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Sample records for extra dimension due

  1. Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.

    2004-10-05

    The large separation between the weak scale {approx} 10{sup 3} GeV and the traditional scale of gravity--the Planck scale with M{sub PI} {approx} 10{sup 19} GeV--is one of the most puzzling aspects of nature. The origin of this large ratio, as well as its stability under radiative corrections, demands explanation. This is known as the hierarchy problem. One theoretical means of solving this problem is to introduce Supersymmetry. Alternatively one may hope to address the hierarchy by exploiting the geometry of space time. Specifically, recent theories involve the idea that the 3-spatial dimensions in which we live could be a 3-spatial-dimensional ''membrane'' embedded in a much larger extra dimensional space, and that the hierarchy is generated by the geometry of the additional dimensions. Such ideas have led to extra dimensional theories which have verifiable consequences at the TeV scale. Our knowledge of the weak and strong forces extends down to scales of {approx} (100 GeV){sup -1} (or of order 10{sup -15} mm). On the other hand, we have almost no knowledge of gravity at distances less than roughly a millimeter, as direct tests of the gravitational force at the smallest distances are based on torsion-balance experiments, which are mechanically limited. It is thus conceivable that gravity may behave quite differently from the 3-dimensional Newtonian theory at small distances. This leads to the possibility that matter and non-gravitational forces are confined to our 3-dimensional subspace, whereas gravity may propagate throughout a higher dimensional volume. In this case, the gauge forces are trapped within our 3-dimensional space, unaware of the extra dimensions, and maintain their usual behavior. Gravity, on the other hand, would no longer follow the inverse-square force law at distances smaller than the size of the extra dimensions, as the gravitational equivalent of Gauss' Law mandates that the gravitational field spreads out into the full spatial volume

  2. Inhomogeneous compact extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Budaev, R. I.; Grobov, A. V.; Dmitriev, A. E.; Rubin, Sergey G.

    2017-10-01

    We show that an inhomogeneous compact extra space possesses two necessary features— their existence does not contradict the observable value of the cosmological constant Λ4 in pure f(R) theory, and the extra dimensions are stable relative to the "radion mode" of perturbations, the only mode considered. For a two-dimensional extra space, both analytical and numerical solutions for the metric are found, able to provide a zero or arbitrarily small Λ4. A no-go theorem has also been proved, that maximally symmetric compact extra spaces are inconsistent with 4D Minkowski space in the framework of pure f(R) gravity.

  3. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2010-04-29

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  4. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2010-07-12

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  5. Collider Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, Benjamin Huntington; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-10

    In recent years there has been much interest in the possibility that there exist more spacetime dimensions than the usual four. Models of particle physics beyond the Standard Model that incorporate these extra dimensions can solve the gauge hierarchy problem and explain why the fermion masses a spread over many orders of magnitude. In this thesis we explore several possibilities for models with extra dimensions. First we examine constraints on the proposal of Arkani-Hamed and Schmaltz that the Standard Model fermions are localized to different positions in an extra dimension, thereby generating the hierarchy in fermion masses. We find strong constraints on the compactification scale of such models arising from flavor-changing neutral currents. Next we investigate the phenomenology of the Randall-Sundrum model, where the hierarchy between the electroweak and Planck scales is generated by the warping in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. In particular, we investigate the ''Higgsless'' model of electroweak symmetry breaking due to Csaki et. al., where the Higgs has been decoupled from the spectrum by taking its vacuum expectation value to infinity. We find that this model produces many distinctive features at the LHC. However, we also find that it is strongly constrained by precision electroweak observables and the requirement that gauge-boson scattering be perturbative. We then examine the model with a finite vacuum expectation value, and find that there are observable shifts to the Higgs scalar properties. Finally, in the original large extra dimension scenario of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali, the hierarchy problem is solved by allowing gravity to propagate in a large extra dimensional volume, while the Standard Model fields are confined to 4 dimensions. We consider the case where there are a large number of extra dimensions (n {approx} 20). This model can solve the hierarchy problem without introducing a exponentially large radii for the extra

  6. Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    If the structure of spacetime is different than that readily observed, gravitational physics, particle physics and cosmology are all immediately affected. The physics of extra dimensions offers new insights and solutions to fundamental questions arising in these fields. Novel ideas and frameworks are continuously born and evolved. They make use of string theoretical features and tools and they may reveal if and how the 11-dimensional string theory is relevant to our four-dimensional world. We have outlined some of the experimental observations in particle and gravitational physics as well as astrophysical and cosmological considerations that can constrain or confirm these scenarios. These developing ideas and the wide interdisciplinary experimental program that is charted out to investigate them mark a renewed effort to describe the dynamics behind spacetime. We look forward to the discovery of a higher dimensional spacetime.

  7. Nonminimal universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Flacke, Thomas; Menon, A.; Phalen, Daniel J.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phenomenological implications of boundary localized terms (BLTs) in the model of universal extra dimensions (UED). In particular, we study the electroweak Kaluza-Klein mass spectrum resulting from BLTs and their effect on electroweak symmetry breaking via the five-dimensional Higgs mechanism. We find that the addition of BLTs to massive five-dimensional fields induces a nontrivial extra-dimensional profile for the zero and nonzero Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes. Hence BLTs generically lead to a modification of standard model parameters and are therefore experimentally constrained, even at tree level. We study standard model constraints on three representative nonminimal UED models in detail and find that the constraints on BLTs are weak. On the contrary, nonzero BLTs have a major impact on the spectrum and couplings of nonzero KK modes. For example, there are regions of parameter space where the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle is either the Kaluza-Klein Higgs boson or the first KK mode of the W{sup 3}.

  8. Scientific Visualization of Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don V.

    2010-10-01

    In the 21st Century, many theoretical physicists claim that higher dimensions may indeed exist. Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, & Dvali (ADD) and Randall-Sundrum (RS), in addition to Kaluza-Klein (KK) and M-string theorists, have introduced reasonable explanations for the existence of heretofore ``invisible'' higher dimensions. Whether or not these extra dimensions actually exist is irrelevant to their contributions to the visionary conceptualization associated with novel and improved mathematical and physical analysis. Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. This presentation is a video ``outtake'' of the author's research into ``Visualizing Extra Spatial Dimensions'' at the University of California at Irvine.

  9. Inflation from periodic extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Tatsuta, Yoshiyuki

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a realization of a small field inflation based on string inspired supergravities. In theories accompanying extra dimensions, compactification of them with small radii is required for realistic situations. Since the extra dimension can have a periodicity, there will appear (quasi-)periodic functions under transformations of moduli of the extra dimensions in low energy scales. Such a periodic property can lead to a UV completion of so-called multi-natural inflation model where inflaton potential consists of a sum of multiple sinusoidal functions with a decay constant smaller than the Planck scale. As an illustration, we construct a SUSY breaking model, and then show that such an inflaton potential can be generated by a sum of world sheet instantons in intersecting brane models on extra dimensions containing orbifold. We show also predictions of cosmic observables by numerical analyzes.

  10. Phenomenology of universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; /Florida U.

    2006-10-01

    In this proceeding, the phenomenology of Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which all the Standard Model fields propagate, is explored. We focus on models with one universal extra dimension, compactified on an S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. We revisit calculations of Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter without an assumption of the KK mass degeneracy including all possible coannihilations. We then contrast the experimental signatures of low energy supersymmetry and UED.

  11. Extra Dimensions of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three:…

  12. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-10

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  13. Extra Dimensions of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three:…

  14. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  15. Extra Dimensions of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-09-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three: left/right, up/down, and forward/backward. No matter how you express an object's coordinate, be it Cartesian, spherical, cylindrical, or something exotic, it's eminently clear that we live in a three-dimensional universe.

  16. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  17. Pedagogical Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T

    2004-09-27

    Extra dimensions provide a new window on a number of problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides an introduction to this very broad subject aimed at experimental graduate students and post-docs based on a lecture given at the 2004 SLAC Summer Institute.

  18. Cosmology with dynamical extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Joel K.

    Nearly every attempt to unify the fundamental forces incorporates the idea of compact extra dimensions. The notion was introduced by Kaluza and Klein in the 1920s and is an essential part of contemporary string theory and M-theory. In most treatments the extra dimensions are static. We consider the consequences of extra dimensions with time-varying radii. The radii are modeled by light scalar fields. These may have unusual properties which produce observable effects, such as non-canonical kinetic energies, couplings to matter and radiation, and non-minimal coupling to gravity. Extra dimensions may be responsible for dark energy in the late universe. The simplest model of dark energy is characterized by its equation of state. We show that constraints placed on realistic models by the universality of free fall, variation of fundamental constants and metric tests of gravity are often stricter than bounds on the equation of state. Testing the equivalence principle maybe an effective way of distinguishing some quintessence models from a cosmological constant. In certain dark energy models the speed of sound is much less than the speed of light. We calculate how this affects the cosmic microwave background and show that the speed of sound may be measurable, provided dark energy is sufficiently dense at decoupling. This is another possible signature of quintessence. Dynamical extra dimensions may have consequences for the early universe. In the cyclic model, the universe is described in terms of a series of contractions and expansions of an extra dimension. The big bang is preceded by a big crunch and quantum fluctuations of the scalar field produce structure in universe. We consider how the fluctuations evolve and build over many cycles and show that there are no observable instabilities or adverse effects. In the cyclic model extra dimensions act as both dark energy and as an agent to cause contraction and a big crunch. Previous theorems suggested that contraction

  19. Wormholes leading to extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Skvortsova, M. V.

    2016-10-01

    In 6D general relativity with a scalar field as a source of gravity, a new type of static wormhole solutions is presented: such wormholes connect our universe with a small 2D extra subspace with a universe where this extra subspace is large, and the whole space-time is effectively 6-dimensional. We consider manifolds with the structure M0 x M1 x M2 , where M0 is 2D Lorentzian space-time while each of M1 an M2 can be a 2-sphere or a 2-torus. After selecting possible asymptotic behaviors of the metric functions compatible with the field equations, we give two explicit examples of wormhole solutions with spherical symmetry in our space-time and toroidal extra dimensions. In one example, with a massless scalar field (it is a special case of a well-known more general solution), the extra dimensions have a large constant size at the "far end"; the other example contains a nonzero potential $V(\\phi)$ which provides a 6D anti-de Sitter asymptotic, where all spatial dimensions are infinite.

  20. Warping the universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2009-07-15

    We develop the necessary ingredients for the construction of realistic models with warped universal extra dimensions. Our investigations are based on the seven-dimensional (7D) spacetime AdS{sub 5}xT{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} and we derive the Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra for gravitons, bulk vectors, and the TeV brane localized Higgs boson. We show that, starting with a massive 7D fermion, one may obtain a single chiral massless mode whose profile is readily localized towards the Planck or TeV brane. This allows one to place the standard model fermions in the bulk and construct models of flavor as in Randall-Sundrum models. Our solution also admits the familiar KK parity of models with universal extra dimensions so that the lightest odd KK state is stable and may be a dark matter candidate. As an additional feature the AdS{sub 5} warping ensures that the excited modes on the torus, including the dark matter candidate, appear at TeV energies (as is usually assumed in models with universal extra dimensions) even though the Planck scale sets the dimensions for the torus.

  1. Constraints on extra dimensions from atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a hydrogen atom confined in a thick brane embedded in a higher-dimensional space. Due to effects of the extra dimensions, the gravitational potential is amplified in distances smaller than the size of the supplementary space, in comparison with the Newtonian potential. Studying the influence of the gravitational interaction modified by the extra dimensions on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom, we find independent constraints for the higher-dimensional Planck mass in terms of the thickness of the brane by using accurate measurements of atomic transition frequencies. The constraints are very stringent for narrow branes.

  2. Electroweak symmetry breaking by extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hsin-Chia Cheng; Bogdan A. Dobrescu and Christopher T. Hill

    2000-05-25

    Electroweak symmetry breaking may be naturally induced by the observed quark and gauge fields in extra dimensions without a fundamental Higgs field. The authors show that a composite Higgs doublet can arise as a bound state of (t,b){sub L} and a linear combination of the Kaluza-Klein states of t{sub R}, due to QCD in extra dimensions. The top quark mass depends on the number of active t{sub R} Kaluza-Klein modes, and is consistent with the experimental value.

  3. Search for Extra Dimensions at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Wynne, Sara-Madge; /Liverpool U.

    2007-08-01

    This poster, presented at the 2006 Duke Hadron Collider Symposium, presents the results from searches for large extra dimensions, as proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD), and Randall-Sundrum (RS) model warped extra dimensions, at CDF.

  4. Signatures of extra dimensions in gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriot, David; Lucena Gómez, Gustavo

    2017-06-01

    Considering gravitational waves propagating on the most general 4+N-dimensional space-time, we investigate the effects due to the N extra dimensions on the four-dimensional waves. All wave equations are derived in general and discussed. On Minkowski4 times an arbitrary Ricci-flat compact manifold, we find: a massless wave with an additional polarization, the breathing mode, and extra waves with high frequencies fixed by Kaluza-Klein masses. We discuss whether these two effects could be observed.

  5. Physics of Extra Dimensions Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Csaba Csaki

    2007-12-19

    We provide the final report for Csaba Csaki's OJI project on "Physics of extra dimensions". It includes the summary of results of higgsless electroweak symmetry breaking, gauge-higgs unification, AdS/QCD and holographic technicolor, and chiral lattice theories from warped extra dimensions.

  6. Searching for extra-dimensions at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benucci, Leonardo

    2009-06-01

    A possible solution to the hierarchy problem is the presence of extra space dimensions beyond the three ones which are known from our everyday experience. The phenomenological ADD model of large extra-dimensions predicts a ETmiss +jet signature. Randall-Sundrum-type extra-dimensions predict di-lepton and di-jet resonances. This contribution addresses an overview of experimental issues and discovery potential for these new particles at the LHC, focusing on perspectives with the CMS detector during early data taking.

  7. Johannes Kepler and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Archibald W.

    2004-02-01

    How many dimensions are there? The answer used to be four — three spatial and one time dimension. Maybe it still is, though nowadays we hear that the answer may be more, perhaps many more. Many of our students have heard about this on television or read about it. They want to know more. Why do physicists think we need more than three spatial dimensions? What's the point of it all?

  8. Editorial: Focus on Extra Space Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Pomarol, Alex

    2010-07-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have just started. In addition to verifying the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics, these experiments will probe a new energy frontier and test extensions of the SM. The existence of extra dimensions is one of the most attractive possibilities for physics beyond the SM. This focus issue contains a collection of articles addressing both theoretical and phenomenological aspects of extra-dimensional models. Focus on Extra Space Dimensions Contents Minimal universal extra dimensions in CalcHEP/CompHEP AseshKrishna Datta, Kyoungchul Kong and Konstantin T Matchev Disordered extra dimensions Karim Benakli Codimension-2 brane-bulk matching: examples from six and ten dimensions Allan Bayntun, C P Burgess and Leo van Nierop Gauge threshold corrections in warped geometry Kiwoon Choi, Ian-Woo Kim and Chang Sub Shin Holographic methods and gauge-Higgs unification in flat extra dimensions Marco Serone Soft-wall stabilization Joan A Cabrer, Gero von Gersdorff and Mariano Quirós Warped five-dimensional models: phenomenological status and experimental prospects Hooman Davoudiasl, Shrihari Gopalakrishna, Eduardo Pontón and José Santiago

  9. Hierarchies Without Symmetries from Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Schmaltz, Martin

    1999-03-22

    It is commonly thought that small couplings in a low-energy theory, such as those needed for the fermion mass hierarchy or proton stability, must originate from symmetries in a high-energy theory. We show that this expectation is violated in theories where the Standard Model fields are confined to a thick wall in extra dimensions, with the fermions ''stuck'' at different points in the wall. Couplings between them are then suppressed due to the exponentially small overlaps of their wave functions. This provides a framework for understanding both the fermion mass hierarchy and proton stability without imposing symmetries, but rather in terms of higher dimensional geography. A model independent prediction of this scenario is non-universal couplings of the Standard Model fermions to the ''Kaluza-Klein'' excitations of the gauge fields. This allows a measurement of the fermion locations in the extra dimensions at the LHC or NLC if the wall thickness is close to the TeV scale.

  10. Supersymmetric unification requires extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Fallbacher, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael

    2013-05-23

    We discuss settings that predict precision gauge unification in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We show that, if one requires anomaly freedom and fermion masses while demanding that unification is not an accident, only R symmetries can forbid the supersymmetric Higgs mass term {mu}. We then review the proof that R symmetries are not available in conventional grand unified theories (GUTs) and argue that this prevents natural solutions to the doublet-triplet splitting problem in four dimensions. On the other hand, higher-dimensional GUTs do not suffer from this problem. We briefly comment on an explicit string-derived model in which the {mu} and dimension five proton decay problems are solved by an order four discrete R symmetry, and comment on the higher-dimensional origin of this symmetry.

  11. Probes of Universal Extra Dimensions at Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-06-28

    In the Universal Extra Dimensions model of Appelquist, Cheng and Dobrescu, all of the Standard Model fields are placed in the bulk and thus have Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. These KK states can only be pair produced at colliders due to the tree-level conservation of KK number, with the lightest of them being stable and possibly having a mass as low as {approx_equal} 350 400 GeV. After calculating the contribution to g-2 in this model we investigate the production cross sections and signatures for these particles at both hadron and lepton colliders. We demonstrate that these signatures critically depend upon whether the lightest KK states remain stable or are allowed to decay by any of a number of new physics mechanisms. These mechanisms which induce KK decays are studied in detail.

  12. A Brief Review on Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Lorenzana, Abdel

    2006-09-01

    Considering models with extra dimensions have introduced completely new ways of looking up on old problems in theoretical physics, and conversely, it has also introduced new interesting problems of theoretical interest. Here we present a brief review on the developments of the idea and the current trends. We discuss both theoretical and phenomenological aspects of some models where extra dimensions play a role, and which provide particular insights for the possible use of additional dimensions in particle model building as well as in some new interesting scenarios of possible cosmological applications. Given the interest of this special volume, we particularly underline some of the contributions to the field by people working in Mexico, from the dawn to the present days of extra dimensional models.

  13. A Brief Review on Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Lorenzana, Abdel

    2006-09-25

    Considering models with extra dimensions have introduced completely new ways of looking up on old problems in theoretical physics, and conversely, it has also introduced new interesting problems of theoretical interest. Here we present a brief review on the developments of the idea and the current trends. We discuss both theoretical and phenomenological aspects of some models where extra dimensions play a role, and which provide particular insights for the possible use of additional dimensions in particle model building as well as in some new interesting scenarios of possible cosmological applications. Given the interest of this special volume, we particularly underline some of the contributions to the field by people working in Mexico, from the dawn to the present days of extra dimensional models.

  14. Deconstructing Dimensions: Adventures in Theory Space (Large Extra Dimension)

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    2009-11-28

    Theories of gravity and gauge forces in more than four dimensions offer a new paradigm for physics beyond the standard model. We present some of the most interesting recent ideas, and explain how signals for extra dimensions could appear in experiments at a linear e+e- collider.

  15. Microscopic Primordial Black Holes and Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John A.; Wizansky, Tommer

    2006-11-15

    We examine the production and evolution of microscopic black holes in the early universe in the large extra dimensions scenario. We demonstrate that, unlike in the standard four-dimensional cosmology, in large extra dimensions absorption of matter from the primordial plasma by the black holes is significant and can lead to rapid growth of the black hole mass density. This effect can be used to constrain the conditions present in the very early universe. We demonstrate that this constraint is applicable in regions of parameter space not excluded by existing bounds.

  16. Microscopic primordial black holes and extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John; Wizansky, Tommer

    2007-02-15

    We examine the production and evolution of microscopic black holes in the early universe in the large extra dimensions scenario. We demonstrate that, unlike in the standard four-dimensional cosmology, in large extra dimensions absorption of matter from the primordial plasma by the black holes is significant and can lead to rapid growth of the black hole mass density. This effect can be used to constrain the conditions present in the very early universe. We demonstrate that this constraint is applicable in regions of parameter space not excluded by existing bounds.

  17. Quantum simulation of an extra dimension.

    PubMed

    Boada, O; Celi, A; Latorre, J I; Lewenstein, M

    2012-03-30

    We present a general strategy to simulate a D+1-dimensional quantum system using a D-dimensional one. We analyze in detail a feasible implementation of our scheme using optical lattice technology. The simplest nontrivial realization of a fourth dimension corresponds to the creation of a bi-volume geometry. We also propose single- and many-particle experimental signatures to detect the effects of the extra dimension.

  18. Phenomenology of Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne L.

    2002-12-09

    We study the phenomenology of a supersymmetric bulk in the scenario of large extra dimensions. The virtual exchange of gravitino KK states in selectron pair production in polarized e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions is examined. The leading order operator for this exchange is dimension six, in contrast to that of graviton KK exchange which induces a dimension eight operator at lowest order. Some kinematic distributions for selectron production are presented. These processes yield an enormous sensitivity to the fundamental higher dimensional Planck scale.

  19. CERN LHC signals from warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Belyaev, Alexander; Krupovnickas, Tadas; Perez, Gilad; Virzi, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gluons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the standard model fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of the KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton's constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decays mostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for M{sub KKG} < or approx. 4 TeV, 100 fb{sup -1} of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic 'top-jets'. We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays (golden modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example, little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely, (1) suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z{sup '}), due to their 'light-fermion-phobic' nature, and (2) difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  20. LHC Signals from Warped Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, K.; Belyaev, A.; Krupovnickas, T.; Perez, G.; Virzi, J.

    2006-12-06

    We study production of Kaluza-Klein gluons (KKG) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the framework of a warped extra dimension with the Standard Model (SM) fields propagating in the bulk. We show that the detection of KK gluon is challenging since its production is suppressed by small couplings to the proton's constituents. Moreover, the KK gluon decaysmostly to top pairs due to an enhanced coupling and hence is broad. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that for MKKG<~;; 4 TeV, 100 fb-1 of data at the LHC can provide discovery of the KK gluon. We utilize a sizeable left-right polarization asymmetry from the KK gluon resonance to maximize the signal significance, and we explore the novel feature of extremely highly energetic"top-jets." We briefly discuss how the detection of electroweak gauge KK states (Z/W) faces a similar challenge since their leptonic decays ("golden" modes) are suppressed. Our analysis suggests that other frameworks, for example little Higgs, which rely on UV completion via strong dynamics might face similar challenges, namely (1) Suppressed production rates for the new particles (such as Z'), due to their"lightfermion-phobic" nature, and (2) Difficulties in detection since the new particles are broad and decay predominantly to third generation quarks and longitudinal gauge bosons.

  1. Resonances from two universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Burdman, Gustavo; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Ponton, Eduardo

    2006-10-01

    Standard model gauge bosons propagating in two universal extra dimensions give rise to heavy spin-1 and spin-0 particles. The lightest of these, carrying Kaluza-Klein numbers (1,0), may be produced only in pairs at colliders, whereas the (1,1) modes, which are heavier by a factor of {radical}(2), may be singly produced. We show that the cascade decays of (1,1) particles generate a series of closely-spaced narrow resonances in the tt invariant mass distribution. At the Tevatron, s-channel production of (1,1) gluons and electroweak bosons will be sensitive to tt resonances up to masses in the 0.5-0.7 TeV range. Searches at the LHC for resonances originating from several higher-level modes will further test the existence of two universal extra dimensions.

  2. Particle Physics Probes of Extra Spacetime Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne L

    2002-05-13

    The possibility that spacetime is extended beyond the familiar 3+1-dimensions has intrigued physicists for a century. Indeed, the consequences of a dimensionally richer spacetime would be profound. Recently, new theories with higher dimensional spacetimes have been developed to resolve the hierarchy problem in particle physics. These scenarios make distinct predictions which allow for experiment to probe the existence of extra dimensions in new ways. We review the conceptual framework of these scenarios, their implications in collider and short-range gravity experiments, their astrophysical and cosmological effects, as well as the constraints placed on these models from present data.

  3. Kinks, extra dimensions, and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Gregory, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    We investigate in detail the gravitational wave signal from kinks on cosmic (super)strings, including the kinematical effects from the internal extra dimensions. We find that the signal is suppressed, however, the effect is less significant that that for cusps. Combined with the greater incidence of kinks on (super)strings, it is likely that the kink signal offers the better chance for detection of cosmic (super)strings.

  4. Signals for Extra Dimensions at CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-08-28

    A brief overview is presented of the signatures for several different models with extra dimensions at CLIC, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with a center of mass energy of 3-5 TeV and an integrated luminosity of order 1 ab{sup -1}. In all cases the search reach for the resulting new physic signatures is found to be in the range of {approx} 15-80 TeV.

  5. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2016-12-16

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Finally, stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.

  6. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; de Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.; Minos Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab's Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×1 020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μ m at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.

  7. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; De Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O’Connor, J.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-12-16

    Here, we report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. This analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 × 1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μ m at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Furthermore, we obtained stronger limits for nonvanishing masses.

  8. Constraints on Large Extra Dimensions from the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2016-12-16

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56×1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.

  9. Large Extra Dimension and Dark Matter Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Bo; Starkman, Glenn D.; Silk, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    If our space has the large extra dimensions as proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (ADD), then gravity would start to deviate from Newtonian gravity and be greatly enhanced in sub-millimeter scales. Here we show that in the ADD scenario, gravity could play an important role (compared to the weak interaction) in the interactions between dark matter particles and the electron. We find that for typical WIMP dark matter, such dark matter-electron ``gravitational'' scattering cross section may be much larger than the dark matter-nucleon cross section constrained by current dark matter experiments.

  10. Light sterile neutrinos from large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, E.; Rajasekaran, G.; Sarkar, U.

    2000-12-01

    An experimentally verifiable Higgs-triplet model of neutrino masses from large extra dimensions was recently proposed. We extend it to accommodate a light sterile neutrino which also mixes with the three active neutrinos. Another extension without the Higgs triplet allows the specific realization of a previously proposed phenomenological model of neutrino oscillations with decay to account for the LSND data, which is now the only viable such model now left, in view of the latest atmospheric and solar neutrino-oscillation data from the Super-Kamiokande collaboration.

  11. Split universal extra dimension and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seong Chan; Shu Jing

    2009-05-01

    Motivated by the recent observation of the high energy electron and positron excesses in cosmic ray by PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS, we suggest an anomaly-free scenario for the universal extra dimension that localizes the standard model quarks and splits the spectrum of Kaluza-Klein (KK) quarks from KK leptons. When the SM quarks are 'well localized' at the boundaries, the most stringent bound of the model (1/R>510 GeV) comes from the resonance search for the Tevatron dijet channels. Even at the early stage of LHC, one can discover the second KK gluon for masses up to 4 TeV.

  12. Lepton flavor violation in extra dimension models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.

    2005-03-01

    Models involving large extra spatial dimension(s) have interesting predictions on lepton flavor violating processes. We consider some five-dimensional (5D) models which are related to neutrino mass generation or address the fermion masses hierarchy problem. We study the signatures in low energy experiments that can discriminate the different models. The focus is on muon-electron conversion in nuclei {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {mu}{yields}3e processes and their {tau} counterparts. Their links with the active neutrino mass matrix are investigated. We show that in the models we discussed the branching ratio of {mu}{yields}e{gamma} like rare process is much smaller than the ones of {mu}{yields}3e like processes. This is in sharp contrast to most of the traditional wisdom based on four-dimensional (4D) gauge models. Moreover, some rare tau decays are more promising than the rare muon decays.

  13. KK parity in warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; Servant, Géraldine

    2008-04-01

    We construct models with a Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity in a five-dimensional warped geometry, in an attempt to address the little hierarchy problem present in setups with bulk Standard Model fields. The lightest KK particle (LKP) is stable and can play the role of dark matter. We consider the possibilities of gluing two identical slices of AdS5 in either the UV (IR-UV-IR model) or the IR region (UV-IR-UV model) and discuss the model-building issues as well as phenomenological properties in both cases. In particular, we find that the UV-IR-UV model is not gravitationally stable and that additional mechanisms might be required in the IR-UV-IR model to address flavor issues. Collider signals of the warped KK parity are different from either the conventional warped extra dimension without KK parity, in which the new particles are not necessarily pair-produced, or the KK parity in flat universal extra dimensions, where each KK level is nearly degenerate in mass. Dark matter and collider properties of a TeV mass KK Z gauge boson as the LKP are discussed.

  14. Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking from Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2003-08-01

    We study the dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking (DEWSB) in the D(= 6, 8, ⋯)-dimensional bulk with compactified extra dimensions. We identify the critical binding strength for triggering the DEWSB, based on the ladder Schwinger-Dyson equation. In the top mode standard model with extra dimensions, where the standard model gauge bosons and the third generation of quarks and leptons are put in the bulk, we analyze the most attractive channel (MAC) by using renormalization group equations (RGEs) of (dimensionless) bulk gauge couplings and determine the effective cutoff where the MAC coupling exceeds the critical value. We then find that the top-condensation can take place for D = 8. Combining RGEs of top-Yukawa and Higgs-quartic couplings with compositeness conditions, we predict the top mass, mt = 173 - 180 GeV, and the Higgs mass, mH = 181 - 211 GeV, for D = 8, where we took the universal compactification scale 1/R = 1 - 100 TeV.

  15. Black hole production and large extra dimensions.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kingman

    2002-06-03

    Black hole (BH) production at colliders is possible when the colliding energy is above the Planck scale, which can effectively be at TeV scale in models of large extra dimensions. In this work, we study the production of black holes at colliders and discuss the possible signatures. We point out the " ij-->BH+others" subprocesses, in which the BH and other standard-model particles are produced with a large transverse momentum. When the BH decays, it gives a signature that consists of particles of high multiplicity in a boosted spherical shape on one side of the event and a few numbers of high p(T) partons on the other side, which provide very useful tags for the event.

  16. Dark energy, inflation, and extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhardt, Paul J.; Wesley, Daniel

    2009-05-15

    We consider how accelerated expansion, whether due to inflation or dark energy, imposes strong constraints on fundamental theories obtained by compactification from higher dimensions. For theories that obey the null energy condition (NEC), we find that inflationary cosmology is impossible for a wide range of compactifications; and a dark energy phase consistent with observations is only possible if both Newton's gravitational constant and the dark energy equation of state vary with time. If the theory violates the NEC, inflation and dark energy are only possible if the NEC-violating elements are inhomogeneously distributed in the compact dimensions and vary with time in precise synchrony with the matter and energy density in the noncompact dimensions. Although our proofs are derived assuming general relativity applies in both four and higher dimensions and certain forms of metrics, we argue that similar constraints must apply for more general compactifications.

  17. Looking for extra dimensions in compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugones, Germán; Arbañil, José D. V.

    2017-06-01

    The properties of spherically symmetric static compact stars are studied in the Randall-Sundrum II type braneworld model assuming that the spacetime outside the star is described by a Schwarzschild metric. The integration of the stellar structure equations employing the so called causal limit equation of state (EoS) shows that the equilibrium solutions can violate the general relativistic causal limit. An analysis of the properties of hadronic and strange quark stars using standard EoSs confirm the same result: there is a branch in the mass-radius diagram that shows the typical behaviour found within the frame of General Relativity and another branch of stars that are supported against collapse by the nonlocal effects of the bulk on the brane. Stars belonging to the new branch can violate the general relativistic causal limit, may have an arbitrarily large mass, and are stable under small radial perturbations. If they exist in Nature, these objects could be hidden among the population of black hole candidates. The future observation of compact stars with masses and radii falling above the causal limit of General Relativity but below the Schwarzschild limit maybe a promising astrophysical evidence for the existence of extra dimensions.

  18. Diphoton resonance from a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Hörner, Clara; Neubert, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We argue that extensions of the Standard Model (SM) with a warped extra dimension, which successfully address the hierarchy and flavor problems of elementary particle physics, can provide an elegant explanation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess recently reported by ATLAS and CMS. A gauge-singlet bulk scalar with {O} (1) couplings to fermions is identified as the new resonance S, and the vector-like Kaluza-Klein excitations of the SM quarks and leptons mediate its loop-induced couplings to photons and gluons. The electroweak gauge symmetry almost unambiguously dictates the bulk matter content and hence the hierarchies of the Sto γ γ, W W,ZZ,Zγ, toverline{t} and dijet decay rates. We find that the S → Zγ decay mode is strongly suppressed, such that Br( S → Zγ) /Br( S → γγ) < 0 .1. The hierarchy problem for the new scalar boson is solved in analogy with the Higgs boson by localizing it near the infrared brane. The infinite sums over the Kaluza-Klein towers of fermion states converge and can be calculated in closed form with a remarkably simple result. Reproducing the observed pp → S → γγ signal requires Kaluza-Klein masses in the multi-TeV range, consistent with bounds from flavor physics and electroweak precision observables.

  19. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.

    2016-12-16

    We report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. Our analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 ×1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The ratiosmore » of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Finally, stronger limits are obtained for nonvanishing masses.« less

  20. Constraints on large extra dimensions from the MINOS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Here, we report new constraints on the size of large extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS experiment between 2005 and 2012. This analysis employs a model in which sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions and thus modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities due to mixing between active and sterile neutrino states. Using Fermilab’s Neutrinos at the Main Injector beam exposure of 10.56 × 1020 protons on target, we combine muon neutrino charged current and neutral current data sets from the Near and Far Detectors and observe no evidence for deviations from standard three-flavor neutrino oscillations.more » The ratios of reconstructed energy spectra in the two detectors constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.45 μ m at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Furthermore, we obtained stronger limits for nonvanishing masses.« less

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions Black Holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.

    2013-10-01

    The book Black holes, Cosmology and Extra Dimensions written by Kirill A Bronnikov and Sergey G Rubin has been published recently by World Scientific Publishing Company. The authors are well known experts in gravity and cosmology. The book is a monograph, a considerable part of which is based on the original work of the authors. Their original point of view on some of the problems makes the book quite interesting, covering a variety of important topics of the modern theory of gravity, astrophysics and cosmology. It consists of 11 chapters which are organized in three parts. The book starts with an introduction, where the authors briefly discuss the main ideas of General Relativity, giving some historical remarks on its development and application to cosmology, and mentioning some more recent subjects such as brane worlds, f(R)-theories and gravity in higher dimensions. Part I of the book is called 'Gravity'. Chapters two and three are devoted to the Einstein equations and their spherical symmetric black hole solutions. This material is quite standard and can be found in practically any book on General Relativity. A brief summary of the Kerr metric and black hole thermodynamics are given in chapter four. The main part of this chapter is devoted to spherically symmetric black holes in non-Einstein gravity (with scalar and phantom fields), black holes with regular interior, and black holes in brane worlds. Chapters five and six are mainly dedicated to wormholes and the problem of their stability. Part II (Cosmology) starts with discussion of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and de Sitter solutions of the Einstein equations and their properties. It follows by describing a `big picture' of the modern cosmology (inflation, post-inflationary reheating, the radiation-dominated and matter-dominated states, and modern stage of the (secondary) inflation). The authors explain how the inflation models allow one to solve many of the long-standing problems of cosmology, such as

  2. Intersection democracy for winding branes and stabilization of extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rador, Tonguç

    2005-08-01

    We show that, in the context of pure Einstein gravity, a democratic principle for intersection possibilities of branes winding around extra dimensions in a given partitioning yield stabilization, while what the observed space follows is matter-like dust evolution. Here democracy is used in the sense that, in a given decimation of extra dimensions, all possible wrappings and hence all possible intersections are allowed. Generally, the necessary and sufficient condition for this is that the dimensionality m of the observed space dimensions obey 3 ⩽ m ⩽ N for N ⩾ 3, where N is the decimation order of the extra dimensions.

