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Sample records for extracellular calcium increases

  1. Extracellular calcium increases bisphosphonate-induced growth inhibition of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Journé, Fabrice; Kheddoumi, Naïma; Chaboteaux, Carole; Duvillier, Hugues; Laurent, Guy; Body, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Bisphosphonates have become standard therapy for the treatment of skeletal complications related to breast cancer. Although their therapeutic effects mainly result from an inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption, in vitro data indicate that they also act directly on breast cancer cells, inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Methods The present study examined the effects of calcium (from 0.6 to 2.0 mmol/l) on the antitumour activity of the bisphosphonate ibandronate (1 to 1,000 nmol/l) on MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Cell culture densities were determined using crystal violet staining assay. Apoptotic cell death was assessed by annexin V-phycoerythrin and 7-amino-actinomycin double staining. Results At low calcium concentration, 30 μmol/l ibandronate had no effect on MDA-MB-231 cells growth and only slightly inhibited MCF-7 cells growth. Higher calcium levels significantly increased growth inhibition as well as cell apoptosis induced by ibandronate. We observed similar effects with zoledronic acid. Of note, enhancement of ibandronate-induced growth inhibition was also observed in other breast cancer cell lines (T-47D, ZR-75, Hs-578T and BT-549 cells). The growth inhibitory effect of ibandronate in the presence of high concentrations of calcium was partly suppressed by the calcium chelator EGTA (ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid). In addition, in the presence of calcium at high concentrations, cells accumulated more [14C]ibandronate than at low calcium concentrations. We obtained further evidence of enhancement of cellular ibandronate accumulation by calcium by demonstrating that high calcium levels increased the inhibition of protein prenylation induced by the bisphosphonate. Conclusion Altogether, our data suggest that extracellular calcium, probably through its binding to ibandronate, markedly increased its cellular accumulation and its inhibitory activity on breast tumour cells. Thus, calcium released during the process of

  2. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  3. Increased extracellular pressure stimulates tumor proliferation by a mechanosensitive calcium channel and PKC-β.

    PubMed

    Basson, Marc D; Zeng, Bixi; Downey, Christina; Sirivelu, Madhu P; Tepe, Jetze J

    2015-02-01

    Large tumors exhibit high interstitial pressure heightened by growth against the constraining stroma. Such pressures could stimulate tumor proliferation via a mechanosensitive ion channel. We studied the effects of 0-80 mmHg increased extracellular pressure for 24 h on proliferation of SW620, Caco-2, and CT-26 colon; MCF-7 breast; and MLL and PC3 prostate cancer cells, and delineated its mechanism in SW620 cells with specific inhibitors and siRNA. Finally, we compared NF-kB, phospho-IkB and cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in the high pressure centers and low pressure peripheries of human tumors. Pressure-stimulated proliferation in all cells. Pressure-driven SW620 proliferation required calcium influx via the T-type Ca(2+) channel Cav3.3, which stimulated PKC-β to invoke the IKK-IkB-NF-kB pathway to increase proliferation and S-phase fraction. The mitotic index and immunoreactivity of NF-kB, phospho-IkB, and cyclin D1 in the center of 28 large human colon, lung, and head and neck tumors exceeded that in tumor peripheries. Extracellular pressure increases [Ca(2+)]i via Cav3.3, driving a PKC-β- IKK- IkB-NF-kB pathway that stimulates cancer cell proliferation. Rapid proliferation in large stiff tumors may increase intratumoral pressure, activating this pathway to stimulate further proliferation in a feedback cycle that potentiates tumor growth. Targeting this pathway may inhibit proliferation in large unresectable tumors.

  4. Increased extracellular pressure stimulates tumor proliferation by a mechanosensitive calcium channel and PKC-β

    PubMed Central

    Basson, Marc D.; Zeng, Bixi; Downey, Christina; Siriveluprabhakar, Madhu; Tepe, Jetze J.

    2014-01-01

    Large tumors exhibit high interstitial pressure heightened by growth against the constraining stroma. Such pressures could stimulate tumor proliferation via a mechanosensitive ion channel. We studied the effects of 0–80 mm Hg increased extracellular pressure for 24 hours on proliferation of SW620, Caco-2, and CT-26 colon; MCF-7 breast; and MLL and PC3 prostate cancer cells, and delineated its mechanism in SW620 cells with specific inhibitors and siRNA. Finally, we compared NF-kB, phospho-IkB and cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in the high pressure centers and low pressure peripheries of human tumors. Pressure stimulated proliferation in all cells. Pressure-driven SW620 proliferation required calcium influx via the T-type Ca2+ channel Cav3.3, which stimulated PKC-β to invoke the IKK-IkB-NF-kB pathway to increase proliferation and S-phase fraction. The mitotic index and immunoreactivity of NF-kB, phospho-IkB, and cyclin D1 in the center of 28 large human colon, lung, and head and neck tumors exceeded that in tumor peripheries. Extracellular pressure increases [Ca2+]i via Cav3.3, driving a PKC-β-IKK-IkB-NF-kB pathway that stimulates cancer cell proliferation. Rapid proliferation in large stiff tumors may increase intratumoral pressure, activating this pathway to stimulate further proliferation in a feedback cycle that potentiates tumor growth. Targeting this pathway may inhibit proliferation in large unresectable tumors. PMID:25454347

  5. Growth-inhibiting extracellular matrix proteins also inhibit electrical activity by reducing calcium and increasing potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; De-Miguel, F F

    2009-01-23

    Inhibitionof neurite sprouting and electrical activity by extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins was studied during neurite regeneration by using anterior pagoda (AP) neurons of the leech. Adult isolated neurons were plated in culture inside ganglion capsules, which among many ECM proteins, contain a group of inhibitory peanut lectin- (PNA) binding glycoproteins. These proteins inhibit neurite production and contribute to the formation of a bipolar outgrowth pattern by AP neurons. Addition of PNA lectin to the culture medium to block the inhibitory effects of ECM glycoproteins induced an increase of neurite sprouting, the loss of the bipolar pattern, and also an increase in the amplitude and duration of action potentials evoked by intracellular current injection. PNA lectin had independent effects on neurite sprouting and electrical activity, since there was no correlation between the total neurite length and the amplitude of the action potentials. Moreover, action potentials were increased by the presence of PNA lectin even in neurons that did not grow. The changes induced by PNA lectin on the active conductances underlying the action potentials were estimated by quantitative model simulations. We predict that the increases in the amplitude and duration of the action potential induced by PNA lectin were due to an increase in a calcium conductance and a reduction in the delayed rectifier potassium conductance. Our results suggest that inhibitory ECM glycoproteins may use independent signaling pathways to inhibit neurite sprouting and electrical activity. These proteins affect the action potential by changing the proportion of inward and outward active conductances. PMID:18976697

  6. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate.

  7. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate. PMID:27161228

  8. Elevated extracellular calcium increases expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene via a calcium channel and ERK pathway in human dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Eiji; Kanaya, Sousuke; Hamaji, Nozomu; Sato, Hisae; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2010-04-16

    Dental pulp cells, which have been shown to share phenotypical features with osteoblasts, are capable of differentiating into odontoblast-like cells and generating a dentin-like mineral structure. Elevated extracellular Ca{sup 2+}Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} has been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} signaling in odontogenesis remains unclear. We found that elevated Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} increases bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 gene expression in human dental pulp cells. The increase was modulated not only at a transcriptional level but also at a post-transcriptional level, because treatment with Ca{sup 2+} increased the stability of BMP-2 mRNA in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. A similar increase in BMP-2 mRNA level was observed in other human mesenchymal cells from oral tissue; periodontal ligament cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, the latter cells exhibited considerably lower expression of BMP-2 mRNA compared with dental pulp cells and periodontal ligament cells. The BMP-2 increase was markedly inhibited by pretreatment with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, and partially inhibited by the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels inhibitor, nifedipine. However, pretreatment with nifedipine had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation triggered by Ca{sup 2+}, suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+} influx from Ca{sup 2+} channels may operate independently of ERK signaling. Dental pulp cells do not express the transcript of Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptors (CaSR) and only respond slightly to other cations such as Sr{sup 2+} and spermine, suggesting that dental pulp cells respond to Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} to increase BMP-2 mRNA expression in a manner different from CaSR and rather specific for Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} among cations.

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals metabolic alterations, calcium dysregulation, and increased expression of extracellular matrix proteins in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Bruno Menezes; Matsumura, Cintia Y; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Gawlik, Kinga I; Acosta, Helena; Wernhoff, Patrik; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-11-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy with laminin α2 chain deficiency (MDC1A) is one of the most severe forms of muscular disease and is characterized by severe muscle weakness and delayed motor milestones. The genetic basis of MDC1A is well known, yet the secondary mechanisms ultimately leading to muscle degeneration and subsequent connective tissue infiltration are not fully understood. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying MDC1A, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of affected muscles (diaphragm and gastrocnemius) from laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice, using multidimensional protein identification technology combined with tandem mass tags. Out of the approximately 700 identified proteins, 113 and 101 proteins, respectively, were differentially expressed in the diseased gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles compared with normal muscles. A large portion of these proteins are involved in different metabolic processes, bind calcium, or are expressed in the extracellular matrix. Our findings suggest that metabolic alterations and calcium dysregulation could be novel mechanisms that underlie MDC1A and might be targets that should be explored for therapy. Also, detailed knowledge of the composition of fibrotic tissue, rich in extracellular matrix proteins, in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle might help in the design of future anti-fibrotic treatments. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000978 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000978).

  10. Allosteric modulators of the extracellular calcium receptor.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, E F

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular calcium receptor (CaR) is a Family C G protein-coupled receptor that controls systemic Ca2+ homeostasis, largely by regulating the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Ligands that activate the CaR have been termed calcimimetics and are classified as either Type I (agonists) or Type II (allosteric activators) and effectively inhibit the secretion of PTH. CaR antagonists have been termed calcilytics and all act allosterically to stimulate secretion of PTH. The calcimimetic cinacalcet has been approved for treating parathyroid cancer and secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients on renal replacement therapy. Cinacalcet was the first allosteric modulator of a G proteincoupled receptor to achieve regulatory approval. This review will focus on the technologies used to discover and develop allosterically acting calcimimetics and calcilytics as novel therapies for bone and mineral-related disorders. PMID:24050279

  11. Extracellular calcium as an integrator of tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Breitwieser, Gerda E.

    2008-01-01

    The past several decades of research into calcium signaling have focused on intracellular calcium (Ca2+i), revealing both exquisite spatial and dynamic control of this potent second messenger. Our understanding of Ca2+i signaling has benefited from the evolution of cell culture methods, development of high affinity fluorescent calcium indicators (both membrane-permeant small molecules and genetically encoded proteins), and high resolution fluorescence microscopy. As our understanding of single cell calcium dynamics has increased, translational efforts have attempted to push calcium signaling studies back into tissues, organs and whole animals. Emerging results from these more complicated, diffusion-limited systems have begun to define a role for extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) as an agonist, spurred by the cloning and characterization of a G protein-coupled receptor activated by Ca2+o (the calcium sensing receptor, CaR). Here we review the current state-of-the art for measurement of Ca2+o fluctuations, and the evidence that fluctuations in Ca2+o can act as primary signals regulating cell function. Current results suggest that Ca2+o in bone and epidermis may act as a chemotactic homing signal, targeting cells to the appropriate tissue locations prior to initiation of the differentiation program. Ca2+i signaling-mediated Ca2+o fluctuations in interstitial spaces may integrate cell signaling responses in multicellular networks through activation of CaR. Appreciation of the importance of Ca2+o fluctuations in coordinating cell function will likely spur identification of additional, niche-specific Ca2+ sensors, and provide unique insights into the regulation of multicellular signaling networks. PMID:18328773

  12. Quantification of Dialytic Removal and Extracellular Calcium Mass Balance during a Weekly Cycle of Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik-Zaluska, Alicja; Ksiazek, Andrzej; Zaluska, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The removal of calcium during hemodialysis with low calcium concentration in dialysis fluid is generally slow, and the net absorption of calcium from dialysis fluid is often reported. The details of the calcium transport process during dialysis and calcium mass balance in the extracellular fluid, however, have not been fully studied. Methods Weekly cycle of three dialysis sessions with interdialytic breaks of 2-2-3 days was monitored in 25 stable patients on maintenance hemodialysis with calcium concentration in dialysis fluid of 1.35 mmol/L. Total and ionic calcium were frequently measured in blood and dialysate. The volume of fluid compartments was measured by bioimpedance. Results Weekly dialytic removal of 12.79 ± 8.71 mmol calcium was found in 17 patients, whereas 9.48 ± 8.07 mmol calcium was absorbed per week from dialysis fluid in 8 patients. Ionic calcium was generally absorbed from dialysis fluid, whereas complexed calcium (the difference of total and ionic calcium in dialysis fluid) was removed from the body. The concentration of total calcium in plasma increased slightly during dialysis. The mass of total and ionic calcium in extracellular fluid decreased during dialysis in patients with the dialytic removal of calcium from the body and did not change in patients with the absorption of calcium from dialysis fluid. Conclusions We conclude that about one third of patients on dialysis with calcium 1.35 mmol/L in dialysis fluid may absorb calcium from dialysis fluid and therefore individual prescriptions of calcium concentration in dialysis fluid should be considered for such patients. PMID:27073861

  13. Extracellular calcium elicits a chemokinetic response from monocytes in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olszak, I. T.; Poznansky, M. C.; Evans, R. H.; Olson, D.; Kos, C.; Pollak, M. R.; Brown, E. M.; Scadden, D. T.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Recruitment of macrophages to sites of cell death is critical for induction of an immunologic response. Calcium concentrations in extracellular fluids vary markedly, and are particularly high at sites of injury or infection. We hypothesized that extracellular calcium participates in modulating the immune response, perhaps acting via the seven-transmembrane calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) on mature monocytes/macrophages. We observed a dose-dependent increase in monocyte chemotaxis in response to extracellular calcium or the selective allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467. In contrast, monocytes derived from mice deficient in CaR lacked the normal chemotactic response to a calcium gradient. Notably, CaR activation of monocytes bearing the receptor synergistically augmented the transmigration response of monocytes to the chemokine MCP-1 in association with increased cell-surface expression of its cognate receptor, CCR2. Conversely, stimulation of monocytes with MCP-1 or SDF-1alpha reciprocally increased CaR expression, suggesting a dual-enhancing interaction of Ca(2+) with chemokines in recruiting inflammatory cells. Subcutaneous administration in mice of Ca(2+), MCP-1, or (more potently) the combination of Ca(2+) and MCP-1, elicited an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of monocytes/macrophages. Thus extracellular calcium functions as an ionic chemokinetic agent capable of modulating the innate immune response in vivo and in vitro by direct and indirect actions on monocytic cells. Calcium deposition may be both consequence and cause of chronic inflammatory changes at sites of injury, infection, and atherosclerosis.

  14. Recent advances in understanding the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Colella, Matilde; Gerbino, Andrea; Hofer, Aldebaran M.; Curci, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), a ubiquitous class C G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is responsible for the control of calcium homeostasis in body fluids. It integrates information about external Ca 2+ and a surfeit of other endogenous ligands into multiple intracellular signals, but how is this achieved? This review will focus on some of the exciting concepts in CaR signaling and pharmacology that have emerged in the last few years. PMID:27803801

  15. Chondrocyte death in mechanically injured articular cartilage--the influence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anish K; Huntley, James S; Bush, Peter G; Simpson, A Hamish R W; Hall, Andrew C

    2009-06-01

    Calcium is thought to be an important regulator of chondrocyte death associated with articular cartilage injury. Our objective was to determine the influence of extracellular calcium on chondrocyte death following mechanical injury. Using a surgically relevant model of sharp mechanical injury (with a scalpel) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), in situ chondrocyte death was quantified within the full thickness of articular cartilage as a function of medium calcium concentration and time (2.5 h and 7 days). Exposure of articular cartilage to calcium-free media (approximately 0 mM) significantly reduced superficial zone chondrocyte death after mechanical injury compared with exposure to calcium-rich media (2-20 mM, ANOVA at 2.5 h, p = 0.002). In calcium-rich media, although the extent of chondrocyte death increased with increasing medium calcium concentration, cell death remained localized to the superficial zone of articular cartilage over 7 days (ANOVA, p < 0.05). However, in calcium-free media, there was an increase in chondrocyte death within deeper zones of articular cartilage over 7 days. The early (within hours) chondroprotective effect in calcium-free media suggests that the use of joint irrigation solutions without added calcium may decrease chondrocyte death from mechanical injury during articular surgery. The delayed (within days) increase in chondrocyte death in calcium-free media supports the use of calcium supplementation in media used during cartilage culture for tissue engineering or transplantation.

  16. Preservation of the secretory response of peritoneal mast cells in the absence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C; Gies, J P; Vallé, A; Landry, Y

    1987-12-01

    The transfer of rat peritoneal mast cells from balanced salt solution to calcium-free buffer led to a time-dependent decrease in their response to compound 48/80 and to ionophore A23187. The concomittant absence of potassium from the calcium-free buffer enabled the mast cells to retain their secretory response. The increase in potassium level, with a parallel decrease in sodium to maintain osmolarity, led to a slight potentiation of the response to 48/80 and to a large but transient potentiation of the response to A23187. Mast cells can be considered nonexcitable. The apparent dependency upon extracellular calcium of mast cell secretory responses might be related to the presumed tight equilibrium between endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores and extracellular calcium. The control of this equilibrium by transmembrane gradients of monovalent ions is proposed. PMID:2446099

  17. Phosphoprotein Phosphatase 1 Is Required for Extracellular Calcium-Induced Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hong; Zeng, Qin; Pennypacker, Sally D.; Xie, Zhongjian

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular calcium is a major regulator of keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and appears to play that role in vivo, but the mechanism is unclear. We have previously demonstrated that, following calcium stimulation, PIP5K1α is recruited by the E-cadherin-β-catenin complex to the plasma membrane where it provides the substrate PIP2 for both PI3K and PLC-γ1. This signaling pathway is critical for calcium-induced generation of second messengers including IP3 and intracellular calcium and keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored the upstream regulatory mechanism by which calcium activates PIP5K1α and the role of this activation in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation. We found that treatment of human keratinocytes in culture with calcium resulted in an increase in serine dephosphorylation and PIP5K1α activation. PP1 knockdown blocked extracellular calcium-induced increase in serine dephosphorylation and activity of PIP5K1α and induction of keratinocyte differentiation markers. Knockdown of PLC-γ1, the downstream effector of PIP5K1α, blocked upstream dephosphorylation and PIP5K1α activation induced by calcium. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed calcium induced recruitment of PP1 to the E-cadherin-catenin-PIP5K1α complex in the plasma membrane. These results indicate that PP1 is recruited to the extracellular calcium-dependent E-cadherin-catenin-PIP5K1α complex in the plasma membrane to activate PIP5K1α, which is required for PLC-γ1 activation leading to keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27340655

  18. Extracellular calcium- and magnesium-mediated regulation of passive calcium transport across Caco-2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Davies, Sarah L; Gibbons, Claire E; Steward, Martin C; Ward, Donald T

    2008-10-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is expressed on intestinal epithelial serosal membrane and in Caco-2 cells. In renal epithelium, CaR expressed on the basolateral membrane acts to limit excess tubular Ca2+ reabsorption. Therefore, here we investigated whether extracellular calcium (Ca(o)2+) can regulate active or passive 45Ca2+ transport across differentiated Caco-2 monolayers via CaR-dependent or CaR-independent mechanisms. Raising the Ca(o)2+ concentration from 0.8 to 1.6 mM increased transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and decreased passive Ca2+ permeability but failed to alter active Ca2+ transport. The Ca(o)2+ effect on TER was rapid, sustained and concentration-dependent. Increasing basolateral Mg2+ concentration increased TER and inhibited both passive and active Ca2+ transport, whereas spermine and the CaR-selective calcimimetic NPS R-467 were without effect. We conclude that small increases in divalent cation concentration elicit CaR-independent increases in TER and inhibit passive Ca2+ transport across Caco-2 monolayers, most probably through a direct effect on tight junction permeability. Whilst it is known that the complete removal of Ca(o)2+ lowers TER, here we show that Ca(o)2+ addition actually increases TER in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, such Ca(o)2+-sensitivity could modulate intestinal solute transport including the limiting of excess Ca2+ absorption.

  19. Osteoblasts detect pericellular calcium concentration increase via neomycin-sensitive voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuanhao; Kishore, Vipuil; Fites, Kateri; Akkus, Ozan

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the detection of critically loaded or micro-damaged regions of bone by bone cells are still a matter of debate. Our previous studies showed that calcium efflux originates from pre-failure regions of bone matrix and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts respond to such efflux by an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration. The mechanisms by which the intracellular calcium concentration increases in response to an increase in the pericellular calcium concentration are unknown. Elevation of the intracellular calcium may occur via release from the internal calcium stores of the cell and/or via the membrane bound channels. The current study applied a wide range of pharmaceutical inhibitors to identify the calcium entry pathways involved in the process: internal calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER, inhibited by thapsigargin and TMB-8), calcium receptor (CaSR, inhibited by calhex), stretch-activated calcium channel (SACC, inhibited by gadolinium), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC, inhibited by nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, and ω-conotoxin), and calcium-induced-calcium-release channel (CICRC, inhibited by ryanodine and dantrolene). These inhibitors were screened for their effectiveness to block intracellular calcium increase by using a concentration gradient induced calcium efflux model which mimics calcium diffusion from the basal aspect of cells. The inhibitor(s) which reduced the intracellular calcium response was further tested on osteoblasts seeded on mechanically loaded notched cortical bone wafers undergoing damage. The results showed that only neomycin reduced the intracellular calcium response in osteoblasts, by 27%, upon extracellular calcium stimulus induced by concentration gradient. The inhibitory effect of neomycin was more pronounced (75% reduction in maximum fluorescence) for osteoblasts seeded on notched cortical bone wafers loaded mechanically to damaging load levels. These results imply that the increase in

  20. Calcium diffusion enhanced after cleavage of negatively charged components of brain extracellular matrix by chondroitinase ABC

    PubMed Central

    Hrabětová, Sabina; Masri, Daniel; Tao, Lian; Xiao, Fanrong; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The concentration of extracellular calcium plays a critical role in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability as well as other physiological processes. The time course and extent of local fluctuations in the concentration of this ion largely depend on its effective diffusion coefficient (D*) and it has been speculated that fixed negative charges on chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and other components of the extracellular matrix may influence calcium diffusion because it is a divalent cation. In this study we used ion-selective microelectrodes combined with pressure ejection or iontophoresis of ions from a micropipette to quantify diffusion characteristics of neocortex and hippocampus in rat brain slices. We show that D* for calcium is less than the value predicted from the behaviour of the monovalent cation tetramethylammonium (TMA), a commonly used diffusion probe, but D* for calcium increases in both brain regions after the slices are treated with chondroitinase ABC, an enzyme that predominantly cleaves chondroitin sulphate glycans. These results suggest that CSPGs do play a role in determining the local diffusion properties of calcium in brain tissue, most likely through electrostatic interactions mediating rapid equilibrium binding. In contrast, chondroitinase ABC does not affect either the TMA diffusion or the extracellular volume fraction, indicating that the enzyme does not alter the structure of the extracellular space and that the diffusion of small monovalent cations is not affected by CSPGs in the normal brain ionic milieu. Both calcium and CSPGs are known to have many distinct roles in brain physiology, including brain repair, and our study suggests they may be functionally coupled through calcium diffusion properties. PMID:19546165

  1. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A

  2. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  3. Effects of extracellular calcium and of light adaptation on the response to dim light in honey bee drone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Raggenbass, M

    1983-11-01

    Light responses in honey bee drone photoreceptors were recorded with intracellular micro-electrodes in superfused slices of retina. The effects of changes in extracellular calcium on the size and the shape of the response to dim light were studied and compared with the effects of light adaptation. Dim light stimuli were used so that the amplitude of the response was linearly related to the number of the photons absorbed, the effects of voltage-dependent mechanisms were negligible and no detectable light adaptation was produced by the stimulus. Lowering the extracellular calcium concentration increased the amplitude and the duration of the response. Raising the extracellular calcium concentration produced the opposite effects. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration modified the response without altering either the linearity of the intensity--response relation or the resting membrane potential in the dark. Light adaptation decreased the amplitude and the duration of the response in a manner that could be quantitatively simulated, in the same photoreceptors, by an increase in the extracellular calcium concentration. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration, or light-adapting the preparation, modified the response without altering its early depolarizing phase. Lowering external calcium either did not affect, or slightly increased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization; raising external calcium, or light-adapting the preparation, either did not affect, or slightly decreased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization. The experimental data can be quantitatively described by a mathematical model with the basic assumption that calcium acts in the process of light adaptation by decreasing the mean open time of the light-activated channels.

  4. Effects of extracellular calcium and of light adaptation on the response to dim light in honey bee drone photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Raggenbass, M

    1983-01-01

    Light responses in honey bee drone photoreceptors were recorded with intracellular micro-electrodes in superfused slices of retina. The effects of changes in extracellular calcium on the size and the shape of the response to dim light were studied and compared with the effects of light adaptation. Dim light stimuli were used so that the amplitude of the response was linearly related to the number of the photons absorbed, the effects of voltage-dependent mechanisms were negligible and no detectable light adaptation was produced by the stimulus. Lowering the extracellular calcium concentration increased the amplitude and the duration of the response. Raising the extracellular calcium concentration produced the opposite effects. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration modified the response without altering either the linearity of the intensity--response relation or the resting membrane potential in the dark. Light adaptation decreased the amplitude and the duration of the response in a manner that could be quantitatively simulated, in the same photoreceptors, by an increase in the extracellular calcium concentration. Changing the extracellular calcium concentration, or light-adapting the preparation, modified the response without altering its early depolarizing phase. Lowering external calcium either did not affect, or slightly increased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization; raising external calcium, or light-adapting the preparation, either did not affect, or slightly decreased, the maximum rate of the light-induced depolarization. The experimental data can be quantitatively described by a mathematical model with the basic assumption that calcium acts in the process of light adaptation by decreasing the mean open time of the light-activated channels. PMID:6655592

  5. Oxygen increases ductus arteriosus smooth muscle cytosolic calcium via release of calcium from inositol triphosphate-sensitive stores.

    PubMed

    Keck, Maggie; Resnik, Ernesto; Linden, Bradley; Anderson, Franklin; Sukovich, David J; Herron, Jean; Cornfield, David N

    2005-05-01

    In utero, blood shunts away from the lungs via the ductus arteriosus (DA) and the foramen ovale. After birth, the DA closes concomitant with increased oxygen tension. The present experimental series tests the hypothesis that oxygen directly increases DA smooth muscle cell (SMC) cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) through inactivation of a K(+) channel, membrane depolarization, and entry of extracellular calcium. To test the hypothesis, DA SMC were isolated from late-gestation fetal lambs and grown to subconfluence in primary culture in low oxygen tension (25 Torr). DA SMC were loaded with the calcium-sensitive fluorophore fura-2 under low oxygen tension conditions and studied using microfluorimetry while oxygen tension was acutely increased (120 Torr). An acute increase in oxygen tension progressively increased DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) by 11.7 +/- 1.4% over 40 min. The effect of acute normoxia on DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) was mimicked by pharmacological blockade of the voltage-sensitive K(+) channel. Neither removal of extracellular calcium nor voltage-operated calcium channel blockade prevented the initial increase in DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i). Manganese quenching experiments demonstrated that acute normoxia initially decreases the rate of extracellular calcium entry. Pharmacological blockade of inositol triphosphate-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, intracellular calcium stores prevented the oxygen-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Endothelin increased [Ca(2+)](i) in acutely normoxic, but not hypoxic, DA SMC. Thus acute normoxia 1) increases DA SMC [Ca(2+)](i) via release of calcium from intracellular calcium stores, and subsequent entry of extracellular calcium, and 2) potentiates the effect of contractile agonists. Prolonged patency of the DA may result from disordered intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  6. Na+ -K+ pump activity in rat peritoneal mast cells: inhibition by extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, T.; Johansen, T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Pure populations of rat peritoneal mast cells were used to study cellular potassium uptake. The radioactive potassium analogue, 86rubidium, was used as a tracer for potassium for measurements of the activity of the cellular potassium uptake process. 2. The ouabain-sensitive and the ouabain-resistant potassium (86rubidium) uptake of mast cells incubated in the presence of calcium, 1 mmol l-1, were very low, 52 and 147 pmol per 10(6) cells min-1. 3. Calcium-deprivation of the cells uncovered a large capacity ouabain-sensitive potassium (86rubidium) uptake mechanism. The activity of the uptake mechanism was decreased by reintroduction of calcium into the cell suspension, and it was dependent on cellular energy metabolism, temperature and pH. 4. The potassium (86rubidium) uptake of mast cells incubated in a calcium-free medium occurs through an active and ouabain-sensitive mechanism that has the nature of an enzyme, and it is mediated by the Na+ -K+ pump located in the plasma membrane. It is demonstrated that the activity of the Na+ -K+ pump mechanism is inhibited by low concentrations of extracellular calcium (0.1-1.2 mmol l-1). The possibility is discussed that calcium-deprivation may increase the pump activity by increasing the permeability of the plasma membrane for Na+. PMID:2743077

  7. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca2+ (Ca2+i) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) signalling in the CAS signalling pathway in guard cells in response to Ca2+o. Here it is shown that Ca2+o could induce H2O2 and NO production from guard cells but only H2O2 from chloroplasts, leading to stomatal closure. In addition, the CASas mutant, the atrbohD/F double mutant, and the Atnoa1 mutant were all insensitive to Ca2+o-stimulated stomatal closure, as well as H2O2 and NO elevation in the case of CASas. Furthermore, it was found that the antioxidant system might function as a mediator in Ca2+o and H2O2 signalling in guard cells. The results suggest a hypothetical model whereby Ca2+o induces H2O2 and NO accumulation in guard cells through the CAS signalling pathway, which further triggers Ca2+i transients and finally stomatal closure. The possible cross-talk of Ca2+o and abscisic acid signalling as well as the antioxidant system are discussed. PMID:21940718

  8. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  9. Clinical disorders of extracellular calcium-sensing and the molecular biology of the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Simon H S

    2002-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that has a key role in extracellular calcium homeostasis, regulating the secretion of parathyroid hormone and the reabsorption of urinary calcium appropriate to the prevailing calcaemic environment. Molecular abnormalities of the calcium-sensing receptor are responsible for three clinical disorders, familial benign hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia, neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism and autosomal dominant hypocalcaemia with hypercalciuria. In the future, therapeutic compounds that modulate calcium-sensing receptor function may have a role in the medical management of hyperparathyroidism (calcimimetic drugs) and osteoporosis (calcilytic drugs). PMID:12173690

  10. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  11. Cyclosporine increases calcium in kidney medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Borowitz, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of rats with 20, 50, or 100 mg/kg of cyclosporine p.o. markedly increased /sup 45/Ca accumulation in kidney slices especially in medulla. The effect was related to dose and duration of treatment, and was also observed in slices of kidney medulla from cyclosporine-treated mice. Total calcium was elevated in kidney medulla of cyclosporine-treated rats so that the effect is not merely an increased exchange but a build-up of calcium in the tissue. No histopathologic evidence of cyclosporine-related cell necrosis was present in mouse kidney, showing that calcium accumulation is not dystrophic in character. Accumulation of /sup 45/Ca in slices of rat heart, liver, or brain was not affected by cyclosporine pretreatment of the animals. It is suggested that cyclosporine-induced changes in calcium metabolism in kidney medulla may influence kidney function.

  12. The calcium, copper and zinc content of some annelid extracellular haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Standley, P R; Mainwaring, M G; Gotoh, T; Vinogradov, S N

    1988-01-01

    The extracellular haemoglobins of Lumbricus and Tylorrhynchus contain 50 and 61 tightly bound calcium atoms per molecule, respectively. In addition, they contain one to four tightly bound copper and zinc atoms. Although the role of the latter is unknown, that of calcium is probably structural, assisting in the maintenance of the native hexagonal bilayer structure. PMID:3355504

  13. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helman, Yael; Natale, Frank; Sherrell, Robert M; Lavigne, Michèle; Starovoytov, Valentin; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Falkowski, Paul G

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity in animals required the production of extracellular matrices that serve to spatially organize cells according to function. In corals, three matrices are involved in spatial organization: (i) an organic ECM, which facilitates cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion; (ii) a skeletal organic matrix (SOM), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate skeleton itself, which provides the structural support for the 3D organization of coral colonies. In this report, we examine the production of these three matrices by using an in vitro culturing system for coral cells. In this system, which significantly facilitates studies of coral cell physiology, we demonstrate in vitro excretion of ECM by primary (nondividing) tissue cultures of both soft (Xenia elongata) and hard (Montipora digitata) corals. There are structural differences between the ECM produced by X. elongata cell cultures and that of M. digitata, and ascorbic acid, a critical cofactor for proline hydroxylation, significantly increased the production of collagen in the ECM of the latter species. We further demonstrate in vitro production of SOM and extracellular mineralized particles in cell cultures of M. digitata. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of Sr/Ca ratios revealed the particles to be aragonite. De novo calcification was confirmed by following the incorporation of (45)Ca into acid labile macromolecules. Our results demonstrate the ability of isolated, differentiated coral cells to undergo fundamental processes required for multicellular organization. PMID:18162537

  14. Calcium binding domains and calcium-induced conformational transition of SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin, an extracellular glycoprotein expressed in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Taylor, W.; Paulsson, M.; Sage, H.; Hogan, B.

    1987-11-03

    PSARC, BM-40, and osteonectin are identical or very closely related extracellular proteins of apparent M/sub r/ 43,000 (M/sub r/ 33,000 predicted from sequence). They were originally isolated from parietal endoderm cells, basement membrane producing tumors, and bone, respectively, but are rather widely distributed in various tissues. In view of the calcium binding activity reported for osteonectin, the authors analyzed the SPARC sequence and found two putative calcium binding domains. One is an N-terminal acid region with clusters of glutamic acid residues. This region, although neither ..gamma..-carboxylated nor homologous, resembles the ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of vitamin K dependent proteins of the blood clotting system in charge density, size of negatively charged clusters, and linkage to the rest of the molecule by a cysteine-rich domain. The other region is an EF-hand calcium binding domain located near the C-terminus. A disulfide bond between the E and F helix is predicted from modeling the EF-hand structure with the known coordinates of intestinal calcium binding protein. The disulfide bridge apparently serves to stabilize the isolated calcium loop in the extracellular protein. As observed for cytoplasmic EF-hand-containing proteins and for Gla domain containing proteins, a major conformational transition is induced in BM-40 upon binding of several Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This is accompanied by a 35% increase in ..cap alpha..-helicity. A pronounced sigmoidicity of the dependence of the circular dichroism signal at 220 nm on calcium concentration indicates that the process is cooperative. In view of its properties, abundance, and wide distribution, it is proposed that SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin has a rather general regulatory function in calcium-dependent processes of the extra-cellular matrix.

  15. Alginate-coated magnetic nanoparticles for noninvasive MRI of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Avram, Liat; Yariv-Shoushan, Shani; Anaby, Debbie; Cohen, Smadar; Segev-Amzaleg, Niva; Frenkel, Dan; Sadan, Ofer; Offen, Daniel; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential to increase the diagnostic capacity of many imaging modalities. MRI is currently regarded as the method of choice for the imaging of deep tissues, and metal ions, such as calcium ions (Ca(2+)), are essential ingredients for life. Despite the tremendous importance of Ca(2+) for the well-being of living systems, the noninvasive determination of the changes in Ca(2+) levels in general, and extracellular Ca(2+) levels in particular, in deep tissues remains a challenge. Here, we describe the preparation and contrast mechanism of a flexible easy to prepare and selective superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) NPs for the noninvasive determination of changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels using conventional MRI. We show that SPIO NPs coated with monodisperse and purified alginate, having a specific molecular weight, provide a tool to selectively determine Ca(2+) concentrations in the range of 250 µm to 2.5 mm, even in the presence of competitive ions. The alginate-coated magnetic NPs (MNPs) aggregate in the presence of Ca(2+) , which, in turn, affects the T2 relaxation of the water protons in their vicinity. The new alginate-coated SPIO NP formulations, which have no effect on cell viability for 24 h, allow the detection of Ca(2+) levels secreted from ischemic cell cultures and the qualitative examination of the change in extracellular Ca(2+) levels in vivo. These results demonstrate that alginate-coated MNPs can be used, at least qualitatively, as a platform for the noninvasive MRI determination of extracellular Ca(2+) levels in myriad in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  16. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  17. Parathyroid Hormone Responses to Catecholamines and to Changes of Extracellular Calcium in Cows

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Juerg W.; Fischer, Jan A.; Hunziker, Willi H.; Binswanger, U.; Picotti, Giovanni B.; Da Prada, Mosè; Guillebeau, Albin

    1978-01-01

    Modifications of the plasma level of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH) in cattle were induced by changes of the plasma concentrations of epinephrine, isoproterenol, or calcium. During abrupt hypocalcemia, PTH, obtained by infusions with ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether) N, N′-tetraacetate (EGTA), increased during the first 4-8 min. After a transient decline, the hormone levels rose again and remained elevated. Infusions of calcium suppressed the hypocalcemia-induced augmentation of PTH levels within a few minutes. Prolonged epinephrine (and isoproterenol) infusions also rapidly increased PTH levels, however, in this case, they returned to basal concentrations after 50-60 min. Additional epinephrine infusions could not further raise PTH values. Moreover, three short-lasting infusions of epinephrine (7 min each), given at 30-min intervals, increased PTH levels to the same extent, whereas additional infusions were much less effective. The PTH response to epinephrine was completely restored, when the interval after a prolonged epinephrine infusion had been prolonged to > 100 min. During moderate hypocalcemia, occurring at the end of EGTA infusions and lasting for 90 min, the PTH response to a short-lasting epinephrine infusion (7 min) was more pronounced than in normocalcemic animals. During severe hypocalcemia, in which superimposed short-lasting infusions of EGTA (7 min) led to an additional abrupt fall of plasma calcium concentrations but not to a corresponding additional rise of the PTH levels, epinephrine rapidly and further increased PTH concentrations. On the other hand, at the end of prolonged infusions of epinephrine, when additional infusions of epinephrine were ineffective in raising PTH levels, EGTA-induced hypocalcemia consistently increased PTH concentrations. The EGTA-induced augmentation of PTH levels was enhanced by epinephrine and isoproterenol but not by propranolol. The present findings indicate, that variations of the extracellular

  18. Increased intra- and extracellular granzyme expression in patients with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Laorden, M Isabel; Blok, Dana C; Kager, Liesbeth M; Hoogendijk, Arie J; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Lede, Ivar O; Rahman, Wahid; Afroz, Rumana; Ghose, Aniruddha; Visser, Caroline E; Md Zahed, Abu Shahed; Husain, Md Anwar; Alam, Khan Mashrequl; Chandra Barua, Pravat; Hassan, Mahtabuddin; Hossain, Ahmed; Tayab, Md Abu; Day, Nick; Dondorp, Arjen M; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Granzymes (gzms) are proteases mainly found in cytotoxic lymphocytes, but also extracellularly. While the role of gzms in target cell death has been widely characterized, considerable evidence points towards broader roles related to infectious and inflammatory responses. To investigate the expression of the gzms in TB, intracellular gzms A, B and K were measured by flow cytometry in lymphocyte populations from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 18 TB patients and 12 healthy donors from Bangladesh, and extracellular levels of gzmA and B were measured in serum from 58 TB patients and 31 healthy controls. TB patients showed increased expression of gzmA in CD8(+) T, CD4(+) T and CD56(+) T, but not NK, cells, and of gzmB in CD8(+) T cells, when compared to controls. GzmK expression was not altered in TB patients in any lymphocyte subset. The extracellular levels of gzmA and, to a lesser extent, of gzmB, were increased in TB patients, but did not correlate with intracellular gzm expression in lymphocyte subsets. Our results reveal enhanced intra- and extracellular expression of gzmA and B in patients with pulmonary TB, suggesting that gzms are part of the host response to tuberculosis.

  19. Modulation of the dimer interface at ionotropic glutamate-like receptor δ2 by D-serine and extracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kasper B.; Naur, Peter; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Kristensen, Anders S.; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    GluRδ2 is a member of the iGluR family, but despite a prominent role in cerebellar synaptic plasticity, this receptor does not appear to function as an ion channel. Endogenous ligands that modulate the activity of native GluRδ2 in the cerebellum have not been identified, but two candidate modulators are D-serine and extracellular calcium. Taking advantage of known crystal structures and spontaneously active GluRδ2 receptors containing the lurcher mutation (GluRδ2Lc), we investigated the mechanism by which calcium and D-serine regulate the activity of GluRδ2Lc. Our data suggest that calcium binding stabilizes the dimer interface formed between two agonist binding domains and increases GluRδ2Lc currents. The data further suggests that D-serine binding induces rearrangements at the dimer interface to diminish GluRδ2Lc currents by a mechanism that resembles desensitization at AMPA and kainate receptors. Thus, we propose that calcium and D-serine binding have opposing effects on the stability of the dimer interface. Furthermore, the effects of calcium are observed at concentrations that are within the physiological range, suggesting that the ability of native GluRδ2 to respond to ligand binding may be modulated by extracellular calcium. These findings place GluRδ2 among AMPA and kainate receptors, where the dimer interface is not only a biologically important site for functional regulation, but also an important target for exogenous and endogenous ligands that modulate receptor function. PMID:19176800

  20. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Miller, Cassandra L.; Gorkhali, Rakshya; Zou, Juan; Huang, Kenneth; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs) play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o) homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids, and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT) domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR's cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs) in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics. PMID:27746744

  1. Calcium carbonate mineralization: involvement of extracellular polymeric materials isolated from calcifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Claudia; Bozzelli, Paola; Altieri, Fabio; Cacchio, Paola; Del Gallo, Maddalena

    2012-08-01

    This study highlights the role of specific outer bacterial structures, such as the glycocalix, in calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro. We describe the formation of calcite crystals by extracellular polymeric materials, such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) isolated from Bacillus firmus and Nocardia calcarea. Organic matrices were isolated from calcifying bacteria grown on synthetic medium--in the presence or absence of calcium ions--and their effect on calcite precipitation was assessed. Scanning electron microscopy observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed that CPS and EPS fractions were involved in calcium carbonate precipitation, not only serving as nucleation sites but also through a direct role in crystal formation. The utilization of different synthetic media, with and without addition of calcium ions, influenced the biofilm production and protein profile of extracellular polymeric materials. Proteins of CPS fractions with a molecular mass between 25 and 70 kDa were overexpressed when calcium ions were present in the medium. This higher level of protein synthesis could be related to the active process of bioprecipitation.

  2. Calcium carbonate mineralization: involvement of extracellular polymeric materials isolated from calcifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Claudia; Bozzelli, Paola; Altieri, Fabio; Cacchio, Paola; Del Gallo, Maddalena

    2012-08-01

    This study highlights the role of specific outer bacterial structures, such as the glycocalix, in calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro. We describe the formation of calcite crystals by extracellular polymeric materials, such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) isolated from Bacillus firmus and Nocardia calcarea. Organic matrices were isolated from calcifying bacteria grown on synthetic medium--in the presence or absence of calcium ions--and their effect on calcite precipitation was assessed. Scanning electron microscopy observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed that CPS and EPS fractions were involved in calcium carbonate precipitation, not only serving as nucleation sites but also through a direct role in crystal formation. The utilization of different synthetic media, with and without addition of calcium ions, influenced the biofilm production and protein profile of extracellular polymeric materials. Proteins of CPS fractions with a molecular mass between 25 and 70 kDa were overexpressed when calcium ions were present in the medium. This higher level of protein synthesis could be related to the active process of bioprecipitation. PMID:22697480

  3. Contribution of intestine, bone, kidney, and dialysis to extracellular fluid calcium content.

    PubMed

    Bushinsky, David A

    2010-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) balance is the net of Ca intake and output from the body over a period of time. The concept of Ca balance does not consider the redistribution of Ca that often occurs in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially those who are on dialysis, which is often in the form of soft tissue and/or vascular calcification. In this article, we consider movement of Ca with respect to the extracellular fluid (ECF) and develop a mathematical formulation for Ca homeostasis with respect to the ECF that includes input and output from the diet, the bone, the kidney, and dialysis. We consider calcium homeostasis in healthy individuals and in patients with excess parathyroid hormone, excess 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), and metabolic acidosis; patients who have CKD and are not on dialysis; and, finally, patients who have CKD and are on dialysis. On the basis of a number of assumptions, dialysis patients with a daily intake of >37.5 mmol of elemental Ca (1.5 g) have movement of Ca into the ECF even without supplemental activated vitamin D. Addition of activated vitamin D, which increases intestinal Ca absorption and can increase resorption of Ca from bone, leads to the movement of Ca into the ECF at virtually all levels of intake; however, there are numerous unanswered questions regarding Ca homeostasis in patients with CKD, including how much of the Ca, administered as a phosphate binder, is absorbed and what is the fate of this absorbed Ca. Until these pressing questions are answered with well-designed experiments, we do not know whether we are doing more harm than good for our dialysis patients by administering additional Ca as a phosphate binder, especially when they also receive activated vitamin D.

  4. [The influence of extracellular calcium on volume, enzyme and calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1977-01-28

    1. The kinetics of Ca++ and enzyme secretion are of corresponding pattern as well at hydrokinetic as at ecbolic stimulation. 2. Physiological respectively pathophysiologically relevant changes of perfusate Ca++ concentrations do not influence pancreatic Ca++ secretion. Extracellular Ca++ concentrations beyond 12 mEq/1 initiate an enzyme independent Ca++ secretion. 3. Hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulated pancreatic secretion do not distinguish in calcium/protein ratio. 4. Basal and stimulated enzyme secretion of isolated perfused canine pancreas remain unaffected by increments of extracellular Ca++ concentrations even at pharmacological values. 5. The stimulated enzyme- and Ca++ secretion remain constant during hypocalcemic perfusate conditions but decrease to basal values in Ca++ free media, rapidly and completely reversible by recalcification of the perfusate. 6. The secretin stimulated volume secretion remains unchanged either by extremely hypercalcemic or Ca++ depleted perfusate conditions.

  5. [The influence of extracellular calcium on volume, enzyme and calcium secretion in the isolated perfused canine pancreas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teufel, H; Stock, P; Rohrmoser, H; Forell, M M

    1977-01-28

    1. The kinetics of Ca++ and enzyme secretion are of corresponding pattern as well at hydrokinetic as at ecbolic stimulation. 2. Physiological respectively pathophysiologically relevant changes of perfusate Ca++ concentrations do not influence pancreatic Ca++ secretion. Extracellular Ca++ concentrations beyond 12 mEq/1 initiate an enzyme independent Ca++ secretion. 3. Hydrokinetic or ecbolic stimulated pancreatic secretion do not distinguish in calcium/protein ratio. 4. Basal and stimulated enzyme secretion of isolated perfused canine pancreas remain unaffected by increments of extracellular Ca++ concentrations even at pharmacological values. 5. The stimulated enzyme- and Ca++ secretion remain constant during hypocalcemic perfusate conditions but decrease to basal values in Ca++ free media, rapidly and completely reversible by recalcification of the perfusate. 6. The secretin stimulated volume secretion remains unchanged either by extremely hypercalcemic or Ca++ depleted perfusate conditions. PMID:841188

  6. Active vitamin D deficiency mediated by extracellular calcium and phosphorus results in male infertility in young mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weiwei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Rong; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2015-01-01

    We used mice with targeted deletion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 α-hydroxylase [1α(OH)ase(-/-)] to investigate whether 1,25(OH)2D3 deficiency results in male infertility mediated by 1,25(OH)2D3 or extracellular calcium and phosphorus. Male 1α(OH)ase(-/-) and their wild-type littermates fed either a normal diet or a rescue diet from weaning were mated at 6-14 wk of age with female wild-type mice on the same diet. The fertility efficiency of females was analyzed, and the reproductive phenotypes of males were evaluated by histopathological and molecular techniques. Hypocalcemic and hypophosphatemic male 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice on a normal diet developed infertility characterized by hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, with downregulation of testicular calcium channels, lower intracellular calcium levels, decreased sperm count and motility, and histological abnormalities of the testes. The proliferation of spermatogenic cells was decreased with downregulation of cyclin E and CDK2 and upregulation of p53 and p21 expression, whereas apoptosis of spermatogenic cells was increased with upregulation of Bax and p-caspase 3 expression and downregulation of Bcl-xl expression. When serum calcium and phosphorus were normalized by the rescue diet, the defective reproductive phenotype in the male 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, including the hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, decreased sperm count and motility, histological abnormalities of testis, and defective spermatogenesis, was reversed. These results indicate that the infertility seen in male 1,25(OH)2D3-deficient mice is not a direct effect of active vitamin D deficiency on the reproductive system but is an indirect effect mediated by extracellular calcium and phosphorus.

  7. Ubiquitylation functions in the calcium carbonate biomineralization in the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes.

