates at the anal margin. Medium grade squamous carcinoma is equally distributed between men and women; it may arise at the anus or in the anal canal. High grade squamous carcinoma is much more common in the female sex and is almost entirely limited to the anal canal. Quadrant affected—about one-third of the anal margin growths and one-half of the anal canal growths were situated anteriorly. Differential diagnosis from simple papilloma, simple ulcer, chronic inflammation, tuberculous ulcer, tuberculide, primary chancre, amœbic ulcer, basal-cell carcinoma, columnar-cell carcinoma. Biopsy and grading essential before treatment is decided upon. The results of treatment in the three grades of malignancy are described. The best results were obtained in the early low-grade cases treated by interstitial radium needling. In the medium and high grades only three five-year survivals can be reported and these followed excision of the rectum. The management of the inguinal glands is discussed and the importance of a very close post-operative supervision emphasized. Squamous carcinoma of the anal canal may cause lymphatic metastases in the superior hæmorrhoidal glands; there have been four such cases in this series. Diathermy perineal excision is indicated in these cases. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:19992316

  17. Gender Nonconformity and Birth Order in Relation to Anal Sex Role Among Gay Men.

    PubMed

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A; Monks, D Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2017-04-04

    Androphilia is associated with an elevated number of older brothers among natal males. This association, termed the fraternal birth order effect, has been observed among gay men who exhibit marked gender nonconformity. Gender nonconformity has been linked to gay men's preferred anal sex role. The present study investigated whether these two lines of research intersect by addressing whether the fraternal birth order effect was associated with both gender nonconformity and a receptive anal sex role (243 gay men, 91 heterosexual men). Consistent with previous research, we identified the fraternal birth order effect in our sample of gay men. Also, gay men were significantly more gender-nonconforming on adulthood and recalled childhood measures compared to heterosexual men. When gay men were compared based on anal sex role (i.e., top, versatile, bottom), all groups showed significantly greater recalled childhood and adult male gender nonconformity than heterosexual men, but bottoms were most nonconforming. Only gay men with a bottom anal sex role showed evidence of a fraternal birth order effect. A sororal birth order effect was found in our sample of gay men, driven by versatiles. No significant associations were found between fraternal birth order and gender nonconformity measures. These results suggest that the fraternal birth order effect may apply to a subset of gay men who have a bottom anal sex role preference and that this subgroup is more gender-nonconforming. However, there were no significant associations between fraternal birth order and gender nonconformity at the individual level. As such, based on the present study, whether processes underpinning the fraternal birth order effect influence gender nonconformity is equivocal.

  18. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Neumann, Lukas; Ohtani, Maki; Strøm, Helene Kragelund; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM). Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health) or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were included, one group receiving the experimental oral vaccine in a 50 times higher dose, and the other group receiving a single dose administered anally in order to bypass the stomach. Each group was bath challenged with 6.3 × 10(8) CFU/ml Y. ruckeri, six months post the primary vaccination. The challenge induced significant mortality in all the infected groups except for the groups vaccinated anally with a single dose or orally with the high dose of bacterin. Both of these groups had 100% survival. These results show that a low dose of Y. ruckeri bacterin induces full protection when the bacterin is administered anally. Oral vaccination also induces full protection, however, at a dose 50 times higher than if the fish were to be vaccinated anally. This indicates that much of the orally fed antigen is digested in the stomach before it reaches the second segment of the intestine where it can be taken up as immunogenic antigens and presented to lymphocytes.

  19. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  20. Anal cytology and p16 immunostaining for screening anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rahul; Pandhi, Deepika; Mishra, Kiran; Bhattacharya, Sambit N; Yhome, Vizodilhou A

    2014-09-01

    Summary Akin to cervical cancer in sexually-active women, men who have sex with men (MSM) are predisposed to anal cancers, especially those with HIV co-infection. This cross-sectional study endeavored to assess the prevalence of anal dysplasia using Pap smears and p16 immunostaining amongst Indian MSM. A total of 31 consecutive HIV-positive and 34 HIV-negative MSM, from a cohort of sexually transmitted infection clinic attendees, underwent anal cytological evaluation with Pap smear and p16 staining. Chi square test and coefficient of correlation were used for comparison. Eighteen (27.7%) had abnormal anal cytology; increased in HIV-positive as compared to HIV-negative men (35% versus 20%, p = 0.180). Similarly, both low-grade (25.8% versus 17.6%) and high-grade lesions (8.3% versus 4.8%) were comparable in HIV-positive and HIV-negative group. Thirteen (20%) smears were p16-positive with a sensitivity and specificity for anal dysplasia of 72.3% and 100%, respectively. Anal cytology may be used to screen for anal dysplasia in MSM irrespective of HIV status. Furthermore, the addition of p16, with greater specificity for high-grade lesions, may improve diagnostic accuracy especially for high-grade lesions. A larger study to further corroborate these observations is warranted.

  1. Space station neutral external environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H.; Leger, L.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular contamination levels arising from the external induced neutral environment of the Space Station (Phase 1 configuration) were calculated using the MOLFLUX model. Predicted molecular column densities and deposition rates generally meet the Space Station contamination requirements. In the doubtful cases of deposition due to materials outgassing, proper material selection, generally excluding organic products exposed to the external environment, must be considered to meet contamination requirements. It is important that the Space Station configuration, once defined, is not significantly modified to avoid introducing new unacceptable contamination sources.

  2. External hydrocephalus in two cats.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Curtis W; Coates, Joan R; Ducoté, Julie M; Stefanacci, Joseph D; Walker, Michael A; Marino, Dominic J

    2003-01-01

    External hydrocephalus describes an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the cerebral hemispheres and the overlying arachnoid membrane, rather than within the lateral ventricles. Two young cats with encephalopathic signs were diagnosed with external hydrocephalus, one via magnetic resonance imaging and one via computed tomography. Both cats had abnormally large, broad heads, with no evidence of open fontanelles. A surgical shunt was placed in each cat to divert the accumulated CSF within the cranial cavity to the peritoneal space. Both cats improved dramatically soon after surgical shunting was performed, and they continue to do well clinically, approximately 42 months and 8 months postoperatively, respectively.

  3. Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression associates with progression of anal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wan-Hsiang; Miyai, Katsumi; Sporn, Judith C; Luo, Linda; Wang, Jean Y J; Cosman, Bard; Ramamoorthy, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The macroH2A histone variants are epigenetic marks for inactivated chromatin. In this study, we examined the expression of macroH2A2 in anal neoplasm from anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) to anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods AIN and anal SCC samples were analysed for macroH2A2 expression, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). The association of macroH2A2 expression with clinical grade, disease recurrence, overall survival and viral involvement was determined. Results macroH2A2 was expressed in normal squamous tissue and lower grade AIN (I and II). Expression was lost in 38% of high-grade AIN (III) and 71% of anal SCC (p=0.002). Patients with AIN with macroH2A2-negative lesions showed earlier recurrence than those with macroH2A2-positive neoplasm (p=0.017). With anal SCC, macroH2A2 loss was more prevalent in the HPV-negative tumours. Conclusions Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression is associated with the progression of anal neoplasm and can be used as a prognostic biomarker for high-grade AIN and SCC. PMID:26658220

  4. [Treatment by external insulin pump].

    PubMed

    Clavel, Sylvaine

    2010-12-01

    Since the recent recommendations by the French speaking association for research on diabetes and metabolic illnesses (Alfediam), treatment by insulin pump has found itself in competition with basal-bolus, a procedure using similar injections of insulin which has become a benchmark treatment. The latest Alfediam guidelines focus on defining ways of treating diabetics with an external insulin pump.

  5. Lupus vulgaris of external nose.

    PubMed

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Ranganna, B Usha

    2008-12-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of cutaneous tuberculosis which commonly involve trunk and buttocks. Lupus vulgaris affecting nose and face, are rarely reported in India. This study reports an unusual case of lupus vulgaris involving the external nose that showed dramatic outcome after six months of anti- tubercular treatment.

  6. External Communication. SPEC Kit 56.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    One section of a spring 1979 Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) survey on communication in Association of Research Libraries (ARL) institutions examined how members exchange information with external groups including the university administration, faculty, users, support groups, other libraries, and the profession in general. According…

  7. 10 Core External Environmental Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    This is an institutional report summarizing 10 core external environmental trends and their implications for El Camino College and the surrounding community. The report offers a brief description for the following trends: (1) there is more emphasis on colleges becoming learning institutions rather than teaching institutions; (2) the current and…

  8. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  9. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  10. 14 CFR 27.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false External loads. 27.865 Section 27.865... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction External Loads § 27.865 External loads. (a) It must be shown by analysis, test, or both, that the rotorcraft external load attaching means...

  11. 14 CFR 29.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false External loads. 29.865 Section 29.865... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction External Loads § 29.865 External loads. (a) It must be shown by analysis, test, or both, that the rotorcraft external load attaching means...

  12. 14 CFR 29.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false External loads. 29.865 Section 29.865... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction External Loads § 29.865 External loads. (a) It must be shown by analysis, test, or both, that the rotorcraft external load attaching means...

  13. 14 CFR 29.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false External loads. 29.865 Section 29.865... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction External Loads § 29.865 External loads. (a) It must be shown by analysis, test, or both, that the rotorcraft external load attaching means...

  14. 14 CFR 27.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false External loads. 27.865 Section 27.865... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction External Loads § 27.865 External loads. (a) It must be shown by analysis, test, or both, that the rotorcraft external load attaching means...

  15. 14 CFR 27.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false External loads. 27.865 Section 27.865... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction External Loads § 27.865 External loads. (a) It must be shown by analysis, test, or both, that the rotorcraft external load attaching means...