  3. Particle Physics of Brane Worlds and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, Sreerup; Sridhar, K.

    2016-06-01

    Preface; 1. Dimensional dreams; 2. The Standard Model and beyond; 3. The birth of compact dimensions; 4. String theory: a review; 5. Effective theories; 6. Large extra dimensions; 7. Visible towers of invisible gravitons; 8. Making black holes; 9. Universal extra dimensions; 10. Warped compactifications; 11. Graviton resonances; 12. Stability of warped Worlds; 13. Exploring the bulk; 14. Epilogue; Appendix A. General relativity in a nutshell; Appendix B. Testing the inverse square law; Index.

  4. Zero point energy on extra dimensions: Noncommutative torus

    SciTech Connect

    Fabi, S.; Harms, B.; Karatheodoris, G.

    2007-09-15

    In this paper we calculate the zero point energy density experienced by observers on M{sup 4} due to a massless scalar field defined throughout M{sup 4}xT{sub F}{sup 2}, where T{sub F}{sup 2} are fuzzy extra dimensions. Using the Green's function approach we calculate the energy density for the commutative torus and the fuzzy torus. We also calculate the energy density for the fuzzy torus using the Hamiltonian approach. Agreement is shown between the Green's function and Hamiltonian approaches.

  5. Monojet and single photon signals from universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Macesanu, Cosmin; Nandi, Satyanarayan; Rujoiu, Marius

    2006-04-01

    The usual universal extra dimensions scenario does not allow for single production of first level Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations of matter due to the KK number conservation. However, if the matter fields are localized on a fat rane embedded in a higher dimensional space, matter-gravitation interactions violate KK number, and the production of single KK excitations becomes possible. In this paper we analyze the production of a single KK matter excitation together with a graviton in the final state, and study the potential for discovery at the Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Constraints on large extra dimensions from MINOS and MINOS+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rijck, Simon; Huang, Junting

    2017-09-01

    In a model where sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein states in large extra dimensions, we derive limits on the size of the extra dimensions from data collected by the MINOS and MINOS+ experiments. Using Fermilab’s NuMI beam exposure of 16.36 × 1020 protons-on-target we constrain the size of large extra dimensions to be smaller than 0.17 µm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest active neutrino mass. Even stronger limits are obtained for non-vanishing masses.

  7. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in Dielectron and Diphoton Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bean, A.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Doulas, S.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hou, S.; Huang, Y.; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Meng, X. C.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Peters, O.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramberg, E.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sculli, J.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wightman, J. A.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2001-02-01

    We report a search for effects of large extra spatial dimensions in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector, using events containing a pair of electrons or photons. The data are in good agreement with the expected background and do not exhibit evidence for large extra dimensions. We set the most restrictive lower limits to date, at the 95% C.L. on the effective Planck scale between 1.0 and 1.4 TeV for several formalisms and numbers of extra dimensions.

  8. Report of the Snowmass Subgroup on Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-12-17

    In this report we summarize the work performed at Snowmass 2001 on the physics of extra dimensions. We divide these analyses into the following classes: searches for extra dimensional phenomena, identification of specific new physics scenarios, studies of black hole production and non-commutative QED.

  9. Realistic Field Theories on Submanifolds of Compact Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mirabelli, E.

    2005-04-05

    In this thesis, they study various physical models which assume the existence of spatial dimensions beyond the familiar three. While everyday observation suggests only three dimensions, there is no shortage of potential explanations for how extra dimensions could have escaped detection for so long. For instance, the extra dimensions could be compact, curled into a microscopic volume so that you can never move far in the extra dimensions without ending up back where you started. Or, the elements of everyday experience could be trapped on a three-dimensional membrane floating in a higher dimensions space. The models studied in this thesis each use both of these mechanisms in tandem, with electrons, photons, quarks, and the like being confined to a three-dimensional membrane that sits in a space with compact extra dimensions. Gravitons (and perhaps other new types of particles) could travel beyond the three-dimensional membrane, so they can feel the effects of the higher-dimensional space, but because the extra dimensions are compactified on a small scale, the effects are subtle.

  10. Probing large extra dimensions with IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, Arman; Peres, O.L.G.; Tabrizi, Zahra E-mail: orlando@ifi.unicamp.br

    2014-12-01

    In models with Large Extra Dimensions the smallness of neutrino masses can be naturally explained by introducing gauge singlet fermions which propagate in the bulk. The Kaluza-Klein modes of these fermions appear as towers of sterile neutrino states on the brane. We study the phenomenological consequences of this picture for the high energy atmospheric neutrinos. For this purpose we construct a detailed equivalence between a model with large extra dimensions and a (3+n) scenario consisting of three active and n extra sterile neutrino states, which provides a clear intuitive understanding of Kaluza-Klein modes. Finally, we analyze the collected data of high energy atmospheric neutrinos by IceCube experiment and obtain bounds on the radius of extra dimensions.

  11. FLRW and LTB Cosmology in Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gueham, A.; Mebarki, N.

    2010-10-31

    Two models of 4+1 dimensions are discussed and some new exact solutions are found. Moreover, a dynamical study of a 4+1 homogeneous FLRW model is made. It is shown that the LTB inhomogeneous case leads to a scenario of the universe similar to that of Turok's cyclic model but with different mechanism.

  12. Effect of extra dimensions on gravitational waves from cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands.

  13. Effect of Extra Dimensions on Gravitational Waves from Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    O'Callaghan, Eimear; Chadburn, Sarah; Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Gregory, Ruth; Zavala, Ivonne

    2010-08-20

    We show how the motion of cosmic superstrings in extra dimensions can modify the gravitational wave signal from cusps. Additional dimensions both round off cusps, as well as reducing the probability of their formation, and thus give a significant dimension dependent damping of the gravitational waves. We look at the implication of this effect for LIGO and LISA, as well as commenting on more general frequency bands.

  14. Particle creation in the presence of a warped extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Suman; Kar, Sayan E-mail: sayan@cts.iitkgp.ernet.in

    2008-08-15

    Particle creation in spacetimes with a warped extra dimension is studied. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of a conformally coupled, massless scalar field in a five-dimensional warped geometry where the induced metric on the 3-branes is that of a spatially flat cosmological model. We look at situations where the scale of the extra dimension is assumed (i) to be time independent or (ii) to have specific functional forms for time dependence. The warp factor is chosen to be that of the Randall-Sundrum model. With particular choices for the functional form of the scale factor (and also the function characterizing the time evolution of the extra dimension) we obtain the |{beta}{sub k}|{sup 2}, the particle number and energy densities after solving (wherever possible, analytically but, otherwise, numerically) the conformal scalar field equations. The behaviours of these quantities for the massless and massive Kaluza-Klein modes are examined. Our results show the effect of a warped extra dimension on particle creation and illustrate how the nature of particle production on the brane depends on the nature of warping, and the type of cosmological evolution as well as the temporal evolution of the extra dimension.

  15. Higher Curvature Gravity in TeV-Scale Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-03-31

    We begin a general exploration of the phenomenology of TeV-scale extra-dimensional models with gravitational actions that contain higher curvature terms. In particular, we examine how the classic collider signatures of the models of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali (missing energy and new dimension-8 contact interactions) and of Randall and Sundrum (TeV-scale graviton Kaluza-Klein resonances) are altered by these modifications to the usual Einstein-Hilbert action. We find that not only are the detailed signatures for these gravitationally induced processes altered but new contributions are found to arise due to the existence of additional scalar Kaluza-Klein states in the spectrum.

  16. Current LHC constraints on minimal universal extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutschmann, Nicolas; Flacke, Thomas; Kim, Jong Soo

    2017-08-01

    In this letter, we present LHC limits on the minimal universal extra dimension (MUED) model from LHC Run 1 data and current limits from searches of the ongoing Run 2. Typical collider signals of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) states mimic generic degenerate supersymmetry (SUSY) missing transverse momentum signatures since the KK particles cascade decay into jets, leptons and the lightest KK particle which is stable due to KK parity and evades detection. We test the parameter space against a large number of supersymmetry based missing energy searches implemented in the public code CheckMATE. We demonstrate the complementarity of employing various searches which target a large number of final state signatures, and we derive the most up to date limits on the MUED parameter space from 13 TeV SUSY searches.

  17. Solar neutrino oscillation from large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, A.; Ramond, P.; Romanino, A.; Ross, G. G.

    2000-12-01

    A plausible explanation for the existence of additional light sterile neutrinos is that they correspond to modulini, fermionic partners of moduli, which propagate in new large dimensions. We discuss the phenomenological implications of such states and show that solar neutrino oscillation is well described by small angle MSW oscillation to the tower of Kaluza-Klein states associated with the modulini. In the optimal case the recoil electron energy spectrum agrees precisely with the measured one, in contrast to the single sterile neutrino case which is disfavoured. We also consider how all oscillation phenomena can be explained in a model including bulk neutrino states. In particular, we show that a naturally maximal mixing for atmospheric neutrinos can be easily obtained.

  18. Gravitational waves from mesoscopic dynamics of the extra dimensions

    PubMed

    Hogan

    2000-09-04

    Recent models which describe our world as a brane embedded in a higher dimensional space introduce new geometrical degrees of freedom, associated with spatial variations in the position of the brane and the size of the extra dimensions, that can be coherently excited by symmetry breaking in the early universe even on "mesoscopic" scales as large as 1 mm. The characteristic frequency and intensity of resulting gravitational radiation backgrounds are estimated. Extra dimensions with scale between 10(-14) and 1 mm can produce detectable backgrounds at frequencies f approximately 10(3) to 10(-4) Hz.

  19. What does SN1987A say about extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerahanumak, Satheeshkumar

    2010-02-01

    There has been a tremendous progress in the last decade in our efforts to confront the String-inspired ideas with experiments or observations. There are two approaches to this problem. One is to use the LHC data and other is to use astronomical data. Among the latter, using SN1987A data for placing the constraints on the models of extra dimensions is very popular. In this poster, we consider all the possible energy loss mechanisms of SN1987A and study the constraints they place on the number and size of extra dimensions and the higher dimensional Planck scale in the ADD scenario. )

  20. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r→0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  1. Universal Extra Dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2008-04-21

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension (UED) models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the KK graviton problem in the minimal UED model. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a dark matter candidate in this framework. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the dark matter relic abundance can increase significantly. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of UED models with right-handed neutrinos.

  2. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  3. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    DOE PAGES

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  4. Extra Dimensions: 3D in PDF Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) and the ISO PRC file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. Until recently, Adobe's Acrobat software was also capable of incorporating 3D content into PDF files from a variety of 3D file formats, including proprietary CAD formats. However, this functionality is no longer available in Acrobat X, having been spun off to a separate company. Incorporating 3D content now requires the additional purchase of a separate plug-in. In this talk we present alternatives based on open source libraries which allow the programmatic creation of 3D content in PDF format. While not providing the same level of access to CAD files as the commercial software, it does provide physicists with an alternative path to incorporate 3D content into PDF files from such disparate applications as detector geometries from Geant4, 3D data sets, mathematical surfaces or tesselated volumes.

  5. Wormholes and black universes communicated with extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Korolyov, P. A.; Makhmudov, A.; Skvortsova, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    In 6D general relativity with a phantom scalar field as a source of gravity, we present solutions that implement a transition from an effective 4D geometry times small extra dimensions to an effectively 6D space-time where the physical laws are different from ours. We consider manifolds with the structure 𝕄0×𝕄1×𝕄2, where 𝕄0 is 2D Lorentzian space-time while each of 𝕄1,2 can be a 2-sphere or a 2-torus. Some solutions describe wormholes with spherical symmetry in our space-time and toroidal extra dimensions. Others are of black universe type: at one end there is a 6D asymptotically anti-de Sitter black hole while beyond the horizon the geometry tends to a 4D de Sitter cosmology times a small 2D spherical extra space.

  6. Deviations from Newton's law in supersymmetric large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callin, P.; Burgess, C. P.

    2006-09-01

    Deviations from Newton's inverse-squared law at the micron length scale are smoking-gun signals for models containing supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLEDs), which have been proposed as approaches for resolving the cosmological constant problem. Just like their non-supersymmetric counterparts, SLED models predict gravity to deviate from the inverse-square law because of the advent of new dimensions at sub-millimeter scales. However SLED models differ from their non-supersymmetric counterparts in three important ways: (i) the size of the extra dimensions is fixed by the observed value of the dark energy density, making it impossible to shorten the range over which new deviations from Newton's law must be seen; (ii) supersymmetry predicts there to be more fields in the extra dimensions than just gravity, implying different types of couplings to matter and the possibility of repulsive as well as attractive interactions; and (iii) the same mechanism which is purported to keep the cosmological constant naturally small also keeps the extra-dimensional moduli effectively massless, leading to deviations from general relativity in the far infrared of the scalar-tensor form. We here explore the deviations from Newton's law which are predicted over micron distances, and show the ways in which they differ and resemble those in the non-supersymmetric case.

  7. Astrophysical bounds on photons escaping into extra dimensions.

    PubMed

    Friedland, A; Giannotti, M

    2008-01-25

    In a class of extra-dimensional models with a warped metric and a single brane the photon can be localized on the brane by gravity only. An intriguing feature of these models is the possibility of the photon escaping into the extra dimensions. The search for this effect has motivated the present round of precision ortho-positronium decay experiments. We point out that in this framework a photon in plasma should be metastable, and we consider what this implies for cooling of globular cluster stars and core-collapse supernovae. The resulting bounds on the model parameter exceed the possible reach of ortho-positronium experiments by many orders of magnitude.

  8. Fermion generations from ``apple-shaped'' extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Midodashvili, Pavle; Singleton, Douglas

    2007-08-01

    We examine the behavior of fermions in the presence of an internal compact 2-manifold which in one of the spherical angles exhibits a conical character with an obtuse angle. The extra manifold can be pictured as an apple-like surface i.e. a sphere with an extra 'wedge' insert. Such a surface has conical singularities at north and south poles. It is shown that for this setup one can obtain, in four dimensions, three trapped massless fermion modes which differ from each other by having different values of angular momentum with respect to the internal 2-manifold. The extra angular momentum acts as the family label and these three massless modes are interpreted as the three generations of fundamental fermions.

  9. Experimental Probes of the Randall-Sundrum Infinite Extra Dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    2000-10-16

    The phenomenological possibilities of the Randall-Sundrum non-compact extra dimension scenario with the AdS horizon increased to approximately a millimeter length, corresponding to an effective brane tension of (TeV){sup 4}, are investigated. The corrections to the Newtonian potential are found to be the only observationally accessible probe of this scenario, as previously suggested in the literature. In particular, the presence of the continuum of KK modes does not lead to any observable collider signatures. The extent to which experimental tests of Newtonian gravity can distinguish this scenario from the scenario of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali with one and two millimeter size extra dimensions is explicitly demonstrated.

  10. Detecting extra dimensions by Hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Ping, Zhou; Peng, Zhou; Hao-Xue, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the idea in spectroscopy of detecting extra dimensions by regarding the nucleus as a homogeneous sphere. In our results, it turns out that the gravitational potential inside the nucleus is much stronger than the potential induced by a particle in the same regime in ref. [16], and thus a more significant correction of the ground state energy of hydrogen-like atoms is obtained, which can be used to determine the existence of ADD's extra dimensions. In order to get a larger order of magnitude for the correction, it is better to apply our theory to high-Z atoms or muonic atoms, where the volume of the nucleus can't be ignored and the relativistic effect is important. Our work is based on the Dirac equation in aweak gravity field, and the result is more precise.

  11. Gamma rays from the Galactic bulge and large extra dimensions.

    PubMed

    Cassé, Michel; Paul, Jacques; Bertone, Gianfranco; Sigl, Günter

    2004-03-19

    An intriguing feature of extra dimensions is the possible production of Kaluza-Klein gravitons by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung, in the course of core collapse of massive stars, with gravitons then being trapped around the newly born neutron stars and decaying into two gamma rays, making neutron stars gamma-ray sources. We strengthen the limits on the radius of compactification of extra dimensions for a small number n of them, or alternatively the fundamental scale of quantum gravity, considering the gamma-ray emission of the whole population of neutron stars sitting in the Galactic bulge, instead of the closest member of this category. For n=1 the constraint on the compactification radius is R<400 microm.

  12. Two universal extra dimensions and spinless photons at the ILC.

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, A.; Kong, K.-C.; High Energy Physics; Univ Chicago; FNAL

    2008-02-01

    We study the ILC phenomenology of Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes along two universal extra dimensions compactified on the chiral square. We compute production cross sections of various (1, 0) particles at the ILC with (s){sup 1/2} = 1 TeV, focusing on decays of KK-leptons and the KK partner of the hypercharge gauge boson down to the 'spinless photon', which is the lightest KK particle. We contrast this model to one universal extra dimension with KK-photon (spin-1) and supersymmetry with neutralino (spin-1/2) or gravitino (spin-3/2) dark matter. We also investigate the discovery potential for (1, 1) KK bosons as s-channel resonances.

  13. Charged seven-dimensional spacetimes with spherically symmetric extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    De Felice, Antonio; Ringeval, Christophe

    2009-06-15

    We derive exact solutions of the seven-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell equations for a spacetime exhibiting Poincare invariance along four dimensions and spherical symmetry in the extra dimensions. Such topology generically arises in the context of braneworld models. Our solutions generalize previous results on Ricci-flat spacetimes admitting the two-sphere and are shown to include wormhole configurations. A regular coordinate system suitable to describe the whole spacetime is singled out, and we discuss the physical relevance of the derived solutions.

  14. Applying EFT to Higgs pair production in universal extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelhäuser, Lisa; Knochel, Alexander; Steeger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We investigate single Higgs and Higgs pair production at the LHC in models of Universal Extra Dimensions. After calculating the relevant cross sections, we use the UED model as a testing ground for the Effective Field Theory approach to physics beyond the Standard Model. We show how the UED contributions to Higgs production can be matched to a dimension-6 operator. We then discuss the range of validity of this approach, in particular for Higgs pair production, and determine the sensitivity to the number of KK modes in the loop.

  15. Auto-concealment of supersymmetry in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Howe, Kiel; March-Russell, John; Scoville, James

    2015-06-05

    In supersymmetric (SUSY) theories with extra dimensions the visible energy in sparticle decays can be significantly reduced and its energy distribution broadened, thus significantly weakening the present collider limits on SUSY. The mechanism applies when the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is a bulk state — e.g. a bulk modulino, axino, or gravitino — the size of the extra dimensions ≳ 10–14 cm, and for a broad variety of visible sparticle spectra. In such cases the lightest ordinary supersymmetric particle (LOSP), necessarily a brane-localised state, decays to the Kaluza-Klein (KK) discretuum of the LSP. This dynamically realises the compression mechanism for hiding SUSY as decays into the more numerous heavier KK LSP states are favored. We find LHC limits on right-handed slepton LOSPs evaporate, while LHC limits on stop LOSPs weaken to ~350 ÷ 410 GeV compared to ~700 GeV for a stop decaying to a massless LSP. Similarly, for the searches we consider, present limits on direct production of degenerate first and second generation squarks drop to ~450 GeV compared to ~800 GeV for a squark decaying to a massless LSP. Auto-concealment typically works for a fundamental gravitational scale of M* ~10 ÷ 100 TeV, a scale sufficiently high that traditional searches for signatures of extra dimensions are mostly avoided. If superpartners are discovered, their prompt, displaced, or stopped decays can also provide new search opportunities for extra dimensions with the potential to reach M* ~109 GeV. As a result, this mechanism applies more generally than just SUSY theories, pertaining to any theory where there is a discrete quantum number shared by both brane and bulk sectors.

  16. Auto-concealment of supersymmetry in extra dimensions

    DOE PAGES

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Howe, Kiel; March-Russell, John; ...

    2015-06-05

    In supersymmetric (SUSY) theories with extra dimensions the visible energy in sparticle decays can be significantly reduced and its energy distribution broadened, thus significantly weakening the present collider limits on SUSY. The mechanism applies when the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is a bulk state — e.g. a bulk modulino, axino, or gravitino — the size of the extra dimensions ≳ 10–14 cm, and for a broad variety of visible sparticle spectra. In such cases the lightest ordinary supersymmetric particle (LOSP), necessarily a brane-localised state, decays to the Kaluza-Klein (KK) discretuum of the LSP. This dynamically realises the compression mechanism formore » hiding SUSY as decays into the more numerous heavier KK LSP states are favored. We find LHC limits on right-handed slepton LOSPs evaporate, while LHC limits on stop LOSPs weaken to ~350 ÷ 410 GeV compared to ~700 GeV for a stop decaying to a massless LSP. Similarly, for the searches we consider, present limits on direct production of degenerate first and second generation squarks drop to ~450 GeV compared to ~800 GeV for a squark decaying to a massless LSP. Auto-concealment typically works for a fundamental gravitational scale of M* ~10 ÷ 100 TeV, a scale sufficiently high that traditional searches for signatures of extra dimensions are mostly avoided. If superpartners are discovered, their prompt, displaced, or stopped decays can also provide new search opportunities for extra dimensions with the potential to reach M* ~109 GeV. As a result, this mechanism applies more generally than just SUSY theories, pertaining to any theory where there is a discrete quantum number shared by both brane and bulk sectors.« less

  17. Extra Dimensions in Photon or Jet plus Missing Transverse Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardaci, Marco

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies of the CMS collaboration are presented on the sensitivity to searches for large (ADD) extra dimensions in channels with missing transverse energy (MET), i.e. the channels jets plus MET and photon plus MET. These studies are based on detailed detector simulation, including all Standard Model backgrounds. Particular emphasis is given to possible early discoveries, i.e. with 100 pb-1 or less. Projected 95% CL exclusion limits as function of luminosity are presented as well.

  18. Kaluza-Klein mesons in universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    De Pree, Erin; Sher, Marc

    2005-11-01

    In models with universal extra dimensions, the isosinglet Kaluza-Klein (KK) quarks (q{sup 1}) have very narrow widths, of O(5-10) MeV, and will thus hadronize. Studies of KK quarkonia (q{sup 1}q{sup 1}) show very sharp resonances and dramatic signatures at the linear collider. In this Brief Report, we consider the possibility of detecting KK mesons (q{sup 1}q), and show that detection at a linear collider is unlikely.

  19. Plasmon annihilation into Kaluza-Klein gravitons: New astrophysical constraints on large extra dimensions?

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prasanta Kumar; Satheeshkumar, V. H.; Suresh, P. K.

    2008-09-15

    In the large extra dimensional Kaluza-Klein (KK) scenario, where the usual standard model (SM) matter is confined to a 3+1-dimensional hypersurface called the 3-brane and gravity can propagate to the bulk (D=4+d, d being the number of extra spatial dimensions), the light graviton KK modes can be produced inside the supernova core due to the usual nucleon-nucleon bremstrahlung, electron-positron, and photon-photon annihilations. This photon inside the supernova becomes a plasmon due to the plasma effect. In this paper, we study the energy-loss rate of SN 1987A due to the KK gravitons produced from the plasmon-plasmon annihilation. We find that the SN 1987A cooling rate leads to the conservative bound M{sub D}>22.9 TeV and 1.38 TeV for the case of two and three spacelike extra dimensions.

  20. Extra dimensions and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góźdź, Marek; Kamiński, Wiesław A.; Faessler, Amand

    2005-05-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the few phenomena, belonging to the nonstandard physics, which is extensively being sought for in experiments. In the present paper the link between the half-life of the neutrinoless double beta decay and theories with large extra dimensions is explored. The use of the sensitivities of currently planned 0ν2β experiments: DAMA, CANDLES, COBRA, DCBA, CAMEO, GENIUS, GEM, MAJORANA, MOON, CUORE, EXO, and XMASS, gives the possibility for a nondirect “experimental” verification of various extra dimensional scenarios. We discuss also the results of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration. The calculations are based on the Majorana neutrino mass generation mechanism in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model.

  1. Extra dimensions and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Faessler, Amand

    2005-05-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the few phenomena, belonging to the nonstandard physics, which is extensively being sought for in experiments. In the present paper the link between the half-life of the neutrinoless double beta decay and theories with large extra dimensions is explored. The use of the sensitivities of currently planned 0{nu}2{beta} experiments: DAMA, CANDLES, COBRA, DCBA, CAMEO, GENIUS, GEM, MAJORANA, MOON, CUORE, EXO, and XMASS, gives the possibility for a nondirect 'experimental' verification of various extra dimensional scenarios. We discuss also the results of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration. The calculations are based on the Majorana neutrino mass generation mechanism in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model.

  2. Search for universal extra dimensions in ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2011-12-01

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  3. Inert scalar dark matter in an extra dimension inspired model

    SciTech Connect

    Lineros, R.A.; Santos, F.A. Pereira dos E-mail: fabio.alex@fis.puc-rio.br

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a dark matter model inspired by theories with extra dimensions. The dark matter candidate corresponds to the first Kaluza–Klein mode of an real scalar added to the Standard Model. The tower of new particles enriches the calculation of the relic abundance. For large mass splitting, the model converges to the predictions of the inert singlet dark matter model. For nearly degenerate mass spectrum, coannihilations increase the cross-sections used for direct and indirect dark matter searches. Moreover, the Kaluza–Klein zero mode can mix with the SM higgs and further constraints can be applied.

  4. Radion stabilization from the vacuum on flat extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Eli; Perez-Lorenzana, A.; Pimentel, Luis O.

    2008-01-15

    Volume stabilization in models with flat extra dimensions could follow from vacuum energy residing in the bulk when translational invariance is spontaneously broken. We study a simple toy model that exemplifies this mechanism which considers a massive scalar field with nontrivial boundary conditions at the end points of the compact space, and includes contributions from brane and bulk cosmological constants. We perform our analysis in the conformal frame where the radion field, associated with volume variations, is defined, and present a general strategy for building stabilization potentials out of those ingredients. We also provide working examples for the interval and the T{sup n}/Z{sub 2} orbifold configuration.

  5. The Cosmology of Extra Dimensions and Varying Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2003-03-01

    The workshop on the cosmology of extra dimensions and varying fundamental constants was part of JENAM 2002, held in Porto in September 2002. It was the first major international workshop devoted to this topic. It brought together string theorists, particle physicists, theoretical and observational cosmologists, relativists and observational astrophysicists. The overall motivation for the workshop was to discuss the current theoretical motivations for the existence of additional space-time dimensions, and to confront these expectations with existing or upcoming observational and experimental tests. The interaction between specialists in different areas was quite fruitful, and a number of outstanding issues were identified which are likely to become the main paths of research to be explored in this area in the coming years. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1138-5

  6. Constraining extra space dimensions using precision molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz

    2015-07-01

    Highly accurate measurements of quantum level energies in molecular systems provide a test ground for new physics, as such effects could manifest themselves as minute shifts in the quantum level structures of atoms and molecules. For the lightest molecular systems, neutral molecular hydrogen (H2, HD and D2) and the molecular hydrogen ions (H+2, HD+ and D+2), weak force effects are several orders weaker than current experimental and theoretical results, while contributions of Newtonian gravity and the strong force at the characteristic molecular distance scale of 1 Å can be safely neglected. Comparisons between experiment and QED calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra space dimensions, under which gravity could become much stronger than in ordinary 3-D space. Under this assumption, using the spectra of H2 we have derived constraints on the compactification scales for extra dimensions within the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali (ADD) framework, and constraints on the brane separation and bulk curvature within the Randall-Sundrum (RS-I and RS-II) frameworks.

  7. Signals of two universal extra dimensions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdman, G.; Éboli, O. J. P.; Spehler, D.

    2016-11-01

    Extensions of the standard model with universal extra dimensions are interesting both as phenomenological templates as well as model-building fertile ground. For instance, they are one of the prototypes for theories exhibiting compressed spectra, leading to difficult searches at the LHC since the decay products of new states are soft and immersed in a large standard model background. Here we study the phenomenology at the LHC of theories with two universal extra dimensions. We obtain the current bound by using the production of second level excitations of electroweak gauge bosons decaying to a pair of leptons and study the reach of the LHC Run II in this channel. We also introduce a new channel originating in higher dimensional operators and resulting in the single production of a second level quark excitation. Its subsequent decay into a hard jet and lepton pair resonance would allow the identification of a more model-specific process, unlike the more generic vector resonance signal. We show that the sensitivity of this channel to the compactification scale is very similar to the one obtained using the vector resonance.

  8. Chiral orbifold construction of field theories with extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailu, Girma

    We build higher dimensional field theories which have chiral fermion zero-modes on orbifolds. We show that orbifold boundary conditions and scalar vacuum expectation values interplay to produce chiral fermions localized on fat three branes. We develop a scheme for computing field propagators in higher dimensional theories obeying chiral orbifold boundary conditions. Using this scheme we compute the loop corrections to an effective field theory in five dimensions. We find that the renormalization group running of the higher dimensional bulk theory leads to a running of the four dimensional brane couplings. We generalize an argument to verify that the chiral anomaly that arises in these chiral orbifold theories is entirely confined on and uniformly distributed over the fixed points of the orbifold, independent of the shape of the chiral zero-modes. We construct a setup in which a scalar field with appropriate profile in the extra dimension is used to address the hierarchy problem and also localize both chiral fermions and zero-mode gravitons on the same three brane in five dimensions. We construct exact and nonpetrurbative quantum moduli spaces and dynamical superpotentials of an infinite set of linear and ring N = 1 supersymmetric moose theories with SU(2) gauge group at each node and link chiral superfields in the fundamental representation.

  9. Compton Scattering at the NLC and Large Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    1999-07-20

    We study Compton scattering, {gamma}e {yields} {gamma}e, in the context of the recent proposal for Weak Scale Quantum Gravity (WSQG) with large extra dimensions. It is shown that, with an ultraviolet cutoff M{sub S} {approx} 1 TeV for the effective gravity theory, the cross section for this process at the Next Linear Collider (NLC) deviates from the prediction of the Standard Model significantly. Our results suggest that, for typical proposed NLC energies and luminosities, WSQG can be tested in the range 4 TeV {approx}< M{sub S} {approx}< 16 TeV, making {gamma}e {yields} {gamma}e an important test channel.

  10. Searching for Primordial Black Holes & an Extra Spatial Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larracuente, Amanda; Kavic, M.; Cutchin, S.; Simonetti, J. H.; Ellingson, S.

    2013-01-01

    Exploding primordial black holes (PBHs) are expected to produce a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation detectable at the low-frequency end of the radio spectrum. A detection of a radio transient from an exploding PBH could be a signature of an extra spatial dimension, which would drastically alter our perception of spacetime. We present here the results of a search for single-dispersed low-frequency radio pulses utilizing the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA). No compelling astrophysical signal was detected, and from ≈5 hours of interference-free data the implied observational upper limit on the rate of exploding PBHs is r≈ 4.8×107 pc-3 y-1 for a PBH with a fireball Lorentz-factor γ = 104.3. This limit is applicable to PBHs in the halo of the Galaxy to distances ≤ 2 kpc, and dispersion measures ≤80 pc cm-3.

  11. Signals of Warped Extra Dimensions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Osland, P.; Pankov, A. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Paver, N.

    2010-12-22

    We discuss the signatures of the spin-2 graviton excitations predicted by the Randall-Sundrum model with one warped extra dimension, in dilepton and diphoton production at LHC. By using a specific angular analysis, we assess the ranges in mass and coupling constant where such gravitons can be discriminated against competitor spin-1 and spin-0 objects, that potentially could manifest themselves in these processes with the same mass and rate of events. Depending on the value of the coupling constant to quarks and leptons, the numerical results indicate graviton identification mass ranges up to 1.1-2.4 TeV and 1.6-3.2 TeV for LHC nominal energy of 14 TeV and time-integrated luminosity of 10 and 100fb{sup -1}, respectively.

  12. Universal extra dimension: Violation of Kaluza-Klein parity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob

    2009-01-01

    The minimal universal extra dimension (mUED) model respects the Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity (-1){sup n}, where n is the KK number. However, it is possible to have interactions located at only one of the two fixed points of the S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. Such asymmetric interactions violate the KK parity. This kills the cold dark matter component of UED but also removes the upper bound on the inverse compactification radius, and thus nonobservation of the KK excitations even at the Large Hadron Collider does not necessarily invalidate the model. Apart from the decay of the lightest n=1 KK excitation, this leads to collider signals which are markedly different from those in the mUED scenario. The phenomenological consequences of such KK-parity violating terms are explored.

  13. ISLES: Probing Extra Dimensions Using a Superconducting Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Moody, M. Vol; Prieto-Gortcheva, Violeta A.

    2003-01-01

    In string theories, extra dimensions must be compactified. The possibility that gravity can have large radii of compactification leads to a violation of the inverse square law at submillimeter distances. The objective of ISLES is to perform a null test of Newton s law in space with a resolution of one part in 10(exp 5) or better at 100 microns. The experiment will be cooled to less than or equal to 2 K, which permits superconducting magnetic levitation of the test masses. To minimize Newtonian errors, ISLES employs a near null source, a circular disk of large diameter-to-thickness ratio. Two test masses, also disk-shaped, are suspended on the two sides of the source mass at a nominal distance of 100 microns. The signal is detected by a superconducting differential accelerometer. A ground test apparatus is under construction.

  14. Emergent Yang-Mills theories from universal extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkareuli, J. L.; Kepuladze, Z.

    2017-02-01

    We study emergent Yang-Mills theories which could origin from universal extra dimensions. Particularly, some vector field potential terms or polynomial vector field constraints introduced into five-dimensional (5D) non-Abelian gauge theory is shown to lead to spontaneous violation of an underlying spacetime symmetry and generate vector pseudo-Goldstone modes as conventional four-dimensional (4D) gauge boson candidates. As a special signature, apart from conventional gauge couplings, there appear an infinite number of the properly suppressed direct multi-boson (multi-photon in particular) interaction couplings in emergent Yang-Mills theories whose observation could shed light on their high-dimensional nature. Moreover, in these theories, an internal symmetry also appeared spontaneously broken to its diagonal subgroups. This breaking originates from the extra vector field components playing the role of some adjoint scalar field multiplet in the 4D spacetime. So, one naturally has the Higgs effect without a specially introduced scalar field multiplet. Remarkably, when applied to Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), this results in an automatic breakdown of emergent GUTs down to the Standard Model (SM) just at the 5D Lorentz violation scale M.

  15. Relic abundance of dark matter in universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-04-17

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the serious Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton problem that the original universal extra dimension model possesses. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a candidate for dark matter in this framework. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the dark matter relic abundance can change significantly. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos.

  16. Flavor ratios of extragalactic neutrinos and neutrino shortcuts in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Aeikens, Elke; Päs, Heinrich; Pakvasa, Sandip; Sicking, Philipp

    2015-10-02

    The recent measurement of high energy extragalactic neutrinos by the IceCube Collaboration has opened a new window to probe non-standard neutrino properties. Among other effects, sterile neutrino altered dispersion relations (ADRs) due to shortcuts in an extra dimension can significantly affect astrophysical flavor ratios. We discuss two limiting cases of this effect, first active-sterile neutrino oscillations with a constant ADR potential and second an MSW-like resonant conversion arising from geodesics oscillating around the brane in an asymmetrically warped extra dimension. We demonstrate that the second case has the potential to suppress significantly the flux of specific flavors such as ν{sub μ} or ν{sub τ} at high energies.