  8. Copper-induced activation of TRP channels promotes extracellular calcium entry, activation of CaMs and CDPKs, copper entry and membrane depolarization in Ulva compressa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Melissa; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A.; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify channels involved in membrane depolarization, Ulva compressa was incubated with agonists of TRP channels C5, A1 and V1, and the level of intracellular calcium was detected. Agonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 11 min of exposure, respectively, and antagonists of TRPC5, A1, and V1 corresponding to SKF-96365 (SKF), HC-030031 (HC), and capsazepin (CPZ), respectively, inhibited calcium increases indicating that functional TRPs exist in U. compressa. In addition, copper excess induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 12 min which were inhibited by SKF, HC, and CPZ, respectively, indicating that copper activate TRPC5, A1, and V1 channels. Moreover, copper-induced calcium increases were inhibited by EGTA, a non-permeable calcium chelating agent, but not by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ATPase, indicating that activation of TRPs leads to extracellular calcium entry. Furthermore, copper-induced calcium increases were not inhibited by W-7, an inhibitor of CaMs, and staurosporine, an inhibitor of CDPKs, indicating that extracellular calcium entry did not require activation of CaMs and CDPKs. In addition, copper induced membrane depolarization events at 4, 8, and 11 min and these events were inhibited by SKF, HC, CPZ, and bathocuproine, a specific copper chelating agent, indicating that copper entry through TRP channels leads to membrane depolarization. Moreover, membrane depolarization events were inhibited by W-7 and staurosporine, indicating that activation of CaMs and CDPKs is required to allow copper entry through TRPs. Interestingly, copper-induced calcium increases and depolarization events were light-dependent and were inhibited by DCMU, an inhibitor of photosystem II, and ATP-γ-S, a non-hydrolizable analog of ATP, suggesting that ATP derived from photosynthesis is required to activate TRPs. Thus, light-dependent copper-induced activation TRPC5, A1

  9. The effect of estrogens and dietary calcium deficiency on the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage in Göttingen miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Horst; Hornberger, Frank; Scholz-Ahrens, Katharina; Schünke, Michael; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Kurz, Bodo

    2002-03-01

    Clinical observations have suggested that estrogens are involved in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoarthritis (OA). However, positive and negative associations between the incidence of OA and serum estrogen concentrations have been reported. In contrast to this, osteoporosis is regarded as a disease with a strong estrogen-dependent component. Moreover, there is an interaction between estrogen and calcium deficiency: calcium supplementation potentiates the effect of estrogen therapy. The present study was designed to investigate how estrogen deficiency affects the articular cartilage depending on calcium supply. The distribution of different types of glycosaminoglycans and collagens can be used as an indicator for extracellular matrix changes induced by estrogen deficiency. Different levels of dietary calcium were therefore fed to intact and ovariectomized Göttingen miniature pigs for one year before articular cartilage was harvested. The histochemical staining for heavy sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ovariectomized miniature pigs, especially of those fed with a low calcium diet, was stronger in comparison to intact animals. In intact animals type II-collagen was immunodetected in all zones of unmineralized and mineralized articular cartilage, while immunostaining for this protein was negative to weak in the deep radiated fiber zone of ovariectomized minipigs. These results suggest that the synthesis of heavy sulfated glycosaminoglycans and immunohistochemically detectable type II-collagen is possibly influenced by estrogen deficiency. In conclusion, under estrogen deficiency, the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage underwent similar changes to those observed in physiologically aging cartilage where keratan sulfate is increased as a heavy sulfated glycosaminoglycan.

  10. The role of extracellular free-calcium gradients in gravitropic signalling in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Gravitropism in roots has been proposed to depend on a downward redistribution of calcium across the root cap. However, because of the many calcium-binding sites in the apoplast, redistribution might not result in a physiologically effective change in the apoplasmic calcium activity. To test whether there is such a change, we measured the effect of gravistimulation on the calcium activity of statocyte cell walls with calcium-specific microelectrodes. Such a measurement must be made on a tissue with gravity sensing cells at the surface. To obtain such a tissue, decapped maize roots (Zea mays L. cv. Golden Cross Bantam) were grown for 31 h to regenerate gravitropic sensitivity, but not root caps. The calcium activity in the apoplasm surrounding the gravity-sensing cells could then be measured. The initial pCa was 2.60 +/- 0.28 (approx 2.5 mM). The calcium activity on the upper side of the root tip remained constant for 10 min after gravistimulation, then decreased 1.7-fold. On the lower side, after a similar lag the calcium activity increased 1.6-fold. Control roots, which were decapped but measured before recovering gravisensitivity (19 h), showed no change in calcium activity. To test whether this gradient is necessary for gravitropic curvature, we eliminated the calcium activity gradient during gravitropism by applying a mobile calcium-binding site (dinitro-BAPTA; 1,2-bis(2-amino-5-nitro-phenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) to the root cap; this treatment eliminated gravicurvature. A calcium gradient may be formed by proton-induced calcium desorption if there is a proton gradient. Preventing the formation of apoplastic pH gradients, using 10 and 50 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (Mes) buffer or 10 mM fusicoccin to stimulate proton excretion maximally, did not inhibit curvature; therefore the calcium gradient is not a secondary effect of a proton gradient. We have found a distinct and rapid differential in the apoplasmic calcium activity between the

  11. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  12. Different calcium sensitivity in osteoclasts on glass and on bone and maintenance of cytoskeletal structures on bone in the presence of high extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Lakkakorpi, P T; Lehenkari, P P; Rautiala, T J; Väänänen, H K

    1996-09-01

    The sensitivity of rat osteoclasts to increased extracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]e) was investigated by single cell measurements of free cytosolic calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i), by changes in microfilament organization of resorbing osteoclasts, and by in vitro bone resorption assays. Osteoclasts cultured on glass and on bone showed clear differences in their responses, as in 44% and 52% of osteoclasts on glass but in only 21% and 25% of osteoclasts on bone [Ca2+]i increased when [Ca2+]e was increased from 2 mM to 6 or 10 mM via perfusion, respectively. Bone resorption was inhibited without changes in the osteoclast numbers only by 10 mM [Ca2+]e in 2 day cultures. Furthermore, there were no changes in the organization of microfilament structures in resorbing osteoclasts after increased [Ca2+]e (up to 20 mM [Ca2+]e, 30 min incubation). These results suggest that the sensitivity of osteoclasts to increased [Ca2+]e is dependent on their activation phase (resting/migrating vs. resorbing) and that resorbing osteoclasts are not sensitive to increased [Ca2+]e or that the sensing system cannot be reached in polarized resorbing osteoclasts. In contrast, increasing [Ca2+]i through the use of calcium ionophores dispersed specific microfilament structures at the sealing zone transiently in a few minutes. This shows that [Ca2+]i is used as a signaling mechanism to inactivate osteoclasts, with a similar end result on microfilament structures at the sealing zone as caused by increased concentration of cAMP and activation of protein kinase C.

  13. Influence of calcium in extracellular DNA mediated bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Theerthankar; Sehar, Shama; Koop, Leena; Wong, Yie Kuan; Ahmed, Safia; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Manefield, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) has an important structural role in guaranteeing the integrity of the outer lipopolysaccharide layer and cell walls of bacterial cells. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) being part of the slimy matrix produced by bacteria promotes biofilm formation through enhanced structural integrity of the matrix. Here, the concurrent role of Ca(2+) and eDNA in mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation was studied for the first time using a variety of bacterial strains and the thermodynamics of DNA to Ca(2+) binding. It was found that the eDNA concentrations under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions were different among bacterial strains. Whilst Ca(2+) had no influence on eDNA release, presence of eDNA by itself favours bacterial aggregation via attractive acid-base interactions in addition, its binding with Ca(2+) at biologically relevant concentrations was shown further increase in bacterial aggregation via cationic bridging. Negative Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values in iTC data confirmed that the interaction between DNA and Ca(2+) is thermodynamically favourable and that the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic owing to its highly negative enthalpy. Removal of eDNA through DNase I treatment revealed that Ca(2+) alone did not enhance cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This discovery signifies the importance of eDNA and concludes that existence of eDNA on bacterial cell surfaces is a key facilitator in binding of Ca(2+) to eDNA thereby mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

  14. Morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor impairs early skeletal development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Herberger, Amanda L; Loretz, Christopher A

    2013-11-01

    The complex vertebrate skeleton depends on regulated cell activities to lay down protein matrix and mineral components of bone. As a distinctive vertebrate characteristic, bone is a storage site for physiologically-important calcium ion. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is linked to homeostatic regulation of calcium through its expression in endocrine glands that secrete calcium homeostatic hormones, in Ca(2+)- and ion-transporting epithelia, and in skeleton. Since CaSR is restricted in its presence to the chordate-vertebrate evolutionary lineage, we propose there to be important functional ties between CaSRs and vertebrate skeleton in the context of that group's characteristic form of calcium-mineralized skeleton. Since little is known about CaSR in the skeletal biology of non-mammalian vertebrates, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were applied to adult and embryonic zebrafish to reveal CaSR transcript and protein expression in several tissues, including, among these, chondrocytes and developing bone and notochord as components in skeletal development. Morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) knockdown technique was used to probe CaSR role(s) in the zebrafish model system. By RT-PCR assessment, injection of a splice-inhibiting CaSR MO reduced normally-spliced Casr gene transcript expression measured at 2days postfertilization (dpf). Corresponding to the knockdown of normally-spliced mRNA by the CaSR MO, we observed a morphant phenotype characterized by stunted growth and disorganization of the notochord and axial skeleton by 1dpf. We conclude that, like its critically important role in normal bone development in mammals, CaSR is essential in skeletogenesis in fishes.

  15. Electrogenic Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger, the link between intra- and extracellular calcium in the Limulus ventral photoreceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Deckert, A; Stieve, H

    1991-01-01

    1. Limulus ventral photoreceptors were injected with Arsenazo III and the internal change in the calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, was measured under voltage clamp conditions. It is shown that in response to a light flash the rising phase of the [Ca2+]i is independent of the clamp voltage, Vm. This observation is contrary to other results reported in the literature. Experiments are reported that resolve this contradiction (see paragraph 4). 2. The relaxation of the [Ca2+]i after a bright light flash was observed to have a fast and slow phase. A function consisting of the sum of an exponential and a ramp was fitted to the relaxation. The fast phase, characterized by the time constant of the exponential, was observed not to depend on Vm, while the slow phase, characterized by the slope of the ramp, was strongly dependent on Vm. Furthermore the slope of the slow phase is shown to depend on the external Na+ concentration, but not the time constant of the fast phase. 3. In the dark the [Ca2+]i was observed to increase when the cell was depolarized and to decrease when the cell was hyperpolarized. This observation was more pronounced when the cell was continuously illuminated. 4. When the cell was clamped to a depolarizing voltage before illumination of the cell, the maximum of the calcium indicator signal was observed to depend on how long the cell had been clamped before applying the light stimulus. This experiment resolves the contradiction mentioned in paragraph 1. 5. The results presented here are consistent with the interpretation that a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger with a stoichiometry greater than 2:1 is the predominant link between intra- and extracellular calcium. Secondly that the light-induced intracellular calcium increase comes from a release by intracellular stores. Finally a measurable uptake of calcium occurs after a light-induced release, possibly by the internal calcium stores. The two-phase recovery of [Ca2+]i after a light flash is interpreted as being a

  16. [New insights into the pharmacology of the extracellular calcium sensing receptor].

    PubMed

    Ruat, Martial; Petrel, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to class III of G-protein coupled receptors. The CaR is expressed at the surface of the parathyroid cells and plays an essential role in the regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis through the control of parathyroid secretion. The CaR is activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+ present in the extracellular fluids, various di- and trivalent cations, L-aminoacids and charged molecules including several antibiotics. Calcimimetics potentiate the effect of Ca2+ and are proposed to be of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Calcilytics block the Ca2+-induced activation of the CaR. Three-dimensional models of the seven transmembrane domains of the human CaR have been used to identify specific residues implicated in the recognition of calcimimetics and calcilytics. These molecules should be useful for delineating the physiological roles played by the CaR in several tissues and for clarifying the direct effects attributed to extracellular Ca2+. PMID:15525493

  17. Extracellular matrix stiffness modulates VEGF calcium signaling in endothelial cells: individual cell and population analysis.

    PubMed

    Derricks, Kelsey E; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Nugent, Matthew A

    2015-09-01

    Vascular disease and its associated complications are the number one cause of death in the Western world. Both extracellular matrix stiffening and dysfunctional endothelial cells contribute to vascular disease. We examined endothelial cell calcium signaling in response to VEGF as a function of extracellular matrix stiffness. We developed a new analytical tool to analyze both population based and individual cell responses. Endothelial cells on soft substrates, 4 kPa, were the most responsive to VEGF, whereas cells on the 125 kPa substrates exhibited an attenuated response. Magnitude of activation, not the quantity of cells responding or the number of local maximums each cell experienced distinguished the responses. Individual cell analysis, across all treatments, identified two unique cell clusters. One cluster, containing most of the cells, exhibited minimal or slow calcium release. The remaining cell cluster had a rapid, high magnitude VEGF activation that ultimately defined the population based average calcium response. Interestingly, at low doses of VEGF, the high responding cell cluster contained smaller cells on average, suggesting that cell shape and size may be indicative of VEGF-sensitive endothelial cells. This study provides a new analytical tool to quantitatively analyze individual cell signaling response kinetics, that we have used to help uncover outcomes that are hidden within the average. The ability to selectively identify highly VEGF responsive cells within a population may lead to a better understanding of the specific phenotypic characteristics that define cell responsiveness, which could provide new insight for the development of targeted anti- and pro-angiogenic therapies.

  18. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Modulates VEGF Calcium Signaling in Endothelial Cells: Individual Cell and Population Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Derricks, Kelsey E.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Nugent, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disease and its associated complications are the number one cause of death in the Western world. Both extracellular matrix stiffening and dysfunctional endothelial cells contribute to vascular disease. We examined endothelial cell calcium signaling in response to VEGF as a function of extracellular matrix stiffness. We developed a new analytical tool to analyze both population based and individual cell responses. Endothelial cells on soft substrates, 4 kPa, were the most responsive to VEGF, whereas cells on the 125 kPa substrates exhibited an attenuated response. Magnitude of activation, not the quantity of cells responding or the number of local maximums each cell experienced distinguished the responses. Individual cell analysis, across all treatments, identified two unique cell clusters. One cluster, containing most of the cells, exhibited minimal or slow calcium release. The remaining cell cluster had a rapid, high magnitude VEGF activation that ultimately defined the population based average calcium response. Interestingly, at low doses of VEGF, the high responding cell cluster contained smaller cells on average, suggesting that cell shape and size may be indicative of VEGF-sensitive endothelial cells. This study provides a new analytical tool to quantitatively analyze individual cell signaling response kinetics, that we have used to help uncover outcomes that are hidden within the average. The ability to selectively identify highly VEGF responsive cells within a population may lead to a better understanding of the specific phenotypic characteristics that define cell responsiveness, which could provide new insight for the development of targeted anti- and pro-angiogenic therapies. PMID:26183123

  19. Kinetics of fungal extracellular alpha-amylase from Fusarium solani immobilized in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devendra; Muthukumar, M; Garg, Neelima

    2012-11-01

    Extracellular alpha-amylase mass produced by Fusarium solani using mango kernel as substrate was immobilized in calcium alginate beads through entrapment technique. Maximum enzyme immobilization efficiency was achieved in 2 mm size beads formed by 6.5% (w/v) of sodium alginate in 2% (w/v) calcium chloride. The catalytic properties of the immobilized alpha-amylase were compared with that of free enzyme (soluble). The activity yield of the immobilized enzyme was 81% of the free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme showed optimum activityat pH 4.5-6.0 and temperature 40 degrees C, in contrast to the free enzyme at 5.5 and 30 degrees C, respectively. Thermal stability of the immobilized enzyme was found to be more than the free enzyme over a longer time interval. The immobilized enzyme retained activity upto 20% of optimum even after 180 min. While the free enzyme lost its 80% activity after 60 min and lost total activity down to zero by 120 min. The kinetic constants, viz., K(M) (Michaelis constant), V(max) and activation energy were affected by immobilization. However, the immobilized alpha-amylase in calcium alginate beads supports its long-term storage which has immense industrial applications.

  20. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R.; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  1. Poliovirus protein 2BC increases cytosolic free calcium concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, R; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus-infected cells undergo an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations from the 4th h postinfection. The protein responsible for this effect was identified by the expression of different poliovirus nonstructural proteins in HeLa cells by using a recombinant vaccinia virus system. Synthesis of protein 2BC enhances cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in a manner similar to that observed in poliovirus-infected cells. To identify the regions in 2BC involved in modifying cytoplasmic calcium levels, several 2BC variants were generated. Regions present in both 2B and 2C are necessary to augment cellular free calcium levels. Therefore, in addition to inducing proliferation of membranous vesicles, poliovirus protein 2BC also alters cellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:9223520

  2. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C.; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S.; Irace, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk. Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods. We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women. Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:26937904

  3. Expression of OsCAS (Calcium-Sensing Receptor) in an Arabidopsis Mutant Increases Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Rongrong; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaS), which is localized in the chloroplasts, is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis. It has homologs in Oryza sativa and other plants. These sequences all have a rhodanese-like protein domain, which has been demonstrated to be associated with specific stress conditions. In this study, we cloned the Oryza sativa calcium-sensing receptor gene (OsCAS) and demonstrated that OsCAS could sense an increase of extracellular Ca2+ concentration and mediate an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. The OsCAS gene was transformed into an Arabidopsis CaS knockout mutant (Salk) and overexpressed in the transgenic plants. OsCAS promoted stomatal closure. We screened homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis plants and determined physiological indices such as the oxidative damage biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA), relative membrane permeability (RMP), proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, after 21 days of drought treatment. Our results revealed lower RMP and MDA contents and a higher Proline content in transgenic Arabidopsis plants after drought stress, whereas the opposite was observed in Salk plants. With respect to chlorophyll fluorescence, the electron transport rate and effective PSII quantum yield decreased in all lines under drought stress; however, in the transgenic plants these two parameters changed fewer and were higher than those in wild-type and Salk plants. The quantum yield of regulated energy dissipation and nonregulated energy dissipation in PSII were higher in Salk plants, whereas these values were lower in the transgenic plants than in the wild type under drought stress. The above results suggest that the transgenic plants showed better resistance to drought stress by decreasing damage to the cell membrane, increasing the amount of osmoprotectants, and maintaining a relatively high photosynthetic capacity. In conclusion, OsCAS is an extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

  4. Release of calcium from endolysosomes increases calcium influx through N-type calcium channels: Evidence for acidic store-operated calcium entry in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liang; Geiger, Nicholas H; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Churchill, Grant C; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-12-01

    Neurons possess an elaborate system of endolysosomes. Recently, endolysosomes were found to have readily releasable stores of intracellular calcium; however, relatively little is known about how such 'acidic calcium stores' affect calcium signaling in neurons. Here we demonstrated in primary cultured neurons that calcium released from acidic calcium stores triggered calcium influx across the plasma membrane, a phenomenon we have termed "acidic store-operated calcium entry (aSOCE)". aSOCE was functionally distinct from store-operated calcium release and calcium entry involving endoplasmic reticulum. aSOCE appeared to be governed by N-type calcium channels (NTCCs) because aSOCE was attenuated significantly by selectively blocking NTCCs or by siRNA knockdown of NTCCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NTCCs co-immunoprecipitated with the lysosome associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and that aSOCE is accompanied by increased cell-surface expression levels of NTCC and LAMP1 proteins. Moreover, we demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of LAMP1 or Rab27a, both of which are key proteins involved in lysosome exocytosis, attenuated significantly aSOCE. Taken together our data suggest that aSOCE occurs in neurons, that aSOCE plays an important role in regulating the levels and actions of intraneuronal calcium, and that aSOCE is regulated at least in part by exocytotic insertion of N-type calcium channels into plasma membranes through LAMP1-dependent lysosome exocytosis.

  5. Calcium intake increases risk of prostate cancer among Singapore Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Lesley M.; Wong, Alvin S.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yu, Mimi C.

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of dairy products, the primary source of calcium in Western diets, has been found to be positively associated with prostate cancer. In an Asian diet, non-dairy foods are the major contributors of calcium. Thus, a study of dietary calcium and prostate cancer in Asians can better inform on whether calcium, as opposed to other dairy components is responsible for the dairy foods-prostate cancer association. We examined calcium intake and prostate cancer risk among 27,293 men of the Singapore Chinese Health Study that was established between 1993 and 1998. As of December 31, 2007, 298 incident prostate cancer cases had been diagnosed among the cohort members. Diet was assessed at baseline with a validated 165-item food frequency questionnaire. It is hypothesized that there is greater net absorption of calcium in smaller individuals. Therefore, the calcium-prostate cancer association was also assessed in stratified analyses by median body mass index (BMI). Vegetables were the largest contributor of daily calcium intake in the study population. Overall, we observed a modest, statistically nonsignificant 25% increase in prostate cancer risk for the 4th (median = 659 mg/day) versus 1st (median=211 mg/day) quartiles of calcium intake after adjustment for potential confounders. The association became considerably stronger and achieved statistical significance (hazard ratio=2.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.34; P for trend=0.01) for men with below median (22.9 kg/m2) BMI. Dietary calcium may be a risk factor for prostate cancer even at relatively low intake. PMID:20516117

  6. Wind-induced plant motion immediately increases cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, M R; Smith, S M; Trewavas, A J

    1992-01-01

    Wind is one of the most unusual and more dramatic of the environmental signals to modify plant development. Wind-stimulated crops are also known to experience considerable reductions in growth and subsequent yield. There is at present no experimental data to suggest how wind signals are perceived and transduced by plant cells. We have genetically transformed Nicotiana plumbaginifolia to express aequorin and thus produced luminous plants that directly report cytosolic calcium by emitting blue light. With these plants we have found wind stimulation to cause immediate increases in cytosolic calcium and our evidence, based on the use of specific inhibitors, suggests that this calcium is mobilized from organelle sources. Our data further suggest that wind-induced movement of tissues, by mechanically stimulating and stressing constituent plant cells, is responsible for the immediate elevation of cytosolic calcium; increases occur only when the plant tissue is actually in motion. Repeated wind stimulation renders the cells refractory to further calcium signaling but responsiveness is rapidly recovered when stimulation is subsequently diminished. Our data suggest that mechanoperception in plant cells may possibly be transduced through intracellular calcium. Since mechanoperception and transduction are considered crucial to plant morphogenesis, our observations suggest that calcium could be central in the control and generation of plant form. Images PMID:11536497

  7. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E.; Bravo-San Pedro, José M.; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M.; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24 h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3 h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection. PMID:24184327

  8. Calcium carbonate formation on mica supported extracellular polymeric substance produced by Rhodococcus opacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra; Czemierska, Magdalena; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from Rhodococcus opacus bacterial strain was used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation using the vapour diffusion method. The total exopolymer and water-soluble exopolymer fraction of different concentrations were spread on the mica surface by the spin-coating method. The obtained layers were characterized using the atomic force microscopy measurement and XPS analysis. The effects of polymer concentration, initial pH of calcium chloride solution and precipitation time on the obtained crystals properties were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the precipitated minerals. It was found that the type of precipitated CaCO3 polymorph and the crystal size depend on the kind of EPS fraction. The obtained results indicates that the water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth, whereas the total EPS stabilizes vaterite and this effect is stronger at basic pH. It seems to be due to different contents of the functional group of EPS fractions.

  9. Toll-Like Receptor-Triggered Calcium Mobilization Protects Mice against Bacterial Infection through Extracellular ATP Release

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hua; Teng, Yunfei; Tan, Binghe; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Mingyao; Jiang, Wenzheng

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP), released as a “danger signal” by injured or stressed cells, plays an important role in the regulation of immune responses, but the relationship between ATP release and innate immune responses is still uncertain. In this study, we demonstrated that ATP was released through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-associated signaling in both Escherichia coli-infected mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or Pam3CSK4-treated macrophages. This ATP release could be blocked completely only by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), not by carbenoxolone (CBX), flufenamic acid (FFA), or probenecid, suggesting the key role of exocytosis in this process. Furthermore, LPS-induced ATP release could also be reduced dramatically through suppressing calcium mobilization by use of U73122, caffeine, and thapsigargin (TG). In addition, the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and CCL-2 was enhanced significantly by ATP, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of bacteria was also promoted significantly by ATP stimulation. Furthermore, extracellular ATP reduced the number of invading bacteria and protected mice from peritonitis by activating purinergic receptors. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of AKT and ERK was overtly increased by ATP in antibacterial immune responses. Accordingly, if we blocked the P2X- and P2Y-associated signaling pathway by using suramin and pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid), tetrasodium salt (PPADS), the ATP-enhanced immune response was restrained significantly. Taken together, our findings reveal an internal relationship between danger signals and TLR signaling in innate immune responses, which suggests a potential therapeutic significance of calcium mobilization-mediated ATP release in infectious diseases. PMID:25245808

  10. Critical role of extracellular calcium in vanadate-induced renal vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Benabe, J.E.; Cruz-Soto, M.A.; Martinez-Maldonado, M.

    1984-03-01

    Intra-arterial infusion of vanadate (VO/sub 4/) in dogs produces a reduction in renal blood flow (RBF), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine flow (V), and the fractional excretion of sodium (FE/sub Na/sup +//). To evaluate the role of Ca/sup 2 +/ in these changes VO/sub 4/ was infused into the renal artery in the presence of the calcium antagonists trifluoperazine (TFP), verapamil, or EGTA. TFP inhibited the effect of VO/sub 4/ on RBF (TFP + VO/sub 4/: 64.1, VO/sub 4/: 38.5 ml/min; P < 0.05), GFR (TFP + VO/sub 4/: 22.9, VO/sub 4/: 9.3, ml/min; P < 0.05) and V (TFP + VO/sub 4/: 0.80, VO/sub 4/: 0.38 ml/min; P < 0.05) without changing FE/sub Na/sup +// (TFP + VO/sub 4/: 3.8, VO/sub 4/: 3.2%). Similar changes were obtained with verapamil as well as with EGTA. Furthermore thyroparathyroidectomy (TPTX) decreased serum calcium (control: 8.78, TPTX: 4.98 mg/100ml; P < 0.05) and blunted the effects of VO/sub 4/ on renal hemodynamics. Reestablishing normal serum Ca/sup 2 +/ by an intra-arterial infusion of CaCl/sub 2/ elicited the VO/sub 4/ effects of vasoconstriction and decreased GFR; V was not affected and FE/sub Na/sup +// rose. The data support the idea that influx of extracellular calcium into smooth muscle cells mediates the hemodynamic effects of VO/sub 4/ in the dog. 34 references.

  11. Release of O2- and LTC4 by murine eosinophils: role of intra- and extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    de Andres, B; del Pozo, V; Martin, E; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1990-01-01

    Using an experimental model of mouse peritoneal eosinophilia, we investigated the role of Ca2+ in the in vitro activation of these cells challenged with specific Mesocestoides corti antigen. We have detected LTC4, a metabolite derived from arachidonic acid by way of 5'lipo-oxygenase and superoxide anion from the oxidative burst, as inflammatory mediators produced by activated eosinophils. Preincubation with hyperimmune mice serum increases the amount of LTC4 and superoxide anion in response to the antigenic extract. Release of O2- is inhibited by Verapamil (a voltage-gated calcium channel) and Quin 2 (an intracellular trapped chelator of calcium). Also, LTC4 produced by preincubated eosinophils challenged with M. corti is dramatically inhibited by Quin 2. Our results suggest an intact mechanism for calcium control for the release of these inflammatory mediators by eosinophils, after specific antigenic stimulation. PMID:1689695

  12. Nitric oxide inhibited the melanophore aggregation induced by extracellular calcium concentration in snakehead fish, Channa punctatus.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saikat P; Palande, Nikhil V; Jadhao, Arun G

    2011-12-01

    We studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) and extra-cellular Ca(2+) on the melanophores in Indian snakehead teleost, Channa punctatus. Increase of Ca(2+) level in the external medium causes pigment aggregation in melanophores. This pigment-aggregating effect was found to be inhibited when the external medium contained spontaneous NO donor, sodium nitro prusside (SNP) at all the levels of concentration tested. Furthermore, it has been observed that SNP keeps the pigment in dispersed state even after increasing the amount of Ca(2+). In order to test whether NO donor SNP causes dispersion of pigments or not is checked by adding the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, N-omega-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) in the medium. It has been noted that the inhibitor L-NNA blocked the effect of NO donor SNP causing aggregation of pigments. In that way NO is inhibiting the effect of extracellular Ca(2+), keeping the pigment dispersed.

  13. Acanthamoeba castellanii metabolites increase the intracellular calcium level and cause cytotoxicity in wish cells.

    PubMed

    Mattana, A; Bennardini, F; Usai, S; Fiori, P L; Franconi, F; Cappuccinelli, P

    1997-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that trophozoites of the pathogenic free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii rapidly lyse a variety of cells in vitro. However, the role played by cytolitic molecules that may participate in Acanthamoebal cytopathogenicity has yet to be completely elucidated. The aim of this work was to study whether soluble molecules released by A. castellanii trophozoites could induce cytopathic effect in human epithelial cells in vitro. The results obtained indicate that A. castellanii trophozoites constitutively elaborate and release soluble factors that immediately elicit a cytosolic free-calcium increase in target cells. This phenomenon is induced by low molecular weight amoebic metabolites and depends on a transmembrane influx of extracellular calcium. Morphological changes, cytoskeletal damage, cell death and cytolysis followed the elevation of cytosolic free-calcium levels. Calcium ions are very important for cell homeostasis, in fact, they control the functions of a variety of cellular responses, including secretion, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our results suggest that the substained elevation of the cytosolic free-calcium in response to A. castellanii metabolites might play a fundamental role in target cell damage during Acanthamoeba infections. PMID:9245619

  14. Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor distribution in osmoregulatory and endocrine tissues of the tilapia.

    PubMed

    Loretz, Christopher A; Pollina, Catherine; Hyodo, Susumu; Takei, Yoshio

    2009-04-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) serves an important detector function in vertebrate Ca(2+) homeostasis. In this study, we surveyed using immunohistochemistry the tissue and cellular distribution of the CaSR protein in the Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica). Specifically, we examined receptor expression in ion-transporting barrier tissues that may be directly responsive to extracellular Ca(2+) levels, and in tissues that are implicated in endocrine signaling to homeostatic effectors such as Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. In tilapia osmoregulatory tissues, CaSR protein is strongly expressed in proximal segments of renal tubule, but not in distal segments (where Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is prominently expressed) or in glomeruli. The receptor was also localized in the ion-transporting mitochondria-rich cells of gill and in ion- and nutrient-transporting epithelia of middle and posterior intestine. Consistent with our earlier RT-PCR assessment of mRNA expression in tilapia, CaSR protein expression was salinity dependent in some osmoregulatory tissues. In tilapia pituitary gland, CaSR expression was observed in the rostral pars distalis (containing prolactin-secreting cells, and in the pars intermedia (containing somatolactin-secreting and melanocyte-stimulating hormone-secreting cells), with notably greater expression in the latter. In the eel, weak immunostaining was seen in the stanniocalcin-secreting cells of the corpuscles of Stannius. Olfactory lobe CaSR expression suggests an environment-sensing role for the receptor. Altogether, these findings support the involvement of CaSR in piscine Ca(2+) homeostasis at the levels of environmental sensing, of integrative endocrine signaling through both hypercalcemic (prolactin, and perhaps somatolactin) and hypocalcemic (stanniocalcin) hormones, and of direct local regulation of Ca(2+)-transporting tissues.

  15. Extracellular calcium influx promotes antibacterial autophagy in Escherichia coli infected murine macrophages via CaMKKβ dependent activation of ERK1/2, AMPK and FoxO1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Yang, Yongjun; Chen, Xiaoli; Chen, Qian; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-15

    Autophagy induction has been found as an alternative mechanism for ultimate elimination of invaded bacteria in innate immune cells. However, underlying mechanisms for the regulation of antibacterial autophagy require further elucidation. The present study mainly explores calcium dependent regulation of autophagy and its contribution to bactericidal activity in Escherichia coli (E. coli) infected murine macrophages. In this study, E. coli was shown to increase cellular calcium levels by triggering extracellular calcium influx in murine bone marrow derived macrophages. The elevated calcium was required for autophagy and bactericidal activity against E. coli, as extracellular calcium depletion or inhibition of calcium influx suppressed E. coli induced Beclin1 and LC3B expression, dampened LC3B puncta or LC3I to LC3II conversion and impaired intracellular E. coli degradation. Then CaMKKβ was identified as activated by E. coli induced calcium influx and chemical inhibition or RNAi knockdown of CaMKKβ abolished calcium mediated antibacterial autophagy. CaMKKβ was demonstrated to activate signaling pathways involving ERK, AMPK and FoxO1 and RNAi knockdown of these molecules also dampened the antibacterial autophagy against E. coli. In summary, we demonstrate a new mechanism of calcium dependent antibacterial strategy in E. coli infected macrophages, which requires autophagy enhancement mediated by activation of CaMKKβ, ERK, AMPK and FoxO1.

  16. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor regulates human fetal lung development via CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Sarah C.; Wilkinson, William J.; Tseng, Hsiu-Er; Finney, Brenda; Monk, Bethan; Dibble, Holly; Quilliam, Samantha; Warburton, David; Galietta, Luis J.; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Optimal fetal lung growth requires anion-driven fluid secretion into the lumen of the developing organ. The fetus is hypercalcemic compared to the mother and here we show that in the developing human lung this hypercalcaemia acts on the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaSR, to promote fluid-driven lung expansion through activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR. Several chloride channels including TMEM16, bestrophin, CFTR, CLCN2 and CLCA1, are also expressed in the developing human fetal lung at gestational stages when CaSR expression is maximal. Measurements of Cl−-driven fluid secretion in organ explant cultures show that pharmacological CaSR activation by calcimimetics stimulates lung fluid secretion through CFTR, an effect which in humans, but not mice, was also mimicked by fetal hypercalcemic conditions, demonstrating that the physiological relevance of such a mechanism appears to be species-specific. Calcimimetics promote CFTR opening by activating adenylate cyclase and we show that Ca2+-stimulated type I adenylate cyclase is expressed in the developing human lung. Together, these observations suggest that physiological fetal hypercalcemia, acting on the CaSR, promotes human fetal lung development via cAMP-dependent opening of CFTR. Disturbances in this process would be expected to permanently impact lung structure and might predispose to certain postnatal respiratory diseases. PMID:26911344

  17. Increase of Calcium Sensing Receptor Expression Is Related to Compensatory Insulin Secretion during Aging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoon Sin; Seo, Eun-Hui; Lee, Young-Sun; Cho, Sung Chun; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Sang Chul; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is caused by both insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. To investigate age-related changes in glucose metabolism and development of type 2 diabetes, we compared glucose homeostasis in different groups of C57BL/6J mice ranging in age from 4 months to 20 months (4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months). Interestingly, we observed that non-fasting glucose levels were not significantly changed, but glucose tolerance gradually increased by 20 months of age, whereas insulin sensitivity declined with age. We found that the size of islets and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion increased with aging. However, mRNA expression of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 and granuphilin was decreased in islets of older mice compared with that of 4-month-old mice. Serum calcium (Ca2+) levels were significantly decreased at 12, 20 and 28 months of age compared with 4 months and calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) mRNA expression in the islets significantly increased with age. An extracellular calcium depletion agent upregulated CaSR mRNA expression and consequently enhanced insulin secretion in INS-1 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, we suggest that decreased Ca2+ levels and increased CaSR expression might be involved in increased insulin secretion to compensate for insulin resistance in aged mice. PMID:27441644

  18. Expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human osteoblastic MG-63 cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Ye, C.; Vassilev, P. M.; Sanders, J. L.; Brown, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown the expression of the extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor (CaR) in osteoblast-like cell lines, and others have documented its expression in sections of murine, bovine, and rat bone. The existence of the CaR in osteoblasts remains controversial, however, since some studies have failed to document its expression in the same osteoblast-like cell lines. The goals of the present study were twofold. 1) We sought to determine whether the CaR is expressed in the human osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63, which has recently been reported by others not to express this receptor. 2) We investigated whether the CaR, if present in MG-63 cells, is functionally active, since most previous studies have not proven the role of the CaR in mediating known actions of Ca2+o on osteoblast-like cells. We used immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with the specific, affinity-purified anti-CaR antiserum 4637 as well as Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR using a riboprobe and PCR primers specific for the human CaR, respectively, to show readily detectable CaR protein and mRNA expression in MG-63 cells. Finally, we employed the patch-clamp technique to show that an elevation in Ca2+o as well as the specific, allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467 (0.5 microM), but not its less active stereoisomer NPS S-467 (0.5 microM), activate an outward K+ channel in MG-63 cells, strongly suggesting that the CaR in MG-63 cells is not only expressed but is functionally active.

  19. Increases in intracellular calcium via activation of an endogenous P2-purinoceptor in cultured CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Iredale, P. A.; Hill, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. Increases in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) were measured in chinese hamster cultured ovary cells (clone, CHO-K1), by use of the fluorescent, calcium-sensitive dye, fura-2. 2. Addition of both ATP and UTP elicited rapid increases in [Ca2+]i due to mobilization from intracellular stores and calcium entry across the plasma membrane. 3. Omission of calcium from the extracellular medium and pre-incubation with the inorganic calcium channel blocker, nickel (Ni2+) prevented the calcium entry components of the responses. 4. Investigation of the concentration-response relationships of various analogues of ATP suggests the presence of a purinoceptor which cannot be characterized as P2X or P2Y. In addition, there appears to be a sub-population of P2Y-purinoceptors which do not cross-react with the 'nucleotide' receptor population. 5. Cross-desensitization and additivity experiments suggest that both ATP and UTP activate the same receptor. 6. Pre-incubation with the tumour-promoting agent, beta-phorbol-12,13 dibutyrate (PDBu), caused a reduction in the increases in [Ca2+]i, suggesting a role for protein kinase C in feedback inhibition of purinoceptor responses in this cell line. 7. In summary, we present evidence for the existence of an endogenous P2U-purinoceptor (or 'nucleotide receptor') which is linked to increases in [Ca2+]i in CHO-K1 cells. PMID:8306069

  20. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical ...

  1. Does extracellular calcium determine what pool of GABA is the target for alpha-latrotoxin?

    PubMed

    Storchak, L G; Linetska, M V; Himmelreich, N H

    2002-04-01

    Presynaptic neurotoxin alpha-latrotoxin, from the venom of Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, causes massive [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain synaptosomes, irrespective of calcium presence in the extracellular medium. Whether the binding of alpha-latrotoxin to Ca(2+)-dependent (neurexin 1 alpha) or to Ca(2+)-independent (latrophilin) receptor triggers [(3)H]GABA release by the same mechanisms or different ones, inducing either exocytotic process or outflow by mobile membrane GABA transporter, is unknown. We examined alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release from synaptosomes which cytosolic [(3)H]GABA pool was depleted either by applying competitive inhibitors of the GABA transporter, nipecotic acid and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, or by permeation with digitonin. We also compared the effect of the GABA transporter inhibitors on depolarisation-evoked and alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release using as depolarising agents 4-aminopyridine and high KCl in the Ca(2+)-containing and in Ca(2+)-free medium, respectively. Incubation of synaptosomes with nipecotic acid induced the essential acceleration of unstimulated [(3)H]GABA release and deep inhibition of high KCl-evoked Ca(2+)-independent [(3)H]GABA release. In contrast, at the similar conditions the effect of alpha-latrotoxin was greatly augmented with respect to the control response. Another way to assay what GABA pool was involved in alpha-latrotoxin-induced release lays in an analysis of the effects of depolarisation and alpha-latrotoxin in consecutive order. The preliminary 4-aminopyridine-stimulated [(3)H]GABA release attenuated the toxin effect. But when depolarisation occurred in Ca(2+)-free medium, no influence on alpha-latrotoxin effect was revealed. Employing digitonin-permeated synaptosomes, we have shown that alpha-latrotoxin could stimulate [3H]GABA release in the medium with 1mM EGTA, this effect of the toxin was blocked by concanavalin A and was ATP-dependent. The latter suggests that alpha

  2. Extracellular ubiquitin increases expression of angiogenic molecules and stimulates angiogenesis in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Steagall, Rebecca J; Daniels, Christopher R; Dalal, Suman; Joyner, William L; Singh, Mahipal; Singh, Krishna

    2014-05-01

    Extracellular Ub is an immune modulator that plays a role in suppression of inflammation, organ injury, myocyte apoptosis, and fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of extracellular Ub on the process of cardiac angiogenesis. CMECs and aortic tissue were isolated from rats to measure changes in angiogenic protein levels and to assess angiogenic responses to extracellular Ub. In CMECs, extracellular Ub increased protein levels of VEGF-A and MMP-2, known angiogenesis regulators. CMECs demonstrated enhanced rearrangement of fibrillar actin and migration in response to Ub treatment. Ub-treated CMECs demonstrated an increase in tube network formation which was inhibited by the CXCR4 receptor antagonist, AMD3100. Methylated Ub, unable to form polyubiquitin chains, enhanced tube network formation. Aortic ring sprouting assays demonstrated that Ub increases microvessel sprouting in the Matrigel. The results of our study suggest a novel role for extracellular Ub in cardiac angiogenesis, providing evidence that extracellular Ub, at least in part acting via the CXCR4 receptor, has the potential to facilitate the process of angiogenesis in myocardial endothelial cells. PMID:24308702

  3. Control of cytosolic free calcium in rat and chicken osteoclasts. The role of extracellular calcium and calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Malgaroli, A; Meldolesi, J; Zallone, A Z; Teti, A

    1989-08-25

    Single cell [Ca2+], studies were performed in chicken and rat osteoclasts loaded with fura-2 and exposed to a variety of treatments. Under resting conditions, basal [Ca2+]i, was 79.2 +/- 47.3 and 84.3 +/- 65.7 nM (averages +/- S.D.; n = 141 and 126) in the osteoclasts of the two species, respectively. Basal [Ca2+]i was stable in all rat and in approximately 80% of chicken osteoclasts. In the remaining 20%, spontaneous, irregular [Ca2+], fluctuations were observed (amplitude range: 50-200 nm over basal values). Increase of [Ca2+]o over the concentration of the Krebs-Ringer incubation medium (2 mM) induced rises of [Ca2+] in almost all cells investigated. [Ca2+] rises were already appreciable with 0.5 mM [Ca2+]o additions and reached high values with 4 mM additions: 390 +/- 113 and 364 +/- 214 nM [Ca2+], in rat and chicken osteoclasts, respectively (n = 122 and 101). Qualitatively, the responses to [Ca2+]o additions consisted of discrete [Ca2+]i transients, biphasic (an initial spike followed by a plateau), or monophasic (either the spike or the plateau). In a few chicken osteoclasts, the [Ca2+]i increase occurring after [Ca2+]o addition consisted of multiple, irregular fluctuations, similar to those observed in 20% of these cells under resting conditions. In individual osteoclasts subsequently exposed to multiple [Ca2+]o increase pulses, the type of the [Ca2+]i transient (mono- or biphasic) was maintained, and the size was dependent on the magnitude of the [Ca2+]o additions. Effects similar to those of [Ca2+]o were induced by the addition of Cd2+ or Ba2+ (but not La3+ or Mg2+) into the medium. The Cd2+ effect was maintained in part even in a Ca2+-free medium. Of various hormones and factors, parathormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and prostaglandin E2 were inactive. In contrast, calcitonin was active in rat osteoclasts (which express numerous receptors). [Ca2+]i increases were small (19 +/- 17.9 nM; n = 21) when the hormone was administered alone; they were

  4. Effect of extracellular calcium on regucalcin expression and cell viability in neoplastic and non-neoplastic human prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Cátia V; Rodrigues, Daniel B; Socorro, Sílvia; Maia, Cláudio J

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) and its receptor, the Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR), play an important role in prostate physiology, and it has been shown that the deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis and the overexpression of CaSR are involved in prostate cancer (PCa). Regucalcin (RGN), a Ca2+-binding protein that plays a relevant role in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, was identified as an under-expressed protein in human PCa. Moreover, RGN was associated with suppression of cell proliferation, suggesting that the loss of RGN may favor development and progression of PCa. This work aims to unveil the role of Ca2+o on RGN expression and viability of non-neoplastic (PNT1A) and neoplastic (LNCaP) prostate cell lines. It was demonstrated that Ca2+o up-regulates RGN expression in both cell lines, but important differences were found between cells for dose- and time-responses to Ca2+o treatment. It was also shown that high [Ca2+]o triggers different effects on cell proliferation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic PCa cells, which seems to be related with RGN expression levels. This suggests the involvement of RGN in the regulation of cell proliferation in response to Ca2+o treatment. Also, the effect of Ca2+o on CaSR expression seems to be dependent of RGN expression, which is strengthened by the fact that RGN-knockdown in PNT1A cells increases the CaSR expression, whereas transgenic rats overexpressing RGN exhibit low levels of CaSR. Overall, our results highlighted the importance of RGN as a regulatory protein in Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways and its deregulation of RGN expression by Ca2+o may contribute for onset and progression of PCa.

  5. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shan-Li; Sun, Ming-Rui; Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin; Xu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3

  6. Inhibition of Extracellular Calcium Influx Results in Enhanced IL-12 Production in LPS-Treated Murine Macrophages by Downregulation of the CaMKKβ-AMPK-SIRT1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanfeng; Yang, Yongjun; Chen, Xiaoli; Fan, Shijun; Chen, Qian; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Activated macrophages are the primary sources of IL-12, a key cytokine bridging innate and adaptive immunity. However, macrophages produce low amounts of IL-12 upon stimulation and the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we found a new calcium-dependent mechanism that controlled IL-12 production in LPS-treated murine macrophages. First, LPS was demonstrated to induce extracellular calcium entry in murine peritoneal macrophages and inhibition of calcium influx resulted in marked enhancement in IL-12 production. Then, withdrawal of extracellular calcium was found to suppress CaMKKβ and AMPK activation triggered by LPS while chemical inhibition or genetic knockdown of these two kinases augmented LPS induced IL-12 production. AMPK activation increased the NAD+/NADH ratio and activated Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent deacetylating enzyme and negative regulator of inflammation. Chemical inhibitor or siRNA of SIRT1 enhanced IL-12 release while its agonist suppressed IL-12 production. Finally, it was found that SIRT1 selectively affected the transcriptional activity of NF-κB which thereby inhibited IL-12 production. Overall, our study demonstrates a new role of transmembrane calcium mobilization in immunity modulation such that inhibition of calcium influx leads to impaired activation of CaMKKβ-AMPK-SIRT1 signaling pathway which lifts restriction on NF-κB activation and results in enhanced IL-12 production. PMID:27313401

  7. Adolescence: How do we increase intestinal calcium absorption to allow for bone mineral mass accumulation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase in calcium absorptive efficiency (fractional absorption of dietary calcium) during adolescence is associated with a rapid increase in total body bone mineral mass (BMM) accumulation. This increase occurs across a range of calcium intakes. It appears to be principally mediated by hormonal...

  8. T-type calcium channels contribute to calcium disturbances in brain during hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Odackal, John; Sherpa, Ang D; Patel, Nisha; Colbourn, Robert; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-11-01

    Disturbance of calcium homeostasis is implicated in the normal process of aging and brain pathology prevalent in the elderly such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies demonstrated that applying a hyponatremic iso-osmotic (low-NaCl) artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to rodent hippocampus causes extracellular calcium to rapidly decrease. Restoring normonatremia after low-NaCl treatment causes a rapid increase in extracellular calcium that overshoots baseline. This study examined the amplitude, timing, and mechanism of these surprising calcium changes. We also tested whether hyponatremia increased calcium entry into brain cells or calcium binding to chondroitin sulfate (CS), a negatively charged constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that may be occupied by sodium during normonatremia. We report three major findings. First we show that CS does not contribute to extracellular calcium changes during low-NaCl treatments. Second, we show that the time to minimum extracellular calcium during low-NaCl treatment is significantly shorter than the time to maximum extracellular calcium in recovery from low-NaCl treatment. Third, we show that the decrease in extracellular calcium observed during hyponatremia is attenuated by ML 218, a highly selective T-type calcium channel blocker. Together these data suggest that calcium rapidly enters cells at the onset of low-NaCl treatment and is extruded from cells when normonatremia is restored. Calcium binding to CS does not significantly contribute to calcium changes in brain during hyponatremia. Differences in timing suggest that extracellular calcium changes during and in recovery from hyponatremia occur by distinct mechanisms or by a multistep process. Finally, partial block of extracellular calcium influx by ML 218 suggests that T-type channels are involved in calcium entering cells during hyponatremia. Given the high prevalence of hyponatremia among elderly patients and the

  9. Expression of a functional extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Xiong Yali; He Chaoxia; Hu Qinghua . E-mail: qinghuaa@jhmi.edu

    2006-03-31

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) regulates the functions of many cell types through a G protein-coupled [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}-sensing receptor (CaR). Whether the receptor is functionally expressed in vascular endothelial cells is largely unknown. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), RT-PCR yielded the expected 555-bp product corresponding to the CaR, and CaR protein was demonstrated by fluorescence immunostaining and Western blot. RT-PCR also demonstrated the expression in HAEC of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR lacking exon 5. Although stimulation of fura 2-loaded HAEC by several CaR agonists (high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}, neomycin, and gadolinium) failed to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), the CaR agonist spermine stimulated an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} that was diminished in buffer without Ca{sup 2+} and was abolished after depletion of an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} pool with thapsigargin or after blocking IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} release with xestospongin C and with high concentration ryanodine, respectively. Spermine stimulated an increase in DAF-FM fluorescence in HAEC, consistent with NO production. Both the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and in NO production were reduced or absent in HAEC transfected with siRNA specifically targeted to the CaR. HAEC express a functional CaR that responds to the endogenous polyamine spermine with an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, primarily due to release of IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores, leading to the production of NO. Expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR may result in the absence of a functional response to other known CaR agonists in HAEC.