  16. SU-E-J-181: Effect of Prostate Motion On Combined Brachytherapy and External Beam Dose Based On Daily Motion of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, V; McLaughlin, P; Ealbaj, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, the adequacy of target expansions on the combined external beam and implant dose was examined based on the measured daily motion of the prostate. Methods: Thirty patients received an I–125 prostate implant prescribed to dose of 90Gy. This was followed by external beam to deliver a dose of 90Gyeq (external beam equivalent) to the prostate over 25 to 30 fractions. An ideal IMRT plan was developed by optimizing the external beam dose based on the delivered implant dose. The implant dose was converted to an equivalent external beam dose using the linear quadratic model. Patients were set up on the treatment table by daily orthogonal imaging and aligning the marker seeds in the prostate. Orthogonal images were obtained at the end of treatment to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Based on the observed motion of the markers between the initial and final images, 5 individual plans showing the actual dose delivered to the patient were calculated. A final true dose distribution was established based on summing the implant dose and the 5 external beam plans. Dose to the prostate, seminal vesicles, lymphnodes and normal tissues, rectal wall, urethra and lower sphincter were calculated and compared to ideal. On 18 patients who were sexually active, dose to the corpus cavernosum and internal pudendal artery was also calculated. Results: The average prostate motion in 3 orthogonal directions was less than 1 mm with a standard deviation of less than +2 mm. Dose and volume parameters showed that there was no decrease in dose to the targets and a marginal decrease in dose to in normal tissues. Conclusion: Dose delivered by seed implant moves with the prostate, decreasing the impact of intrafractions dose movement on actual dose delivered. Combined brachytherapy and external beam dose delivered to the prostate was not sensitive to prostate motion.

  17. Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Lasers (EC-QCL): an application field for MOEMS based scanning gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grahmann, Jan; Merten, André; Ostendorf, Ralf; Fontenot, Michael; Bleh, Daniela; Schenk, Harald; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-01

    In situ process information in the chemical, pharmaceutical or food industry as well as emission monitoring, sensitive trace detection and biological sensing applications would increasingly rely on MIR-spectroscopic anal­ysis in the 3 μm - 12 μm wavelength range. However, cost effective, portable, low power consuming and fast spectrometers with a wide tuning range are not available so far. To provide these MIR-spectrometer properties, the combination of quantum cascade lasers with a MOEMS scanning grating as wavelength selective element in the external cavity is addressed to provide a very compact and fast tunable laser source for spectroscopic analysis.

  18. A new surgical technique versus an old marker: can expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty reduce C-reactive protein levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed

    Binar, Murat; Akcam, Timur; Karakoc, Omer; Sagkan, Rahsan Ilikci; Musabak, Ugur; Gerek, Mustafa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty (ESP) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Fifty-one patients with newly diagnosed OSA were prospectively enrolled in this study. We performed ESP in twenty-three patients in the surgery group and twenty-eight patients were included in the CPAP group. Serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays before and 3 months after treatment. The relations between CRP and the apnea hypopnea index (AHI), visual analog scale (VAS), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and saturation parameters were evaluated. Both surgical and CPAP treatments caused significant improvements in the clinical and laboratory parameters. However, only the patients whose postoperative AHI levels improved to final AHI of <5 (n = 6) after ESP, had significant decrease in their serum CRP levels (p = 0.028). CPAP group and the rest of the patients in the surgery group did not show statistically significant difference in CRP levels after treatment. We suggest that the successful surgical treatment for OSA-ESP in this study-, which provides OSA cure, can decrease serum levels of CRP and reduce possible cardiovascular morbidity.

  19. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT) in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). Methods This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure or transobturator tape (TOT) procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) < 60 cmH2O in a urodynamic study. Cases of neurogenic bladder, previous SUI surgery, and concomitant cystocele repair were excluded. The primary outcome was treatment success at 12 months, defined by self-reported absence of symptoms, no leakage episodes recorded, and no retreatment. Results Among the 157 women who were included in the final analysis, 105 patients received TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°), were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009). On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223–12.582, p = 0.022) was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment. Conclusion TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD. PMID:27228092

  20. In vitro effect of nicorandil on the carbachol-induced contraction of the lower esophageal sphincter of the rat.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Tomonori; Adachi, Takeshi; Fujisawa, Susumu; Hongoh, Mai; Ohba, Takayoshi; Ono, Kyoichi

    2016-08-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized region of the esophageal smooth muscle that allows the passage of a swallowed bolus into the stomach. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a major role in LES relaxation. Nicorandil possesses dual properties of a NO donor and an ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) agonist, and is expected to reduce LES tone. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicorandil on the LES. Rat LES tissues were placed in an organ bath, and activities were recorded using an isometric force transducer. Carbachol-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by KATP channel agonists in a concentration-dependent manner; pinacidil > nicorandil ≈ diazoxide. Nicorandil-induced relaxation of the LES was prevented by pretreatment with glibenclamide, whereas N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and iberiotoxin were ineffective at preventing nicorandil-induced LES relaxation. Furthermore, nicorandil did not affect high K(+)-induced LES contraction. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed expression of KCNJ8 (Kir6.1), KCNJ11 (Kir6.2), ABCC8 (SUR1) and ABCC9 (SUR2) subunits of the KATP channel in the rat lower esophagus. These findings indicate that nicorandil causes LES relaxation chiefly by activating the KATP channel, and that it may provide an additional pharmacological tool for the treatment of spastic esophageal motility disorders.

  1. 'Mind the Gap'-The Impact of Variations in the Duration of the Treatment Gap and Overall Treatment Time in the First UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT I)

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Adams, Richard; McDonald, Alec; Gollins, Simon; James, Roger; Northover, John M.A.; Meadows, Helen M.; Jitlal, Mark

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The United Kingdom Coordinating Committee on Cancer Research anal cancer trial demonstrated the benefit of combined modality treatment (CMT) using radiotherapy (RT), infusional 5-fluorouracil, and mitomycin C over RT alone. The present study retrospectively examines the impact of the recommended 6-week treatment gap and local RT boost on long-term outcome. Methods and Materials: A total of 577 patients were randomly assigned RT alone or CMT. After a 6-week gap responders received a boost using either additional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (15 Gy) or iridium-192 implant (25 Gy). The effect of boost, the gap between initial treatment (RT alone or CMT) and boost (Tgap), and overall treatment time (OTT) were examined for their impact on outcome. Results: Among the 490 good responders, 436 (89%) patients received a boost after initial treatment. For boosted patients, the risk of anal cancer death decreased by 38% (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62, 99% CI 0.35-1.12; p = 0.04), but there was no evidence this was mediated via a reduction in locoregional failure (LRF) (HR: 0.90, 99% CI 0.48-1.68; p = 0.66). The difference in Tgap was only 1.4 days longer for EBRT boost, compared with implant (p = 0.51). OTT was longer by 6.1 days for EBRT (p = 0.006). Tgap and OTT were not associated with LRF. Radionecrosis was reported in 8% of boosted, compared with 0% in unboosted patients (p = 0.03). Conclusions: These results question the benefit of a radiotherapy boost after a 6-week gap. The higher doses of a boost may contribute more to an increased risk of late morbidity, rather than local control.

  2. Management of persistent anal canal carcinoma after combined-modality therapy: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anal canal carcinoma is a rare gastro-intestinal cancer. Radiochemotherapy is the recommended primary treatment for patients with non-metastatic carcinoma; surgery is generally reserved for persistent or recurrent disease. Follow-up and surveillance after primary treatment is paramount to classify patients in those with complete remission, persistent or progressive disease. Locally persistent disease represents a clinically significant problem and its management remains subject of some controversy. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise recommendations for the primary treatment of anal canal carcinoma, to focus on the optimal time to consider residual disease as genuine persistence to proceed with salvage treatment, and to discern how this analysis might inform future clinical trials in management in this class of patients. PMID:24472223

  3. Casual sexual encounters among gay men: familiarity, trust and unprotected anal intercourse.

    PubMed

    Zablotska, Iryna B; Grulich, Andrew E; De Wit, John; Prestage, Garrett

    2011-04-01

    Familiarity with and a history of prior sex with casual partners is associated with unprotected anal intercourse and may increase the risk of HIV transmission among gay men. Using data from the Sydney Gay Community Periodic Survey 2007, we explored the relationship between familiarity and unprotected anal intercourse with the last casual partner (UAI-LC). 51% of the men knew their last casual partner and 49% had previously had sex with him. Men were more inclined to engage in UAI-LC if they had previously had sex with this partner. HIV-negative men were more likely to have UAI-LC with a more familiar partner independent of his serostatus. Familiarity with and a previous history of sex between casual partners may result in a false sense of trust and may increase the risk of HIV transmission. HIV prevention services should address this issue and develop programs to improve men's skills in negotiating safer sex.

  4. A case of severe anal injury in an adolescent male due to bestial sexual experimentation.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Roger O

    2009-10-01

    This report delineates a case of anal injury in a 12-year-old boy who gave a detailed history of bestial behavior with a male bulldog. The child described how he had seen this behavior modeled on the internet and subsequently initiated contact with his own dog, causing the dog to penetrate him anally. This type of juvenile bestial behavior with injury has only been reported once previously in the medical literature. Zoophilia, along with a number of other paraphilias, frequently has its onset in the adolescent age group. Adolescents evidencing paraphilic behaviors require thorough psychological evaluation. Spontaneous sexual assault of a human by a canine has never been described in the human or veterinary medical literature, nor is such a thing likely. A clinician involved in evaluating serious ano-genital injury in a child reportedly due to spontaneous canine sexual assault must consider other possible traumatic etiologies including sexual abuse. Investigation in any such case is essential.