  17. Global Fits of the Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Kong, Kyoungchul; de Austri, Roberto Ruiz; Trotta, Roberto; /Imperial Coll., London

    2012-06-22

    In theories with Universal Extra-Dimensions (UED), the {gamma}{sub 1} particle, first excited state of the hypercharge gauge boson, provides an excellent Dark Matter (DM) candidate. Here we use a modified version of the SuperBayeS code to perform a Bayesian analysis of the minimal UED scenario, in order to assess its detectability at accelerators and with DM experiments. We derive in particular the most probable range of mass and scattering cross sections off nucleons, keeping into account cosmological and electroweak precision constraints. The consequences for the detectability of the {gamma}{sub 1} with direct and indirect experiments are dramatic. The spin-independent cross section probability distribution peaks at {approx} 10{sup -11} pb, i.e. below the sensitivity of ton-scale experiments. The spin-dependent cross-section drives the predicted neutrino flux from the center of the Sun below the reach of present and upcoming experiments. The only strategy that remains open appears to be direct detection with ton-scale experiments sensitive to spin-dependent cross-sections. On the other hand, the LHC with 1 fb{sup -1} of data should be able to probe the current best-fit UED parameters.

  18. Gravitating Global Monopoles in Extra Dimensions and the Braneworld Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K.A.; Meierovich, B.E.

    2005-12-15

    Multidimensional configurations with a Minkowski external spacetime and a spherically symmetric global monopole in extra dimensions are discussed in the context of the braneworld concept. The monopole is formed with a hedgehoglike set of scalar fields {phi}{sup i} with a symmetry-breaking potential V depending on the magnitude {phi}{sup 2} = {phi}{sup i}{phi}{sup i}. All possible kinds of globally regular configurations are singled out without specifying the shape of V({phi}). These variants are governed by the maximum value {phi}{sub m} of the scalar field, characterizing the energy scale of symmetry breaking. If {phi}{sub m} < {phi}{sub cr} (where {phi}{sub cr} is a critical value of {phi} related to the multidimensional Planck scale), the monopole reaches infinite radii, whereas in the 'strong field regime', when {phi}{sub m} {>=} {phi}{sub cr} , the monopole may end with a finite-radius cylinder or have two regular centers. The warp factors of monopoles with both infinite and finite radii may either exponentially grow or tend to finite constant values far from the center. All such configurations are shown to be able to trap test scalar matter, in striking contrast to RS2 type five-dimensional models. The monopole structures obtained analytically are also found numerically for the Mexican hat potential with an additional parameter acting as a cosmological constant.

  19. Large extra dimensions at the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, Jeffrey M.; de Gouvêa, André; Kelly, Kevin J.; Peres, O. L. G.; Tabrizi, Zahra

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the potential of the long-baseline Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to study large-extra-dimension (LED) models originally proposed to explain the smallness of neutrino masses by postulating that right-handed neutrinos, unlike all standard model fermion fields, can propagate in the bulk. The massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the right-handed neutrino fields modify the neutrino oscillation probabilities and can hence affect their propagation. We show that, as far as DUNE is concerned, the LED model is indistinguishable from a (3 +3 N )-neutrino framework for modest values of N ; N =1 is usually a very good approximation. Nonetheless, there are no new sources of C P -invariance violation other than one C P -odd phase that can be easily mapped onto the C P -odd phase in the standard three-neutrino paradigm. We analyze the sensitivity of DUNE to the LED framework and explore the capability of DUNE to differentiate the LED model from the three-neutrino scenario and from a generic (3 +1 )-neutrino model.

  20. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  1. Searches for hyperbolic extra dimensions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melbéus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2008-08-01

    We investigate a model of large extra dimensions where the internal space has the geometry of a hyperbolic disc. Compared with the ADD model, this model provides a more satisfactory solution to the hierarchy problem between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale, and it also avoids constraints from astrophysics. In general, a novel feature of this model is that the physical results depend on the position of the brane in the internal space, and in particular, the signal almost disappears completely if the brane is positioned at the center of the disc. Since there is no known analytic form of the Kaluza-Klein spectrum for our choice of geometry, we obtain a spectrum based on a combination of approximations and numerical computations. We study the possible signatures of our model for hadron colliders, especially the LHC, where the most important processes are the production of a graviton together with a hadronic jet or a photon. We find that the signals are similar to those of the ADD model, regarding both qualitative behavior and strength. For the case of hadronic jet production, it is possible to obtain relatively strong signals, while for the case of photon production, this is much more difficult.

  2. Higgs phenomenology in warped extra dimensions with a fourth generation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Mariana; Korutlu, Beste; Toharia, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    We study a warped extra-dimension scenario where the standard model fields lie in the bulk, with the addition of a fourth family of fermions. We concentrate on the flavor structure of the Higgs couplings with fermions in the flavor anarchy ansatz. Even without a fourth family, these couplings will be generically misaligned with respect to the standard model fermion mass matrices. The presence of the fourth family typically enhances the misalignment effects and we show that one should expect them to be highly nonsymmetrical in the (34) intergenerational mixing. The radiative corrections from the new fermions and their flavor-violating couplings to the Higgs affect negligibly known experimental precision measurements such as the oblique parameters and Z{yields}bb or Z{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. On the other hand, {Delta}F=1, 2 processes, mediated by tree-level Higgs exchange, as well as radiative corrections to b{yields}s{gamma} and {mu}{yields}e{gamma} put some generic pressure on the allowed size of the flavor-violating couplings. But more importantly, these couplings will alter the Higgs decay patterns as well as those of the new fermions, and produce very interesting new signals associated to Higgs phenomenology in high energy colliders. These signals might become very important indirect signals for these type of models as they would be present even when the KK mass scale is high and no heavy KK particle is discovered.

  3. Gravitons and dark matter in universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nausheen R.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2006-11-15

    Models of universal extra dimensions (UED) at the TeV scale lead to the presence of Kaluza Klein (KK) excitations of the ordinary fermions and bosons of the standard model that may be observed at hadron and lepton colliders. A conserved discrete symmetry, KK-parity, ensures the stability of the lightest KK particle (LKP), which, if neutral, becomes a good dark matter particle. It has been recently shown that for a certain range of masses of the LKP a relic density consistent with the experimentally observed one may be obtained. These works, however, ignore the impact of KK graviton production at early times. Whether the G{sup 1} is the LKP or not, the G{sup n} tower thus produced can decay to the LKP, and depending on the reheating temperature, may lead to a modification of the relic density. In this article, we show that this effect may lead to a relevant modification of the range of KK masses consistent with the observed relic density. Additionally, if evidence for UED is observed experimentally, we find a stringent upper limit on the reheating temperature depending on the mass of the LKP observed.

  4. Gravitons and dark matter in universal extra dimensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N. R.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Enrico Femi Inst.; Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics

    2006-11-01

    Models of universal extra dimensions (UED) at the TeV scale lead to the presence of Kaluza Klein (KK) excitations of the ordinary fermions and bosons of the standard model that may be observed at hadron and lepton colliders. A conserved discrete symmetry, KK-parity, ensures the stability of the lightest KK particle (LKP), which, if neutral, becomes a good dark matter particle. It has been recently shown that for a certain range of masses of the LKP a relic density consistent with the experimentally observed one may be obtained. These works, however, ignore the impact of KK graviton production at early times. Whether the G{sup 1} is the LKP or not, the G{sup n} tower thus produced can decay to the LKP, and depending on the reheating temperature, may lead to a modification of the relic density. In this article, we show that this effect may lead to a relevant modification of the range of KK masses consistent with the observed relic density. Additionally, if evidence for UED is observed experimentally, we find a stringent upper limit on the reheating temperature depending on the mass of the LKP observed.

  5. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  6. Hawking radiation from squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes: A window to extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Hideki; Soda, Jiro

    2007-09-15

    We explore the observability of extra dimensions through five-dimensional squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes residing in the Kaluza-Klein spacetime. With the expectation that the Hawking radiation reflects the five-dimensional nature of the squashed horizon, we study the Hawking radiation of a scalar field in the squashed black hole background. As a result, we show that the luminosity of Hawking radiation tells us the size of the extra dimension, namely, the squashed Kaluza-Klein black holes open a window to extra dimensions.

  7. Transient pulses from exploding primordial black holes as a signature of an extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John H; Cutchin, Sean E; Ellingson, Steven W; Patterson, Cameron D E-mail: jhs@vt.edu E-mail: ellingson@vt.edu

    2008-11-15

    An evaporating black hole in the presence of an extra spatial dimension would undergo an explosive phase of evaporation. We show that such an event, involving a primordial black hole, can produce a detectable, distinguishable electromagnetic pulse, signaling the existence of an extra dimension of size L{approx}10{sup -18}-10{sup -20} m. We derive a generic relationship between the Lorentz factor of a pulse-producing 'fireball' and the TeV energy scale. For an ordinary toroidally compactified extra dimension, transient radio-pulse searches probe the electroweak energy scale ({approx}0.1 TeV), enabling comparison with the Large Hadron Collider.

  8. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {sup {yields}} {infinity} and r {sup {yields}} const > 0 as l {sup {yields}} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {sup {yields}} 0 as l {sup {yields}} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  9. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {yields} {infinity} and r {yields} const > 0 as l {yields} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {yields} 0 as l {yields} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {Gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {Gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  10. Extra dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    SciTech Connect

    Rubakov, Valery

    2010-04-27

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  11. Extra Dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    SciTech Connect

    Rubakov, Valery

    2010-04-27

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  12. Extra Dimensions of Space: Are They Going to be Found Soon?

    ScienceCinema

    Rubakov, Valery [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, Russia

    2016-07-12

    Our space may well have more than 3 dimensions. Indeed, theories that pretend to be most fundamental choose to live in higher dimensions: a natural area for superstring/Mtheory is 9- or 10-dimensional space. Extra dimensions have been hidden so far, but they would open up above a certain energy threshold. A fascinating possibility is that this happens within reach of particle colliders. This lecture will address the motivation for such a viewpoint and implications of accessible extra dimensions for our understanding of nature.

  13. Vacuum energy, the cosmological constant, and compact extra dimensions: Constraints from Casimir effect experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2008-05-15

    We consider a universe with a compact extra dimension and a cosmological constant emerging from a suitable ultraviolet cutoff on the zero-point energy of the vacuum. We derive the Casimir force between parallel conducting plates as a function of the following scales: plate separation, radius of the extra dimension and cutoff energy scale. We find that there are critical values of these scales where the Casimir force between the plates changes sign. For the cutoff energy scale required to reproduce the observed value of the cosmological constant, we find that the Casimir force changes sign and becomes repulsive for plate separations less than a critical separation d{sub 0}=0.6 mm, assuming a zero radius of the extra dimension (no extra dimension). This prediction contradicts Casimir experiments which indicate an attractive force down to plate separations of 100 nm. For a nonzero extra dimension radius, the critical separation d{sub 0} gets even larger than 0.6 mm and remains inconsistent with Casimir force experiments. We conclude that with or without the presence of a compact extra dimension, vacuum energy with any suitable cutoff cannot play the role of the cosmological constant.

  14. Boom and Bust Inflation: A Graceful Exit via Compact Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Adam R.

    2008-11-28

    A model of inflation is proposed in which compact extra dimensions allow a graceful exit without recourse to flat potentials or super-Planckian field values. Though bubbles of true vacuum are too sparse to uniformly reheat the Universe by colliding with each other, a compact dimension enables a single bubble to uniformly reheat by colliding with itself. This mechanism, which generates an approximately scale invariant perturbation spectrum, requires that inflation be driven by a bulk field, that vacuum decay be slow, and that the extra dimension be at least a hundred times larger than the false vacuum Hubble length.

  15. Vibrating winding branes, wrapping democracy and stabilization of extra dimensions in dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rador, Tonguç

    2005-06-01

    We show that, in the context of dilaton gravity, a recently proposed democratic principle for intersection possibilities of branes winding around extra dimensions yield stabilization, even with the inclusion of momentum modes of the wrapped branes on top of the winding modes. The constraints for stabilization massaged by string theory inputs forces the number of observed dimensions to be three. We also discuss consequences of adding ordinary matter living in the observed dimensions.

  16. Cartography with Locating Fermions in Extra Dimensions at Future Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-01-24

    In the model of Arkani-Hamed and Schmaltz the various chiral fermions of the Standard Model(SM) are localized at different points on a thick wall which forms an extra dimension. Such a scenario provides a way of understanding the absence of proton decay and the fermion mass hierarchy in models with extra dimensions. In this paper we explore the capability of future lepton colliders to determine the location of these fermions in the extra dimension through precision measurements of conventional scattering processes both below and on top of the lowest lying Kaluza-Klein gauge boson resonance. We show that for some classes of models the locations of these fermions can be very precisely determined while in others only their relative positions can be well measured.

  17. Search for one large extra dimension with the DELPHI detector at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2009-03-01

    Single photons detected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP2 in the years 1997-2000 are reanalysed to investigate the existence of a single extra dimension in a modified ADD scenario with slightly warped large extra dimensions. The data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 180 and 209 GeV for an integrated luminosity of ˜650 pb-1 agree with the predictions of the Standard Model and allow a limit to be set on graviton emission in one large extra dimension. The limit obtained on the fundamental mass scale M D is 1.69 TeV/ c 2 at 95% CL, with an expected limit of 1.71 TeV/ c 2.

  18. Split Fermions in Extra Dimensions and Exponentially Small Cross-Sections at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, yuval

    1999-09-22

    We point out a dramatic new experimental signature for a class of theories with extra dimensions, where quarks and leptons are localized at slightly separated parallel ''walls'' whereas gauge and Higgs fields live in the bulk of the extra dimensions. The separation forbids direct local couplings between quarks and leptons, allowing for an elegant solution to the proton decay problem. We show that scattering cross sections for collisions of fermions which are separated in the extra dimensions vanish at energies high enough to probe the separation distance. This is because the separation puts a lower bound on the attainable impact parameter in the collision. We present cross sections for two body high energy scattering and estimate the power with which future colliders can probe this scenario, finding sensitivity to inverse fermion separations of order 10-70 TeV.

  19. New supernova limit on large extra dimensions: bounds on Kaluza-Klein graviton production.

    PubMed

    Hannestad, S; Raffelt, G G

    2001-07-30

    If large extra dimensions exist in nature, supernova (SN) cores will emit large fluxes of Kaluza-Klein gravitons, producing a cosmic background of these particles with energies and masses up to about 100 MeV. Radiative decays then give rise to a diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background with E(gamma) approximately less than 100 MeV which is well in excess of the observations if more than 0.5%-1% of the SN energy is emitted into the new channel. For two extra dimensions we derive a conservative bound on their radius of R approximately less than 0.9 x 10(-4) mm; for three extra dimensions it is R approximately less than 1.9 x 10(-7) mm.

  20. Extra dimensions vs. supersymmetric interpretation of missing energy events at a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Perelstein, Maxim; Wells, James D.

    2001-10-25

    The photon plus missing energy signature is a primary handle on two important classes of theories. Theories with large extra dimensions predict the production of photons in association with Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton. In supersymmetric theories with superlight gravitinos, photons can be produced in association with gravitino pairs. The signatures for these two theories are compared, and it is found that they can be distinguished by studying the photon energy distributions and scaling of the cross section with center-of-mass energy. Both these methods fail, however, if there are six extra dimensions. In that case, additional phenomena predicted by the theories would be required to narrow down the underlying causes of the photon plus missing energy signal. We also study the ability of these measurements to determine the number of extra dimensions.

  1. Gravitational radiation from ultra high energy cosmic rays in models with large extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Ben; Drescher, Hans-Joachim; Bleicher, Marcus

    2006-06-01

    The effects of classical gravitational radiation in models with large extra dimensions are investigated for ultra high energy cosmic rays (CRs). The cross sections are implemented into a simulation package (SENECA) for high energy hadron induced CR air showers. We predict that gravitational radiation from quasi-elastic scattering could be observed at incident CR energies above 10 9 GeV for a setting with more than two extra dimensions. It is further shown that this gravitational energy loss can alter the energy reconstruction for CR energies ECR ⩾ 5 × 10 9 GeV.

  2. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in the Diphoton Final State at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2011-05-01

    A search for large extra spatial dimensions via virtual-graviton exchange in the diphoton channel has been carried out with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectations is found using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. New lower limits on the effective Planck scale in the range of 1.6-2.3 TeV at the 95% confidence level are set, providing the most restrictive bounds to date on models with more than two large extra dimensions.

  3. Extra dimensions: 3D and time in PDF documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  4. Extra dimensions: 3d and time in pdf documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, N. A.

    2008-07-01

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  5. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High energy physics is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide audience. In this talk, we present examples of HEP applications which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input. Using this technique, higher dimensional data, such as LEGO plots or time-dependent information can be included in PDF files. In principle, a complete event display, with full interactivity, can be incorporated into a PDF file. This would allow the end user not only to customize the view and representation of the data, but to access the underlying data itself.

  6. Extra Dimensions: 3D and Time in PDF Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. We demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  7. Probing the size of extra dimensions with gravitational wave astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Kent; Tanahashi, Norihiro; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2011-04-15

    In the Randall-Sundrum II braneworld model, it has been conjectured, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, that a brane-localized black hole (BH) larger than the bulk AdS curvature scale l cannot be static, and it is dual to a four-dimensional BH emitting Hawking radiation through some quantum fields. In this scenario, the number of the quantum field species is so large that this radiation changes the orbital evolution of a BH binary. We derived the correction to the gravitational waveform phase due to this effect and estimated the upper bounds on l by performing Fisher analyses. We found that the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and the Big Bang Observatory (DECIGO/BBO) can give a stronger constraint than the current tabletop result by detecting gravitational waves from small mass BH/BH and BH/neutron star (NS) binaries. Furthermore, DECIGO/BBO is expected to detect 10{sup 5} BH/NS binaries per year. Taking this advantage, we find that DECIGO/BBO can actually measure l down to l=0.33 {mu}m for a 5 yr observation if we know that binaries are circular a priori. This is about 40 times smaller than the upper bound obtained from the tabletop experiment. On the other hand, when we take eccentricities into binary parameters, the detection limit weakens to l=1.5 {mu}m due to strong degeneracies between l and eccentricities. We also derived the upper bound on l from the expected detection number of extreme mass ratio inspirals with LISA and BH/NS binaries with DECIGO/BBO, extending the discussion made recently by McWilliams [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 141601 (2010)]. We found that these less robust constraints are weaker than the ones from phase differences.

  8. Shadowing effects in Newton’s law from compact extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-10-01

    One problem that appears in theories with compact extra dimensions is the shadowing phenomenon, which makes it difficult to identify the topology and the geometry of the extra-dimensional manifold, if it exists. In this paper, we address this problem from the perspective of Newton’s law modifications caused by compact extra dimensions. After providing the modifications cause by some of the most phenomenologically interesting compact manifolds, we qualitatively study and compare the modifications that these manifolds cause to Newton’s law. As we demonstrate, the shadowing phenomenon persists in this approach too, and it seems that the shadowing phenomenon is grouped in “shadowing zones”. At these points, it is impossible to distinguish which compact space causes the modification of Newton’s law. However, away from the shadowing zones, the effects of the different compact manifolds are distinguishable. It is possible that these effects can be observed in the next generation of Newton’s law experiments.

  9. New asymptotic Anti-de Sitter solution with a timelike extra dimension in 5D relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Molin; Shi, Yingying; Zhao, Zonghua; Han, Yu

    2017-07-01

    In 5D relativity, the usual 4D cosmological constant is determined by the extra dimension. If the extra dimension is spacelike, one can get a positive cosmological constant Λ and a 4D de Sitter (dS) space. In this paper we present that, if the extra dimension is timelike oppositely, the negative Λ will be emerged and the induced 4D space will be an asymptotic Anti-de Sitter (AdS). Under the minimum assumption, we solve the Kaluza-Klein equation RAB = 0 in a canonical system and obtain the AdS solution in a general case. The result shows that an AdS space is induced naturally from a Kaluza-Klein manifold on a hypersurface (brane). The Lagrangian of test particle indicates the equation of motion can be geodesics if the 4D metric is independent of extra dimension. The causality is well respected because it is appropriately defined by a null higher dimensional interval. In this 5D relativity, the holographic principle can be used safely because the brane is asymptotic Euclidean AdS in the bulk. We also explore some possible holographic duality implications about the field/operator correspondence and the two-points correlation functions.

  10. Results of searches for extra spatial dimensions in the CMS experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shmatov, S. V.

    2016-03-15

    An overview of basic results of the CMS experiment that concern searches for signals from extra spatial dimensions in the course of the first run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the c.m. proton–proton collision energies of 00000 and 8 TeV is given.

  11. Relic abundance of dark matter in universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2007-08-15

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the serious Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton problem that the original universal extra dimension model has. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a candidate for dark matter in this framework, and its relic abundance is determined by three processes, (1) the decay of the KK photon into the first KK right-handed neutrino in the late universe, (2) production of the first KK right-handed neutrino from the thermal bath in the early universe, and (3) the decay of higher KK right-handed neutrinos into the first KK right-handed neutrino in the late universe. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the last process contributes to the abundance significantly, even if the reheating temperature is low. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos.

  12. Estimate for the size of the compactification radius of a one extra dimension universe

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rosa, Felipe S; Pascoal, F; Oliveira, L F; Farina, C

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we use the Casimir effect to probe the existence of one extra dimension. We begin by evaluating the Casimir pressure between two plates in a M{sup 4} x S{sup 1} manifold, and then use an appropriate statistical analysis in order to compare the theoretical expression with a recent experimental data and set bounds for the compactification radius.

  13. Warping, extra dimensions, and a slice of AdSd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the Randall-Sundrum framework we consider a number of phenomenologically relevant model-building questions on a slice of compactified AdSd for d>5. Such spaces are interesting as they enable one to realize the weak scale via warping. We perform the Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction for gravitons and bulk vectors in these spaces, and for the case of AdS6 consider the KK spectrum of gauge scalars. We further obtain the KK towers for bulk fermions on a slice of AdS7 and AdS9 and show that the Randall-Sundrum approach to flavor generalizes to these spaces with the localization of chiral zero-mode fermions controlled by their bulk Dirac mass parameters. However, for the phenomenologically interesting case where the transverse radius is R-1˜TeV, we show that bulk standard model fields are not viable due to a resulting volume suppression of the gauge-coupling constants. A similar suppression occurs for the case of UV localization. Thus it seems that the standard model fields should be confined to the infrared brane in such spaces. Sterile fields and extended gauge sectors may propagate in the bulk, with the gauge-coupling volume suppression experienced by the latter motivating a weak coupling to standard model fields. We also discuss some issues regarding the effective 4D theory description in these spaces.

  14. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE PAGES

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; ...

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemore » of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.« less

  15. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  16. Measuring the dimensionality of compact extra dimensions with inspiral gravitational waves from black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li-E.; Zhao, Shu Hong; Xu, Peng

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing black-hole binaries (BHBs) were recently observed by the advanced LIGO detectors. Based on the perturbation analysis, for general Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions, we find a 1st-order post-Newtonian correction to the inspiral gravitational waveforms of black-hole binaries, that comes from the variations of the volume of the extra dimensions in near source zones. Such correction depends on a new parameter χ=\\frac{n}{2+n} with n the dimensionality of the extra space and it is irrelevant to the particular choice of the topology of the extra space. For the ideal case of a black-hole binary system following nearly circular orbital motion with almost equal or intermediate mass ratio, such higher-dimensional corrections to the chirping amplitude are worked out. Giving the power of tracing inspiral waves from coalescing massive BHBs with high signal-to-noise ratios, the planned space-borne antennas such as the eLISA and DECIGO may give us a measurement of the parameter χ in the near future and may serve us as new probes in the searching for the evidence of the hidden compact dimensions.

  17. Effects of nonminimal universal extra dimension on B →Xsγ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Anindya; Shaw, Avirup

    2017-01-01

    We estimate contributions from Kaluza-Klein excitations of third generation quarks and gauge bosons to the branching ratio of B →Xsγ decay process in the five-dimensional universal extra dimensional scenario with nonvanishing boundary localized terms. This model is conventionally known as the nonminimal universal extra dimensional model. We have derived the lower limit on the size of the extra dimension by comparing our theoretical estimation of the branching ratio that includes next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections with its experimentally measured value. Coefficients of the boundary localized terms have also been constrained. 95% C.L. lower limit on the inverse of the radius of compactification (R-1) can be as large as 670 GeV for some choice of the value of coefficients of boundary localized terms.

  18. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino flux as a probe of large extra-dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph; Mena, Olga; Razzaque, Soebur; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Penn State U.

    2007-05-01

    A suppression in the spectrum of ultrahigh-energy (UHE, {ge} 10{sup 18} eV) neutrinos will be present in extra-dimensional scenarios, due to enhanced neutrino-antineutrino annihilation processes with the supernova relic neutrinos. In this scenario, neutrinos can not be responsible for the highest energy events observed in the UHE cosmic ray spectrum. A direct implication of these extra-dimensional interactions would be the absence of UHE neutrinos in ongoing and future neutrino telescopes.

  19. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  20. Constraints on universal extra dimension models with gravity mediated decays from ATLAS diphoton search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Kirtiman; Huitu, Katri

    2012-06-01

    We discuss the collider phenomenology of Universal Extra Dimension models with gravity mediated decays. We concentrate on diphoton associated with large missing transverse energy signature. At the collider, level-1 Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles are produced in pairs due to the conservation of KK-parity. Subsequently, KK-particles decay via cascades involving lighter KK-particles until reaching the lightest KK-particle (LKP). Finally, gravity induced decay of the LKP into photons gives rise to the diphoton signature. The search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy was recently communicated by the ATLAS collaboration for 7 TeV center-of-mass energy and 3.1 inverse femtobarn integrated luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider. Above the Standard Model background prediction, no excess of such events was reported. We translate the absence of any excess of the diphoton events to constrain the model parameters, namely, the radius of compactification ( R) and the fundamental Planck mass ( M D ).

  1. Cosmology of Randall-Sundrum models with an extra dimension stabilized by balancing bulk matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. B.

    2000-04-01

    We provide the cosmological solutions for Randall-Sundrum models with the bulk energy-momentum T55 incorporated. It alters the Friedmann equation for the brane scale factor. We make a specific choice of T55 which is adjusted to stabilize the extra dimension. This makes it possible to compactify the extra dimension with a single positive tension brane, and this model provides a RS-type solution to the cosmological constant problem. When the same idea is applied to the RS model with two branes, the wrong sign of Friedmann equation for the negative tension brane can be resolved, but a specific correlation between energy densities on two branes is still required to reproduce the usual FRW universe.

  2. Search for extra dimensions in the diphoton final state with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, Quentin

    2012-06-01

    The large difference between the Planck scale and the electroweak scale, known as the hierarchy problem, has been addressed in some models through the existence of extra spatial dimensions. A search for evidence of extra spatial dimensions has been performed, through an analysis of the diphoton final state in data recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis uses a dataset of 2.12 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV. The diphoton invariant mass spectrum is observed to be in good agreement with the expected Standard Model (SM) background. We set 95% CL lower limits on the scale related to virtual graviton exchange process in the context of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali model (ADD) and on the lightest Kaluza Klein excitation mass in the context of the Randall-Sundrum model (RS).

  3. Searches for extra spatial dimensions with the CMS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsberg, Greg

    2015-05-01

    The success of the first three years of operations of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV radically changed the landscape of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) and our very way of thinking about its possible origin and its hiding place. Among the paradigms of new physics that have been probed quite extensively at the LHC, are various models that predict the existence of extra spatial dimensions. In this review, the current status of searches for extra dimensions with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is presented, along with prospects for future searches at the full energy of the LHC, expected to be reached in the next few years.

  4. Search for large extra spatial dimensions in dimuon production at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2005-06-01

    We present the results of a search for the e.ects of large extra spatial dimensions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in events containing a pair of energetic muons. The data correspond to 246 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Good agreement with the expected background was found, yielding no evidence for large extra dimensions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale between 0.85 TeV and 1.27 TeV within several formalisms. These are the most stringent limits achieved in the dimuon channel to date.

  5. Supersymmetric moose models: An extra dimension from a broken deformed conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, Joshua; Anly Tan, Jong

    2006-09-15

    We find a class of four dimensional deformed conformal field theories which appear extra dimensional when their gauge symmetries are spontaneously broken. The theories are supersymmetric moose models which flow to interacting conformal fixed points at low energies, deformed by superpotentials. Using a-maximization we give strong nonperturbative evidence that the hopping terms in the resulting latticized action are relevant deformations of the fixed-point theories. These theories have an intricate structure of RG flows between conformal fixed points. Our results suggest that at the stable fixed points each of the bulk gauge couplings and superpotential hopping terms is turned on, in favor of the extra-dimensional interpretation of the theory. However, we argue that the higher-dimensional gauge coupling is generically small compared to the size of the extra dimension. In the presence of a brane the topology of the extra dimension is determined dynamically and depends on the numbers of colors and bulk and brane flavors, which suggests phenomenological applications. The RG flows between fixed points in these theories provide a class of tests of Cardy's conjectured a-theorem.

  6. Constraints on extra dimensions within the framework of the Standard Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Hamna; Overduin, James

    2017-01-01

    We consider Kaluza-Klein-type extensions of General Relativity in which extra dimensions may be large but do not necessarily have units of length. Additional coordinates of this kind necessarily violate Lorentz symmetry in principle, but whether or not the violations are detectable in practice depends on the dimension-transposing constants that convert them into lengths. We parametrize these violations in terms of coefficients associated with the matter sector of the Standard Model Extension, and show that the associated variation in fundamental quantities, such as rest mass or charge, must occur slowly, on cosmological scales.

  7. Natural realization of a large extra dimension in 5D supersymmetric theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamura, Yutaka; Yamada, Yusuke

    2014-09-01

    An exponentially large extra dimension can be naturally realized by the Casimir energy and the gaugino condensation in 5D supersymmetric theory. The model does not require any hierarchies among the 5D parameters. The key ingredient is an additional modulus other than the radion, which generically exists in 5D supergravity. SUSY is broken at the vacuum, which can be regarded as the Scherk-Schwarz SUSY breaking. We also analyze the mass spectrum and discuss some phenomenological aspects.

  8. Diffractive Z boson pair production at the LHC in the large extra dimensions scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, V. P.; Sauter, W. K.; Thiel, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we study the diffractive Z boson pair production mediated by the Kaluza-Klein graviton in the large extra dimensions scenario at the CERN Large Hadron Collider energies. Considering the Durham model, we estimate the total cross section for the central inclusive and exclusive diffractive production of a Z boson pair in pp/pPb/PbPb collisions. Our results indicate that the experimental analysis of the central inclusive production in pp collisions is feasible at the CERN LHC.

  9. Constraints on extra dimensions from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne

    2015-04-01

    The quest for hints about the existence of extra dimensions has recently made tremendous progress with the analysis of the data registered during the first run of the LHC, at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. While we are awaiting the LHC run at nominal energy, it is a good time to review the results and constraints already obtained in a large variety of scenarios and signatures.

  10. Evolution of the CKM matrix in the universal extra dimension model

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, A. S.; Liu Luxin

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and the quark Yukawa couplings is performed for the one-loop renormalization group equations in the universal extra dimension model. It is found that the evolution of mixing angles and the CP violation measure J may rapidly vary in the presence of the Kaluza-Klein modes, and this variation becomes dramatic as the energy approaches the unification scale.

  11. Kaluza-Klein Effects on Higgs Physics in Universal Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Petriello, Frank J

    2002-04-05

    We examine the virtual effects of Kaluza-Klein (KK) states on Higgs physics in universal extra dimension models. We study the partial widths {Lambda}{sub h{yields}gg}, {Lambda}{sub h{yields}{gamma}{gamma}}, and {Lambda}{sub h{yields}{gamma}Z}, which are relevant for Higgs production and detection in future collider experiments. These interactions occur at one loop in the Standard Model, as do the KK contributions. We find that the deviations induced by the KK exchanges can be significant; for one extra dimension, the gg {yields} h production rate is increased by 10% - 85% for the mass of the first KK state in the range 500 {approx}> m{sub 1} {approx}> 1500 GeV, a region untested by current direct search and precision measurement constraints. The h {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay width is decreased by {approx}< 20% in the same mass range. For two or more universal extra dimensions the results are cutoff dependent, and can only be qualitatively estimated. We comment on the detectability of these shifts at the LHC and at future e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} colliders.

  12. Bulk spacetimes for cosmological braneworlds with a time-dependent extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Suman; Kar, Sayan

    2009-09-15

    We explore the possibilities of constructing bulk spacetimes in five dimensions for warped braneworld models with a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker line element on the 3-brane and with a time-dependent extra dimension. Our first step in this direction involves looking at the status of energy conditions when such a bulk line element is assumed. We check these conditions by analyzing the relevant inequalities--for specific functional forms (chosen to satisfy certain desirable features) of the warp factor--the cosmological scale factor, and the extra-dimensional scale factor. Subsequently, we aim to obtain solutions with different types of bulk matter sources. We begin with a general analysis of the solution space of nonsingular Randall-Sundrum-type bulk models with an exponential warp factor and a chosen equation of state. Thereafter, we focus on three specific bulk sources--the ordinary scalar field, the Brans-Dicke scalar, and the dilaton. In each case, we are able to solve the field equations and obtain desirable solutions, for which we once again check the viability of the energy conditions. We also show how one can place branes in the bulk using the junction conditions. The issue of resolution of the bulk singularities which appear in our solutions, using standard methods, is also presented briefly. In summary, we are able to demonstrate that it is indeed possible to construct viable bulk spacetimes for warped cosmological braneworlds with a time-varying extra dimension and with bulk matter satisfying the energy conditions.

  13. Probe of extra dimensions in lepton pair production at the LHC: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulous, and Dvali have proposed a model (ADD) of low-scale quantum gravity featuring large extra dimensions. In this model, the exchange of Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons can enhance the production rate of lepton pairs at high invariant mass in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. By considering the present and future LHC energy regimes, we reanalyse the potential of the LHC to discover the effects of large extra dimensions and to discriminate between various theoretical models. Specifically, in latter case we explore the capability of the LHC to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energy 14 TeV and luminosity 100 fb⁻¹ will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order M{sub S} = 6.2 TeV (4.8 TeV) for d = 6 and M{sub S} = 8.8 TeV (6.8 TeV) for d = 3.

  14. Probe of extra dimensions in lepton pair production at the LHC: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulous, and Dvali have proposed a model (ADD) of low-scale quantum gravity featuring large extra dimensions. In this model, the exchange of Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons can enhance the production rate of lepton pairs at high invariant mass in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. By considering the present and future LHC energy regimes, we reanalyse the potential of the LHC to discover the effects of large extra dimensions and to discriminate between various theoretical models. Specifically, in latter case we explore the capability of the LHC to distinguish spin-2 Kaluza-Klein towers of gravitons exchange from other new physics effects which might be conveniently parametrized by the four-fermion contact interactions. We find that the LHC with planned energy 14 TeV and luminosity 100 fb-1 will be capable of discovering (and identifying) graviton exchange effects in the large extra dimensions with the cutoff parameter of order MS = 6.2 TeV (4.8 TeV) for d = 6 and MS = 8.8 TeV (6.8 TeV) for d = 3.

  15. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Gu, Bao-Min; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    The future gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. However, if there exist extra dimensions and only GWs can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of GWs and electromagnetic waves (EMWs) are in general different. In this paper, we study null geodesics of GWs and EMWs in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time in the presence of the curvature of the universe. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of GW is longer than EMW within equal time. Taking the GW150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as an example, we study how the curvature k and the constant curvature radius l affect the horizon radii of GW and EMW in the de Sitter and Einstein-de Sitter models of the universe. This provides an alternative method for probing extra dimension through future GW observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts.