  10. Lithium prevents early cytosolic calcium increase and secondary injurious calcium overload in glycolytically inhibited endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bosche, Bert; Schäfer, Matthias; Graf, Rudolf; Härtel, Frauke V.; Schäfer, Ute; Noll, Thomas

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We investigate free calcium as a central signalling element in endothelial cells. •Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduces cellular ATP. •This manoeuvre leads to a biphasic increase and overload of free calcium. •Pre-treatment with lithium for 24 h abolishes both phases of the calcium increase. •This provides a new strategy to protect endothelial calcium homeostasis and barrier function. -- Abstract: Cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is a central signalling element for the maintenance of endothelial barrier function. Under physiological conditions, it is controlled within narrow limits. Metabolic inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion, however, induces [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload, which results in barrier failure. In a model of cultured porcine aortic endothelial monolayers (EC), we addressed the question of whether [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload can be prevented by lithium treatment. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ATP were analysed using Fura-2 and HPLC, respectively. The combined inhibition of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by 2-desoxy-D-glucose (5 mM; 2-DG) plus sodium cyanide (5 mM; NaCN) caused a significant decrease in cellular ATP content (14 ± 1 nmol/mg protein vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg protein in the control, n = 6 culture dishes, P < 0.05), an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (278 ± 24 nM vs. 71 ± 2 nM in the control, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05), and the formation of gaps between adjacent EC. These observations indicate that there is impaired barrier function at an early state of metabolic inhibition. Glycolytic inhibition alone by 10 mM 2-DG led to a similar decrease in ATP content (14 ± 2 nmol/mg vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg in the control, P < 0.05) with a delay of 5 min. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} response of EC was biphasic with a peak after 1 min (183 ± 6 nM vs. 71 ± 1 nM, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05) followed by a sustained increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. A 24-h pre-treatment with 10 mM of lithium

  11. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Actions of Orthosteric and Allosteric Ligands on Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1α*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jason Y.; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Zhang, Li; Hamelberg, Donald; Hall, Randy A.; Brown, Edward M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α), a member of the family C G protein-coupled receptors, is emerging as a potential drug target for various disorders, including chronic neuronal degenerative diseases. In addition to being activated by glutamate, mGluR1α is also modulated by extracellular Ca2+. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Moreover, it has long been challenging to develop receptor-specific agonists due to homologies within the mGluR family, and the Ca2+-binding site(s) on mGluR1α may provide an opportunity for receptor-selective targeting by therapeutics. In the present study, we show that our previously predicted Ca2+-binding site in the hinge region of mGluR1α is adjacent to the site where orthosteric agonists and antagonists bind on the extracellular domain of the receptor. Moreover, we found that extracellular Ca2+ enhanced mGluR1α-mediated intracellular Ca2+ responses evoked by the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate. Conversely, extracellular Ca2+ diminished the inhibitory effect of the mGluR1α orthosteric antagonist (S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine. In addition, selective positive (Ro 67-4853) and negative (7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester) allosteric modulators of mGluR1α potentiated and inhibited responses to extracellular Ca2+, respectively, in a manner similar to their effects on the response of mGluR1α to glutamate. Mutations at residues predicted to be involved in Ca2+ binding, including E325I, had significant effects on the modulation of responses to the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate and the allosteric modulator Ro 67-4853 by extracellular Ca2+. These studies reveal that binding of extracellular Ca2+ to the predicted Ca2+-binding site in the extracellular domain of mGluR1α modulates not only glutamate-evoked signaling but also the actions of both orthosteric ligands and allosteric modulators on mGluR1α. PMID:24280223

  12. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiujun; Liang Ge; Yang Hui; Wang Shouping; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Wei Huafeng

    2011-02-01

    Isoflurane is known to increase {beta}-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdh{sup Q111/Q111}) and wild type (STHdh{sup Q7/Q7}) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdh{sup Q7/Q7} striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP{sub 3} receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} striatal cells.

  13. Arabidopsis Histone Methylase CAU1/PRMT5/SKB1 Acts as an Epigenetic Suppressor of the Calcium Signaling Gene CAS to Mediate Stomatal Closure in Response to Extracellular Calcium[W

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Lv, Xin-Fang; Guan, Yuan; Yi, Hong-Ying; Gong, Ji-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Elevations in extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o) are known to stimulate cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) oscillations to close stomata. However, the underlying mechanisms regulating this process remain largely to be determined. Here, through the functional characterization of the calcium underaccumulation mutant cau1, we report that the epigenetic regulation of CAS, a putative Ca2+ binding protein proposed to be an external Ca2+ sensor, is involved in this process. cau1 mutant plants display increased drought tolerance and stomatal closure. A mutation in CAU1 significantly increased the expression level of the calcium signaling gene CAS, and functional disruption of CAS abolished the enhanced drought tolerance and stomatal [Ca2+]o signaling in cau1. Map-based cloning revealed that CAU1 encodes the H4R3sme2 (for histone H4 Arg 3 with symmetric dimethylation)-type histone methylase protein arginine methytransferase5/Shk1 binding protein1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CAU1 binds to the CAS promoter and modulates the H4R3sme2-type histone methylation of the CAS chromatin. When exposed to elevated [Ca2+]o, the protein levels of CAU1 decreased and less CAU1 bound to the CAS promoter. In addition, the methylation level of H4R3sme2 decreased in the CAS chromatin. Together, these data suggest that in response to increases in [Ca2+]o, fewer CAU1 protein molecules bind to the CAS promoter, leading to decreased H4R3sme2 methylation and consequent derepression of the expression of CAS to mediate stomatal closure and drought tolerance. PMID:23943859

  14. Calcium-independent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 by cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, M.; Takei, T.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that cyclic strain induces extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation in endothelial cells (EC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Ca2+ on the activation of ERK1/2. Bovine aortic EC were pretreated with a chelator of extracellular Ca2+, ethylaneglycol-bis(aminoethylether)-tetra-acetate (EGTA), a depleter of Ca2+ pools, 2,5-Di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone (BHQ), or a Ca2+ channel blocker, GdCl3, and subjected to an average 10 % strain at a rate of 60 cycles/min for 10 min. BHQ and GdCl3 did not inhibit the strain-induced ERK1/2 activation. Chelation of normal extracellular Ca2+ (1.8 mM) medium with EGTA (3 mM) acutely stimulated baseline phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2, thereby obscuring any strain-induced activation of ERK1/2. However, in EC preincubated for 24 hours in Ca2+-free medium, elevated baseline phosphorylation was minimally activated by EGTA (200 microM) such that cyclic strain stimulated ERK1/2 in the presence or absence of BHQ. These results suggest a Ca2+ independence of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway by cyclic strain. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  15. Gabapentin increases extracellular glutamatergic level in the locus coeruleus via astroglial glutamate transporter-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Suto, Takashi; Severino, Amie L; Eisenach, James C; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro

    2014-06-01

    Gabapentin has shown to be effective in animals and humans with acute postoperative and chronic pain. Yet the mechanisms by which gabapentin reduces pain have not been fully addressed. The current study performed in vivo microdialysis in the locus coeruleus (LC) in normal and spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats to examine the effect of gabapentin on extracellular glutamate concentration and its mechanisms of action with focus on presynaptic GABA-B receptors, astroglial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), and interactions with α2δ subunits of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and endogenous noradrenaline. Basal extracellular concentration and tissue content of glutamate in the LC were greater in SNL rats than normal ones. Intravenously administered and LC-perfused gabapentin increased extracellular glutamate concentration in the LC. The net amount of glutamate increased by gabapentin is larger in SNL rats compared with normal ones, although the percentage increases from the baseline did not differ. The gabapentin-related α2δ ligand pregabalin increased extracellular glutamate concentration in the LC, whereas another α2δ ligand, 3-exo-aminobicyclo [2.2.1] heptane-2-exo-carboxylic acid (ABHCA), did not. Selective blockade by the dihydrokainic acid or knock-down of GLT-1 by the small interfering RNA abolished the gabapentin-induced glutamate increase in the LC, whereas blockade of GABA-B receptors by the CGP-35348 and depletion of noradrenalin by the dopamine-β-hydroxylase antibody conjugated to saporin did not. These results suggest that gabapentin induces glutamate release from astrocytes in the LC via GLT-1-dependent mechanisms to stimulate descending inhibition. The present study also demonstrates that this target of gabapentin in astrocytes does not require interaction with α2δ subunits in neurons.

  16. Increased extracellular levels of glutamate in the hippocampus of chronically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Soukupova, M; Binaschi, A; Falcicchia, C; Palma, E; Roncon, P; Zucchini, S; Simonato, M

    2015-08-20

    An increase in the release of excitatory amino acids has consistently been observed in the hippocampus during seizures, both in humans and animals. However, very little or nothing is known about the extracellular levels of glutamate and aspartate during epileptogenesis and in the interictal chronic period of established epilepsy. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the relationship between seizure activity and changes in hippocampal glutamate and aspartate extracellular levels under basal and high K(+)-evoked conditions, at various time-points in the natural history of experimental temporal lobe epilepsy, using in vivo microdialysis. Hippocampal extracellular glutamate and aspartate levels were evaluated: 24h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE); during the latency period preceding spontaneous seizures; immediately after the first spontaneous seizure; in the chronic (epileptic) period. We found that (i) basal (spontaneous) glutamate outflow is increased in the interictal phases of the chronic period, whereas basal aspartate outflow remains stable for the entire course of the disease; (ii) high K(+) perfusion increased glutamate and aspartate outflow in both control and pilocarpine-treated animals, and the overflow of glutamate was clearly increased in the chronic group. Our data suggest that the glutamatergic signaling is preserved and even potentiated in the hippocampus of epileptic rats, and thus may favor the occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Together with an impairment of GABA signaling (Soukupova et al., 2014), these data suggest that a shift toward excitation occurs in the excitation/inhibition balance in the chronic epileptic state. PMID:26073699

  17. Identification of 70 calcium-sensing receptor mutations in hyper- and hypo-calcaemic patients: evidence for clustering of extracellular domain mutations at calcium-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Nesbit, M Andrew; Zhang, Chen; Cranston, Treena; Curley, Alan J; Harding, Brian; Fratter, Carl; Rust, Nigel; Christie, Paul T; Turner, Jeremy J O; Lemos, Manuel C; Bowl, Michael R; Bouillon, Roger; Brain, Caroline; Bridges, Nicola; Burren, Christine; Connell, John M; Jung, Heike; Marks, Eileen; McCredie, David; Mughal, Zulf; Rodda, Christine; Tollefsen, Sherida; Brown, Edward M; Yang, Jenny J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2012-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that has an extracellular bilobed venus flytrap domain (VFTD) predicted to contain five calcium (Ca(2+))-binding sites. To elucidate the structure-function relationships of the VFTD, we investigated 294 unrelated probands with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) or autosomal dominant hypocalcaemic hypercalciuria (ADHH) for CaSR mutations and performed in vitro functional expression studies and three-dimensional modelling of mutations involving the VFTD. A total of 70 different CaSR mutations were identified: 35 in FHH, 10 in NSHPT and 25 in ADHH patients. Furthermore, a CaSR variant (Glu250Lys) was identified in FHH and ADHH probands and demonstrated to represent a functionally neutral polymorphism. NSHPT was associated with a large proportion of truncating CaSR mutations that occurred in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. Thirty-four VFTD missense mutations were identified, and 18 mutations were located within 10 Å of one or more of the predicted Ca(2+)-binding sites, particularly at the VFTD cleft, which is the principal site of Ca(2+) binding. Mutations of residues 173 and 221, which are located at the entrance to the VFTD cleft binding site, were associated with both receptor activation (Leu173Phe and Pro221Leu) and inactivation (Leu173Pro and Pro221Gln), thereby highlighting the importance of these residues for entry and binding of Ca(2+) by the CaSR. Thus, these studies of disease-associated CaSR mutations have further elucidated the role of the VFTD cleft region in Ca(2+) binding and the function of the CaSR. PMID:22422767

  18. Identification of 70 calcium-sensing receptor mutations in hyper- and hypo-calcaemic patients: evidence for clustering of extracellular domain mutations at calcium-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Nesbit, M Andrew; Zhang, Chen; Cranston, Treena; Curley, Alan J; Harding, Brian; Fratter, Carl; Rust, Nigel; Christie, Paul T; Turner, Jeremy J O; Lemos, Manuel C; Bowl, Michael R; Bouillon, Roger; Brain, Caroline; Bridges, Nicola; Burren, Christine; Connell, John M; Jung, Heike; Marks, Eileen; McCredie, David; Mughal, Zulf; Rodda, Christine; Tollefsen, Sherida; Brown, Edward M; Yang, Jenny J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2012-06-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that has an extracellular bilobed venus flytrap domain (VFTD) predicted to contain five calcium (Ca(2+))-binding sites. To elucidate the structure-function relationships of the VFTD, we investigated 294 unrelated probands with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH), neonatal severe primary hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT) or autosomal dominant hypocalcaemic hypercalciuria (ADHH) for CaSR mutations and performed in vitro functional expression studies and three-dimensional modelling of mutations involving the VFTD. A total of 70 different CaSR mutations were identified: 35 in FHH, 10 in NSHPT and 25 in ADHH patients. Furthermore, a CaSR variant (Glu250Lys) was identified in FHH and ADHH probands and demonstrated to represent a functionally neutral polymorphism. NSHPT was associated with a large proportion of truncating CaSR mutations that occurred in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. Thirty-four VFTD missense mutations were identified, and 18 mutations were located within 10 Å of one or more of the predicted Ca(2+)-binding sites, particularly at the VFTD cleft, which is the principal site of Ca(2+) binding. Mutations of residues 173 and 221, which are located at the entrance to the VFTD cleft binding site, were associated with both receptor activation (Leu173Phe and Pro221Leu) and inactivation (Leu173Pro and Pro221Gln), thereby highlighting the importance of these residues for entry and binding of Ca(2+) by the CaSR. Thus, these studies of disease-associated CaSR mutations have further elucidated the role of the VFTD cleft region in Ca(2+) binding and the function of the CaSR.

  19. Acute isoproterenol induces anxiety-like behavior in rats and increases plasma content of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Leo, Giuseppina; Guescini, Michele; Genedani, Susanna; Stocchi, Vilberto; Carone, Chiara; Filaferro, Monica; Sisti, Davide; Marcoli, Manuela; Maura, Guido; Cortelli, Pietro; Guidolin, Diego; Fuxe, Kjell; Agnati, Luigi Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Several clinical observations have demonstrated a link between heart rate and anxiety or panic disorders. In these patients, β-adrenergic receptor function was altered. This prompted us to investigate whether the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, at a dose that stimulates peripheral β-adrenergic system but has no effects at the central nervous system, can induce anxiety-like behavior in rats. Moreover, some possible messengers involved in the peripheral to brain communication were investigated. Our results showed that isoproterenol (5 mg kg(-1) i.p.) increased heart rate, evoked anxiety-like behavior, did not result in motor impairments and increased extracellular vesicle content in the blood. Plasma corticosterone level was unmodified as well as vesicular Hsp70 content. Vesicular miR-208 was also unmodified indicating a source of increased extracellular vesicles different from cardiomyocytes. We can hypothesize that peripheral extracellular vesicles might contribute to the β-adrenergic receptor-evoked anxiety-like behavior, acting as peripheral signals in modulating the mental state.

  20. Increase in glial intracellular K+ in drone retina caused by photostimulation but not mediated by an increase in extracellular K+.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Schneider-Picard, G

    1989-01-01

    The predominant glial cells of the drone retina (outer pigment cells) respond to an increase in extracellular [K+] (Ko) by a net uptake of K+; thus, they contribute to bringing Ko back toward its baseline value. The authors report herein that there is also a different mechanism by which light stimulation of the retina causes an increase in intracellular free [K+] in the glial cells. In superfused retinal slices, after 5-10 minutes of continuous illumination at physiological intensities, extracellular [K+] often fell back to below its original level in the dark. This fall can be explained by increased activity of the Na/K pump in the photoreceptors and diffusion of K+ down their axons. Despite the absence of raised Ko, K+-selective microelectrodes in glial cells recorded a small increase in intracellular [K+] that was maintained for the duration of the illumination; i.e. a change occurred in the glia that was not mediated by an increase in Ko. The increase in intracellular [K+] is not mediated by illumination of the screening pigment in the glia. Unless the increase is caused by illumination of some other, unknown, pigment in the glia, the results show that some unidentified signal (that is not K+) passes from the photoreceptors to the glia.

  1. Comparative expression of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the mouse, rat, and human kidney.

    PubMed

    Graca, J A Z; Schepelmann, M; Brennan, S C; Reens, J; Chang, W; Yan, P; Toka, H; Riccardi, D; Price, S A

    2016-03-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was cloned over 20 years ago and functionally demonstrated to regulate circulating levels of parathyroid hormone by maintaining physiological serum ionized calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]). The receptor is highly expressed in the kidney; however, intrarenal and intraspecies distribution remains controversial. Recently, additional functions of the CaSR receptor in the kidney have emerged, including parathyroid hormone-independent effects. It is therefore critical to establish unequivocally the localization of the CaSR in the kidney to relate this to its proposed physiological roles. In this study, we determined CaSR expression in mouse, rat, and human kidneys using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry (using 8 different commercially available and custom-made antibodies), and proximity ligation assays. Negative results in mice with kidney-specific CaSR ablation confirmed the specificity of the immunohistochemistry signal. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed CaSR expression in the thick ascending limb, distal tubule, and collecting duct of all species, with the thick ascending limb showing the highest levels. Within the collecting ducts, there was significant heterogeneity of expression between cell types. In the proximal tubule, lower levels of immunoreactivity were detected by immunohistochemistry and proximity ligation assays. Proximity ligation assays were the only technique to demonstrate expression within glomeruli. This study demonstrated CaSR expression throughout the kidney with minimal discrepancy between species but with significant variation in the levels of expression between cell and tubule types. These findings clarify the intrarenal distribution of the CaSR and enable elucidation of the full physiological roles of the receptor within this organ.

  2. Acid-sensing ion channels contribute to the increase in vesicular release from SH-SY5Y cells stimulated by extracellular protons.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Wu, Peng-Fei; Ni, Lan; Deng, Zhi-Fang; Wu, Wen-Ning; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2012-08-15

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) have been reported to play a role in the neuronal dopamine pathway, but the exact role in neurotransmitter release remains elusive. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y is a dopaminergic neuronal cell line, which can release monoamine neurotransmitters. In this study, the expression of ASICs was identified in SH-SY5Y cells to further explore the role of ASICs in vesicular release stimulated by acid. We gathered evidence that ASICs could be detected in SH-SY5Y cells. In whole cell patch-clamp recording, a rapid decrease in extracellular pH evoked inward currents, which were reversibly inhibited by 100 μM amiloride. The currents were pH dependent, with a pH of half-maximal activation (pH(0.5)) of 6.01 ± 0.04. Furthermore, in calcium imaging and FM 1-43 dye labeling, it was shown that extracellular protons increased intracellular calcium levels and vesicular release in SH-SY5Y cells, which was attenuated by PcTx1 and amiloride. Interestingly, N-type calcium channel blockers inhibited the vesicular release induced by acidification. In conclusion, ASICs are functionally expressed in SH-SY5Y cells and involved in vesicular release stimulated by acidification. N-type calcium channels may be involved in the increase in vesicular release induced by acid. Our results provide a preliminary study on ASICs in SH-SY5Y cells and neurotransmitter release, which helps to further investigate the relationship between ASICs and dopaminergic neurons.

  3. The Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor in the Intestine: Evidence for Regulation of Colonic Absorption, Secretion, Motility, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lieqi; Cheng, Catherine Y.; Sun, Xiangrong; Pedicone, Alexandra J.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Cheng, Sam X.

    2016-01-01

    Different from other epithelia, the intestinal epithelium has the complex task of providing a barrier impeding the entry of toxins, food antigens, and microbes, while at the same time allowing for the transfer of nutrients, electrolytes, water, and microbial metabolites. These molecules/organisms are transported either transcellularly, crossing the apical and basolateral membranes of enterocytes, or paracellularly, passing through the space between enterocytes. Accordingly, the intestinal epithelium can affect energy metabolism, fluid balance, as well as immune response and tolerance. To help accomplish these complex tasks, the intestinal epithelium has evolved many sensing receptor mechanisms. Yet, their roles and functions are only now beginning to be elucidated. This article explores one such sensing receptor mechanism, carried out by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In addition to its established function as a nutrient sensor, coordinating food digestion, nutrient absorption, and regulating energy metabolism, we present evidence for the emerging role of CaSR in the control of intestinal fluid homeostasis and immune balance. An additional role in the modulation of the enteric nerve activity and motility is also discussed. Clearly, CaSR has profound effects on many aspects of intestinal function. Nevertheless, more work is needed to fully understand all functions of CaSR in the intestine, including detailed mechanisms of action and specific pathways involved. Considering the essential roles CaSR plays in gastrointestinal physiology and immunology, research may lead to a translational opportunity for the development of novel therapies that are based on CaSR's unique property of using simple nutrients such as calcium, polyamines, and certain amino acids/oligopeptides as activators. It is possible that, through targeting of intestinal CaSR with a combination of specific nutrients, oral solutions that are both inexpensive and practical may be

  4. Warming and increased precipitation have differential effects on soil extracellular enzyme activities in a temperate grassland.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqi; Chen, Chengrong; Wang, Yanfen; Xu, Zhihong; Han, Hongyan; Li, Linghao; Wan, Shiqiang

    2013-02-01

    Few studies have conducted the responses of soil extracellular enzyme activities (EEA) to climate change, especially over the long term. In this study, we investigated the six-year responses of soil EEA to warming and increased precipitation in a temperate grassland of northern China at two depths of 0-10 and 10-20 cm. These extracellular enzymes included carbon-acquisition enzymes (β-glucosidase, BG), nitrogen-acquisition enzymes (N-acetylglucosaminidase, NAG; Leucine aminopeptidase, LAP) and phosphorus-acquisition enzymes (acid and alkaline phosphatases). The results showed that warming significantly increased acid phosphatase at the 0-10 cm depth and NAG at the 10-20 cm depth, but dramatically decreased BG and acid phosphatase in the subsurface. In contrast, increased precipitation significantly increased NAG, LAP and alkaline phosphatase in the surface and NAG, LAP and acid phosphatase in the subsurface. There was a significant warming and increased precipitation interaction on BG in the subsurface. Redundancy analysis indicated that the patterns of EEA were mainly driven by soil pH and NH(4)(+)-N and NO(3)(-)-N in the surface, while by NH(4)(+)-N and microbial biomass in the subsurface. Our results suggested that soil EEA responded differentially to warming and increased precipitation at two depths in this region, which may have implications for carbon and nutrient cycling under climate change.

  5. Vitamin D does not increase calcium absorption in young women: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J Christopher; Jindal, Prachi S; Smith, Lynette M

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly said that vitamin D should be used to increase calcium absorption. We tested this statement in a dose-response study of vitamin D on calcium absorption. A total of 198 white and African American women, aged 25 to 45 years, with vitamin D insufficiency, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) <20 ng/mL, were randomized in a double-blind study to vitamin D3 400, 800, 1600, 2400 IU, or placebo. A calcium supplement was given to increase mean calcium intake at baseline from 706 mg/d to 1031 mg/d. Calcium absorption was measured at baseline and after 12 months using a single isotope method with radiocalcium45 and 100 mg of calcium. Mean baseline serum 25OHD was 13.4 ng/mL (33.5 nmol/L) and increased to 40 ng/mL (100 nmol/L) on the highest dose of 2400 IU. Using a multivariate regression analysis with significant predictors, baseline absorption, calcium intake, and weight, there was no increase in 12-month calcium absorption compared with baseline on any dose of vitamin D in either whites or African Americans. There was no significant relationship between 12-month calcium absorption and final serum 25OHD. In an analysis of calcium absorption and serum 25OHD at baseline, serum 25OHD levels were divided into groups: 0 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 15, or 16 to 20 ng/mL. There was no evidence of a threshold decrease in calcium absorption or serum 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2 D) amongst the lowest groups. Vitamin D doses up to 2400 IU daily did not increase calcium absorption. No threshold level of serum 25OHD for calcium absorption was found at baseline or in the longitudinal study, suggesting that active transport of calcium is saturated at very low serum 25OHD levels <5 ng/mL. There is no need to recommend vitamin D for increasing calcium absorption in normal subjects. Very efficient calcium absorption at very low levels of serum 25OHD explains why people do not develop osteomalacia provided that dietary intakes of calcium and phosphorus are adequate.

  6. Bradykinin and histamine-induced cytosolic calcium increase in capillary endothelial cells of bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Vinet, Raúl; Cortés, Magdalena P; Alvarez, Rocío; Delpiano, Marco A

    2014-09-01

    We have assessed the effect of bradykinin and histamine on the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i ) of bovine adrenal medulla capillary endothelial cells (BAMCECs). To measure [Ca(2+)]i changes in BAMCECs the intracellular fluorescent probe, fluo-3 AM, was used. Bradykinin (3 µM) produced a transient monophasic increase in [Ca(2+)]i , which was depressed by B1650 (0.1 µM), a B2-bradykinin receptor antagonist (D-Arg-[Hyp(3), Thi(5,8) , D-Phe(7)]-Bradykinin). Similarly, increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by histamine was also depressed by tripolidine (0.1 µM), an H1-histamine receptor antagonist. [Ca(2+)]i increase induced by both agonists was unaffected in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or presence of antagonists of voltage operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCCs). Thapsigargin (1 µM) did not abolish the increase of [Ca(2+)]i produced by bradykinin, but abolished that of histamine. In contrast, caffeine (100 µM), abolished the [Ca(2+)]i response induced by bradykinin (3 µM), but did not affect the [Ca(2+)]i increase induced by histamine (100 µM). The results indicate the presence of B2 bradykinin- and H1 histamine-receptors in BAMCECs. Liberation of Ca(2+) induced by both agonists occurs through 2 different intracellular mechanisms. While bradykinin activates a sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum (SER) containing a SER Ca(2+) -ATPase (SERCA) thapsigargin-insensitive, histamine activates a SER containing a SERCA thapsigargin-sensitive. We suggest that the increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by bradykinin and histamine could be of physiological relevance, modulating adrenal gland microcirculation.

  7. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca2+ via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca2+ both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  8. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Activates CaMMKβ to Initiate Autophagy in PK-15 Cells by Increasing Cytosolic Calcium.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanxing; Qi, Baozhu; Zhou, Yingshan; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) induces autophagy via the 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in pig kidney PK-15 cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of AMPK activation in autophagy induction remain unknown. With specific inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi), we show that PCV2 infection upregulated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKβ) by increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R). Elevation of cytosolic calcium ion (Ca(2+)) did not seem to involve inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) release from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by phosphoinositide phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-γ). CaMKKβ then activated both AMPK and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I (CaMKI). PCV2 employed CaMKI and Trp-Asp (WD) repeat domain phosphoinositide-interacting protein 1 (WIPI1) as another pathway additional to AMPK signaling in autophagy initiation. Our findings could help better understanding of the signaling pathways of autophagy induction as part of PCV2 pathogenesis. Further research is warranted to study if PCV2 interacts directly with IP3R or indirectly with the molecules that antagonize IP3R activity responsible for increased cytosolic Ca(2+) both in PK-15 cells and PCV2-targeted primary cells from pigs. PMID:27213427

  9. 8-Diethylamino-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, a calcium store blocker, increases calcium influx, inhibits alpha-1 adrenergic receptor calcium mobilization, and alters iodide transport in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Smallridge, R C; Gist, I D; Ambroz, C

    1991-07-01

    8-Diethylamino-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8) is known to inhibit mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores but, more recently, other cellular effects have been described. In the present study, the effects of TMB-8 on cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]i levels in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells were determined using the fluorescent dye, Indo-1. TMB-8 increased [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximum rise from 120 +/- 7 nM to 229 +/- 16 nM (90 +/- 5% increase) at 5 x 10(-4) M. This effect was considerably reduced in Ca2+ free buffer, demonstrating a dependency upon extracellular calcium influx but not upon membrane potential and which did not involve the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In Ca2+ free buffer TMB-8, at a dose which did not affect [Ca2+]i, completely prevented norepinephrine (10(-5) M) from mobilizing intracellular Ca2+. To determine whether TMB-8 affected differentiated functions, iodide uptake and efflux studies were performed with 125I. TMB-8 (10(-4) M) inhibited iodide uptake by approximately 40% without affecting efflux. At 10(-3) M TMB-8, efflux was also enhanced. These studies demonstrate that TMB-8 has at least two effects on [Ca2+]i, promoting calcium influx and preventing alpha-1 adrenergic mobilization from intracellular stores. TMB-8 also has multiple effects on 125I transport, both inhibiting influx and increasing efflux. The results emphasize the importance of characterizing the behavior of this compound in any cell system before using it as a biological probe.

  10. Novel psychoactive benzofurans strongly increase extracellular serotonin level in mouse corpus striatum.

    PubMed

    Fuwa, Tatsu; Suzuki, Jin; Tanaka, Toyohito; Inomata, Akiko; Honda, Yoshiko; Kodama, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of three benzofurans [1-(Benzofuran-5-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine (5-MAPB), 1-(Benzofuran-2-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine (2-MAPB), and 1-(Benzofuran-5-yl)-N-ethylpropan-2-amine (5-EAPB)] on the extracellular monoamine level in mouse corpus striatum by the microdialysis method and compared them with the effects of psychoactive 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). The effects of benzofurans on the extracellular monoamine level were qualitatively analogous to that of MDMA, with an increase in serotonin (5-HT) level exceeding dopamine (DA) level. The effects of 2-MAPB and 5-EAPB were almost the same as the effect of MDMA. However, 5-MAPB strongly increased extracellular monoamine level than MDMA. These differences in the potency appear to have a structure-activity relationship. The administration of 5-MAPB (1.6 × 10(-4) mol/kg B.W.) resulted in the death of two-thirds of the mice. The same dose of MDMA did not cause any deaths. The administration of 5-MAPB (1.6 × 10(-4) mol/kg B.W.) produced a 3.41°C ± 0.28°C rise in rectal temperature after 1 hr, whereas the administration of MDMA (1.6 × 10(-4) mol/kg B.W.) produced an approximate 1.85°C ± 0.26°C rise. These results suggest that benzofurans have 5-HT toxicity similar to MDMA, and 5-MAPB has a higher risk of lethal intoxication than MDMA. Furthermore, 5-APB, the metabolic product of 5-MAPB demethylation, may be involved in the acute 5-HT toxicity and may cause lethal intoxication in mice. PMID:27193726

  11. Extracellular Self-DNA (esDNA), but Not Heterologous Plant or Insect DNA (etDNA), Induces Plasma Membrane Depolarization and Calcium Signaling in Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Maize (Zea mays)

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Francesca; Guglielmotto, Michela; Capuzzo, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular self-DNA (esDNA) is produced during cell and tissue damage or degradation and has been shown to induce significant responses in several organisms, including plants. While the inhibitory effects of esDNA have been shown in conspecific individuals, little is known on the early events involved upon plant esDNA perception. We used electrophysiology and confocal laser scanning microscopy calcium localization to evaluate the plasma membrane potential (Vm) variations and the intracellular calcium fluxes, respectively, in Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and maize (Zea mays) plants exposed to esDNA and extracellular heterologous DNA (etDNA) and to etDNA from Spodoptera littoralis larvae and oral secretions. In both species, esDNA induced a significant Vm depolarization and an increased flux of calcium, whereas etDNA was unable to exert any of these early signaling events. These findings confirm the specificity of esDNA to induce plant cell responses and to trigger early signaling events that eventually lead to plant response to damage. PMID:27690017

  12. Bromelain Surface Modification Increases the Diffusion of Silica Nanoparticles in the Tumor Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br–MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br–MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25119793

  13. Bromelain surface modification increases the diffusion of silica nanoparticles in the tumor extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Alessandro; Haddix, Seth G; Taghipour, Nima; Scaria, Shilpa; Taraballi, Francesca; Cevenini, Armando; Yazdi, Iman K; Corbo, Claudia; Palomba, Roberto; Khaled, Sm Z; Martinez, Jonathan O; Brown, Brandon S; Isenhart, Lucas; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-10-28

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br-MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br-MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Inflammaging and Frailty Status Do Not Result in an Increased Extracellular Vesicle Concentration in Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Alberro, Ainhoa; Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Mateo-Abad, Maider; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Matheu, Ander; Vergara, Itziar; Otaegui, David

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades extracellular vesicles (EVs) have emerged as key players for intercellular communication. In the case of inflammation, several studies have reported that EV levels are increased in circulation during inflammatory episodes. Based on this, we investigated whether aging results in elevated EV number, as a basal proinflammatory status termed “inflammaging” has been described in aged individuals. Moreover, we also hypothesized that frailty and dependence conditions of the elderly could affect EV concentration in plasma. Results showed that inflammaging, frailty or dependence status do not result in EV increase, at least in the total number of EVs in circulation. These results open a new perspective for investigating the role of EVs in human aging and in the inflammaging process. PMID:27447627

  15. PDGF-mediated protection of SH-SY5Y cells against Tat toxin involves regulation of extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuhui; Yao Honghong; Peng Fuwang; Callen, Shannon; Buch, Shilpa

    2009-10-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protein Tat has been implicated in mediating neuronal apoptosis, one of the hallmark features of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Mitigation of the toxic effects of Tat could thus be a potential mechanism for reducing HIV toxicity in the brain. In this study we demonstrated that Tat-induced neurotoxicity was abolished by NMDA antagonist-MK801, suggesting the role of glutamate in this process. Furthermore, we also found that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF exerted protection against Tat toxicity by decreasing extracellular glutamate levels. We also demonstrated that extracellular calcium chelator EGTA was able to abolish PDGF-mediated neuroprotection, thereby underscoring the role of calcium signaling in PDGF-mediated neuroprotection. We also showed that Erk signaling pathway was critical for PDGF-mediated protection of cells. Additionally, blocking calcium entry with EGTA resulted in suppression of PDGF-induced Erk activation. These findings thus underscore the role of PDGF-mediated calcium signaling and Erk phosphorylation in the protection of cells against HIV Tat toxicity.

  16. Aqueous solubility of calcium L-lactate, calcium D-gluconate, and calcium D-lactobionate: importance of complex formation for solubility increase by hydroxycarboxylate mixtures.

    PubMed

    Vavrusova, Martina; Munk, Merete Bøgelund; Skibsted, Leif H

    2013-08-28

    Among the calcium hydroxycarboxylates important for cheese quality, D-lactobionate [Ksp = (7.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-3) mol(3) L(-3)] and L-lactate [Ksp = (5.8 ± 0.2) × 10(-3) mol(3) L(-3)] were found more soluble than D-gluconate [Ksp = (7.1 ± 0.2) × 10(-4) mol(3) L(-3)], as indicated by the solubility products determined electrochemically for aqueous 1.0 M NaCl at 25.0 °C. Still, solubility of calcium L-lactate increases by 45% in the presence of 0.50 M sodium D-gluconate and by 37% in the presence of 0.50 M sodium D-lactobionate, while solubility of calcium D-gluconate increases by 66 and 85% in the presence of 0.50 M sodium L-lactate and 0.50 M sodium D-lactobionate, respectively, as determined by complexometric titration. Sodium L-lactate and sodium D-gluconate have only little influence on solubility of calcium D-lactobionate. The increased solubility is described quantitatively by calcium binding to D-gluconate (K1 = 14 ± 3 mol(-1) L) in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C, D-lactobionate (K1 = 11 ± 2 mol(-1) L), and L-lactate (K1 = 8 ± 2 mol(-1) L), as indicated by the association constants determined electrochemically. In mixed hydroxycarboxylate solutions, calcium binding is quantitatively described by the geometric mean of the individual association constants for both aqueous 1.0 and 0.20 M NaCl, indicating a 1:1 stoichiometry for complex formation.

  17. Expression of the high capacity calcium-binding domain of calreticulin increases bioavailable calcium stores in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Tsou, Pei-Lan; Robertson, Dominique; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of cytosolic calcium levels in both plants and animals is achieved by a system of Ca2+-transport and storage pathways that include Ca2+ buffering proteins in the lumen of intracellular compartments. To date, most research has focused on the role of transporters in regulating cytosolic calcium. We used a reverse genetics approach to modulate calcium stores in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our goals were two-fold: to use the low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ binding characteristics of the C-domain of calreticulin to selectively increase Ca2+ storage in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to determine if those alterations affected plant physiological responses to stress. The C-domain of calreticulin is a highly acidic region that binds 20-50 moles of Ca2+ per mole of protein and has been shown to be the major site of Ca2+ storage within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. A 377-bp fragment encoding the C-domain and ER retention signal from the maize calreticulin gene was fused to a gene for the green fluorescent protein and expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of a heat shock promoter. Following induction on normal medium, the C-domain transformants showed delayed loss of chlorophyll after transfer to calcium depleted medium when compared to seedlings transformed with green fluorescent protein alone. Total calcium measurements showed a 9-35% increase for induced C-domain transformants compared to controls. The data suggest that ectopic expression of the calreticulin C-domain increases Ca2+ stores, and that this Ca2+ reserve can be used by the plant in times of stress.

  18. Increased arterial stiffness and extracellular matrix reorganization in intrauterine growth–restricted fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Reuben Blair; Rozance, Paul J.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Petrash, Carson C.; Shoemaker, Lauren G.; Hunter, Kendall S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) results in increased placental resistance to blood flow, fetal hypertension, and increased pulsatility stresses shown to lead to vascular remodeling. We tested our hypothesis that IUGR causes decreased compliance in the carotid and umbilical arteries due to altered extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and structure. METHODS A sheep model of placental insufficiency–induced IUGR (PI-IUGR) was created by exposure of the pregnant ewe to elevated ambient temperatures. Umbilical and carotid arteries from near-term fetuses were tested with pressure–diameter measurements to compare passive compliance in control and PI-IUGR tissues. ECM composition was measured via biochemical assay, and the organization was determined by using histology and second-harmonic generation imaging. RESULTS We found that PI-IUGR increased arterial stiffness with increased collagen engagement, or transition stretch. PI-IUGR carotid arteries exhibited increased collagen and elastin quantity, and PI-IUGR umbilical arteries exhibited increased sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Histomorphology showed altered collagen-to-elastin ratios with altered cellular proliferation. Increased stiffness indicates altered collagen-to-elastin ratios with less elastin contribution leading to increased collagen engagement. CONCLUSION Because vessel stiffness is a significant predictor in the development of hypertension, disrupted ECM deposition in IUGR provides a potential link between IUGR and adult hypertension. PMID:23154756

  19. Nitrotyrosine immunostaining correlates with increased extracellular matrix: evidence of postplacental hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Stanek, J; Eis, A L; Myatt, L

    2001-04-01

    Nitrotyrosine residues (NT), an index of oxidative stress arising from peroxynitrite formation and action, are found in placental vasculature of pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia (PE) or pregestational insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). This study correlates conventional placental pathology with NT immunostaining in 20 cases of perinatal mortality (13 stillbirths and seven cases of neonatal mortality) associated with PE, IDDM, amniotic fluid infection syndrome (AFIS), or from fetal/neonatal demise not related to these conditions (congenital anomalies) (n = five/group). Patients with PE have more decidual arteriolopathy and Tenney-Parker change, while patients with IDDM and ascending infection have more villous cytotrophoblastic hyperplasia. Archival paraffin-embedded placental sections were immunostained for NT for correlation with clinical features and H&E histological findings. The intensity of immunostaining for NT varied from absent (n = 7) to 1+ (n = 5) or 2+ (n = 8). All eight placentae with 2+ staining showed increased villous extracellular matrix (ECM), compared to none of five with 1+ staining and two of seven with no staining (chi2 = 14.3, P = 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of stem villi with luminal vascular abnormalities (5.7 vs 10 vs 35.7 per cent, F = 2.3, P = 0.1). Our data show that increased production of reactive oxygen species by placental tissue may be associated with increased extracellular matrix, itself produced by fibroblasts under the influence of oxygen. NT immunostaining may therefore help differentiate those cases of perinatal morbidity/mortality associated with post-placental hypoxia provided that the secondary impact of intrauterine fetal death can be excluded by future studies. PMID:11312630

  20. Data on calcium increases depending on stretch in dystrophic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Aguettaz, E; Lopez, J J; Krzesiak, A; Constantin, B; Cognard, C; Sebille, S

    2016-09-01

    In this data article, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured in isolated ventricular Wild Type (WT) and mdx cardiomyocytes in two different conditions: at rest and during the application of an axial stretch. Using a carbon microfibers technique, axial stretch was applied to mimic effects of physiological conditions of ventricular filling. A study of cation entry with the same experimental model and the manganese quenching method reported (i) a constitutive cation entry in mdx cardiomyocytes and (ii) the involvement of TRPV2 channels in axial-stretch dependant cation entry, "Axial stretch-dependent cation entry in dystrophic cardiomyopathy: involvement of several TRPs channels" (Aguettaz et al., 2016) [1]. Here, the Ca(2+) dye fluo-8 was used for [Ca(2+)]i measurement, in both resting and stretching conditions, using a perfusion protocol starting initially with a calcium free Tyrode solution followed by the perfusion of 1.8 mM Ca(2+) Tyrode solution. The variation of [Ca(2+)]i was found higher in mdx cardiomyocytes. PMID:27617280

  1. A pilot intervention to increase calcium intake in female collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Mehlenbeck, Robyn S; Ward, Kenneth D; Klesges, Robert C; Vukadinovich, Christopher M

    2004-02-01

    Calcium intake in adolescent and young adult female athletes often is inadequate to optimize peak bone mass, an important determinant of osteoporosis risk. The purpose of this study was to determine if calcium supplementation in eumenorrheic female collegiate athletes increases intake to recommended levels and promotes increases in bone mineral density (BMD). Forty-eight eumenorrheic female athletes from several college teams (15 soccer, 7 cross-country, 8 indoor track, and 18 basketball) were randomized at the beginning of a competitive season to receive either an oral calcium supplement (1000 mg calcium citrate/400 I.U. Vitamin D) or placebo daily throughout the training season (16 weeks). Self-reported daily pill intake was obtained every 2 weeks to assess adherence. Calcium intake was evaluated using the Rapid Assessment Method, and total body and leg BMD was measured at pre-, mid-, and postseason using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA; Hologic QDR-2000). Pre-season calcium intake was lower than national recommendations for this age group (12), averaging 842 mg/d (SD = 719) and was lower in the placebo group compared to the supplemented group (649 +/- 268 vs. 1071 +/- 986 mg/d, respectively; p = .064). Adherence to supplementation was good, averaging 70% across the training season. Supplementation boosted total calcium intake to a mean of 1397 +/- 411 mg/d, which is consistent with recommended levels for this group (37). Supplementation did not influence BMD change during this 16-week intervention. Across teams, a small increase of 0.8% was observed in leg BMD. Change in total body BMD was modified by team, with a significant increase of 1.5% observed in basketball players. These results indicate that providing calcium supplements of 1000 mg/d is adequate to boost total intake to recommended levels during athletic training. Longer intervention trials are required to determine whether calcium supplementation has a positive effect on BMD.

  2. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  3. Defective female reproductive function in 1,25(OH)2D-deficient mice results from indirect effect mediated by extracellular calcium and/or phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weiwei; Xie, Hui; Ji, Ji; Zhou, Xiaojie; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2010-12-01

    We used mice with targeted deletion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase [1α(OH)ase(-/-)] to investigate the effects of calcium and phosphorus on defects in the reproductive system of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D]-deficient female mice. The 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice and their wild-type littermates were fed either a normal diet or a rescue diet (high calcium, phosphate, and lactose) starting from weaning until 3 mo of age. We then determined serum calcium and phosphorus levels, assessed gonadotropin and gonadal hormone production, and evaluated folliculogenesis, corpus luteum formation, ovarian angiogenesis, uterus development, and fertility. Results showed that hypocalcemic and hypophosphatemic female 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice developed infertility accompanied by decreased estrogen and progestogen levels, elevated follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone levels, defects in follicular development and corpus luteum formation, uterine hypoplasia, and decreased ovarian expression of angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 and -2, and Tie-2. When serum calcium and phosphorus were normalized by the rescue diet, the defective reproductive phenotype in the female 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice, including the dysfunction in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and ovarian angiogenesis were reversed. These results indicate that the infertility seen in 1,25(OH)(2)D-deficient mice is not a direct effect of active vitamin D deficiency on the reproductive system but is an indirect effect mediated by extracellular calcium and phosphorus.

  4. Increased expression of extracellular proteins as a hallmark of human endothelial cell in vitro senescence.

    PubMed

    Hampel, B; Fortschegger, K; Ressler, S; Chang, M W; Unterluggauer, H; Breitwieser, A; Sommergruber, W; Fitzky, B; Lepperdinger, G; Jansen-Dürr, P; Voglauer, R; Grillari, J

    2006-05-01

    A convenient way to study processes of aging in distinct human tissues consists of a molecular analysis of cells from the tissue in question, that were explanted and grown in vitro until they reach senescence. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), we have established an in vitro senescence model for human endothelial cells. A major hallmark of HUVEC in vitro senescence is the increased frequency of apoptotic cell death, which occurs as a determining feature of HUVEC senescence. Senescent endothelial cells are also found in vivo in atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that the presence of such cells may contribute to the development of vascular pathology. To elucidate mechanisms underlying endothelial cell senescence and age-associated apoptosis, gene expression analyses were carried out. In these experiments, we observed the up-regulation of genes coding for extracellular proteins in senescent HUVEC. In particular, a significant upregulation of interleukin-8, VEGI, and the IGF-binding proteins 3 and 5 was observed. Upregulation of these genes was confirmed by both RT-PCR and Western blot. In the case of interleukin-8, a roughly 50-fold upregulation of the protein was also found in cellular supernatants. The extracellular proteins encoded by these genes are well known for their ability to modulate the apoptotic response of human cells, and in the case of interleukin-8, clear links to the establishment of atherosclerotic lesions have been defined. The results described here support a new model, where changes in the secretome of human endothelial cells contribute to vascular aging and vascular pathology. PMID:16626901

  5. A novel method using Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus for increasing the sensitivity of insecticide through calcium influx in insect cell line.

    PubMed

    Licznar, Patricia; List, Olivier; Goven, Delphine; Nna, Rolande Ndong; Lapied, Bruno; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Due to an intensive use of chemical insecticides, resistance mechanisms to insecticides together with adverse effects on non-target organisms have been largely reported. Improvement in pest control strategy represents an urgent need to optimize efficiency in the control of pest insects. In this context, a novel method based on the use of insect specific virus applied in combination with chemical insecticide, which could lead to sensitization of the insect target to insecticides is described. Insect virus, the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), applied onto Sf9 cells induces an increase of intracellular calcium concentration via extracellular calcium influx. Co-application of AcMNPV with chlorpyrifos-ethyl onto Sf9 cells expressing the key enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE), known to be targeted by organophosphate insecticides, increases 1.5-fold the sensitivity of AChE to the insecticide. This effect is correlated with intracellular calcium concentration rise since AcMNPV-induced potentiating insecticide effect is counteracted by pretreatment with the calcium channel blocker, cadmium chloride. Increasing insecticide target sensitivity through intracellular calcium modulation by using insect virus co-applied with a chemical insecticide is a very promising strategy allowing optimization of insecticide treatment while reducing the concentration of insecticides used.

  6. INCREASES IN CYTOSOLIC CALCIUM ION LEVELS IN HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS IN RESPONSE TO BUTYLTIN EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Rhonda; Ghazi, Sabah O.; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether exposures to butyltins (BTs), tributylin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) were able to alter cytosolic calcium levels in human natural killer (NK) cells. Additionally, the effects of cytosolic calcium ion increases on the activation state of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in NK cells were also investigated. NK cells are an intital immune defense against the development of tumors or viral infections. TBT and DBT are widespread environmental contaminants, due to their various industrial applications. Both TBT and DBT have been shown to decrease the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells (lytic function). TBT has also been shown to activate MAPKs in NK cells. The results of this study indicated that TBT increased cytosolic calcium levels by as much as 100% after a 60 min exposure to 500 nM TBT while DBT increased cytosolic calcium levels to a much smaller extent (and required higher concentrations). The results also indicated that increases in cytosolic calcium could activate MAPKs but only for a short period of time (5 min), while previous studies showed that activation of MAPKs by TBT last for at least 6 hours. Thus, it appears that TBT stimulated increases in cytosolic calcium may contribute to, but are not fully responsible for, TBT-induced activation of MAPKs. PMID:19365649

  7. Nuclear membrane R-type calcium channels mediate cytosolic ET-1-induced increase of nuclear calcium in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bkaily, Ghassan; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Chamoun, Marc; Semaan, Rana; Jubinville-Leblanc, Cynthia; D'Orléans-Juste, Pedro; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this work was to verify whether, as in the case of the plasma membrane of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs), cytosolic ET-1-induced increase of nuclear calcium is mediated via the activation of calcium influx through the steady-state R-type calcium channel. Pharmacological tools to identify the R-type calcium channels, as well as real 3-D confocal microscopy imaging techniques coupled to calcium fluorescent probes, were used to study the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on nuclear calcium in isolated nuclei of human hepatocytes and plasma membrane perforated hVSMCs. Our results showed that pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) or cholera toxin (CTX) prevented cytosolic ET-1 (10(-9) mol/L) from inducing a sustained increase in nuclear calcium. Furthermore, the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine did not prevent cytosolic ET-1 from inducing an increase in nuclear calcium, as opposed to the dual L- and R-type calcium channel blocker isradipine (PN200-110) (in the presence of nifedipine). In conclusion, the preventative effect with PTX and CTX, and the absence of an effect with nifedipine, as well as the blockade by isradipine on cytosolic ET-1-induced increase in nuclear calcium, suggest that this nuclear calcium influx in hVSMCs is due to activation of the steady-state R-type calcium channel. The sarcolemmal and nuclear membrane R-type calcium channels in hVSMCs are involved in ET-1 modulation of vascular tone in physiology and pathology.