  5. Prevalence of genital, oral, and anal HPV infection among STI patients in Italy.

    PubMed

    Ciccarese, Giulia; Herzum, Astrid; Rebora, Alfredo; Drago, Francesco

    2016-12-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a carcinogenic agent responsible for tumor development in many sexually involved tissues. We present a survey on the prevalence of HPV infection in a risk population for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The studied population was formed by 125 STI clinic attendees, who took part in a screening program on STIs. To be included in the study, the patients had to show no overt clinical signs of HPV infection. Genital (cervical in women, urethral in men), anal, and oral samples were collected with ThinPrep liquid based cytology preparation system. Overall, of the screened population, 56% proved positive for genital HPV, 37% for oral HPV, and 42% for anal HPV infection. Our data indicate that in STI patients, HPV infection is more prevalent, than previously estimated. Further studies are needed to better understand the epidemiological burden of HPV in sexually involved tissues, especially in the oral mucosa.

  6. Heterosexual anal intercourse: increasing prevalence, and association with sexual dysfunction, bisexual behavior, and venereal disease history.

    PubMed

    Brody, Stuart; Weiss, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Representative samples of the Czech population were surveyed with regard to sexual behavior in 1993, 1998, 2003, and 2008 (N = 7,720). Lifetime prevalence of Heterosexual Anal Intercourse increased from 1993 to 2008 (16.6% to 19.7% among women, 15.7% to 25.3% among men). Anal intercourse was associated with lifetime number of sex partners, current masturbation, and histories (prevalence of which increased from 1993 to 2008) of homosexual sex, prostitution, venereal disease (adjusted for number of sex partners), and women's sexual dysfunction. The authors discuss the possible reasons for the increasing prevalence and the associations. Multivariate predictors of ever having a sexual dysfunction or a venereal disease are also presented.

  7. Tracking vaginal, anal and oral infection in a mouse papillomavirus infection model

    PubMed Central

    Budgeon, Lynn R.; Cladel, Nancy M.; Balogh, Karla; Myers, Roland; Cooper, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and practical techniques to longitudinally track viral infection are sought after in clinical practice. We report a proof-of-principle study to monitor the viral DNA copy number using a newly established mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1) mucosal infection model. We hypothesized that viral presence could be identified and quantified by collecting lavage samples from cervicovaginal, anal and oral sites. Nude mice infected at these sites with infectious MmuPV1 were tracked for up to 23 weeks starting at 6 weeks post-infection. Viral DNA copy number was determined by SYBR Green Q-PCR analysis. In addition, we tracked viral DNA load through three complete oestrous cycles to pinpoint whether there was a correlation between the DNA load and the four stages of the oestrous cycle. Our results showed that high viral DNA copy number was reproducibly detected from both anal and cervicovaginal lavage samples. The infection and disease progression were further confirmed by histology, cytology, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, the viral copy number fluctuated over the oestrous cycle, with the highest level at the oestrus stage, implying that multiple sampling might be necessary to provide a reliable diagnosis. Virus DNA was detected in oral lavage samples at a later time after infection. Lower viral DNA load was found in oral samples when compared with those in anal and vaginal tracts. To our knowledge, our study is the first in vivo study to sequentially monitor papillomavirus infection from mucosal anal, oral and vaginal tracts in a preclinical model. PMID:26399579

  8. [Surgical therapy of chronic anal fissure--do additional proctologic operations impair continence?].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, J; Berger, A; Uranüs, S

    1994-07-01

    78 patients with chronic anal fissures have been mainly operated on by lateral internal sphincterotomy (LATS). Continence have been evaluated by questionnaire at least 9 months postoperatively. Patient without any additional proctological operation had minor disturbances of continence in 17%. Patient with additional operations had disturbances of continence in 30%. Especially the subgroup of patients with LATS and haemorrhoidectomy had bad results. In this group only 45% were fully continent.

  9. [Recurrent anal abscess and cecal perforation as a first presentation of Behçet's disease].

    PubMed

    Haller, Claude; Guenot, Cécile; Odman, Micaela; Bruttin, Jean-Marie; Rosso, Raphaël

    2003-10-01

    Intestinal involvement during Behçet's disease (entero-Behçet) is rare in Europe (<1%). We report the case of a 33-year-old Chad woman with Behçet's disease revealed by recurrent anal abscess and cecal perforation. We discuss the diagnosis of this atypical presentation and the different therapeutic strategies in severe attacks of Behçet's disease.

  10. Successful closure of gastrocutaneous fistulas using the Surgisis® anal fistula plug

    PubMed Central

    Kasem, H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gastrocutaneous fistulas remain an uncommon complication of upper gastrointestinal surgery. Less common but equally problematic are gastrocutaneous fistulas secondary to non-healing gastrostomies. Both are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Surgical repair remains the gold standard of care. For those unfit for surgical intervention, results from conservative management can be disappointing. We describe a case series of seven patients with gastrocutaneous fistulas who were unfit for surgical intervention. These patients were managed successfully in a minimally invasive manner using the Surgisis® (Cook Surgical, Bloomington, IN, US) anal fistula plug. Methods Between September 2008 and January 2009, seven patients with gastrocutaneous fistulas presented to Wishaw General Hospital. Four gastrocutaneous fistulas represented non-healing gastrostomies, two followed an anastomotic leak after an oesophagectomy and one following an anastomotic leak after a distal gastrectomy. All patients had poor nutritional reserve with no other identifiable reason for failure to heal. All were deemed unfit for surgical intervention. Five gastrocutaneous fistulas were closed successfully using the Surgisis® anal fistula plug positioned directly into the fistula tract under local anaesthesia and two gastrocutaneous fistulas were closed successfully using the Surgisis® anal fistula positioned endoscopically using a rendezvous technique. Results For the five patients with gastrocutaneous fistulas closed directly under local anaesthesia, oral alimentation was reinstated immediately. Fistula output ceased on day 12 with complete epithelialisation occurring at a median of day 26. For the two gastrocutaneous fistulas closed endoscopically using the rendezvous technique, oral alimentation was reinstated on day 5 with immediate cessation of fistula output. Follow-up upper gastrointestinal endoscopy confirmed re-epithelialisation at eight weeks. In none of the

  11. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Invasive Anal Cancers in the United States prior to Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Steinau, M; Unger, ER; Hernandez, BY; Goodman, MT; Copeland, G; Hopenhayn, C; Cozen, W; Saber, MS; Huang, Y; Peters, ES; Lynch, CF; Wilkinson, EJ; Rajeevan, MS; Lyu, C; Saraiya, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conduct a representative survey of Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and its genotype distribution in invasive anal cancer specimens in the U.S. Methods Population-based archival anal cancer specimens were identified from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana and Michigan cancer registries and SEER tissue repositories in Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles. Sections from one representative block per case were used for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed first by Linear Array and re-tested with INNO-LiPA if inadequate or HPV negative. Results Among 146 unique invasive anal cancer cases, 93 (63.7%) were from women and 53 (36.3%) from men. HPV (any type) was detected in 133 (91.1%) cases and 129 (88.4%) contained at least one high risk type, most (80.1%) as a single genotype. HPV16 had the highest prevalence (113 cases, 77.4%); HPV6, 11, 18 and 33 were also found multiple times. Among HPV16 positive cases, 37% were identified as prototype variant Ep and 63% were non-prototypes: 33% Em, 12% E-G131G, 5% Af1, 4% AA/NA-1, 3% E-C109G, 3% E-G131T, 2% As and 1% Af2. No significant differences in the distributions of HPV (any), high-risk types, or HPV16/18 were seen between gender, race or age group. Conclusions The establishment of pre-vaccine HPV prevalence in the U.S. is critical to the surveillance of vaccine efficacy. Almost 80% of anal cancers were positive for the vaccine types HPV16 or HPV18 and in 70% these were the only types detected suggesting that a high proportion might be preventable by current vaccines. PMID:23609590

  12. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  13. Multisystemic Therapy for Externalizing Youth

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Kristyn; Randall, Jeff; Swenson, Cynthia Cupit

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Externalizing problems are multi-determined and related to individual, family, peer, school, and community risk factors. Multisystemic therapy (MST) was originally developed to address these risk factors among youth with serious conduct problems who were at-risk for out-of-home placement. Several decades of research has established MST as an evidence-based intervention for adolescents with serious clinical problems, including serious offending, delinquency, substance abuse, and parental physical abuse and neglect. Further, research points to the importance of maintaining high treatment fidelity through systematic quality assurance procedures to replicate positive clinical outcomes. This paper presents an overview of the clinical procedures and evidence base of MST for externalizing problems as well as two adaptations: MST for Substance Abuse and MST for Child Abuse and Neglect. PMID:26092742

  14. [Adenocarcinoma of anal canal. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pollastri, E; Brosutti, O; Montenovo, A; Bergero, A; Moroni, J

    1994-01-01

    Carcinomas of the anal channel includes only 2 to 6 per cent of all colorectal tumors. They are squamous cell carcinomas, cloacogenic carcinoma and unusually, adenocarcinomas. A 41 year old man in which an adenocarcinoma of the anal channel developed within a chronic perianal fistula, is presented. A review of the literature about adenocarcinoma or the anus is made, and then the incidence, probable etiologies, biologic behavior, clinical features, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment are enunciated. This rare tumor is associated with chronic inflammatory disease of the anal channel because of its etiology (fistula-in-ano, condyloma acuminata), because of cellular changes that are perpetuated by local immunologic blockade. We conclude that any chronic inflammatory disease must be treated early and adequately to avoid metaplastic and frank neoplastic changes. A deep and early biopsy of any benign lesion must be made if it does not respond to treatment, and a histopathologic exam of any tissue resected in orificial surgery must be performed. We suggest to use the classification of histological typing used by the W.H.O. and the staging of cancer by the U.I.C.C. and A.J.C.C. (1987).