  16. Bounds on the Number and Size of Extra Dimensions from Molecular Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salumbides, Edcel John; Schellekens, Bert; Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Ubachs, Wim

    2015-06-01

    Modern string theories, which seek to produce a consistent description of physics beyond the Standard Model that also includes the gravitational interaction, appear to be most consistent if a large number of dimensions are postulated. For example the mysterious M-theory, which generalizes all consistent versions of superstring theories, require 11 dimensions. We demonstrate that investigations of quantum level energies in simple molecular systems provide a testing ground to constrain the size of compactified extra dimensions, for example those proposed in the ADD [1] and RS scenarios [2]. This is made possible by the recent progress in precision metrology with ultrastable lasers on energy levels in neutral molecular hydrogen (H_2, HD and D_2) [3] and the molecular hydrogen ions (H_2^+, HD^+ and D_2^+) [4]. Comparisons between experiment and quantum electrodynamics calculations for these molecular systems can be interpreted in terms of probing large extra dimensions, under which conditions gravity will become much stronger. Molecules are a probe of space-time geometry at typical distances where chemical bonds are effective, i.e. at length scales of an Å. [1] N. Arkani-Hamed, S. Dimopoulos and G. Dvali, Phys. Lett. B 429, 263 (1998) [2] L. Randall and R. Sundrum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 3370 (1999). [3] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [4] J. C. J. Koelemeij et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173002 (2007).

  17. Headache due to an extra joint between head and neck.

    PubMed

    Stolt-Nielsen, A; Fredriksen, T A; Sjaastad, O

    1995-01-01

    A girl, born in 1973, started having headache in preschool age. After a head trauma in 1985, there was a clear worsening of the headache, and the headache became chronic at around 14 years, making regular school attendance impossible. The headache was "symptom poor," bilateral-occipital, but with a clear left-sided preponderance and occasionally spreading to the forehead. The headache was always worst in the morning hours, easing up by noontime. Neck rotation to the right could provoke long-lasting exacerbations. Neck movement was restricted on rotation to the left. A sore bony structure was discovered on palpation just underneath the mastoid process of the left side. This proved to correspond to a bony "bridge" with an extra joint between the first vertebra on the left side and the skull, medially to the mastoid process that could be demonstrated on x-ray tomography and CT scanning. This bony bridge was removed surgically more than 2 years ago, and the pain disappeared on the day of operation and has not recurred in the intervening time. Such bony bridges have in the past been considered to be innocuous and not symptom producing. Although this may be the general rule, the present case tends to show that even to this rule, there are exceptions.

  18. Classical geometry to quantum behavior correspondence in a virtual extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Dolce, Donatello

    2012-09-15

    In the Lorentz invariant formalism of compact space-time dimensions the assumption of periodic boundary conditions represents a consistent semi-classical quantization condition for relativistic fields. In Dolce (2011) we have shown, for instance, that the ordinary Feynman path integral is obtained from the interference between the classical paths with different winding numbers associated with the cyclic dynamics of the field solutions. By means of the boundary conditions, the kinematical information of interactions can be encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary, see Dolce (2012) . Furthermore, such a purely four-dimensional theory is manifestly dual to an extra-dimensional field theory. The resulting correspondence between extra-dimensional geometrodynamics and ordinary quantum behavior can be interpreted in terms of AdS/CFT correspondence. By applying this approach to a simple Quark-Gluon-Plasma freeze-out model we obtain fundamental analogies with basic aspects of AdS/QCD phenomenology. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum behavior is related to the intrinsic periodicity of isolated systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A periodic phenomenon can be parameterized by a virtual extra dimension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KK modes are used to describe the quantum excitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5D classical geometry encodes 4D quantum behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Geometrodynamical description of AdS/QCD as modulation of space-time periodicity.

  19. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in the Monojet+ET Channel with the DØ Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Anderson, E. W.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Klima, B.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nomerotski, A.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Kooten, R. Van; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2003-06-01

    We present a search for large extra dimensions (ED) in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8TeV using data collected by the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron in 1994 1996. Data corresponding to 78.8±3.9 pb-1 are examined for events with large missing transverse energy, one high-pT jet, and no isolated muons. There is no excess observed beyond expectation from the standard model, and we place lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale of 1.0 and 0.6TeV for 2 and 7 ED, respectively.

  20. Resonant leptogenesis and a verifiable seesaw model from large extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peihong

    2010-04-01

    In the presence of large extra dimensions, the fundamental scale could be as low as a few TeV. This yields leptogenesis and seesaw at a TeV scale. Phenomenologically, two TeV-scale Majorana fermions with a small mass split can realize a resonant leptogenesis, whereas a TeV-scale Higgs triplet with a small trilinear coupling to the standard model Higgs doublet can give a verifiable seesaw. We propose an interesting scenario where the small parameters for the resonant leptogenesis and the type-II seesaw can be simultaneously generated by the propagation of lepton number violation from distant branes to our world.

  1. Effect of the extra dimensions on the meson spectra in the perturbed background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, J.; Heshmatian, S.

    2017-05-01

    A class of the d-dimensional black holes space-time with the perturbed geometric function and dilaton field is considered to study meson spectroscopy. Holographic description of the black holes are used to investigate the meson spectra and the effective potential of mesons which described by a massless scalar field in the d-dimensional black holes with a dilaton background. The effects of perturbations and extra dimensions on the meson spectra and effective potential are investigated by using some experimental data and simulation of spectra ratios.

  2. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  3. Towards a Natural Theory of Dark Energy: Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.

    2004-12-10

    The first part of this article summarizes the evidence for Dark Energy and Dark Matter, as well as the naturalness issues which plague current theories of Dark Energy. The main point of this part is to argue why these naturalness issues should provide the central theoretical guidance for the search for a successful theory. The second part of the article describes the present status of what I regard as being the best mechanism yet proposed for addressing this issue: Six-dimensional Supergravity with submillimetre-sized Extra Dimensions (Supersymmetric Large Extra Dimensions, or SLED for short). Besides summarizing the SLED proposal itself, this section also describes the tests which this model has passed, the main criticisms which have been raised, and the remaining challenges which remain to be checked. The bottom line is that the proposal survives the tests which have been completed to date, and predicts several distinctive experimental signatures for cosmology, tests of gravity and for accelerator-based particle physics.

  4. Bounds on universal extra dimension from LHC run I and II data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Kirtiman

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the collider bounds on minimal Universal Extra Dimension (mUED) model from LHC Run-I and II data. The phenomenology of mUED is determined by only two parameters namely, the compactification scale (R-1) of the extra dimension and cutoff scale (Λ) of the theory. The characteristic feature of mUED is the occurrence of nearly degenerate mass spectrum for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles and hence, soft leptons, soft jets at the collider experiments. The degree of degeneracy of KK-mass spectrum crucially depends on Λ. The strongest direct bound on R-1 (∼ 950GeV for large Λ) arises from a search for a pair of soft dimuons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment with 8 TeV center-of-mass energy and 20 fb-1 integrated luminosity. However, for small Λ and hence, small splitting within the first KK-level, the bounds from the dimuon channel are rather weak. On the other hand, the discovery of 126 GeV Higgs boson demands small Λ to prevent the scalar potential form being unbounded from below. We discuss LHC monojet searches as a probe of low Λ region of mUED parameter space. We also compute bounds on the mUED parameter space from 13 TeV multijets results.

  5. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-12-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  6. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the large hadron collider.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knapitsch, A; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Trauner, C; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Benucci, L; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Karadzhinova, A; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, S; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; 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Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Cooper, W; Eartly, D P; Elvira, V D; Esen, S; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Green, D; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jensen, H; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kousouris, K; Kunori, S; Kwan, S; Leonidopoulos, C; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Pivarski, J; Pordes, R; Prokofyev, O; Schwarz, T; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Tan, P; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Goldberg, S; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Park, M; Remington, R; Rinkevicius, A; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Sellers, P; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Veeraraghavan, V; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Vodopiyanov, I; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bai, Y; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kunde, G J; Lacroix, F; Malek, M; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Silvestre, C; Strom, D; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Duru, F; Griffiths, S; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Bonato, A; Eskew, C; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Grachov, O; Kenny Iii, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tinti, G; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Barfuss, A F; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, A; Boutemeur, M; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Peterman, A; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y-J; Li, W; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wenger, E A; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Haupt, J; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Jindal, P; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Ziegler, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Killewald, P; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Rodenburg, M; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Laird, E; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Zatserklyaniy, A; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Borrello, L; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Boulahouache, C; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Flacher, H; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Gotra, Y; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Sakumoto, W; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Atramentov, O; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hits, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Richards, A; Rose, K; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Bardak, C; Damgov, J; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Mane, P; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Appelt, E; Brownson, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Gabella, W; Gurrola, A; Issah, M; Johns, W; Johnston, C; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goadhouse, S; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Mattson, M; Milstène, C; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Belknap, D; Bellinger, J N; Bernardini, J; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Efron, J; Friis, E; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M

    2012-03-16

    A search for signatures of extra spatial dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb(-1). In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  7. Extra dimensions, SN1987a, and nucleon-nucleon scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Christoph Hanhart; Daniel R. Phillips; Sanjay Reddy; Martin J. Savage

    2001-02-01

    One of the strongest constraints on the existence of large, compact, ''gravity-only'' dimensions comes from SN1987a. If the rate of energy loss into these putative extra dimensions is too high, then the neutrino pulse from the supernova will differ from that actually seen. The dominant mechanism for the production of Kaluza-Klein gravitons and dilatons in the supernova is via gravistrahlung and dilastrahlung from the nucleon-nucleon system. In this paper we compute the rates for these processes in a model-independent way using low-energy theorems which relate the emissivities to the measured nucleon-nucleon cross section. This is possible because for soft gravitons and dilatons the leading contribution to the energy-loss rate is from graphs in which the gravitational radiation is produced from external nucleon legs. Previous calculations neglected these mechanisms. We re-evaluate the bounds on toroidally-compactified ''gravity-only'' dimensions (GODs), and find that consistency with the observed SN1987a neutrino signal requires that if there are two such dimensions then their radius must be less than 1 micron.

  8. Prospects for identification the direct and indirect effects of extra spatial dimensions at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Serenkova, I. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Bednyakov, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    The existence of massive graviton states, that may be produced as real and virtual particles in high-energy proton collisions, is predicted by the modern developments of Kaluza-Klein models with extra spatial dimensions. The direct and indirect signatures of large and warped extra spatial dimensions may be revealed by analyzing the specific characteristics of dilepton and diphoton final states formed in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Virtual effects in the Kaluza-Klein models with large extra spatial dimensions can be discovered by the specic behavior of the dilpton and diphoton invariant-mass distributions, and their identication (in case of discovery) can be performed by the analysis of their angular distributions with integrated center-edge asymmetry. Assuming the nominal values of the LHC collision energy (14 TeV) and luminosity (100 fb-1), for the models with large extra spatial dimensions we find that the sensitivity to the cutoff parameter M S will extend up to 8.5 and 7.6 TeV for their discovery and identification, respectively. For the Randall-Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension, the LHC experiments will be sensitive to the graviton resonance with mass up to 4.4 and 3.1 TeV for its discovery and identification, respectively.

  9. Cosmological constraints on parameters of one-brane models with extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Iofa, Mikhail Z.

    2009-11-01

    We study some aspects of cosmologies in 5D models with one infinite extra dimension. Matter is confined to the brane, gravity extends to the bulk. Models with positive and negative tension of the brane are considered. Cosmological evolution of the 4D world is described by warped solutions of the generalized Friedmann equation. Cosmological solutions on the brane are obtained with the input of the present-time observational cosmological parameters. We estimate the age of the Universe and abundance of {sup 4}He produced in primordial nucleosynthesis in different models. Using these estimates we find constraints on dimensionless combinations of the 5D gravitational scale, scale of the warp factor and coupling at the 4D curvature term in the action.

  10. Early Search for Extra Dimensions in the Diphoton Channel at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duong

    2010-02-01

    The existence of extra dimensions (EDs) is an exciting new proposed solution of the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model. The evidence can be revealed in the diphoton mass spectrum either as a broad enhancement (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, Dvali, or ADD model) or as a narrow resonance (Randall-Sandrum, or RS model) over the continuum SM background. We present the search for these scenarios at CMS with early data. From simulation, we expect a 95% C.L. signal cross section limit of 0.053 pb assuming only the presence of SM processes with 100 pb-1 of pp collision data at √s = 10 TeV. This would translate in the most stringent limits on the ADD and RS model parameters to date. The discovery potential in the ADD and RS models is discussed in the expectation of rapidly increasing integrated luminosity. The status of this search using first LHC data is presented as well. )

  11. Noncommutative brane-world, (Anti) de Sitter vacua and extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Supriya

    2006-10-01

    We investigate a curved brane-world, inspired by a noncommutative D3-brane, in a type IIB string theory. We obtain, an axially symmetric and a spherically symmetric, (anti) de Sitter black holes in 4D. The event horizons of these black holes possess a constant curvature and may be seen to be governed by different topologies. The extremal geometries are explored, using the noncommutative scaling in the theory, to reassure the attractor behavior at the black hole event horizon. The emerging two dimensional, semi-classical, black hole is analyzed to provide evidence for the extra dimensions in a curved brane-world. It is argued that the gauge nonlinearity in the theory may be redefined by a potential in a moduli space. As a result, D = 11 and D = 12 dimensional geometries may be obtained at the stable extrema of the potential.

  12. Constraints on the size of the extra dimension from Kaluza-Klein gravitino decay

    SciTech Connect

    Gherson, David

    2007-08-15

    We study the consequences of the gravitino decay into dark matter. We suppose that the lightest neutralino is the main component of dark matter. In our framework the gravitino is heavy enough to decay before big bang nucleosynthesis starts. We consider a model coming from a five dimensional supergravity compactified on S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} with gravity in the bulk and matter localized on tensionless branes at the orbifold fixed points. We require that the dark matter, which is produced thermally and in the decay of Kaluza-Klein modes of the gravitino, has an abundance compatible with observation. We deduce from our model that there are curves of constraints between the size of the extra dimension and the reheating temperature of the Universe after inflation.

  13. Boosted top quark signals for heavy vector boson excitations in a universal extra dimension model

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup; Sridhar, K.; Guchait, Monoranjan

    2010-09-01

    In view of the fact that the n=1 Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes in a model with a universal extra dimension could mimic supersymmetry signatures at the LHC, it is necessary to look for the n=2 KK modes, which have no analogues in supersymmetry. We discuss the possibility of searching for heavy n=2 vector boson resonances--especially the g{sub 2}--through their decays to a highly boosted top quark-antiquark pair using recently developed top-jet tagging techniques in the hadronic channel. It is shown that tt signals from the n=2 gluon resonance are as efficient a discovery mode at the LHC as dilepton channels from the {gamma}{sub 2} and Z{sub 2} resonances.

  14. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  15. Limits on Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G.A.; Cameron, R.A.; Caraveo, P.A.; Casandjian, J.M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; /more authors..

    2012-08-17

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to {gamma}{gamma} should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  16. Limits on large extra dimensions based on observations of neutron stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.

    2012-02-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  17. Limits on large extra dimensions based on observations of neutron stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Borgland, A.W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R.A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P.A.; Casandjian, J.M. E-mail: elliott@slac.stanford.edu [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU Collaboration: Fermi-LAT collaboration; and others

    2012-02-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Considering 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.

  18. Limits on large extra dimensions based on observations of neutron stars with the Fermi-LAT

    DOE PAGES

    Ajello, M.

    2012-02-01

    We present limits for the compactification scale in the theory of Large Extra Dimensions (LED) proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali. We use 11 months of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) to set gamma ray flux limits for 6 gamma-ray faint neutron stars (NS). To set limits on LED we use the model of Hannestad and Raffelt (HR) that calculates the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton production in supernova cores and the large fraction subsequently gravitationally bound around the resulting NS. The predicted decay of the bound KK gravitons to γγ should contribute to the flux from NSs. Consideringmore » 2 to 7 extra dimensions of the same size in the context of the HR model, we use Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the expected differential flux of gamma-rays arising from these KK gravitons, including the effects of the age of the NS, graviton orbit, and absorption of gamma-rays in the magnetosphere of the NS. We compare our Monte Carlo-based differential flux to the experimental differential flux using maximum likelihood techniques to obtain our limits on LED. Our limits are more restrictive than past EGRET-based optimistic limits that do not include these important corrections. Additionally, our limits are more stringent than LHC based limits for 3 or fewer LED, and comparable for 4 LED. We conclude that if the effective Planck scale is around a TeV, then for 2 or 3 LED the compactification topology must be more complicated than a torus.« less

  19. Search for large extra dimensions in the exclusive photon + missing energy channel in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lazoflores, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    A search was conducted for evidence of large extra dimensions (LED) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's Tevatron using the D0 detector. The Tevatron is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events with particles escaping into extra dimensions will have large missing energy. The search was carried out using data from a total luminosity of 197 ± 13 pb-1 with an observable high transverse momentum photon and a large transverse missing energy. The 70 observed events are consistent with photons produced by standard known reactions plus other background processes produced by cosmic muons. The mass limits on the fundamental mass scale at 95% confidence level for large extra dimensions of 2, 4, 6 and 8 are 500 GeV, 581 GeV, 630 GeV, and 668 GeV respectively.

  20. Unified dark matter model in a singlet extension of the universal extra dimension model

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yang; Han Zhenyu

    2009-05-01

    We propose a dark matter model with standard model singlet extension of the universal extra dimension model to explain the recent observations of ATIC, PPB-BETS, PAMELA, and DAMA. Other than the standard model fields propagating in the bulk of a five-dimensional space, one fermion field and one scalar field are introduced and both are standard model singlets. The zero mode of the new fermion is identified as the right-handed neutrino, while its first Klein-Kaluza (KK) mode is the lightest KK-odd particle and the dark matter candidate. The cosmic ray spectra from ATIC and PPB-BETS determine the dark matter particle mass and hence the fifth dimension compactification scale to be 1.0-1.6 TeV. The zero mode of the singlet scalar field with a mass below 1 GeV provides an attractive force between dark matter particles, which allows a Sommerfeld enhancement to boost the annihilation cross section in the Galactic halo to explain the PAMELA data. The DAMA annual modulation results are explained by coupling the same scalar field to the electron via a higher-dimensional operator. We analyze the model parameter space that can satisfy the dark matter relic abundance and accommodate all the dark matter detection experiments. We also consider constraints from the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, which can be satisfied if the dark matter particle and the first KK mode of the scalar field have highly degenerate masses.

  1. Gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with extra dimensions: Phase structure and renormalizability

    SciTech Connect

    Gusynin, Valery P.; Hashimoto, Michio; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2004-11-01

    We investigate phase structure of the D(>4)-dimensional gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with {delta}(=D-4) extra dimensions compactified on TeV scale, based on the improved ladder Schwinger-Dyson (SD) equation in the bulk. We assume that the bulk (dimensionless) running gauge coupling in the SD equation for the SU(N{sub c}) gauge theory with N{sub f} massless flavors is given by the truncated Kaluza-Klein effective theory and hence has a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point (UVFP), resulting in the walking coupling. We find the critical line in the parameter space of two couplings, the gauge coupling (value fixed at the UVFP) and the (dimensionless) four-fermion coupling, which is similar to that of the gauged NJL model with fixed (walking) gauge coupling in four dimensions. It is shown that in the presence of such walking gauge interactions the four-fermion interactions become nontrivial and renormalizable even in higher dimensions, similar to the four dimensional gauged NJL model. Such a renormalizability/nontriviality holds only in the restricted region of the critical line ('nontrivial window') with the gauge coupling larger than a nonvanishing value ('marginal triviality' point), in contrast to the four dimensional case where such a renormalizability holds for all regions of the critical line except for the pure NJL point (without gauge coupling). In the nontrivial window the renormalized effective potential yields a nontrivial interaction which is conformal invariant. The existence of the nontrivial window implies 'cutoff insensitivity' of the physics prediction in spite of the ultraviolet dominance of the dynamics. In the formal limit D{yields}4, the nontrivial window shrinks to the pure NJL point but with a nontrivial condition which coincides with the known condition of the renormalizability/nontriviality of the four dimensional gauged NJL model (9/2)(1/N{sub c})

  2. Probing Micro Black Holes and Extra Dimensions through IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Sultan

    2010-11-01

    If extra space dimensions and low-scale gravity exist, Microscopic Black Holes (MBHs) will be produced in collisions of elementary particles. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrinos, also known as GZK neutrinos, provide a promising window on this phenomenon. For GZK neutrinos above ˜10^7GeV, the MBH production cross section in neutrino-nucleon interactions exceeds the standard model cross section by two or more orders of magnitude increasing the chances of detection by neutrino observatories. The IceCube neutrino observatory, buried 1.4 km under the Antarctic ice near the South Pole, was used to probe production of MBHs in this analysis. One month data from the IceCube detector was searched for events that could be possible MBH events. The expected number of events was also calculated theoretically for both the Standard Model cross section and the MBH model cross section using a standard GZK flux prediction. No significant MBH events were found in the data analysis which is consistent with the low expected number of MBH events. Detecting MBH directly requires large amount of observable data, and so is not an effective method for probing MBHs. Further study is required to come up with indirect ways of detecting MBH production using IceCube.

  3. Single-brane cosmological solutions with a stable compact extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Kanti, Panagiota; Kogan, Ian I.; Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim

    2000-05-15

    We consider 5-dimensional cosmological solutions of a single brane. The correct cosmology on the brane, i.e., governed by the standard 4-dimensional Friedmann equation, and stable compactification of the extra dimension is guaranteed by the existence of a nonvanishing T{sub 5}{sup 5} which is proportional to the 4-dimensional trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We show that this component of the energy-momentum tensor arises from the back reaction of the dilaton coupling to the brane. The same positive features are exhibited in solutions found in the presence of nonvanishing cosmological constants both on the brane ({lambda}{sub br}) and in the bulk ({lambda}{sub B}). Moreover, the restoration of the Friedmann equation, with the correct sign, takes place for both signs of {lambda}{sub B} so long as the sign of {lambda}{sub br} is opposite {lambda}{sub B} in order to cancel the energy densities of the two cosmological constants. We further extend our single-brane thin-wall solution to allow a brane with finite thickness. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. An extra dimension in protein tagging by quantifying universal proteotypic peptides using targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vandemoortele, Giel; Staes, An; Gonnelli, Giulia; Samyn, Noortje; De Sutter, Delphine; Vandermarliere, Elien; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart; Eyckerman, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein tagging to facilitate detailed characterization of target proteins has not only revolutionized cell biology, but also enabled biochemical analysis through efficient recovery of the protein complexes wherein the tagged proteins reside. The endogenous use of these tags for detailed protein characterization is widespread in lower organisms that allow for efficient homologous recombination. With the recent advances in genome engineering, tagging of endogenous proteins is now within reach for most experimental systems, including mammalian cell lines cultures. In this work, we describe the selection of peptides with ideal mass spectrometry characteristics for use in quantification of tagged proteins using targeted proteomics. We mined the proteome of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus to obtain two peptides that are unique in the proteomes of all known model organisms (proteotypic) and allow sensitive quantification of target proteins in a complex background. By combining these ’Proteotypic peptides for Quantification by SRM’ (PQS peptides) with epitope tags, we demonstrate their use in co-immunoprecipitation experiments upon transfection of protein pairs, or after introduction of these tags in the endogenous proteins through genome engineering. Endogenous protein tagging for absolute quantification provides a powerful extra dimension to protein analysis, allowing the detailed characterization of endogenous proteins. PMID:27264994

  5. Search for Kaluza-Klein gravitons in extra dimension models via forward detectors at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Gi-Chol; Kono, Takanori; Mawatari, Kentarou; Yamashita, Kimiko

    2015-06-01

    We investigate contributions of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton in extra dimension models to the process p p →p γ p →p γ j X , where a proton emits a quasireal photon and is detected by using the very forward detectors planned at the LHC. In addition to the γ q initial state as in the Compton scattering in the standard model, the γ g scattering contributes through the t -channel exchange of KK gravitons. Taking account of pileup contributions to the background and examining viable kinematical cuts, constraints on the parameter space of both the ADD (Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali) model and the RS (Randall and Sundrum) model are studied. With 200 fb-1 data at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, the expected lower bound on the cutoff scale for the ADD model is 6.3 TeV at 95% confidence level, while a lower limit of 2.0 (0.5) TeV is set on the mass of the first excited graviton with the coupling parameter k /M¯ Pl=0.1 (0.01 ) for the RS model.

  6. Anomalies, Chern-Simons terms and chiral delocalization in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2006-04-15

    Gauge invariant topological interactions, such as the D=5 Chern-Simons (CS) term, are required in models in extra dimensions that split anomaly free representations. The Chern-Simons term is necessary to maintain the overall anomaly cancellations of the theory, but it can have significant, observable, physical effects. The CS term locks the Kaluza-Klein (KK)-mode parity to the parity of space-time, leaving a single parity symmetry. It leads to new processes among KK modes e.g., the decay of a KK mode to a 2-body final state of KK modes. A formalism for the effective interaction among KK modes is constructed, and the decay of a KK mode to KK mode plus zero mode is analyzed as an example. We elaborate the general KK-mode current and anomaly structure of these theories. This includes a detailed study of the triangle diagrams and the associated 'consistent anomalies' for Weyl spinors on the boundary branes. We also develop the non-Abelian formalism. We illustrate this by showing in a simple way how a D=5 Yang-Mills 'quark flavor' symmetry leads to the D=4 chiral Lagrangian of mesons and the quantized Wess-Zumino-Witten term.

  7. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Berenji, Bijan

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  8. Computational techniques to enable visualizing shapes of objects of extra spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don Vaughn, II

    Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. In order to enable such a capability for ourselves, it is first necessary to devise and implement a computationally tractable method to visualize, explore, and manipulate objects of dimension beyond three on the personal computer. A technology is described in this dissertation to convert a representation of higher dimensional models into a format that may be displayed in realtime on graphics cards available on many off-the-shelf personal computers. As a result, an opportunity has been created to experience the shape of four dimensional objects on the desktop computer. The ultimate goal has been to provide the user a tangible and memorable experience with mathematical models of four dimensional objects such that the user can see the model from any user selected vantage point. By use of a 4D GUI, an arbitrary convex hull or 3D silhouette of the 4D model can be rotated, panned, scrolled, and zoomed until a suitable dimensionally reduced view or Aspect is obtained. The 4D GUI then allows the user to manipulate a 3-flat hyperplane cutting tool to slice the model at an arbitrary orientation and position to extract or "pluck" an embedded 3D slice or "aspect" from the embedding four-space. This plucked 3D aspect can be viewed from all angles via a conventional 3D viewer using three multiple POV viewports, and optionally exported to a third party CAD viewer for further manipulation. Plucking and Manipulating the Aspect provides a tangible experience for the end-user in the same manner as any 3D Computer Aided Design viewing and manipulation tool does for the engineer or a 3D video game provides

  9. `Shut The Front Door!':. Obviating the Challenge of Large-Scale Extra Dimensions and Psychophysical Bridging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    Physics has been slowly and reluctantly beginning to address the role and fundamental basis of the `observer' which has until now also been considered metaphysical and beyond the mandate of empirical rigor. It is suggested that the fundamental premise of the currently dominant view of `Cognitive Theory' - "Mind Equals Brain" is erroneous; and the associated belief that the `Planck scale, `the so-called basement level of reality', as an appropriate arena from which to model psycho-physical bridging is also in error. In this paper we delineate a simple, inexpensive experimental design to `crack the so-called cosmic egg' thereby opening the door to largescale extra dimensions (LSXD) tantamount to the regime of the unified field and thus awareness. The methodology surmounts the quantum uncertainty principle in a manner violating Quantum Electrodynamics, (QED), a cornerstone of modern theoretical physics, by spectrographic analysis of newly theorized Tight-Bound State (TBS) Bohr orbits in `continuous-state' transition frequencies of atomic hydrogen. If one wonders why QED violation in the spectra of atomic hydrogen relates to solving the mind-body (observer) problem; consider this a 1st wrench in a forthcoming tool box of Unified Field Mechanics, UF that will soon enough in retrospect cause the current tools of Classical and Quantum Mechanics to appear as stone axes. Max Planck is credited as the founder of quantum mechanics with his 1900 quantum hypothesis that energy is radiated and absorbed discretely by the formulation, E = hv. Empirically implementing this next paradigm shift utilizing parameters of the long sought associated `new physics' of the 3rd regime (classicalquantum- unified) allows access to LSXD of space; thus pragmatically opening the domain of mental action for the 1st time in history. This rendering constitutes a massive paradigm shift to Unified Field Theory creating a challenge for both the writer and the reader!

  10. New origin for approximate symmetries from distant breaking in extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    1998-11-20

    The recently proposed theories with TeV-scale quantum gravity do not have the usual ultraviolet desert between {approximately} 10{sup 3}-10{sup 19} GeV where effective field theory ideas apply. Consequently, the success of the desert in explaining approximate symmetries is lost, and theories of flavor, neutrino masses, proton longevity or supersymmetry breaking, lose their usual habitat. In this paper we show that these ideas can find a new home in an infrared desert: the large space in the extra dimensions. The main idea is that symmetries are primordially exact on our brane, but are broken at O(1) on distant branes. This breaking is communicated to us in a distance-suppressed way by bulk messengers. We illustrate these ideas in a number of settings: (1) We construct theories for the fermion mass hierarchy which avoid problems with large flavor-changing neutral currents. (2) We re-iterate that proton stability can arise if baryon number is gauged in the bulk. (3) We study limits on light gauge fields and scalars in the bulk coming from rare decays, astrophysics and cosmology. (4) We remark that the same ideas can be used to explain small neutrino masses, as well as hierarchical supersymmetry breaking. (5) We construct a theory with bulk technicolor, avoiding the difficulties with extended technicolor. There are also a number of interesting experimental signals of these ideas: (1) Attractive or repulsive, isotope dependent sub-millimeter forces {approximately} 10{sup 6} times gravitational strength, from the exchange of light bulk particles. (2) Novel Higgs decays to light generation fermions plus bulk scalars. (3) Collider production of bulk vector and scalar fields, leading to {gamma} or jet+ missing energy signals as in the case of bulk graviton production, with comparable or larger rates.

  11. The birds and the Bs in RS: the b → sγ penguin in a warped extra dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Monika; Shakya, Bibhushan; Tanedo, Philip; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2012-08-01

    We calculate contributions to the photon and gluon magnetic dipole operators that mediate b → sγ and b → dγ transitions in the Randall-Sundrum model of a warped extra dimension with anarchic bulk fermions and a brane localized Higgs. Unlike the Standard Model, there are large contributions to the left-handed b quark decays, parameterized by the Wilson coefficient C_7^' } , due to the pattern of bulk fermion localization, and sizable contributions from the gluonic penguins, C_8^{{( ' )}} , through renormalization group mixing. Further, unlike the Randall-Sundrum result for μ → eγ, the unprimed Wilson coefficients receive non-negligible contributions from the misalignment of the bulk fermion spectrum with the Standard Model flavor sector. We compare the size of effects and the constraints imposed by the branching ratios Br( B → X sγ ) and within the minimal and the custodial model. Within the custodial framework, we study the effect on a number of benchmark observables and find that Br( B → X s μ + μ -) and the forward-backward asymmetry in B → K*μ + μ - remain close to their Standard Model predictions. On the other hand, there can be large enhancements of the time-dependent CP asymmetry in B → K*γ and the transverse asymmetry A_T^{{(2)}}.

  12. Search for large extra dimensions in dimuon and dielectron events in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; Ceard, L.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Lomidze, D.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Erdmann, M.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Davids, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Cakir, A.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. 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B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, W.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Esen, S.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jensen, H.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pivarski, J.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Schwarz, T.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Goldberg, S.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kunde, G. J.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Silvestre, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Peterman, A.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Jindal, P.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Killewald, P.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Sakumoto, W.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Atramentov, O.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Richards, A.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Gurrola, A.; Issah, M.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goadhouse, S.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Bellinger, J. N.; Bernardini, J.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Efron, J.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; CMS Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    Results are presented from a search for large, extra spatial dimensions in events with either two isolated muons or two isolated electrons. The data are from proton-proton interactions at √{ s} = 7 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The size of the data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 2fb-1. The observed dimuon and dielectron mass spectra are found to be consistent with standard-model expectations. Depending on the number of extra dimensions, the 95% confidence level limits from the combined μμ and ee channels range from Ms > 2.4 TeV to Ms > 3.8 TeV, where Ms characterizes the scale for the onset of quantum gravity.

  13. Obstetrical management of patients with extra-anatomic vascular bypass grafts due to Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Egawa, Makiko; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Inoue, Yoshinori; Kubota, Toshiro

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the obstetrical management of patients with Takayasu arteritis (TA) who have undergone extra-anatomic vascular bypass (EAVB). We describe two cases of EAVB. Case 1 underwent EAVB due to renovascular hypertension associated with stenosis of the abdominal aorta, and Case 2 due to amaurosis fugax episodes associated with stenosis of the brachiocephalic and left common carotid arteries. Pregnancy outcomes were favorable for both cases, though the original symptoms recurred during the third trimester in each case, possibly due to increased blood flow to the pregnant uterus. Neither bypass occlusion nor anastomotic aneurysm formation was observed. Pregnancy outcomes of patients with EAVB due to TA are favorable, although pregnancies of patients with TA who have cardiovascular complications are associated with an increased risk of maternal and fetal morbidity. The obstetrical management of these patients, however, should include monitoring for complications related to the EAVB.

  14. Equivariant fields in an S U (N ) gauge theory with new spontaneously generated fuzzy extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüoǧlu, S.; Ünal, G.

    2016-05-01

    We find new spontaneously generated fuzzy extra dimensions emerging from a certain deformation of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with cubic soft supersymmetry breaking and mass deformation terms. First, we determine a particular four-dimensional fuzzy vacuum that may be expressed in terms of a direct sum of product of two fuzzy spheres, and denote it in short as SF2 Int×SF2 Int . The direct sum structure of the vacuum is clearly revealed by a suitable splitting of the scalar fields in the model in a manner that generalizes our approach in [Phys. Rev. D 92, 025022 (2015)]. Fluctuations around this vacuum have the structure of gauge fields over SF2 Int×SF2 Int, and this enables us to conjecture the spontaneous broken model as an effective U (n ) (n

  15. Dirac neutrinos with S4 flavor symmetry in warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2013-11-01

    We present a warped extra dimension model with the custodial symmetry SU(2×SU(2×U(1×PLR based on the flavor symmetry S4×Z2×Z2', and the neutrinos are taken to be Dirac particles. At leading order, the democratic lepton mixing is derived exactly, and the high-dimensional operators introduce corrections of order λc to all the three lepton mixing angles such that agreement with the experimental data can be achieved. The neutrino mass spectrum is predicted to be of the inverted hierarchy and the second octant of θ23 is preferred. We suggest the modified democratic mixing, which is obtained by permuting the second and the third rows of the democratic mixing matrix, should be a good first order approximation to understanding sizable θ13 and the first octant of θ23. The constraints on the model from the electroweak precision measurements are discussed. Furthermore, we investigate the lepton mixing patterns for all the possible residual symmetries Gν and Gl in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors, respectively. For convenience, we work in the base in which m≡mlml† is diagonal, where ml is the charged lepton mass matrix. It is easy to see that the symmetry transformation matrix Gl, which is determined by the condition Gl†mGl=m, is a diagonal and non-degenerate 3×3 phase matrix. In the case that neutrinos are Majorana particles, the light neutrino mass matrix for DC mixing is of the form mνDC=UDC*diag(m1,m2,m3)UDC†. The symmetry transformations Gi, which satisfy GiTmνDCGi=mνDC, are determined to be G1=+u1u1†-u2u2†-u3u3†, G2=-u1u1†+u2u2†-u3u3† and G3=-u1u1†-u2u2†+u3u3† besides the identity transformation, where ui is the ith column of UDC. They satisfy Gi2=1, GiGj=GjGi=Gk(i≠j≠k). Consequently the symmetry group of the neutrino mass matrix mνDC is the Klein four group K4≅Z2×Z2. Denoting the underlying family symmetry group at high energies as G, then the symmetry transformations Gl and Gi should be the elements of G. In the

  16. An anisotropic universe due to dimension-changing vacuum decay

    SciTech Connect

    Scargill, James H.C.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we consider the question of observational signatures of a false vacuum decay event in the early universe followed by a period of inflation; in particular, motivated by the string landscape, we consider decays in which the parent vacuum has a smaller number of large dimensions than the current vacuum, which leads to an anisotropic universe. We go beyond previous studies, and examine the effects on the CMB temperature and polarisation power spectra, due to both scalar and tensor modes, and consider not only late-time effects but also the full cosmological perturbation theory at early times. We find that whilst the scalar mode behaves as one would expect, and the effects of anisotropy at early times are sub-dominant to the late-time effects already studied, for the tensor modes in fact the the early-time effects grow with multipole and can become much larger than one would expect, even dominating over the late-time effects. Thus these effects should be included if one is looking for such a signal in the tensor modes.