  8. Intrinsic stiffness of extracellular matrix increases with age in skeletal muscles of mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren K; Kayupov, Erdan; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L; Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2014-08-15

    Advanced age is associated with increases in muscle passive stiffness, but the contributors to the changes remain unclear. Our purpose was to determine the relative contributions of muscle fibers and extracellular matrix (ECM) to muscle passive stiffness in both adult and old animals. Passive mechanical properties were determined for isolated individual muscle fibers and bundles of muscle fibers that included their associated ECM, obtained from tibialis anterior muscles of adult (8-12 mo old) and old (28-30 mo old) mice. Maximum tangent moduli of individual muscle fibers from adult and old muscles were not different at any sarcomere length tested. In contrast, the moduli of bundles of fibers from old mice was more than twofold greater than that of fiber bundles from adult muscles at sarcomere lengths >2.5 μm. Because ECM mechanical behavior is determined by the composition and arrangement of its molecular constituents, we also examined the effect of aging on ECM collagen characteristics. With aging, muscle ECM hydroxyproline content increased twofold and advanced glycation end-product protein adducts increased threefold, whereas collagen fibril orientation and total ECM area were not different between muscles from adult and old mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ECM of tibialis anterior muscles from old mice has a higher modulus than the ECM of adult muscles, likely driven by an accumulation of densely packed extensively crosslinked collagen.

  9. Intrinsic stiffness of extracellular matrix increases with age in skeletal muscles of mice

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lauren K.; Kayupov, Erdan; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Mendias, Christopher L.; Claflin, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced age is associated with increases in muscle passive stiffness, but the contributors to the changes remain unclear. Our purpose was to determine the relative contributions of muscle fibers and extracellular matrix (ECM) to muscle passive stiffness in both adult and old animals. Passive mechanical properties were determined for isolated individual muscle fibers and bundles of muscle fibers that included their associated ECM, obtained from tibialis anterior muscles of adult (8–12 mo old) and old (28–30 mo old) mice. Maximum tangent moduli of individual muscle fibers from adult and old muscles were not different at any sarcomere length tested. In contrast, the moduli of bundles of fibers from old mice was more than twofold greater than that of fiber bundles from adult muscles at sarcomere lengths >2.5 μm. Because ECM mechanical behavior is determined by the composition and arrangement of its molecular constituents, we also examined the effect of aging on ECM collagen characteristics. With aging, muscle ECM hydroxyproline content increased twofold and advanced glycation end-product protein adducts increased threefold, whereas collagen fibril orientation and total ECM area were not different between muscles from adult and old mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ECM of tibialis anterior muscles from old mice has a higher modulus than the ECM of adult muscles, likely driven by an accumulation of densely packed extensively crosslinked collagen. PMID:24994884

  10. Enhancement of rat bladder contraction by artificial sweeteners via increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Jaydip; Elliott, Ruth A. . E-mail: rae5@leicester.ac.uk; Doshani, Angie; Tincello, Douglas G.

    2006-12-01

    Introduction: Consumption of carbonated soft drinks has been shown to be independently associated with the development of overactive bladder symptoms (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.18, 2.22) [Dallosso, H.M., McGrother, C.W., Matthews, R.J., Donaldson, M.M.K., 2003. The association of diet and other lifestyle factors with overactive bladder and stress incontinence: a longitudinal study in women. BJU Int. 92, 69-77]. We evaluated the effects of three artificial sweeteners, acesulfame K, aspartame and sodium saccharin, on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle strips. Methods: Strips of detrusor muscle were placed in an organ bath and stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the absence and presence of atropine, and with {alpha},{beta} methylene ATP, potassium, calcium and carbachol. Results: Sweeteners 10{sup -7} M to 10{sup -2} M enhanced the contractile response to 10 Hz EFS compared to control (p < 0.01). The atropine-resistant response to EFS was marginally increased by acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M, aspartame 10{sup -7} M and sodium saccharin 10{sup -7} M. Acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M increased the maximum contractile response to {alpha},{beta} methylene ATP by 35% ({+-} 9.6%) (p < 0.05) and to KCl by 12% ({+-} 3.1%) (p < 0.01). Sodium saccharin also increased the response to KCl by 37% ({+-} 15.2%) (p < 0.05). These sweeteners shifted the calcium concentration-response curves to the left. Acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M increased the log EC{sub 5} from -2.79 ({+-} 0.037) to -3.03 ({+-} 0.048, p < 0.01) and sodium saccharin 10{sup -7} M from -2.74 ({+-} 0.03) to 2.86 ({+-} 0.031, p < 0.05). The sweeteners had no significant effect on the contractile response to carbachol but they did increase the amplitude of spontaneous bladder contractions. Discussion: These results suggest that low concentrations of artificial sweeteners enhanced detrusor muscle contraction via modulation of L-type Ca{sup +2} channels.

  11. Short term tolvaptan increases water intake and effectively decreases urinary calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid supersaturations

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Erickson, Stephen B.; Rule, Andrew D.; Enders, Felicity; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many patients cannot effectively increase water intake and urine volume to prevent urinary stones. Tolvaptan, a V2 receptor antagonist, blocks water reabsorption in the collecting duct and should reduce urinary supersaturation (SS) of stone forming solutes, but this has never been proven. Materials and Methods We conducted a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 21 adult calcium urinary stone formers stratified as majority calcium oxalate(CaOx, n=10) or calcium phosphate(CaP, n=11). Patients received tolvaptan 45 mg/day or placebo for 1 week, followed by a washout week and crossover to tolvaptan or placebo for week 3. A 24h urines was collected at the end of weeks 1 and 3. Results Tolvaptan vs. placebo decreased urinary osmolality (204±96 vs 529±213 mOsm/kg, P<0.001) and increased urinary volume (4.8±2.9 vs 1.8±0.9 L, P<0.001). The majority of urinary solute excretion rates including sodium and calcium did not significantly change, although oxalate secretion slightly increased (23±8 to 15±8 mg/24h, P = 0.009). Urinary CaOx SS (−0.01±1.14 vs 0.95±0.87 DG, P<0.001), CaP SS (−1.66±1.17 vs −0.13±1.02 DG, P<0.001) and Uric Acid SS (−2.05±4.05 vs −5.24±3.12 DG, P=0.04) all dramatically decreased. Effects did not differ between CaOx and CaP groups (P>0.05 for all interactions). Conclusions Tolvaptan increases urine volume and decreases urinary SS in calcium stone formers. Further study is needed to determine if long term use of V2 receptor antagonists results in fewer stone events. PMID:26598423

  12. Pharmacological characterization of the involvement of protein kinase C in oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Morita, Mitsuhiro; Nakane, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Kudo, Yoshihisa

    2015-09-01

    Evidence increasingly shows that astrocytes play a pivotal role in brain physiology and pathology via calcium dependent processes, thus the characterization of the calcium dynamics in astrocytes is of growing importance. We have previously reported that the epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor up-regulate the oscillation of the calcium releases that are induced by stimuli, including glutamate in cultured astrocytes. This calcium oscillation is assumed to involve protein kinase C (PKC), which is activated together with the calcium releases as a consequence of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis. In the present study, this issue has been investigated pharmacologically by using astrocytes cultured with and without the growth factors. The pharmacological activation of PKC largely reduced the glutamate-induced oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases. Meanwhile, PKC inhibitors increased the total amounts of both calcium increases without affecting the peak amplitudes and converted the calcium oscillations to non-oscillatory sustained calcium increases by abolishing the falling phases of the repetitive calcium increases. Furthermore, the pharmacological effects were consistent between both glutamate- and histamine-induced calcium oscillations. These results suggest that PKC up-regulates the removal of cytosolic calcium in astrocytes, and this up-regulation is essential for calcium oscillation in astrocytes cultured with growth factors.

  13. Extracellular vesicles released from cells exposed to reactive oxygen species increase annexin A2 expression and survival of target cells exposed to the same conditions.

    PubMed

    Grindheim, Ann Kari; Vedeler, Anni

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A2 (AnxA2) is present in multiple cellular compartments and interacts with numerous ligands including calcium, proteins, cholesterol, negatively charged phospholipids and RNA. These interactions are tightly regulated by its post-translational modifications. The levels of AnxA2 and its Tyr23 phosphorylated form (pTyr23AnxA2) are increased in many cancers and the protein is involved in malignant cell transformation, metastasis and angiogenesis. Our previous studies of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce rapid, simultaneous and transient dephosphorylation of nuclear AnxA2, most likely associating with PML bodies, while AnxA2 associated with F-actin at the cell cortex undergoes Tyr23 phosphorylation. The pTyr23AnxA2 in the periphery of the cells is incorporated into intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes and subsequently released to the extracellular space. We show here that extracellular vesicles (EVs) from cells exposed to ROS prime untreated PC12 cells to better tolerate subsequent oxidative stress, thus enhancing their survival. There is an increase in the levels of pTyr23AnxA2 and AnxA2 in the primed cells, suggesting that AnxA2 is involved in their survival. This increase is due to an upregulation of AnxA2 expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels after relatively short term (2 h) exposure to primed EVs. PMID:27574537

  14. Intracellular Modulation, Extracellular Disposal and Serum Increase of MiR-150 Mark Lymphocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    de Candia, Paola; Torri, Anna; Gorletta, Tatiana; Fedeli, Maya; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Cheroni, Cristina; Marabita, Francesco; Crosti, Mariacristina; Moro, Monica; Pariani, Elena; Romanò, Luisa; Esposito, Susanna; Mosca, Fabio; Rossetti, Grazisa; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Geginat, Jens; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Activated lymphocytes release nano-sized vesicles (exosomes) containing microRNAs that can be monitored in the bloodstream. We asked whether elicitation of immune responses is followed by release of lymphocyte-specific microRNAs. We found that, upon activation in vitro, human and mouse lymphocytes down-modulate intracellular miR-150 and accumulate it in exosomes. In vivo, miR-150 levels increased significantly in serum of humans immunized with flu vaccines and in mice immunized with ovalbumin, and this increase correlated with elevation of antibody titers. Immunization of immune-deficient mice, lacking MHCII, resulted neither in antibody production nor in elevation of circulating miR-150. This study provides proof of concept that serum microRNAs can be detected, with minimally invasive procedure, as biomarkers of vaccination and more in general of adaptive immune responses. Furthermore, the prompt reduction of intracellular level of miR-150, a key regulator of mRNAs critical for lymphocyte differentiation and functions, linked to its release in the external milieu suggests that the selective extracellular disposal of microRNAs can be a rapid way to regulate gene expression during lymphocyte activation. PMID:24205408

  15. Absence of K-Ras Reduces Proliferation and Migration But Increases Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Cuesta, Cristina; Eleno, Nélida; Crespo, Piero; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of Ras-GTPases in the development of renal fibrosis has been addressed in the last decade. We have previously shown that H- and N-Ras isoforms participate in the regulation of fibrosis. Herein, we assessed the role of K-Ras in cellular processes involved in the development of fibrosis: proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins synthesis. K-Ras knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (K-ras(-/-) ) stimulated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) exhibited reduced proliferation and impaired mobility than wild-type fibroblasts. Moreover, an increase on ECM production was observed in K-Ras KO fibroblasts in basal conditions. The absence of K-Ras was accompanied by reduced Ras activation and ERK phosphorylation, and increased AKT phosphorylation, but no differences were observed in TGF-β1-induced Smad signaling. The MEK inhibitor U0126 decreased cell proliferation independently of the presence of K-ras but reduced migration and ECM proteins expression only in wild-type fibroblasts, while the PI3K-AKT inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and ECM synthesis in both types of fibroblasts. Thus, our data unveil that K-Ras and its downstream effector pathways distinctively regulate key biological processes in the development of fibrosis. Moreover, we show that K-Ras may be a crucial mediator in TGF-β1-mediated effects in this cell type. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2224-2235, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Traumatic brain injury increases levels of miR-21 in extracellular vesicles: implications for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Emily B; Hochfelder, Colleen G; Lamberty, Benjamin G; Meays, Brittney M; Morsey, Brenda M; Kelso, Matthew L; Fox, Howard S; Yelamanchili, Sowmya V

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important health concern and effective treatment strategies remain elusive. Understanding the complex multicellular response to TBI may provide new avenues for intervention. In the context of TBI, cell-cell communication is critical. One relatively unexplored form of cell-cell communication in TBI is extracellular vesicles (EVs). These membrane-bound vesicles can carry many different types of cargo between cells. Recently, miRNA in EVs have been shown to mediate neuroinflammation and neuronal injury. To explore the role of EV-associated miRNA in TBI, we isolated EVs from the brain of injured mice and controls, purified RNA from brain EVs, and performed miRNA sequencing. We found that the expression of miR-212 decreased, while miR-21, miR-146, miR-7a, and miR-7b were significantly increased with injury, with miR-21 showing the largest change between conditions. The expression of miR-21 in the brain was primarily localized to neurons near the lesion site. Interestingly, adjacent to these miR-21-expressing neurons were activated microglia. The concurrent increase in miR-21 in EVs with the elevation of miR-21 in neurons, suggests that miR-21 is secreted from neurons as potential EV cargo. Thus, this study reveals a new potential mechanism of cell-cell communication not previously described in TBI. PMID:27516962

  17. Porcine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: increased calcium-sequestering activity of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1986-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-sequestration by isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum was abnormal in skeletal muscle of malignant hyperthermia-susceptible swine. A heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction was isolated from malignant hyperthermia and control muscle using differential and density-gradient centrifugation. Prior to onset of malignant hyperthermia, calcium-sequestering activity (Vmax at 37 degrees C, mumol calcium/mg/min) was twofold increased in malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum compared to control sarcoplasmic reticulum (1.96 +/- 0.50 versus 4.00 +/- 0.87, P less than 0.01), although thermodynamic and kinetic properties of this activity were otherwise indistinguishable between groups. This increased activity of the malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction was associated with twofold increased concentration of Ca-ATPase and calsequestrin protein. When a malignant hyperthermia-reaction developed, calcium-uptake was depressed to less than 5% of control values. These data indicate that malignant hyperthermia is not initiated due to a defect in the calcium-sequestration mechanism, however, loss of calcium-uptake activity occurring after the onset of malignant hyperthermia might result in the propagation and irreversibility of the malignant hyperthermia reaction. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3742368

  18. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  19. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements and fortified foods include gluconate, lactate, and phosphate. Calcium absorption is best when a person consumes ... also interfere with the body's ability to absorb iron and zinc, but this effect is not well ...

  20. Computational modeling of neurons: intensity-duration relationship of extracellular electrical stimulation for changes in intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert D; Willits, Rebecca K; Harkins, Amy B

    2016-01-01

    In many instances of extensive nerve damage, the injured nerve never adequately heals, leaving lack of nerve function. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to increase the rate and orient the direction of neurite growth, and is a promising therapy. However, the mechanism in which ES affects neuronal growth is not understood, making it difficult to compare existing ES protocols or to design and optimize new protocols. We hypothesize that ES acts by elevating intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) via opening voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). In this work, we have created a computer model to estimate the ES Ca(2+) relationship. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, we modeled a small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron that includes one Na(+) channel, two K(+) channels, and three VDCCs to estimate [Ca(2+)]i in the soma and growth cone. As expected, the results show that an ES that generates action potentials (APs) can efficiently raise the [Ca(2+)]i of neurons. More interestingly, our simulation results show that sub-AP ES can efficiently raise neuronal [Ca(2+)]i and that specific high-voltage ES can preferentially raise [Ca(2+)]i in the growth cone. The intensities and durations of ES on modeled growth cone calcium rise are consistent with directionality and orientation of growth cones experimentally shown by others. Finally, this model provides a basis to design experimental ES pulse parameters, including duration, intensity, pulse-train frequency, and pulse-train duration to efficiently raise [Ca(2+)]i in neuronal somas or growth cones. PMID:26510759

  1. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems. PMID:26318765

  2. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems.

  3. Nondigestible oligosaccharides increase calcium absorption and suppress bone resorption in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Tasleem A; Weaver, Connie M; Zhao, Yongdong; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E

    2004-02-01

    Nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDO) including inulin and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) have been reported to stimulate calcium absorption. Here we report the effect of a mixture of inulin and FOS (Raftilose Synergy 1, Orafti) on calcium and bone metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. OVX rats (6 mo old) were fed a semipurified diet for 3 mo in our animal care laboratory for stabilization after ovariectomy. They were then divided into two groups (n = 13/group) and fed either a control or a NDO-supplemented diet (55 g/kg) for 21 d. Catheters were placed in their jugular veins. After 2 d, a tracer ((45)Ca) was administered by gavage or i.v. and blood was sampled for up to 300 min. Urine and fecal samples were collected for 4 d after (45)Ca administration. Femurs were measured for bone mineral density (BMD), breaking strength, and total calcium. Calcium absorption, femoral calcium content, BMD, and bone balance (V(bal)) were significantly increased (P < 0.05) by NDO, whereas the bone resorption rate relative to the bone formation rate was significantly depressed by NDO. We conclude that feeding NDO at 5.5 g/100 g for 21 d has a positive effect on calcium absorption and retention in ovariectomized rats.

  4. Monocytes increase human cardiac myofibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling through TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Lipon, Brodie D; Svystonyuk, Daniyil A; Teng, Guoqi; Guzzardi, David G; Silva, Claudia; Yong, V Wee; Fedak, Paul W M

    2016-03-15

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myofibroblasts remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM), preventing mechanical complications. However, prolonged myofibroblast activity leads to dysregulation of the ECM, maladaptive remodeling, fibrosis, and heart failure (HF). Chronic inflammation is believed to drive persistent myofibroblast activity; however, the mechanisms are unclear. We assessed the influence of peripheral blood monocytes on human cardiac myofibroblast activity in a three-dimensional (3D) ECM microenvironment. Human cardiac myofibroblasts isolated from surgical biopsies of the right atrium and left ventricle were seeded into 3D collagen matrices. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human donors and cocultured with myofibroblasts. Monocytes increased myofibroblast activity measured by collagen gel contraction (baseline: 57.6 ± 5.9% vs. coculture: 65.2 ± 7.1% contraction; P < 0.01) and increased local ECM remodeling quantified by confocal microscopy. Under coculture conditions that allow indirect cellular interaction via paracrine factors but prevent direct cell-cell contact, monocytes had minimal effects on myofibroblast activity (17.9 ± 11.1% vs. 6.4 ± 7.0% increase, respectively; P < 0.01). When cells were cultured under direct contact conditions, multiplex analysis of the coculture media revealed an increase in the paracrine factors TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 compared with baseline (122.9 ± 10.1 pg/ml and 3,496.0 ± 190.4 pg/ml, respectively, vs. 21.5 ± 16.3 pg/ml and 183.3 ± 43.9 pg/ml; P < 0.001). TGF-β blockade abolished the monocyte-induced increase in cardiac myofibroblast activity. These data suggest that direct cell-cell interaction between monocytes and cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast activity and increases remodeling of local matrix. Peripheral blood monocyte interaction with human cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates myofibroblast activity through release of TGF-β1

  5. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  6. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  7. Extracellular SOD and VEGF are increased in vitreous bodies from proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Izuta, Hiroshi; Chikaraishi, Yuichi; Adachi, Tetsuo; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) in vitreous body and serum in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and investigate the role of EC-SOD in PDR by evaluating its angiostatic effect, using an in vitro angiogenesis model. To investigate the role of EC-SOD in PDR by evaluating its angiostatic effect, using an in vitro angiogenesis model. Methods EC-SOD and VEGF concentrations in vitreous and serum samples from PDR and macular hole (MH) were measured by ELISA. The effects of EC-SOD on VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation were evaluated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Moreover, the effects of EC-SOD on VEGF-induced proliferation and migration were evaluated in HUVECs and primary normal human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Results Intravitreal concentrations of EC-SOD were significantly higher (p<0.01) in PDR (58.0±23.8 ng/ml, mean±SD) than in MH (29.3±6.6 ng/ml). Intravitreal concentrations of VEGF were dramatically higher (p<0.01) in PDR (798.2±882.7 pg/ml) than in MH (17.7±15.5 pg/ml). The serum concentrations of EC-SOD and VEGF did not differ between the two patient groups. The vitreous concentrations of VEGF correlated with those of EC-SOD in all patients (rs=0.61, p<0.001). In HUVECs, EC-SOD at 100 ng/ml significantly suppressed VEGF-induced proliferation and tube formation, but not VEGF-induced migration. Conclusions EC-SOD was increased together with VEGF in the vitreous body from PDR patients, suggesting that EC-SOD may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of angiogenesis. PMID:20011081

  8. Aquaporin-4 Deficient Mice have Increased Extracellular Space Without Tortuosity Change

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaoming; Hrabětová, Sabina; Nicholson, Charles; Manley, Geoffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the major water channel expressed at fluid-tissue barriers throughout the brain and plays a crucial role in cerebral water balance. To assess whether these channels influence brain extracellular space (ECS) under resting physiological conditions, we used the established real-time iontophoresis method with tetramethylammonium (TMA+) to measure three diffusion parameters: ECS volume fraction (α), tortuosity (λ), and TMA+ loss (k’). In vivo measurements were performed in the somatosensory cortex of AQP4 deficient (AQP4-/-) mice and wild-type controls with matched age. Mice lacking AQP4 showed a 28% increase in α (0.23 ± 0.007 vs. 0.18 ± 0.003) with no differences in λ (1.62 ± 0.04 vs. 1.61 ± 0.02) and k’ (0.0045 ± 0.0001 1/sec vs. 0.0031 ± 0.0009 1/sec). Additional recordings in brain slices showed similarly elevated α in AQP4-/- mice, and no differences in λ and k’ between the two genotypes. This is the first direct comparison of ECS properties in adult mice lacking AQP4 water channels with wild-type animals and demonstrates a significant enlargement of the volume fraction but no difference in hindrance to TMA+ diffusion, expressed as tortuosity. These findings provide direct evidence for involvement of AQP4 in modulation of the ECS volume fraction and provide a basis for future modeling of water and ion transport in the central nervous system. PMID:18495879

  9. Increasing serotonin concentrations alter calcium and energy metabolism in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Jimena; Moore, Spencer A E; Weaver, Samantha R; Cronick, Callyssa M; Olsen, Megan; Prichard, Austin P; Schnell, Brian P; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    A 4×4 Latin square design in which varied doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/kg) of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP, a serotonin precursor) were intravenously infused into late-lactation, non-pregnant Holstein dairy cows was used to determine the effects of serotonin on calcium and energy metabolism. Infusion periods lasted 4 days, with a 5-day washout between periods. Cows were infused at a constant rate for 1 h each day. Blood was collected pre- and 5, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min post-infusion, urine was collected pre- and post-infusion, and milk was collected daily. All of the 5-HTP doses increased systemic serotonin as compared to the 0 mg/kg dose, and the 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg doses increased circulating glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) concentrations. Treatment of cows with either 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg 5-HTP doses decreased urine calcium elimination, and the 1.5 mg/kg dose increased milk calcium concentrations. No differences were detected in the heart rates, respiration rates, or body temperatures of the cows; however, manure scores and defecation frequency were affected. Indeed, cows that received 5-HTP defecated more, and the consistency of their manure was softer. Treatment of late-lactation dairy cows with 5-HTP improved energy metabolism, decreased loss of calcium into urine, and increased calcium secretion into milk. Further research should target the effects of increasing serotonin during the transition period to determine any benefits for post-parturient calcium and glucose metabolism.

  10. Implication of the calcium sensing receptor and the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in the extracellular calcium-mediated migration of RAW 264.7 osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Cédric; Saidak, Zuzana; Boulanouar, Abdel Krim; Petit, Laurent; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Massy, Ziad; Brazier, Michel; Mentaverri, Romuald; Kamel, Saïd

    2010-05-01

    While the processes involved in the formation, maturation and apoptosis of osteoclasts have been investigated extensively in previous studies, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the localization and homing of osteoclast precursor cells to the bone environment in order to initiate the bone remodeling process. Recent studies have suggested that the extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(o)) concentration gradient present near the bone environment may be one of the participating factors, producing a chemoattractant effect on osteoclast precursors. Using the murine osteoclast precursor cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, the RAW 264.7 cell line, we have shown that Ca(2+)(o) increases the migration of these cells in a directional manner. The participation of the calcium sensing receptor (CaR) in this effect was tested by knocking down its expression through RNA interference, which resulted in an abolition of the migratory response. By the use of specific pathway inhibitors and western blot analysis, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and phospholipase Cbeta pathways were shown to be implicated in the migratory effect. The implication of the Akt pathway in the Ca(2+)(o)-induced chemoattraction of RAW 264.7 cells was also confirmed by transducing the cells with the fusion protein TAT-dominant negative-Akt, which decreased the migratory effect. In contrast, the MAPK pathways (ERK1/2, p38 and JNK) were not involved in the production of the migratory effect. We conclude that through the activation of the CaR and subsequent signaling via the PI3K/Akt pathway, Ca(2+)(o) produces a chemoattractant effect on the osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that the Ca(2+)(o) gradient present near the bone may be one of the initiating factors for the homing of osteoclast precursors to bone, thus possibly playing a role in the initiation of bone remodeling. PMID:20149906

  11. Plum and soy aglycon extracts superior at increasing bone calcium retention in ovariectomized Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jessica W; Martin, Berdine R; McCabe, George P; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Weaver, Connie M

    2014-07-01

    Plant-derived polyphenols have been shown to influence bone turnover and bone properties in the estrogen-depleted state. We used a crossover design in ovariectomized rats (n = 16 rats for each diet) to investigate the effect of supplementation of two doses each of blueberry, plum, grape, grape seed extract, and resveratrol on bone. We tested the aglycon and glucoside forms of genistein to quantify differences in efficacy on bone calcium retention. Rats were given an intravenous dose of ⁴⁵Ca to prelabel bone, and bone calcium retention was assessed by urinary excretion of ⁴⁵Ca:Ca ratio during an intervention period compared with nonintervention. Genistein aglycon increased bone calcium retention significantly (p<0.05) more than the glucoside (22% vs 13%, respectively). Plum extract (0.45% w/w total dietary polyphenols) and resveratrol (0.2% w/w total dietary polyphenols) were also effective, increasing bone calcium retention by 20% (p=0.0153) and 14% (p=0.0012), respectively. Several polyphenolic-rich diets improved bone calcium retention.

  12. Plum and Soy Aglycon Extracts Superior at Increasing Bone Calcium Retention in Ovariectomized Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived polyphenols have been shown to influence bone turnover and bone properties in the estrogen-depleted state. We used a crossover design in ovariectomized rats (n = 16 rats for each diet) to investigate the effect of supplementation of two doses each of blueberry, plum, grape, grape seed extract, and resveratrol on bone. We tested the aglycon and glucoside forms of genistein to quantify differences in efficacy on bone calcium retention. Rats were given an intravenous dose of 45Ca to prelabel bone, and bone calcium retention was assessed by urinary excretion of 45Ca:Ca ratio during an intervention period compared with nonintervention. Genistein aglycon increased bone calcium retention significantly (p < 0.05) more than the glucoside (22% vs 13%, respectively). Plum extract (0.45% w/w total dietary polyphenols) and resveratrol (0.2% w/w total dietary polyphenols) were also effective, increasing bone calcium retention by 20% (p = 0.0153) and 14% (p = 0.0012), respectively. Several polyphenolic-rich diets improved bone calcium retention. PMID:24894797

  13. Enhanced expression of extracellular calcium sensing receptor in monocyte-differentiated versus undifferentiated HL-60 cells: potential role in regulation of a nonselective cation channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Ye, C.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Sanders, J. L.; Vassilev, P. M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) have been used widely as a model for studying the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. After treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], HL-60 cells differentiate into cells with the phenotype of monocytes/macrophages. We previously showed that peripheral blood monocytes and the murine J774 monocytic cell line express the CaR, and myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and myeloid cells in peripheral blood other than monocytes express lower levels of the CaR. Therefore, we investigated whether undifferentiated HL-60 cells express a functional G protein-coupled, extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o))-sensing receptor (CaR) and if the expression of the CaR increases as these cells differentiate along the monocytic lineage. The use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with CaR-specific primers, followed by sequencing of the amplified products, identified an authentic CaR transcript in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis using a CaR-specific antiserum detected low levels of CaR protein expression in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. The levels of CaR protein increased considerably following treatment of the cells with PMA (50 nM) or 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (100 nM) for 5 days. Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe identified CaR transcripts in undifferentiated HL-60 cells, but CaR mRNA levels did not change appreciably after treatment with either agent, suggesting that upregulation of CaR protein occurs at a translational level. PMA-treated HL-60 cells expressed a nonselective cation channel (NCC), and the calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467, but not its less active stereoisomer, NPS S-467, as well as the polycationic CaR agonist, neomycin, activated this NCC, demonstrating that the CaR expressed in these cells is functionally active. Therefore, HL-60 cells exhibit an increase in Ca

  14. Neutrophil cathepsin G increases calcium flux and inositol polyphosphate production in cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.W.; Gruenhaupt, D.; Shasby, D.M. )

    1989-07-15

    Exposure of endothelial cells (ENDO) to human neutrophil cathepsin G (CG) increases albumin flux across the endothelial monolayer. Since calcium influences cell shape and barrier function of ENDO monolayers, the current study was designed to determine if CG acted through alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis in ENDO. The role of Ca2+ in the increased permeability of ENDO monolayers to albumin after exposure to CG was studied by using ENDO monolayers cultured on polycarbonate filters. Exposure of ENDO monolayers to CG in the presence of the Ca2+-antagonist lanthanum partially prevented the increase in albumin flux, but exposure in the presence of agents that block voltage-regulated calcium channels did not block the increase in albumin flux. To monitor the effect of CG on Ca2+-flux, ENDO were labeled with {sup 45}Ca2+ and changes in Ca2+ flux were monitored by the release of {sup 45}Ca2+. From 1 to 15 minutes after exposure of ENDO to CG, there was increased release of {sup 45}Ca2+ compared with control cells. Calcium channel blocking agents did not inhibit the increased release of {sup 45}Ca2+, but lanthanum partially blocked the increase. The increased release of Ca2+ appeared to be due, at least in part, to activation of phospholipase C because there was an increase both in inositol polyphosphate species and in diglycerides after incubation of ENDO with CG. These studies support the hypothesis that CG increases the flux of calcium in ENDO, that this increase in Ca2+ flux may result from activation of phospholipase C, and that this system may be involved in the decreased barrier properties of the ENDO after CG exposure.

  15. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Nachum; Shaltiel, Galit; Daniely, Michal; Meiron, Oren E; Shechter, Assaf; Abrams, Steven A; Niv, Eva; Shapira, Yami; Sagi, Amir

    2014-10-01

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (CCC) using the dual stable isotope technique. The study was conducted in the Unit of Clinical Nutrition, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel. The study population included 15 early postmenopausal women aged 54.9 ± 2.8 (mean ± SD) years with no history of major medical illness or metabolic bone disorder, excess calcium intake, or vitamin D deficiency. Standardized breakfast was followed by randomly provided CCC or ACC capsules containing 192 mg elemental calcium labeled with 44Ca at intervals of at least 3 weeks. After swallowing the capsules, intravenous CaCl2 labeled with 42Ca on was administered on each occasion. Fractional calcium absorption (FCA) of ACC and CCC was calculated from the 24-hour urine collection following calcium administration. The results indicated that FCA of ACC was doubled (± 0.96 SD) on average compared to that of CCC (p < 0.02). The higher absorption of the synthetic stable ACC may serve as a more efficacious way of calcium supplementation.

  16. Pollen tube growth is coupled to the extracellular calcium ion flux and the intracellular calcium gradient: effect of BAPTA-type buffers and hypertonic media.

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, E S; Miller, D D; Callaham, D A; Shipley, A M; Rivers, B A; Cresti, M; Hepler, P K

    1994-01-01

    Lily pollen tubes possess a steep, tip-focused intracellular Ca2+ gradient and a tip-directed extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ratiometric ion imaging revealed that the gradient extends from above 3.0 microM at the apex to approximately 0.2 microM within 20 microns from the tip, while application of the Ca(2+)-specific vibrating electrode indicated that the extracellular influx measured between 1.4 and 14 pmol cm-2 sec-1. We examined the relationship between these phenomena and their role in tube growth by using different 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)-type buffers and hypertonic media. Injection of active BAPTA-type buffers or application of elevated levels of sucrose reversibly inhibited growth, destroyed tip zonation of organelles, and modified normal patterns of cytoplasmic streaming. Simultaneously, these treatments dissipated both the intracellular tip-focused gradient and the extracellular Ca2+ flux. Of the BAPTA-type buffers, 5,5'-dibromo-BAPTA (dissociation constant [Kd] is 1.5 microM) and 4,4'-difluoro-BAPTA (Kd of 1.7 microM) exhibited greater activity than those buffers with either a higher affinity (5,5'-dimethyl-BAPTA, Kd of 0.15 microM; BAPTA, Kd of 0.21 microM; 5,5'-difluoro-BAPTA, Kd of 0.25 microM) or lower affinity (5-methyl, 5'-nitro-BAPTA, Kd of 22 microM) for Ca2+. Our findings provide evidence that growing pollen tubes have open Ca2+ channels in their tip and that these channels become inactivated in nongrowing tubes. The studies with elevated sucrose support the view that stretching of the apical plasma membrane contributes to the maintenance of the Ca2+ signal. PMID:7866026

  17. Calcium and vitamin D enriched diets increase and preserve vertebral mineral content in aging laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Schapira, D; Linn, S; Sarid, M; Mokadi, S; Kabala, A; Silbermann, M

    1995-05-01

    To assess the long-term effect of vitamin D or calcium supplementation on the skeletal metabolism of aging laboratory rodents, 1.5-month-old female Wistar rats were fed with diets containing twice the concentration of vitamin D (group 2) and of calcium (group 3) as in the usual rat chow. Follow-up to 24 months of age did not show significant differences between the enriched-diet groups and the controls (group 1) in terms of the vertebral body weight and protein content. Significantly higher bone mineral contents were found in groups 2 and 3 than were found in controls, as revealed by an increased bone mineral density (BMD: +62%, group 2; +48%, group 3) and vertebral calcium content (+73%, group 2; +84%, group 3). The vertebral alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity was significantly lower in the enriched diet groups than in controls (-47%, group 2; -45%, group 3). The ratio alkaline phosphatase/acid phosphatase activity was markedly reduced in groups 2 and 3 (-57% and -59%, respectively), which might indicate a diminished rate of bone turnover. The trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) decreased in all groups during senescence, being significantly elevated in group 3 as compared to controls. Vitamin D and calcium dietary supplementations increase the axial mineral bone content in laboratory rats and might reduce the bone turnover. Their influence on the trabecular bone volume has yet to be examined.

  18. Increased calcium affinity of a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from sea cucumber.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, J; Vieira, R P; Mourão, P A

    1994-04-01

    Calcium binding and charge distribution on a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate and a standard chondroitin 6-sulfate have been studied using a metallochromic indicator and conductimetric titrations. The fucosylated chondroitin sulfate has a approximately 5-fold greater affinity for calcium ions than the standard chondroitin 6-sulfate. Possibly, this increased affinity for calcium ions is due to the branches on the fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, since the calcium affinity of an unbranched, sulfated fucan is similar to that of the standard chondroitin 6-sulfate. More charged groups per disaccharide unit (and a shorter distance between these groups) also distinguish the fucosylated chondroitin sulfate from standard chondroitin 6-sulfate. Comparison between native and chemically modified (desulfated or carboxyl-reduced) polysaccharides suggests that the sulfate esters are responsible for the increased charge density of the fucosylated chondroitin sulfate and that the presence of the fucose branches does not alter the length of the repetitive units which compose the central core of chondroitin from sea cucumber. These results are consistent with the chemical studies of these two polysaccharides.

  19. The Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Motility, Pseudopod and Uropod Formation, Chemotaxis and the Cortical Localization of Myosin II in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lusche, Daniel F.; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular Ca++, a ubiquitous cation in the soluble environment of cells both free living and within the human body, regulates most aspects of amoeboid cell motility, including shape, uropod formation, pseudopod formation, velocity and turning in Dictyostelium discoideum. Hence it affects the efficiency of both basic motile behavior and chemotaxis. Extracellular Ca++ is optimal at 10 mM. A gradient of the chemoattractant cAMP generated in the absence of added Ca++ only affects turning, but in combination with extracellular Ca++, enhances the effects of extracellular Ca++. Potassium, at 40 mM, can substitute for Ca++. Mg++, Mn++, Zn++ and Na+ cannot. Extracellular Ca++, or K+, also induce the cortical localization of myosin II in a polar fashion. The effects of Ca++, K+ or a cAMP gradient do not appear to be similarly mediated by an increase in the general pool of free cytosolic Ca++. These results suggest a model, in which each agent functioning through different signaling systems, converge to affect the cortical localization of myosin II, which in turn effects the behavioral changes leading to efficient cell motility and chemotaxis. PMID:19363786

  20. Genetically modified Medicago truncatula lacking calcium oxalate has increased calcium bioavailability and partially rescues vitamin D receptor knockout mice phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How the distribution and sequestered form of plant macro/micro-nutrients influence their bioavailability, and ultimately impact human health, is poorly understood. The legume Medicago truncatula has a portion of its tissue calcium sequestered in the form of the calcium oxalate crystal, which reduces...

  1. Supplementation trials with calcium citrate malate: evidence in favor of increasing the calcium RDA during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Andon, M B; Lloyd, T; Matkovic, V

    1994-08-01

    The vast majority of peak adult bone mass is accumulated by the time longitudinal growth is complete. As peak bone mass is an important determinant of future fracture risk, the goal of the current calcium recommended dietary allowance during youth is to provide a calcium intake that allows individuals to reach their full genetic potential for acquiring skeletal mass. The advent of controlled trials of calcium supplementation and total body bone mass measurements in children and adolescents provide the first direct way of determining the amount of calcium necessary to achieve optimal skeletal accretion. These studies indicate that the current RDAs are insufficient to support optimal bone mass gain during growth and development. Based on the recent intervention trials, recommendations are made for an RDA of 1250 mg during childhood and 1450 mg during adolescence. These values are consistent with established calcium balance intake thresholds for growth during pre-adolescence and adolescence.

  2. Impact of Increasing Dietary Calcium Levels on Calcium Excretion and Vitamin D Metabolites in the Blood of Healthy Adult Cats

    PubMed Central

    Paßlack, Nadine; Schmiedchen, Bettina; Raila, Jens; Schweigert, Florian J.; Stumpff, Friederike; Kohn, Barbara; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary calcium (Ca) concentrations might affect regulatory pathways within the Ca and vitamin D metabolism and consequently excretory mechanisms. Considering large variations in Ca concentrations of feline diets, the physiological impact on Ca homeostasis has not been evaluated to date. In the present study, diets with increasing concentrations of dicalcium phosphate were offered to ten healthy adult cats (Ca/phosphorus (P): 6.23/6.02, 7.77/7.56, 15.0/12.7, 19.0/17.3, 22.2/19.9, 24.3/21.6 g/kg dry matter). Each feeding period was divided into a 10-day adaptation and an 8-day sampling period in order to collect urine and faeces. On the last day of each feeding period, blood samples were taken. Results Urinary Ca concentrations remained unaffected, but faecal Ca concentrations increased (P < 0.001) with increasing dietary Ca levels. No effect on whole and intact parathyroid hormone levels, fibroblast growth factor 23 and calcitriol concentrations in the blood of the cats were observed. However, the calcitriol precursors 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3, which are considered the most useful indicators for the vitamin D status, decreased with higher dietary Ca levels (P = 0.013 and P = 0.033). Increasing dietary levels of dicalcium phosphate revealed an acidifying effect on urinary fasting pH (6.02) and postprandial pH (6.01) (P < 0.001), possibly mediated by an increase of urinary phosphorus (P) concentrations (P < 0.001). Conclusions In conclusion, calcitriol precursors were linearly affected by increasing dietary Ca concentrations. The increase in faecal Ca excretion indicates that Ca homeostasis of cats is mainly regulated in the intestine and not by the kidneys. Long-term studies should investigate the physiological relevance of the acidifying effect observed when feeding diets high in Ca and P. PMID:26870965

  3. Aspartame ingestion increases urinary calcium, but not oxalate excretion, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, U N; Dumoulin, G; Henriet, M T; Regnard, J

    1998-01-01

    Aspartame is the artificial sweetener most extensively used as a substitute for glucose or sucrose in the food industry, particularly in soft drinks. As glucose ingestion increases calciuria and oxaluria, the two main determinants of urinary calcium-oxalate saturation, we considered it worthwhile to determine whether aspartame ingestion also affects calcium-oxalate metabolism. Our study compares the effects of the ingestion of similarly sweet doses of aspartame (250 mg) and glucose (75 g) on calcium and oxalate metabolisms of seven healthy subjects. Urinary calcium excretion increased after the intake of both aspartame (+86%; P < 0.01) and glucose (+124%; P < 0.01). This may be due to the rise in calcemia observed after both aspartame (+2.2%; P < 0.05) and glucose ingestion (+1.8%; P < 0.05). The increased calcemia may be linked to the decrease in phosphatemia that occurred after both aspartame (P < 0.01) and glucose (P < 0.01) load. Aspartame did not alter glycemia or insulinemia, whereas glucose intake caused striking increases in both glycemia (+59%; P < 0.001) and insulinemia (+869%; P < 0.01). Although insulin was considered the main calciuria-induced factor after glucose load, it is unlikely that this mechanism played a role with aspartame. Urinary oxalate excretion did not change after aspartame, whereas it increased (+27%; P < 0.05) after glucose load. Thus, as aspartame induced a similar increase in calciuria as did glucose but, conversely, no change in oxaluria, substituting glucose by aspartame in soft drinks may appear to be of some potential benefit.

  4. Stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation in mouse 3T3 cells by calcium phosphate and other extracellular particles.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D W; Colowick, S P

    1977-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the marked stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation by addition of extra Ca2+ to stationary phase mouse 3T3 cells in culture is phosphate dependent and due to the action of the calcium phosphate precipitate formed in the medium. The cells are similarly stimulated by a variety of particulate materials, including calcium pyrophosphate, barium sulfate, kaolin, and polystrene beads. The precipitate effects on sugar uptake are of the same magnitude as those seen with certain hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor) or with fresh 10% calf serum. The effect of barium sulfate on thymidine incorporation is also of the same magnitude as seen with these hormones, but much less than half that found with fresh calf serum. The stimulation by barium sulfate or hormones of thymidine incorporation is not phosphate dependent. PMID:202958

  5. Stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation in mouse 3T3 cells by calcium phosphate and other extracellular particles.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D W; Colowick, S P

    1977-12-01

    Evidence is presented that the marked stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation by addition of extra Ca2+ to stationary phase mouse 3T3 cells in culture is phosphate dependent and due to the action of the calcium phosphate precipitate formed in the medium. The cells are similarly stimulated by a variety of particulate materials, including calcium pyrophosphate, barium sulfate, kaolin, and polystrene beads. The precipitate effects on sugar uptake are of the same magnitude as those seen with certain hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor) or with fresh 10% calf serum. The effect of barium sulfate on thymidine incorporation is also of the same magnitude as seen with these hormones, but much less than half that found with fresh calf serum. The stimulation by barium sulfate or hormones of thymidine incorporation is not phosphate dependent. PMID:202958

  6. High calcium enhances calcium oxalate crystal binding capacity of renal tubular cells via increased surface annexin A1 but impairs their proliferation and healing.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Fong-ngern, Kedsarin; Peerapen, Paleerath; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-07-01

    Hypercalciuria is associated with kidney stone formation and impaired renal function. However, responses of renal tubular cells upon exposure to high-calcium environment remain largely unknown. We thus performed a proteomic analysis of altered proteins in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium and evaluated functional significance of these changes. MDCK cells were maintained with or without 20 mM CaCl(2) for 72 h. Cellular proteins were then analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) (n = 5 gels derived from 5 independent culture flasks per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed 20 protein spots (from a total of 700) that were differentially expressed between the two groups. These altered proteins were then identified by Q-TOF-MS and MS/MS analyses, including those involved in calcium binding, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, mitosis regulation, apoptosis, cell migration, oxidative stress, and ion transport. Protein network analysis and functional validation revealed that high-calcium-exposed cells had 36.5% increase in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal-binding capacity. This functional change was consistent to the expression data in which annexin A1 (ANXA1), a membrane-associated calcium-binding protein, was markedly increased on the apical surface of high-calcium-exposed cells. Pretreatment with anti-ANXA1 antibody could neutralize this increasing crystal-binding capacity. Moreover, high-calcium exposure caused defects in cell proliferation and wound healing. These expression and functional data demonstrate the enhanced crystal-binding capacity but impaired cell proliferation and wound healing in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium. Taken together, these phenomena may contribute, at least in part, to the pathogenic mechanisms of hypercalciuria-induced nephrolithiasis and impaired renal function. Our in vitro study offers several candidates for further

  7. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Korin; Erickson, Brian K; Mueller, Ryan; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  8. Calcium Gluconate in Phosphate Buffered Saline Increases Gene Delivery with Adenovirus Type 5

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Marko T.; Diaconu, Iulia; Pesonen, Sari; Kanerva, Anna; Baumann, Marc; Parviainen, Suvi T.; Spiller, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Background Adenoviruses are attractive vectors for gene therapy because of their stability in vivo and the possibility of production at high titers. Despite exciting preclinical data with various approaches, there are only a few examples of clear efficacy in clinical trials. Effective gene delivery to target cells remains the key variable determining efficacy and thus enhanced transduction methods are important. Methods/Results We found that heated serum could enhance adenovirus 5 mediated gene delivery up to twentyfold. A new protein-level interaction was found between fiber knob and serum transthyretin, but this was not responsible for the observed effect. Instead, we found that heating caused the calcium and phosphate present in the serum mix to precipitate, and this was responsible for enhanced gene delivery. This finding could have relevance for designing preclinical experiments with adenoviruses, since calcium and phosphate are present in many solutions. To translate this into an approach potentially testable in patients, we used calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline, both of which are clinically approved, to increase adenoviral gene transfer up to 300-fold in vitro. Gene transfer was increased with or without heating and in a manner independent from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor. In vivo, in mouse studies, gene delivery was increased 2-, 110-, 12- and 13-fold to tumors, lungs, heart and liver and did not result in increased pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Antitumor efficacy of a replication competent virus was also increased significantly. Conclusion In summary, adenoviral gene transfer and antitumor efficacy can be enhanced by calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline. PMID:20927353

  9. Three-dimensional printed sample load/inject valves enabling online monitoring of extracellular calcium and zinc ions in living rat brains.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Hsia, Sheng-Chieh; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a simple and low-cost flow injection system coupled to a quadruple ICP-MS for the direct and continuous determination of multi-element in microdialysates. To interface microdialysis sampling to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), we employed 3D printing to manufacture an as-designed sample load/inject valve featuring an in-valve sample loop for precise handling of microliter samples with a dissolved solids content of 0.9% NaCl (w/v). To demonstrate the practicality of our developed on-line system, we applied the 3D printed valve equipped a 5-μL sample loop to minimize the occurrence of salt matrix effects and facilitate an online dynamic monitoring of extracellular calcium and zinc ions in living rat brains. Under the practical condition (temporal resolution: 10h(-1)), dynamic profiling of these two metal ions in living rat brain extracellular fluid after probe implantation (the basal values for Ca and Zn were 12.11±0.10mg L(-1) and 1.87±0.05μg L(-1), respectively) and real-time monitoring of the physiological response to excitotoxic stress elicited upon perfusing a solution of 2.5mM N-methyl-d-aspartate were performed. PMID:25064244

  10. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2 + o)-sensing receptor in the clonal osteoblast-like cell lines, UMR-106 and SAOS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Kifor, O.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2 + o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. More recent data have suggested the presence of this receptor in additional tissues, such as brain, intestine and skin. In this study, we examined the expression of the CaR in the rat and human osteosarcoma cell lines, UMR-106 and SAOS-2, respectively, which possess osteoblast-like characteristics. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in UMR-106 and SAOS-2 cells. The use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, also identified CaR transcripts in each cell line. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the osteoblast-like cell lines, UMR-106 and SAOS-2, possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those in parathyroid and kidney.

  11. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  12. Ethanol-induced increases in extracellular dopamine are blunted in brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Kelly E.; Mathews, Tiffany A.