  15. Results of surgical treatment on benign anal diseases in Korean HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Heung-Kwon; Moon, Sang-Hui; Ryoo, Seungbum; Choe, Eun Kyung; Park, Kyu Joo

    2014-09-01

    Perianal diseases are the most common reasons for surgery in HIV-positive patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of these surgical procedures in Korean patients, focusing on wound healing and postoperative complications. Retrospective analysis was performed on 72 HIV-positive patients who underwent surgery by a single surgeon for benign anal disease between 1998 and 2011. Of these, 68.1% (49/72) of patients received surgery for condyloma acuminata, 19.4% (14/72) for anal fistulas, 6.9% (5/72) for hemorrhoids, and 5.6% (4/72) for perianal abscesses. Patients with condyloma acuminata received surgical excision with electrical coagulation, and all wounds healed completely within 3 months, though 16.3% (8/49) of these patients experienced recurrence. Twelve of the 49 patients (24.5%) who were treated for condyloma acuminata underwent simultaneous operations for concomitant anal fistulas (n = 6), hemorrhoids (n = 4), and perianal abscesses (n = 2). Overall, 3 postoperative complications developed following a total of 94 procedures, and there was no significant increase in complication rate for patients with a low CD4+ T-cell count ( < 200/µL) compared to those with a higher count. The results demonstrate favorable results following perianal surgery in HIV-positive Korean patients.

  16. Molecular biology of anal squamous cell carcinoma: implications for future research and clinical intervention.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Maria-Pia; Ngan, Samuel Y; Michael, Michael; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G; Ramsay, Robert G; Phillips, Wayne A

    2015-12-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma is a human papillomavirus-related disease, in which no substantial advances in treatment have been made in over 40 years, especially for those patients who develop disease relapse and for whom no surgical options exist. HPV can evade the immune system and its role in disease progression can be exploited in novel immunotherapy platforms. Although several studies have investigated the expression and inactivation (through loss of heterozygosity) of tumour suppressor genes in the pathways to cancer, no clinically valuable biomarkers have emerged. Regulators of apoptosis, including survivin, and agents targeting the PI3K/AKT pathway, offer opportunities for targeted therapy, although robust data are scarce. Additionally, antibody therapy targeting EGFR may prove effective, although its safety profile in combination with standard chemoradiotherapy has proven to be suboptimal. Finally, progress in the treatment of anal cancer has remained stagnant due to a lack of preclinical models, including cell lines and mouse models. In this Review, we discuss the molecular biology of anal squamous cell carcinoma, clinical trials in progress, and implications for novel therapeutic targets. Future work should focus on preclinical models to provide a resource for investigation of new molecular pathways and for testing novel targets.

  17. Case of anal fistula with Fournier's gangrene in an obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patient.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Kyoko; Yoshino, Gen; Sawada, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old man was admitted to Shin-suma General Hospital, Kobe, Japan, complaining of a 3-day history of scrotal swelling and high fever. He had type 2 diabetes mellitus. On examination, his body temperature had risen to 38.5 °C. Examination of the scrotum showed abnormal enlargement. Laboratory data were as follows: white cell count 35,400/μL and glycated hemoglobin 9.6%. Anal fistula was found in an endorectal ultrasound. Computed tomography scan showed a relatively high density of subcutaneous tissue and elevated air density. Thus, he was diagnosed with Fournier's gangrene. On the fourth hospital day, the patient underwent debridement of gangrenous tissue. Seton surgery was carried out for anal fistula on the 34th hospital day. He responded to the treatment very well. He was discharged on the 33rd postoperative day. Once Fournier's gangrene has been diagnosed, considering the association of anal fistula and perianal abscess is important.

  18. Distinct Ecological Niche of Anal, Oral, and Cervical Mucosal Microbiomes in Adolescent Women

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin C.; Zolnik, Christine P.; Usyk, Mykhaylo; Chen, Zigui; Kaiser, Katherine; Nucci-Sack, Anne; Peake, Ken; Diaz, Angela; Viswanathan, Shankar; Strickler, Howard D.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Burk, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Human body sites represent ecological niches for microorganisms, each providing variations in microbial exposure, nutrient availability, microbial competition, and host immunological responses. In this study, we investigated the oral, anal, and cervical microbiomes from the same 20 sexually active adolescent females, using culture-independent, next-generation sequencing. DNA from each sample was amplified for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and sequenced on an Illumina platform using paired-end reads. Across the three anatomical niches, we found significant differences in bacterial community composition and diversity. Overall anal samples were dominated with Prevotella and Bacteriodes, oral samples with Streptococcus and Prevotella, and cervical samples with Lactobacillus. The microbiomes of a few cervical samples clustered with anal samples in weighted principal coordinate analyses, due in part to a higher proportion of Prevotella in those samples. Additionally, cervical samples had the lowest alpha diversity. Our results demonstrate the occurrence of distinct microbial communities across body sites within the same individual. PMID:27698612

  19. Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Sofo, Luigi; Caprino, Paola; Sacchetti, Franco; Bossola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (RP-IPAA) is the gold standard surgical treatment for ulcerative colitis. However, despite the widespread use of RP-IPAA, many aspects of this treatment still remain controversial, such as the approach (open or laparoscopic), number of stages in the surgery, type of pouch, and construction type (hand-sewn or stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomosis). The present narrative review aims to discuss current evidence on the short-, mid-, and long-term results of each of these technical alternatives as well as their benefits and disadvantages. A review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid databases was performed to identify studies published through March 2016. Few large, randomized, controlled studies have been conducted, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn regarding controversial issues. The available data from retrospective studies suggest that laparoscopic surgery has no clear advantages compared with open surgery and that one-stage RP-IPAA may be indicated in selected cases. Regarding 2- and 3-stage RP-IPAA, patients who underwent these surgeries differed significantly with respect to clinical and laboratory variables, making any comparisons extremely difficult. The long-term results regarding the pouch type show that the W- and J-reservoirs do not differ significantly, although the J pouch is generally preferred by surgeons. Hand-sewn and stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomoses have their own advantages, and there is no clear benefit of one technique over the other. PMID:27648159

  20. Seroconversion Following Anal and Genital HPV Infection in Men: The HIM Study

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Anna R.; Viscidi, Raphael; Torres, B. Nelson; Ingles, Donna J.; Sudenga, Staci L.; Villa, Luisa L.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Abrahamsen, Martha; Quiterio, Manuel; Salmeron, Jorge; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Protection from naturally acquired human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies may influence HPV infection across the lifespan. This study describes seroconversion rates following genital, anal, and oral HPV 6/11/16/18 infections in men and examines differences by HPV type and anatomic site. Methods Men with HPV 6/11/16/18 infections who were seronegative for those genotypes at the time of DNA detection were selected from the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. Sera specimens collected ≤36 months after detection were analyzed for HPV 6/11/16/18 antibodies using a virus-like particle-based ELISA. Time to seroconversion was separately assessed for each anatomic site, stratified by HPV type. Results Seroconversion to ≥1 HPV type (6/11/16/18) in this sub-cohort (N=384) varied by anatomic site, with 6.3, 18.9, and 0.0% seroconverting following anal, genital, and oral HPV infection, respectively. Regardless of anatomic site, seroconversion was highest for HPV 6 (19.3%). Overall, seroconversion was highest following anal HPV 6 infection (69.2%). HPV persistence was the only factor found to influence seroconversion. Conclusions Low seroconversion rates following HPV infection leave men susceptible to recurrent infections that can progress to HPV-related cancers. This emphasizes the need for HPV vaccination in men to ensure immune protection against new HPV infections and subsequent disease. PMID:26688833

  1. Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Sofo, Luigi; Caprino, Paola; Sacchetti, Franco; Bossola, Maurizio

    2016-08-27

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (RP-IPAA) is the gold standard surgical treatment for ulcerative colitis. However, despite the widespread use of RP-IPAA, many aspects of this treatment still remain controversial, such as the approach (open or laparoscopic), number of stages in the surgery, type of pouch, and construction type (hand-sewn or stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomosis). The present narrative review aims to discuss current evidence on the short-, mid-, and long-term results of each of these technical alternatives as well as their benefits and disadvantages. A review of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Ovid databases was performed to identify studies published through March 2016. Few large, randomized, controlled studies have been conducted, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn regarding controversial issues. The available data from retrospective studies suggest that laparoscopic surgery has no clear advantages compared with open surgery and that one-stage RP-IPAA may be indicated in selected cases. Regarding 2- and 3-stage RP-IPAA, patients who underwent these surgeries differed significantly with respect to clinical and laboratory variables, making any comparisons extremely difficult. The long-term results regarding the pouch type show that the W- and J-reservoirs do not differ significantly, although the J pouch is generally preferred by surgeons. Hand-sewn and stapled ileal pouch-anal anastomoses have their own advantages, and there is no clear benefit of one technique over the other.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of screening for anal cancer using regular digital ano-rectal examinations in men who have sex with men living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason J; Fairley, Christopher K; Carroll, Susan; Walker, Sandra; Chen, Marcus; Read, Tim; Grulich, Andrew; Bradshaw, Catriona; Kaldor, John; Clarke, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anal cancer in men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV is an important issue but there are no consistent guidelines for how to screen for this cancer. In settings where screening with anal cytology is unavailable, regular anal examinations have been proposed in some guidelines but their cost-effectiveness is unknown. Methods Our objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of regular anal examinations to screen for anal cancer in HIV-positive MSM living in Australia using a probabilistic Markov model. Data sources were based on the medical literature and a clinical trial of HIV-positive MSM receiving an annual anal examination in Australia. The main outcome measures for calculating effectiveness were undiscounted and discounted (at 3%) lifetime costs, life years gained, quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Base-case analysis estimated the average cost of screening for and management of anal cancer ranged from $195 for no screening to $1,915 for lifetime annual screening of men aged ≥ 50. Screening of men aged ≥ 50 generated ICERs of $29,760 per QALY gained (for screening every four years), $32,222 (every three years) and $45,484 (every two years). Uncertainty for ICERs was mostly influenced by the cost (financially and decrease in quality of life) from a false-positive result, progression rate of anal cancer, specificity of the anal examination, the probability of detection outside a screening program and the discount rate. Conclusions Screening for anal cancer by incorporating regular anal examinations into routine HIV care for MSM aged ≥ 50 is most likely to be cost-effective by conventional standards. Given that anal pap smears are not widely available yet in many clinical settings, regular anal exams for MSM living with HIV to detect anal cancer earlier should be implemented. PMID:26942721