  17. Higgs production and decay processes via loop diagrams in various 6D Universal Extra Dimension models at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiwaki, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    We calculate loop-induced Higgs production and decay processes which are relevant for the LHC in various six-dimensional Universal Extra Dimension models. More concretely, we focus on the Higgs production through gluon fusion and the Higgs decay into two photons induced by loop diagrams. They are one-loop leading processes and the contribution of Kaluza-Klein particles is considered to be significant. These processes are divergent in six dimensions. Therefore, we employ a momentum cutoff, whose size is fixed from the validity of perturbative calculation through naive dimensional analysis. In these six-dimensional Universal Extra Dimension models, the Higgs production cross section through gluon fusion is highly enhanced and the Higgs decay width into two photons is suppressed. In particular in the case of the compactification on Projective Sphere, these effects are remarkable. The deviation of the h (0) → 2γ signal from the prediction of the Standard model is much greater than that in the case of the five-dimensional minimal UED model. We also consider threshold corrections in the two processes and these effect are noteworthy even when we take a higher cutoff and/or a heavy KK scale. Comparing our calculation to the recent LHC results which were published at the Lepton-Photon 2011 and at the December of 2011 is performed briefly.

  18. XD-GRASP: Golden-angle radial MRI with reconstruction of extra motion-state dimensions using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Axel, Leon; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    To develop a novel framework for free-breathing MRI called XD-GRASP, which sorts dynamic data into extra motion-state dimensions using the self-navigation properties of radial imaging and reconstructs the multidimensional dataset using compressed sensing. Radial k-space data are continuously acquired using the golden-angle sampling scheme and sorted into multiple motion-states based on respiratory and/or cardiac motion signals derived directly from the data. The resulting undersampled multidimensional dataset is reconstructed using a compressed sensing approach that exploits sparsity along the new dynamic dimensions. The performance of XD-GRASP is demonstrated for free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) abdominal imaging, two-dimensional (2D) cardiac cine imaging and 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI of the liver, comparing against reconstructions without motion sorting in both healthy volunteers and patients. XD-GRASP separates respiratory motion from cardiac motion in cardiac imaging, and respiratory motion from contrast enhancement in liver DCE-MRI, which improves image quality and reduces motion-blurring artifacts. XD-GRASP represents a new use of sparsity for motion compensation and a novel way to handle motions in the context of a continuous acquisition paradigm. Instead of removing or correcting motion, extra motion-state dimensions are reconstructed, which improves image quality and also offers new physiological information of potential clinical value. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Search for large extra dimensions via single photon plus missing energy final states at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

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    2008-07-04

    We report on a search for large extra dimensions in a data sample of approximately 1 fb(-1) of pp[over] collisions at sqrt s=1.96 TeV. We investigate Kaluza-Klein graviton production with a photon and missing transverse energy in the final state. At the 95% C.L. we set limits on the fundamental mass scale M(D) from 884 to 778 GeV for two to eight extra dimensions.

  20. Searches for and identification of effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pankov, A. A. Serenkova, I. A. Tsytrinov, A. V. Bednyakov, V. A.

    2015-06-15

    Prospects of discovering and identifying effects of extra spatial dimensions in dilepton and diphoton production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are studied. Such effects may be revealed by the characteristic behavior of the invariant-mass distributions of dileptons and diphotons, and their identification can be performed on the basis of an analysis of their angular distributions. The discovery and identification reaches are estimated for the scale parameter M{sub S} of the Kaluza-Klein gravitational towers, which can be determined in experiments devoted to measuring the dilepton and diphoton channels at the LHC.

  1. Search for the minimal universal extra dimension model at the LHC with {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Ghosh, Kirtiman

    2011-02-01

    The Universal Extra Dimension (UED) model is one of the popular extension of the standard model (SM) which offers interesting phenomenology. In the minimal UED (mUED) model, Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity conservation ensures that n=1 KK states can only be pair produced at colliders and the lightest KK particle is stable. In most of the parameter space, first KK excitation of SM hypercharge gauge boson is the lightest one and it can be a viable dark matter candidate. Thus, the decay of n=1 KK particles will always involve missing transverse energy.

  2. The impact of adding an extra dimension to a preference-based measure

    PubMed Central

    Brazier, John; Rowen, Donna; Tsuchiya, Aki; Yang, Yaling; Young, Tracy A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to compare incremental changes in Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) generated by different condition-specific preference-based measures (CSPBMs), or indeed between generic measures, is often criticised even where the valuation methods and source of values are the same. A key concern is the impact of excluding key dimensions from a descriptive system. This study examines the impact of adding a generic pain/discomfort dimension to a CSPBM, the AQL-5D (an asthma-specific CSPBM), by valuing samples of states from the AQL-5D with and without the new dimension using an interviewer administered time trade-off with a sample of the UK general public. 180 respondents provided 720 valuations for states with and without pain/discomfort. As expected the additional pain/discomfort dimension was found to have a significant and relatively large coefficient. More importantly for comparing changes in QALYs across populations the addition of pain/discomfort significantly impacts on the coefficients of the other dimensions and the degree of impact differs by dimension and severity level. The net effect on the utility value depends on the severity of their state: the addition of pain/discomfort at level 1 (no pain/discomfort) or 2 (moderate pain/discomfort) significantly increased the mean health state values in an asthma patient population; whereas level 3 pain/discomfort (extreme) reduced values. Comparability between measures requires that the impact of different dimensions on preferences is additive, whether or not they are included in the classification system. Our results cast doubt on this assumption, implying that the chosen measure must contain all important and relevant dimensions in its classification system. PMID:21689878

  3. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Jabeen, S.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. 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J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Berry, E.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; deBarbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7at a centre-of-mass energy of 8. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter . The constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  4. A terminal velocity on the landscape: particle production near extra species loci in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battefeld, Diana; Battefeld, Thorsten

    2010-07-01

    We investigate particle production near extra species loci (ESL) in a higher dimensional field space and derive a speed limit in moduli space at weak coupling. This terminal velocity is set by the characteristic ESL-separation and the coupling of the extra degrees of freedom to the moduli, but it is independent of the moduli’s potential if the dimensionality of the field space is considerably larger than the dimensionality of the loci, D ≫ d. Once the terminal velocity is approached, particles are produced at a plethora of nearby ESLs, preventing a further increase in speed via their backreaction. It is possible to drive inflation at the terminal velocity, providing a generalization of trapped inflation with attractive features: we find that more than sixty e-folds of inflation for sub-Planckian excursions in field space are possible if ESLs are ubiquitous, without fine tuning of initial conditions and less tuned potentials. We construct a simple, observationally viable model with a slightly red scalar power-spectrum and suppressed gravitational waves; we comment on the presence of additional observational signatures originating from IR-cascading and individual massive particles. We also show that moduli-trapping at an ESL is suppressed for D ≫ d, hindering dynamical selection of high-symmetry vacua on the landscape based on this mechanism.

  5. Basal salivary oxytocin level predicts extra- but not intra-personal dimensions of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Koven, Nancy S; Max, Laura K

    2014-06-01

    A wealth of literature suggests that oxytocin is an important mediator of social cognition, but much of the research to date has relied on pharmaceutical administration methods that can raise oxytocin to artificially high levels. The present study builds upon previous work by examining whether basal oxytocin level predicts intra- and extra-personal (i.e., self- and other-focused) elements of emotional intelligence (EI), independent of shared variance with current mood. The sample included 71 healthy young adults (46 women). Assessment measures included the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test Version 2.0 (MSCEIT), the Trait Meta-Mood Scale, and the Profile of Mood States. Peripheral oxytocin levels were examined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from saliva after solid phase extraction. Oxytocin level was unrelated to TMMS scores but was positively associated with performance in the Experiential EI domain of the MSCEIT. However, total mood disturbance was positively related to MSCEIT scores. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that oxytocin level added unique variance to the prediction of MSCEIT performance beyond that of current mood. These results confirm an association between endogenous levels of oxytocin in healthy adults and a subset of EI abilities, including extra-personal emotion recognition and the channeling of emotions to enhance social proficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flavor dynamics with conformal matter and gauge theories on compact hyperbolic manifolds in extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, D. A.; Shifman, M.

    2002-05-01

    We outline a toy model in which a unique mechanism may trigger a dynamical chain resulting in key low-energy regularities. The starting points are a negative cosmological term in the bulk and conformally invariant nongravity sector. These elements ensure compactification of the extra dimensional space on a compact hyperbolic manifold (with the negative and constant scalar curvature). The overall geometry is then M4×Bn. The negative curvature on Bn triggers the formation of the four-dimensional defect which provides in turn a dynamical localization of ordinary particles. It also leads, simultaneously, to a spontaneous breaking of gauge symmetry through a Higgs mechanism. Masses of the fermions, gauge bosons and scalars all derive from the curvature of the internal manifold such that the Higgs boson is generally heavier than the gauge bosons. The factorizable geometry M4×Bn and flatness of M4 require fine tuning.

  7. Cosmic strings with twisted magnetic flux lines and wound-strings in extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2012-09-01

    We consider a generalization of the Nielsen-Olesen ansatz, in the abelian-Higgs model, which describes strings with twisted magnetic flux lines in the vortex core. The solution does not possess cylindrical symmetry, which leads to the existence of components of conserved momentum, both around the core-axis and along the length of the string. In addition, we consider a model of F-strings with rotating, geodesic windings in the compact space of the Klebanov-Strassler geometry and determine matching conditions which ensure energy and momentum conservation when loops chop off from the long-string network. We find that the expressions for the constants of motion, which determine the macroscopic string dynamics, can be made to coincide with those for the twisted flux line string, suggesting that extra-dimensional effects for F-strings may be mimicked by field-theoretic structure in topological defects.

  8. Dual Purpose Landscaping Tools: Small Extra Dimensions in AdS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph; Silverstein, Eva; /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-08-26

    We propose a class of AdS/CFT dual pairs which have small internal dimensions on the gravity side. Starting from known Freund-Rubin AdS/CFT dual pairs, we use 7-branes to nearly cancel the curvature energy of the internal dimensions while maintaining their stabilization. This leads to a new corner of the landscape - a class of AdS solutions with a hierarchically large AdS radius - with a dual field theory given (implicitly) by the infrared limit of a concrete brane construction involving D3-branes, 7-branes, and curvature. We first construct a class of hierarchical AdS5/CFT4 dual pairs with a simple formula for the number of degrees of freedom which we interpret in the dual QFT. We then generalize these to AdS4/CFT3 duals, and suggest extensions of the method to obtain de Sitter solutions.

  9. One-loop effects of extra dimensions on the WWγ and WWZ vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Montaño, J.; Novales-Sánchez, H.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, F.; Toscano, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The one-loop contribution of the excited Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the SUL(2) gauge group on the off-shell W-W+γ and W-W+Z vertices is calculated in the context of a pure Yang-Mills theory in five dimensions and its phenomenological implications discussed. The use of a gauge-fixing procedure for the excited KK modes that is covariant under the standard gauge transformations of the SUL(2) group is stressed. A gauge-fixing term and the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector for the KK gauge modes that are separately invariant under the standard gauge transformations of SUL(2) are presented. It is shown that the one-loop contributions of the KK modes to the off-shell W-W+γ and W-W+Z vertices are free of ultraviolet divergences and well-behaved at high energies. It is found that for a size of the fifth dimension of R-1˜1TeV, the one-loop contribution of the KK modes to these vertices is about 1 order of magnitude lower than the corresponding standard model radiative correction. This contribution is similar to the one estimated for new gauge bosons contributions in other contexts. Tree-level effects on these vertices induced by operators of higher canonical dimension are also investigated. It is found that these effects are lower than those generated at the one-loop order by the KK gauge modes.

  10. One-loop effects of extra dimensions on the WW{gamma} and WWZ vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Novales-Sanchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.; Montano, J.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.

    2011-01-01

    The one-loop contribution of the excited Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of the SU{sub L}(2) gauge group on the off-shell W{sup -}W{sup +}{gamma} and W{sup -}W{sup +}Z vertices is calculated in the context of a pure Yang-Mills theory in five dimensions and its phenomenological implications discussed. The use of a gauge-fixing procedure for the excited KK modes that is covariant under the standard gauge transformations of the SU{sub L}(2) group is stressed. A gauge-fixing term and the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector for the KK gauge modes that are separately invariant under the standard gauge transformations of SU{sub L}(2) are presented. It is shown that the one-loop contributions of the KK modes to the off-shell W{sup -}W{sup +}{gamma} and W{sup -}W{sup +}Z vertices are free of ultraviolet divergences and well-behaved at high energies. It is found that for a size of the fifth dimension of R{sup -1{approx}}1 TeV, the one-loop contribution of the KK modes to these vertices is about 1 order of magnitude lower than the corresponding standard model radiative correction. This contribution is similar to the one estimated for new gauge bosons contributions in other contexts. Tree-level effects on these vertices induced by operators of higher canonical dimension are also investigated. It is found that these effects are lower than those generated at the one-loop order by the KK gauge modes.

  11. Aether field in extra dimensions: Stefan-Boltzmann law and Casimir effect at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.

    2017-01-01

    The Lorentz and C P T symmetries are not violated at the highest laboratory energies available. However these symmetries may be violated at Planck scale. A particular development is to investigate the breakdown of Lorentz and C P T symmetries by introducing an aether field that exhibits nonzero vacuum expectation value along the fifth dimension. The interactions of the aether field with scalar, electromagnetic, and fermions fields are analyzed. The Stefan-Boltzmann law and Casimir effect at finite temperature are calculated using the Thermo Field Dynamics formalism.

  12. Compact hyperbolic extra dimensions: branes, kaluza-klein modes, and cosmology

    PubMed

    Kaloper; March-Russell; Starkman; Trodden

    2000-07-31

    We reconsider theories with low gravitational (or string) scale M(*) where Newton's constant is generated via new large-volume spatial dimensions, while standard model states are localized to a 3-brane. Utilizing compact hyperbolic manifolds we show that the spectrum of Kaluza-Klein modes is radically altered. This allows the early Universe to evolve normally up to substantial temperatures, and completely negates the astrophysical constraints on M(*). Furthermore, an exponential hierarchy between the usual Planck scale and the true fundamental scale of physics can emerge with only O(1) coefficients. The linear size of the internal space remains small. The proposal has striking testable signatures.

  13. Extra Deimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris

    2009-10-03

    We describe recent ideas involving latticizing or "deconstructing" extra space time dimensions. Particles and geometry meld into the same thing. Intriguing topological beasts arise. Above all, new organizing principles for physics beyond the Standard Model come into view.

  14. Search for dark matter and large extra dimensions in pp collisions yielding a photon and missing transverse energy.

    PubMed

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Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Peterman, A; Rossato, K; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Twedt, E; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Hahn, K A; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y-J; Li, W; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wenger, E A; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Haupt, J; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Jindal, P; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Shipkowski, S P; Smith, K; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Ziegler, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Killewald, P; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Laird, E; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Zatserklyaniy, A; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Boulahouache, C; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Gotra, Y; Han, J; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hits, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Richards, A; Robles, J; Rose, K; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Sengupta, S; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Roh, Y; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Belknap, D; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2012-06-29

    Results are presented from a search for new physics in the final state containing a photon (γ) and missing transverse energy (E[combininb /](T)). The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 fb(-1) collected in pp collisions at √[s]=7 TeV by the CMS experiment. The observed event yield agrees with standard-model expectations for the γ+E[combininb /](T) events. Using models for the production of dark-matter particles (χ), we set 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits of 13.6-15.4 fb on χ production in the γ+E[combininb /](T) state. These provide the most sensitive upper limits for spin-dependent χ-nucleon scattering for χ masses (M(χ)) between 1 and 100 GeV. For spin-independent contributions, the present limits are extended to M(χ)<3.5 GeV. For models with 3-6 large extra dimensions, our data exclude extra-dimensional Planck scales between 1.64 and 1.73 TeV at 95% C.L.

  15. Search for Large Extra Dimensions via Single Photons Plus Missing Energy Final States at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Carrera, Edgar Fernando

    2008-12-01

    This dissertation presents a search for large extra dimensions in the single photon plus missing transverse energy final states. We use a data sample of approximately 2.7 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV (recorded with the D- detector) to investigate direct Kaluza Klein graviton production and set limits, at the 95% C.L., on the fundamental mass scale MD from 970 GeV to 816 GeV for two to eight extra dimensions.

  16. Search for large extra spatial dimensions in the dielectron and diphoton channels in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-02-06

    We report on a search for large extra spatial dimensions in the dielectron and diphoton channels using a data sample of 1.05 fb;{-1} of pp[over ] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The invariant mass spectrum of the data agrees well with the prediction of the standard model. We find the most restrictive 95% C.L. lower limits on the effective Planck scale between 2.1 and 1.3 TeV for 2 to 7 extra dimensions.

  17. Search for large extra dimensions in the mono-photon final state at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP /Michigan U.

    2008-03-01

    The authors report on a search for large extra dimensions in a data sample of approximately 1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. They investigate Kaluza-Klein graviton production with a photon and missing transverse energy in the final state. At the 95% C.L. they set limits on the fundamental mass scale M{sub D} from 884 GeV to 778 GeV for 2 to 8 extra dimensions.

  18. Estimate of the trigger inefficiency due to extra hits in H1 and H2, using clean Chi(2) events

    SciTech Connect

    Mussa, R.; /INFN, Turin /Turin U.

    1992-07-01

    An accurate study of the inefficiency of the trigger selection criterium based on the multiplicity of hits in the two hodoscopes has been done using {chi}{sub 2} events take during the 1991 run, selected requiring that both electron tracks were associated to a Cherenkov hit (so that no multiplicity requirement at trigger level was asked), and a {chi}{sup 2} probability for the kinematic fit bigger than 0.01. In a table it is shown the number of events found for different multiplicities in the two hodoscopes. They have 554/1819 = 30.5 {+-} 1.3% of the events with extra-hits in the two hodoscopes, and they can think of 3 possible sources for this effect: (1) accidental {delta} rays due to the interactions of the beam halo inside or against the walls of the beam pipe give an extra activity on H1 that should be uncorrelated to the hits due to real tracks; (2) {delta} rays at large angles emitted by the electrons interacting with the inner layers of the detector, so that they expect extra-hits close to the real tracks; and (3) the conversion of the {delta} inside the beam pipe and in the inner detectors can give an extra-hit in H2 or H1 and H2: this also doubles the number of sources of {delta} rays, so that a big number of these events have 4 H2 firing.

  19. Testing extra dimensions below the production threshold of Kaluza-Klein excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Boos, Edward E.; Bunichev, Viacheslav E.; Smolyakov, Mikhail N.; Volobuev, Igor P.

    2009-05-15

    We consider a stabilized Randall Sundrum 1 model in the energy range below the direct production of Kaluza-Klein (KK) states. In this range, we work out the effective Lagrangian due to exchange of heavy KK tensor graviton and scalar radion states and compute explicitly the corresponding effective coupling constants. As an example, the Drell-Yan lepton pair production at the Tevatron and the LHC is analyzed in two situations, when the first KK resonance is too heavy to be directly detected at the colliders, and when the first KK resonance is visible, but other states are still too heavy. It is shown that in both cases the contribution from the KK invisible tower leads to a modification of final particles distributions. In particular, for the second case a nontrivial interference between the first KK mode and the rest KK tower takes place. Expected 95% C.L. limits for model parameters for the Tevatron and the LHC are given. In the Appendix, useful formulas for the cross sections and distributions of various new 2{yields}2 processes via heavy KK tower exchange are presented, the new formulas containing nonzero particle masses for final state fermions and bosons. The formulas and numerical results are obtained by means of the CompHEP code, in which all new effective interactions are implemented providing a tool for simulation of corresponding events and a more detailed analysis.

  20. Warping, extra dimensions, and a slice of AdS{sub d}

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2010-01-15

    Inspired by the Randall-Sundrum framework we consider a number of phenomenologically relevant model-building questions on a slice of compactified AdS{sub d} for d>5. Such spaces are interesting as they enable one to realize the weak scale via warping. We perform the Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction for gravitons and bulk vectors in these spaces, and for the case of AdS{sub 6} consider the KK spectrum of gauge scalars. We further obtain the KK towers for bulk fermions on a slice of AdS{sub 7} and AdS{sub 9} and show that the Randall-Sundrum approach to flavor generalizes to these spaces with the localization of chiral zero-mode fermions controlled by their bulk Dirac mass parameters. However, for the phenomenologically interesting case where the transverse radius is R{sup -1{approx}}TeV, we show that bulk standard model fields are not viable due to a resulting volume suppression of the gauge-coupling constants. A similar suppression occurs for the case of UV localization. Thus it seems that the standard model fields should be confined to the infrared brane in such spaces. Sterile fields and extended gauge sectors may propagate in the bulk, with the gauge-coupling volume suppression experienced by the latter motivating a weak coupling to standard model fields. We also discuss some issues regarding the effective 4D theory description in these spaces.

  1. Productions of second Kaluza-Klein gauge bosons in the minimal universal extra dimension model at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-09-01

    We calculate the production rates of the second Kaluza-Klein (KK) photon {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z boson Z{sup (2)} at the LHC including all significant processes in the minimal universal extra dimension (MUED) model. For discrimination of the MUED model from other TeV scale models at the LHC, {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z{sup (2)} play a crucial role. In order to discuss the discrimination and calculate their production rates, we derive KK number violating operators including the contribution of the top Yukawa coupling. Using these operators, we accurately calculate branching ratios of second KK particles. In addition we find that these KK number violating operators provide new processes for {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z{sup (2)} productions, such as cascade decay from second KK quarks produced through these operators. They have large contributions to their total production rates. In particular, these production processes give the dominant contribution for {gamma}{sup (2)} production for 1/R > or approx. 800 GeV. As a result, with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb{sup -1}, the number of produced {gamma}{sup (2)} and Z{sup (2)} are estimated as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 2} for the compactification scale between 400 and 2000 GeV.

  2. Pedigree error due to extra-pair reproduction substantially biases estimates of inbreeding depression.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jane M; Keller, Lukas F; Marr, Amy B; Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Sardell, Rebecca J; Arcese, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of inbreeding and inbreeding depression requires unbiased estimation of inbreeding depression across diverse mating systems. However, studies estimating inbreeding depression often measure inbreeding with error, for example, based on pedigree data derived from observed parental behavior that ignore paternity error stemming from multiple mating. Such paternity error causes error in estimated coefficients of inbreeding (f) and reproductive success and could bias estimates of inbreeding depression. We used complete "apparent" pedigree data compiled from observed parental behavior and analogous "actual" pedigree data comprising genetic parentage to quantify effects of paternity error stemming from extra-pair reproduction on estimates of f, reproductive success, and inbreeding depression in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). Paternity error caused widespread error in estimates of f and male reproductive success, causing inbreeding depression in male and female annual and lifetime reproductive success and juvenile male survival to be substantially underestimated. Conversely, inbreeding depression in adult male survival tended to be overestimated when paternity error was ignored. Pedigree error stemming from extra-pair reproduction therefore caused substantial and divergent bias in estimates of inbreeding depression that could bias tests of evolutionary theories regarding inbreeding and inbreeding depression and their links to variation in mating system. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Black-Hole Solutions to Einstein's Equations in the Presence of Matter and Modifications of Gravitation in Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutéraux, B.

    2010-11-01

    In this thesis, we wish to examine the black-hole solutions of modified gravity theories inspired by String Theory or Cosmology. Namely, these modifications will take the guise of additional gauge and scalar fields for the so-called Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories with an exponential Liouville potential; and of extra spatial dimensions for Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theories. The black-hole solutions of EMD theories as well as their integrability are reviewed. One of the main results is that a master equation is obtained in the case of planar horizon topology, which allows to completely integrate the problem for s special relationship between the couplings. We also classify existing solutions. We move on to the study of Gauss-Bonnet black holes, focusing on the six-dimensional case. It is found that the Gauss-Bonnet coupling exposes the Weyl tensor of the horizon to the dynamics, severely restricting the Einstein spaces admissible and effectively lifting some of the degeneracy on the horizon topology. We then turn to the study of the thermodynamic properties of black holes, in General Relativity as well as in EMD theories. For the latter, phase transitions may be found in the canonical ensemble, which resemble the phase transitions for Reissner-Nordström black holes. Generically, we find that the thermodynamic properties (stability, order of phase transitions) depend crucially on the values of the EMD coupling constants. Finally, we interpret our planar EMD solutions holographically as Infra-Red geometries through the AdS/CFT correspondence, taking into account various validity constraints. We also compute AC and DC conductivities as applications to Condensed Matter Systems, and find some properties characteristic of strange metal behaviour.

  4. Measurement of dijet angular distributions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV and searches for quark compositeness and extra spatial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prado da Silva, W L; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-11-06

    We present the first measurement of dijet angular distributions in pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement is based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb(-1) collected with the D0 detector. Dijet angular distributions have been measured over a range of dijet masses, from 0.25 TeV to above 1.1 TeV. The data are in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD and are used to constrain new physics models including quark compositeness, large extra dimensions, and TeV(-1) scale extra dimensions. For all models considered, we set the most stringent direct limits to date.

  5. Measurement of dijet angular distributions at sqrt{s}=1.96TeV and searches for quark compositeness and extra spatial dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, D0

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of dijet angular distributions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement is based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector. Dijet angular distributions have been measured over a range of dijet masses, from 0.25 TeV to above 1.1 TeV. The data are in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD and are used to constrain new physics models including quark compositeness, large extra dimensions, and TeV{sup -1} scale extra dimensions. For all models considered, we set the most stringent direct limits to date.

  6. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. )

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  7. A Search for universal extra dimensions in the multi-lepton channel from proton anti-proton collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chun

    2005-12-01

    In this thesis we present the results of a search for Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) with compactification radius near the TeV scale in the multi-lepton channel from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This is the first UED search in the multi-lepton channel performed at the Tevatron.

  8. Search for dark matter candidates and large extra dimensions in events with a jet and missing transverse momentum with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Dos Santos, S. P. Amor; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Bella, L. Aperio; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Mayes, J. Backus; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Galtieri, A. Barbaro; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Harpaz, S. Behar; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Garcia, J. A. Benitez; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Urbán, S. Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Toro, R. Camacho; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Armadans, R. Caminal; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Garrido, M. D. M. Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Hernandez, A. M. Castaneda; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Gimenez, V. Castillo; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Barajas, C. A. Chavez; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Muiño, P. Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Donszelmann, T. Cuhadar; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Yagci, K. Dindar; Dingfelder, J.; Dinut, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Dressnandt, N.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Duguid, L.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edson, W.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Curull, X. Espinal; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; de Lima, D. E. Ferreira; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Parodi, A. Ferretto; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Castillo, L. R. Flores; Flowerdew, M. J.; Martin, T. Fonseca; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A. J.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Torregrosa, E. Fullana; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Goddard, J. R.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Fajardo, L. S. Gomez; Gonçalo, R.; Da Costa, J. Goncalves Pinto Firmino; Gonella, L.; de la Hoz, S. González; Parra, G. Gonzalez; Silva, M. L. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Eschrich, I. Gough; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Hall, D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Correia, A. M. Henriques; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernandez, C. M.; Jiménez, Y. Hernández; Herrberg, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holder, M.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, T. M.; van Huysduynen, L. Hooft; Horner, S.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huettmann, A.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibbotson, M.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Quiles, A. Irles; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Plante, I. Jen-La; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Jež, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Belenguer, M. Jimenez; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Jovin, T.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Rozas, A. Juste; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karakostas, K.; Karnevskiy, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Keller, J. S.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, T.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiuchi, K.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Koenig, S.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolachev, G. M.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A. I.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kreiss, S.; Krejci, F.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruker, T.; Krumnack, N.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kruse, M. K.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwee, R.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Labbe, J.; Lablak, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laisne, E.; Lambourne, L.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larner, A.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorini, V.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Miotto, G. Lehmann; Lei, X.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leonhardt, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Lepold, F.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lester, C. G.; Lester, C. M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Lewis, A.; Lewis, G. H.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lichtnecker, M.; Lie, K.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Linde, F.; Linnemann, J. T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, C.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Livermore, S. S. A.; Lleres, A.; Merino, J. Llorente; Lloyd, S. L.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Lombardo, V. P.; Long, R. E.; Lopes, L.; Mateos, D. Lopez; Lorenz, J.; Martinez, N. Lorenzo; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Sterzo, F. Lo; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Loureiro, K. F.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lowe, A. J.; Lu, F.; Lubatti, H. 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Vives; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Smit, G. V. Ybeles; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G. Zevi; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-04-01

    A search for new phenomena in events with a high-energy jet and large missing transverse momentum is performed using data from proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s}=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Four kinematic regions are explored using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1. No excess of events beyond expectations from Standard Model processes is observed, and limits are set on large extra dimensions and the pair production of dark matter particles.

  9. Search for large extra dimensions in the production of jets and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beachemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-10-27

    We present the results of a search for new physics in the jets plus missing transverse energy data sample collected from 368 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. We compare the number of events observed in the data with a data-based estimate of the standard model backgrounds contributing to this signature. We observe no significant excess of events, and we interpret this null result in terms of lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale for a large extra dimensions scenario.

  10. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in the Production of Jets and Missing Transverse Energy in ppbar Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-04-01

    The authors present the results of a search for new physics in the jets plus missing transverse energy data sample collected from 368 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They compare the number of events observed in the data with a data-based estimate of the standard model backgrounds contributing to this signature. They observe no significant excess of events, and they interpret this null result in terms of lower limits on the fundamental Planck scale for a large extra dimensions scenario.

  11. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Our results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter MD in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter ΛU. Finally, the constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  12. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 8$$ TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-29

    Our results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton–proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parametermore » MD in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter ΛU. Finally, the constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.« less

  13. Search for dark matter, extra dimensions, and unparticles in monojet events in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; SuarezGonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Kim, T J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Júnior, W L Aldá; Alves, G A; CorreaMartins Junior, M; Martins, T Dos Reis; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De JesusDamiao, D; De OliveiraMartins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; MatosFigueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado DaSilva, W L; 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Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Bihan, A-C Le; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; 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Hanson, G; Heilman, J; Jandir, P; Kennedy, E; Lacroix, F; Liu, H; Long, O R; Luthra, A; Malberti, M; Nguyen, H; Shrinivas, A; Sumowidagdo, S; Wimpenny, S; Andrews, W; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; D'Agnolo, R T; Evans, D; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Kovalskyi, D; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Olivito, D; Padhi, S; Palmer, C; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Sudano, E; Tu, Y; Vartak, A; Welke, C; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yoo, J; Barge, D; Bradmiller-Feld, J; Campagnari, C; Danielson, T; Dishaw, A; Flowers, K; Sevilla, M Franco; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Gouskos, L; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Mccoll, N; Richman, J; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Di Marco, E; Duarte, J; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; LuiggiLopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Hopkins, W; Kreis, B; Mirman, N; Kaufman, G Nicolas; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Skinnari, L; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Outschoorn, V I Martinez; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Yang, F; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Carver, M; Cheng, T; Curry, D; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Haytmyradov, M; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Rahmat, R; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Swartz, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Gray, J; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Sekaric, J; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Saini, L K; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Di Matteo, L; Dutta, V; Ceballos, G Gomez; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Suarez, R Gonzalez; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Velasco, M; Won, S; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Drozdetskiy, A; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Wulsin, H W; Berry, E; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Mendez, H; Vargas, J E Ramirez; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Pegna, D Lopes; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; deBarbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Khukhunaishvili, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Duric, S; Friis, E; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Woods, N; Collaboration, Authorinst Cms

    Results are presented from a search for particle dark matter (DM), extra dimensions, and unparticles using events containing a jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum. The data were collected by the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]at a centre-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text]. The number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits are placed on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section as a function of the DM particle mass for spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions. Limits are also placed on the scale parameter [Formula: see text] in the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali (ADD) model of large extra dimensions, and on the unparticle model parameter [Formula: see text]. The constraints on ADD models and unparticles are the most stringent limits in this channel and those on the DM-nucleon scattering cross section are an improvement over previous collider results.

  14. Search for dark matter and large extra dimensions in monojet events in pp collisions at sqrt {s} = {7} TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.

    2012-09-01

    A search has been made for events containing an energetic jet and an imbalance in transverse momentum using a data sample of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. This signature is common to both dark matter and extra dimensions models. The data were collected by the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 fb-1. The number of observed events is consistent with the standard model expectation. Constraints on the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections are determined for both spin-independent and spin-dependent interaction models. For the spin-independent model, these are the most constraining limits for a dark matter particle with mass below 3.5 GeV/ c 2, a region unexplored by direct detection experiments. For the spin-dependent model, these are the most stringent constraints over the 0.1-200 GeV/ c 2 mass range. The constraints on the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali model parameter M D determined as a function of the number of extra dimensions are also an improvement over the previous results.

  15. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for graviton and photon associated production in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiangdong; Li Chongsheng; Gao Jun; Wang Jian; Oakes, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    We present the calculations of the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the inclusive total cross sections for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton and photon associated production process pp{yields}{gamma}G{sub KK}+X in the large extra dimensions model at the LHC. We show that the NLO QCD corrections in general enhance the total cross sections and reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the factorization and renormalization scales. When jet veto is considered, the NLO corrections reduce the total cross sections. We also calculate some important differential cross sections for this process at NLO: the missing transverse momentum distribution, the transverse momentum distribution, and the pseudorapidity distribution of photon.

  16. Algebraic geometry approach in gravity theory and new relations between the parameters in type I low-energy string theory action in theories with extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, B. G.

    2010-02-01

    On the base of the distinction between covariant and contravariant metric tensor components, a new (multivariable) cubic algebraic equation for reparametrization invariance of the gravitational Lagrangian has been derived and parametrized with complicated non - elliptic functions, depending on the (elliptic) Weierstrass function and its derivative. This is different from standard algebraic geometry, where only two-dimensional cubic equations are parametrized with elliptic functions and not multivariable ones. Physical applications of the approach have been considered in reference to theories with extra dimensions. The s.c. "length function" l(x) has been introduced and found as a solution of quasilinear differential equations in partial derivatives for two different cases of "compactification + rescaling" and "rescaling + compactification". New physically important relations (inequalities) between the parameters in the action are established, which cannot be derived in the case $l=1$ of the standard gravitational theory, but should be fulfilled also for that case.