    2010-01-01

    Drugs of abuse like ethanol have the ability to stimulate forebrain dopaminergic pathways. Although the positive reinforcing properties of abused substances are largely attributed to their effects on dopamine transmission, alcohol addiction involves complex interactions between numerous molecular mediators. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is suggested to have a protective role in regulating the reinforcing effects of ethanol. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of an acute, systemic injection of ethanol (2 g/kg) on BDNF protein levels and extracellular dopamine concentrations, measured by in vivo microdialysis, in the caudate-putamen of wildtype and heterozygous BDNF mice. In both genotypes, the peak increase in extracellular dopamine following ethanol coincided temporally with a decrease in BDNF protein levels following a similar ethanol treatment. Moreover, the effect of ethanol to increase extracellular dopamine was blunted in heterozygous BDNF mice compared to wildtype mice. While the magnitude of decrease in BDNF protein induced by ethanol was similar between genotypes (two-fold), ethanol treatment induced significantly lower BDNF protein levels in heterozygous BDNF mice overall. These findings suggest the effects of ethanol are influenced by an interaction between BDNF and dopamine transmission, which may relate to the pathway through which BDNF regulates ethanol intake. PMID:21163332

  13. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:23084979

  14. Sucralose, an activator of the glucose-sensing receptor, increases ATP by calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Longfei; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Kojima, Itaru

    2016-08-31

    Sucralose is an artificial sweetener and activates the glucose-sensing receptor expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Although sucralose does not enter β-cells nor acts as a substrate for glucokinase, it induces a marked elevation of intracellular ATP ([ATP]c). The present study was conducted to identify the signaling pathway responsible for the elevation of [ATP]c induced by sucralose. Previous studies have shown that sucralose elevates cyclic AMP (cAMP), activates phospholipase C (PLC) and stimulates Ca(2+) entry by a Na(+)-dependent mechanism in MIN6 cells. The addition of forskolin induced a marked elevation of cAMP, whereas it did not affect [ATP]c. Carbachol, an activator of PLC, did not increase [ATP]c. In addition, activation of protein kinase C by dioctanoylglycerol did not affect [ATP]c. In contrast, nifedipine, an inhibitor of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel, significantly reduced [ATP]c response to sucralose. Removal of extracellular Na(+) nearly completely blocked sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Stimulation of Na(+) entry by adding a Na(+) ionophore monensin elevated [ATP]c. The monensin-induced elevation of [ATP]c was only partially inhibited by nifedipine and loading of BAPTA, both of which completely abolished elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. These results suggest that Na(+) entry is critical for the sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Both calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms are involved in the action of sucralose. PMID:27250218

  15. NG2 proteoglycan increases mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Jing; Wang Yang; Zhu, Zhonghua; Liu Jianshe; Wang Yumei; Zhang Chun; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Lang, Florian; Feng Yuxi

    2007-10-05

    As a membrane-spanning protein, NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan interacts with molecules on both sides of plasma membrane. The present study explored the role of NG2 in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In the normal kidneys, NG2 was observed predominantly in glomerular mesangium, Bowman's capsule and interstitial vessels. Both mRNA and protein expression in kidneys was significantly higher in strepozotocin-induced diabetic rats than that in normal rats. In the cultured rat mesangial cell line HBZY-1, overexpression of NG2 promoted mesangial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production, such as type VI collagen and laminin. Furthermore, target knockdown of NG2 resulted in decreased cell proliferation and ECM formation. The observations suggest that NG2 is up-regulated in diabetic nephropathy. It actively participates in the development and progression of glomerulosclerosis by stimulating proliferation of mesangial cells and deposition of ECM.

  16. Similar increases in extracellular lactic acid in the limbic system during epileptic and/or olfactory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fornai, F; Bassi, L; Gesi, M; Giorgi, F S; Guerrini, R; Bonaccorsi, I; Alessandrì, M G

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that physiological stimulation of brain activity increases anaerobic glucose consumption, both in humans and in experimental animals. To investigate this phenomenon further, we measured extracellular lactate levels within different rat brain regions, using microdialysis. Experiments were performed comparing the effects of natural, physiological olfactory stimulation of the limbic system with experimental limbic seizures. Olfactory stimulation was carried out by using different odors (i.e. both conventional odors: 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, green pepper essence; thymol; and 2-sec-butylthiazoline, a sexual pheromone). Limbic seizures were either induced by systemic injection of pilocarpine (200-400 mg/kg) or focally elicited by microinfusions of chemoconvulsants (bicuculline 118 pmol and cychlothiazide 1.2 nmol) within the anterior piriform cortex. Seizures induced by systemic pilocarpine tripled lactic acid within the hippocampus, whereas limbic seizures elicited by focal microinfusion of chemoconvulsants within the piriform cortex produced a less pronounced increase in extracellular lactic acid. Increases in extracellular lactate occurring during olfactory stimulation with the sexual pheromone (three times the baseline levels) were non-significantly different from those occurring after systemic pilocarpine. Increases in lactic acid following natural olfactory stimulation were abolished both by olfactory bulbectomy and by the focal microinfusion of tetrodotoxin, while they were significantly attenuated by the local application of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist AP-5. Increases in hippocampal lactate induced by short-lasting stimuli (olfactory stimulation or microinfusion of subthreshold doses of chemoconvulsants, bicuculline 30 pmol) were reproducible after a short delay (1 h) and cumulated when applied sequentially. In contrast, limbic status epilepticus led to a long-lasting refractoriness to additional lactate-raising stimuli

  17. Increased red cell calcium, decreased calcium adenosine triphosphatase, and altered membrane proteins during fava bean hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient (Mediterranean variant) individuals.

    PubMed

    Turrini, F; Naitana, A; Mannuzzu, L; Pescarmona, G; Arese, P

    1985-08-01

    RBCs from four glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient (Mediterranean variant) subjects were studied during fava bean hemolysis. In the density-fractionated RBC calcium level, Ca2+-ATPase activity, reduced glutathione level, and ghost protein pattern were studied. In the bottom fraction, containing most heavily damaged RBCs, calcium level ranged from 143 to 244 mumol/L RBCs (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 17 +/- 5 mumol/L RBCs). The Ca2+-ATPase activity ranged from 0.87 to 1.84 mumol ATP consumed/g Hb/min (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 2.27 +/- 0.4). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of ghosts showed: (1) the presence of high mol wt aggregates (in three cases they were reduced by dithioerythritol; in one case, only partial reduction was possible); (2) the presence of multiple, scattered new bands; and (3) the reduction of band 3. Oxidant-mediated damage to active calcium extrusion, hypothetically associated with increased calcium permeability, may explain the large increase in calcium levels. They, in turn, could activate calcium-dependent protease activity, giving rise to the profound changes in the ghost protein pattern.

  18. Juice of Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) inhibits oxytocin-induced increase of the intracellular calcium concentration in human myometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Simões-Wüst, A P; Grãos, M; Duarte, C B; Brenneisen, R; Hamburger, M; Mennet, M; Ramos, M H; Schnelle, M; Wächter, R; Worel, A M; von Mandach, U

    2010-10-01

    The use of preparations from Bryophyllum pinnatum in tocolysis is supported by both clinical (retrospective comparative studies) and experimental (using uterus strips) evidence. We studied here the effect of B. pinnatum juice on the response of cultured human myometrial cells to stimulation by oxytocin, a hormone known to be involved in the control of uterine contractions by increasing the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In this work, [Ca2+]i was measured online during stimulation of human myometrial cells (hTERT-C3 and M11) with oxytocin, which had been pre-incubated in the absence or in the presence of B. pinnatum juice. Since no functional voltage-gated Ca2+ channels could be detected in these myometrial cells, the effect of B. pinnatum juice was as well studied in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which are known to have such channels and can be depolarised with KCl. B. pinnatum juice prevented the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in hTERT-C3 human myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner, achieving a ca. 80% inhibition at a 2% concentration. Comparable results were obtained with M11 human primary myometrial cells. In hTERT-C3 cells, prevention of the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was independent of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration and of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels. B. pinnatum juice delayed, but did not prevent the depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, the data suggest a specific and concentration-dependent effect of B. pinnatum juice on the oxytocin signalling pathway, which seems to corroborate its use in tocolysis. Such a specific mechanism would explain the rare and minor side-effects in tocolysis with B. pinnatum as well as its high therapeutic index. PMID:20381326

  19. Opiates selectively increase intracellular calcium in developing type-1 astrocytes: role of calcium in morphine-induced morphologic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stiene-Martin, A; Mattson, M P; Hauser, K F

    1993-12-17

    Endogenous opioids and opiate drugs inhibit nervous system maturation, in part, by affecting the growth of astrocytes. Opiates inhibit astrocyte proliferation and cause premature differentiation. The emerging importance of Ca2+ in astrocyte function prompted us to explore whether opiates might affect astrocyte development by altering Ca2+ homeostasis. Astrocyte-enriched cultures were derived from newborn ICR mouse cerebra. Quantitative fluorescent measurements of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) using Fura-2 as well as fluo-3 and computer-aided image analysis showed that 1 microM morphine significantly increased [Ca2+]i in flat, polyhedral, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactive astrocytes at 2 and 6 min, and at 72 h. Co-administration of 3 microM naloxone blocked morphine-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i. Treatment with 1 microM concentrations of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U69,593, but not equimolar amounts of mu ([D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly(ol)5]enkephalin)- or delta ([D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin)-opioid receptor agonists, significantly increased [Ca2+]i in astrocytes. To assess the role of Ca2+ in morphine-induced astrocyte differentiation, untreated and 1 microM morphine-treated astrocyte cultures were incubated for 5 days in < 0.01, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mM extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o), or incubated with 1.0 mM [Ca2+]o in the presence of 1 microM of the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187. The areas of single astrocytes were measured and there was a positive correlation between astrocyte area and [Ca2+]o. Morphine had an additive effect on area and form factor measures when [Ca2+]o was 1.0 mM. High [Ca2+]o (3.0 mM) alone mimicked the action of morphine. Morphine alone had no effect on astrocyte area in the presence of 3.0 mM Ca2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Theophylline and adenosine modulate the inflammatory functions of the human neutrophil by exerting an opposing influence on the stimulus-induced increase in intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeichel Morley, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    Based on evidence that endogenously-produced adenosine inhibited neutrophil responses, the influence of methylxanthine bronchodilators on neutrophil responses stimulated in vitro by n-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) was examined. At concentrations between 10/sup /minus/5/ M and 10/sup /minus/4/ M, theophylline potentiated lysosomal enzyme release by 30 to 50%, superoxide anion formation by 30 to 60%, and neutrophil aggregation. Theophylline at concentrations >10/sup /minus/4/ M inhibited the same responses by >90%. Adenosine deaminase mimicked, whereas adenosine reversed the theophylline potentiation. A potential role for calcium in the modulation of the neutrophil responses by theophylline and adenosine was explored. Theophylline enhanced by >150% the fMLP-stimulated increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration ((Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/) at time points between 5 and 90 sec as measured by Fura-2. Adenosine deaminase induced a comparable enhancement, whereas 3 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ M adenosine and 10/sup /minus/7/ M N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine decreased the (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils. Extracellular calcium was not required for the opposing influences of theophylline and adenosine and neither compound altered fMLP-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake at the early time points.

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  3. Increased Calcium Supplementation Postpartum Is Associated with Breastfeeding among Chinese Mothers: Finding from Two Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Yun; Binns, Colin W.; Lee, Andy H.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium supplementation status during the postpartum period among Chinese lactating women is still unclear. The objective of this study is to utilize data from two population-based prospective cohort studies to examine the calcium supplementation status and to identify whether breastfeeding is associated with increased calcium supplementation among Chinese mothers after child birth. Information from 1540 mothers on breastfeeding and calcium supplementation measured at discharge, 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum were extracted to evaluate the association between breastfeeding and calcium supplementation postpartum. A generalized linear mixed model was applied to each study initially to account for the inherent correlation among repeated measurements, adjusting for socio-demographic, obstetric factors and calcium supplementation during pregnancy. In addition, breastfeeding status measured at different follow-up time points was treated as a time dependent variable in the longitudinal analysis. Furthermore, the effect sizes of the two cohort studies were pooled using fixed effect model. Based on the two cohort studies, the pooled likelihood of taking calcium supplementation postpartum among breastfeeding mothers was 4.02 times (95% confidence interval (2.30, 7.03)) higher than that of their non-breastfeeding counterparts. Dietary supplementation intervention programs targeting different subgroups should be promoted in Chinese women, given currently a wide shortage of dietary calcium intake and calcium supplementation postpartum. PMID:27735835

  4. Triiodothyronine increases calcium loss in a bed rest antigravity model for space flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Bray, George A; Rood, Jennifer; Most, Marlene M; Ryan, Donna H

    2008-12-01

    Bed rest has been used as a model to simulate the effects of space flight on bone metabolism. Thyroid hormones accelerate bone metabolism. Thus, supraphysiologic doses of this hormone might be used as a model to accelerate bone metabolism during bed rest and potentially simulate space flight. The objective of the study was to quantitate the changes in bone turnover after low doses of triiodothyronine (T(3)) added to short-term bed rest. Nine men and 5 women were restricted to bed rest for 28 days with their heads positioned 6 degrees below their feet. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or oral T(3) at doses of 50 to 75 microg/d in a single-blind fashion. Calcium balance was measured over 5-day periods; and T(3), thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, immunoreactive parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and urinary deoxypyridinoline were measured weekly. Triiodothyronine increased 2-fold in the men and 5-fold in the women during treatment, suppressing both thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Calcium balance was negative by 300 to 400 mg/d in the T(3)-treated volunteers, primarily because of the increased fecal loss that was not present in the placebo group. Urinary deoxypyridinoline to creatinine ratio, a marker of bone resorption, increased 60% in the placebo group during bed rest, but more than doubled in the T(3)-treated subjects (P < .01), suggesting that bone resorption was enhanced by treatment with T(3). Changes in serum osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, markers of bone formation, were similar in T(3)- and placebo-treated subjects. Triiodothyronine increases bone resorption and fecal calcium loss in subjects at bed rest.

  5. Nicotinic receptors on rat alveolar macrophages dampen ATP-induced increase in cytosolic calcium concentration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) have been identified on a variety of cells of the immune system and are generally considered to trigger anti-inflammatory events. In the present study, we determine the nAChR inventory of rat alveolar macrophages (AM), and investigate the cellular events evoked by stimulation with nicotine. Methods Rat AM were isolated freshly by bronchoalveolar lavage. The expression of nAChR subunits was analyzed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. To evaluate function of nAChR subunits, electrophysiological recordings and measurements of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were conducted. Results Positive RT-PCR results were obtained for nAChR subunits α3, α5, α9, α10, β1, and β2, with most stable expression being noted for subunits α9, α10, β1, and β2. Notably, mRNA coding for subunit α7 which is proposed to convey the nicotinic anti-inflammatory response of macrophages from other sources than the lung was not detected. RT-PCR data were supported by immunohistochemistry on AM isolated by lavage, as well as in lung tissue sections and by Western blotting. Neither whole-cell patch clamp recordings nor measurements of [Ca2+]i revealed changes in membrane current in response to ACh and in [Ca2+]i in response to nicotine, respectively. However, nicotine (100 μM), given 2 min prior to ATP, significantly reduced the ATP-induced rise in [Ca2+]i by 30%. This effect was blocked by α-bungarotoxin and did not depend on the presence of extracellular calcium. Conclusions Rat AM are equipped with modulatory nAChR with properties distinct from ionotropic nAChR mediating synaptic transmission in the nervous system. Their stimulation with nicotine dampens ATP-induced Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Thus, the present study identifies the first acute receptor-mediated nicotinic effect on AM with anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:20920278

  6. Noradrenaline activates a calcium-activated chloride conductance and increases the voltage-dependent calcium current in cultured single cells of rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Pacaud, P; Loirand, G; Mironneau, C; Mironneau, J

    1989-05-01

    1. Membrane responses were recorded by a patch pipette technique in cultured cells isolated from rat portal vein. Using the whole-cell mode, pressure ejections of noradrenaline evoked depolarization (current clamp) and inward current (voltage clamp) at membrane potentials of -60 to -70 mV. The noradrenaline-induced response was reversibly blocked by prazosin indicating that the response was mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors. 2. The ionic mechanism of the noradrenaline-induced inward current was investigated in potassium-free caesium-containing solutions. Alteration of the chloride equilibrium potential produced similar changes in the reversal potential of the noradrenaline-induced current, indicating that noradrenaline opened chloride-selective channels. There was no evidence implicating sodium or calcium as the charge-carrying ion. 3. Caffeine applied in the bathing solution also induced a transient increase in chloride conductance but the noradrenaline-induced response was lost after application of caffeine. This is interpreted to mean that the increase in chloride conductance induced by noradrenaline and caffeine can occur as a consequence of a rise in intracellular calcium concentration depending on release of calcium from the same intracellular stores. 4. In the presence of caffeine, noradrenaline increased both the voltage-dependent calcium and chloride membrane conductances during application of repetitive depolarizing pulses. It is concluded that in isolated cells of the rat portal vein the depolarization in response to noradrenaline is mediated by an increase in chloride conductance depending on both the calcium release from intracellular stores and the increase of the voltage-dependent calcium current. PMID:2470458

  7. Phototropism and geotropism in maize coleoptiles are spatially correlated with increases in cytosolic free calcium.

    PubMed

    Gehring, C A; Williams, D A; Cody, S H; Parish, R W

    1990-06-01

    Phototropism and gravitropism in the shoots and roots of higher plants are the result of asymmetric growth. This is explained by the redistribution of growth regulators following exposure to gravity or unilateral light (the Cholodny-Went hypothesis). The positive phototropism and the negative geotropism of grass seedling coleoptiles are believed to result from lateral movement of auxin from the irradiated to the shaded side and from the upper to the lower side, respectively. Many physiological processes in plants, including auxin-induced cell elongation, are reported to be under the control of calcium. Added auxin triggers oscillations in cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) and cytosolic pH (pHcyt) in epidermal cells of maize coleoptiles. Until recently, it has not been possible to visualize these changes spatially with the commonly used fluorescent cation indicators. Using a scanning laser confocal microscope, a new visible wavelength Ca2+ probe fluo-3 and the fluorescent pH indicator BCECF, we have recorded rapid light-induced increases in [Ca2+]cyt and a lowering of pHcyt of cells on the shaded side of maize coleoptiles. In horizontally orientated coleoptiles, [Ca2+]cyt increases and pHcyt decreases in the more rapidly elongating cells on the lower side. For the first time, rapid changes in [Ca2+]cyt and pHcyt are correlated directly with increases in cell elongation stimulated by light and gravity.

  8. Expression of Arabidopsis CAX1 in tobacco: altered calcium homeostasis and increased stress sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschi, K D

    1999-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2)+) efflux from the cytosol modulates Ca(2+) concentrations in the cytosol, loads Ca(2+) into intracellular compartments, and supplies Ca(2+) to organelles to support biochemical functions. The Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter CAX1 (for CALCIUM EXCHANGER 1) of Arabidopsis is thought to be a key mediator of these processes. To clarify the regulation of CAX1, we examined CAX1 RNA expression in response to various stimuli. CAX1 was highly expressed in response to exogenous Ca(2+). Transgenic tobacco plants expressing CAX1 displayed symptoms of Ca(2+) deficiencies, including hypersensitivity to ion imbalances, such as increased magnesium and potassium concentrations, and to cold shock, but increasing the Ca(2+) in the media abrogated these sensitivities. Tobacco plants expressing CAX1 also demonstrated increased Ca(2+) accumulation and altered activity of the tonoplast-enriched Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter. These results emphasize that regulated expression of Ca(2+)/H(+) antiport activity is critical for normal growth and adaptation to certain stresses. PMID:10559438

  9. Increased LDL electronegativity in chronic kidney disease disrupts calcium homeostasis resulting in cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Lee, An-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Lin, Yen-Nien; Hsu, Jing-Fang; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Pan, Chia-Chi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Chang, Chi-Tzong; Su, Ming-Jai; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2015-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is associated with abnormal lipoprotein metabolism. We examined whether electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is mechanistically linked to cardiac dysfunction in patients with early CKD. We compared echocardiographic parameters between patients with stage 2 CKD (n = 88) and normal controls (n = 89) and found that impaired relaxation was more common in CKD patients. Reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate was an independent predictor of left ventricular relaxation dysfunction. We then examined cardiac function in a rat model of early CKD induced by unilateral nephrectomy (UNx) by analyzing pressure-volume loop data. The time constant of isovolumic pressure decay was longer and the maximal velocity of pressure fall was slower in UNx rats than in controls. When we investigated the mechanisms underlying relaxation dysfunction, we found that LDL from CKD patients and UNx rats was more electronegative than LDL from their respective controls and that LDL from UNx rats induced intracellular calcium overload in H9c2 cardiomyocytes in vitro. Furthermore, chronic administration of electronegative LDL, which signals through lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), induced relaxation dysfunction in wild-type but not LOX-1(-/-) mice. In in vitro and in vivo experiments, impaired cardiac relaxation was associated with increased calcium transient resulting from nitric oxide (NO)-dependent nitrosylation of SERCA2a due to increases in inducible NO synthase expression and endothelial NO synthase uncoupling. In conclusion, LDL becomes more electronegative in early CKD. This change disrupts SERCA2a-regulated calcium homeostasis, which may be the mechanism underlying cardiorenal syndrome.

  10. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Song, Dong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca(2+) signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca(2+)-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca(2+) influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na(+)-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca(2+)]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na(+)-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca(2+)]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca(2+)]i increase through Ca(2+) influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  11. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  12. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way.

  13. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile: An Observational Study on a Large Cohort From South Italy.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S; Irace, Concetta

    2016-02-01

    Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk.Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods.We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women.Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:26937904

  14. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile: An Observational Study on a Large Cohort From South Italy.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S; Irace, Concetta

    2016-02-01

    Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk.Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods.We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women.Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk.

  15. Modulation by extracellular ATP of L-type calcium channels in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal cell.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, A. D.; Kwan, Y. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate ([ATP]zero) on the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cells, isolated by enzymatic dissociation, were investigated by use of whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. 2. The application of [ATP]zero (2 microM-1 mM) produced an inhibitory effect on the L-type Ca2+ channel current peak amplitude (10 mM Ba2+ as charge carrier) in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner with an IC50 of 100 microM and a Hill coefficient of 1.83. 3. The presence of the adenosine receptor antagonists, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM) did not affect the [ATP]zero-induced inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine (100 microM) had little effect on the basal Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine 500 microM, caused 23% inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current, which was abolished by 0.1 microM DPCPX. 4. The presence of the P2-purinoceptor antagonists, suramin (1, 10 and 100 microM), reactive blue 2 (1 and 10 microM) and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 50 and 100 microM) failed to affect the inhibitory action of [ATP]zero on Ca2+ channel currents. 5. The relative rank order of potency of different nucleotides and nucleosides, at a concentration of 100 microM, on the inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents is as follows: adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) = alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (alpha,beta MeATP) > > 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) > or = adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S) > > uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) = adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) > adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) > or = adenosine. 6. These results suggest that [ATP]zero may play an important role in the heart beat by inhibiting the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in single SAN cells. This inhibitory effect is not due to the formation of adenosine resulting from the enzymatic degradation of [ATP]zero. Based on the relative order of inhibitory

  16. Decreased fibrinolytic activity and increased platelet function in hypertension. Possible influence of calcium antagonism.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1991-02-01

    Twelve patients with mild hypertension were compared, after 14 days of placebo, with an age- and gender-matched group of 12 healthy volunteers for platelet aggregability and fibrinolytic activity. Following this, 10 of the 12 hypertensives were treated with the calcium antagonist isradipine for 12 months. Blood was drawn for determinations of platelet aggregation and fibrinolytic activity after two weeks and 12 months of treatment. Platelet aggregation tended to increase in the hypertensives compared with controls, indicated by a lowering of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) threshold value for irreversible aggregation. Tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA) activity was significantly decreased in hypertensives compared to controls (P less than .05). During therapy, platelet aggregation decreased and t-PA activity increased (P less than .05). The present data suggest that fibrinolytic activity is decreased and platelet aggregation increased in mild hypertension. Besides the blood pressure-lowering effect, isradipine may protect against thromboembolic diseases by modifying platelet function and fibrinolytic activity.

  17. Increased Asynchronous Release and Aberrant Calcium Channel Activation in Amyloid Precursor Protein Deficient Neuromuscular Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Baiping; Long, Cheng; Wu, Gangyi; Zheng, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Despite the critical roles of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, its physiological function remains poorly established. Our previous studies implicated a structural and functional activity of the APP family of proteins in the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we performed comprehensive analyses of neurotransmission in mature neuromuscular synapse of APP deficient mice. We found that APP deletion led to reduced paired-pulse facilitation and increased depression of synaptic transmission with repetitive stimulation. Readily releasable pool size and total releasable vesicles were not affected, but probability of release was significantly increased. Strikingly, the amount of asynchronous release, a measure sensitive to presynaptic calcium concentration, was dramatically increased, and pharmacological studies revealed that it was attributed to aberrant activation of N- and L-type Ca2+ channels. We propose that APP modulates synaptic transmission at the NMJ by ensuring proper Ca2+ channel function. PMID:17919826

  18. Calcium intake is not associated with increased coronary artery calcification: The Framingham Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate calcium intake is known to protect the skeleton. However, studies that have reported adverse effects of calcium supplementation on vascular events have raised widespread concern. We assessed the association between calcium intake (from diet and supplements) and coronary artery calcification...

  19. Human resistin promotes neutrophil proinflammatory activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation and increases severity of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2014-05-15

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. We examined whether the human-specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation and the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using humanized resistin mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN(+/-)(/-)) but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn(+/-/-) neutrophils compared with control Rtn(-/-/-) neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that also is implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced acute lung injury, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4-induced inflammatory responses, and it may be a target for future therapies aimed at reducing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations in which neutrophils play a major role.

  20. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis and increased cytosolic calcium are both necessary but not sufficient for activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Andrew; Marland, Jamie R K; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. By definition this mode is triggered by neuronal activity; however, key questions regarding its mechanism of activation remain unaddressed. To determine the basic requirements for ADBE triggering in central nerve terminals, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. ADBE was monitored both optically and morphologically by observing uptake of the fluid phase markers tetramethylrhodamine-dextran and horse radish peroxidase respectively. Ablation of SV fusion with tetanus toxin resulted in the arrest of ADBE, but had no effect on other calcium-dependent events such as activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation, indicating that SV exocytosis is necessary for triggering. Furthermore, the calcium chelator EGTA abolished ADBE while leaving SV exocytosis intact, demonstrating that ADBE is triggered by intracellular free calcium increases outside the active zone. Activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation was also arrested in EGTA-treated neurons, consistent with its proposed role in triggering ADBE. Thus, SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient individually to trigger ADBE. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. To determine the minimal requirements for ADBE triggering, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. We found that SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient to trigger ADBE.

  1. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis and increased cytosolic calcium are both necessary but not sufficient for activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Andrew; Marland, Jamie R K; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. By definition this mode is triggered by neuronal activity; however, key questions regarding its mechanism of activation remain unaddressed. To determine the basic requirements for ADBE triggering in central nerve terminals, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. ADBE was monitored both optically and morphologically by observing uptake of the fluid phase markers tetramethylrhodamine-dextran and horse radish peroxidase respectively. Ablation of SV fusion with tetanus toxin resulted in the arrest of ADBE, but had no effect on other calcium-dependent events such as activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation, indicating that SV exocytosis is necessary for triggering. Furthermore, the calcium chelator EGTA abolished ADBE while leaving SV exocytosis intact, demonstrating that ADBE is triggered by intracellular free calcium increases outside the active zone. Activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation was also arrested in EGTA-treated neurons, consistent with its proposed role in triggering ADBE. Thus, SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient individually to trigger ADBE. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. To determine the minimal requirements for ADBE triggering, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. We found that SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient to trigger ADBE. PMID:25913068

  2. Increased Calcium Availability Leads to Greater Forest Floor Accumulation in an Adirondack Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, A.; Goodale, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Nutrient availability in Northeastern US forests has been dramatically altered by anthropogenic activities. Acid deposition has not only increased nitrogen (N) availability, but has also been linked to soil acidification and a loss of base cations, largely calcium (Ca). We are studying the long-term effects of a Ca addition on carbon (C) and N cycling in a forested catchment in the Adirondack Park, New York. In 1989, calcium carbonate (lime) was added to two subcatchments within the Woods Lake Watershed to ameliorate the effects of soil Ca depletion. Two additional subcatchments were left as controls. Eighteen years after the Ca application, both soil pH and exchangeable Ca concentrations remain elevated in the organic horizons and upper mineral soils of the treated subcatchments. The forest floor mass in this watershed is very large and measurements show that the organic layer in the limed subcatchments is significantly larger than in the controls (212 t/ha vs. 116 t/ha), resulting in greater C and N stocks in the Ca-amended soils. This finding suggests that Ca may stabilize soil organic matter (SOM), resulting in greater C storage under high soil Ca conditions. We are investigating potential drivers of this SOM accumulation in the limed subcatchments, including rates of leaf litter production and the decomposition rate of forest floor material. This work will provide important insights into how long-term changes in soil Ca availability influence SOM stabilization, retention and nutrient cycling.

  3. Alcohol consumption increases basal extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core of Sprague-Dawley rats without increasing spontaneous glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Pati, Dipanwita; Kelly, Kyle; Stennett, Bethany; Frazier, Charles J; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc) mediates ethanol consumption. Previous studies using non-contingent and voluntary alcohol administration in inbred rodents have reported increased basal extracellular glutamate levels in the NAc. Here, we assessed basal glutamate levels in the NAc following intermittent alcohol consumption in male Sprague-Dawley rats that had access to ethanol for 7 weeks on alternating days. We found increased basal NAc glutamate at 24 h withdrawal from ethanol and thus sought to identify the source of this glutamate. To do so, we employed a combination of microdialysis, slice electrophysiology and western blotting. Reverse dialysis of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin did not affect glutamate levels in either group. Electrophysiological recordings in slices made after 24 h withdrawal revealed a decrease in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) frequency relative to controls, with no change in sEPSC amplitude. No change in metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGlu2/3) function was detected as bath application of the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268 decreased spontaneous and miniature EPSC frequency in slices from both control and ethanol-consuming rats. The increase in basal glutamate was not associated with changes in the surface expression of GLT-1, however, a decrease in slope of the no-net-flux dialysis function was observed following ethanol consumption, indicating a potential decrease in glutamate reuptake. Taken together, these findings indicate that the increase in basal extracellular glutamate occurring after chronic ethanol consumption is not mediated by an increase in action potential-dependent glutamate release or a failure of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors to regulate such release. PMID:27207718

  4. Riboflavin and vitamin E increase brain calcium and antioxidants, and microsomal calcium-ATP-ase values in rat headache models induced by glyceryl trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Bütün, Ayşe; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Demirci, Serpil; Çelik, Ömer; Uğuz, Abdulhadi Cihangir

    2015-04-01

    The essential use of riboflavin is the prevention of migraine headaches, although its effect on migraines is considered to be associated with the increased mitochondrial energy metabolism. Oxidative stress is also important in migraine pathophysiology. Vitamin E is a strong antioxidant in nature and its analgesic effect is not completely clear in migraines. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-sourced exogen nitric oxide (NO), in particular, and also riboflavin and/or vitamin E on involved in the headache model induced via GTN-sourced exogen NO on oxidative stress, total brain calcium levels, and microsomal membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase levels. GTN infusion is a reliable method to provoke migraine-like headaches in experimental animals and humans. GTN resulted in a significant increase in brain cortex and microsomal lipid peroxidation levels although brain calcium, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E, and brain microsomal-reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase values decreased through GTN. The lipid peroxidation, GSH, vitamin A, β-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E, and calcium concentrations, GSH-Px, and the Ca(2+)-ATPase activities were increased both by riboflavin and vitamin E treatments. Brain calcium and vitamin A concentrations increased through riboflavin only. In conclusion, riboflavin and vitamin E had a protective effect on the GTN-induced brain injury by inhibiting free radical production, regulation of calcium-dependent processes, and supporting the antioxidant redox system. However, the effects of vitamin E on the values seem more important than in riboflavin.

  5. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Facilitate Vesicle Endocytosis by Increasing Presynaptic Calcium Channel Expression at a Central Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi-cheng; Ge, Jian-long; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Hao, Mei; Wu, Yi-chen; Lin, Yi-an; La, Ting; Yao, Pan-tong; Mei, Yan-ai; Feng, Yi; Xue, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests significant biological effects caused by extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF). Although exo-endocytosis plays crucial physical and biological roles in neuronal communication, studies on how ELF-EMF regulates this process are scarce. By directly measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance at a large mammalian central nervous synapse, the calyx of Held, we report for the first time that ELF-EMF critically affects synaptic transmission and plasticity. Exposure to ELF-EMF for 8 to 10 days dramatically increases the calcium influx upon stimulation and facilitates all forms of vesicle endocytosis, including slow and rapid endocytosis, endocytosis overshoot and bulk endocytosis, but does not affect the RRP size and exocytosis. Exposure to ELF-EMF also potentiates PTP, a form of short-term plasticity, increasing its peak amplitude without impacting its time course. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms and found that calcium channel expression, including the P/Q, N, and R subtypes, at the presynaptic nerve terminal was enhanced, accounting for the increased calcium influx upon stimulation. Thus, we conclude that exposure to ELF-EMF facilitates vesicle endocytosis and synaptic plasticity in a calcium-dependent manner by increasing calcium channel expression at the nerve terminal. PMID:26887777

  6. Increased neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated Staphylococcus aureus clearance through inhibition of nuclease activity by clindamycin and immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Schilcher, Katrin; Andreoni, Federica; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Ogawa, Taiji; Schuepbach, Reto A; Zinkernagel, Annelies S

    2014-08-01

    The Gram-positive human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of human diseases such as skin infections, pneumonia, and endocarditis. The micrococcal nuclease Nuc1 is one of the major S. aureus virulence factors and allows the bacterium to avoid neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-mediated killing. We found that addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin to S. aureus LAC cultures decreased nuc1 transcription and subsequently blunted nuclease activity in a molecular beacon-based fluorescence assay. We also observed reduced NET degradation through Nuc1 inhibition translating into increased NET-mediated clearance. Similarly, pooled human immunoglobulin specifically inhibited nuclease activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of nuclease activity by clindamycin and immunoglobulin enhanced S. aureus clearance and should be considered in the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  7. Stem cell and extracellular matrix-related molecules increase following melatonin treatment in the skin of postmenopausal rats.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Serap; Oktem, Gulperi; Uysal, Aysegul; Soner, Burak Cem; Arbak, Serap; Ince, Umit

    2014-08-01

    The menopause has a negative effect in the skin. Melatonin affects skin functions and structures through actions mediated by cell-surface and putative-nuclear receptors expressed in skin cell. We have therefore determined the effects of melatonin treatment on stem cell in the epidermis and extracellular matrix related molecules in the dermis the skin of postmenopausal rats. A total of 45 female rats were divided into 5 groups: control group, group A [ovariectomy (OVX)], group B (OVX +10 mg/kg/day melatonin), group C (OVX +30 mg/kg/day melatonin), group S (sham operated + 10 mg/kg/day melatonin). Ventral skin samples were excised at 12th week after ovariectomy. Hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid- methylamine silver, elastic van Gieson staining techniques were used to measure histomorphometrically the thickness of elastic fibers and basement membrane, depths of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous fat layer. Immunohistochemical staining methods were used for fibroblast growth factor β (FGF β), collagen type I, fibronectin, β-catenin, c-kit, c-Myc evaluation. Epidermal thickness, subcutaneous fat layer, and elastic fibers were significantly decreased in group C, and there was a significant increase after melatonin treatment. Although there was no difference in dermal thickness of group C, melatonin also significantly increased the dermal thickness. High FGF β, type I collagen, fibronectin, β-catenin, c-Myc immunoreactivity developed following melatonin in all groups. Thus melatonin treatment of postmenopausal rats was mostly due to the decrease of stem cell and extracellular matrix-related molecules in the skin.

  8. Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in a mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line (J774): potential mediator of the actions of Ca2+o on the function of J774 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Kifor, O.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Bai, M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone remodeling and may play a role in the "reversal" phase following osteoclastic resorption and preceding bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for bone marrow mononuclear cells in the vicinity, leading us to investigate whether such mononuclear cells express the CaR. In this study, we used the mouse J774 cell line, which exhibits a pure monocyte-macrophage phenotype. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using polyclonal antisera specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in J774 cells. The use of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with CaR-specific primers, including a set of intron-spanning primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, also identified CaR transcripts in J774 cells. Exposure of J774 cells to high Ca2+o (2.8 mM or more) or the polycationic CaR agonist, neomycin (100 microM), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in J774 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the monocyte-macrophage cell line, J774, possesses both CaR protein and mRNA very similar, if not identical, to those in parathyroid and kidney.

  9. Mouse osteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1) expresses extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor and its agonists stimulate chemotaxis and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Butters, R. R. Jr; Sugimoto, T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Osteoblasts appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone remodeling in the "reversal" phase following osteoclastic resorption and preceding bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for osteoblasts in the vicinity, leading us to determine whether such osteoblasts express the CaR. In this study, we used the mouse osteoblastic, clonal cell line MC3T3-E1. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in MC3T3-E1 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of MC3T3-E1 cells to high Ca2+o (up to 4.8 mM) or the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin and gadolinium (Gd3+), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 possesses both CaR protein and mRNA very similar, if not identical, to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, the CaR in these osteoblasts could play a key role in regulating bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local release of Ca2+o.

  10. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol mediated increases in extracellular peroxidase activity in three species of Lemnaceae.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dilip K; Scannell, Gillian; Akhmetov, Nurlan; Fitzpatrick, Dara; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2010-11-01

    Chlorinated phenols, or chlorophenols, are persistent priority pollutants that are widespread in the environment. Class III peroxidases are well-characterised plant enzymes that can catalyse the oxidative dechlorination of chlorophenols. Expression of these enzymes by plants is commonly associated with plant stress, therefore limiting scope for phytoremediation. In this study, we have quantitatively compared peroxidase activity and phytotoxicity as a function of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) concentration in three species of Lemnaceae; Lemna minor, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata. Effects of TCP on the growth rates of the three species differed considerably with L. punctata being the most tolerant species. TCP also affected photosynthetic parameters, causing a decrease in open photosystem II reaction centres (qP) and, in L. punctata only, a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (qN). In parallel, TCP exposure resulted in increased peroxidase activity in all three species. Peroxidase activity in L. minor and L. gibba displayed an inverse relationship with biomass accumulation, i.e. the more growth reduction the more peroxidase activity. In contrast, induction of peroxidase activity in L. punctata was bi-phasic, with a TCP-induced activity peak at concentrations that had no major effect on growth, and further induction under phytotoxic concentrations. The mechanism by which L. punctata recognises and responds to low concentrations of an anthropogenic compound, in the absence of wide-ranging stress, remains enigmatic. However, we conclude that this "window" of peroxidase production in the absence of major growth inhibition offers potential for the development of sustainable, peroxidise-mediated phytoremediation systems. PMID:20810175

  11. Neovibsanin B increases extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells via activation of Smad signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Rong, Ao; Lin, Yan; Qiu, Xu-Ling; Qu, Shen; Lan, Xian-Hai

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of neovibsanin B on the synthesis and deposition of ECM proteins and the signalling pathways used in optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells. For investigation of the signalling pathway used by neovibsanin B, ONH cells were treated with neovibsanin B. Western blot and immunostaining analyses were used to examine the phosphorylation of proteins involved in Smad and non-Smad signalling pathway. The results revealed that ONH cells on treatment with neovibsanin B showed enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Neovibsanin B induced phosphorylation of canonical signalling proteins, Smad2/3. However phosphorylation of non-canonical signalling proteins, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) 1/2 remained unaffected. There was also increase in co-localization of pSmad2/3 with Co-Smad4 in the nucleus of ONH astrocytes and LC cells indicating activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway. Treatment of ONH cells with SIS3, inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation reversed the neovibsanin B stimulated ECM expression as well as activation of canonical pathway signalling molecules. In addition, inhibition of Smad2 or Smad3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed neovibsanin B stimulated ECM protein synthesis in ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Thus neovibsanin B utilizes the canonical Smad signalling pathway to stimulate ECM synthesis in human ONH cells. The neovibsanin B induced ECM synthesis and activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway may be due to its effect on transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2). However, further studies are under process to understand the mechanism.

  12. Extracellular signal regulated kinase and GEF-H1 mediate depolarization-induced Rho activation and paracellular permeability increase

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Faiza; Speight, Pam; Kawai, Glenn; Dan, Qinghong; Kapus, András; Szászi, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization activates the Rho/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway and thereby enhances myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which in turn is thought to be a key regulator of paracellular permeability. However, the upstream mechanisms that couple depolarization to Rho activation and permeability changes are unknown. Here we show that three different depolarizing stimuli (high extracellular [K+], the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium or L-alanine, which is taken up by electrogenic Na+-cotransport) all provoke robust phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (ERK) in LLC-PK1 and MDCK cells. Importantly, inhibition of ERK prevented the depolarization-induced activation of Rho. Searching for the underlying mechanism, we have identified GEF-H1 as the ERK-regulated critical exchange factor, responsible for the depolarization-induced Rho activation. This conclusion is based on our findings that a) depolarization activated GEF-H1, but not p115RhoGEF; b) siRNA-mediated GEF-H1 silencing eliminated the activation of the Rho pathway; c) ERK inhibition prevented the activation of GEF-H1. Moreover, we found that the Na+/K+ pump inhibitor ouabain also caused ERK, GEF-H1 and Rho activation, partially due to its depolarizing effect. Regarding functional consequences of this newly identified pathway, we found that depolarization increased paracellular permeability in LLC-PK1 and MDCK cells, and this effect was mitigated by inhibiting myosin using blebbistatin or a dominant negative (phosphorylation-incompetent) MLC. Taken together, we propose, that the ERK/GEF-H1/Rho/ROK/pMLC pathway could be a central mechanism whereby electrogenic transmembrane transport processes control myosin phosphorylation and regulate paracellular transport in the tubular epithelium. PMID:20237148

  13. Role of serotonin and/or norepinephrine in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Pachmerhiwala, Rashida; Bhide, Nirmal; Straiko, Megan; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    The acute administration of MDMA has been shown to promote glycogenolysis and increase the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum. In the present study the role of serotonergic and/or noradrenergic mechanisms in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis was assessed. The relationship of these responses to the hyperthermia produced by MDMA also was examined. The administration of MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a significant and sustained increase of 65-100% in the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum, as well as in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and a 35% decrease in brain glycogen content. Peripheral blood glucose was modestly increased by 32% after MDMA treatment. Treatment of rats with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose in the striatum but had no effect on MDMA-induced glycogenolysis or hyperthermia. Treatment with prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) did not alter the glucose or glycogen responses to MDMA but completely suppressed MDMA-induced hyperthermia. Finally, propranolol (3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis but did not alter MDMA-induced hyperthermia. The present results suggest that MDMA increases extracellular glucose in multiple brain regions, and that this response involves both serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. Furthermore, β-adrenergic and α-adrenergic receptors appear to contribute to MDMA-induced glycogenolysis and hyperthermia, respectively. Finally, hyperthermia, glycogenolysis and elevated extracellular glucose appear to be independent, unrelated responses to acute MDMA administration. PMID:20633550

  14. Lysergic acid diethylamide and [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine increase extracellular glutamate in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Muschamp, John W; Regina, Meredith J; Hull, Elaine M; Winter, Jerrold C; Rabin, Richard A

    2004-10-01

    The ability of hallucinogens to increase extracellular glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. The hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a time-dependent increase in PFC glutamate that was blocked by the 5-HT(2A) antagonist M100907 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, the 5-HT(2A/C) agonist [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM; 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.), which is a phenethylamine hallucinogen, increased glutamate to 206% above saline-treated controls. When LSD (10 microM) was directly applied to the PFC by reverse dialysis, a rapid increase in PFC glutamate levels was observed. Glutamate levels in the PFC remained elevated after the drug infusion was discontinued. These data provide direct evidence in vivo for the hypothesis that an enhanced release of glutamate is a common mechanism in the action of hallucinogens.

  15. Increased extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} lead to adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow stromal cells by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Seigo; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2015-02-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common progenitors for both adipocyte and osteoblast. An increase in marrow adipogenesis is associated with age-related osteopenia and anemia. Both extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) are versatile signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of cell functions, including proliferation and differentiation. We have recently reported that upon treatment of BMSCs with insulin and dexamethasone, both high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} enhanced adipocyte accumulation, which suggested that increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} caused by bone resorption may accelerate adipocyte accumulation in aging and diabetic patients. In this study, we used primary mouse BMSCs to investigate the mechanisms by which high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} may enhance adipocyte accumulation. In the process of adipocyte accumulation, two important keys are adipocyte differentiation and the proliferation of BMSCs, which have the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Use of MTT assay and real-time RT-PCR revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (ionomycin)-dependent adipocyte accumulation is caused by enhanced proliferation of BMSCs but not enhanced differentiation into adipocytes. Using fura-2 fluorescence-based approaches, we showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} (addition of CaCl{sub 2}) leads to increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Flow cytometric methods revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK independently of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The inhibition of ERK by U0126 and PD0325901 enhanced the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes. These data suggest that increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} provides the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes by the suppression of ERK activity independently of increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, which results in BMSC proliferation. - Highlights:

  16. Calcium channel as a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Kriazhev, L

    2009-11-01

    Anticancer treatment in modern clinical practices includes chemotherapy and radiation therapy with or without surgical interventions. Efficiency of both methods varies greatly depending on cancer types and stages. Besides, chemo- and radiotherapy are toxic and damaging that causes serious side effects. This fact prompts the search for alternative methods of antitumor therapy. It is well known that prolonged or high increase of intracellular calcium concentration inevitably leads to the cell death via apoptosis or necrosis. However, stimulation of cell calcium level by chemical agents is hardly achievable because cells have very sophisticated machinery for maintaining intracellular calcium in physiological ranges. This obstacle can be overridden, nevertheless. It was found that calcium channels in so called calcium cells in land snails are directly regulated by extracellular calcium concentration. The higher the concentration the higher the calcium intake is through the channels. Bearing in mind that extracellular/intracellular calcium concentration ratio in human beings is 10,000-12,000 fold the insertion of the channel into cancer cells would lead to fast and uncontrollable by the cells calcium intake and cell death. Proteins composing the channel may be extracted from plasma membrane of calcium cells and sequenced by mass-spectrometry or N-terminal sequencing. Either proteins or corresponding genes could be used for targeted delivery into cancer cells.

  17. Impact of a nutrition education program to increase intake of calcium-rich foods by Chinese-American women.

    PubMed

    Lv, Nan; Brown, J Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Chinese-American women have a high risk of osteoporosis. However, their calcium intake has been reported previously as considerably below the Dietary Reference Intake. Increasing consumption of calcium-rich foods, many of which are also fortified with vitamin D, is a safe way to increase their calcium and vitamin D intake. This study's objective was to pilot-test an intervention to help Chinese-American women incorporate calcium-rich foods into their diet. This intervention was evaluated using a quasi-experimental study with a nested design and pre-, immediate post-, and 3-month follow-up assessments. Calcium and vitamin D intake, Theory of Planned Behavior constructs, and knowledge were measured at three time points. First-generation Chinese-American mothers between 35 and 55 years old (n=141) were recruited from six weekend Chinese schools. Three Chinese schools each were randomly assigned to the experimental (n=71) or control group (n=70). The experimental group received a free heel scan and six weekly interactive lessons designed based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. The control group received six weekly nonrelated financial lessons by mail. Changes for each measure were assessed by linear mixed model with repeated measures adjusted for confounding variables. Compared to the control group, the experimental group improved all measures considerably, except two subjective norm constructs (normative belief and motivation to comply) at post-assessments. The experimental group significantly increased its baseline calcium (t=7.898, P<0.001) and vitamin D intake (t=6.609; P<0.001) at posttest and this increase was retained at follow-up. Results suggest that this theory-based intervention is effective for increasing the dietary calcium and vitamin D intake of Chinese-American women.

  18. Impact of a nutrition education program to increase intake of calcium-rich foods by Chinese-American women.

    PubMed

    Lv, Nan; Brown, J Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Chinese-American women have a high risk of osteoporosis. However, their calcium intake has been reported previously as considerably below the Dietary Reference Intake. Increasing consumption of calcium-rich foods, many of which are also fortified with vitamin D, is a safe way to increase their calcium and vitamin D intake. This study's objective was to pilot-test an intervention to help Chinese-American women incorporate calcium-rich foods into their diet. This intervention was evaluated using a quasi-experimental study with a nested design and pre-, immediate post-, and 3-month follow-up assessments. Calcium and vitamin D intake, Theory of Planned Behavior constructs, and knowledge were measured at three time points. First-generation Chinese-American mothers between 35 and 55 years old (n=141) were recruited from six weekend Chinese schools. Three Chinese schools each were randomly assigned to the experimental (n=71) or control group (n=70). The experimental group received a free heel scan and six weekly interactive lessons designed based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. The control group received six weekly nonrelated financial lessons by mail. Changes for each measure were assessed by linear mixed model with repeated measures adjusted for confounding variables. Compared to the control group, the experimental group improved all measures considerably, except two subjective norm constructs (normative belief and motivation to comply) at post-assessments. The experimental group significantly increased its baseline calcium (t=7.898, P<0.001) and vitamin D intake (t=6.609; P<0.001) at posttest and this increase was retained at follow-up. Results suggest that this theory-based intervention is effective for increasing the dietary calcium and vitamin D intake of Chinese-American women. PMID:21185977

  19. Tight skin 2 mice exhibit a novel time line of events leading to increased extracellular matrix deposition and dermal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristen B; Artlett, Carol M; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P

    2014-09-01

    The tight skin 2 (Tsk2) mouse model of systemic sclerosis (SSc) has many features of the human disease including tight skin, fibrosis, extracellular matrix abnormalities, and reported antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Here we report that Tsk2/+ mice develop excess dermal fibrosis with age, as skin is not significantly fibrotic until 10 weeks, a full eight weeks after the development of the physical tight skin phenotype. Concomitantly with the tight skin phenotype at two weeks of age, Tsk2/+ mice demonstrate increased levels of total transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and excessive accumulation of dermal elastic fibers. The increase in elastic fibers is not responsible for tight skin, however, because Tsk2/+ mice genetically engineered to lack skin elastic fibers nevertheless have tight skin and fibrosis. Finally, about two months after the first measurable increases of total collagen, a portion of Tsk2/+ mice produce ANAs, but at a similar level to wild-type littermates. The timeline of disease development in the Tsk2/+ mouse shows that fibrosis is progressive, with elastic fiber alterations and TGF-β1 over-production occurring at least two months before bona fide fibrosis, that is not dependent on ANA production.