  3. The Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC): design and methods of a three-year prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal cancer is increasing in men who have sex with men (MSM). Screening for the presumed cancer precursor, high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) in a manner analogous to cervical cancer screening has been proposed. Uncertainty remains regarding anal HPV natural history and the role of anal cytology and high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) as screening tests. Well-designed cohort studies are required to address these issues. Methods/design The SPANC study is a prospective study of the epidemiology of low-risk and high-risk anal HPV infection and related cytological and histological abnormalities in HIV-negative and HIV-positive homosexual men aged 35 years and over. The study aims to recruit 600 men from community-based settings in Sydney, Australia. There are six study visits over three years. At the first five visits men undergo a digital ano-rectal examination (DARE), an anal “Papanicolaou” (Pap) test for HPV detection, genotyping and anal cytology, followed by HRA and directed biopsy of any visible abnormalities. The men also complete a behavioural questionnaire before each visit. Questions include a detailed history of sexual behaviour, of anal symptoms, possible anal cancer risk factors and validated quality of life and psychosocial questions. Questionnaires are also completed 2 weeks and 3 months following the provision of test results and include questions on participant experience during the procedure and post-procedure symptoms, including pain and bleeding in addition to quality of life/ psychosocial outcomes. Discussion Recruitment for the study began in September 2010 and will conclude in mid-2015, with follow up continuing to 2018. Thus far, over 350 men have been recruited from a variety of community-based settings and are broadly representative of the target screening population. The SPANC study is one of only a small number of cohort studies globally to perform HPV

  4. Apical phosphatidylserine externalization in auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui; Gillespie, Peter G; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2007-01-01

    In hair cells of the inner ear, phosphatidylserine (PS), detected with fluorescent annexin V labeling, was rapidly exposed on the external leaflet of apical plasma membranes upon dissection of the organ of Corti. PS externalization was unchanged by caspase inhibition, suggesting that externalization did not portend apoptosis or necrosis. Consistent with that conclusion, mitochondrial membrane potential and hair-cell nuclear structure remained normal during externalization. PS externalization was triggered by forskolin, which raises cAMP, and blocked by inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Blocking Na(+) influx by inhibiting the mechanoelectrical transduction channels and P2X ATP channels also inhibited external PS externalization. Diminished PS externalization was also seen in cells exposed to LY 294002, which blocks membrane recycling in hair cells by inhibiting phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. These results indicate that PS exposure on the external leaflet, presumably requiring vesicular transport, results from elevation of intracellular cAMP, which can be triggered by Na(+) entry into hair cells.

  5. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  6. The influence of physical body traits and masculinity on anal sex roles in gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, David A; Hart, Trevor A

    2011-08-01

    Sociological, psychological, and public health studies document that many gay and bisexual men may self-label by their anal penetrative role (i.e., bottom or exclusively receptive; top or exclusively insertive; or versatile, both receptive and insertive during anal intercourse). Yet, what orients men to think of themselves as tops, bottoms or versatiles is poorly understood. We surveyed 429 men engaging in same-sex anal intercourse to investigate the degree to which anal penetrative self-identity was concordant with actual penetrative behavior. Additionally, the roles of masculinity and physical body traits (e.g., penis size, muscularity, height, hairiness, and weight) were tested as correlates of anal penetrative identity and identity-behavior concordance. Tops and bottoms showed a high degree of concordance between identity and enacted behavior; however, only half of versatiles reported concordant identity and behavior (i.e., wanting to be versatile and actually reporting versatile behavior). Generally, tops reported larger penises than bottoms. They also reported being comparatively more masculine than bottoms. Versatiles fell somewhat between the tops and bottoms on these traits. Of the six independent variables, penis size and masculinity were the only two factors to influence concordance or discordance between identity and penetrative behavior. Our study suggests that the correlates of gay men's sexual self-labels may depend on objective traits in addition to the subjective pleasure associated with receptive or insertive anal intercourse.

  7. Sexual dysfunction and unprotected anal intercourse among men who have sex with men in two Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Hi Yi; Lau, Joseph T F; Feng, T; Hong, F; Cai, Y; Zhou, H; Liu, X

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between sexual dysfunction and unprotected anal intercourse among adult Chinese men who have sex with men; 519 participants who had had anal sex (past 12 months) were recruited from gay venues (Hong Kong and Shenzhen) and from the Internet (Hong Kong). Respectively, 48.9% and 59.6% (p< .05) of the Hong Kong and Shenzhen participants had had at least one type of sexual dysfunction for 3 consecutive months (past 12 months); the difference may be explained by differential income levels or other factors. After adjustment for significant background variables, three variables related to sexual dysfunction (premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, and experienced at least one sexual dysfunction) were significantly associated with unprotected anal intercourse in the Hong Kong (adjusted odds ratio = 1.65-2.80) and Shenzhen samples (adjusted odds ratio = 5.46-6.41). Anxiety about sex was significant only in the Shenzhen sample (adjusted odds ratio = 8.67). The associations may be results of coping toward sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction is prevalent and may contribute to unprotected anal intercourse among men who have sex with men in China. Physiological damages of receptive anal sex may contribute to some types of sexual dysfunction. However, one limitation is that participants were not asked about insertion/receptive anal sex. HIV interventions targeting men who have sex with men in China need to take counseling related to sexual dysfunction into account.

  8. International Space Station External Contamination Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikatarian, Ron; Soares, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    PResentation slides examine external contamination requirements; International Space Station (ISS) external contamination sources; ISS external contamination sensitive surfaces; external contamination control; external contamination control for pre-launch verification; flight experiments and observations; the Space Shuttle Orbiter waste water dump, materials outgassing, active vacuum vents; example of molecular column density profile, modeling and analysis tools; sources of outgassing induced contamination analyzed to date, quiescent sources, observations on optical degradation due to induced external contamination in LEO; examples of typical contaminant and depth profiles; and status of the ISS system, material outgassing, thruster plumes, and optical degradation.

  9. Estimating location without external cues.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Allen

    2014-10-01

    The ability to determine one's location is fundamental to spatial navigation. Here, it is shown that localization is theoretically possible without the use of external cues, and without knowledge of initial position or orientation. With only error-prone self-motion estimates as input, a fully disoriented agent can, in principle, determine its location in familiar spaces with 1-fold rotational symmetry. Surprisingly, localization does not require the sensing of any external cue, including the boundary. The combination of self-motion estimates and an internal map of the arena provide enough information for localization. This stands in conflict with the supposition that 2D arenas are analogous to open fields. Using a rodent error model, it is shown that the localization performance which can be achieved is enough to initiate and maintain stable firing patterns like those of grid cells, starting from full disorientation. Successful localization was achieved when the rotational asymmetry was due to the external boundary, an interior barrier or a void space within an arena. Optimal localization performance was found to depend on arena shape, arena size, local and global rotational asymmetry, and the structure of the path taken during localization. Since allothetic cues including visual and boundary contact cues were not present, localization necessarily relied on the fusion of idiothetic self-motion cues and memory of the boundary. Implications for spatial navigation mechanisms are discussed, including possible relationships with place field overdispersion and hippocampal reverse replay. Based on these results, experiments are suggested to identify if and where information fusion occurs in the mammalian spatial memory system.

  10. External tank aft cargo carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, T. B.

    1984-01-01

    The External Tank (ET) Aft Cargo Carrier (ACC) is a low cost, low risk augmentation of the Space Transportation System (STS). It almost doubles the cargo volume of the STS while minimally impacting other STS elements (orbiter, ET and solid rocket boosters SRBs, launch facilities and STS operations. In addition to increasing the potential volume of cargo carried on a Shuttle launch, the ACC provides the following additional benefits: (1) Increased STS competitiveness for payloads; (2) Increased cargo manifest flexibility; (3) Increased spacecraft design options; (4) Alternate manifesting for special payloads; and (5) Future space platform/station design options.

  11. Externally blown flap impingement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of externally blown flap impingement noise was conducted using a full-scale turbofan engine and aircraft wing. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine exhaust system was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The daisy nozzle caused the jet velocity to decay about 35 percent at the flap. The presence of the wing next to the conical nozzle increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested.

  12. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  13. Easing the Burden of External Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoGrasso, Marc F.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, the author presents suggestions for improving the effectiveness of external reporting while minimizing burden. Recommendations include repurposing existing internal reports to address the needs of external reports.

  14. 14 CFR 27.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... authorized external load as demonstrated under § 27.25 and this section. (f) The fatigue evaluation of § 27.... For rotorcraft-load combinations to be used for human external cargo, the fatigue evaluation of §...