  17. Charge instabilities due to local charge conjugation symmetry in /2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bais, F. A.; Striet, J.

    2003-08-01

    Alice electrodynamics (AED) is a theory of electrodynamics in which charge conjugation is a local gauge symmetry. In this paper we investigate a charge instability in alice electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions due to this local charge conjugation. The instability manifests itself through the creation of a pair of alice fluxes. The final state is one in which the charge is completely delocalized, i.e., it is carried as cheshire charge by the flux pair that gets infinitely separated. We determine the decay rate in terms of the parameters of the model. The relation of this phenomenon with other salient features of 2-dimensional compact QED, such as linear confinement due to instantons/monopoles, is discussed.

  18. AdS and stabilized extra dimensions in multi-dimensional gravitational models with nonlinear scalar curvature terms R-1 and R4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Uwe; Zhuk, Alexander; Bezerra, Valdir B.; Romero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study multi-dimensional gravitational models with scalar curvature nonlinearities of types R-1 and R4. It is assumed that the corresponding higher dimensional spacetime manifolds undergo a spontaneous compactification to manifolds with a warped product structure. Special attention has been paid to the stability of the extra-dimensional factor spaces. It is shown that for certain parameter regions the systems allow for a freezing stabilization of these spaces. In particular, we find for the R-1 model that configurations with stabilized extra dimensions do not provide a late-time acceleration (they are AdS), whereas the solution branch which allows for accelerated expansion (the dS branch) is incompatible with stabilized factor spaces. In the case of the R4 model, we obtain that the stability region in parameter space depends on the total dimension D = dim(M) of the higher dimensional spacetime M. For D > 8 the stability region consists of a single (absolutely stable) sector which is shielded from a conformal singularity (and an antigravity sector beyond it) by a potential barrier of infinite height and width. This sector is smoothly connected with the stability region of a curvature-linear model. For D < 8 an additional (metastable) sector exists which is separated from the conformal singularity by a potential barrier of finite height and width so that systems in this sector are prone to collapse into the conformal singularity. This second sector is not smoothly connected with the first (absolutely stable) one. Several limiting cases and the possibility of inflation are discussed for the R4 model.

  19. Search for Large Extra Dimensions in Final States Containing One Photon or Jet and Large Missing Transverse Energy Produced in p pmacr Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savard, P.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-10-01

    We present the results of searches for large extra dimensions in samples of events with large missing transverse energy E̸T and either a photon or a jet produced in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II. For γ+E̸T and jet+E̸T candidate samples corresponding to 2.0 and 1.1fb-1 of integrated luminosity, respectively, we observe good agreement with standard model expectations and obtain a combined lower limit on the fundamental parameter of the large extra dimensions model MD as a function of the number of extra dimensions in the model.

  20. Search for large extra dimensions in final states containing one photon or jet and large missing transverse energy produced in pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-10-31

    We present the results of searches for large extra dimensions in samples of events with large missing transverse energy E_{T} and either a photon or a jet produced in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II. For gamma+E_{T} and jet+E_{T} candidate samples corresponding to 2.0 and 1.1 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity, respectively, we observe good agreement with standard model expectations and obtain a combined lower limit on the fundamental parameter of the large extra dimensions model M_{D} as a function of the number of extra dimensions in the model.

  1. Search for large extra dimensions in final states containing one photon or jet and large missing transverse energy produced in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-07-01

    The authors present the results of searches for large extra dimensions in samples of events with large missing transverse energy E{sub T} and either a photon or a jet produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. For {gamma} + E{sub T} and jet + E{sub T} candidate samples corresponding to 2.0 fb{sup -1} and 1.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity respectively, they observe good agreement with standard model expectations and obtain a combined lower limit on the fundamental parameter of the large extra dimensions model, M{sub D}, as a function of the number of extra dimensions in the model.

  2. Improving the accuracy of ultrafast ligand-based screening: incorporating lipophilicity into ElectroShape as an extra dimension.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M Stuart; Finn, Paul W; Morris, Garrett M; Richards, W Graham

    2011-08-01

    In a previous paper, we presented the ElectroShape method, which we used to achieve successful ligand-based virtual screening. It extended classical shape-based methods by applying them to the four-dimensional shape of the molecule where partial charge was used as the fourth dimension to capture electrostatic information. This paper extends the approach by using atomic lipophilicity (alogP) as an additional molecular property and validates it using the improved release 2 of the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD). When alogP replaced partial charge, the enrichment results were slightly below those of ElectroShape, though still far better than purely shape-based methods. However, when alogP was added as a complement to partial charge, the resulting five-dimensional enrichments shows a clear improvement in performance. This demonstrates the utility of extending the ElectroShape virtual screening method by adding other atom-based descriptors.

  3. Domain wall interactions due to vacuum Dirac field fluctuations in 2 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, C. D.; Mazzitelli, F. D.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate quantum effects due to a two-component Dirac field in 2 +1 spacetime dimensions, coupled to domain-wall-like defects with a smooth shape. We show that these effects induce nontrivial contributions to the (shape-dependent) energy of the domain walls. For a single defect, we study the divergences in the corresponding self-energy, and also consider the role of the massless zero mode—corresponding to the Callan-Harvey mechanism—by coupling the Dirac field to an external gauge field. For two defects, we show that the Dirac field induces a nontrivial, Casimir-like effect between them, and we provide an exact expression for that interaction in the case of two straight-line parallel defects. As is the case for the Casimir interaction energy, the result is finite and unambiguous.

  4. Improved discovery of a nearly degenerate model: Minimal universal extra dimension model using M{sub T2} at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2011-11-01

    We study the discovery potential of the minimal universal extra dimension model (MUED) and improve it by utilizing the multijet+lepton mode at the LHC. Since the MUED has a nearly degenerate spectrum, most events only have soft jets and small E{sub T}{sup miss}. The signature is challenging to search. We apply M{sub T2} for the event selection and set the invisible particle mass of M{sub T2} (test mass) to zero. The test mass is much smaller than the invisible particle mass of MUED. In that case, M{sub T2} of the signal can be large depending on up-stream radiation which includes initial state radiation. On the other hand, M{sub T2} of the background is mainly below the top quark mass. Hence, the signal is extracted from the background in the high M{sub T2} region. Since we use the leading jets for M{sub T2}, there is a combinatorics effect. We find that the effect also enhances the signal to background ratio for high M{sub T2}. We perform a detailed simulation with the matrix element correction to the QCD radiations. The discovery potential of the MUED is improved by the M{sub T2} cut, and the improvement is especially significant for the most degenerate parameter we consider, {Lambda}R=10.

  5. Natural supersymmetry from extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A.; Garcia-Pepin, M.; Nardini, G.; Quiros, M.

    2016-11-01

    We show that natural supersymmetry can be embedded in a five-dimensional theory with supersymmetry breaking à la Scherk-Schwarz (SS). There is no "gluino-sucks" problem for stops localized in the four-dimensional brane and gluinos propagating in the full five-dimensional bulk, and sub-TeV stops are easily accommodated. The μ /Bμ problem is absent as well; the SS breaking generates a Higgsino Dirac mass, and no bilinear Higgs mass parameter in the superpotential is required. Moreover, for nonmaximal SS twists leading to tan β ≃1 , the Higgs spectrum is naturally split, in agreement with LHC data. The 125 GeV Higgs mass and radiative electroweak symmetry breaking can be accommodated by minimally extending the Higgs sector with Y =0 S U (2 )L triplets.

  6. Science Clubs: The Extra Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsland, Ross

    1991-01-01

    Describes the objectives and the impact of the Double Helix Science Club upon students, teachers, and the nonschool community. This club, which has become a major concern in Australia with a membership of over 16,000 and a magazine distribution approaching 30,000, provides an effective vehicle for many teachers and public servants looking to…

  7. Unusual pungency from extra-virgin olive oil is due to restricted spatial expression of oleocanthal’s receptor

    PubMed Central

    Peyrot des Gachons, Catherine; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Bryant, Bruce; Shima, Asako; Sperry, Jeffrey B.; Dankulich-Nagrudny, Luba; Tominaga, Makoto; Smith, Amos B.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Breslin, Paul A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Oleocanthal, a major phenolic compound in extra-virgin olive oil with anti-inflammatory properties, elicits an unusual oral pungency sensed almost exclusively in the throat. This contrasts with most other common oral irritants, such as cinnamaldehyde, capsaicin, and alcohol, which irritate mucus membranes throughout the oral cavity. Here we show that this rare irritation pattern is a consequence of both the specificity of oleocanthal for a single sensory receptor and the anatomical restriction of this sensory receptor to the pharynx, within the oral cavity. We demonstrate, in vitro, that oleocanthal selectively activates the hTRPA1 channel in HEK 293 cells and that its ability to excite the trigeminal nervous system in rodents requires a functional TRPA1. Moreover, we similarly demonstrate that the over-the-counter analgesic, ibuprofen, which elicits the same restricted pharyngeal irritation as oleocanthal, also specifically excites rodent sensory neurons via TRPA1. Using human sensory psychophysical studies and immunohistochemical TRPA1 analyses of human oral and nasal tissues, we observe an overlap of the anatomical distribution of TRPA1 and the regions irritated by oleocanthal in humans. These results suggest that a TRPA1 (ANKTM1) gene product mediates the tissue sensitivity to oleocanthal within the oral cavity. Further, we demonstrate that, despite the fact that oleocanthal possesses the classic electrophilic reactivity of many TRPA1 agonists, it does not use the previously identified activation mechanism via covalent cysteine modification. These findings provide an anatomical and molecular explanation for a distinct oral sensation elicited by oleocanthal and ibuprofen and that is commonly experienced around the world when consuming many extra-virgin olive oils. PMID:21248124

  8. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I.

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET.

  9. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I.

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET.

  10. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Apathy, I; Hejja, I; Lang, E; Feher, I

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET.

  11. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baas, A; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Backus Mayes, J; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Bartsch, V; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernat, P; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, T T; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutouil, S; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Byszewski, M; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D

    A search is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton-proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb[Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the [Formula: see text] contact interaction scale [Formula: see text] between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95 % credibility level. For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale [Formula: see text] between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.

  12. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-11

    Research is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton–proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale Λ between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95% credibility level. For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale MS between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.

  13. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in the dilepton channel using proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-11

    Research is conducted for non-resonant new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions. The LHC 2012 proton–proton collision dataset recorded by the ATLAS detector is used, corresponding to 20 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV. The dilepton invariant mass spectrum is a discriminating variable in both searches, with the contact interaction search additionally utilizing the dilepton forward-backward asymmetry. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Lower limits are set on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale Λ between 15.4 TeV and 26.3 TeV, at the 95% credibility level.more » For large extra spatial dimensions, lower limits are set on the string scale MS between 3.2 TeV to 5.0 TeV.« less

  14. Esthetic and functional rehabilitation of mutilated dentition and loss of vertical dimension due to amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Shweta; Tewari, Sanjay; Goel, Rajat

    2014-04-01

    Cases of severe attrition are a common finding. Among the congenital anomalies, amelogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta are important conditions that may cause accelerated wear of teeth. The following case report describes the complete oral rehabilitation of a patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta. A detailed treatment plan was chalked out which included proper oral hygiene measures, restoration of carious teeth and endodontic treatment followed by foundation restorations of teeth that were crucial for the final prostheses. Patient was given transitional restorations for about 6 weeks with the aim of regaining the lost vertical dimensions. Final rehabilitation was done by fixed dental prostheses.

  15. Esthetic and functional rehabilitation of mutilated dentition and loss of vertical dimension due to amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shweta; Tewari, Sanjay; Goel, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    Cases of severe attrition are a common finding. Among the congenital anomalies, amelogenesis imperfecta and dentinogenesis imperfecta are important conditions that may cause accelerated wear of teeth. The following case report describes the complete oral rehabilitation of a patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta. A detailed treatment plan was chalked out which included proper oral hygiene measures, restoration of carious teeth and endodontic treatment followed by foundation restorations of teeth that were crucial for the final prostheses. Patient was given transitional restorations for about 6 weeks with the aim of regaining the lost vertical dimensions. Final rehabilitation was done by fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25565735

  16. Search for dark matter candidates and large extra dimensions in events with a photon and missing transverse momentum in pp collision data at sqrt[s]=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abouzeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Akesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M-L; Anduaga, X S; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Asman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Atkinson, M; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beale, S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, A K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertella, C; Bertin, A; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bittner, B; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brendlinger, K; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brown, H; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Byszewski, M; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; Capasso, L; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capriotti, D; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernandez, A M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Cataldi, G; Catastini, P; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G; Caughron, S; Cavaliere, V; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chalupkova, I; Chan, K; Chang, P; Chapleau, B; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Chareyre, E; Charlton, D G; Chavda, V; Chavez Barajas, C A; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; 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Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Virchaux, M; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Weydert, C; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xu, C; Xu, D; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Young, C J; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Zeniš, T; Zinonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimin, N I; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2013-01-04

    Results of a search for new phenomena in events with an energetic photon and large missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 7 TeV are reported. Data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb(-1) are used. Good agreement is observed between the data and the standard model predictions. The results are translated into exclusion limits on models with large extra spatial dimensions and on pair production of weakly interacting dark matter candidates.

  17. Rare erroneous results on the Siemens Dimension Vista® platform due to urine carryover: A warning to current users.

    PubMed

    Karger, Amy B; Senn, Christine; Skogseth, Kathy; Floodman, Stacy

    2016-07-01

    In 2014, the West Bank Laboratory at the University of Minnesota, part of the non-profit Fairview Health Services system, went live with two Siemens Dimension Vista® 500 instruments. In the first few months after go-live, the lab began receiving reports of rare, erroneous results from clinicians. After further investigation it was noted that most of the errors being reported followed a consistent pattern with significantly elevated potassium, BUN and creatinine. After months of unsuccessful troubleshooting with Siemens, our lab and others within the Fairview Health Services system began hypothesizing that urine carryover was occurring due to the pattern of elevated analytes, and asked Siemens to investigate this hypothesis. In March 2016 Siemens confirmed a software defect which omits an aliquot probe rinse resulting in sample carryover in rare cases. Our objective is to alert current users of the Siemens Dimension Vista® instruments to this rare but alarming phenomenon, discuss the frequency and impact of the erroneous results at our institution, and detail recommended steps for users of Siemens Dimension Vista® instruments to help retrospectively determine whether they have experienced similar erroneous results.

  18. Secondary flow mixing due to biofilm growth in capillaries of varying dimensions.

    PubMed

    Hornemann, Jennifer A; Codd, Sarah L; Fell, Robert J; Stewart, Philip S; Seymour, Joseph D

    2009-06-01

    Using a magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) technique, velocity perturbations due to biofouling in capillaries were detected in 3D velocity maps. The velocity images in each of the three square capillary sizes (2, 0.9, and 0.5 mm i.d.) tested indicate secondary flow in both the x- and y-directions for the biofouled capillaries. Similar flow maps generated in a clean square capillary show only an axial component. Investigation of these secondary flows and their geometric and dynamic similarity is the focus of this study. The results showed significant secondary flows present in the 0.9 mm i.d. capillary, on the scale of 20% of the bulk fluid flow. Since this is the "standard 1 mm" size capillary used in confocal microscopy laboratory bioreactors to investigate biofilm properties, it is important to understand how these enhanced flows impact bioreactor transport. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Secondary Flow Mixing due to Biofilm Growth in Capillaries of Varying Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Hornemann, Jennifer A.; Codd, Sarah L.; Fell, Robert J.; Stewart, Philip S.; Seymour, Joseph D.

    2009-01-01

    Using a magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) technique, velocity perturbations due to biofouling in capillaries were detected in 3-D velocity maps. The velocity images in each of the three square capillary sizes (2 mm, 0.9 mm, and 0.5 mm i.d.) tested indicate secondary flow in both the x and y directions for the biofouled capillaries. Similar flow maps generated in a clean square capillary show only an axial component. Investigation of these secondary flows and their geometric and dynamic similarity is the focus of this paper. The results showed significant secondary flows present in the 0.9 mm i.d. capillary, on the scale of 20% of the bulk fluid flow. Since this is the “standard 1 mm” size capillary used in confocal microscopy laboratory bioreactors to investigate biofilm properties, it is important to understand how these enhanced flows impact bioreactor transport. PMID:19191352

  20. Adding an extra dimension to what students see through the light microscope: a lab exercise demonstrating critical analysis for microscopy students.

    PubMed

    Garrill, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate lab exercise that demonstrates the importance of students thinking critically about what they see through a microscope. The students are given growth data from tip-growing organisms that suggest the cells grow in a pulsatile manner. The students then critique this data in several exercises that incorporate aspects of a problem-based learning approach, envisaging growth not just in two dimensions, but in three dimensions. For some cells, what appears to be pulsatile growth could also be explained by growth at a constant rate up and down in the z-axis. Depending on the diffraction pattern generated by the tip of the cell, this movement in the z-axis could go undetected. This raises the possibility that pulsatile growth seen in some species may be an artifact generated by the limitations of the light microscope. Students were subsequently asked to rate their awareness of the need to think critically about what they see through a microscope, using a scale of 1 (unaware) to 5 (very much aware). Prior to doing the lab exercise, the mean rating was 2.7; this increased to 4.4 after the lab. The students also indicated a likelihood of being more critical in their thinking in other aspects of their biology curriculum.

  1. Extra Yq and partial monosomy 12p due to a Y;12 translocation in a boy with features of the 12p deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Orye, E; Craen, M; Laureys, G; van Coster, R; van Mele, B

    1985-06-01

    A Y;12 translocation, resulting in extra Yq material and partial monosomy 12p, was found in a 7 1/2 year old boy. He showed growth and mental retardation and several of the congenital anomalies seen in the 12p deletion syndrome. LDHB activity, the gene for which is located at 12p12, was normal in serum, in accordance with the suspected 12p13 deletion in the patient.

  2. An Extra Dimension to Decision-Making in Animals: The Three-way Trade-off between Speed, Effort per-Unit-Time and Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    de Froment, Adrian J.; Rubenstein, Daniel I.; Levin, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    The standard view in biology is that all animals, from bumblebees to human beings, face a trade-off between speed and accuracy as they search for resources and mates, and attempt to avoid predators. For example, the more time a forager spends out of cover gathering information about potential food sources the more likely it is to make accurate decisions about which sources are most rewarding. However, when the cost of time spent out of cover rises (e.g. in the presence of a predator) the optimal strategy is for the forager to spend less time gathering information and to accept a corresponding decline in the accuracy of its decisions. We suggest that this familiar picture is missing a crucial dimension: the amount of effort an animal expends on gathering information in each unit of time. This is important because an animal that can respond to changing time costs by modulating its level of effort per-unit-time does not have to accept the same decrease in accuracy that an animal limited to a simple speed-accuracy trade-off must bear in the same situation. Instead, it can direct additional effort towards (i) reducing the frequency of perceptual errors in the samples it gathers or (ii) increasing the number of samples it gathers per-unit-time. Both of these have the effect of allowing it to gather more accurate information within a given period of time. We use a modified version of a canonical model of decision-making (the sequential probability ratio test) to show that this ability to substitute effort for time confers a fitness advantage in the face of changing time costs. We predict that the ability to modulate effort levels will therefore be widespread in nature, and we lay out testable predictions that could be used to detect adaptive modulation of effort levels in laboratory and field studies. Our understanding of decision-making in all species, including our own, will be improved by this more ecologically-complete picture of the three-way tradeoff between time

  3. An extra dimension to decision-making in animals: the three-way trade-off between speed, effort per-unit-time and accuracy.

    PubMed

    de Froment, Adrian J; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Levin, Simon A

    2014-12-01

    The standard view in biology is that all animals, from bumblebees to human beings, face a trade-off between speed and accuracy as they search for resources and mates, and attempt to avoid predators. For example, the more time a forager spends out of cover gathering information about potential food sources the more likely it is to make accurate decisions about which sources are most rewarding. However, when the cost of time spent out of cover rises (e.g. in the presence of a predator) the optimal strategy is for the forager to spend less time gathering information and to accept a corresponding decline in the accuracy of its decisions. We suggest that this familiar picture is missing a crucial dimension: the amount of effort an animal expends on gathering information in each unit of time. This is important because an animal that can respond to changing time costs by modulating its level of effort per-unit-time does not have to accept the same decrease in accuracy that an animal limited to a simple speed-accuracy trade-off must bear in the same situation. Instead, it can direct additional effort towards (i) reducing the frequency of perceptual errors in the samples it gathers or (ii) increasing the number of samples it gathers per-unit-time. Both of these have the effect of allowing it to gather more accurate information within a given period of time. We use a modified version of a canonical model of decision-making (the sequential probability ratio test) to show that this ability to substitute effort for time confers a fitness advantage in the face of changing time costs. We predict that the ability to modulate effort levels will therefore be widespread in nature, and we lay out testable predictions that could be used to detect adaptive modulation of effort levels in laboratory and field studies. Our understanding of decision-making in all species, including our own, will be improved by this more ecologically-complete picture of the three-way tradeoff between time

  4. Dirac neutrino in warped extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, We-Fu; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-12-01

    We implement Dirac neutrinos in the minimal custodial Randall-Sundrum setting via the Krauss-Wilczek mechanism. We demonstrate by giving explicit lepton mass matrices that with neutrinos in the normal hierarchy, lepton mass and mixing patterns can be naturally reproduced at the scale set by the constraints from electroweak precision measurements, and at the same time without violating bounds set by lepton flavor violations. Our scenario generically predicts a nonzero neutrino mixing angle θ13, as well as the existence of sub-TeV right-handed Kaluza-Klein neutrinos, which partner the right-handed standard model charged leptons. These relatively light KK neutrinos may be searched for at the LHC.

  5. Homogeneity, flatness, and "large" extra dimensions.

    PubMed

    Starkman, G D; Stojkovic, D; Trodden, M

    2001-12-03

    We consider a model in which the Universe is the direct product of an ordinary (3+1)-dimensional space--a brane where all the standard model fields are confined-and a compact hyperbolic manifold. The decay of massive Kaluza-Klein modes leads to the injection of bulk entropy into the observable Universe. The large statistical averaging inherent in the collapse of the initial entropy onto the brane smoothes out any initial inhomogeneities in the distribution of matter and of three-curvature.

  6. Theories with Extra Dimensions at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzza, Alessia

    2005-10-12

    In 5-dimensional theories on multiply-connected manifolds the fifth component of the gauge fields can be identified with the Higgs field. We consider the Hosotani mechanism on S1/Z2 orbifold with an SU(2) gauge group. When A5 gets a VEV the gauge symmetry is completely broken. The VEV is undetermined at the tree level but a potential is generated at one loop. Finite temperature effects on the effective potential are studied.

  7. A comparative study of foot dimension between adult male and female and evaluation of foot hazards due to using of footwear.

    PubMed

    Manna, I; Pradhan, D; Ghosh, S; Kar, S K; Dhara, P

    2001-07-01

    Using footwear often becomes troublesome and creates many problems. Most of these problems are associated with the wearing of ill-fitting footwear, as it leads to biomechanical imbalance and ultimately give rise to different foot problems. In the present investigation different foot problems, viz., discomfort, pain and other hazards related to the use of footwear have been evaluated and attempts have been made to study different foot dimensions of men and women that are related to the design of footwear. For the present study different foot dimensions of both right and left feet of the subjects were measured on 300 Bengalee (Indian) subjects having the age range of 20-35 years. The subjects reported that they had got discomfort, pain, blister and corn due to using different footwear. It was noted that the occurrence of these problems in right foot was greater than that in left foot. There was no significant correlation between foot troubles and type of footwear. Results also showed that there was no significant difference in most of the foot dimensions between left foot and right foot. However, significant difference (P < 0.001) in all foot dimensions was observed between male and female subjects. Correlation coefficient among different foot dimensions has also been evaluated and it was noted that foot length was highly correlated with stature and foot volume, particularly in left foot. Footwear should be made according to the foot dimensions of the user population. The database collected from the Bengalee (Indian) population may be a helpful guide for manufacturing different footwear.

  8. Time-dependent analysis of extra length of stay and mortality due to ventilator-associated pneumonia in intensive-care units of ten limited-resources countries: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, V D; Udwadia, F E; Muñoz, H J; Erben, N; Higuera, F; Abidi, K; Medeiros, E A; Fernández Maldonado, E; Kanj, S S; Gikas, A; Barnett, A G; Graves, N

    2011-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) are a worldwide problem that significantly increases patient morbidity, mortality, and length of stay (LoS), and their effects should be estimated to account for the timing of infection. The purpose of the study was to estimate extra LoS and mortality in an intensive-care unit (ICU) due to a VAP in a cohort of 69,248 admissions followed for 283,069 days in ICUs from 10 countries. Data were arranged according to the multi-state format. Extra LoS and increased risk of death were estimated independently in each country, and their results were combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. VAP prolonged LoS by an average of 2·03 days (95% CI 1·52-2·54 days), and increased the risk of death by 14% (95% CI 2-27). The increased risk of death due to VAP was explained by confounding with patient morbidity.

  9. Gravitational contributions to the running Yang-Mills coupling in large extra-dimensional brane worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Dietmar; Plefka, Jan; Rodigast, Andreas

    2009-02-01

    We study the question of a modification of the running gauge coupling of Yang-Mills theories due to quantum gravitational effects in a compact large extra dimensional brane world scenario with a low energy quantum gravity scale. The ADD scenario is applied for a D = d+δ dimensional space-time in which gravitons freely propagate, whereas the non-abelian gauge fields are confined to a d-dimensional brane. The extra dimensions are taken to be toroidal and the transverse fluctuation modes (branons) of the brane are taken into account. On this basis we have calculated the one-loop corrections due to virtual Kaluza-Klein graviton and branon modes for the gluon two- and three-point functions in an effective field theory treatment. Applying momentum cut-off regularization we find that for a d = 4 brane the leading gravitational divergencies cancel irrespective of the number of extra dimensions δ, generalizing previous results in the absence of extra-dimensions. Hence, again the Yang-Mills β-function receives no gravitational corrections at one-loop. This is no longer true in a `universal' extra dimensional scenario with a d > 4 dimensional brane. Moreover, the subleading power-law gravitational divergencies induce higher-dimensional counterterms, which we establish in our scheme. Interestingly, for d = 4 these gravitationally induced counterterms are of the form recently considered in non-abelian Lee-Wick extensions of the standard model—now with a possible mass scale in the TeV range due to the presence of large extra dimensions.

  10. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    DOE PAGES

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; ...

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variationmore » of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Finally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.« less

  11. Image Reconstruction in Higher Dimensions: Myocardial Perfusion Imaging of Tracer Dynamics with Cardiac Motion Due to Deformation and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. However, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  12. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  13. Interpretation of the X(3872) as a charmonium state plus an extra component due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, J.; Galatà, G.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-07-01

    We present a quark model calculation of the charmonium spectrum with self-energy corrections due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum. The bare masses used in the calculation are computed within the relativized quark model by Godfrey and Isgur. The strong decay widths of 3S, 2P, 1D, and 2D cc¯ states are also calculated, to set the values of the 3P0 pair-creation model's parameters we use to compute the vertex functions of the loop integrals. Finally, the nature of the X(3872) resonance is analyzed and the main possibilities (cc¯ state or DD¯* molecule) are discussed. According to our results, the X(3872) is compatible with the meson χc1(2P), with JPC=1++, and is thus interpreted as a cc¯ core plus higher Fock components due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum. These JPC=1++ quantum numbers are in agreement with the experimental results found by the LHCb collaboration. In our view, the X(3872)'s mass is lower than the quark model's predictions because of self-energy shifts.

  14. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime for various extra-dimensional models.

  15. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime for various extra-dimensional models.

  16. Search for contact interactions and large extra dimensions in dilepton events from pp collisions at s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, R.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J. -W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-01-04

    A search for nonresonant new phenomena, originating from either contact interactions or large extra spatial dimensions, has been carried out using events with two isolated electrons or muons. These events, produced at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at √ s = 7 TeV , were recorded by the ATLAS detector. The data sample, collected throughout 2011, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 and 5.0 fb -1 in the e+ e- and μ+ μ- channels, respectively. No significant deviations from the Standard Model expectation are observed. Using a Bayesian approach, 95% confidence level lower limits ranging from 9.0 to 13.9 TeV are placed on the energy scale of ℓ ℓ q q contact interactions in the left-left isoscalar model. Lower limits ranging from 2.4 to 3.9 TeV are also set on the string scale in large extra dimension models. After combining these limits with results from a similar search in the diphoton channel, slightly more stringent limits are obtained.

  17. Discriminating between technicolor and warped extra dimensional model via pp{yields}ZZ channel

    SciTech Connect

    Antipin, O.; Tuominen, K.

    2009-04-01

    We explore the possibility to discriminate between certain strongly coupled technicolor (TC) models and warped extra dimensional models where the standard model fields are propagating in the extra dimension. We consider a generic QCD-like TC model with running coupling as well as two TC models with walking dynamics. We argue that, due to the different production mechanisms for the lowest-lying composite tensor state in these TC theories compared to the first Kaluza-Klein graviton mode of the warped extra dimensional case, it is possible to distinguish between these models based on the angular analysis of the reconstructed longitudinal Z bosons in the pp{yields}ZZ{yields}4 charged leptons channel.

  18. Left Atrial Area and Right Ventricle Dimensions in Non-gated Axial Chest CT can Differentiate Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease from Other Causes.

    PubMed

    Katikireddy, Chandra K; Singh, Manmeet; Muhyieddeen, Kamil; Acharya, Tushar; Ambrose, John A; Samim, Arang

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether axial non-gated CT can distinguish World Health Organization Group 2 pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease) from non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. The study was performed to identity imaging parameters in non-gated chest CT that differentiate Group 2 from non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. Among 158 patients who underwent right heart catheterization for evaluation of pulmonary hypertension, 112 had sufficient data and chest CT for review. Invasive hemodynamic data and numerous variables obtained from axial CT images (maximum diameters of main, right, left pulmonary arteries, ascending aorta, main pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio, right atrial diameter, left atrial area and right ventricular size) were collected. CT variables were validated against hemodynamic data to identify parameters that would allow to differentiate pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (Group 2) from non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. Based on right heart catheterization data, we identified 53 patients with Group 2 pulmonary hypertension, 50 patients with non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension, and 9 subjects with no pulmonary hypertension. In patients with a dilated pulmonary artery (n = 84), the ROC curve for left atrial area (area under the ROC curve 0.76 ± 0.06) independently distinguished patients with Group 2 pulmonary hypertension (n = 42) from patients with non-Group 2 pulmonary hypertension (n = 42). A dilated left atrium (>20 mm(2)) in combination with a normal right ventriuclar size had a sensitivity of 77% and specificity of 94% for Group 2 pulmonary hypertension. In patients with a dilated pulmonary artery on chest CT, left atrial area and right ventricular dimensions may aid to diagnose pulmonary hypertension and to distinguish underlying cardiac disease from other causes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Hubble Extra Solar Planet Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a proposed third-generation Hubble instrument for extra-solar planet detection, the Hubble Extra-Solar Planet Interferometer (HESPI). This instrument would be able to achieve starlight cancellation at the 10 exp 6 to 10 exp 8 level, given a stellar wavefront with phase errors comparable to the present Hubble telescope wavefront. At 10 exp 6 starlight cancellation, HESPI would be able to detect a Jupiter-like planet next to a star at a distance of about 10 parsec, for which there are about 400 candidate stars. This paper describes a novel approach for starlight suppression, using a combination of active control and single-mode spatial filters, to achieve starlight suppression far below the classical limit set by scattering due to microsurface imperfections. In preliminary lab experiments, suppression by a factor of 40 below the classical scatter limit due to optical wavefront errors has been demonstrated.

  20. Attitude Strength: An Extra-Content Aspect of Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwitt, Linda F.

    Attitude strength is considered as an extra-content aspect of attitude. A model of the relationship of attitude strength to attitude direction and behavior proposes that attitude strength is comprised of three dimensions that moderate the relationship between attitude direction and behavior. The dimensions are parallel to the tripartite dimensions…

  1. Extra-dimensional models on the lattice

    DOE PAGES

    Knechtli, Francesco; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2016-08-05

    In this paper we summarize the ongoing effort to study extra-dimensional gauge theories with lattice simulations. In these models the Higgs field is identified with extra-dimensional components of the gauge field. The Higgs potential is generated by quantum corrections and is protected from divergences by the higher dimensional gauge symmetry. Dimensional reduction to four dimensions can occur through compactification or localization. Gauge-Higgs unification models are often studied using perturbation theory. Numerical lattice simulations are used to go beyond these perturbative expectations and to include nonperturbative effects. We describe the known perturbative predictions and their fate in the strongly-coupled regime formore » various extra-dimensional models.« less

  2. Space: The Hunt for Hidden Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne

    2006-04-25

    Extra dimensions of space may be present in our universe. Their discovery would dramatically change our view of the cosmos and would prompt many questions. How do they hide? What is their shape? How many are there? How big are they? Do particles and forces feel their presence? This lecture will explain the concept of dimensions and show that current theoretical models predict the existence of extra spatial dimensions which could be in the discovery reach of present and near-term experiments. The manner by which these additional dimensions reveal their existence will be described. Searches for modifications of the gravitational force, astrophysical effects, and collider signatures already constrain the size of extra dimensions and will be summarized. Once new dimensions are discovered, the technology by which the above questions can be answered will be discussed.

  3. Constructing gravitational dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Matthew

    2003-07-01

    It would be extremely useful to know whether a particular low energy effective theory might have come from a compactification of a higher dimensional space. Here, this problem is approached from the ground up by considering theories with multiple interacting massive gravitons. It is actually very difficult to construct discrete gravitational dimensions which have a local continuum limit. In fact, any model with only nearest neighbor interactions is doomed. If we could find a non-linear extension for the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian for a graviton of mass mg, which does not break down until the scale Λ2=(mgMPl), this could be used to construct a large class of models whose continuum limit is local in the extra dimension. But this is shown to be impossible: a theory with a single graviton must break down by Λ3=(m2gMPl)1/3. Next, we look at how the discretization prescribed by the truncation of the Kaluza-Klein tower of an honest extra dimension raises the scale of strong coupling. It dictates an intricate set of interactions among various fields which conspire to soften the strongest scattering amplitudes and allow for a local continuum limit, at least at the tree level. A number of candidate symmetries associated with locality in the discretized dimension are also discussed.

  4. Extra Terrestrial Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes-Gautier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Volcanism has been one of the major processes shaping the surfaces of the terrestrial planets. Lava flows have been identified on the Moon, Mars, Venus, and on Juptier's moon Io. The study of extra-terrestrial lavas has largely relied on the interpretation of remotely acquired imaging, topographic and spectroscopic data. Models relating the final flow morpohology to eruption characteristics and magma chemistry have been important tools in the interpretation of these data.

  5. z-Weyl gravity in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Taeyoon; Oh, Phillial

    2017-09-01

    We consider higher dimensional gravity in which the four dimensional spacetime and extra dimensions are not treated on an equal footing. The anisotropy is implemented in the ADM decomposition of higher dimensional metric by requiring the foliation preserving diffeomorphism invariance adapted to the extra dimensions, thus keeping the general covariance only for the four dimensional spacetime. The conformally invariant gravity can be constructed with an extra (Weyl) scalar field and a real parameter z which describes the degree of anisotropy of conformal transformation between the spacetime and extra dimensional metrics. In the zero mode effective 4D action, it reduces to four-dimensional scalar-tensor theory coupled with nonlinear sigma model described by extra dimensional metrics. There are no restrictions on the value of z at the classical level and possible applications to the cosmological constant problem with a specific choice of z are discussed.