  20. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is increased in psoriasis and induces human β-defensin-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Yu, Hsin-Su; Yen, Feng-Lin; Lin, Chi-Ling; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lan, Cheng-Che E

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in the development of certain immune-mediated diseases, but their role in psoriasis has not been clearly defined. Human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) is an important antimicrobial peptide overexpressed in psoriasis epidermis. We evaluated whether the amount of NETs is increased in psoriasis and determined the effect of NETs on HBD-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes. Using fluorescent microscopy, we found that patients with psoriasis (n = 48) had higher amount of NETotic cells in their peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (n = 48) and patients with eczema (n = 35). Psoriasis sera showed increased ability to induce NET formation in control neutrophils but normal NET degradation ability. The amount of NETs in the peripheral blood correlated with psoriasis disease severity. NETosis was also observed in the majority (18 of 20) of psoriasis skin specimens. Furthermore, NETs induced HBD-2 mRNA and protein production in keratinocytes, and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed strong expression of HBD-2 in psoriasis lesional skin. In summary, NET formation is increased in peripheral blood and lesional skin of psoriasis patients and correlates with disease severity. Additionally, NET-induced HBD-2 production may provide a novel mechanism for the decreased susceptibility of psoriasis plaques to microbial infections. PMID:27493143

  1. The phosphorylation status of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 in astrocytes and neurons from rat hippocampus determines the thrombin-induced calcium release and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Zündorf, Gregor; Reiser, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Challenge of protease-activated receptors induces cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ](c)) increase, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation with a bandwidth of responses in individual cells. We detected in this study in situ the thrombin-induced [Ca(2+) ](c) rise and ROS formation in dissociated hippocampal astrocytes and neurons in a mixed culture. In identified cells, single cell responses were correlated with extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation level. On average, in astrocytes, thrombin induced a transient [Ca(2+) ](c) rise with concentration-dependent increase in amplitude and extrusion rate and high ERK1/2 phosphorylation level. Correlation analysis of [Ca(2+) ](c) response characteristics of single astrocytes reveals that astrocytes with nuclear phosphoERK1/2 localization have a smaller Ca(2+) amplitude and extrusion rate compared with cells with a cytosolic phosphoERK1/2 localization. In naive neurons, without thrombin challenge, variable ERK1/2 phosphorylation patterns are observed. ROS were detected by hydroethidine. Only in neurons with increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation level, we see sustained intracellular rise in fluorescence of the dye lasting over several minutes. ROS formation was abolished by pre-incubation with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Additionally, thrombin induced an immediate, transient hydroethidine fluorescence increase. This was interpreted as NADPH oxidase-mediated O(2) (•-) -release into the extracellular milieu, because it was decreased by pre-incubation with apocynin, and could be eluted by superfusion. In conclusion, the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2 determines the thrombin-dependent [Ca(2+) ](c) increase and ROS formation and, thus, influences the capacity of thrombin to regulate neuroprotection or neurodegeneration. PMID:21988180

  2. Increased extracellular matrix density decreases MCF10A breast cell acinus formation in 3D culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Lance, Amanda; Yang, Chih-Chao; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Dean, Delphine; Deitch, Sandy; Burg, Karen J L; Dréau, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the generation and dynamic of normal breast tissue, in particular to the generation of polarized acinar and ductal structures. In vitro 3D culture conditions, including variations in the composition of the ECM, have been shown to directly influence the formation and organization of acinus-like and duct-like structures. Furthermore, the density of the ECM appears to also play a role in the normal mammary tissue and tumour formation. Here we show that the density of the ECM directly influences the number, organization and function of breast acini. Briefly, non-malignant human breast MCF10A cells were incubated in increasing densities of a Matrigel®-collagen I matrix. Elastic moduli near and distant to the acinus structures were measured by atomic force microscopy, and the number of acinus structures was determined. Immunochemistry was used to investigate the expression levels of E-cadherin, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase-14 and ß-casein in MCF10A cells. The modulus of the ECM was significantly increased near the acinus structures and the number of acinus structures decreased with the increase in Matrigel-collagen I density. As evaluated by the expression of laminin, the organization of the acinus structures present was altered as the density of the ECM increased. Increases in both E-cadherin and MMP14 expression by MCF10A cells as ECM density increased were also observed. In contrast, MCF10A cells expressed lower ß-casein levels as the ECM density increased. Taken together, these observations highlight the key role of ECM density in modulating the number, organization and function of breast acini.

  3. Oxidative damage increases intracellular free calcium [Ca2+]i concentration in human erythrocytes incubated with lead.

    PubMed

    Quintanar-Escorza, M A; González-Martínez, M T; del Pilar, Intriago-Ortega Ma; Calderón-Salinas, J V

    2010-08-01

    One important effect of lead toxicity in erythrocytes consists of increasing [Ca(2+)](i) which in turn may cause alterations in cell shape and volume and it is associated with cellular rigidity, hemolysis, senescence and apoptosis. In this work, we proposed the use of erythrocytes incubated with Pb(2+) to assess association of the mechanisms of lead erythrocyte oxidative damage and calcium homeostasis. Lead incubation produced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) dose- and time-dependent, which mainly involved Ca(2+) entry mechanism. Additionally, in this in vitro model alterations similar to erythrocytes of lead-exposed workers were produced: Increase in Ca(2+) influx, decrease in (Ca(2+)-Mg(2+))-ATPase activity and GSH/GSGG ratio; increase in lipoperoxidation, protein carbonylation and osmotic fragility accompanied of dramatic morphological changes. Co-incubation with trolox, a soluble vitamin-E analog is able to prevent these alterations indicating that lead damage mechanism is strongly associated with oxidative damage with an intermediate toxic effect via [Ca(2+)](i) increase. Furthermore, erythrocytes oxidation induced with a free radical generator (APPH) showed effects in [Ca(2+)](i) and oxidative damage similar to those found in erythrocytes incubated with lead. Co-incubation with trolox prevents the oxidative effects induced by AAPH in erythrocytes. These results suggest that increase of [Ca(2+)](i) depends on the oxidative status of the erythrocytes incubated with lead. We consider that this model contributes in the understanding of the relation between oxidative damage induced by lead exposure and Ca(2+) homeostasis, the consequences related to these phenomena and the molecular basis of lead toxicity in no excitable cells.

  4. Aldosterone increases kidney tubule cell oxidants through calcium-mediated activation of NADPH oxidase and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Queisser, Nina; Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Schinzel, Reinhard; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2011-12-01

    Chronic hyperaldosteronism has been associated with an increased cancer risk. We recently showed that aldosterone causes an increase in cell oxidants, DNA damage, and NF-κB activation. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying aldosterone-induced increase in cell oxidants in kidney tubule cells. Aldosterone caused an increase in both reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen (RNS) species. The involvement of the activation of NADPH oxidase in the increase in cellular oxidants was demonstrated by the inhibitory action of the NADPH oxidase inhibitors DPI, apocynin, and VAS2870 and by the migration of the p47 subunit to the membrane. NADPH oxidase activation occurred as a consequence of an increase in cellular calcium levels and was mediated by protein kinase C. The prevention of RNS increase by BAPTA-AM, W-7, and L-NAME indicates a calcium-calmodulin activation of NOS. A similar pattern of effects of the NADPH oxidase and NOS inhibitors was observed for aldosterone-induced DNA damage and NF-κB activation, both central to the pathogenesis of chronic aldosteronism. In summary, this paper demonstrates that aldosterone, via the mineralocorticoid receptor, causes an increase in kidney cell oxidants, DNA damage, and NF-κB activation through a calcium-mediated activation of NADPH oxidase and NOS. Therapies targeting calcium, NOS, and NADPH oxidase could prevent the adverse effects of hyperaldosteronism on kidney function as well as its potential oncogenic action.

  5. Secular decline of seawater calcium increases seawater buffering and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, M.; Sigman, D. M.; Higgins, J. A.; Haug, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model (Millero and Pierrot, 1998) to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] (Hain et al., 2015). We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increase in seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  6. Calmodulin Binds to Extracellular Sites on the Plasma Membrane of Plant Cells and Elicits a Rise in Intracellular Calcium Concentration*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinli; Chen, Bo; Liu, Peng; Zheng, Maozhong; Wang, Yuqing; Cui, Sujuan; Sun, Daye; Fang, Xiaohong; Liu, Chun-Ming; Lucas, William J.; Lin, Jinxing

    2009-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly conserved intracellular calcium sensor. In plants, CaM also appears to be present in the apoplasm, and application of exogenous CaM has been shown to influence a number of physiological functions as a polypeptide signal; however, the existence and localization of its corresponding apoplasmic binding sites remain controversial. To identify the site(s) of action, a CaM-conjugated quantum dot (QD) system was employed for single molecule level detection at the surface of plant cells. Using this approach, we show that QD-CaM binds selectively to sites on the outer surface of the plasma membrane, which was further confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Measurements of Ca2+ fluxes across the plasma membrane, using ion-selective microelectrodes, demonstrated that exogenous CaM induces a net influx into protoplasts. Consistent with these flux studies, calcium-green-dextran and FRET experiments confirmed that applied CaM/QD-CaM elicited an increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels. These results support the hypothesis that apoplasmic CaM can act as a signaling agent. These findings are discussed in terms of CaM acting as an apoplasmic peptide ligand to mediate transmembrane signaling in the plant kingdom. PMID:19254956

  7. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  8. RNA interference targeting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) inhibits growth and increases chemosensitivity in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Zeng, Y L; Zhang, X G; Chen, W J; Yang, R; Li, S J

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inducer (EMMPRIN CD147) has been implicated in the growth and survival of malignant cells. However, its presence and role in cervical cancer cells has not been well-studied. In the present study, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was designed and synthesized to breakdown the expression of CD147. The present data demonstrated that 24 and 48 hours after transfecting CD147 siRNA, both the CD147 mRNA and protein expression were significantly inhibited as determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry. Meanwhile, simultaneous silencing of CD147 resulted in distinctly increasing MMP-9, VEGF, and MDR-1. Further studies demonstrated decreased CD147 expression, resulted in G1/S phase transition with flow cytometry analysis, as well as the resistance of the cells to 5-FU. These findings provide further evidence that CD147 may become a promising therapeutic target for human cervical cancer and a potential chemotherapy-sensitizing agent.

  9. Royal Jelly Constituents Increase the Expression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase through Histone Acetylation in Monocytic THP-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Makino, Junya; Ogasawara, Rie; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Mitsugi, Yukari; Yamaguchi, Eiji; Itoh, Akichika; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-04-22

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is one of the main SOD isozymes and plays an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases by accelerating the dismutation reaction of superoxide. Royal jelly includes 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10H2DA, 2), which regulates the expression of various types of genes in epigenetics through the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) antagonism. The expression of EC-SOD was previously reported to be regulated epigenetically through histone acetylation in THP-1 cells. Therefore, we herein evaluated the effects of the royal jelly constituents 10-hydroxydecanoic acid (10HDA, 1), sebacic acid (SA, 3), and 4-hydroperoxy-2-decenoic acid ethyl ester (4-HPO-DAEE, 4), which is a derivative of 2, on the expression of EC-SOD in THP-1 cells. The treatment with 1 mM 1, 2, or 3 or 100 μM 4 increased EC-SOD expression and histone H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Moreover, the enrichment of acetylated histone H4 was observed in the proximal promoter region of EC-SOD and was caused by the partial promotion of ERK phosphorylation (only 4) and inhibition of HDAC activities, but not by the expression of HDACs. Overall, 4 exerted stronger effects than 1, 2, or 3 and has potential as a candidate or lead compound against atherosclerosis.

  10. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular calcium: A mechanism of mustard toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Majerus, B.J.; Munavalli, G.S.; Petrali, J.P.

    1993-05-13

    The effect of sulfur mustard SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+)i was studied in vitro using the clonal mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 and primary normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cell culture models. SM depletes cellular glutathione (GSH) and thus may inhibit GSH-dependent Ca2+-ATPase (Ca2+ pump), leading to a high (Ca2+) and consequent cellular toxicity. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, GSH levels decreased 20-34% between 1-6 hr in NG108-15 cells. SM increased (Ca2+)i, measured using the Ca2+-specific fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM, in both NG108-15 cells (1030% between 2-6 hr) and NHEK (23-30% between 0.5-3 hr) . Depletion of cellular GSH by buthionine sulfoximine (1 mM), a specific GSH biosynthesis inhibitor, also increased Ca2+, (88% at 1 hr) in NHEK, suggesting that GSH depletion may lead to increased (Ca2+)i. Calcium, localized cytochemically with antimony, accumulated in increased amounts around mitochondria and endoplasmic reticula, in the cytosol, and in particular in the euchromatin regions of the nucleus beginning at 6 hr after 0.3 mM SM exposure of NG108-15 cells. Cell membrane integrity examined with the fluorescent membrane probe calcein AM was unaffected through 6 hr following 1 mM SM exposure; and cell viability (NG108-15 cells) measured by trypan blue exclusion was >80% of control through 9 hr following 0.3 mM SM exposure.

  11. Licochalcone A induces T24 bladder cancer cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinhui; Jiang, Jiangtao; Yang, Xinyan; Han, Jichun; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-07-01

    Licochalcone A (LCA) has been reported to significantly inhibit cell proliferation, increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induce apoptosis of T24 human bladder cancer cells via mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-triggered signaling pathways. Based on these findings, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which LCA induces apoptosis of T24 cells. Cultured T24 cells were treated with LCA, and cell viability was measured using the sulforhodamine B assay. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry with Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, and by fluorescent microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. The levels of intracellular free calcium ions were determined using Fluo-3 AM dye marker. Intracellular ROS levels were assessed using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate probe assay. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl benzimidazole carbocyanine iodide. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of B‑cell lymphoma (Bcl)‑extra large, Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, Bcl‑2‑interacting mediator of cell death, apoptotic protease activating factor‑1 (Apaf‑1), calpain 2, cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase (caspase)‑3, caspase‑4 and caspase‑9 were determined using reverse transcription semiquantitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. Treatment with LCA inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of T24 cells, and increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and ROS production. Furthermore, LCA induced mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased the mRNA expression levels of Apaf‑1, caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. Exposure of T24 cells to LCA also triggered calpain 2 and caspase‑4 activation, resulting in apoptosis. These findings indicated that LCA increased intracellular Ca2+ levels, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, the ER stress pathway may be

  12. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  13. Increasing complexity and versatility: how the calcium signaling toolkit was shaped during plant land colonization.

    PubMed

    Edel, Kai H; Kudla, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Calcium serves as a versatile messenger in adaptation reactions and developmental processes in plants and animals. Eukaryotic cells generate cytosolic Ca(2+) signals via Ca(2+) conducting channels. Ca(2+) signals are represented in form of stimulus-specific spatially and temporally defined Ca(2+) signatures. These Ca(2+) signatures are detected, decoded and transmitted to downstream responses by an elaborate toolkit of Ca(2+) binding proteins that function as Ca(2+) sensors. In this article, we examine the distribution and evolution of Ca(2+)-conducting channels and Ca(2+) decoding proteins in the plant lineage. To this end, we have in addition to previously studied genomes of plant species, identified and analyzed the Ca(2+)-signaling components from species that hold key evolutionary positions like the filamentous terrestrial algae Klebsormidium flaccidum and Amborella trichopoda, the single living representative of the sister lineage to all other extant flowering plants. Plants and animals exhibit substantial differences in their complements of Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) binding proteins. Within the plant lineage, remarkable differences in the evolution of complexity between different families of Ca(2+) signaling proteins are observable. Using the CBL/CIPK Ca(2+) sensor/kinase signaling network as model, we attempt to link evolutionary tendencies to functional predictions. Our analyses, for example, suggest Ca(2+) dependent regulation of Na(+) homeostasis as an evolutionary most ancient function of this signaling network. Overall, gene families of Ca(2+) signaling proteins have significantly increased in their size during plant evolution reaching an extraordinary complexity in angiosperms.

  14. Arginine vasopressin increases cellular free calcium concentration and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate production in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, S.; Okada, K.; Saito, T.

    1988-09-01

    The role of calcium (Ca) in the cellular action of arginine vasopressin (AVP) was examined in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture. AVP increased both the cellular free Ca concentration ((Ca2+)i) using fura-2, and cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. AVP-induced cellular Ca mobilization was totally blocked by the antagonist to the antidiuretic action of AVP, and somewhat weakened by the antagonist to the vascular action of AVP. 1-Deamino-8-D-AVP (dDAVP). an antidiuretic analog of AVP, also increased (Ca2+) significantly. Cellular Ca mobilization was not obtained with cAMP, forskolin (a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase), or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. The early phase of (Ca2+)i depended on the intracellular Ca pool, since an AVP-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was obtained in cells pretreated with Ca-free medium containing 1 mM EGTA, verapamil, or cobalt, which blocked cellular Ca uptake. Also, AVP increased /sup 45/Ca2+ influx during the initial 10 min, which initiated the sustained phase of cellular Ca mobilization. However, cellular cAMP production induced by AVP during the 10-min observation period was diminished in the cells pretreated with Ca-free medium, verapamil, or cobalt, but was still significantly higher than the basal level. This was also diminished by a high Ca concentration in medium. These results indicate that 1) AVP concomitantly regulates cellular free Ca as well as its second messenger cAMP production; 2) AVP-induced elevation of cellular free Ca is dependent on both the cellular Ca pool and extracellular Ca; and 3) there is an optimal level of extracellular Ca to modulate the AVP action in renal papillary collecting tubule cells.

  15. Yeast respond to hypotonic shock with a calcium pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batiza, A. F.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the transgenic AEQUORIN calcium reporter system to monitor the cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypotonic shock. Such a shock generates an almost immediate and transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt which is eliminated by gadolinium, a blocker of stretch-activated channels. In addition, this transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt is initially insensitive to 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), an extracellular calcium chelator. However, BAPTA abruptly attenuates the maintenance of that transient rise. These data show that hypotonic shock generates a stretch-activated channel-dependent calcium pulse in yeast. They also suggest that the immediate calcium influx is primarily generated from intracellular stores, and that a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt depends upon extracellular calcium.

  16. Increased osteoblast density in the presence of novel calcium phosphate coated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareta, Rajesh A.; Taylor, Erik; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-07-01

    Bone diseases (including osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and bone cancer) are of great concern to the medical world. Drugs are available to treat such diseases, but often these drugs are not specifically targeted to the site of the disease and, thus, lack an immediate directed therapeutic effect. The optimal drug delivery system should enhance healthy bone growth with high specificity to the site of bone disease. It has been previously shown that magnetic nanoparticles can be directed in the presence of a magnetic field to any part of the body, allowing for site-specific drug delivery and possibly an immediate increase in bone density. The objective of the present study was to build off of this evidence and determine the density of osteoblasts (bone forming cells) in the presence of various uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles that could eventually be used in drug delivery applications. Results showed that some magnetic nanoparticles (specifically, γ-Fe2O3) significantly promoted osteoblast density (that is, cells per well) after 5 and 8 days of culture compared to controls (no particles). These magnetic nanoparticles were further coated with calcium phosphate (CaP; the main inorganic component of bone) to tailor them for treating various bone diseases. The coatings were conducted in the presence of either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or citric acid (CA) to reduce magnetic nanoparticle agglomeration, a common problem resulting from the use of nanoparticles which decreases their effectiveness. Results with these coatings showed that magnetic nanoparticles, specifically (γ-Fe2O3), coated in the presence of BSA significantly increased osteoblast density compared to controls after 1 day. In this manner, this study provided unexpected evidence that CaP-coated γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticles increased osteoblast density (compared to no particles) and, thus, should be further studied to treat numerous bone diseases.

  17. Caffeine promotes autophagy in skeletal muscle cells by increasing the calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mathew, T S; Ferris, R K; Downs, R M; Kinsey, S T; Baumgarner, B L

    2014-10-24

    Caffeine has been shown to promote calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and AMPK-dependent glucose and fatty acid uptake in mammalian skeletal muscle. Though caffeine has been shown to promote autophagy in various mammalian cell lines it is unclear if caffeine-induced autophagy is related to the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of calcium-dependent AMPK activation in regulating caffeine-induced autophagy in mammalian skeletal muscle cells. We discovered that the addition of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C could significantly reduce the expression of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3b-II (LC3b-II) and autophagic vesicle accumulation in caffeine treated skeletal muscle cells. Additional experiments using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinases CaMKKβ and CaMKII contributed to the AMPK-dependent expression of LC3b-II and autophagic vesicle accumulation in a caffeine dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that in skeletal muscle cells caffeine increases autophagy by promoting the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK.

  18. Increased calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal binding to injured renal tubular epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Verkoelen, C F; van der Boom, B G; Houtsmuller, A B; Schröder, F H; Romijn, J C

    1998-05-01

    The retention of crystals in the kidney is considered to be a crucial step in the development of a renal stone. This study demonstrates the time-dependent alterations in the extent of calcium oxalate (CaOx) monohydrate (COM) crystal binding to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells during their growth to confluence and during the healing of wounds made in confluent monolayers. As determined by radiolabeled COM crystal binding studies and confirmed by confocal-scanning laser microscopy, relatively large amounts of crystals (10.4 +/- 0.4 micrograms/cm2) bound to subconfluent cultures that still exhibited a low transepithelial electrical resistance (TER < 400 omega.cm2). The development of junctional integrity, indicated by a high resistance (TER > 1,500 omega.cm2), was followed by a decrease of the crystal binding capacity to almost undetectable low levels (0.13 +/- 0.03 microgram/cm2). Epithelial injury resulted in increased crystal adherence. The highest level of crystal binding was observed 2 days postinjury when the wounds were already morphologically closed but TER was still low. Confocal images showed that during the repair process, crystals selectively adhered to migrating cells at the wound border and to stacked cells at sites were the wounds were closed. After the barrier integrity was restored, crystal binding decreased again to the same low levels as in undamaged controls. These results indicate that, whereas functional MDCK monolayers are largely protected against COM crystal adherence, epithelial injury and the subsequent process of wound healing lead to increased crystal binding.

  19. Altered calcium handling and increased contraction force in human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes following short term dexamethasone exposure.

    PubMed

    Kosmidis, Georgios; Bellin, Milena; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; van Meer, Berend; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Passier, Robert; Tertoolen, Leon G J; Mummery, Christine L; Casini, Simona

    2015-11-27

    One limitation in using human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) for disease modeling and cardiac safety pharmacology is their immature functional phenotype compared with adult cardiomyocytes. Here, we report that treatment of human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) with dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, activated glucocorticoid signaling which in turn improved their calcium handling properties and contractility. L-type calcium current and action potential properties were not affected by dexamethasone but significantly faster calcium decay, increased forces of contraction and sarcomeric lengths, were observed in hESC-CMs after dexamethasone exposure. Activating the glucocorticoid pathway can thus contribute to mediating hPSC-CMs maturation.

  20. Intracellular calcium puffs in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Radding, W; Jordan, S E; Hester, R B; Blair, H C

    1999-12-15

    We studied intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in acid-secreting bone-attached osteoclasts, which produce a high-calcium acidic extracellular compartment. Acid secretion and [Ca(2+)](i) were followed using H(+)-restricted dyes and fura-2 or fluo-3. Whole cell calcium of acid-secreting osteoclasts was approximately 100 nM, similar to cells on inert substrate that do not secrete acid. However, measurements in restricted areas of the cell showed [Ca(2+)](i) transients to 500-1000 nM consistent with calcium puffs, transient (millisecond) localized calcium elevations reported in other cells. Spot measurements at 50-ms intervals indicated that puffs were typically less than 400 ms. Transients did not propagate in waves across the cell in scanning confocal measurements. Calcium puffs occurred mainly over regions of acid secretion as determined using lysotracker red DND99 and occurred at irregular periods averaging 5-15 s in acid secreting cells, but were rare in lysotracker-negative nonsecretory cells. The calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, cell-surface calcium transport inhibitors lanthanum or barium, and the endoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin had variable acute effects on the mean [Ca(2+)](i) and puff frequency. However, none of these agents prevented calcium puff activity, suggesting that the mechanism producing the puffs is independent of these processes. We conclude that [Ca(2+)](i) transients in osteoclasts are increased in acid-secreting osteoclasts, and that the puffs occur mainly near the acid-transporting membrane. Cell membrane acid transport requires calcium, suggesting that calcium puffs function to maintain acid secretion. However, membrane H(+)-ATPase activity was insensitive to calcium in the 100 nM-1 microM range. Thus, any effects of calcium puffs on osteoclastic acid transport must be indirect.

  1. The effect of GlycoPEGylation on the physical stability of human rFVIIa with increasing calcium chloride concentration.

    PubMed

    Plesner, Bitten; Westh, Peter; Nielsen, Anders D

    2011-06-01

    The effects of calcium chloride on the structural, kinetic and thermal stability of recombinant human factor VIIa (rFVIIa) were investigated using rFVIIa and two GlycoPEGylated recombinant human FVIIa derivatives, a linear 10 kDa PEG and a branched 40 kDa PEG, respectively. Three different CaCl(2) concentrations were used: 10mM, 35 mM and 100mM. The secondary structure and tertiary structure of rFVIIa at 25°C, measured by circular dichroism (CD), were maintained upon GlycoPEGylation as well as CaCl(2) content. In contrast, the thermal stability of the three rFVIIa compounds, measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD), and aggregation behaviour, measured by light scattering (LS), were affected by the increasing calcium concentration. Increasing the CaCl(2) concentration from 10mM to 35 mM resulted in a decrease in the apparent unfolding temperature, T(m), of rFVIIa, whereas the concentration of CaCl(2) has to be raised to 100mM in order to see the same effect on the GlycoPEGylated rFVIIa compounds. The temperature of aggregation of rFVIIa, T(agg), increased as the CaCl(2) concentration increased from 35 mM to 100 mM, while T(agg) for the GlycoPEGylated rFVIIa compounds was practically independent of the CaCl(2) concentration. From the obtained results, it is concluded that GlycoPEGylation postpones the calcium induced thermal destabilisation of rFVIIa, and a much higher calcium concentration also postpones the thermally induced aggregation of rFVIIa. The thermally induced aggregation of the GlycoPEGylated rFVIIa compounds is unaffected by an increasing calcium chloride concentration.

  2. Effect of increasing the colloidal calcium phosphate of milk on the texture and microstructure of yogurt.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, T; Horne, D; Lucey, J A

    2011-11-01

    The effect of increasing the colloidal calcium phosphate (CCP) content on the physical, rheological, and microstructural properties of yogurt was investigated. The CCP content of heated (85°C for 30 min) milk was increased by increasing the pH by the addition of alkali (NaOH). Alkalized milk was dialyzed against pasteurized skim milk at approximately 4°C for 72 h to attempt to restore the original pH and soluble Ca content. By adjustment of the milk to pH values 7.45, 8.84, 10.06, and 10.73, the CCP content was increased to approximately 107, 116, 123, and 128%, respectively, relative to the concentration in heated milk. During fermentation of milk, the storage modulus (G') and loss tangent values of yogurts were measured using dynamic oscillatory rheology. Large deformation rheological properties were also measured. The microstructure of yogurt was observed using fluorescence microscopy, and whey separation was determined. Acid-base titration was used to evaluate changes in the CCP content in milk. Total Ca and casein-bound Ca increased with an increase in the pH value of alkalization. During acidification, elevated buffering occurred in milk between pH values 6.7 to 5.2 with an increase in the pH of alkalization. When acidified milk was titrated with alkali, elevated buffering occurred in milk between pH values 5.6 to 6.4 with an increase in the pH of alkalization. The high residual pH of milk after dialysis could be responsible for the decreased contents of soluble Ca in these milks. The pH of gelation was higher in all dialyzed samples compared with the heated control milk, and the gelation pH was higher with an increase in CCP content. The sample with highest CCP content (128%) exhibited gelation at very high pH (6.3), which could be due to alkali-induced CN micellar disruption. The G' values at pH 4.6 were similar in gels with CCP levels up to 116%; at higher CCP levels, the G' values at pH 4.6 greatly decreased. Loss tangent values at pH 5.1 were similar

  3. Lipofundin® MCT/LCT 20% increase left ventricular systolic pressure in an ex vivo rat heart model via increase of intracellular calcium level

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon A; Han, Jeong Yeol; Jin, Sangkyu; Ok, Seong-Ho; Lee, Heon-Keun; Chung, Young-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Lipid emulsions have been used to treat various drug toxicities and for total parenteral nutrition therapy. Their usefulness has also been confirmed in patients with local anesthetic-induced cardiac toxicity. The purpose of this study was to measure the hemodynamic and composition effects of lipid emulsions and to elucidate the mechanism associated with changes in intracellular calcium levels in myocardiocytes. Methods We measured hemodynamic effects using a digital analysis system after Intralipid® and Lipofundin® MCT/LCT were infused into hearts hanging in a Langendorff perfusion system. We measured the effects of the lipid emulsions on intracellular calcium levels in H9c2 cells by confocal microscopy. Results Infusion of Lipofundin® MCT/LCT 20% (1 ml/kg) resulted in a significant increase in left ventricular systolic pressure compared to that after infusing modified Krebs-Henseleit solution (1 ml/kg) (P = 0.003, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4–12.5). Lipofundin® MCT/LCT 20% had a more positive inotropic effect than that of Intralipid® 20% (P = 0.009, 95% CI, 1.4–11.6). Both lipid emulsion treatments increased intracellular calcium levels. Lipofundin® MCT/LCT (0.01%) increased intracellular calcium level more than that of 0.01% Intralipid® (P < 0.05, 95% CI, 0.0–1.9). Conclusions These two lipid emulsions had different inotropic effects depending on their triglyceride component. The inotropic effect of lipid emulsions could be related with intracellular calcium level. PMID:26885303

  4. Extracellular calcium (Ca2+(o))-sensing receptor in a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2): potential mediator of the actions of Ca2+(o) on the function of ST2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+(o)) homeostasis by mediating the actions of Ca2+(o) on parathyroid gland and kidney. Bone marrow stromal cells support the formation of osteoclasts from their progenitors as well as the growth of hematopoietic stem cells by secreting humoral factors and through cell to cell contact. Stromal cells also have the capacity to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Bone resorption by osteoclasts probably produces substantial local increases in Ca2+(o) that could provide a signal for stromal cells in the immediate vicinity, leading us to determine whether such stromal cells express the CaR. In this study, we used the murine bone marrow-derived, stromal cell line, ST2. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in ST2 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in ST2 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific probe and by RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of ST2 cells to high Ca2+(o) (4.8 mM) or to the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin (300 microM) or gadolinium (100 microM), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in ST2 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, ST2, possesses both CaR protein and messenger RNA that are very similar if not identical to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, as ST2 cells have the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, the CaR in stromal cells could participate in bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local, osteoclast-mediated release of Ca2+(o) and, thereafter, initiating bone formation after their differentiation into osteoblasts.

  5. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx. PMID:24233561

  6. The protective effect of supplemental calcium on colonic permeability depends on a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Schepens, Marloes A A; ten Bruggencate, Sandra J M; Schonewille, Arjan J; Brummer, Robert-Jan M; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M J

    2012-04-01

    An increased intestinal permeability is associated with several diseases. Previously, we have shown that dietary Ca decreases colonic permeability in rats. This might be explained by a calcium-phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity, which protects against an acidic pH due to microbial fermentation. Therefore, we investigated whether dietary phosphate is a co-player in the effect of Ca on permeability. Rats were fed a humanised low-Ca diet, or a similar diet supplemented with Ca and containing either high, medium or low phosphate concentrations. Chromium-EDTA was added as an inert dietary intestinal permeability marker. After dietary adaptation, short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) were added to all diets to stimulate fermentation, acidify the colonic contents and induce an increase in permeability. Dietary Ca prevented the scFOS-induced increase in intestinal permeability in rats fed medium- and high-phosphate diets but not in those fed the low-phosphate diet. This was associated with higher faecal water cytotoxicity and higher caecal lactate levels in the latter group. Moreover, food intake and body weight during scFOS supplementation were adversely affected by the low-phosphate diet. Importantly, luminal buffering capacity was higher in rats fed the medium- and high-phosphate diets compared with those fed the low-phosphate diet. The protective effect of dietary Ca on intestinal permeability is impaired if dietary phosphate is low. This is associated with a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity. Dragging phosphate into the colon and thereby increasing the colonic phosphate concentration is at least part of the mechanism behind the protective effect of Ca on intestinal permeability. PMID:21851756

  7. Calcium isotope evidence for pulses of increased continental weathering during the early Toarcian (Early Jurassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suan, Guillaume; Brazier, Jean-Michel; Balter, Vincent; Simon, Laurent; Mattioli, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    The Toarcian interval is punctuated by a number of episodes of environmental changes and mass extinctions that are considered as some of the most severe of the Mesozoic era. Significantly, the corresponding strata record marked negative carbon isotope excursions that point to pulses of massive injection of isotopically light carbon to the superficial reservoirs. Potential causes of these perturbations include gas hydrate dissociation, wildfires, and massive inputs of thermogenic and volcanogenic carbon related to the onset of volcanic activity of the Karoo-Ferrar province. All these scenarii imply large increases in chemical weathering rate as key drivers of the accompanying biotic and environmental perturbations (e.g., productivity-driven anoxia and coastal eutrophication). Nevertheless, detailed examination of most likely cause(s) of these events has been hampered by the uncertainty surrounding the timing and intensity of coeval changes in continental weathering. In this study, we reconstruct changes in continental weathering during the Toarcian using new calcium isotope ratios δ44/42Ca of brachiopods and bulk rock sediments from the Peniche section in Portugal. The data reveal two marked (>0.4permil) negative Ca-isotope excursions near the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition (Pl-To) and at the base of the levisoni ammonite Zone recording the Early Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE). The comparison of the brachiopod and bulk rock Ca isotope data indicates that these excursions reflect changes in the global Ca-isotope composition of seawater rather than changes in the dominant mineralogy of calcifying organisms. Mass balance calculations suggest that the Ca-isotope excursions recorded across the Pl-To transition and T-OAE interval can be explained by the Ca inputs from rivers corresponding respectively to 90% and 34% of the initial mass of oceanic Ca. Based on these values, the injection of tens of thousands of gigatons of carbon with a C-isotope composition

  8. Osteocyte-derived RANKL is a critical mediator of the increased bone resorption caused by dietary calcium deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinhu; Piemontese, Marilina; Thostenson, Jeff D.; Weinstein, Robert S.; Manolagas, Stavros C.; O’Brien, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) excess stimulates bone resorption. This effect is associated with increased expression of the osteoclastogenic cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor кB ligand (RANKL) in bone. However, several different cell types, including bone marrow stromal cells, osteocytes, and T lymphocytes, express both RANKL and the PTH receptor and it is unclear whether RANKL expression by any of these cell types is required for PTH-induced bone loss. Here we have used mice lacking the RANKL gene in osteocytes to determine whether RANKL produced by this cell type is required for the bone loss caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by dietary calcium deficiency in adult mice. Thirty days of dietary calcium deficiency caused bone loss in control mice, but this effect was blunted in mice lacking RANKL in osteocytes. The increase in RANKL expression in bone and the increase in osteoclast number caused by dietary calcium deficiency were also blunted in mice lacking RANKL in osteocytes. These results demonstrate that RANKL produced by osteocytes contributes to the increased bone resorption and the bone loss caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism, strengthening the evidence that osteocytes are an important target cell for hormonal control of bone remodeling. PMID:24933342

  9. Enzymatic modification of pectin to increase its calcium sensitivity while preserving its molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Arland T; Savary, Brett J; Cameron, Randall G; Chau, Hoa K; Brouillette, Janine; Luzio, Gary A; Fishman, Marshall L

    2002-05-01

    A commercial high-methoxy citrus pectin was treated with a purified salt-independent pectin methylesterase (PME) isozyme isolated from Valencia orange peel to prepare a series of deesterified pectins. A series of alkali-deesterified pectins was also prepared at pH 10 under conditions permitting beta-elimination. Analysis of these pectins using high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with on-line multiangle laser light-scattering, differential viscometer, and refractive index (RI) detectors revealed no reduction in weight-average molecular weight (M(w); 150000) in the PME-treated pectin series, whereas a 16% reduction in intrinsic viscosity (IV) occurred below a degree of esterification (DE) of 47%. In contrast, alkali deesterification rapidly reduced both M(w) and IV to less than half of that observed for untreated pectin. PME treatment of a non-calcium-sensitive citrus pectin introduced calcium sensitivity with only a 6% reduction in the DE. Triad blocks of unesterified galacturonic acid were observed in (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of this calcium-sensitive pectin (CSP). These results demonstrate that the orange salt-independent PME isozyme utilizes a blockwise mode of action. This is the first report of the preparation of a CSP by PME treatment without significant loss of the pectin's M(w) due to depolymerization.

  10. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  11. Calcium store-mediated signaling in sustentacular cells of the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hegg, Colleen Cosgrove; Irwin, Mavis; Lucero, Mary T

    2009-04-15

    Sustentacular cells have structural features that allude to functions of secretion, absorption, phagocytosis, maintenance of extracellular ionic gradients, metabolism of noxious chemicals, and regulation of cell turnover. We present data detailing their dynamic activity. We show, using a mouse olfactory epithelium slice model, that sustentacular cells are capable of generating two types of calcium signals: intercellular calcium waves where elevations in intracellular calcium propagate between neighboring cells, and intracellular calcium oscillations consisting of repetitive elevations in intracellular calcium confined to single cells. Sustentacular cells exhibited rapid, robust increases in intracellular calcium in response to G-protein coupled muscarinic and purinergic receptor stimulation. In a subpopulation of sustentacular cells, oscillatory calcium transients were evoked. We pharmacologically characterized the properties of purinergic-evoked increases in intracellular calcium. Calcium transients were elicited by release from intracellular stores and were not dependent on extracellular calcium. BAPTA-AM, a cytosolic calcium chelator, and cyclopiazonic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor irreversibly blocked the purinergic-induced calcium transient. Phospholipase C antagonist U73122 inhibited the purinergic-evoked calcium transient. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonist, and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists tetracaine and ryanodine, inhibited the UTP-induced calcium transients. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of the phospholipase C pathway, IP(3)-mediated calcium release, and subsequent calcium-induced-calcium release is involved in ATP-elicited increases in intracellular calcium. Our findings indicate that sustentacular cells are not static support cells, and, like glia in the central nervous system, have complex calcium signaling.

  12. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  13. Adequate dietary vitamin D and calcium are both required to reduce bone turnover and increased bone mineral volume.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice M C; Sawyer, Rebecca K; Moore, Alison J; Morris, Howard A; O'Loughlin, Peter D; Anderson, Paul H

    2014-10-01

    Clinical studies indicate that the combination of vitamin D and dietary calcium supplementation is more effective for reducing fracture risk than either supplement alone. Our previous dietary studies demonstrated that an adequate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D) of 80nmol/L or more reduces bone RANKL expression, osteoclastogenesis and maintains the optimal levels of trabecular bone volume (BV/TV%) in young rats. The important clinical question of the interaction between vitamin D status, dietary calcium intake and age remains unclear. Hence, 9 month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=5-6/group) were pair-fed a semi-synthetic diet containing varying levels of vitamin D (0, 2, 12 or 20IU/day) and dietary calcium (0.1% or 1%) for 6 months. At 15 months of age, animals were killed, for biochemical and skeletal analyses. While changes to serum 25D were determined by both dietary vitamin D and calcium levels, changes to serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) were consistently raised in animals fed 0.1% Ca regardless of dietary vitamin D or vitamin D status. Importantly, serum cross-laps levels were significantly increased in animals fed 0.1% Ca only when combined with 0 or 2 IUD/day of vitamin D, suggesting a contribution of both dietary calcium and vitamin D in determining bone resorption activity. Serum 25(OH)D3 levels were positively correlated with both femoral mid-diaphyseal cortical bone volume (R(2)=0.24, P<0.01) and metaphyseal BV/TV% (R(2)=0.23, P<0.01, data not shown). In multiple linear regressions, serum 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were a negative determinant of CBV (R(2)=0.24, P<0.01) and were not a determinant of metaphyseal BV/TV% levels. These data support clinical data that reduced bone resorption and increased bone volume can only be achieved with adequate 25D levels in combination with high dietary calcium and low serum 1,25D levels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:24309068

  14. Low-calcium-induced enhancement of chemical synaptic transmission from photoreceptors to horizontal cells in the vertebrate retina.

    PubMed Central

    Piccolino, M; Byzov, A L; Kurennyi, D E; Pignatelli, A; Sappia, F; Wilkinson, M; Barnes, S

    1996-01-01

    According to the classical calcium hypothesis of synaptic transmission, the release of neurotransmitter from presynaptic terminals occurs through an exocytotic process triggered by depolarization-induced presynaptic calcium influx. However, evidence has been accumulating in the last two decades indicating that, in many preparations, synaptic transmitter release can persist or even increase when calcium is omitted from the perfusing saline, leading to the notion of a "calcium-independent release" mechanism. Our study shows that the enhancement of synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and horizontal cells of the vertebrate retina induced by low-calcium media is caused by an increase of calcium influx into presynaptic terminals. This paradoxical effect is accounted for by modifications of surface potential on the photoreceptor membrane. Since lowering extracellular calcium concentration may likewise enhance calcium influx into other nerve cells, other experimental observations of "calcium-independent" release may be reaccommodated within the framework of the classical calcium hypothesis without invoking unconventional processes. PMID:8637867

  15. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Calcium modulates promoter occupancy by the Entamoeba histolytica Ca2+-binding transcription factor URE3-BP.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Leo, Megan; Line, C Genghis; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A

    2003-02-14

    The Entamoeba histolytica upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) binds to the URE3 sequence of the Gal/GalNAc-inhibitable lectin hgl5 and ferredoxin 1 (fdx) gene promoters. This binding can be inhibited in vitro by addition of calcium. Two EF-hand motifs, which are associated with the ability to bind calcium, are present in the amino acid sequence of URE3-BP. Mutation of the second EF-hand motif in URE3-BP resulted in the loss of calcium inhibition of DNA binding as monitored by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that URE3-BP was physically bound to the hgl5 and fdx promoters in vivo. Parasite intracellular calcium concentrations were altered by changes in extracellular calcium. Promoter occupancy was lost when intracellular calcium levels were increased by coordinate increases in extracellular calcium. Increased intracellular calcium also resulted in decreased levels of URE3-BP mRNA. Together these results demonstrate that changes in extracellular calcium result in changes in URE3-BP mRNA and in the ability of URE3-BP to bind to URE3-containing promoters. Modulation of URE3-BP by calcium may represent an important mechanism of control of gene expression in E. histolytica.

  17. Astrocytes increase ATP exocytosis mediated calcium signaling in response to microgroove structures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay V; Raymond, Michael; Pace, Fabiano; Certo, Anthony; Zuidema, Jonathan M; McKay, Christopher A; Gilbert, Ryan J; Lu, X Lucas; Wan, Leo Q

    2015-01-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form glial scars, which inhibit axonal regeneration, leading to long-term functional deficits. Engineered nanoscale scaffolds guide cell growth and enhance regeneration within models of spinal cord injury. However, the effects of micro-/nanosize scaffolds on astrocyte function are not well characterized. In this study, a high throughput (HTP) microscale platform was developed to study astrocyte cell behavior on micropatterned surfaces containing 1 μm spacing grooves with a depth of 250 or 500 nm. Significant changes in cell and nuclear elongation and alignment on patterned surfaces were observed, compared to on flat surfaces. The cytoskeleton components (particularly actin filaments and focal adhesions) and nucleus-centrosome axis were aligned along the grooved direction as well. More interestingly, astrocytes on micropatterned surfaces showed enhanced mitochondrial activity with lysosomes localized at the lamellipodia of the cells, accompanied by enhanced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and calcium activities. These data indicate that the lysosome-mediated ATP exocytosis and calcium signaling may play an important role in astrocytic responses to substrate topology. These new findings have furthered our understanding of the biomechanical regulation of astrocyte cell-substrate interactions, and may benefit the optimization of scaffold design for CNS healing. PMID:25597401

  18. Acetylcholine and calcium on membrane permeability and contraction of intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, L; Von Hagen, S; Joiner, P D

    1967-05-01

    Acetylcholine elicited a sustained contraction and an increase in potassium efflux in longitudinal muscle isolated from the guinea pig ileum. Stepwise increases in the calcium concentration of the bathing medium, from 0.06 to 36 mM generally reduced the increase in potassium efflux, but had a complex effect on the mechanical response. Contractions produced by high levels of acetylcholine became progressively larger or remained at a high magnitude as the calcium concentration was increased. Contractions produced by low levels of acetylcholine also improved initially, but were depressed again by the highest concentration of calcium introduced. Ethanol, in the appropriate concentration, inhibited completely the acetylcholine-induced contraction without reducing the increase in potassium efflux. Calcium reversed this effect. Both extracellular calcium and ethanol depressed the large, transient increase in muscle tone developed by fibers that were preincubated in a high calcium medium and then exposed to a calcium-free medium. These findings suggested that extracellular calcium ions react with two different sites in the membrane, a stabilizing site and a storage site. A muscle contraction is activated by calcium ions which diffuse from the storage site to the myoplasm. Calcium ions reacting with the stabilizing site impede this diffusion process. Part of the stimulatory effect of acetylcholine is derived from its capacity to counteract the action of calcium at the stabilizing site.

  19. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  20. Variations of both bacterial community and extracellular polymers: the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from biofloc to aerobic granule sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Yu, Xin; Wei, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from aerobic biofloc (ABF) and granular sludge (AGS), in this study, as the first time the hydrophilic and hydrophobic bacterial communities were analyzed independently. Meanwhile, the effect of extracellular polymers (EPS) on the cell hydrophobicity is also studied. Few Bacteroidetes were detected (1.35% in ABF and 3.84% in AGS) in hydrophilic bacteria, whereas they are abundant in the hydrophobic cells (47.8% and 43% for ABF and AGS, respectively). The main species of Bacteroidetes changed from class Sphingobacteria to Flavobacteria in AGS. On the other hand, EPS is directly responsible to cell hydrophobicity. For AGS, cell hydrophobicity was sharply decreased after EPS extraction. Both quantity and property of the extracellular protein are related to hydrophobicity. Our results showed the variation of cell hydrophobicity was resulted from variations of both bacterial population and EPS. PMID:21482465

  1. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons.

  2. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  3. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  4. Purinergic stimulation of rabbit ciliated airway epithelia: control by multiple calcium sources.

    PubMed Central

    Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1996-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of average intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and ciliary beat frequency (CBF) were carried out on ciliated rabbit tracheal cells in order to determine quantitatively the role of calcium in the regulation of mucus-transporting cilia. 2. Extracellular ATP caused a rapid increase in both [Ca2+]i and CBF in the 0.1-1000 microM concentration range. The rise in [Ca2+]i levelled off to an elevated [Ca2+]i plateau while the cilia remained in a high activation state. The magnitude of the rise in [Ca2+]i and CBF as well as the value of the elevated [Ca2+]i plateau and the value of the sustained CBF were dependent on the concentration of ATP in the solution. 3. No correlation was found between the mean values of [Ca2+]i and CBF at rest but a sigmoidal relationship was found to exist between the maximal rises of these parameters following excitation with extracellular ATP. This sigmoidal correlation incorporated the experiments where [Ca2+]i rise was induced by depletion of internal calcium stores with thapsigargin or by entry of calcium induced by ionomycin. 4. Extracellular ATP caused both the release of calcium from internal stores and calcium influx from the extracellular solution. The release of calcium was identified as originating from a thapsigargin-sensitive and a thapsigargin-insensitive calcium store. It is suggested that the release of calcium from these stores induces the initial rise in CBF. 5. The sustained activation of the cilia and elevated calcium plateau were found to be the result of the extracellular ATP-induced calcium influx. This calcium influx was insensitive to the voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitors verapamil and diltiazem, but was completely eliminated by lowering the extracellular calcium concentration to 0.1 microM. 6. We propose that the initial jump in the CBF is mediated by the calcium released from a thapsigargin-insensitive calcium store adjacent to the cilia, while the later, and longer, rise in

  5. Extracellular calcium-sensing-receptor (CaR)-mediated opening of an outward K(+) channel in murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells: evidence for expression of a functional CaR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, C. P.; Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Sanders, J. L.; Vassilev, P. M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The existence in osteoblasts of the G-protein-coupled extracellular calcium (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) that was originally cloned from parathyroid and kidney remains controversial. In our recent studies, we utilized multiple detection methods to demonstrate the expression of CaR transcripts and protein in several osteoblastic cell lines, including murine MC3T3-E1 cells. Although we and others have shown that high Ca(o)(2+) and other polycationic CaR agonists modulate the function of MC3T3-E1 cells, none of these actions has been unequivocally shown to be mediated by the CaR. Previous investigations using neurons and lens epithelial cells have shown that activation of the CaR stimulates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Because osteoblastic cells express a similar type of channel, we have examined the effects of specific "calcimimetic" CaR activators on the activity of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel in MC3T3-E1 cells as a way of showing that the CaR is not only expressed in those cells but is functionally active. Patch-clamp analysis in the cell-attached mode showed that raising Ca(o)(2+) from 0.75 to 2.75 mmol/L elicited about a fourfold increase in the open state probability (P(o)) of an outward K(+) channel with a conductance of approximately 92 pS. The selective calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467 (0.5 micromol/L), evoked a similar activation of the channel, while its less active stereoisomer, NPSS-467 (0.5 micromol/L), did not. Thus, the CaR is not only expressed in MC3T3-E1 cells, but is also functionally coupled to the activity of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel. This receptor, therefore, could transduce local or systemic changes in Ca(o)(2+) into changes in the activity of this ion channel and related physiological processes in these and perhaps other osteoblastic cells.