  15. 14 CFR 27.865 - External loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... authorized external load as demonstrated under § 27.25 and this section. (f) The fatigue evaluation of § 27.... For rotorcraft-load combinations to be used for human external cargo, the fatigue evaluation of §...

  16. Anal cytological abnormalities and epidemiological correlates among men who have sex with men at risk for HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of anal cancer, a Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related neoplasia, has been increasing in recent decades, mainly in men who have sex with men (MSM). Cytological changes of the anal epithelium induced by HPV can be detected through an anal pap smear. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and epidemiological correlates of anal cytological abnormalities among relatively young MSM at risk for HIV-1 infection, to help clarify whether or not this population deserves further investigation to assess the presence of anal cancer precursor lesions. Methods MSM were recruited among attendees of a large STI clinic for a HIV-1 screening program. Anal samples, collected with a Dracon swab in PreservCyt, were used both for liquid-based cytology and HPV testing by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and sexual behavior were collected in face-to-face interviews. Results A total of 346 MSM were recruited (median age 32 years). Overall, 72.5% of the individuals had an anal HPV infection, with 56.1% of them being infected by oncogenic HPV genotypes. Anal cytological abnormalities were found in 29.8% of the cases (16.7% ASC-US and 13.1% L-SIL). Presence of ASC-US+ was strongly associated with infection by any HPV type (OR=4.21, 95% CI: 1.97-9.23), and particularly by HPV 16 and/or 18 (OR=5.62, 95% CI: 2.33-13.81). A higher proportion of ASC-US+ was found in older MSM, in those with a higher number of lifetime partners and in those with a history of ano-genital warts. However, none of these variables or the others analyzed showed any significant association with abnormal cytological findings. Conclusions The presence of anal cytological abnormalities in about one third of the recruited MSM and their strong association with HPV infection, in particular that caused by HPV 16 and/or 18, might provide a further complement to the data that now support the introduction of HPV vaccination among MSM to protect them

  17. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence Causes Hypertrophy of the Urethral Sphincters and Reduces Bladder Neck Mobility During Coughing

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Linda; Varette, Kevin; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Harvey, Marie-Andree; Baker, Kevin; Sauerbrei, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 12-week pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training program on urethral morphology and mobility in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Forty women with SUI were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the treatment group received 12 weekly physiotherapy sessions during which they learned how to properly contract their pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and a home exercise program was prescribed, reviewed, and progressed; the control group received no treatment. Before and after the 12-week study period, ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate bladder neck position and mobility during coughing and Valsalva maneuver in supine and in standing, as well as urethral morphology. Secondary outcome measures included a 3-day bladder diary, 30-min pad test, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6). Results The women in the treatment group demonstrated reduced bladder neck mobility during coughing and increased cross-sectional area of their urethra after as compared to before the training. These changes were not evident in the control group. No differences in the resting position of the bladder neck or in bladder neck excursion during Valsalva maneuver were noted in either group. Concomitantly the women in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvements in the 3-day bladder diary and IIQ-7 after the PFM training and improved significantly more than the control group. Conclusion Physiotherapist-supervised PFM training reduces bladder neck motion during coughing, and results in hypertrophy of the urethral sphincter in women who present with SUI. PMID:23861324

  18. Manometric Measurement of the Sphincter of Oddi in Patients with Common Bile Duct Stones: A Consecutive Study of the Han Population of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Jiao, Chunhua; Cheng, Wenfang; Xu, Shunfu; Xiao, Bin; Ni, Jinliang

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Role of dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi (SO) in choledocholithiasis is controversial. This study was to evaluate SO motor activity in patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones in the Han population of China. Patients and Methods. In this study, 76 patients with CBD stones were enrolled in a single tertiary endoscopy center. Data of SO motor activities was prospectively evaluated by endoscopic manometry. Mean basal SO pressure, amplitude, and frequency were collected and analyzed. Results. The mean basal SO pressure, amplitude, and frequency were 52.7 ± 40.0 (1.60–171.1) mmHg, 39.9 ± 19.7 (14.9–115.5) mmHg, and 5.7 ± 3.2 (1.3–13.8)/min, respectively. The basal SO pressure was higher in patients with CBD stones < 10 mm in diameter than that in those with CBD stones larger than 10 mm in diameter (60.7 ± 41.0 mmHg versus 36.8 ± 29.4 mmHg, P = 0.043). There was no significant difference in the basal SO pressure, amplitude, and frequency when compared with the CBD diameter, CBD stone number, prior cholecystectomy, periampullary diverticula, and symptoms. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, and alkaline phosphatase showed no significant difference in patients with normal or elevated basal SO pressure. Conclusion. These results identify that, in Chinese Han population, abnormalities of SO motor activity are associated with CBD stones. PMID:28133480

  19. The effect of dividing the sphincter of Oddi at endoscopic sphincterotomy on the filling and emptying aspects of function of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Taskin, V; Ozyilkan, E; Sare, M; Hilmioglu, F

    1999-10-01

    The effect of dividing the sphincter of Oddi at endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) on the filling and emptying aspects of gallbladder function has not been definitely established in humans. This prospective study is designed to examine the effects of EST on gallbladder emptying. In 13 patients (8 men and 5 women; mean age, 60.54 years +/- 2.14; range, 45-75 years), postprandial gallbladder emptying was measured ultrasonographically before and after EST (within 1-4 days). The fasting volumes after 8 hours of fasting, at times 0 min and before the test meal was given, residual volume (the smallest postprandial volume), gallbladder ejection fraction (EF), and total ejection volume, at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 min after the test meal, were studied. The fasting gallbladder volume and the residual volume tended to decrease after EST, but the differences were not significant (40.21 +/- 10.79 mL and 35.48 +/- 11.21 mL, 17.79 +/- 4.83 mL, and 13.10 +/- 4.83 mL, respectively; p > 0.05). Maximum EF was found to be 19.72% at 40 min and increased to 28.62% at 70 min after EST. Although the difference was not statistically relevant, a trend of improvement was evident after EST. The ejected volumes after EST have depicted a trend toward increase, without reaching to any statistical significance (p > 0.05). Our results demonstrate at least no adverse effects of EST and further support some positive effects on gallbladder kinetics.

  20. Childhood Externalizing Behavior: Theory and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    TOPIC Childhood externalizing behavior PURPOSE To analyze the construct of externalizing behavior (aggression, delinquency, and hyperactivity), illustrate the biosocial model of childhood externalizing, and draw clinical implications for nursing research and practice. SOURCES A review of the literature based on psychological, psychiatric, and nursing journals. CONCLUSIONS A better understanding of childhood externalizing behavior problems and the risk factors underlying them are essential to prevent them. The employment of an integrative biosocial perspective is argued to be important in understanding this behavior. PMID:15535385

  1. Neural correlates of sound externalization.

    PubMed

    Callan, Akiko; Callan, Daniel E; Ando, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    When we listen to sounds through headphones without utilizing special transforms, sound sources seem to be located inside our heads. The sound sources are said to be lateralized to one side or the other to varying degree. This internal lateralization is different than sound source localization in the natural environment in which the sound is localized distal to the head. We used fMRI to investigate difference in neural responses between lateralization and localization. Individualized binaural recordings were used as externalized auditory stimuli and stereo recordings were used as internalized auditory stimuli. Brain activity was measured while 14 participants performed an active auditory localization task and while 12 participants performed a stimulus type identification task. Irrespective of the task condition, we observed enhanced activity in the bilateral posterior temporal gyri (pSTG) for the externalized stimuli relative to the internalized stimuli. Region of interest analysis indicated that both left and right pSTG were more sensitive to sound sources in contra- than ipsilateral hemifields. Moreover, greater back than front activity was also found in the left pSTG. Compared to impoverished spatial auditory stimuli, realistic spatial auditory stimuli enhance neural responses in the pSTG. This may be why we could observe contralateral hemifield preference in bilateral pSTG that many previous studies have failed to observe. Overall, the results indicate the importance of using ecologically valid stimuli for investigating neural processes in human cortex.

  2. Convergence rates to stationary solutions of a gas-liquid model with external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Long; Liu, Qingqing; Zhu, Changjiang

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behaviour of solutions to a gas-liquid model with external forces. Under some suitable assumptions on the initial data, if γ > 1 and \\theta\\in(0,\\frac{\\gamma}{2}]\\cap(0,\\gamma-1]\\cap(0,1-\\alpha\\gamma] , we prove the weak solution (cQ (x, t), u(x, t)) behaviour asymptotically to the stationary one by adapting and modifying the technique of weighted estimates. In addition, if \\theta\\in(0,\\frac{\\gamma}{2}]\\cap(0,\\gamma-1)\\cap(0,1-\\alpha\\gamma] , following the same idea used in Zhang and Fang (2006 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 182 223-53), we estimate the stabilization rate of the solution as time tends to infinity in the sense of L∞ norm.

  3. Teaching Externally: Lecturers' Viewpoints. Occasional Paper 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David, Ed.

    Perspectives of academic staff who have been involved in teaching externally are presented in three papers. In "Teaching Students Externally: The First Twelve Years," Frank Molloy examines three aspects of teaching by the external mode: preparing materials, making assignments, and providing educational experiences for students at the…

  4. Your College Degree: The External Degree Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haponski, William C.; And Others

    Information on undertaking an external degree program to obtain a college education is presented. An external degree program is one that has no, or minimal requirements for residence (on-campus attendance). Most often it can be entered at any time of the year and usually grants credit for documented learning already acquired. An external degree…

  5. 49 CFR 195.108 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External pressure. 195.108 Section 195.108 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.108 External pressure. Any external pressure that will be exerted on...