  6. Infinitely Large New Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dvali, Gia; Kaloper, Nemanja

    1999-07-29

    We construct intersecting brane configurations in Anti-de-Sitter space localizing gravity to the intersection region, with any number n of extra dimensions. This allows us to construct two kinds of theories with infinitely large new dimensions, TeV scale quantum gravity and sub-millimeter deviations from Newton's Law. The effective 4D Planck scale M{sub Pl} is determined in terms of the fundamental Planck scale M{sub *} and the AdS radius of curvature L via the familiar relation M{sub Pl}{sup 2} {approx} M{sub *}{sup 2+n} L{sup n}; L acts as an effective radius of compactification for gravity on the intersection. Taking M{sub *} {approx} TeV and L {approx} sub-mm reproduces the phenomenology of theories with large extra dimensions. Alternately, taking M{sub *} {approx} L{sup -1} {approx} M{sub Pl}, and placing our 3-brane a distance {approx} 100M{sub Pl}{sup -1} away from the intersection gives us a theory with an exponential determination of the Weak/Planck hierarchy.

  7. Extra-Axial Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Imad; Jallu, Ashraf; Alwatban, Jehad; Patay, Zoltan; Hessler, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Two patients with extra-axial cavernous hemangioma who presented with headache and oculovisual disturbances were investigated with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions masqueraded as basal meningioma, but this diagnosis was not supported by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in one patient. Cerebral angiography with embolization was indicated in one patient, but embolization was not justified in the other. Both patients underwent a pterional craniotomy. The lesions were extradural and highly vascular, necessitating excessive transfusion in one patient in whom gross total resection was achieved, and precluding satisfactory removal in the other. There was no mortality. Transient ophthalmoplegia, the only complication in one patient, was due to surgical manipulation of the cavernous sinus; it resolved progressively over 3 months. Extra-axial skull base cavernous hemangiomas are distinct entities with clinical and radiological characteristics that differ from those of intraparenchymal cavernous malformations. They can mimic meningiomas or pituitary tumors. In some cases, magnetic resonance spectroscopy may narrow the differential diagnoses. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice, facilitated by preoperative embolization to reduce intraoperative bleeding and by the application of the principles of skull base surgery. Fractionated radiotherapy is an alternative in partial or difficult resections and in high-risk and elderly patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17167631

  8. Le Higgs avec de grandes dimensions supplementaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benakli, Karim; Quirós, Mariano

    2003-04-01

    Transverse (submillimeter) and longitudinal (TeV) extra dimensions can help in dealing with the Higgs hierarchy problem. On the one hand large transverse dimensions can lower the fundamental scale of quantum gravity from the Planck scale to the TeV range. On the other hand longitudinal dimensions can provide genuine extra-dimensional symmetries (higher dimensional gauge symmetry and/or supersymmetry) to protect the Higgs mass against ultraviolet sensitivity. In this article we review recent developments along these directions. To cite this article: K. Benakli, M. Quirós, C. R. Physique 4 (2003).

  9. 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22): A Unique Aneuploidy Associated with Klinefelter Syndrome due to an Extra Derivative X Chromosome Inherited Maternally.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ruixue; Liang, Zuowen; Yue, Jiaming; Liu, Ruizhi

    2015-01-01

    A derivative X chromosome formed by translocation involving an X chromosome and a chromosome 18 in a Klinefelter syndrome (KS) patient with a 47,XXY karyotype has not been reported before. In this study, we present the clinical and molecular cytogenetic characteristics. The patient presented with small testes and azoospermia. G-banding analysis identified the karyotype as 47,XY,del(X)(p?11.4). Array CGH detected a 10.36-Mb duplication of chromosome region 18p11.22p11.32 (14,316-10,377,516) and a 111.18-Mb duplication of chromosome region Xp11.4q28 (61,931, 689-155,111,583), in addition to the normal chromosome 18 and an X chromosome. FISH results further revealed the extra 18p located at the end of the short arm of a deleted X chromosome, forming a derivative X chromosome. Finally, we identified the karyotype of the patient as 47,XY,+der(X)t(X;18)(p11.4;p11.22). The derivative X chromosome was maternally inherited. To our knowledge, this rare karyotype has not yet been reported in the literature. The present study may suggest a novel karyotype associated with KS.

  10. Balance failure in single limb stance due to ankle sprain injury: an analysis of center of pressure using the fractal dimension method.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Instrumented postural control analysis plays an important role in evaluating the effects of injury on dynamic stability during balance tasks, and is often conveyed with measures based on the displacement of the center-of-pressure (COP) assessed with a force platform. However, the desired outcome of the task is frequently characterized by a loss of dynamic stability, secondary to injury. Typically, these failed trials are discarded during research investigations, with the potential loss of informative data pertaining to task success. The novelty of the present study is that COP characteristics of failed trials in injured participants are compared to successful trial data in another injured group, and a control group of participants, using the fractal dimension (FD) method. Three groups of participants attempted a task of eyes closed single limb stance (SLS): twenty-nine participants with acute ankle sprain successfully completed the task on their non-injured limb (successful injury group); twenty eight participants with acute ankle sprain failed their attempt on their injured limb (failed injury group); sixteen participants with no current injury successfully completed the task on their non-dominant limb (successful non-injured group). Between trial analyses of these groups revealed significant differences in COP trajectory FD (successful injury group: 1.58±0.06; failed injury group: 1.54±0.07; successful non-injured group: 1.64±0.06) with a large effect size (0.27). These findings demonstrate that successful eyes-closed SLS is characterized by a larger FD of the COP path when compared to failed trials, and that injury causes a decrease in COP path FD.

  11. Predictions of Warped Extra Dimensions for Flavor Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Gori, Stefania

    2010-02-10

    The aim of these proceedings is to present the main predictions of the Randall-Sundrum model with custodial protection for particle-antiparticle mixing and rare decays of K and B{sub s,d} mesons, putting particular attention on the testability of the resulting NP effects at future experiments. Before giving numerical results, we discuss theoretical expectations, residing in the flavor structure of the model. The high energy scale M{sub KK} is chosen in such a way that direct searches of new particles at the LHC are possible, still being consistent with electroweak precision observables.

  12. Non-custodial warped extra dimensions at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Barry M.; Huber, Stephan J.

    2015-06-01

    With the prospect of improved Higgs measurements at the LHC and at proposed future colliders such as ILC, CLIC and TLEP we study the non-custodial Randall-Sundrum model with bulk SM fields and compare brane and bulk Higgs scenarios. The latter bear resemblance to the well studied type III two-Higgs-doublet models. We compute the electroweak precision observables and argue that incalculable contributions to these, in the form of higher dimensional operators, could have an impact on the T -parameter. This could potentially reduce the bound on the lowest Kaluza-Klein gauge boson masses to the 5 TeV range, making them detectable at the LHC. In a second part, we compute the misalignment between fermion masses and Yukawa couplings caused by vector-like Kaluza-Klein fermions in this setup. The misalignment of the top Yukawa can easily reach 10%, making it observable at the high-luminosity LHC. Corrections to the bottom and tau Yukawa couplings can be at the percent level and detectable at ILC, CLIC or TLEP.

  13. Cosmology of a brane radiating gravitons into the extra dimension.

    PubMed

    Langlois, David; Sorbo, Lorenzo; Rodríguez-Martínez, María

    2002-10-21

    We study in a self-consistent way the impact of the emission of bulk gravitons on the (homogeneous) cosmology of a three-brane embedded in a five-dimensional spacetime. In the low energy regime, we recover the well known result that the bulk affects the Friedmann equation only via a radiationlike term C/a(4), called dark or Weyl radiation. In the high energy regime, we find that the Weyl parameter C is no longer constant but grows rapidly. Consequently, C today is determined by the past history of the brane universe and depends on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom at the high/low energy transition.

  14. Extra-Articular Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Doral, Mahmut N; Huri, Gazi; Bohacek, Ivan; Turhan, Egemen; Bojanic, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of endoscopy in the last 2 decades, a number of procedures, and modifications to them, have been developed and have advanced exponentially. The list of indications was extended over time because of several reasons: better understanding of the pathophysiology, better diagnostics, and advances in endoscopic technology. In this review article, we summarize the most frequently performed extra-articular endoscopic procedures on the extremities. As there are several methods, some have been described briefly, whereas others have been described in greater detail, such as suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome and Achilles tendon disorders, as they present our area of interest and subspecialty domain. Recent advances in the treatment of versatile pathologic entities have been described, together with new methods, which currently lack sufficient clinical data but still represent promising techniques for the future.

  15. Extra large telescope actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben; Hatheway, Alson E.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of the Extra Large Telescope Actuator (ELTA) development project was to demonstrate operation of a relatively high stiffness, single stage optical positioning actuator capable of achieving diffraction-limited performance (<10 nm) in the visible optical band for weeks at a time while consuming no electrical power and dissipating no heat. The design challenge was to develop a linear positioning mechanism exhibiting high stiffness, low power, zero backlash, and thermal stability over extended time periods. The key to achieving high resolution, and stability with low power is to eliminate the closed-loop control system that is normally employed to overcome the nonlinearities and hysteresis inherent in some technologies, such as piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers. This was accomplished by using the patented elastic transducer developed by Alson E. Hatheway (AEH Inc.) This device consists of two elastic elements; a soft spring and a stiff flexural member. Deflection of the soft spring applies a force input to the stiff flexure, which responds with a proportionally reduced output deflection. To maintain linearity, the displacements, and hence the stresses, developed in both elastic members are kept below the micro-yield strength of the material. The AEH transducer is inherently linear and hysteresis free. The unique design features of this actuator which contribute to its extremely precise motion capability include an electric motor driving a leadscrew through a zero backlash harmonic drive gear reduction. The already fine incremental motion of the leadscrew nut is further attenuated by the elastic action of the AEH transducer, to provide output motion with resolution <10 nm.

  16. Particle creation by naked singularities in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Umpei; Nemoto, Hiroya; Shimano, Masahiro

    2011-04-15

    Recently, the possibility was pointed out by one of the present authors and his collaborators that an effective naked singularity referred to as ''a visible border of spacetime'' is generated by high-energy particle collision in the context of large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity. In this paper, we investigate the particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, while adopting a model in which a marginally naked singularity forms in the collapse of a homothetic lightlike pressureless fluid. We find that the spectrum deviates from that of Hawking radiation due to scattering near the singularity but can be recast in quasithermal form. The temperature is always higher than that of Hawking radiation of a same-mass black hole, and can be arbitrarily high depending on a parameter in the model. This implies that, in principle, the naked singularity may be distinguished from a black hole in collider experiments.

  17. Constraints on Universal Extra-Dimensional Dark Matter from Direct Detection Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torpin, Trevor; Duda, Gintaras

    2011-04-01

    Detection of dark matter is one of the most challenging and important problems in astro-particle physics. One theory that produces a viable particle dark matter candidate is Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which the existence of a 4th spatial dimension is theorized. The extra dimension is not seen because it is compactifed on a circular orbifold whose radius is too small to be observed with current technology. What separates this theory over other Kaluza-Klein-type theories is that UED allows all standard model particles and fields to propagate in the extra dimension. The dark matter candidate in UED theories is a stable particle known as the Lightest Kaluza-Klein Particle or LKP, and the LKP can exist with sufficient relic density to serve as the dark matter. This work will present bounds on UED model parameters from direct dark matter searches such as the CDMS II.

  18. Physics in One Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertel, Erminald

    2013-01-01

    Due to progress in nanotechnology high-quality quantum wires can nowadays be fabricated. The behavior of particles in one dimension differs significantly from that in three-dimensional (3D) systems, yet the physics of such low-dimensional systems is generally not very well represented in standard undergraduate or graduate curricula. For instance,…

  19. Dimension stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2003-01-01

    Dimension stone can be defined as natural rock material quarried to obtain blocks or slabs that meet specifications as to size (width, length and thickness) and shape for architectural or engineering purposes. Color, grain texture and pattern, and surface finish of the stone are also normal requirements. Other important selection criteria are durability (based on mineral composition, hardness and past performance), strength and the ability of the stone to take a polish.

  20. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Fawzia; El Hazmi, Malak M

    2010-01-01

    Studies from developed countries have reported that extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is on the rise due to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, similar studies from high-burden countries with low prevalence of HIV like Saudi Arabia are lacking. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. A retrospective analysis was carried out on all patients (n=431) with a culture - proven diagnosis of tuberculosis seen at University teaching hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2001 to December 2007. A total of 183 (42.5%) pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 248 (57.5%) extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) cases were compared in terms of age, sex, and nationality. There were 372 Saudis (SA) (86.3%) and the remaining non-Saudis (NSA) 59 (13.7%). The age distribution of the PTB patients had a bimodal distribution. EPTB was more common at young age (20-29 years). The proportion of EPTB cases was significantly higher among NSA patients (72.9%) compared to SA patients (55.1%). Females had higher proportion (59.5%) of EPTB than males (55.6%). The most common site was lymph node tuberculosis (42%). In conclusion, our data suggest that EPTB was relatively common in younger age, female gender and NSA. Tuberculosis (TB) control program may target those populations for EPTB case-finding.

  1. Extra Stimulation in Intermediate Grade Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, George E.

    Three types of extra stimulation in reading are discussed: extra teacher time devoted to teaching reading, extra student time devoted to practice in reading, and extra motivation and reinforcement leading to greater amounts of student reading outside the school. Problems are created (1) when teaching time spent on reading is increased in the…

  2. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Soccer Extra-Time Period: Implications for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Harper, Liam D; Fothergill, Melissa; West, Daniel J; Stevenson, Emma; Russell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research investigating soccer practitioners' perceptions can allow researchers to create practical research investigations. The extra-time period of soccer is understudied compared to other areas of soccer research. Using an open-ended online survey containing eleven main and nine sub questions, we gathered the perceptions of extra-time from 46 soccer practitioners, all working for different professional soccer clubs. Questions related to current practices, views on extra-time regulations, and ideas for future research. Using inductive content analysis, the following general dimensions were identified: 'importance of extra-time', 'rule changes', 'efficacy of extra-time hydro-nutritional provision', 'nutritional timing', 'future research directions', 'preparatory modulations' and 'recovery'. The majority of practitioners (63%) either agreed or strongly agreed that extra-time is an important period for determining success in knockout football match-play. When asked if a fourth substitution should be permitted in extra-time, 67% agreed. The use of hydro-nutritional strategies prior to extra-time was predominately considered important or very important. However; only 41% of practitioners felt that it was the most important time point for the use of nutritional products. A similar number of practitioners account (50%) and do not (50%) account for the potential of extra-time when training and preparing players and 89% of practitioners stated that extra-time influences recovery practices following matches. In the five minute break prior to extra-time, the following practices (in order of priority) were advocated to players: hydration, energy provision, massage, and tactical preparations. Additionally, 87% of practitioners advocate a particular nutritional supplementation strategy prior to extra-time. In order of importance, practitioners see the following as future research areas: nutritional interventions, fatigue responses, acute injury risk, recovery

  3. Origin of the 'Extra Entropy'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss how one can determine the origin of the 'extra entropy' in groups and clusters and the feedback needed in models of galaxy formation. I will stress the use of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging and the critical value that Con-X has in this regard.

  4. The Warping of Extra Spaces Accelerates the Expansion of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Ishwaree P.

    Generic cosmological models derived from higher-dimensional theories with warped extra-dimensions have a nonzero cosmological constant-like term induced on the 3 + 1 space-time, or a physical three-brane. In the scenario where this 3 + 1 space-time is an inflating de Sitter "bran" embedded in a higher-dimensional space-time, described by warped geometry, the four-dimensional cosmological term is determined in terms of two length scales: one is a scale associated with the size of extra-dimension(s) and the other is a scale associated with the warping of extra-space(s). The existence of this term in four dimensions provides a tantalizing possibility of explaining the observed accelerating expansion of the universe from fundamental theories of gravity, e.g. string theory.

  5. Extra-articular hip endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, L.; Guevara, V.; De Schepper, J.; Van Melkebeek, J.; Pattyn, C.; Audenaert, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the current available literature evidencing on peri-articular hip endoscopy (the third compartment). A comprehensive approach has been set on reports dealing with endoscopic surgery for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, snapping hip (or coxa-saltans; external and internal), gluteus medius and minimus tears and endoscopy (or arthroscopy) after total hip arthroplasty. This information can be used to trigger further research, innovation and education in extra-articular hip endoscopy. PMID:23610664

  6. Compactified Vacuum in Ten Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurmser, Daniel

    1987-09-01

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M ^4 and a "compactified" space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum be annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. Recently, it has been proposed that gravity in more than four dimensions may involve terms of higher order in the curvature as well as the linear terms present in ordinary general relativity. I illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S^6 where S ^6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. I explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The example M^4 times S^6 is still plagued by the semi -classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a

  7. Stabilization of Sub-Millimeter Dimensions: The New Guise of the Hierarchy Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    1999-01-11

    A new framework for solving the hierarchy problem was recently proposed which does not rely on low energy supersymmetry or technicolor. The fundamental Planck mass is at a TeV and the observed weakness of gravity at long distances is due the existence of new sub-millimeter spatial dimensions. In this picture the standard model fields are localized to a (3 + 1)-dimensional wall or ''3-brane''. The hierarchy problem becomes isomorphic to the problem of the largeness of the extra dimensions. This is in turn inextricably linked to the cosmological constant problem, suggesting the possibility of a common solution. The radii of the extra dimensions must be prevented from both expanding to too great a size, and collapsing to the fundamental Planck length TeV{sup -1}. In this paper we propose a number of mechanisms addressing this question. We argue that a positive bulk cosmological constant anti-Lambda can stabilize the internal manifold against expansion, and that the value of anti-Lambda is not unstable to radiative corrections provided that the supersymmetries of string theory are broken by dynamics on our 3-brane. We further argue that the extra dimensions can be stabilized against collapse in a phenomenologically successful way by either of two methods: (1) Large, topologically conserved quantum numbers associated with higher-form bulk U(1) gauge fields, such as the naturally occurring Ramond-Ramond gauge fields, or the winding number of bulk scalar fields. (2) The brane-lattice-crystallization of a large number of 3-branes in the bulk. These mechanisms are consistent with theoretical, laboratory, and cosmological considerations such as the absence of large time variations in Newton's constant during and after primordial nucleosynthesis, and millimeter-scale tests of gravity.

  8. Extra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors (Aggressive Fibromatoses)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Resources Copyright 2014 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Extra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors Extra-abdominal desmoids ... to serve as medical advice. Anyone seeking specific orthopaedic advice or assistance should consult his or her ...

  9. Error bounds from extra precise iterative refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Demmel, James; Hida, Yozo; Kahan, William; Li, Xiaoye S.; Mukherjee, Soni; Riedy, E. Jason

    2005-02-07

    We present the design and testing of an algorithm for iterative refinement of the solution of linear equations, where the residual is computed with extra precision. This algorithm was originally proposed in the 1960s [6, 22] as a means to compute very accurate solutions to all but the most ill-conditioned linear systems of equations. However two obstacles have until now prevented its adoption in standard subroutine libraries like LAPACK: (1) There was no standard way to access the higher precision arithmetic needed to compute residuals, and (2) it was unclear how to compute a reliable error bound for the computed solution. The completion of the new BLAS Technical Forum Standard [5] has recently removed the first obstacle. To overcome the second obstacle, we show how a single application of iterative refinement can be used to compute an error bound in any norm at small cost, and use this to compute both an error bound in the usual infinity norm, and a componentwise relative error bound. We report extensive test results on over 6.2 million matrices of dimension 5, 10, 100, and 1000. As long as a normwise (resp. componentwise) condition number computed by the algorithm is less than 1/max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, the computed normwise (resp. componentwise) error bound is at most 2 max{l_brace}10,{radical}n{r_brace} {center_dot} {var_epsilon}{sub w}, and indeed bounds the true error. Here, n is the matrix dimension and w is single precision roundoff error. For worse conditioned problems, we get similarly small correct error bounds in over 89.4% of cases.

  10. Extra-Territorial Siting of Nuclear Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Thomas E.; Morris, Frederic A.

    2009-10-07

    Arrangements might be created for siting nuclear installations on land ceded by a host State for administration by an international or multinational organization. Such arrangements might prove useful in terms of resolving suspicions of proliferation in troubled areas of the world, or as a means to introduce nuclear activities into areas where political, financial or technical capabilities might otherwise make such activities unsound, or as a means to enable global solutions to be instituted for major nuclear concerns (e.g., spent fuel management). The paper examines practical matters associated with the legal and programmatic aspects of siting nuclear installations, including diplomatic/political frameworks, engaging competent industrial bodies, protection against seizure, regulation to ensure safety and security, waste management, and conditions related to the dissolution of the extra-territorial provisions as may be agreed as the host State(s) achieve the capabilities to own and operate the installations. The paper considers the potential for using such a mechanism across the spectrum of nuclear power activities, from mining to geological repositories for nuclear waste. The paper considers the non-proliferation dimensions associated with such arrangements, and the pros and cons affecting potential host States, technology vendor States, regional neighbors and the international community. It considers in brief potential applications in several locations today.

  11. Screening and validation of EXTraS data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpano, Stefania; Haberl, F.; De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.: Israel, G.; Rodriguez, G.; Belfiore, A.; Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Wilms, J.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Law-Green, D.

    2015-09-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky) is aimed at fullyexploring the serendipitous content of the XMM-Newton EPIC database in the timedomain. The project is funded within the EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework and is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany). The several tasks consist in characterise aperiodicvariability for all 3XMM sources, search for short-term periodic variability on hundreds of thousands sources, detect new transient sources that are missed by standard source detection and hence not belonging to the 3XMM catalogue, search for long term variability by measuring fluxes or upper limits for both pointed and slew observations, and finally perform multiwavelength characterisation andclassification. Screening and validation of the different products is essentially in order to reject flawed results, generated by the automatic pipelines. We present here the screening tool we developed in the form of a Graphical User Interface and our plans for a systematic screening of the different catalogues.

  12. Welfarism vs. extra-welfarism.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Werner B F; Culyer, Anthony J; van Exel, N Job A; Rutten, Frans F H

    2008-03-01

    'Extra-welfarism' has received some attention in health economics, yet there is little consensus on what distinguishes it from more conventional 'welfarist economics'. In this paper, we seek to identify the characteristics of each in order to make a systematic comparison of the ways in which they evaluate alternative social states. The focus, though this is not intended to be exclusive, is on health. Specifically, we highlight four areas in which the two schools differ: (i) the outcomes considered relevant in an evaluation; (ii) the sources of valuation of the relevant outcomes; (iii) the basis of weighting of relevant outcomes and (iv) interpersonal comparisons. We conclude that these differences are substantive.

  13. Dynamics of particles near black hole with higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Iftikhar, Sehrish

    2016-07-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of particles in higher dimensions. For this purpose, we discuss some interesting features related to the motion of particles near a Myers-Perry black hole with arbitrary extra dimensions as well as a single non-zero spin parameter. Assuming it as a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy, we calculate red-blue shifts in the equatorial plane for the far away observer as well as the corresponding black hole parameters of the photons. Next, we study the Penrose process and find that the energy gain of the particle depends on the variation of the black hole dimensions. Finally, we discuss the center of mass energy for 11 dimensions, which indicates a similar behavior to that of four dimensions but it is higher in four dimensions than five or more dimensions. We conclude that higher dimensions have a great impact on the particle dynamics.

  14. Extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Extra-solar planet detection has been a goal of astronomers for many decades. This paper describes current efforts in planet detection using interferometric techniques. At present, the Mark III long baseline interferometer has been operational for a number of years. The Mark III has achieved significant improvement in astrometric accuracy in two areas, wide angle astrometry and double star astrometry. Two new interferometers are being developed. The first is a direct combination IR interferometer, an upgrade of the UCB IR heterodyne interferometer. The second is the Keck Interferometer Array. This instrument, to be operational at the end of the decade will be a major interferometric facility, with the capability to combine coherently the light from the two 10-meter Keck telescopes as well as four 1.5-meter movable outrigger telescopes. The last project directed at planet detection is OSI, a space-based long-baseline interferometer with a planned astrometric accuracy of 1-10 microarcsec.

  15. Extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Extra-solar planet detection has been a goal of astronomers for many decades. This paper describes current efforts in planet detection using interferometric techniques. At present, the Mark III long baseline interferometer has been operational for a number of years. The Mark III has achieved significant improvement in astrometric accuracy in two areas, wide angle astrometry and double star astrometry. Two new interferometers are being developed. The first is a direct combination IR interferometer, an upgrade of the UCB IR heterodyne interferometer. The second is the Keck Interferometer Array. This instrument, to be operational at the end of the decade will be a major interferometric facility, with the capability to combine coherently the light from the two 10-meter Keck telescopes as well as four 1.5-meter movable outrigger telescopes. The last project directed at planet detection is OSI, a space-based long-baseline interferometer with a planned astrometric accuracy of 1-10 microarcsec.

  16. Extra Chance Generalized Hybrid Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Cédric M.; Sanz-Serna, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We study a method, Extra Chance Generalized Hybrid Monte Carlo, to avoid rejections in the Hybrid Monte Carlo method and related algorithms. In the spirit of delayed rejection, whenever a rejection would occur, extra work is done to find a fresh proposal that, hopefully, may be accepted. We present experiments that clearly indicate that the additional work per sample carried out in the extra chance approach clearly pays in terms of the quality of the samples generated.

  17. Bottom-tau unification in supersymmetric SU(5) models with extra matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigusa, So; Moroi, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    We consider b-\\tau unification in supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theories (GUTs) with extra matters. The renormalization group runnings of b and \\tau Yukawa coupling constants may be significantly affected by the existence of extra matters. If the extra matters interact with the standard-model particles (and their superpartners) only through gauge interaction, the ratio of the b to \\tau Yukawa coupling constants at the GUT scale becomes suppressed compared to the case without extra matters. This is mainly due to the change of the renormalization group running of the SU(3)_C gauge coupling constant. If the extra matters have Yukawa couplings, on the contrary, the (effective) b Yukawa coupling at the GUT scale can be enhanced due to the new Yukawa interaction. Such an effect may improve the b-\\tau unification in supersymmetric GUTs.

  18. Signatures from an extra-dimensional seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Melbeus, Henrik; Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang He

    2010-08-15

    We study the generation of small neutrino masses in an extra-dimensional model, where singlet fermions are allowed to propagate in the extra dimension, while the standard model particles are confined to a brane. Motivated by the fact that extra-dimensional models are nonrenormalizable, we truncate the Kaluza-Klein towers at a maximal Kaluza-Klein number. This truncation, together with the structure of the bulk Majorana mass term, motivated by the Sherk-Schwarz mechanism, implies that the Kaluza-Klein modes of the singlet fermions pair to form Dirac fermions, except for a number of unpaired Majorana fermions at the top of each tower. These heavy Majorana fermions are the only sources of lepton number breaking in the model, and similarly to the type-I seesaw mechanism, they naturally generate small masses for the left-handed neutrinos. The lower Kaluza-Klein modes mix with the light neutrinos, and the mixing effects are not suppressed with respect to the light-neutrino masses. Compared to conventional fermionic seesaw models, such mixing can be more significant. We study the signals of this model at the Large Hadron Collider, and find that the current low-energy bounds on the nonunitarity of the leptonic mixing matrix are strong enough to exclude an observation.

  19. Origin of a peculiar extra U(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.M.; Dorsner, I.

    2005-07-01

    The origin of a family-independent ''extra U(1)'', discovered by Barr, Bednarz, and Benesh and independently by Ma, and whose phenomenology has recently been studied by Ma and Roy, is discussed. Even though it satisfies anomaly constraints in a highly economical way, with just a single extra triplet of leptons per family, this extra U(1) cannot come from four-dimensional grand unification. However, it is shown here that it can come from a Pati-Salam scheme with an extra U(1), which explains the otherwise surprising cancellation of anomalies.

  20. Extra Molting and Selection on Nymphal Growth in the Desert Locust

    PubMed Central

    Piou, Cyril; Jourdan-Pineau, Hélène; Pagès, Christine; Blondin, Laurence; Chapuis, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In insects, extra-molting has been viewed as a compensatory mechanism for nymphal growth that contributes to optimize body weight for successful reproduction. However, little is known on the capacity of extra-molting to evolve in natural populations, which limits our understanding of how selection acts on nymphal growth. We used a multi-generational pedigree, individual monitoring and quantitative genetics models to investigate the evolution of extra-molting and its impact on nymphal growth in a solitarious population of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Growth compensation via extra-molting was observed for 46% of the females, whose adult weight exceeded by 4% that of other females, at a cost of a 22% longer development time. We found a null heritability for body weight threshold only, and the highest and a strongly female-biased heritability for extra molting. Our genetic estimates show that (1) directional selection can act on growth rate, development time and extra-molting to optimize body weight threshold, the target of stabilizing selection, (2) extra-molting can evolve in natural populations, and (3) a genetic conflict, due to sexually antagonistic selection on extra-molting, might prevent its fixation. Finally, we discuss how antagonistic selection between solitarious and gregarious environments and/or genetic correlations between growth and phase traits might also impact the evolution of extra-molting in locusts. PMID:27227885

  1. Hypercalcemia due to talc granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Woywodt, A; Schneider, W; Goebel, U; Luft, F C

    2000-04-01

    Pulmonary disease due to talc, a group of hydrous magnesium silicates, is almost exclusively encountered after occupational exposure. One form of this rare disorder is talc granulomatosis. In varying degrees, hypercalcemia is typical of granulomatous disease but has not yet been reported in talcosis. We report the case of a former mold maker who presented with hypercalcemia. Laboratory findings indicated extra-renal 1-alpha-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Pulmonary infiltrates prompted a lung biopsy that disclosed talc granulomatosis. We suggest that talc granulomatosis should be added to the list of granulomatous disorders capable of causing hypercalcemia due to increased extra-renal 1-alpha-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

  2. Bubble dynamics in N dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Alexander R.

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics are central concepts in engineering, the natural sciences, and the mathematics of fluid mechanics. Due to the nonlinear nature of their dynamics, the governing equations are not fully solvable. Here, the dynamics of a spherical bubble in an N-dimensional fluid are discussed in the hope that examining bubble behavior in N dimensions will add insight to their behavior in three dimensions. Several canonical results in bubble dynamics are re-derived, including the Rayleigh collapse time, the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, and the Minnaert frequency. Recent analytical approximations to the Rayleigh collapse are discussed, and the N-dimensional generalization is used to resolve a known discrepancy. Numerical simulations are used to examine the onset of nonlinear behavior. Overall, the dynamics of bubbles are faster at higher dimensions, with nonlinear behavior occurring at lower strain. Several features are found to be unique to three dimensions, including the trend of nonlinear behavior and apparent coincidences in timescales.

  3. Grandes nouvelles dimensions et gravité quantique au coin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dvali, Gia

    2003-04-01

    The electroweak unification mass may be the only fundamental scale in nature. If so, the visible universe may lie on a membrane floating within a higher dimensional space; new dimensions, black holes, quantum gravity, and string theory may become experimentally accessible in this decade. The dark matter could reside on parallel universes inside the extra dimensions. To cite this article: N. Arkani-Hamed et al., C. R. Physique 4 (2003).

  4. Extra-pair copulation and extra-range movements in Flammulated Owls

    Treesearch

    Richard T. Reynolds; Brian D. Linkhart

    1990-01-01

    We report an extra-pair copulation (EPC) in the Flammulated Owl (Otus flammeolus), the first in strigiforms, and document 21 cases of extra-range movements (ERMs) in this species. Extra-range movements occurred throughout nesting with both sexes participating: males anytime during nesting and females only after their young fledged. Males appear to make ERMs to...

  5. Extra Credit Exercise: A Painless Pop Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, B. Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the extra credit exercise (ECE), a pop quiz variation that combines the benefits of frequent, unannounced testing with the features that make quizzes less aversive (the ECE are extra-credit and do not hurt the students' grades). Addresses the benefits of the ECE assignment and the students' reactions to it. (CMK)

  6. Extra Credit Exercise: A Painless Pop Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, B. Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the extra credit exercise (ECE), a pop quiz variation that combines the benefits of frequent, unannounced testing with the features that make quizzes less aversive (the ECE are extra-credit and do not hurt the students' grades). Addresses the benefits of the ECE assignment and the students' reactions to it. (CMK)

  7. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Soccer Extra-Time Period: Implications for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Liam D.; Fothergill, Melissa; West, Daniel J.; Stevenson, Emma; Russell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research investigating soccer practitioners’ perceptions can allow researchers to create practical research investigations. The extra-time period of soccer is understudied compared to other areas of soccer research. Using an open-ended online survey containing eleven main and nine sub questions, we gathered the perceptions of extra-time from 46 soccer practitioners, all working for different professional soccer clubs. Questions related to current practices, views on extra-time regulations, and ideas for future research. Using inductive content analysis, the following general dimensions were identified: ‘importance of extra-time’, ‘rule changes’, ‘efficacy of extra-time hydro-nutritional provision’, ‘nutritional timing’, ‘future research directions’, ‘preparatory modulations’ and ‘recovery’. The majority of practitioners (63%) either agreed or strongly agreed that extra-time is an important period for determining success in knockout football match-play. When asked if a fourth substitution should be permitted in extra-time, 67% agreed. The use of hydro-nutritional strategies prior to extra-time was predominately considered important or very important. However; only 41% of practitioners felt that it was the most important time point for the use of nutritional products. A similar number of practitioners account (50%) and do not (50%) account for the potential of extra-time when training and preparing players and 89% of practitioners stated that extra-time influences recovery practices following matches. In the five minute break prior to extra-time, the following practices (in order of priority) were advocated to players: hydration, energy provision, massage, and tactical preparations. Additionally, 87% of practitioners advocate a particular nutritional supplementation strategy prior to extra-time. In order of importance, practitioners see the following as future research areas: nutritional interventions, fatigue responses

  8. Bulk stabilization, the extra-dimensional Higgs portal and missing energy in Higgs events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Ross; Burgess, C. P.

    2013-05-01

    To solve the hierarchy problem, extra-dimensional models must explain why the new dimensions stabilize to the right size, and the known mechanisms for doing so require bulk scalars that couple to the branes. Because of these couplings the energetics of dimensional stabilization competes with the energetics of the Higgs vacuum, with potentially observable effects. These effects are particularly strong for one or two extra dimensions because the bulk-Higgs couplings can then be super-renormalizable or dimensionless. Experimental reach for such extra-dimensional Higgs `portals' are stronger than for gravitational couplings because they are less suppressed at low-energies. We compute how Higgs-bulk coupling through such a portal with two extra dimensions back-reacts onto properties of the Higgs boson. When the KK mass is smaller than the Higgs mass, mixing with KK modes results in an invisible Higgs decay width, missing-energy signals at high-energy colliders, and new mechanisms of energy loss in stars and supernovae. Astrophysical bounds turn out to be complementary to collider measurements, with observable LHC signals allowed by existing constraints. We comment on the changes to the Higgs mass-coupling relationship caused by Higgs-bulk mixing, and how the resulting modifications to the running of Higgs couplings alter vacuum-stability and triviality bounds.

  9. The cosmological 'constant' and quantization in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, Paul S.

    2011-11-01

    Campbell's theorem ensures that all vacuum space-times in general relativity can be embedded in five dimensions, with the 4D scalar curvature expressed as an effective cosmological 'constant' Λ which depends on the extra coordinate. This Λ-landscape can be used to give insight to certain physical phenomena, such as the big bang and quantized particles.