  6. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  7. Despite increased plasma concentration, inflammation reduces potency of calcium channel antagonists due to lower binding to the rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Sattari, Saeed; Dryden, William F; Eliot, Lise A; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis reduces verapamil oral clearance thereby increases plasma concentration of the drug. This coincides with reduced drug effects through an unknown mechanism. The effect of interferon-induced acute inflammation on the pharmacokinetics and electrocardiogram of verapamil (20 mg kg−1, p.o.) and nifedipine (0.1 mg kg−1, i.v.) was studied in Sprague–Dawley rats. The effect of both acute and chronic inflammation on radioligand binding to cardiac L-type calcium channels was also investigated. Acute inflammation resulted in increased plasma concentration of verapamil but had no effect on that of nifedipine. Verapamil binding to plasma proteins was unaffected. As has been reported for humans, the increased verapamil concentration coincided with a reduction in the degree to which PR interval is prolonged by the drug. The effect of nifedipine on PR interval was also reduced by inflammation. Maximum binding of 3H-nitrendipine to cardiac cell membrane was significantly reduced from 63.2±2.5 fmol mg−1 protein in controls to 46.4±2.0 in acute inflammation and from 66.8±2.2 fmol mg−1 protein in controls to 42.2±2.0 in chronic inflammation. Incubation of the normal cardiac cell membranes with 100 and 1000 pg ml−1 of rat tissue necrosis factor-α did not influence the binding indices to the calcium channels. Our data suggest that the reduced calcium channel responsiveness is because of altered binding to channels. PMID:12839868

  8. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; Appel, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  9. Modulation and action of the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Drüeke, Tilman B

    2004-08-01

    The discovery and cloning of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) in 1993 has led to a better understanding of the regulation of calcium homoeostasis. Following activation by extracellular calcium ions, the CaR triggers a cascade of intracellular events. These events result in the release of secondary messengers, which have a number of biological effects, the most important of which is a reduction in parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. The way in which calcium acts on the CaR varies depending on the cell type. In the parathyroid gland cell, activation of the CaR by elevated serum levels of calcium leads to a decrease in PTH secretion. In the kidney, CaR activation is thought to have several different actions, leading to enhanced reabsorption of sodium chloride and increased calcium and magnesium excretion in the renal tubules. CaRs are also found in other tissues in the body that are not involved in calcium homoeostasis, suggesting that the CaR has actions that are not associated with calcium homoeostasis. In patients with end-stage renal disease, parathyroid gland hyperplasia is associated with downregulation of the CaR. Discovery of the CaR has allowed the development of a group of drugs called calcimimetics, which mimic or potentiate the actions of extracellular calcium on the CaR. These compounds have considerable potential for the treatment of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:15284356

  10. The initiation of synaptic 2-AG mobilization requires both an increased supply of diacylglycerol precursor and increased postsynaptic calcium.

    PubMed

    Shonesy, Brian C; Winder, Danny G; Patel, Sachin; Colbran, Roger J

    2015-04-01

    On-demand postsynaptic synthesis and release of endocannabinoid lipids and subsequent binding to presynaptic CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) mediates short and long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory transmission in many brain regions. However, mechanisms involved in the synthesis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) by diacylglycerol lipase α (DGLα) are poorly understood. Since Gq-coupled receptor activation can stimulate production of a major DGL substrate 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (SAG) by PLCβ, we sought to determine if 2-AG biosynthesis was limited only by a lack of substrate availability, or if other pathways, such as Ca(2+) signaling, also need to be simultaneously engaged. To address this question, we loaded medium spiny neurons of the dorsolateral striatum with SAG while monitoring excitatory synaptic inputs. SAG-loading had no significant effect on evoked excitatory synaptic currents when cells were voltage-clamped at -80 mV. However, depolarization of MSNs to -50 mV revealed a SAG-loading dependent decrease in the amplitude of excitatory currents that was accompanied by an increase in paired pulse ratio, consistent with decreased glutamate release. Both effects of loading SAG at -50 mV were blocked by chelation of postsynaptic Ca(2+) using BAPTA or by bath application of tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), a DGL inhibitor. Loading of SAG into glutamatergic pyramidal neurons of the amygdala similarly inhibited excitatory synaptic inputs and increased the PPR. SAG-induced depression was absent in both regions from mice lacking CB1Rs. These data show that increasing substrate availability alone is insufficient to drive 2-AG mobilization and that DGL-dependent synaptic depression via CB1R activation requires postsynaptic Ca(2+) signals.

  11. Increase in cone biomass and terpenophenolics in hops ( Humulus lupulus L.) by treatment with prohexadione-calcium.

    PubMed

    Kavalier, Adam R; Pitra, Nicholi J; Koelling, Jared M; Coles, Mark C; Kennelly, Edward J; Matthews, Paul D

    2011-06-22

    Humulus lupulus L. (hop), a specialty crop bred for flavor characteristics of the inflorescence, is an essential ingredient in beer. Hop inflorescences, commonly known as hop cones, contain terpenophenolic compounds, which are important for beer flavoring and of interest in biomedical research. Hop breeders focus their efforts on increasing cone biomass and terpenophenolic content. As an alternative to traditional breeding, hops were treated with prohexadione-calcium (Pro-Ca), a growth inhibitor previously shown to have positive agronomic effects in several crops. Application of Pro-Ca to hop plants during cone maturation induced increases in cone biomass production by 1.5-19.6% and increased terpenophenolic content by 9.1-87.3%; however, some treatments also induced significant decreases in terpenophenolic content. Induced changes in cone biomass production and terpenophenolic accumulation were most dependent on cultivar and the developmental stage at which plants were treated. PMID:21598976

  12. Increased strontium uptake in trabecular bone of ovariectomized calcium-deficient rats treated with strontium ranelate or strontium chloride.

    PubMed

    Pemmer, Bernhard; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Meirer, Florian; Smolek, Stephan; Wobrauschek, Peter; Simon, Rolf; Fuchs, Robyn K; Allen, Matthew R; Condon, Keith W; Reinwald, Susan; Phipps, Roger J; Burr, David B; Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Klaushofer, Klaus; Streli, Christina; Roschger, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Based on clinical trials showing the efficacy to reduce vertebral and non-vertebral fractures, strontium ranelate (SrR) has been approved in several countries for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Hence, it is of special clinical interest to elucidate how the Sr uptake is influenced by dietary Ca deficiency as well as by the formula of Sr administration, SrR versus strontium chloride (SrCl(2)). Three-month-old ovariectomized rats were treated for 90 days with doses of 25 mg kg(-1) d(-1) and 150 mg kg(-1) d(-1) of SrR or SrCl(2) at low (0.1% Ca) or normal (1.19% Ca) Ca diet. Vertebral bone tissue was analysed by confocal synchrotron-radiation-induced micro X-ray fluorescence and by backscattered electron imaging. Principal component analysis and k-means clustering of the acquired elemental maps of Ca and Sr revealed that the newly formed bone exhibited the highest Sr fractions and that low Ca diet increased the Sr uptake by a factor of three to four. Furthermore, Sr uptake in bone of the SrCl(2)-treated animals was generally lower compared with SrR. The study clearly shows that inadequate nutritional calcium intake significantly increases uptake of Sr in serum as well as in trabecular bone matrix. This indicates that nutritional calcium intake as well as serum Ca levels are important regulators of any Sr treatment.

  13. Requirement of glycogenolysis for uptake of increased extracellular K+ in astrocytes: potential implications for K+ homeostasis and glycogen usage in brain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junnan; Song, Dan; Xue, Zhanxia; Gu, Li; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2013-03-01

    The importance of astrocytic K(+) uptake for extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](e)) clearance during neuronal stimulation or pathophysiological conditions is increasingly acknowledged. It occurs by preferential stimulation of the astrocytic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, which has higher K(m) and V(max) values than its neuronal counterpart, at more highly increased [K(+)](e) with additional support of the cotransporter NKCC1. Triggered by a recent DiNuzzo et al. paper, we used administration of the glycogenolysis inhibitor DAB to primary cultures of mouse astrocytes to determine whether K(+) uptake required K(+)-stimulated glycogenolysis. KCl was increased by either 5 mM (stimulating only the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase) or 10 mM (stimulating both transporters) in glucose-containing saline media prepared to become iso-osmotic after the addition. DAB completely inhibited both uptakes, the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase-mediated by preventing Na(+) uptake for stimulation of its intracellular Na(+)-activated site, and the NKCC1-mediated uptake by inhibition of depolarization- and L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) uptake. Drugs inhibiting the signaling pathways involved in either of these processes also abolished K(+) uptake. Assuming similar in vivo characteristics, partly supported by literature data, K(+)-stimulated astrocytic K(+) uptake must discontinue after normalization of extracellular K(+). This will allow Kir1.4-mediated release and reuptake by the less powerful neuronal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase.

  14. Calcium isotope evidence for dramatic increase of continental weathering during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (Early Jurassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Jean-Michel; Suan, Guillaume; Tacail, Théo; Simon, Laurent; Martin, Jeremy E.; Mattioli, Emanuela; Balter, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    The early Toarcian was punctuated by pulses of massive carbon injection that are thought to have triggered, through increased greenhouse conditions, elevated continental discharge and nutrient input, marine anoxia, seawater acidification and species extinctions. Nevertheless, the mode and tempo of changes in continental weathering across this interval remains highly debated, leading to considerable uncertainty about the main causes of these perturbations. In this study we present calcium isotope measurements (δ44/40Ca) of well-preserved brachiopods and bulk rock samples from the hemipelagic strata of Pliensbachian-Toarcian age of Peniche in Portugal in order to constrain changes in the calcium cycle and hence changes in continental weathering during the early Toarcian. The data reveal a similar trend as carbon isotope data from the same section and show negative excursions of about 0.5‰ at the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition (Pl-To) and at the base of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) interval. The comparison of δ44/40Ca ratios recorded in brachiopods and bulk rock corrected for variable dolomite contribution indicates that these excursions reflect changes in the global isotopic composition of seawater rather than changes in the dominant mineralogy of calcifying organisms or in hydrological budget of the considered basin. Box modeling results suggest that the Pl-To and T-OAE δ44/40Ca excursions can be explained by a transient 90% decrease of carbonate accumulation due to seawater acidification followed by a 500% increase in continental weathering rates. The sharp increases in continental weathering inferred from the δ44/40Ca ratios seem overall consistent with lower Toarcian sedimentological and biotic records that document rapid crises in carbonate production followed by episodes of increased calcium carbonate burial. Nevertheless, the maximum of carbonate burial recorded by most NW European basinal successions occurs several hundreds of kyrs after

  15. DC electric fields direct breast cancer cell migration, induce EGFR polarization, and increase the intracellular level of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Ma, Xiuli; Lin, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Migration of cancer cells leads to invasion of primary tumors to distant organs (i.e., metastasis). Growing number of studies have demonstrated the migration of various cancer cell types directed by applied direct current electric fields (dcEF), i.e., electrotaxis, and suggested its potential implications in metastasis. MDA-MB-231 cell, a human metastatic breast cancer cell line, has been shown to migrate toward the anode of dcEF. Further characterizations of MDA-MB-231 cell electrotaxis and investigation of its underlying signaling mechanisms will lead to a better understanding of electrically guided cancer cell migration and metastasis. Therefore, we quantitatively characterized MDA-MB-231 cell electrotaxis and a few associated signaling events. Using a microfluidic device that can create well-controlled dcEF, we showed the anode-directing migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, surface staining of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and confocal microscopy showed the dcEF-induced anodal EGFR polarization in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we showed an increase of intracellular calcium ions in MDA-MB-231 cells upon dcEF stimulation. Altogether, our study provided quantitative measurements of electrotactic migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, and demonstrated the electric field-mediated EGFR and calcium signaling events, suggesting their involvement in breast cancer cell electrotaxis.

  16. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol increases endogenous extracellular glutamate levels in primary cultures of rat cerebral cortex neurons: involvement of CB(1) receptors.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, Maria Cristina; Ferraro, Luca; Bebe, Berta Wonjie; Tanganelli, Sergio; Cassano, Tommaso; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Antonelli, Tiziana

    2002-05-15

    The effects of the principal psychoactive component of marijuana, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), on endogenous extracellular glutamate levels in primary cultures of rat cerebral cortex neurons were investigated. Locally applied Delta(9)-THC (0.03, 3, 300, and 1,000 nM) concentration-dependently increased basal extracellular glutamate levels (+18% +/- 11%, +54% +/- 10%, +90% +/- 14%, +149% +/- 33% vs. basal). The facilitatory effects of Delta(9)-THC (3 and 300 nM) on cortical glutamate were fully counteracted in the presence of the selective CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716A (10 nM) and by replacement of the normal Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer with a low-Ca(2+) (0.2 mM) medium. Delta(9)-THC application also induced an enhancement in K(+)-evoked glutamate levels. These findings suggest that an increase in cortical glutamatergic transmission mediated by local CB(1) receptor activation may underlie some of the psychoactive and behavioral effects of acute marijuana consumption.

  17. The extracellular fragment of GPNMB (Glycoprotein nonmelanosoma protein B, osteoactivin) improves memory and increases hippocampal GluA1 levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenta; Yoshino, Yuta; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Moriguchi, Shigeki; Oyagi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Hara, Hideaki

    2015-03-01

    Glycoprotein nonmelanoma protein B (GPNMB, alias osteoactivin), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is cleaved by extracellular proteases, resulting in release of an extracellular fragment (ECF). GPNMB is widely expressed by neurons within the CNS, including the hippocampus; however, its function in the brain remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of GPNMB in memory and learning by using transgenic (Tg) mice over-expressing GPNMB (Tg mice on a BDF-1 background) and ECF-treated mice. In the hippocampus of both wild-type and Tg mice, GPNMB was highly expressed in neurons and astrocytes. Tg mice exhibited memory improvements in two types of learning tasks but were impaired in a passive-avoidance test. In Tg mice, the hippocampus displayed increased levels of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor subunit GluA1. Intracerebroventricular administration of ECF (50 ng) to Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice also improved memory in a passive-avoidance test and increased hippocampal GluA1 levels 24 h after treatment. In Tg mice and ECF (0.25 μg/mL)-treated hippocampal slices, long-term potentiation was promoted. These findings suggest that GPNMB may be a novel target for research on higher order brain functions.

  18. [The role of gastro-intestinal tract in the calcium absorption].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Akiko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Calcium is associated with various functions of clinical importance. Its unique distribution;low intracellular and high extracellular concentration, is crucial for the neuro-muscular function. Calcium is also indispensable for the vascular contraction and blood coagulation. Thus, circulating calcium concentration must be strictly maintained within a narrow range, for which parathyroid hormone(PTH), vitamin D, and calcitonin contribute. Food-derived protein-bound calcium must be first released in the acidic condition. Thus, gastric acid is essential for the effective calcium absorption. Intestinal calcium absorption occurs via both active transport and passive transport. For the former, such molecules as transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6(TRPV6), calbindin 9k, and Ca²⁺-ATPase contribute. In the adult, calcium absorption rate is approximately 30% under the ordinary condition. Lower calcium intake is associated with increased calcium absorption and decreased urinary excretion. In the Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese, calcium requirement is determined based on factorial method. Recommended Dietary Allowance(RDA)for calcium ranges from 600-800 mg/day for adult. However, the average calcium intake is far lower than Estimated Average Requirement(EAR). Thus, an effort to increase the calcium intake, rather than considering the detailed calcium absorption rate, is most essential in Japan.

  19. [The role of gastro-intestinal tract in the calcium absorption].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Akiko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Calcium is associated with various functions of clinical importance. Its unique distribution;low intracellular and high extracellular concentration, is crucial for the neuro-muscular function. Calcium is also indispensable for the vascular contraction and blood coagulation. Thus, circulating calcium concentration must be strictly maintained within a narrow range, for which parathyroid hormone(PTH), vitamin D, and calcitonin contribute. Food-derived protein-bound calcium must be first released in the acidic condition. Thus, gastric acid is essential for the effective calcium absorption. Intestinal calcium absorption occurs via both active transport and passive transport. For the former, such molecules as transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6(TRPV6), calbindin 9k, and Ca²⁺-ATPase contribute. In the adult, calcium absorption rate is approximately 30% under the ordinary condition. Lower calcium intake is associated with increased calcium absorption and decreased urinary excretion. In the Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese, calcium requirement is determined based on factorial method. Recommended Dietary Allowance(RDA)for calcium ranges from 600-800 mg/day for adult. However, the average calcium intake is far lower than Estimated Average Requirement(EAR). Thus, an effort to increase the calcium intake, rather than considering the detailed calcium absorption rate, is most essential in Japan. PMID:26503863

  20. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X.; Smith, Roger D.; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  1. A Specific Transitory Increase in Intracellular Calcium Induced by Progesterone Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis in Mouse Sperm.

    PubMed

    Romarowski, Ana; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Ramírez-Gómez, Héctor V; Puga Molina, Lis del C; Treviño, Claudia L; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Darszon, Alberto; Buffone, Mariano G

    2016-03-01

    During capacitation, sperm acquire the ability to undergo the acrosome reaction (AR), an essential step in fertilization. Progesterone produced by cumulus cells has been associated with various physiological processes in sperm, including stimulation of AR. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) is necessary for AR to occur. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal correlation between the changes in [Ca(2+)]i and AR in single mouse spermatozoa in response to progesterone. We found that progesterone stimulates an [Ca(2+)]i increase in five different patterns: gradual increase, oscillatory, late transitory, immediate transitory, and sustained. We also observed that the [Ca(2+)]i increase promoted by progesterone starts at either the flagellum or the head. We validated the use of FM4-64 as an indicator for the occurrence of the AR by simultaneously detecting its fluorescence increase and the loss of EGFP in transgenic EGFPAcr sperm. For the first time, we have simultaneously visualized the rise in [Ca(2+)]i and the process of exocytosis in response to progesterone and found that only a specific transitory increase in [Ca(2+)]i originating in the sperm head promotes the initiation of AR. PMID:26819478

  2. Central administration of NPY or an NPY-Y5 selective agonist increase in vivo extracellular monoamine levels in mesocorticolimbic projecting areas.

    PubMed

    Quarta, D; Leslie, C P; Carletti, R; Valerio, E; Caberlotto, L

    2011-01-01

    Selective NPY-Y5 antagonists are known to reduce NPY-evoked increase of food intake under free feeding conditions and drug-reinforced operant responding in rodents suggesting that NPY-Y5 receptors can regulate reinforcers, potentially by modulating the hypothalamic-limbic reward system. However, evidence published to date has revealed a limited expression of NPY-Y5 in the limbic areas. Thus, the first aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of NPY-Y5 receptor binding sites in rat mesocorticolimbic projection areas such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and lateral hypothalamus (LH). Since mesocorticolimbic release of monoamines has been typically associated to the rewarding and motivational significance of reinforcers, we then compared the ability of NPY and an NPY-Y5 selective agonist, [cPP1-7,NPY19-23,Ala31,Aib32,Gln34]hPP, to evoke changes in extracellular monoamines from these brain regions using in vivo microdialysis techniques. Intracerebral doses of each compound were selected on the basis of those previously demonstrated to trigger food intake in a separate set of animals. We found that NPY-Y5 receptors were widely distributed in both the NAc and mPFC but not in the LH nuclei. Central administration of either NPY (4.5 nmol/rat) or the NPY-Y5 agonist (0.6 nmol/rat) induced a significant increase of dopamine (DA) output of up to 150% of basal values in the NAc. In addition, NPY induced a stepped increase of norepinephrine (NE) outflow in the NAc area. Also extracellular levels of NE levels were increased by both treatments in the mPFC (150% vs basal concentration). Hypothalamic monoamine levels were unaffected by both treatments. Extracellular serotonin (5-HT) levels were also unchanged in all regions. Given the NPY-Y5 agonist paralleled the in vivo ability of NPY to increase DA, these data suggest that the release of NPY may modulate behaviours associated to accumbal DA release such reward and reinforcement

  3. Young adolescents who respond to an inulin-type fructan substantially increase total absorbed calcium and daily calcium accretion to the skeleton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium absorption and whole-body bone mineral content are greater in young adolescents who receive 8 g/d of Synergy, a mixture of inulin-type fructans (ITF), compared with those who received a maltodextrin control. Not all adolescents responded to this intervention, however. We evaluated 32 respond...

  4. Increased calcium content and inhomogeneity of mineralization render bone toughness in osteoporosis: mineralization, morphology and biomechanics of human single trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Busse, Björn; Hahn, Michael; Soltau, Markus; Zustin, Jozef; Püschel, Klaus; Duda, Georg N; Amling, Michael

    2009-12-01

    The differentiation and degree of the effects of mineral content and/or morphology on bone quality remain, to a large extent, unanswered due to several microarchitectural particularities in spatial measuring fields (e.g., force transfer, trajectories, microcalli). Therefore, as the smallest basic component of cancellous bone, we focused on single trabeculae to investigate the effects of mineralization and structure, both independently and in superposition. Transiliac Bordier bone cores and T12 vertebrae were obtained from 20 females at autopsy for specimen preparation, enabling radiographical analyses, histomorphometry, Bone Mineral Density Distribution (BMDD) analyses, and trabecular singularization to be performed. Evaluated contact X-rays and histomorphometric limits from cases with osteoporotic vertebral fractures generated two subdivisions, osteoporotic (n=12, Ø 78 years) and non-osteoporotic (n=8, Ø 49 years) cases, based on fracture appearance and bone volume (BV/TV). Measurements of trabecular number (Tb.N.), trabecular separation (Tb.Sp.), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.), trabecular bone pattern factor (TBPf) and eroded surface (ES/BS) were carried out to provide detailed structural properties of the investigated groups. The mechanical properties of 400 rod-like single vertebral trabeculae, assessed by three-point bending, were matched with mineral properties as quantified by BMDD analyses of cross-sectioned rod-like and plate-like trabeculae, both in superposition and independently. Non-osteoporotic iliac crests and vertebrae displayed linear dependency on structure parameters, whereas osteoporotic compartments proved to be non-correlated with bone structure. Independent of trabecular thickness, osteoporotic rod-like trabeculae showed decreases in Young's modulus, fracture load, yield strength, ultimate stress, work to failure and bending stiffness, along with significantly increased mean calcium content and calcium width. Non-osteoporotic trabeculae

  5. Chronic effects of dietary vitamin D deficiency without increased calcium supplementation on the progression of experimental polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Rangan, Gopala K; Schwensen, Kristina G; Foster, Sheryl L; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Peduto, Anthony; Harris, David C

    2013-08-15

    Increasing evidence indicates that vitamin D deficiency exacerbates chronic kidney injury, but its effects on renal enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are not known. In this study, male Lewis polycystic kidney disease (LPK) rats received a normal diet (ND; AIN-93G) supplemented with or without cholecalciferol (vitamin D-deficient diet, VDD; both 0.5% calcium), commenced at either postnatal week 3 (until weeks 10-20; study 1) or from week 10 (until week 20; study 2). Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D were reduced in groups receiving the VDD (12 ± 1 nmol/l vs. 116 ± 5 in ND; P < 0.001). In study 1, food intake and weight gain increased by ∼25% in LPK rats receiving the VDD ad libitum, and at week 20 this was associated with a mild reduction in the corrected serum calcium (SCa(2+), 7.4%) and TKW:BW ratio (8.8%), and exacerbation of proteinuria (87%) and hypertension (19%; all P < 0.05 vs. ND). When LPK rats were pair-fed for weeks 3-10, there was a further reduction in the SCa(2+) (25%) and TKW:BW ratio (22%) in the VDD group (P < 0.05 vs. ND). In study 2, the VDD did not alter food intake and body weight, reduced SCa(2+) (7.7%), worsened proteinuria (41.9%), interstitial monocyte accumulation (26.4%), renal dysfunction (21.4%), and cardiac enlargement (13.2%, all P < 0.05), but there was a trend for a reduction in the TKW:BW ratio (13%, P = 0.09). These data suggest that chronic vitamin D deficiency has adverse long-term actions on proteinuria, interstitial inflammation, renal function, and cardiovascular disease in PKD, and these negate its mild inhibitory effect on kidney enlargement.

  6. Increased levels of extracellular ATP in glaucomatous retinas: Possible role of the vesicular nucleotide transporter during the development of the pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Lara, María J.; Guzmán-Aránguez, Ana; de la Villa, Pedro; Díaz-Hernández, Juan Ignacio; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study retinal extracellular ATP levels and to assess the changes in the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) expression in a murine model of glaucoma during the development of the disease. Methods Retinas were obtained from glaucomatous DBA/2J mice at 3, 9, 15, and 22 months together with C57BL/6J mice used as age-matched controls. To study retinal nucleotide release, the retinas were dissected and prepared as flattened whole mounts and stimulated in Ringer buffer with or without 59 mM KCl. To investigate VNUT expression, sections of the mouse retinas were evaluated with immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis using newly developed antibodies against VNUT. All images were examined and photographed under confocal microscopy. Electroretinogram (ERG) recordings were performed on the C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice to analyze the changes in the electrophysiological response; a decrease in the scotopic threshold response was observed in the 15-month-old DBA/2J mice. Results In the 15-month-old control and glaucomatous mice, electrophysiological changes of 42% were observed. In addition, 50% increases in the intraocular pressure (IOP) were observed when the pathology was fully established. The responses in the retinal ATP net release as the pathology progressed varied from 0.32±0.04 pmol/retina (3 months) to 1.10±0.06 pmol/retina (15 months; threefold increase). Concomitantly, VNUT expression was significantly increased during glaucoma progression in the DBA/2J mice (58%) according to the immunohistochemical and western blot analysis. Conclusions These results may indicate a possible correlation between retinal dysfunction and increased levels of extracellular ATP and nucleotide transporter. These data support an excitotoxicity role for ATP via P2X7R in glaucoma. This modified cellular environment could contribute to explaining the functional and biochemical alterations observed during the development of the pathology. PMID:26392744

  7. Calcium binding to cardiac myocytes protected from proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bailey, L E; Fawzi, A B

    1985-04-17

    Excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle is dependent on extracellular calcium and calcium bound to the surface of the myocardial cell. In this study, we examined the physical characteristics of calcium binding to adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes disaggregated mechanically in oxygenated tissue culture medium containing a proteinase inhibitor (aprotinin), and separated from cellular debris by Cytodex beads. Cells prepared in this manner excluded Trypan blue and showed no evidence of spontaneous contraction or contracture. Scatchard plots of calcium binding determined by continuous flow equilibrium dialysis revealed a high-affinity, low-capacity pool, Ka = 65 X 10(3) M-1 and Bt = 1.3 nmol X mg-1 and a low-affinity, high-capacity pool, Ka = 141 M-1 and Bt = 138 nmol X mg-1. The low-affinity pool was not detectable after lanthanum, trypsin or collagenase treatment or in cells prepared without aprotinin in the isolation medium. Both neuraminidase and phospholipase C reduced Bt of the low-affinity pool by one half, but only neuraminidase affected the affinity constant of this pool. Ka was increased to 516.7 M-1, similar to the apparent affinity constant for calcium binding estimated from dP/dtmax measured at several extracellular calcium concentrations (470 M-1). The results suggest that calcium bound to sarcolemmal phospholipids represents the superficial calcium involved in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart.

  8. Cytoplasmic calcium increases in response to changes in the gravity vector in hypocotyls and petioles of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Masatsugu; Furuichi, Takuya; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2008-02-01

    Plants respond to a large variety of environmental signals, including changes in the gravity vector (gravistimulation). In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, gravistimulation is known to increase the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)). However, organs responsible for the [Ca(2+)](c) increase and the underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms remain to be solved. In this study, using Arabidopsis seedlings expressing apoaequorin, a Ca(2+)-sensitive luminescent protein in combination with an ultrasensitive photon counting camera, we clarified the organs where [Ca(2+)](c) increases in response to gravistimulation and characterized the physiological and pharmacological properties of the [Ca(2+)](c) increase. When the seedlings were gravistimulated by turning 180 degrees, they showed a transient biphasic [Ca(2+)](c) increase in their hypocotyls and petioles. The second peak of the [Ca(2+)](c) increase depended on the angle but not the speed of rotation, whereas the initial peak showed diametrically opposite characters. This suggests that the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase is specific for changes in the gravity vector. The potential mechanosensitive Ca(2+)-permeable channel (MSCC) inhibitors Gd(3+) and La(3+), the Ca(2+) chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), and the endomembrane Ca(2+)-permeable channel inhibitor ruthenium red suppressed the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase, suggesting that it arises from Ca(2+) influx via putative MSCCs in the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Moreover, the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase was attenuated by actin-disrupting drugs cytochalasin B and latrunculin B but not by microtubule-disrupting drugs oryzalin and nocodazole, implying that actin filaments are partially involved in the hypothetical activation of Ca(2+)-permeable channels. These results suggest that the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase via MSCCs is a gravity response in the hypocotyl and

  9. Dietary calcium deficiency increases Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms in chick enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Viviana A; Díaz de Barboza, Gabriela E; Marchionatti, Ana M; Alisio, Arturo E; Dallorso, Maria E; Nasif, Renée; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2004-10-01

    Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms were studied in enterocytes with different degree of differentiation from chicks adapted to a low Ca2+ diet as compared to animals fed a normal diet. Chicks adapted to a low Ca2+ diet presented hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1,25(OH)2D3 and Ca2+ absorption. Low Ca2+ diet increased the alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, independently of the cellular maturation, but it did not alter gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity. Ca2+ uptake, Ca2+-ATPase and Na(+)/Ca2+ exchanger activities and expressions were increased by the mineral-deficient diet either in mature or immature enterocytes. Western blots analysis shows that vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression was much higher in crypt cells than in mature cells. Low Ca2+ diet decreased the number of vitamin D receptor units in both kinds of cells. In conclusion, changes in Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ extrusion mechanisms in the enterocytes by a low Ca2+ diet appear to be a result of enhanced serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3, which would promote cellular differentiation producing cells more efficient to express vitamin D dependent genes required for Ca2+ absorption. PMID:15528161

  10. Effect of calcium on moving-bed biofilm reactor biofilms.

    PubMed

    Goode, C; Allen, D G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of calcium concentration on the biofilm structure, microbiology, and treatment performance was evaluated in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. Three experiments were conducted in replicate laboratory-scale reactors to determine if wastewater calcium is an important variable for the design and optimization of these reactors. Biofilm structural properties, such as thickness, oxygen microprofiles, and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were affected by increasing calcium concentrations. Above a threshold concentration of calcium between 1 and 50 mg/L, biofilms became thicker and denser, with a shift toward increasingly proteinaceous EPS at higher calcium concentrations up to 200 mgCa2+/L. At 300 mgCa2+/L, biofilms were found to become primarily composed of inorganic calcium precipitates. Microbiology was assessed through microscopy, denaturing grade gel electrophoresis, and enumeration of higher organisms. Higher calcium concentrations were found to change the bacterial community and promote the abundant growth of filamentous organisms and various protazoa and metazoan populations. The chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was improved for reactors at calcium concentrations of 50 mg/L and above. Reactor effluents for the lowest calcium concentration (1 mgCa2+/L) were found to be turbid (>50 NTU), as a result of the detachment of small and poorly settling planktonic biomass, whereas higher concentrations promoted settling of the suspended phase. In general, calcium was found to be an important variable causing significant changes in biofilm structure and reactor function.

  11. Calcium-dependent inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The inactivation of calcium channels in mammalian pituitary tumor cells (GH3) was studied with patch electrodes under voltage clamp in cell- free membrane patches and in dialyzed cells. The calcium current elicited by depolarization from a holding potential of -40 mV passed predominantly through one class of channels previously shown to be modulated by dihydropyridines and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation (Armstrong and Eckert, 1987). When exogenous calcium buffers were omitted from the pipette solution, the macroscopic calcium current through those channels inactivated with a half time of approximately 10 ms to a steady state level 40-75% smaller than the peak. Inactivation was also measured as the reduction in peak current during a test pulse that closely followed a prepulse. Inactivation was largely reduced or eliminated by (a) buffering free calcium in the pipette solution to less than 10(-8) M; (b) replacing extracellular calcium with barium; (c) increasing the prepulse voltage from +10 to +60 mV; or (d) increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP, either 'directly' with dibutyryl-cAMP or indirectly by activating adenylate cyclase with forskolin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Thus, inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells only occurs when membrane depolarization leads to calcium ion entry and intracellular accumulation. PMID:2849631

  12. Histamine H1 receptor induces cytosolic calcium increase and aquaporin translocation in human salivary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Park, Seong-Hae; Moon, Young Wha; Hwang, Sungmin; Kim, Donghoon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Oh, Seog Bae; Kim, Joong Soo; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Sung Joong; Choi, Se-Young; Park, Kyungpyo

    2009-08-01

    One of the common side effects of antihistamine medicines is xerostomia (dry mouth). The current consensus is that antihistamine-induced xerostomia comes from an antimuscarinic effect. Although the effect of antihistamines on salivary secretion is both obvious and significant, the cellular mechanism whereby this happens is still unclear because of the lack of knowledge of histamine signaling in human salivary glands. Here, we have studied histamine receptors and the effect of antihistamines on human submandibular acinar cells. In primary cultured human submandibular gland and a HSG cell line, histamine increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The histamine-induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increase was inhibited by histamine H1 receptor-specific antagonists, and the expression of the functional histamine H1 receptor was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, histamine pretreatment did not inhibit a subsequent carbachol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise without "heterologous desensitization." Chlorpheniramine inhibited a carbachol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase at a 100-fold greater concentration than histamine receptor antagonism, whereas astemizole and cetrizine showed more than 1000-fold difference, which in part explains the xerostomia-inducing potency among the antihistamines. Notably, histamine resulted in translocation of aquaporin-5 to the plasma membrane in human submandibular gland cells and green fluorescent protein-tagged aquaporin-5 expressing HSG cells. We found that histidine decarboxylase and the histamine H1 receptor are broadly distributed in submandibular gland cells, whereas choline acetyltransferase is localized only at the parasympathetic terminals. Our results suggest that human salivary gland cells express histamine H1 receptors and histamine-synthesizing enzymes, revealing the cellular mechanism of antihistamine-induced xerostomia. PMID:19443731

  13. In-Vitro effect of Ficus deltoidea on the contraction of isolated rat’s uteri is mediated via multiple receptors binding and is dependent on extracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ficus deltoidea, is a perennial herb that is used to assist labor, firm the uterus post-delivery and to prevent postpartum bleeding. In view of its claimed uterotonic action, the mechanisms underlying plant’s effect on uterine contraction were investigated. Methods Adult female SD rats were injected with 2 mg/kg 17β-oestradiol (E2) to synchronize their oestrous cycle. A day after injection, uteri were removed for in-vitro contraction studies. The dose dependent effect of Ficus deltoidea aqeous extract (FDA) on the tension produced by the isolated rat’s uteri was determined. The effects of atropine (2×10-8 M), atosiban (0.5 IU), THG113.31 (10 μM), oxodipine (0.25 mM), EDTA (1 mM), 2-amino-ethoxy-diphenylborate (2-APB) (40 mM) and thapsigargin (1 mM) on the maximum force of contraction (Emax) achieved following 2 mg/ml FDA administration were also investigated. Results FDA induced in-vitro contraction of the isolated rat’s uteri in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of atropine, atosiban and THG113.31 reduced the Emax with atosiban having the greatest effect. The Emax was also reduced following oxodipine and EDTA administration. There was no significant change observed following 2-APB administration. Thapsigargin, however, augmented Emax. Conclusions FDA-induced contraction of the isolated rat’s uteri is mediated via multiple uterotonin receptors (muscarinic, oxytocin and prostaglandin F2α) and was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+. Contraction, however, was not dependent on the Ca2+ release from the internal stores. This in-vitro study provides the first scientific evidence on the claimed effect of Ficus Deltoidea on uterine contraction. PMID:24330515

  14. Increased cytosolic calcium stimulates exocytosis in bovine lactotrophs. Direct evidence from changes in membrane capacitance

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique has been used to measure changes in membrane capacitance (Cm) of bovine lactotrophs in order to monitor fluctuations in cell surface area associated with exo- and endocytosis. Cells were prepared by an enrichment procedure and cultured for up to 14 d before use. Under whole-cell recording, cell cytoplasm was dialyzed with various Ca2(+)-containing solutions. The resting Cm of 6.05 +/- 1.68 pF was found to correlate well with squared cell radius, suggesting a specific Cm of 0.8 microF/cm2. Discrete Cm steps of 2-10 fF were recorded, which most likely reflect single fusion and retrieval events of prolactin-containing granules (0.2-0.6 microns in diameter). High Ca2+ resulted in a Cm increase of 20-50% from the resting value, demonstrating a role for [Ca2+]i in stimulus-secretion coupling. Spontaneous Cm changes have also been recorded, which presumably reflect prolactin secretion supported by a tonic influx of Ca2+ through the membrane. This is supported by the following findings: addition of Co2+ diminished or reversed the spontaneous Cm changes and decreased resting [Ca2+]i; and membrane depolarization increased Cm, indicating the role of voltage-activated channels in stimulus-secretion coupling. As bovine lactotrophs have been found to be largely devoid of spontaneous electrical activity, a mechanism involving modulation of a tonic Ca2+ influx is proposed; this is shown to provide adequate control of basal and triggered secretion monitored by Cm. PMID:2037838

  15. Infrasound increases intracellular calcium concentration and induces apoptosis in hippocampi of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaohui; Gong, Li; Li, Xiaofang; Ye, Lin; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jing; Qiu, Jianyong; Jiao, Huiduo; Zhang, Wendong; Chen, Jingzao; Wang, Jiuping

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we determined the effect of infrasonic exposure on apoptosis and intracellular free Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺]i) levels in the hippocampus of adult rats. Adult rats were randomly divided into the control and infrasound exposure groups. For infrasound treatment, animals received infrasonic exposure at 90 (8 Hz) or 130 dB (8 Hz) for 2 h per day. Hippocampi were dissected, and isolated hippocampal neurons were cultured. The [Ca²⁺]i levels in hippocampal neurons from adult rat brains were determined by Fluo-3/AM staining with a confocal microscope system on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 following infrasonic exposure. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide double staining. Positive cells were sorted and analyzed by flow cytometry. Elevated [Ca²⁺]i levels were observed on days 14 and 21 after rats received daily treatment with 90 or 130 dB sound pressure level (SPL) infrasonic exposure (p<0.01 vs. control). The highest levels of [Ca²⁺]i were detected in the 130 dB SPL infrasonic exposure group. Meanwhile, apoptosis in hippocampal neurons was found to increase on day 7 following 90 dB SPL infrasound exposure, and significantly increased on day 14. Upon 130 dB infrasound treatment, apoptosis was first observed on day 14, whereas the number of apoptotic cells gradually decreased thereafter. Additionally, a marked correlation between cell apoptosis and [Ca²⁺]i levels was found on day 14 and 21 following daily treatment with 90 and 130 dB SPL, respectively. These results demonstrate that a period of infrasonic exposure induced apoptosis and upregulated [Ca²⁺]i levels in hippocampal neurons, suggesting that infrasound may cause damage to the central nervous system (CNS) through the Ca²⁺‑mediated apoptotic pathway in hippocampal neurons. PMID:21946944

  16. Direction of action potential propagation influences calcium increases in distal dendrites of the cricket giant interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroto; Baba, Yoshichika; Oka, Kotaro

    2002-10-01

    To understand the relationship between the propagation direction of action potentials and dendritic Ca(2+) elevation, simultaneous measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and intradendritic membrane potential were performed in the wind-sensitive giant interneurons of the cricket. The dendritic Ca(2+) transients induced by synaptically-evoked action potentials had larger amplitudes than those induced by backpropagating spikes evoked by antidromic stimulation. The amplitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) changes induced by antidromic stimuli combined with subthreshold synaptic stimulation was not different from that of the Ca(2+) increases evoked by the backpropagating spikes alone. This result means that the synaptically activated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores does not contribute to enhancement of Ca(2+) elevation induced by backpropagating spikes. On the other hand, the synaptically evoked action potentials were also increased at distal dendrites in which the Ca(2+) elevation was enhanced. When the dendritic and axonal spikes were simultaneously recorded, the delay between dendritic spike and ascending axonal spike depended upon which side of the cercal nerves was stimulated. Further, dual intracellular recording at different dendritic branches illustrated that the dendritic spike at the branch arborizing on the stimulated side preceded the spike recorded at the other side of the dendrite. These results suggest that the spike-initiation site shifts depending on the location of the activated postsynaptic site. It is proposed that the difference of spike propagation manner could change the action potential waveform at the distal dendrite, and could produce synaptic activity-dependent Ca(2+) dynamics in the giant interneurons.

  17. Important role of PLC-γ1 in hypoxic increase in intracellular calcium in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vishal R; Song, Tengyao; Joseph, Leroy; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    An increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) induces hypoxic cellular responses in the lungs; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We report, for the first time, that acute hypoxia significantly enhances phospholipase C (PLC) activity in mouse resistance pulmonary arteries (PAs), but not in mesenteric arteries. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining reveal the expression of PLC-γ1 protein in PAs and PASMCs, respectively. The activity of PLC-γ1 is also augmented in PASMCs following hypoxia. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of mitochondrial complex III Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents hypoxia from increasing PLC-γ1 activity in PASMCs. Myxothiazol, a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, reduces the hypoxic response as well. The PLC inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analog U73433, attenuates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in PAs and hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs. PLC-γ1 knockdown suppresses its protein expression and the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Hypoxia remarkably increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) production, which is blocked by U73122. The IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or xestospongin-C inhibits the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). PLC-γ1 knockdown or U73122 reduces H(2)O(2)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs and contraction in PAs. 2-APB and xestospongin-C produce similar inhibitory effects. In conclusion, our findings provide novel evidence that hypoxia activates PLC-γ1 by increasing RISP-dependent mitochondrial ROS production in the complex III, which causes IP(3) production, IP(3)R opening, and Ca(2+) release, playing an important role in hypoxic Ca(2+) and contractile responses in PASMCs.

  18. Coordinated Regulation of the Neutral Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 and the Protein Phosphatase Subunit GADD34 Promotes Adaptation to Increased Extracellular Osmolarity*

    PubMed Central

    Krokowski, Dawid; Jobava, Raul; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Farabaugh, Kenneth; Wu, Jing; Majumder, Mithu; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Snider, Martin D.; Bussolati, Ovidio; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to shrinkage induced by increased extracellular osmolarity via programmed changes in gene transcription and mRNA translation. The immediate response to this stress includes the induction of expression of the neutral amino acid transporter SNAT2. Increased SNAT2-mediated uptake of neutral amino acids is an essential adaptive mechanism for restoring cell volume. In contrast, stress-induced phosphorylation of the α subunit of the translation initiation factor eIF2 (eIF2α) can promote apoptosis. Here we show that the response to mild hyperosmotic stress involves regulation of the phosphorylation of eIF2α by increased levels of GADD34, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). The induction of GADD34 was dependent on transcriptional control by the c-Jun-binding cAMP response element in the GADD34 gene promoter and posttranscriptional stabilization of its mRNA. This mechanism differs from the regulation of GADD34 expression by other stresses that involve activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). ATF4 was not translated during hyperosmotic stress despite an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation. The SNAT2-mediated increase in amino acid uptake was enhanced by increased GADD34 levels in a manner involving decreased eIF2α phosphorylation. It is proposed that the induction of the SNAT2/GADD34 axis enhances cell survival by promoting the immediate adaptive response to stress. PMID:26041779

  19. Increase of Labeled Calcium Uptake in Heart Muscle during Potassium Lack Contracture

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lyell J.

    1960-01-01

    Analyses of ashed muscle tissue show that the uptake of Ca45 by isolated frog heart ventricles from normal Ringer's solution containing 1 mM Ca reaches a maximum value in about 30 minutes of perfusion which is not exceeded after 3 hours of perfusion. The average amount of this labeled Ca taken up from normal Ringer's is 0.7 mM/kg. wet weight of muscle. In contrast to this, the amount of labeled Ca taken up by ventricles perfused with K-free Ringer's increases at a linear rate over a 60 minute period to twice the normal value coinciding with the gradual development of contracture and coinciding with a cellular K loss and Na gain of about 30 mM/kg. How much of the extra labeled Ca taken up from K-free Ringer's represents a net gain in cellular Ca content is not known. However, evidence has been obtained that some of this labeled Ca enters an intracellular compartment. EDTA in K-free Ringer's solution causes relaxation of ventricles in contracture and also renders the muscle fibers indiscriminately permeable. This indicates that a combination of Ca with sensitive intracellular sites is probably the cause of the K lack contracture. PMID:13838003

  20. Increased Obesity-Associated Circulating Levels of the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Osteopontin, Chitinase-3 Like-1 and Tenascin C Are Associated with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Izaguirre, Maitane; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis; Baixauli, Jorge; Martí, Pablo; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Background Excess adipose tissue represents a major risk factor for the development of colon cancer with inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling being proposed as plausible mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity can influence circulating levels of inflammation-related extracellular matrix proteins in patients with colon cancer (CC), promoting a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Methods Serum samples obtained from 79 subjects [26 lean (LN) and 53 obese (OB)] were used in the study. Enrolled subjects were further subclassified according to the established diagnostic protocol for CC (44 without CC and 35 with CC). Anthropometric measurements as well as circulating metabolites and hormones were determined. Circulating concentrations of the ECM proteins osteopontin (OPN), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40), tenascin C (TNC) and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) were determined by ELISA. Results Significant differences in circulating OPN, YKL-40 and TNC concentrations between the experimental groups were observed, being significantly increased due to obesity (P<0.01) and colon cancer (P<0.05). LCN-2 levels were affected by obesity (P<0.05), but no differences were detected regarding the presence or not of CC. A positive association (P<0.05) with different inflammatory markers was also detected. Conclusions To our knowledge, we herein show for the first time that obese patients with CC exhibit increased circulating levels of OPN, YKL-40 and TNC providing further evidence for the influence of obesity on CC development via ECM proteins, representing promising diagnostic biomarkers or target molecules for therapeutics. PMID:27612200

  1. Calcium polycarbophil, a water absorbing polymer, increases bowel movement and prevents sennoside-induced diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Yamada, T; Iwanaga, Y; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Kato, H; Mizumoto, A; Itoh, Z

    2000-07-01

    The effects of calcium polycarbophil (CP), a water-absorbing polymer, on bowel movement were examined in comparison with known laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents in dogs, a species that resembles humans for stool output. CP increased stool frequency, fecal water content and fecal weight in a dose-dependent manner, but did not induce diarrhea. Sennoside and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC-Na) increased fecal water content and induced diarrhea at lower doses than that which enhanced stool frequency. Trimebutine decreased stool frequency, fecal weight and fecal water content, resulting in inhibition rather than stimulation of defecation. In sennoside-induced diarrhea, loperamide and CP improved stool consistency and this was accompanied by reduced fecal moisture and frequency of diarrhea. In contrast, CMC-Na aggravated stool consistency with increased fecal water content and frequency of diarrhea, and trimebutine had little noticeable effect apart from reducing fecal weight. Our results show that CP has both laxative and anti-diarrheal effects in dogs and differed from conventional laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents. CP may be a suitable agent for treatment of idiopathic constipation, secretory diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome with alternating constipation and diarrhea and with either predominating in terms of less side effects such as diarrhea or constipation.