  6. 46 CFR 64.19 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External pressure. 64.19 Section 64.19 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.19 External pressure. (a) A tank without a vacuum breaker must be designed to withstand an external pressure of 71/2 psig or more. (b) A tank with a vacuum...

  7. 46 CFR 64.19 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External pressure. 64.19 Section 64.19 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.19 External pressure. (a) A tank without a vacuum breaker must be designed to withstand an external pressure of 71/2 psig or more. (b) A tank with a vacuum...

  8. 49 CFR 195.108 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External pressure. 195.108 Section 195.108 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.108 External pressure. Any external pressure that will be exerted on...

  9. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  10. 49 CFR 195.108 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External pressure. 195.108 Section 195.108 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.108 External pressure. Any external pressure that will be exerted on...

  11. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  12. 46 CFR 64.19 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External pressure. 64.19 Section 64.19 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.19 External pressure. (a) A tank without a vacuum breaker must be designed to withstand an external pressure of 71/2 psig or more. (b) A tank with a vacuum...

  13. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  14. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  15. 46 CFR 64.19 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External pressure. 64.19 Section 64.19 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.19 External pressure. (a) A tank without a vacuum breaker must be designed to withstand an external pressure of 71/2 psig or more. (b) A tank with a vacuum...

  16. 49 CFR 195.108 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External pressure. 195.108 Section 195.108 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.108 External pressure. Any external pressure that will be exerted on...

  17. 49 CFR 195.108 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External pressure. 195.108 Section 195.108 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.108 External pressure. Any external pressure that will be exerted on...

  18. 46 CFR 64.19 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External pressure. 64.19 Section 64.19 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.19 External pressure. (a) A tank without a vacuum breaker must be designed to withstand an external pressure of 71/2 psig or more. (b) A tank with a vacuum...

  19. 46 CFR 154.452 - External pressure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External pressure. 154.452 Section 154.452 Shipping... Independent Tank Type C and Process Pressure Vessels § 154.452 External pressure. The design external pressure...) for tanks without a vacuum relief valve. P2=0, or the pressure relief valve setting for an...

  20. Anal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... change in bowel habit or rectal bleeding. A hemorrhoid that develops quickly or is particularly painful may ... your doctor. The blood clot of a thrombosed hemorrhoid, although painful, can't break loose and travel, ...

  1. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  2. Anal Fissures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation ...

  3. [Anal cytology].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Béla; Sápi, Zoltán; Bánhegyi, Dénes; Marschalkó, Márta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2015-01-04

    Bevezetés: Az anális carcinoma incidenciája az utóbbi évtizedekben folyamatosan emelkedett, különösen a humán immundeficientia vírussal fertőzött homoszexuális populációban. Az anális laphámrák potenciális prekurzora az anális intraepithelialis neoplasia, amelynek elődleges szűrőtesztje a citológiai vizsgálat. Célkitűzés: A szerzők a Semmelweis Egyetem, Bőr-, Nemikórtani és Bőronkológiai Klinika Országos STD Centrumában humán immundeficientia vírus pozitív betegeknél végzett anális citológiai vizsgálatok eredményének értékelését tűzték ki célul. Módszer: 2011. november 1. és 2014. augusztus 31. között a klinikán 140 betegnél 155 anális citológiai vizsgálat történt. Eredmények: A betegek 44%-ánál találtak anális dysplasiát, és mindössze 1,6%-ban high grade laesiót. Nagyobb betegszámú vizsgálatokkal összehasonlítva ez az arány alacsonyabb. Következtetések: A vizsgálat felhívja a figyelmet a kockázati csoportban végzett rendszeres szűrővizsgálat fontosságára. Orv. Hetil., 2015, 156(1), 24–27.

  4. Anal Fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Conditions Find A Surgeon Patients ASCRS Non-Discrimination Statement Privacy Policy Research Foundation of the ASCRS Non-Discrimination Statement About Us ASCRS News Video Disclaimer Social ...

  5. Anal Itching

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  6. Anal Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resource Library Brochures and Product Store Career Center DC&R Journal Access Member Directory Educational Resources American ... all the circumstances presented by the individual patient. DC&R Journal Diseases and Conditions Find A Surgeon ...

  7. Healthcare Spending and Performance of Specialty Hospitals: Nationwide Evidence from Colorectal-Anal Specialty Hospitals in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Sang Gyu; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics and performance of colorectal-anal specialty vs. general hospitals for South Korean inpatients with colorectal-anal diseases, and assesses the short-term designation effect of the government's specialty hospital. Materials and Methods Nationwide all colorectal-anal disease inpatient claims (n=292158) for 2010-2012 were used to investigate length of stay and inpatient charges for surgical and medical procedures in specialty vs. general hospitals. The patients' claim data were matched to hospital data, and multi-level linear mixed models to account for clustering of patients within hospitals were performed. Results Inpatient charges at colorectal-anal specialty hospitals were 27% greater per case and 92% greater per day than those at small general hospitals, but the average length of stay was 49% shorter. Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals had shorter length of stay and a higher inpatient charges per day for both surgical and medical procedures, but per case charges were not significantly different. A "specialty" designation effect also found that the colorectal-anal specialty hospitals may have consciously attempted to reduce their length of stay and inpatient charges. Both hospital and patient level factors had significant roles in determining length of stay and inpatient charges. Conclusion Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals have shorter length of stay and higher inpatient charges per day than small general hospitals. A "specialty" designation by government influence performance and healthcare spending of hospitals as well. In order to maintain prosperous specialty hospital system, investigation into additional factors that affect performance, such as quality of care and patient satisfaction should be carried out. PMID:26446659

  8. Behavioral and psychosocial correlates of anal sex among male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Pitpitan, Eileen V; Chavarin, Claudia; Patterson, Thomas L

    2015-05-01

    Most studies of heterosexual sex risk practices have focused on condomless vaginal sex despite evidence that condomless anal sex has a significantly higher risk of HIV transmission. The present study focused on male clients' anal sex practices with female sex workers (FSWs) in Tijuana, Mexico, where an HIV epidemic is growing among high-risk groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify psychosocial and behavioral correlates of anal sex among male clients. Our sample of HIV-negative men (N = 400) was predominantly Latino (87.5 %), born in Mexico (78.8 %), never married (36.8 %) or in a regular or common-law marriage (31.5 %), and employed (62.8 %), with an average age and education of 37.8 and 9.2 years, respectively. Eighty-nine percent identified as heterosexual and 11 % as bisexual. By design, 50 % of the sample resided in Tijuana and the other 50 % in San Diego County. Nearly half (49 %) reported at least one incident of anal sex with a FSW in Tijuana in the past 4 months; of those participants, 85 % reported that one or more of their anal sex acts with FSWs had been without a condom. In a multivariate model, anal sex with a FSW in the past 4 months was associated with bisexual identification, methamphetamine use with FSWs, repeat visits to the same FSW, higher scores on perceived stigma about being a client of FSWs, and sexual compulsivity. Prevention programs are needed that address the behavioral and psychosocial correlates of heterosexual anal sex in order to reduce HIV/STI transmission risk among male clients, FSWs, and their sexual network members.

  9. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Mata-Marín, José A; Hernández-Figueroa, Jorge; Huerta-García, Gloria; Sandoval-Ramírez, Jorge; Pichardo-Farfán, Miguel; Manjarrez-Tellez, Bulmaro; Ramírez-Mendoza, Pablo; Gaytan-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-11-01

    Neoplasia is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV patients. The prevalence of anal cancer among men who have sex with men (MSM) has continued to increase since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy. We screened 94 HIV-infected MSM patients. We found high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) in six of the patients. The calculated prevalence of HSIL was 6.4% (95% confidence interval: 2.9-13.2). The study and implementation of screening programs for high-risk groups is a priority.

  10. [Squamous carcinoma of the anal canal and its variations. Personal experience and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Messinetti, S; Marzullo, A; Giacomelli, L; Manno, A; Pavone, M G; Fabrizio, G; Finizio, R; Porcelli, C; Granai, A V

    1994-01-01

    Six cases of anal canal squamous carcinoma are presented. The authors precise the present view about pathological, epidemiological, clinical and therapeutical aspects of these lesions. They stress, also, the primary role of embryology and anatomy in the oncogenesis of such tumours; the importance to single out specific population at risk, absolutely different from the typical one for rectal adenocarcinoma and the role of chemoradiation therapy as treatment of choice of these neoplasms. Particular importance is given to modern histologic and histogenetic classification of these tumours, stressing the difficulties to distinguish the various histologic types.