  10. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  11. Primary extra nodal Hodgkin disease: Bone presentation.

    PubMed

    Nikolica, Goran; Badnjar, Zorka; Cadjenovic, Tanja; Raceta-Masic, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Extra nodal and extra lymphatic propagation of Hodgkin's disease is a characteristic of the fourth stage of disease when the organs are affected. Primary appearances of the disease outside the lymph node is a rare event. Therefore, it makes diagnostic problem. Skeletal system is possible localization of primary extra nodal Hodgkin's disease. Women, 42-years-old, was admitted to hospital because of swelling and pain in the right shoulder. After imaging and histological examination diagnosed Hodgkin's nodular sclerosing histological subtype disease has been established. The patient starts to receive chemotherapy. Primary extra nodal Hodgkin's disease of bone is manifested with painful swelling in geared area. Imaging method shows destruction of the affected bone, with swelling of the soft tissues. Propagation in soft tissue is not accompanied by their destruction, but rather manifested swelling of the surrounding soft tissue.

  12. Dimension of chaotic attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1982-09-01

    Dimension is perhaps the most basic property of an attractor. In this paper we discuss a variety of different definitions of dimension, compute their values for a typical example, and review previous work on the dimension of chaotic attractors. The relevant definitions of dimension are of two general types, those that depend only on metric properties, and those that depend on probabilistic properties (that is, they depend on the frequency with which a typical trajectory visits different regions of the attractor). Both our example and the previous work that we review support the conclusion that all of the probabilistic dimensions take on the same value, which we call the dimension of the natural measure, and all of the metric dimensions take on a common value, which we call the fractal dimension. Furthermore, the dimension of the natural measure is typically equal to the Lyapunov dimension, which is defined in terms of Lyapunov numbers, and thus is usually far easier to calculate than any other definition. Because it is computable and more physically relevant, we feel that the dimension of the natural measure is more important than the fractal dimension.

  13. Doing without dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, C. B.

    1986-03-01

    The author discusses the concept of dimensions of a physical quantity, and the relationship between derived units (expressed in terms of their base units) and the dimensions of the derived quantities. He calls for the replacement of 'dimensions' by base units in the GCE A-level syllabus and provides some recommendations to GCE examining boards.

  14. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in quasi one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Satpathi, Urbashi Deo, P. Singha

    2015-06-24

    Electronic charge and spin separation leading to charge density wave and spin density wave is well established in one dimension in the presence and absence of Coulomb interaction. We start from quasi one dimension and show the possibility of such a transition in quasi one dimension as well as in two dimensions by going to a regime where it can be shown for electrons that just interact via Fermi statistics. Such density waves arise due to internal symmetry breaking in a many fermion quantum system. We can extend this result to very wide rings with infinitely many electrons including Coulomb interaction.

  15. Use of ICS/LABA (extra-fine and non-extra-fine) in elderly asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Benfante, Alida; Basile, Marco; Battaglia, Salvatore; Spatafora, Mario; Scichilone, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Age represents an exclusion criterion in randomized clinical trials designed to test the efficacy and safety of inhaled drugs in asthma. As a consequence, data on efficacy and safety of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting β2 agonist (LABA) combinations in elderly asthmatics are scanty. Older age is associated with an increased proportion of comorbid conditions; in addition, all organ functions undergo a process of senescence, thus reducing their ability to metabolize the agents. Overall, these age-associated conditions may variably, and often unpredictably, affect the metabolism and excretion of respiratory drugs. However, pharmacological treatment of asthma does not follow specific recommendations in the elderly. In the elderly, the ICS/LABA combinations may carry an increased risk of local indesiderable effects, primarily due to the lack of coordination between activation of the device and inhalation, and systemic adverse events, mainly due to the greater amount of active drug that is available because of the age-associated changes in organ functions as well as drug-to-drug and drug-to-concomitant disease interactions. The extra-fine formulations of ICSs/LABAs, which allow for a more favorable drug deposition in the lungs at a reduced dose, may contribute to overcome this issue. This review revises the efficacy and safety of treatment with ICSs/LABAs, focusing on the main pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the drugs and highlighting the potential risks in the elderly asthmatic population. PMID:27789954

  16. Tidal evolution of extra-solar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian Kendall

    In both our solar system and extra-solar planetary systems, tides may have a variety of effects, driving complex orbital evolution and geophysical processes. For extra-solar planets with orbits that pass very close to their host stars, tides have reduced orbital eccentricities and semi-major axes, and the rates of tidal evolution may change dramatically as orbits evolve. Understanding how the orbits have evolved and, ultimately, discerning the origins of close-in extra-solar planets require accounting for all the complexity of tidal evolution. The accompanying dissipation of tidal energy within the planets has probably also affected their internal structures. In some cases, tidal dissipation may account the apparent discrepancy between predictions and observations of the radii of extra-solar planets that transit their host stars. Evolutionary models for these planets that allow determinations of their internal structures and composition must include highly variable tidal heating rates. The same tidal evolution and heating probably also affects the orbital and geophysical properties of rocky extra-solar planets and may play a key role in determining whether such a planet can harbor life. As tides reduce a planet's semi-major axis, the planet may eventually pass so close to its host star that the star's gravity completely disrupts the planet, leading to the destruction of many planets. Tidal destruction has left a discernible signature on the distribution of extra-solar planetary orbits, and so interpretations of the distribution in terms of the origins of planets must include consideration of the effects of tidal destruction.

  17. Carbonaceous Material in Extra-terrestrial Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2016-10-01

    Comets, asteroids, meteorites, micrometeorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and ultra-carbonaceous Antarctic micrometeorites (UCAMMs) may contain carbonaceous material, which was exogenously delivered to the early Earth. Carbonaceous chondrites have an enormous variety of extra-terrestrial compounds, including all the key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry. Comets contain several carbon-rich species and, in addition, the hypervelocity impact-shock of a comet can produce several α-amino acids. The analysis of the carbonaceous content of extra-terrestrial matter provides a window into the resources delivered to the early Earth, which may have been used by the first living organisms.

  18. General gauge mediation in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrie, Moritz; Russo, Rodolfo

    2010-08-01

    We use the ''general gauge mediation'' (GGM) formalism to describe a five-dimensional setup with an S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. We first consider a model independent supersymmetry breaking hidden sector on one boundary and generic chiral matter on another. Using the definition of GGM, the effects of the hidden sector are contained in a set of global symmetry current correlator functions and is mediated through the bulk. We find the gaugino, sfermion and hyperscalar mass formulas for minimal and generalized messengers in different regimes of a large, small and intermediate extra dimension. Then we use the five-dimensional GGM formalism to construct a model in which an SU(5) Intriligator, Seiberg and Shih (ISS) model is located on the hidden boundary. We weakly gauge a global symmetry of the ISS model and associate it with the bulk vector superfield. Compared to four-dimensional GGM, there is a natural way to adjust the gaugino versus sfermion mass ratio by a factor (Ml){sup 2}, where M is a characteristic mass scale of the supersymmetry breaking sector and l is the length of the extra dimension.

  19. Dimensions of Educational Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Roe L., Ed.; And Others

    Roe L. Johns and J. Alan Thomas survey the problem of educational need; and Kern Alexander considers the implications of the dimensions of educational need for school financing. Dimensions of need in the following areas are defined: early childhood and basic elementary and secondary education, by William P. McLure; educational programs for…

  20. Navigating between the Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  1. Navigating between the Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  2. The Qualitative Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodge-Peters, Dianne S.

    The qualitative dimension of educational research methodology is explored, and the literature of qualitative methodology is reviewed so researchers may (1) understand more fully the qualitative dimension as it, in turn, fits within the parameters of educational research as a whole, and (2) have more informed access to the sometimes daunting array…

  3. Extra-1 acupressure for children undergoing anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Ming; Escalera, Sandra; Lin, Eric C; Maranets, Inna; Kain, Zeev N

    2008-09-01

    Acupuncture and related techniques have been used as adjuncts for perioperative anesthesia management. We examined whether acupressure in the Extra-1 (Yin-Tang) point would result in decreased preprocedural anxiety and reduced intraprocedural propofol requirements in a group of children undergoing endoscopic procedures. Fifty-two children were randomized to receive acupressure bead intervention either at the Extra-1 acupuncture point or at a sham point. A Bispectral Index (BIS) monitor was applied to all children before the onset of the intervention. Anxiety was assessed at baseline and before entrance to the operating room. Anesthetic techniques were standardized and maintained with IV propofol infusion titrated to keep BIS values of 40-60. We found that after the intervention, children in the Extra-1 group experienced reduced anxiety whereas children in the sham group experienced increased anxiety (-9% [-3 to -15] vs 2% [-6 to 7.4], P = 0.012). In contrast, no significant changes in BIS values were observed in the preprocedural waiting period between groups (P = ns). We also found that total intraprocedural propofol requirements did not differ between the two study groups (214 +/- 76 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) vs 229 +/- 95 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.52). We conclude that acupressure bead intervention at Extra-1 acupoint reduces preprocedural anxiety in children undergoing endoscopic procedures. This intervention, however, has no impact on BIS values or intraprocedural propofol requirements.

  4. Probabilistic Extra-Tropical Storm Surge Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Taylor, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The National Weather Service's (NWS) Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) developed the Extra-Tropical Storm Surge (ETSS) model in 1995 by applying the Sea Lake and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model to Extra-Tropical storms. Over the last two years, MDL, with Hurricane Sandy Supplemental funding, has enhanced the ETSS model to meet the anticipated requirements of a potential extra-tropical storm surge watch. The latest such enhancement, implemented in October 2015, enabled ETSS to operationally provide deterministic inundation guidance four times a day based on storm surge and tide in all of its model domains. Storm surge guidance has various uncertainties associated with it such as (a) the atmospheric forcing (wind speed, wind direction and atmospheric pressure), (b) the initial water conditions, (c) the included physical processes, (d) the numerical scheme, etc. While some of these can be reduced by enhancing the storm surge model, others, such as atmospheric forcing, rely on external inputs. Uncertainty in atmospheric forcing is particularly challenging as it is the main source of uncertainty in storm surge based inundation guidance. Ensemble techniques are necessary to produce quantitative estimates of storm surge based inundation risk. To create such an ensemble technique, MDL has developed the Probabilistic Extra-Tropical Storm Surge (PETSS) model by using atmospheric inputs from the 21 Global Ensemble Forecast System ensemble members. This paper describes the details of this effort and provides statistical verification of the PETSS products for several case studies.

  5. Progress in extra-solar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in extra-solar planet detection is reviewed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the definition of a planet; (2) the weakness of planet signals; (3) direct techniques - imaging and spectral detection; and (4) indirect techniques - reflex motion and occultations.

  6. Precision constraints on extra fermion generations.

    PubMed

    Erler, Jens; Langacker, Paul

    2010-07-16

    There has been recent renewed interest in the possibility of additional fermion generations. At the same time there have been significant changes in the relevant electroweak precision constraints, in particular, in the interpretation of several of the low energy experiments. We summarize the various motivations for extra families and analyze them in view of the latest electroweak precision data.

  7. [Intra and extra-familiar sexual abuse].

    PubMed

    Taveira, Francisco; Frazão, Sofia; Dias, Ricardo; Matos, Eduarda; Magalhães, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The sexual abuse of a child or young person constitutes a major social and public health problem and there is recent evidence that intra-familial (IF) sexual abuses are more serious in their consequences than extra-familial (EF). However, there are no studies on this phenomenon in Portugal. Thus, the aim of the present study is to contribute to a better characterization of these types of abuses and to identify possible differences between IF and EF cases. A retrospective study was preformed based on medico-legal reports related to victims below the age of 18, suspected of being sexually abused (n = 764), corresponding to 67% of the total of observed sexual crimes. Results revealed that 34.9% of the abuses are IF and they show statistically significant differences when compared to EF cases. These are due to the following factors found in IF situations: a) lower victim age; b) closeness between victim and abuser; c) abusers with a higher rate of previous sexual abuse; d) sexual practices of reduced physical intrusion; e) decreased physical violence but increased emotional violence; f) greater delay between last abuse and the forensic exam; g) reduced number of injuries or biological evidence (none in the great majority of the cases). Results point out the existence of several characteristics in IF abuse that have been identified as factors that influence the severity of the abuse consequences. Among them are: a) lower victim age; b) greater proximity to the abuser; c) increased amount of emotional violence. These factors account for the reduced visibility of this kind of cases and therefore explain their delayed disclosure and diagnosis. The association of this fact with the reduced intrusiveness of this sort of practice and the consequent decrease in number of injuries and other evidence leads to a marked reduction of the number of cases where evidence of the abuse can be found by physical examination alone. The above aspects underlie the need of using different

  8. Suppressing gate errors in frequency-domain quantum computation through extra physical systems coupled to a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Goto, Hayato; Kujiraoka, Mamiko; Ichimura, Kouichi

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scheme for frequency-domain quantum computation (FDQC) in which the errors due to crosstalk are suppressed using extra physical systems coupled to a cavity. FDQC is a promising method to realize large-scale quantum computation, but crosstalk is a major problem. When physical systems employed as qubits satisfy specific resonance conditions, gate errors due to crosstalk increase. In our scheme, the errors are suppressed by controlling the resonance conditions using extra physical systems.

  9. The dimensions of indexing.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, W John; Kim, Won

    2003-01-01

    Indexing of documents is an important strategy intended to make the literature more readily available to the user. Here we describe several dimensions of indexing that are important if indexing is to be optimal. These dimensions are coverage, predictability, and transparency. MeSH terms and text words are compared in MEDLINE in regard to these dimensions. Part of our analysis consists in applying AdaBoost with decisions trees as the weak learners to estimate how reliably index terms are being assigned and how complex the criteria are by which they are being assigned. Our conclusions are that MeSH terms are more predictable and more transparent than text words.

  10. On universal quantum dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, R. L.

    2017-08-01

    We represent in the universal form restricted one-instanton partition function of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. It is based on the derivation of universal expressions for quantum dimensions (universal characters) of Cartan powers of adjoint and some other series of irreps of simple Lie algebras. These formulae also provide a proof of formulae for universal quantum dimensions for low-dimensional representations, needed in derivation of universal knot polynomials (i.e. colored Wilson averages of Chern-Simons theory on 3d sphere). As a check of the (complicated) formulae for universal quantum dimensions we prove numerically Deligne's hypothesis on universal characters for symmetric cube of adjoint representation.

  11. Extra dimensions in photon-induced two lepton final states at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Atag, S.; Inan, S. C.; Sahin, I.

    2009-10-01

    We discuss the potential of the photon-induced two lepton final states at the LHC to explore the phenomenology of the Kaluza-Klein tower of gravitons in the scenarios of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali model and the Randall-Sundrum model. The sensitivity to model parameters can be improved compared to the present LEP or Tevatron sensitivity.

  12. Impact of warped extra dimensions on the dipole coefficients in b → sγ transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Raoul; Neubert, Matthias; Schmell, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We calculate the electro- and chromomagnetic dipole coefficients C 7 γ,8 g and {tilde{C}}_{7γ, 8g} in the context of the minimal Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with a Higgs sector localized on the IR brane using the five-dimensional (5D) approach, where the coefficients are expressed in terms of integrals over 5D propagators. Since we keep the full dependence on the Yukawa matrices, the integral expressions are formally valid to all orders in v 2/ M KK 2 . In addition we relate our results to the expressions obtained in the Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposed theory and show the consistency in both pictures analytically and numerically, which presents a non-trivial cross-check. In Feynman-'t Hooft gauge, the dominant corrections from virtual KK modes arise from the scalar parts of the W ±-boson penguin diagrams, including the contributions from the scalar component of the 5D gauge-boson field and from the charged Goldstone bosons in the Higgs sector. The size of the KK corrections depends on the parameter y *, which sets the upper bound for the anarchic 5D Yukawa matrices. We find that for y * ≳ 1 the KK corrections are proportional to y ∗ 2 . We discuss the phenomenological implications of our results for the branching ratio Br(overline{B}to {X}_sγ ) , the time-dependent CP asymmetry S K ∗ γ , the direct CP asymmetry A CP b → sγ and the CP asymmetry difference Δ A CP b → sγ . We can derive a lower bound on the first KK gluon resonance of 3 .8 TeV for y * = 3, requiring that at least 10% of the RS parameter space covers the experimental 2 σ error margins. We further discuss the branching ratio Br(overline{B}to {X}_s{l}+{l}-) and compare our predictions for C 7γ,9,10 and {tilde{C}}_{7γ, 9,10} with phenomenological results derived from model-independent analyses.

  13. Low scale gravity mediation with warped extra dimension and collider phenomenology on the hidden sector

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Hideo; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamashita, Toshifumi

    2006-09-01

    We propose a scenario of gravity mediated supersymmetry breaking (gravity mediation) in a supersymmetric Randall-Sundrum model. In our setup, both the visible sector and the hidden sector coexist on the infrared (IR) brane. We introduce the Polonyi model as a simple hidden sector. Because of the warped metric, the effective cutoff scale on the IR brane is 'warped down', so that the gravity mediation occurs at a low scale. As a result, the gravitino is naturally the lightest superpartner (LSP) and contact interactions between the hidden and the visible sector fields become stronger. We address phenomenologies for various IR cutoff scales. In particular, we investigate collider phenomenology involving a scalar field (Polonyi field) in the hidden sector for the case with the IR cutoff around 10 TeV. We find a possibility that the hidden sector scalar can be produced at the LHC and the international linear collider (ILC). Interestingly, the scalar behaves like the Higgs boson of the standard model in the production process, while its decay process is quite different and, once produced, it will provide us with a very clean signature. The hidden sector may be no longer hidden.

  14. Life in extra dimensions of database world or penetration of NoSQL in HEP community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Evans, D.; Metson, S.

    2012-12-01

    The recent buzzword in IT world is NoSQL. Major players, such as Facebook, Yahoo, Google, etc. are widely adopted different “NoSQL” solutions for their needs. Horizontal scalability, flexible data model and management of big data volumes are only a few advantages of NoSQL. In CMS experiment we use several of them in production environment. Here, we present CMS projects based on NoSQL solutions, their strengths and weaknesses as well as our experience with those tools and their coexistence with standard RDBMS solutions in our applications.

  15. From hidden symmetry to extra dimensions: A five-dimensional formulation of the degenerate BESS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coradeschi, Francesco; de Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    We consider the continuum limit of a moose model corresponding to a generalization to N sites of the degenerate BESS model. The five-dimensional formulation emerging in this limit is a realization of a RS1 type model with SU(2)L⊗SU(2)R in the bulk, broken by boundary conditions and a vacuum expectation value on the infrared brane. A low-energy effective Lagrangian is derived by means of the holographic technique and corresponding bounds on the model parameters are obtained.

  16. From hidden symmetry to extra dimensions: A five-dimensional formulation of the degenerate BESS model

    SciTech Connect

    Coradeschi, Francesco; De Curtis, Stefania; Dominici, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    We consider the continuum limit of a moose model corresponding to a generalization to N sites of the degenerate BESS model. The five-dimensional formulation emerging in this limit is a realization of a RS1 type model with SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} in the bulk, broken by boundary conditions and a vacuum expectation value on the infrared brane. A low-energy effective Lagrangian is derived by means of the holographic technique and corresponding bounds on the model parameters are obtained.

  17. Diphoton signals in theories with large extra dimensions to NLO QCD at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. C.; Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.; Tripathi, Anurag

    2009-02-01

    We present a full next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to diphoton production at the hadron colliders in both standard model and ADD model. The invariant mass and rapidity distributions of the diphotons are obtained using a semi-analytical two cut-off phase space slicing method which allows for a successful numerical implementation of various kinematical cuts used in the experiments. The fragmentation photons are systematically removed using smooth-cone-isolation cuts on the photons. The NLO QCD corrections not only stabilise the perturbative predictions but also enhance the production cross section significantly.

  18. Extra dimensions in γγ → γγ process at the CERN-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atağ, S.; Inan, S. C.; Şahin, I.

    2010-09-01

    Potential of the LHC to explore the phenomenology of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) tower of gravitons in the scenarios of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali(ADD) model and Randall-Sundrum (RS) model is discussed via the process γγ → γγ including the Standard Model one loop diagram. The improved constraints on model parameters have been obtained compared to the LEP and Tevatron sensitivity.

  19. More and more indirect signals for extra dimensions at more and more colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1999-06-01

    It has been recently suggested by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali that gravity may become strong at energies not far above the electroweak scale and thus remove the hierarchy problem. Such a scenario can be tested at both present and future accelerators since towers of Kaluza-Klein gravitons and associated scalar fields now play an important phenomenological role. In this paper we examine several processes for their sensitivity to a low scale for quantum gravity including deep inelastic ep scattering at DESY HERA, high precision low energy {nu}N scattering, Bhabha and Mo/ller scattering at linear colliders and both fermion and gluon pair production at {gamma}{gamma} colliders. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Radius stabilization and dark matter with a bulk Higgs in warped extra dimension

    DOE PAGES

    Ahmed, A.; Grzadkowski, B.; Gunion, J. F.; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we employ an SU(2) bulk Higgs doublet as the stabilization field in the Randall–Sundrum model with appropriate bulk and brane-localized potentials. The gauge hierarchy problem can be solved for an exponentially IR-localized Higgs background field with mild values of fundamental parameters of the 5D theory. We consider an IR–UV–IR background geometry with the 5D SM fields in the bulk such that all the fields have even and odd towers of KK-modes. The zero-mode 4D effective theory contains all the SM fields plus a stable scalar, which serves as a dark matter candidate.

  1. The fermion mass hierarchy in models with warped extra dimensions and a bulk Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Paul R.

    2012-09-01

    The phenomenological implications of allowing the Higgs to propagate in both AdS5 and a class of asymptotically AdS spaces are considered. Without tuning, the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the Higgs is peaked towards the IR tip of the space and hence such a scenario still offers a potential resolution to the gauge-hierarchy problem. When the exponent of the Higgs VEV is approximately two and one assumes order one Yukawa couplings, then the fermion Dirac mass term is found to range from ~ 10-5 eV to ~ 200 GeV in approximate agreement with the observed fermion masses. However, this result is sensitive to the exponent of the Higgs VEV, which is a free parameter. This paper offers a number of phenomenological and theoretical motivations for considering an exponent of two to be the optimal value. In particular, the exponent is bounded from below by the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound and the requirement that the dual theory resolves the gauge hierarchy problem. While, in the model considered, if the exponent is too large, electroweak symmetry may not be broken. In addition, the holographic method is used to demonstrate, in generality, that the flatter the Higgs VEV, the smaller the contribution to the electroweak T parameter. In addition, the constraints from a large class of gauge mediated and scalar mediated flavour changing neutral currents, will be at minimal values for flatter Higgs VEVs. Some initial steps are taken to investigate the physical scalar degrees of freedom that arise from a mixing between the W 5 /Z 5 components and the Higgs components.

  2. Non-Abelian discrete flavor symmetries of 10D SYM theory with magnetized extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Ohki, Hiroshi; Sumita, Keigo; Tatsuta, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    We study discrete flavor symmetries of the models based on a ten-dimensional supersymmetric Yang-Mills (10D SYM) theory compactified on magnetized tori. We assume non-vanishing non-factorizable fluxes as well as the orbifold projections. These setups allow model-building with more various flavor structures. Indeed, we show that there exist various classes of non-Abelian discrete flavor symmetries. In particular, we find that S 3 flavor symmetries can be realized in the framework of the magnetized 10D SYM theory for the first time.

  3. Diversifying forest communities may change Lyme disease risk: extra dimension to the dilution effect in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ruyts, Sanne C; Ampoorter, Evy; Coipan, Elena C; Baeten, Lander; Heylen, Dieter; Sprong, Hein; Matthysen, Erik; Verheyen, Kris

    2016-09-01

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria of the Borrelia burgdorferi genospecies complex and transmitted by Ixodid ticks. In North America only one pathogenic genospecies occurs, in Europe there are several. According to the dilution effect hypothesis (DEH), formulated in North America, nymphal infection prevalence (NIP) decreases with increasing host diversity since host species differ in transmission potential. We analysed Borrelia infection in nymphs from 94 forest stands in Belgium, which are part of a diversification gradient with a supposedly related increasing host diversity: from pine stands without to oak stands with a shrub layer. We expected changing tree species and forest structure to increase host diversity and decrease NIP. In contrast with the DEH, NIP did not differ between different forest types. Genospecies diversity however, and presumably also host diversity, was higher in oak than in pine stands. Infected nymphs tended to harbour Borrelia afzelii infection more often in pine stands while Borrelia garinii and Borrelia burgdorferi ss. infection appeared to be more prevalent in oak stands. This has important health consequences, since the latter two cause more severe disease manifestations. We show that the DEH must be nuanced for Europe and should consider the response of multiple pathogenic genospecies.

  4. Radius stabilization and dark matter with a bulk Higgs in warped extra dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, A.; Grzadkowski, B.; Gunion, J. F.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we employ an SU(2) bulk Higgs doublet as the stabilization field in the Randall–Sundrum model with appropriate bulk and brane-localized potentials. The gauge hierarchy problem can be solved for an exponentially IR-localized Higgs background field with mild values of fundamental parameters of the 5D theory. We consider an IR–UV–IR background geometry with the 5D SM fields in the bulk such that all the fields have even and odd towers of KK-modes. The zero-mode 4D effective theory contains all the SM fields plus a stable scalar, which serves as a dark matter candidate.

  5. [Penile dimensions in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Belousov, I I; Kogan, M I; Ibishev, H S; Vorobyev, S V; Khripun, I A; Gusova, Z R

    2015-12-01

    The current literature provides a wide range of publications on the anthropometry of the penis specifying the relationship between penile dimensions and sex hormones, weight, height and erectile function. But most of the studies involved healthy volunteers or young patients with erectile dysfunction. Our study was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes. Penile measurements obtained in the present study were compared those of the average Russian man. The patients were divided into groups with preserved and impaired erectile function. Erectile function was also studied relative to the variability of penile dimensions. The effect of DM duration on erectile function was defined. Comparative analysis revealed the relationship between penile anatomical dimensions and erectile function. We studied the effect of type 2 diabetes on the anatomical dimensions and elasticity of the penis, established the relationship between penile dimensions and elasticity of the penis. The correlation between the severity of erectile dysfunction and serum testosterone levels on one side, and penile dimensions on the other was found. The effect of penile dimensions on erectile function in DM patients was also examined. Determining penile dimensions and their variability due to various pathological conditions or processes, may eventually lead to better result of ED management.

  6. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  7. Polyhedra and Higher Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Describes the definition and characteristics of a regular polyhedron, tessellation, and pseudopolyhedra with diagrams. Discusses the nature of simplex, hypercube, and cross-polytope in the fourth dimension and beyond. (YP)

  8. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  9. The EXTraS project: Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A.; Tiengo, A.; D'Agostino, D.; Watson, M.; Haberl, F.; Wilms, J.

    2016-06-01

    The EXTraS project is extracting the hitherto unexplored temporal domain information buried in the serendipitous data collected by XMM-Newton/EPIC since its launch. This includes a search for fast transients, missed by standard image analysis, as well as a search and characterization of variability (both periodic and aperiodic) in hundreds of thousands of sources, spanning more than nine orders of magnitude in time scale and six orders of magnitude in flux. Phenomenological classification of variable sources will also be performed. All our results, together with new analysis tools, will be made available to the community in an easy-to-use form at the end of 2016, with prospects of extending the analysis to future data. EXTraS products will have a very broad range of applications, from the search for rare events to population studies, with a large impact in almost all fields of astrophysics. This will boost the scientific exploitation of XMM data and make EPIC the reference for time-domain astronomy in the soft X-rays. The EXTraS project (2014-2016), funded within the EU/FP7 framework, is carried out by a collaboration including INAF (Italy), IUSS (Italy), CNR/IMATI (Italy), University of Leicester (UK), MPE (Germany) and ECAP (Germany).

  10. Unveiling long-term variability in XMM-Newton surveys within the EXTraS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.; Read, A.; Law-Green, D.; Watson, M.; Pye, J.; O'Brien, P.

    2016-06-01

    The EXTraS project (Exploring the X-ray transient and variable sky) is an EU/FP7-Cooperation Space framework programme that aims to bring together a diverse set of time-domain analyses of XMM-Newton X-ray data and make them available to the public in a coherent manner. Through a combination of pointed observations and slew scans, XMM-Newton has repeatedly observed many regions of the sky, in a few cases up to ˜50 times, ˜70000 sources being observed more than once. While non-uniformly spaced and often sparse, these snapshots provide scientifically valuable information on the photometric behaviour of sources on longer term (hours to ˜ a decade) timescales. Here we describe the collation of XMM-Newton data for long-term variability from the 3XMM-DR5 catalogue, the slew survey and upper-limit information from the associated XMM-Newton products, and the analysis being performed on the ensuing light curves. We also present emerging examples of some newly identified long-term variable sources to highlight the value of this element of the EXTraS project. These longer baseline light curves can (i) unveil variable sources that appear stable in individual observations, (ii) reveal exotic and transient sources and (iii) complement short-term variability information from elsewhere in the EXTraS project by probing slower physical phenomena.

  11. Rokhlin Dimension for Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshberg, Ilan; Szabó, Gábor; Winter, Wilhelm; Wu, Jianchao

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a notion of Rokhlin dimension for one parameter automorphism groups of {C^*} -algebras. This generalizes Kishimoto's Rokhlin property for flows, and is analogous to the notion of Rokhlin dimension for actions of the integers and other discrete groups introduced by the authors and Zacharias in previous papers. We show that finite nuclear dimension and absorption of a strongly self-absorbing {C^*} -algebra are preserved under forming crossed products by flows with finite Rokhlin dimension, and that these crossed products are stable. Furthermore, we show that a flow on a commutative {C^*} -algebra arising from a free topological flow has finite Rokhlin dimension, whenever the spectrum is a locally compact metrizable space with finite covering dimension. For flows that are both free and minimal, this has strong consequences for the associated crossed product {C^{*}} -algebras: Those containing a non-zero projection are classified by the Elliott invariant (for compact manifolds this consists of topological {K} -theory together with the space of invariant probability measures and a natural pairing given by the Ruelle-Sullivan map).

  12. Rokhlin Dimension for Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshberg, Ilan; Szabó, Gábor; Winter, Wilhelm; Wu, Jianchao

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a notion of Rokhlin dimension for one parameter automorphism groups of {C^*}-algebras. This generalizes Kishimoto's Rokhlin property for flows, and is analogous to the notion of Rokhlin dimension for actions of the integers and other discrete groups introduced by the authors and Zacharias in previous papers. We show that finite nuclear dimension and absorption of a strongly self-absorbing {C^*}-algebra are preserved under forming crossed products by flows with finite Rokhlin dimension, and that these crossed products are stable. Furthermore, we show that a flow on a commutative {C^*}-algebra arising from a free topological flow has finite Rokhlin dimension, whenever the spectrum is a locally compact metrizable space with finite covering dimension. For flows that are both free and minimal, this has strong consequences for the associated crossed product {C^{*}}-algebras: Those containing a non-zero projection are classified by the Elliott invariant (for compact manifolds this consists of topological {K}-theory together with the space of invariant probability measures and a natural pairing given by the Ruelle-Sullivan map).

  13. The search for extra-terrestrial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Drake, Frank

    2011-02-13

    Modern history of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence is reviewed. The history of radio searches is discussed, as well as the major advances that have occurred in radio searches and prospects for new instruments and search strategies. Recent recognition that searches for optical and infrared signals make sense, and the reasons for this are described, as well as the equipment and special detection methods used in optical searches. The long-range future of the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) is discussed in the context of the history of rapid change, on the cosmic and even the human time scale, of the paradigms guiding SETI searches. This suggests that SETI searches be conducted with a very open mind.

  14. Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Apollo Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Apollo Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity (IEVA) spacesuits, which supported launch and reentry and extra-vehicular activity. This program was NASA's first attempt to develop a new suit design from requirements and concepts. Mr. Thomas will chronicle the challenges, developments, struggles, and solutions that culminated in the system that allowed the first human exploration of the Moon and deep space (outside low-Earth orbit). Apollo pressure suit designs allowed the heroic repair of the Skylab space station and supported the first U.S. and Russian spacecraft docking during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Mr. Thomas will also discuss the IEVA suits' successes and challenges associated with the IEVA developments of the 1960s.

  15. Origin of extra chromosome in Patau syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriyama, S; Niikawa, N

    1984-01-01

    Five live-born infants with Patau syndrome were studied for the nondisjunctional origin of the extra chromosome. Transmission modes of chromosomes 13 from parents to a child were determined using both QFQ- and RFA-heteromorphisms as markers, and the origin was ascertained in all of the patients. The extra chromosome had originated in nondisjunction at the maternal first meiotic division in two patients, at the maternal second meiosis in other two, and at the paternal first meiosis in the remaining one. Summarizing the results of the present study, together with those of the previous studies on a liveborn and abortuses with trisomy 13, nondisjunction at the maternal and the paternal meiosis occurred in this trisomy in the ratio of 14:3. This ratio is not statistically different from that inferred from the previous studies for Down syndrome. These findings suggest that there may be a fundamental mechanism common to the occurrence of nondisjunction in the acrocentric trisomies.

  16. Extra-pair paternity in waved albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Huyvaert, K P; Anderson, D J; Jones, T C; Duan, W; Parker, P G

    2000-09-01

    We estimated the rate of extra-pair fertilizations (EPFs) in waved albatrosses (Phoebastria irrorata) on Isla Española, Galápagos, Ecuador, using multilocus minisatellite DNA fingerprinting. Waved albatrosses are socially monogamous, long-lived seabirds whose main population is on Española. Aggressive extra-pair copulation (EPC) attempts have been observed in the breeding colony during the days preceding egg-laying. Our genetic analyses of 16 families (single chicks and their attending parents) revealed evidence of EPFs in four families. In all cases males were the excluded parent. These data suggest that waved albatrosses have an unusually high rate of EPF relative to taxa with similar life histories. Future behavioural observations will determine the extent to which forced vs. unforced EPCs contribute to this high EPF rate.

  17. Extra Mass Flux in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ván, Peter; Pavelka, Michal; Grmela, Miroslav

    2017-04-01

    The conditions of existence of extra mass flux in single-component dissipative nonrelativistic fluids are clarified. By considering Galilean invariance, we show that if total mass flux is equal to total momentum density, then mass, momentum, angular momentum and booster (center of mass) are conserved. However, these conservation laws may be fulfilled also by other means. We show an example of weakly nonlocal hydrodynamics where the conservation laws are satisfied as well although the total mass flux is different from momentum density.

  18. Extra gauge symmetries in BHT gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, M.; Cvetković, B.

    2011-03-01

    We study the canonical structure of the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend massive gravity, linearized around a maximally symmetric background. At the critical point in the space of parameters, defined by Λ 0/ m 2 = -1, we discover an extra gauge symmetry, which reflects the existence of the partially massless mode. The number of the Lagrangian degrees of freedom is found to be 1. We show that the canonical structure of the theory at the critical point is unstable under linearization.

  19. Equientangled bases in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Karimipour, V.; Memarzadeh, L.

    2006-01-15

    For the space of two identical systems of arbitrary dimensions, we introduce a continuous family of bases with the following properties: (i) the bases are orthonormal (ii) in each basis, all the states have the same values of entanglement, and (iii) they continuously interpolate between the product basis and the maximally entangled basis. The states thus constructed may find applications in many areas related to the quantum information science including quantum cryptography, optimal Bell tests, and the investigation of the enhancement of channel capacity due to entanglement.

  20. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per...

  1. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TEST