  11. Multisite HPV16/18 Vaccine Efficacy Against Cervical, Anal, and Oral HPV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Quint, Wim; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Struijk, Linda; Schussler, John; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) reports separately demonstrated vaccine efficacy against HPV16 and HPV18 (HPV16/18) infections at the cervical, anal, and oral regions; however, the combined overall multisite efficacy (protection at all three sites) and vaccine efficacy among women infected with HPV16 or HPV18 prior to vaccination are less known. Methods: Women age 18 to 25 years from the CVT were randomly assigned to the HPV16/18 vaccine (Cervarix) or a hepatitis A vaccine. Cervical, oral, and anal specimens were collected at the four-year follow-up visit from 4186 women. Multisite and single-site vaccine efficacies (VEs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for one-time detection of point prevalent HPV16/18 in the cervical, anal, and oral regions four years after vaccination. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was highest among “naïve” women (HPV16/18 seronegative and cervical HPV high-risk DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 83.5%, 95% CI = 72.1% to 90.8%). Multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was also demonstrated among women with evidence of a pre-enrollment HPV16 or HPV18 infection (seropositive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 but cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 57.8%, 95% CI = 34.4% to 73.4%), but not in those with cervical HPV16 and/or HPV18 DNA at vaccination (anal/oral HPV16/18 VE = 25.3%, 95% CI = -40.4% to 61.1%). Concordant HPV16/18 infections at two or three sites were also less common in HPV16/18-infected women in the HPV vaccine vs control arm (7.4% vs 30.4%, P < .001). Conclusions: This study found high multisite vaccine efficacy among “naïve” women and also suggests the vaccine may provide protection against HPV16/18 infections at one or more anatomic sites among some women infected with these types prior to HPV16/18 vaccination. PMID:26467666

  12. Bowel dysfunction in young women with urinary retention.

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, M C; Kamm, M A; Fowler, C J

    1993-01-01

    Urinary retention in young women is rare, but a syndrome has recently been described in which urinary retention is associated with abnormal periurethral electromyography. The incidence of bowel dysfunction in these women was investigated, in an attempt to determine whether this might be a more widespread disorder. Of 12 patients with this urological abnormality, eight were constipated. No consistent anorectal abnormality was identified on anorectal physiological testing. The electromyographic abnormality was not seen in the external anal sphincter. One patient had an abnormality of the internal anal sphincter smooth muscle, while another had a generalised disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder resembling a visceral myopathy. Bowel symptoms are common in this group of women with urinary retention, but abnormalities of bowel function are not specific. A common mechanism for bladder and bowel symptoms remains a possibility. PMID:8244109

  13. Externally blown flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Tests of the noise produced by the impingement of the jet exhaust on the wing and flap for an externally blown flap system were conducted with a CF700 turbofan engine and an F-111B wing panel. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The presence of the wing next to the test nozzles increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection angle. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested. Tests showed that the single-slotted flap deflected 60 deg, produced less noise than the double-slotted flaps. Also, maintaining the maximum distance between the exit nozzle and flap system resulted in a minor reduction in noise.

  14. Automated external defibrillation: laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, E; Carroll, D; Vincent, R; Chamberlain, D A

    1984-04-01

    Twelve samples of ventricular fibrillation were fed into nine automated external defibrillator-pacemakers ( AEDP , "Heart Aid") of recent design. All the devices recognised and defibrillated ventricular fibrillation in seven of the samples within 30 sec. None of the devices reacted to two of the samples; in the remaining three there was inter-device variation ranging from an appropriate response to no response, as well as inappropriate pacing or delay in recognition and treatment. Poor recognition of some ventricular fibrillation waveforms with considerable inter-device variation limits the usefulness of this model. A new prototype responded more consistently and future models may be of value in community resuscitation. The difficulty of evaluating the diagnostic capability of AEDP devices in clinical use makes comprehensive laboratory testing essential prior to release.

  15. Drug use, interpersonal attraction, and communication: situational factors as predictors of episodes of unprotected anal intercourse among Latino gay men.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patrick A; Díaz, Rafael M; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Shrout, Patrick E

    2009-08-01

    It is important to understand situational factors linked to episodes of unprotected sexual intercourse among Latino gay men (LGM), who are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Past research has suggested that participation in difficult sexual situations mediates the relationship between socio-cultural factors and sexual risk behaviors among LGM. This study examined drug use by self and sex partners, interpersonal factors, and other key variables, each examined at the situation-level of analysis, as predictors of episodes of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among LGM. Study participants included 270 LGM living in New York City, Miami, and Los Angeles who reported inconsistent condom use during anal intercourse in the last year. Men participated in structured interviews in which they were asked sets of detailed questions about their most recent episode of anal intercourse in which they used condoms, and their most recent anal intercourse episode in which they did not use condoms. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare the relevance of specific situational factors to participants' episodes of UAI and protected anal intercourse. We found that drug use by a sex partner and lacks of discussions about condom use with partners, among other situational factors, were significantly related to episodes of UAI. The findings highlight the importance of considering the impact of sexual situations and interactions with sex partners when studying HIV risk among LGM and when designing interventions.

  16. Anal human papillomavirus infection in a street-based sample of drug using HIV-positive men.

    PubMed

    Cranston, R D; Murphy, R; Weiss, R E; Da Costa, M; Palefsky, J; Shoptaw, S; Gorbach, P M

    2012-03-01

    HIV facilitates an increase in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated conditions. HIV-positive men living in a substance use context in Los Angeles, USA, were recruited using respondent-driven sampling, completed a questionnaire and had biological samples including an anal HPV swab taken. A total of 316 evaluable men were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of any HPV, high-risk (HR) infection and multiple-type infection was highest for men who have sex with men (MSM) (93.9%, 64.6% and 29.7%, respectively). When any HPV and HR-HPV prevalence in all men was stratified by age, the youngest group had 100% and 68.2% prevalence, respectively, with similarly high rates maintained up to age 49 years. The individual's use of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine or heroin was not significantly associated with anal HPV detection. In this marginalized population, high prevalence rates of anal HPV and HR-HPV occurring over a wide age range may increase the individual's risk for anal dysplasia and anal cancer.

  17. Event-Level Analysis of Anal Sex Roles and Sex Drug Use Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ashleigh J; Lachowsky, Nathan J; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Lal, Allan; Moore, David M; Hogg, Robert S; Roth, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    This study analyzed event-level partnership data from a computer-assisted survey of 719 gay and bisexual men (GBM) enrolled in the Momentum Health Study to delineate potential linkages between anal sex roles and the so-called "sex drugs," i.e., erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD), poppers, and crystal methamphetamine. Univariable and multivariable analyses using generalized linear mixed models with logit link function with sexual encounters (n = 2514) as the unit of analysis tested four hypotheses: (1) EDD are significantly associated with insertive anal sex roles, (2) poppers are significantly associated with receptive anal sex, (3) both poppers and EDD are significantly associated with anal sexual versatility, and (4) crystal methamphetamine is significantly associated with all anal sex roles. Data for survey respondents and their sexual partners allowed testing these hypotheses for both anal sex partners in the same encounter. Multivariable results supported the first three hypotheses. Crystal methamphetamine was significantly associated with all anal sex roles in the univariable models, but not significant in any multivariable ones. Other multivariable significant variables included attending group sex events, venue where first met, and self-described sexual orientation. Results indicate that GBM sex-drug use behavior features rational decision-making strategies linked to anal sex roles. They also suggest that more research on anal sex roles, particularly versatility, is needed, and that sexual behavior research can benefit from partnership analysis.

  18. Metastatic anal sac carcinoma with hypercalcaemia and associated hypertrophic osteopathy in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, A.; Salgüero, R.; Dobson, J.

    2015-01-01

    A seven-year-old male neutered Irish setter was treated for a metastatic anal sac adenocarcinoma (ASAC) and hypercalcaemia by complete surgical excision of the primary tumour and partial excision of the sublumbar lymph nodes. Further enlargement of the sublumbar lymph nodes was linked to recurrent hypercalcaemia 3 months after surgical treatment. Medical treatment with Toceranib and Clodronate showed modest results in the treatment of the tumour and the hypercalcaemia. Radiotherapy of the sublumbar lymph nodes and later concurrent carboplatin chemotherapy resulted in partial tumour remission with marked reduction in size of the lymph nodes and normalization of the calcaemia. Unfortunately, concurrently with subsequent relapse of the hypercalaemia, the dog developed hypertrophic osteopathy (HO) and lumbar spinal metastasis and the dog was euthanized. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the second case of metastatic apocrine gland carcinoma of the anal sac associated with HO and the first case that describe the development of HO late in the stage of the disease. PMID:26623365

  19. Correlates of unprotected anal sex among men who have sex with men in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in Mexico, data on current risk behaviors in this population are lacking. This study investigated the prevalence and correlates of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in a sample of 260 MSM in Tijuana, Mexico. Methods In June 2010, men attending a gay pride celebration were invited to complete a sexual risk survey. Men who reported UAI with a male partner in the past year were compared with men who reported only protected anal sex during the same period. Results Mean age of participants was 29.7; 54% had a high school diploma or less; and 43% were unemployed. In the past year, 55% had been tested for HIV, 21% reported using illicit drugs before or during sex, and 94% had sex only with men. Overall, 50% reported having UAI with another male in the past year. Factors independently associated with UAI in the past year were unemployment (AOR = 1.87), attending adult movie theaters (AOR = 2.21), using illicit drugs before or during sex (AOR = 2.43), and not having a recent HIV test (AOR = 1.85). Conclusions Interventions to promote HIV testing and condom use among men who have sex with men may want to consider venue-specific approaches, as well as focus on drug-use issues in the context of unsafe sex. PMID:22694837

  20. Extramammary Paget’s Disease of Anal Canal Associated With Rectal Adenoma Without Invasive Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chumbalkar, Vaibhav; Jennings, Timothy A.; Ainechi, Sanaz; Lee, Edward C.; Lee, Hwajeong

    2016-01-01

    Extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD) is a rare disease which is found in apocrine-rich locations such as anogenital region, axilla and rarely in other sites. Perianal EMPD is often reported as the involvement of perianal skin, but involvement of anal mucosa is very rare. Based on pathogenesis and association with either synchronous or metachronous malignancy, EMPD can be divided into primary and secondary types. Treatment approach for these two types of Paget’s disease and their prognosis is different, thus it is important to make the distinction. Secondary type of Paget’s disease is almost always described in association with invasive malignancy. While secondary Paget’s disease arising in association with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast is common, secondary EMPD associated with precursor lesion of the rectum without invasion is exceedingly rare. We report a very rare case of secondary Paget’s disease of the anal canal in association with rectal tubular adenoma (precursor lesion) without malignancy. PMID:28058078