  2. Calcium polycarbophil, a water absorbing polymer, increases bowel movement and prevents sennoside-induced diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Yamada, T; Iwanaga, Y; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Kato, H; Mizumoto, A; Itoh, Z

    2000-07-01

    The effects of calcium polycarbophil (CP), a water-absorbing polymer, on bowel movement were examined in comparison with known laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents in dogs, a species that resembles humans for stool output. CP increased stool frequency, fecal water content and fecal weight in a dose-dependent manner, but did not induce diarrhea. Sennoside and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC-Na) increased fecal water content and induced diarrhea at lower doses than that which enhanced stool frequency. Trimebutine decreased stool frequency, fecal weight and fecal water content, resulting in inhibition rather than stimulation of defecation. In sennoside-induced diarrhea, loperamide and CP improved stool consistency and this was accompanied by reduced fecal moisture and frequency of diarrhea. In contrast, CMC-Na aggravated stool consistency with increased fecal water content and frequency of diarrhea, and trimebutine had little noticeable effect apart from reducing fecal weight. Our results show that CP has both laxative and anti-diarrheal effects in dogs and differed from conventional laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents. CP may be a suitable agent for treatment of idiopathic constipation, secretory diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome with alternating constipation and diarrhea and with either predominating in terms of less side effects such as diarrhea or constipation. PMID:10952069

  3. Measurement of shear stress-mediated intracellular calcium dynamics in human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarnejad, M.; Cromer, W. E.; Kaunas, R. R.; Zhang, S. L.; Zawieja, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    The shear stress applied to lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) by lymph flow changes dramatically under normal conditions as well as in response to disease conditions and immune reactions. In general, LEC are known to regulate the contraction frequency and strength of lymphatic pumping in response to shear stress. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is an important factor that regulates lymphatic contraction characteristics. In this study, we measured changes in the [Ca2+]i under different shear stress levels and determined the source of this calcium signal. Briefly, human dermal LEC were cultured in custom-made microchannels for 3 days before loading with 2 µM fura-2 AM, a ratiometric calcium dye to measure [Ca2+]i. Step changes in shear stress resulted in a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i followed by a gradual return to the basal level and sometimes below the initial baseline (45.2 ± 2.2 nM). The [Ca2+]i reached a peak at 126.2 ± 5.6 nM for 10 dyn/cm2 stimulus, whereas the peak was only 71.8 ± 5.4 nM for 1 dyn/cm2 stimulus, indicating that the calcium signal depends on the magnitude of shear stress. Removal of the extracellular calcium from the buffer or pharmocological blockade of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels significantly reduced the peak [Ca2+]i, demonstrating a role of extracellular calcium entry. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pumps showed the importance of intracellular calcium stores in the initiation of this signal. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the shear-mediated calcium signal is dependent on the magnitude of the shear and involves ER store calcium release and extracellular calcium entry. PMID:25617358

  4. Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium appear to be required for the migration of adherent human neutrophils [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Mar;110(3):861

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Human neutrophils exhibit multiple increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i) spontaneously and in response to the chemoattractant N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (Jaconi, M. E. E., R. W. Rivest, W. Schlegel, C. B. Wollheim, D. Pittet, and P. D. Lew. 1988. J. Biol. Chem. 263:10557-10560). The function of these repetitive increases in [Ca2+]i, as well as the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, remain unresolved. We have used microspectrofluorometry to measure [Ca2+]i in single fura-2-loaded human neutrophils as they moved on poly-D-lysine-coated glass in the presence of serum. To investigate the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, we examined cells in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+, as well as intracellular Ca2(+)-buffered and Ca2(+)- depleted cells. In the presence of extracellular Ca2+, multiple increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i were frequently observed, and at least one such transient increase in [Ca2+]i occurred in every moving cell during chemokinesis, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. In addition, neutrophils that extended pseudopodia and assumed a polarized morphology after plating onto a surface were always observed to exhibit [Ca2+]i transients even in the absence of chemoattractant. In contrast, a [Ca2+]i transient was observed in only one of the nonpolarized stationary cells that were examined (n = 15). Although some cells exhibited relatively periodic increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i, resembling the regular oscillations that have been observed in some cell types, many others exhibited increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i that varied in their timing, magnitude, and duration. Buffering of [Ca2+]i or removal of extracellular Ca2+ damped out or blocked transient increases in [Ca2+]i and reduced or inhibited the migration of neutrophils. Under these conditions, polarized cells were often observed to make repeated attempts at migration, but they remained anchored at their rear. These data suggest

  5. Extracellular cGMP Modulates Learning Biphasically by Modulating Glycine Receptors, CaMKII and Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Malaguarnera, Michele; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that extracellular cGMP modulates the ability to learn a Y maze task, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. Here we show that extracellular cGMP, at physiological concentrations, modulates learning in the Y maze in a biphasic way by modulating the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Extracellular cGMP reduces glycine receptors activation inducing a voltage-dependent calcium-channels-mediated increase of calcium in Purkinje neurons. This calcium increase modulates CaMKII phosphorylation in a biphasic way. When basal calcium concentration is low extracellular cGMP reduces CaMKII phosphorylation, increasing nitric oxide synthase activity, the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function and learning ability. When basal calcium is normal extracellular cGMP increases CaMKII phosphorylation, reducing nitric oxide synthase activity, the pathway function and learning. These data unveil new mechanisms modulating learning in the Y maze and likely other learning types which may be therapeutic targets to improve learning in pathological situations associated with altered cGMP levels. PMID:27634333

  6. Extracellular cGMP Modulates Learning Biphasically by Modulating Glycine Receptors, CaMKII and Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Malaguarnera, Michele; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that extracellular cGMP modulates the ability to learn a Y maze task, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. Here we show that extracellular cGMP, at physiological concentrations, modulates learning in the Y maze in a biphasic way by modulating the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Extracellular cGMP reduces glycine receptors activation inducing a voltage-dependent calcium-channels-mediated increase of calcium in Purkinje neurons. This calcium increase modulates CaMKII phosphorylation in a biphasic way. When basal calcium concentration is low extracellular cGMP reduces CaMKII phosphorylation, increasing nitric oxide synthase activity, the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function and learning ability. When basal calcium is normal extracellular cGMP increases CaMKII phosphorylation, reducing nitric oxide synthase activity, the pathway function and learning. These data unveil new mechanisms modulating learning in the Y maze and likely other learning types which may be therapeutic targets to improve learning in pathological situations associated with altered cGMP levels. PMID:27634333

  7. Increase in the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations by switching from calcium carbonate to lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Toru; Kawakami, Junko; Mikami, Noriko; Wakai, Haruki; Ishii, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kazunari; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hida, Miho; Kurata, Yasuhisa

    2014-06-01

    It is widely known that dialysis patients who are administered vitamin D preparations have a better prognosis than patients who are not. In this study, of 22 patients on maintenance dialysis who had been administered calcium (Ca) carbonate in our hospital, we investigated the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations after the phosphorus (P) binder was switched from Ca carbonate to the newly developed lanthanum carbonate (LC). After completely switching to LC, the dosage amount of oral vitamin D3 preparation (alfacalcidol equivalent) was significantly increased from 0.094 μg/day to 0.375 μg/day (P = 0.0090). No significant changes were observed in the values of serum corrected Ca, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone and P after switching. The administration of LC enabled complete cessation of the administration of Ca carbonate preparations, and increased the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations. Therefore, LC may be a useful P binder to improve patient prognosis.

  8. Presence of the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin in the extracellular medium reduces toxic metal accumulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and increases bacterial metal tolerance.

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Geoffroy, Valérie; Hoegy, Françoise; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2010-06-01

    In order to get access to iron, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 produces two major siderophores pyoverdine (PVD) and pyochelin (PCH). Both siderophores are able to chelate many other metals in addition to iron. However, despite this property, only iron is transported efficiently into the bacteria by the PVD and PCH uptake pathways. Growth studies with P. aeruginosa strains showed a lower sensitivity to toxic metals for the siderophore-producing strain than for the mutants unable to produce siderophores. Moreover, addition of PVD or PCH to the growth medium of a siderophore-deficient strain considerably reduced the toxicity of toxic metals present at concentrations of 100 µM in iron-limited and iron-supplemented growth conditions. Measurement by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry of the concentration of metals present in bacteria incubated with metals in the presence or absence of PVD or PCH indicated that both siderophores were able to sequester metals from the extracellular medium of the bacteria, decreasing metal diffusion into the bacteria. Pyoverdine was able to sequester Al(3+) , Co(2+) , Cu(2+) , Eu(3+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) , Tb(3+) and Zn(2+) from the extracellular medium, and PCH, Al(3+) , Co(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) . Moreover, the presence of 100 µM Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) increased PVD production by 290% and 380%, respectively, in a medium supplemented with iron. All these data suggest that PVD and PCH may contribute to P. aeruginosa resistance to heavy metals. PMID:23766115

  9. Simulations of intracellular calcium release dynamics in response to a high-intensity, ultrashort electric pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Nguyen, A.; Sridhara, V.; Hu, Q.; Nuccitelli, R.; Beebe, S. J.; Kolb, J.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2007-04-01

    Numerical simulations for electrically induced, intracellular calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum are reported. A two-step model is used for self-consistency. Distributed electrical circuit representation coupled with the Smoluchowski equation yields the ER membrane nanoporation for calcium outflow based on a numerical simulation. This is combined with the continuum Li-Rinzel model and drift diffusion for calcium dynamics. Our results are shown to be in agreement with reported calcium release data. A modest increase (rough doubling) of the cellular calcium is predicted in the absence of extra-cellular calcium. In particular, the applied field of 15kV/cm with 60ns pulse duration makes for a strong comparison. No oscillations are predicted and the net recovery period of about 5min are both in agreement with published experimental results. A quantitative explanation for the lack of such oscillatory behavior, based on the density dependent calcium fluxes, is also provided.

  10. Effect of a Western-style diet fortified with increased calcium and vitamin D on mammary gland of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Naoto; Fan, Kunhua; Thaler, Howard T; Yang, Kan; Lipkin, Martin

    2008-06-01

    We previously reported hyperproliferation and hyperplasia in C57Bl/6 mouse mammary gland after feeding a Western-style diet (WD); these findings decreased after supplementing WD with increased calcium and vitamin D(3). We now again fortified WD with increased calcium and vitamin D(3) from two sources: (1) a food source, calcium- and vitamin D(3)-enriched yogurt (WD(y) diet) or (2) adding calcium and vitamin D(3) directly to WD (WD(CaD) diet). After 6 months of feeding the number of mammary ducts was higher in mice consuming WD compared to WD(y) (216.0 vs. 202.7, P <.05) and WD(CaD) (216.0 vs. 194.9, P <.001). The percentage of small ducts increased in WD compared to AIN-76A controls (23.3% vs. 17.4%) but was lower in the WD(y) (17.1%) and WD(CaD) (14.8%) groups. WD mice had higher numbers of epithelial cells per duct than WD(y) (33.2 vs. 27.4, P <.001) and WD(CaD) (33.2 vs. 27.8, P <.001) mice, and AIN-76A-fed mice had higher numbers than WD(y) (31.1 vs. 27.4, P <.005) or WD(CaD) (31.1 vs. 27.8, P <.01) mice. Mitotic index was higher in WD than in WD(CaD) mice (0.0020 vs. 0.0009, P <.001). Thus, small mammary gland ductules and mitosis increased after feeding WD and decreased after supplementing the diets with increased calcium and vitamin D(3), administered either in a dairy food (yogurt) or directly as calcium carbonate plus vitamin D(3) in WD, suggesting further study of these nutrients for their possible relationship to breast cancer prevention.

  11. Antidepressants increase glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production through monoamine-independent activation of protein tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka, Kazue; Takebayashi, Minoru; Tsuchioka, Mami; Maeda, Natsuko; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies show that neuronal and glial plasticity are important for therapeutic action of antidepressants. We previously reported that antidepressants increase glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) production in rat C6 glioma cells (C6 cells). Here, we found that amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, increased both GDNF mRNA expression and release, which were selectively and completely inhibited by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors. Indeed, treatment of amitriptyline rapidly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity, as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activities. Furthermore, different classes of antidepressants also rapidly increased ERK activity. The extent of acute ERK activation and GDNF release were significantly correlated to each other in individual antidepressants, suggesting an important role of acute ERK activation in GDNF production. Furthermore, antidepressants increased the acute ERK activation and GDNF mRNA expression in normal human astrocytes as well as C6 cells. Although 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT), but not noradrenaline or dopamine, increased ERK activation and GDNF release via 5-HT2A receptors, ketanserin, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, did not have any effect on the amitriptyline-induced ERK activation. Thus, GDNF production by amitriptyline was independent of monoamine. Both of the amitriptyline-induced ERK activation and GDNF mRNA expression were blocked by genistein, a general protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor. Actually, we found that amitriptyline acutely increased phosphorylation levels of several phosphotyrosine-containing proteins. Taken together, these findings indicate that ERK activation through PTK regulates antidepressant-induced GDNF production and that the GDNF production in glial cells may be a novel action of the antidepressant, which is independent of monoamine. PMID:17210798

  12. Cytosolic Calcium Measurements in Renal Epithelial Cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wing-Kee; Dittmar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A variety of cellular processes, both physiological and pathophysiological, require or are governed by calcium, including exocytosis, mitochondrial function, cell death, cell metabolism and cell migration to name but a few. Cytosolic calcium is normally maintained at low nanomolar concentrations; rather it is found in high micromolar to millimolar concentrations in the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial matrix and the extracellular compartment. Upon stimulation, a transient increase in cytosolic calcium serves to signal downstream events. Detecting changes in cytosolic calcium is normally performed using a live cell imaging set up with calcium binding dyes that exhibit either an increase in fluorescence intensity or a shift in the emission wavelength upon calcium binding. However, a live cell imaging set up is not freely accessible to all researchers. Alternative detection methods have been optimized for immunological cells with flow cytometry and for non-immunological adherent cells with a fluorescence microplate reader. Here, we describe an optimized, simple method for detecting changes in epithelial cells with flow cytometry using a single wavelength calcium binding dye. Adherent renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, which are normally difficult to load with dyes, were loaded with a fluorescent cell permeable calcium binding dye in the presence of probenecid, brought into suspension and calcium signals were monitored before and after addition of thapsigargin, tunicamycin and ionomycin. PMID:25407650

  13. Indole-3-acetic acid-induced oxidative burst and an increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in rice suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T H; Umemura, Kenji; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-08-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the major natural auxin involved in the regulation of a variety of growth and developmental processes such as division, elongation, and polarity determination in growing plant cells. It has been shown that dividing and/or elongating plant cells accompanies the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a number of reports have suggested that hormonal actions can be mediated by ROS through ROS-mediated opening of ion channels. Here, we surveyed the link between the action of IAA, oxidative burst, and calcium channel activation in a transgenic cells of rice expressing aequorin in the cytosol. Application of IAA to the cells induced a rapid and transient generation of superoxide which was followed by a transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). The IAA-induced [Ca(2+)]c elevation was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers and a Ca(2+) chelator. Furthermore, ROS scavengers effectively blocked the action of IAA on [Ca(2+)]c elevation.

  14. Indole-3-acetic acid-induced oxidative burst and an increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in rice suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T H; Umemura, Kenji; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-08-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the major natural auxin involved in the regulation of a variety of growth and developmental processes such as division, elongation, and polarity determination in growing plant cells. It has been shown that dividing and/or elongating plant cells accompanies the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a number of reports have suggested that hormonal actions can be mediated by ROS through ROS-mediated opening of ion channels. Here, we surveyed the link between the action of IAA, oxidative burst, and calcium channel activation in a transgenic cells of rice expressing aequorin in the cytosol. Application of IAA to the cells induced a rapid and transient generation of superoxide which was followed by a transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). The IAA-induced [Ca(2+)]c elevation was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers and a Ca(2+) chelator. Furthermore, ROS scavengers effectively blocked the action of IAA on [Ca(2+)]c elevation. PMID:27149194

  15. Elevated intracellular calcium concentration increases secretory processing of the amyloid precursor protein by a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Petryniak, M A; Wurtman, R J; Slack, B E

    1996-01-01

    Secretory cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a process that releases soluble APP derivatives (APPs) into the extracellular space, is stimulated by the activation of muscarinic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The signalling pathways involved in the release process exhibit both protein kinase C- and protein tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent components [Slack, Breu, Petryniak, Srivastava and Wurtman (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 8337-8344]. The possibility that elevations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration initiate the tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent release of APPs was examined in human embryonic kidney cells expressing muscarinic m3 receptors. Inhibition of protein kinase C with the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X decreased the carbachol-evoked release of APPs by approx. 30%, as shown previously. The residual response was further decreased, in an additive manner, by the Ca2+ chelator EGTA, or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin A25. The Ca2+ ionophore, ionomycin, like carbachol, stimulated both the release of APPs and the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, one of which was identified as paxillin, a component of focal adhesions. The effects of ionomycin on APPs release and on protein tyrosine phosphorylation were concentration-dependent, and occurred over similar concentration ranges; both effects were inhibited only partly by GF 109203X, but were abolished by EGTA or by tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The results demonstrate for the first time that ionophore-induced elevations in intracellular Ca2+ levels elicit APPs release via increased tyrosine phosphorylation. Part of the increase in APPs release evoked by muscarinic receptor activation might be attributable to a similar mechanism. PMID:9003386

  16. Conservation of body calcium by increased dietary intake of potassium: A potential measure to reduce the osteoporosis process during prolonged exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nechay, Bohdan R.

    1989-01-01

    During the 1988 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, it was proposed that the loss of skeletal calcium upon prolonged exposure to microgravity could be explained, in part, by a renal maladjustment characterized by an increased urinary excretion of calcium. It was theorized that because the conservation of body fluids and electrolytes depends upon the energy of adenosine triphosphate and enzymes that control the use of its energy for renal ion transport, an induction of renal sodium and potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na + K ATPase) by oral loading with potassium would increase the reabsorption of sodium directly and that of calcium indirectly, leading to improved hydration and to reduced calcium loss. Preliminary studies showed the following. Rats drinking water containing 0.2 M potassium chloride for six to 13 days excreted in urine 22 muEq of calcium and 135 muEq of sodium per 100 grams of body weight per day. The corresponding values for control rats drinking tap water were 43 muEq and 269 muEq respectively. Renal Na + K ATPase activity in potassium loaded rats was higher than in controls. Thus, oral potassium loading resulted in increased Na + K ATPase activity and diminished urinary excretion of calcium and of sodium as predicted by the hypothesis. An extension of these studies to humans has the potential of resulting in development of harmless, non-invasive, drug-free, convenient measures to reduce bone loss and other electrolyte and fluid problems in space travelers exposed to prolonged periods of microgravity.

  17. Interferon-gamma increases cellular calcium ion concentration and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation in human renal carcinoma cells: relation to ICAM-1 antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, A. B.; Bouchelouche, P. N.; Lillevang, S. T.; Andersen, C. B.

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on cellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins 1,4,5-P3) formation in the human renal carcinoma cell line CaKi-1. We also examined the possible role of a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism during IFN-gamma-induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) antigen expression. IFN-gamma caused a rapid concentration-dependent rise in [Ca2+]i, which was partly inhibited by diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker, TMB-8, an inhibitor of intracellular calcium redistribution, and in calcium-free medium. IFN-gamma caused a fourfold increase in Ins 1,4,5-P3 formation. The induction of ICAM-1 antigen expression was synergistically enhanced by 4-bromocalcium ionophore A23187. Finally, the calcium antagonists diltiazem. TMB-8 and EGTA, as well as two potent inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent kinases, calmidazolium (R24571) and W7, had no or only a minor inhibitory effect on IFN-gamma induction. Our data suggest that IFN-gamma increases [Ca2+]i in CaKi-1 cells by stimulating influx of Ca2+ and release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, probably via Ins 1,4,5-P3 formation. IFN-gamma signal transduction in our model may not be limited to an increase in [Ca2+]i and Ins 1,4,5-P3, since IFN-gamma-induced ICAM-1 antigen expression was abrogated to a minor degree by calcium antagonists and not coupled to Ins 1,4,5-P3 formation. PMID:7905278

  18. Proteomics reveals drastic increase of extracellular matrix proteins collagen and dermatopontin in the aged mdx diaphragm model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Steven; Zweyer, Margit; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal genetic disease of childhood caused by primary abnormalities in the gene coding for the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The mdx mouse is an established animal model of various aspects of X-linked muscular dystrophy and is widely used for studying fundamental mechanisms of dystrophinopathy and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat one of the most frequent gender-specific diseases in humans. In order to determine global changes in the muscle proteome with the progressive deterioration of mdx tissue with age, we have characterized diaphragm muscle from mdx mice at three ages (8-weeks, 12-months and 22-months) using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Altered expression levels in diaphragm of 8-week vs. 22-month mice were shown to occur in 11 muscle-associated proteins. Aging in the mdx diaphragm seems to be associated with a drastic increase in the extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and dermatopontin, the molecular chaperone αB-crystallin, and the intermediate filament protein vimentin, suggesting increased accumulation of connective tissue, an enhanced cellular stress response and compensatory stabilization of the weakened membrane cytoskeleton. These proteomic findings establish the aged mdx diaphragm as an excellent model system for studying secondary effects of dystrophin deficiency in skeletal muscle tissue.

  19. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  20. Increased Expression of the Large Conductance, Calcium-Activated K+ (BK) Channel in Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Samuel T.; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Velinov, Milen; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic J protein co-chaperone that opposes neurodegeneration. Mutations in CSPα (i.e., Leu115 to Arg substitution or deletion (Δ) of Leu116) cause adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease. We have previously demonstrated that CSPα limits the expression of large conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels in neurons, which may impact synaptic excitability and neurotransmission. Here we show by western blot analysis that expression of the pore-forming BKα subunit is elevated ~2.5 fold in the post-mortem cortex of a 36-year-old patient with the Leu116∆ CSPα mutation. Moreover, we find that the increase in BKα subunit level is selective for ANCL and not a general feature of neurodegenerative conditions. While reduced levels of CSPα are found in some postmortem cortex specimens from Alzheimer’s disease patients, we find no concomitant increase in BKα subunit expression in Alzheimer’s specimens. Both CSPα monomer and oligomer expression are reduced in synaptosomes prepared from ANCL cortex compared with control. In a cultured neuronal cell model, CSPα oligomers are short lived. The results of this study indicate that the Leu116∆ mutation leads to elevated BKα subunit levels in human cortex and extend our initial work in rodent models demonstrating the modulation of BKα subunit levels by the same CSPα mutation. While the precise sequence of pathogenic events still remains to be elucidated, our findings suggest that dysregulation of BK channels may contribute to neurodegeneration in ANCL. PMID:25905915

  1. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children.

    PubMed

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness.A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression.HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05).Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern. PMID:27583886

  2. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children

    PubMed Central

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness. A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression. HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern. PMID:27583886

  3. Purinergically induced membrane fluidization in ciliary cells: characterization and control by calcium and membrane potential.

    PubMed Central

    Alfahel, E; Korngreen, A; Parola, A H; Priel, Z

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of membrane dynamics in transmembrane signal transduction, we studied changes in membrane fluidity in mucociliary tissues from frog palate and esophagus epithelia stimulated by extracellular ATP. Micromolar concentrations of ATP induced strong changes in fluorescence polarization, possibly indicating membrane fluidization. This effect was dosage dependent, reaching a maximum at 10-microM ATP. It was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (or Mg2+), though it was insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels. It was inhibited by thapsigargin and by ionomycin (at low extracellular Ca2+ concentration), both of which deplete Ca2+ stores. It was inhibited by the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors quinidine, charybdotoxin, and apamine and was reduced considerably by replacement of extracellular Na+ with K+. Hyperpolarization, or depolarization, of the mucociliary membrane induced membrane fluidization. The degree of membrane fluidization depended on the degree of hyperpolarization or depolarization of the ciliary membrane potential and was considerably lower than the effect induced by extracellular ATP. These results indicate that appreciable membrane fluidization induced by extracellular ATP depends both on an increase in intracellular Ca2+, mainly from its internal stores, and on hyperpolarization of the membrane. Calcium-dependent potassium channels couple the two effects. In light of recent results on the enhancement of ciliary beat frequency, it would appear that extracellular ATP-induced changes both in ciliary beat frequency and in membrane fluidity are triggered by similar signal transduction pathways. PMID:8789123

  4. Virus-induced dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by increased levels of fibrotic extracellular matrix proteins and reduced amounts of energy-producing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nishtala, Krishnatej; Phong, Truong Q; Steil, Leif; Sauter, Martina; Salazar, Manuela G; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kroemer, Heyo K; Felix, Stephan B; Völker, Uwe; Klingel, Karin; Hammer, Elke

    2011-11-01

    The most relevant clinical phenotype resulting from chronic enteroviral myocarditis is dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Mice of the susceptible mouse strain A.BY/SnJ mimick well human DCM since they develop as a consequence of persistent infection and chronic inflammation a dilation of the heart ventricle several weeks after coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection. Therefore, this model is well suited for the analysis of changes in the heart proteome associated with DCM. Here, we present a proteomic survey of the dilated hearts based on differential fluorescence gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric centered methods in comparison to age-matched non-infected hearts. In total, 101 distinct proteins, which belong to categories immunity and defense, cell structure and associated proteins, energy metabolism and protein metabolism/modification differed in their levels in both groups. Levels of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism and electron transport chain were found to be significantly reduced in infected mice suggesting a decrease in energy production in CVB3-induced DCM. Furthermore, proteins associated with muscle contraction (MLRV, MLRc2, MYH6, MyBPC3), were present in significantly altered amounts in infected mice. A significant increase in the level of extracellular matrix proteins in the dilated hearts indicates cardiac remodeling due to fibrosis.

  5. Melatonin increases intracellular calcium in the liver, muscle, white adipose tissues and pancreas of diabetic obese rats.

    PubMed

    Agil, A; Elmahallawy, E K; Rodríguez-Ferrer, J M; Adem, A; Bastaki, S M; Al-Abbadi, I; Fino Solano, Y A; Navarro-Alarcón, M

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin, a widespread substance with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, has been found to act as an antidiabetic agent in animal models, regulating the release and action of insulin. However, the molecular bases of this antidiabetic action are unknown, limiting its application in humans. Several studies have recently shown that melatonin can modify calcium (Ca(2+)) in diabetic animals, and Ca(2+) has been reported to be involved in glucose homeostasis. The objective of the present study was to assess whether the antidiabetic effect of chronic melatonin at pharmacological doses is established via Ca(2+) regulation in different tissues in an animal model of obesity-related type 2 diabetes, using Zücker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and their lean littermates, Zücker lean (ZL) rats. After the treatments, flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine Ca(2+) levels in the liver, muscle, main types of internal white adipose tissue, subcutaneous lumbar fat, pancreas, brain, and plasma. This study reports for the first time that chronic melatonin administration (10 mg per kg body weight per day for 6 weeks) increases Ca(2+) levels in muscle, liver, different adipose tissues, and pancreas in ZDF rats, although there were no significant changes in their brain or plasma Ca(2+) levels. We propose that this additional peripheral dual action mechanism underlies the improvement in insulin sensitivity and secretion previously documented in samples from the same animals. According to these results, indoleamine may be a potential candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with obesity.

  6. Increase in membrane thickness during development compensates for eggshell thinning due to calcium uptake by the embryo in falcons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilla, Aurora M.; van Dongen, Stefan; Herrel, Anthony; Francesch, Amadeu; Martínez de Aragón, Juan; Malone, Jim; José Negro, Juan

    2010-02-01

    We compared membrane thickness of fully developed eggs with those of non-developed eggs in different endangered falcon taxa. To our knowledge, membrane thickness variation during development has never been examined before in falcons or any other wild bird. Yet, the egg membrane constitutes an important protective barrier for the developing embryo. Because eggshell thinning is a general process that occurs during bird development, caused by calcium uptake by the embryo, eggs are expected to be less protected and vulnerable to breakage near the end of development. Thus, egg membranes could play an important protective role in the later stages of development by getting relatively thicker. We used linear mixed models to explore the variation in membrane thickness ( n = 378 eggs) in relation to developmental stage, taxon, female age, mass and identity (73 females), egg-laying sequence (105 clutches) and the study zone. Our results are consistent with the prediction that egg membranes are thicker in fully developed eggs than in non-developed eggs, suggesting that the increase in membrane thickness during development may compensate for eggshell thinning. In addition, our data shown that thicker membranes are associated with larger, heavier and relatively wider eggs, as well as with eggs that had thinner eggshells. Egg-laying sequence, female age and the study zone did not explain the observed variation of membrane thickness in the falcon taxa studied. As we provide quantitative data on membrane thickness variation during development in falcons not subjected to contamination or food limitation (i.e. bred under captive conditions), our data may be used as a reference for studies on eggs from natural populations. Considering the large variation in membrane thickness and the multiple factors affecting on it and its importance in the protection of the embryo, we encourage other researchers to include measurements on membranes in studies exploring eggshell thickness variation.

  7. Increase in membrane thickness during development compensates for eggshell thinning due to calcium uptake by the embryo in falcons.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Aurora M; Van Dongen, Stefan; Herrel, Anthony; Francesch, Amadeu; Martínez de Aragón, Juan; Malone, Jim; Negro, Juan José

    2010-02-01

    We compared membrane thickness of fully developed eggs with those of non-developed eggs in different endangered falcon taxa. To our knowledge, membrane thickness variation during development has never been examined before in falcons or any other wild bird. Yet, the egg membrane constitutes an important protective barrier for the developing embryo. Because eggshell thinning is a general process that occurs during bird development, caused by calcium uptake by the embryo, eggs are expected to be less protected and vulnerable to breakage near the end of development. Thus, egg membranes could play an important protective role in the later stages of development by getting relatively thicker. We used linear mixed models to explore the variation in membrane thickness (n = 378 eggs) in relation to developmental stage, taxon, female age, mass and identity (73 females), egg-laying sequence (105 clutches) and the study zone. Our results are consistent with the prediction that egg membranes are thicker in fully developed eggs than in non-developed eggs, suggesting that the increase in membrane thickness during development may compensate for eggshell thinning. In addition, our data shown that thicker membranes are associated with larger, heavier and relatively wider eggs, as well as with eggs that had thinner eggshells. Egg-laying sequence, female age and the study zone did not explain the observed variation of membrane thickness in the falcon taxa studied. As we provide quantitative data on membrane thickness variation during development in falcons not subjected to contamination or food limitation (i.e. bred under captive conditions), our data may be used as a reference for studies on eggs from natural populations. Considering the large variation in membrane thickness and the multiple factors affecting on it and its importance in the protection of the embryo, we encourage other researchers to include measurements on membranes in studies exploring eggshell thickness variation.

  8. The effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on nicotinic receptors: Intracellular calcium increase, calpain/caspase 3 activation, and functional upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Rates, Sara; Camarasa, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    Previous work by our group demonstrated that homomeric alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) play a role in the neurotoxicity induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), as well as the binding affinity of this drug to these receptors. Here we studied the effect of MDMA on the activation of nAChR subtypes, the consequent calcium mobilization, and calpain/caspase 3 activation because prolonged Ca{sup 2+} increase could contribute to cytotoxicity. As techniques, we used fluorimetry in Fluo-4-loaded PC12 cells and electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes. MDMA produced a rapid and sustained increase in calcium without reaching the maximum effect induced by ACh. It also concentration-dependently inhibited the response induced by ACh, nicotine, and the specific alpha7 agonist PNU 282987 with IC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. Similarly, MDMA induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes transfected with human alpha7 but not with alpha4beta2 nAChR and inhibited ACh-induced currents in both receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The calcium response was inhibited by methyllycaconitine (MLA) and alpha-bungarotoxin but not by dihydro-beta-erythroidine. These results therefore indicate that MDMA acts as a partial agonist on alpha7 nAChRs and as an antagonist on the heteromeric subtypes. Subsequently, calcium-induced Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum and entry through voltage-operated calcium channels are also implicated as proved using specific antagonists. In addition, treatment with MDMA for 24 h significantly increased basal Ca{sup 2+} levels and induced an increase in alpha-spectrin breakdown products, which indicates that calpain and caspase 3 were activated. These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with MLA. Moreover, pretreatment with MDMA induced functional upregulation of calcium responses to specific agonists of both heteromeric and alpha7 nAChR. Sustained calcium entry and calpain activation could favor the

  9. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  10. Calmidazolium evokes high calcium fluctuations in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Budu, Alexandre; Gomes, Mayrim M; Melo, Pollyana M; El Chamy Maluf, Sarah; Bagnaresi, Piero; Azevedo, Mauro F; Carmona, Adriana K; Gazarini, Marcos L

    2016-03-01

    Calcium and calmodulin (CaM) are important players in eukaryote cell signaling. In the present study, by using a knockin approach, we demonstrated the expression and localization of CaM in all erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Under extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, calmidazolium (CZ), a potent CaM inhibitor, promoted a transient cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase in isolated trophozoites, indicating that CZ mobilizes intracellular sources of calcium. In the same extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions, the [Ca(2+)]cyt rise elicited by CZ treatment was ~3.5 fold higher when the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store was previously depleted ruling out the mobilization of calcium from the ER by CZ. The effects of the Ca(2+)/H(+) ionophore ionomycin (ION) and the Na(+)/H(+) ionophore monensin (MON) suggest that the [Ca(2+)]cyt-increasing effect of CZ is driven by the removal of Ca(2+) from at least one Ca(2+)-CaM-related (CaMR) protein as well as by the mobilization of Ca(2+) from intracellular acidic calcium stores. Moreover, we showed that the mitochondrion participates in the sequestration of the cytosolic Ca(2+) elicited by CZ. Finally, the modulation of membrane Ca(2+) channels by CZ and thapsigargin (THG) was demonstrated. The opened channels were blocked by the unspecific calcium channel blocker Co(2+) but not by 2-APB (capacitative calcium entry inhibitor) or nifedipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor). Taken together, the results suggested that one CaMR protein is an important modulator of calcium signaling and homeostasis during the Plasmodium intraerythrocytic cell cycle, working as a relevant intracellular Ca(2+) reservoir in the parasite.

  11. Enhanced accumulation of adipocytes in bone marrow stromal cells in the presence of increased extracellular and intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Nakamura, Kyoko; Itoh, Seigo; Iesaki, Takafumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances adipocyte accumulation in the presence of adipogenic inducers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances both proliferation and adipocyte differentiation in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppresses the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlling [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} may govern the balance of adipocyte and osteoblast development. -- Abstract: The bone marrow stroma contains osteoblasts and adipocytes that have a common precursor: the pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Local bone marrow Ca{sup 2+} levels can reach high concentrations due to bone resorption, which is one of the notable features of the bone marrow stroma. Here, we describe the effects of high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} on the accumulation of adipocytes in the bone marrow stroma. Using primary mouse BMSCs, we evaluated the level of adipocyte accumulation by measuring Oil Red O staining and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhanced the accumulation of adipocytes following treatment with both insulin and dexamethasone together but not in the absence of this treatment. This enhanced accumulation was the result of both the accelerated proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Using the fura-2 method, we also showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppressed the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation due to increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. These data suggest a new role for extracellular Ca{sup 2+} in the bone marrow stroma: increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels, which in turn enhances the accumulation of

  12. Extracellular ATP

    PubMed Central

    Chivasa, Stephen; Tomé, Daniel FA; Murphy, Alex M; Hamilton, John M; Lindsey, Keith; Carr, John P

    2009-01-01

    Living organisms acquire or synthesize high energy molecules, which they frugally conserve and use to meet their cellular metabolic demands. Therefore, it is surprising that ATP, the most accessible and commonly utilized chemical energy carrier, is actively secreted to the extracellular matrix of cells. It is now becoming clear that in plants this extracellular ATP (eATP) is not wasted, but harnessed at the cell surface to signal across the plasma membrane of the secreting cell and neighboring cells to cxontrol gene expression and influence plant development. Identification of the gene/protein networks regulated by eATP-mediated signaling should provide insight into the physiological roles of eATP in plants. By disrupting eATP-mediated signaling, we have identified pathogen defense genes as part of the eATP-regulated gene circuitry, leading us to the discovery that eATP is a negative regulator of pathogen defense in plants.1 Previously, we reported that eATP is a key signal molecule that modulates programmed cell death in plants.2 A complex picture is now emerging, in which eATP-mediated signaling cross-talks with signaling mediated by the major plant defense hormone, salicylic acid, in the regulation of pathogen defense and cell death. PMID:20009563

  13. Improving the cytoplasmic maturation of bovine oocytes matured in vitro with intracellular and/or extracellular antioxidants is not associated with increased rates of embryo development.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Frigoni, Nathália A S; Leão, Beatriz C S; Dall'Acqua, Priscila Chediek; Mingoti, Gisele Z

    2016-11-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a normal process that occurs in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. However, an increase in ROS levels during in vitro production of bovine embryos induces oxidative stress, leading to failed embryonic development. Therefore, we investigated whether supplementation of IVM medium with intracellular (cysteine and cysteamine; C + C) and/or extracellular (catalase; CAT) antioxidants improves the culture system, affects the mitochondrial membrane potential, affects the intracellular levels of ROS and glutathione (GSH) in the bovine oocytes at the end of maturation, and thereby affects the subsequent embryonic development. At the end of IVM, the metaphase II rates were unaffected by the treatments (76.7 ± 1.7% to 80.6 ± 5.2%; P > 0.05). The intracellular ROS levels, expressed in arbitrary fluorescence units, found in the oocytes treated with intracellular antioxidants (C + C and C + C + CAT groups; 1.06, averaged) were as low as those observed in immature oocytes (0 hour: 1.00 ± 0.12). Among mature oocytes, higher (P < 0.05) ROS levels were found in the control group (1.91 ± 0.10) when compared to the ROS levels found in oocytes treated with antioxidants. Intracellular GSH levels in all groups were lower (0.17 ± 0.09 to 0.51 ± 0.05; P < 0.05) than those in immature oocytes (1.00 ± 0.08), although GSH levels in the C + C group (0.51 ± 0.05) were greater (P < 0.05) than in the control, CAT, and C + C + CAT groups (0.23; averaged). The mitochondrial membrane potential in all groups was improved (1.6; averaged; P < 0.05) compared to the membrane potential observed in the immature oocytes (1.00 ± 0.05), with the exception of the C + C group (0.94 ± 0.03). There was no effect (P > 0.05) of antioxidant supplementation on embryonic development to the blastocyst stage (36.1%; averaged); however, there was an increased tendency (P = 0.0689) to obtain a higher

  14. Effect of isoproterenol on uptake of calcium-45 by pregnant human and rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, B J

    1976-05-01

    Rat and human myometria contract is response to substitution of external Na+ with Li+. This contraction was accompanied by elevation of 45Ca uptake in rat but not human uterus. The lanthanum technique failed to demonstrate elevation of cellular 45Ca in human myometrium by Li+ substitution. It also failed to demonstrate reduction of Li-elevated 45Ca uptake by isoproterenol or drugs considered to inhibit calcium influx, in rat myometrium although these drugs prevented Li-induced contraction. In human myometrium, isoproterenol increased 45Ca uptake. This probably represents increased extracellular calcium binding. Isoproterenol relaxed depolarized human myometrium provided that the external calcium had been removed for 15 minutes.

  15. Gossypol Increases Expression of the Pro-apoptotic BH3-only Protein NOXA through a Novel Mechanism Involving Phospholipase A2, Cytoplasmic Calcium, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Soderquist, Ryan S.; Danilov, Alexey V.; Eastman, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Gossypol is a putative BH3 mimetic proposed to inhibit BCL2 and BCLXL based on cell-free assays. We demonstrated previously that gossypol failed to directly inhibit BCL2 in cells or induce apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells or platelets, which require BCL2 or BCLXL, respectively, for survival. Here, we demonstrate that gossypol rapidly increased activity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), which led to an increase in cytoplasmic calcium, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and up-regulation of the BH3-only protein NOXA. Pretreatment with the PLA2 inhibitor, aristolochic acid, abrogated the increase in calcium, ER stress, and NOXA. Calcium chelation also abrogated the gossypol-induced increase in calcium, ER stress, and NOXA, but not the increase in PLA2 activity, indicating that PLA2 is upstream of these events. In addition, incubating cells with the two products of PLA2 (lysophosphatidic acid and arachidonic acid) mimicked treatment with gossypol. NOXA is a pro-apoptotic protein that functions by binding the BCL2 family proteins MCL1 and BFL1. The BCL2 inhibitor ABT-199 is currently in clinical trials for CLL. Resistance to ABT-199 can occur from up-regulation of other BCL2 family proteins, and this resistance can be mimicked by culturing CLL cells on CD154+ stroma cells. We report here that AT-101, a derivative of gossypol in clinical trials, overcomes stroma-mediated resistance to ABT-199 in primary CLL cells, suggesting that a combination of these drugs may be efficacious in the clinic. PMID:24778183

  16. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia. PMID:26994581

  17. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia.

  18. Cameleon calcium indicator reports cytoplasmic calcium dynamics in Arabidopsis guard cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. J.; Kwak, J. M.; Chu, S. P.; Llopis, J.; Tsien, R. Y.; Harper, J. F.; Schroeder, J. I.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) acts as a stimulus-induced second messenger in plant cells and multiple signal transduction pathways regulate [Ca2+]cyt in stomatal guard cells. Measuring [Ca2+]cyt in guard cells has previously required loading of calcium-sensitive dyes using invasive and technically difficult micro-injection techniques. To circumvent these problems, we have constitutively expressed the pH-independent, green fluorescent protein-based calcium indicator yellow cameleon 2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Miyawaki et al. 1999; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 2135-2140). This yellow cameleon calcium indicator was expressed in guard cells and accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Fluorescence ratio imaging of yellow cameleon 2.1 allowed time-dependent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt in Arabidopsis guard cells. Application of extracellular calcium or the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients in guard cells. [Ca2+]cyt changes could be semi-quantitatively determined following correction of the calibration procedure for chloroplast autofluorescence. Extracellular calcium induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients with peak values of up to approximately 1.5 microM, whereas ABA-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients had peak values up to approximately 0.6 microM. These values are similar to stimulus-induced [Ca2+]cyt changes previously reported in plant cells using ratiometric dyes or aequorin. In some guard cells perfused with low extracellular KCl concentrations, spontaneous calcium transients were observed. As yellow cameleon 2.1 was expressed in all guard cells, [Ca2+]cyt was measured independently in the two guard cells of single stomates for the first time. ABA-induced, calcium-induced or spontaneous [Ca2+]cyt increases were not necessarily synchronized in the two guard cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that that GFP-based cameleon calcium indicators are suitable to measure [Ca2+]cyt changes in guard cells and enable the pattern of [Ca

  19. Disruptions in the Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate by Neurons and Glia in the Rat Striatum Two Days after Diffuse Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hinzman, Jason M.; Thomas, Theresa Currier; Quintero, Jorge E.; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Disrupted regulation of extracellular glutamate in the central nervous system contributes to and can exacerbate the acute pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previously, we reported increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum of anesthetized rats 2 days after diffuse brain injury. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for increased extracellular glutamate, we used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) coupled with specific pharmacological agents targeted at in vivo neuronal and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate. After TBI, extracellular glutamate was significantly increased in the striatum by (∼90%) averaging 4.1±0.6 μM compared with sham 2.2±0.4 μM. Calcium-dependent neuronal glutamate release, investigated by local application of an N-type calcium channel blocker, was no longer a significant source of extracellular glutamate after TBI, compared with sham. In brain-injured animals, inhibition of glutamate uptake with local application of an excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor produced significantly greater increase in glutamate spillover (∼ 65%) from the synapses compared with sham. Furthermore, glutamate clearance measured by locally applying glutamate into the extracellular space revealed significant reductions in glutamate clearance parameters in brain-injured animals compared with sham. Taken together, these data indicate that disruptions in calcium-mediated glutamate release and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate contribute to increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum 2 days after diffuse brain injury. Overall, these data suggest that therapeutic strategies used to regulate glutamate release and uptake may improve excitatory circuit function and, possibly, outcomes following TBI. PMID:22233432

  20. Cell-substrate interactions during sea urchin gastrulation: migrating primary mesenchyme cells interact with and align extracellular matrix fibers that contain ECM3, a molecule with NG2-like and multiple calcium-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Hodor, P G; Illies, M R; Broadley, S; Ettensohn, C A

    2000-06-01

    The migratory primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) of the sea urchin embryo are a model experimental system for the analysis of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Although the behavior of PMCs during gastrulation has been analyzed in considerable detail, it has proven difficult to identify specific substrate molecules with which these cells interact. Here, using a new monoclonal antibody (2.5C4) generated by an in vitro immunization procedure, we show that migrating PMCs interact with a distinct class of ECM fiber. The 2.5C4-positive fibers are distributed in a vegetal (high) to animal (low) gradient on the basal surface of the ectoderm. Three observations indicate that PMC filopodia interact directly with the fibers: (1) During gastrulation, 2.5C4-positive fibers gradually become oriented in a prominent circumferential belt that corresponds precisely to the position of the subequatorial PMC ring. (2) This fiber pattern is blocked by microsurgical removal of PMCs but is restored if PMCs are reintroduced into the embryo. (3) Examination of immunostained embryo whole mounts by confocal microscopy reveals a striking association between PMC filopodial roots and foci of fiber bundling. Double-immunostaining experiments using 2.5C4 and antibodies against previously identified matrix constituents show that the protein ECM3 is a component of the fibers. We have determined the complete amino acid sequence of ECM3 and find that this large protein (3103 amino acids) consists of an N-terminal domain similar to the mammalian chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein NG2, a central region composed of five tandem repeats of a domain contained within the regulatory Ca2+-binding loop of Na+-Ca2+ exchange proteins, and a C-terminal region with no homology to known proteins. The general structure of ECM3 is similar in several respects to that of a sponge protein, MAFp4. MAFp4 is a major component of aggregation factor, an ECM complex that mediates the calcium

  1. Extracellular vesicles derived from mesenchymal stromal cells may possess increased therapeutic potential for acute kidney injury compared with conditioned medium in rodent models: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, GUANGYUAN; WANG, DANDAN; MIAO, SHUAI; ZOU, XIANGYU; LIU, GUOHUA; ZHU, YINGJIAN

    2016-01-01

    The potential involvement of the endocrine/paracrine mechanisms in the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been increasingly studied. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to systematically review the therapeutic role of MSC-conditioned medium (CM) or MSCs released by extracellular vesicles (Evs) for the treatment of AKI in rodent models. Studies were identified using PubMed and Scopus databases using a custom search strategy and eligibility criteria. Data regarding serum creatinine (SCr) concentration, CM or Evs, measurement time point, AKI model (toxic or non-toxic) and other parameters, including delivery route, animal type and animal numbers, were extracted. Pooled analysis and subgroup analysis as well as multivariable meta-regression were performed. Heterogeneity and publication bias were also investigated. A total of 13 studies were included and analyzed. Pooled analysis showed reduced SCr (0.93 [0.67, 1.20], mg/dl) in rodent models of AKI after CM/Evs therapy. The results of the subgroup analysis suggested that Evs induced an increased therapeutic effect, in the form of SCr reduction, as compared with CM (P=0.05). There were also other significant influential factors for SCr reduction including measurement time point (P=0.0004) and therapeutic time point (P<0.0001) after surgery. By contrast, parameters such as delivery route, injury type and cell type were not significant influential factors. Multivariable meta-regression analysis showed that measurement time point (P=0.041), therapeutic time point (P=0.03), Evs or CM (P=0.0003) and cell type (P<0.0001) were influential factors in the reduction of SCr. The present meta-analysis indicates that CM or Evs derived from MSCs are able to improve the impaired renal function in rodents modelling AKI. Compared with CM, Evs may produce a more marked therapeutic effect in recovery from renal failure. In addition, CM or Evs administration in early stages of AKI may result in

  2. Calcium signalling in human neutrophil cell lines is not affected by low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Golbach, Lieke A; Philippi, John G M; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-09-01

    We are increasingly exposed to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) by electrical devices and power lines, but if and how these fields interact with living cells remains a matter of debate. This study aimed to investigate the potential effect of LF EMF exposure on calcium signalling in neutrophils. In neutrophilic granulocytes, activation of G-protein coupled receptors leads to efflux of calcium from calcium stores and influx of extracellular calcium via specialised calcium channels. The cytoplasmic rise of calcium induces cytoskeleton rearrangements, modified gene expression patterns, and cell migration. If LF EMF modulates intracellular calcium signalling, this will influence cellular behaviour and may eventually lead to health problems. We found that calcium mobilisation upon chemotactic stimulation was not altered after a short 30 min or long-term LF EMF exposure in human neutrophil-like cell lines HL-60 or PLB-985. Neither of the two investigated wave forms (Immunent and 50 Hz sine wave) at three magnetic flux densities (5 μT, 300 μT, and 500 μT) altered calcium signalling in vitro. Gene-expression patterns of calcium-signalling related genes also did not show any significant changes after exposure. Furthermore, analysis of the phenotypical appearance of microvilli by scanning electron microscopy revealed no alterations induced by LF EMF exposure. The findings above indicate that exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal or Immunent LF EMF will not affect calcium signalling in neutrophils in vitro.

  3. Calcium-activated conductance in skate electroreceptors: current clamp experiments

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    When current clamped, skate electroreceptor epithelium produces large action potentials in response to stimuli that depolarize the lumenal faces of the receptor cells. With increasing stimulus strength these action potentials become prolonged. When the peak voltage exceeds about 140 mV the repolarizing phase is blocked until the end of the stimulus. Perfusion experiments show that the rising phase of the action potential results from an increase in calcium permeability in the lumenal membranes. Perfusion of the lumen with cobalt or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA blocks the action potential. Perfusion of the lumen with a solution containing 10 mM Ca and 20 mM EGTA initially slows the repolarizing process at all voltages and lowers the potential at which it is blocked. With prolonged perfusion, repolarization is blocked at all voltages. When excitability is abolished by perfusion with cobalt, or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA, no delayed rectification occurs. We suggest that repolarization during the action potential depends on an influx of calcium into the cytoplasm, and that the rate of repolarization depends on the magnitude of the inward calcium current. Increasingly large stimuli reduce the rate of repolarization by reducing the driving force for calcium, and then block repolarization by causing the lumenal membrane potential to exceed ECa. Changes in extracellular calcium affect repolarization in a manner consistent with the resulting change in ECa. PMID:190338

  4. The effect of the calcium-antagonist nitrendipine on intracellular calcium concentration in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, A.; Schomecker, G.; Breitkopf, K.; Dhein, S.; Klaus, W.

    1996-01-01

    1. Nitrendipine induces NO-release from coronary vascular endothelium presumably by activating endothelial NO-synthase. We have investigated whether this effect may be mediated by an influence on the intracellular calcium in endothelial cells. 2. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were incubated with Fura-2/AM (1 microM) for 30 min and Fura-2 fluorescence was measured at 510 nm in response to chopped excitation with both 340 and 380 nm. The ratio 340/380 nm (known to reflect changes in intracellular calcium) was calculated from these data. 3. Nitrendipine (0.1 to 100 microM) led to a significant, concentration-dependent, monophasic increase in [Ca2+]i in suspended BAEC by 11 +/- 2 nM (0.1 microM), 23 +/- 3 nM (1 microM), 34 +/- 4 nM (10 microM) and by 47 +/- 5 nM (100 microM) from a control levels of 118 +/- 10 nM. 4. This elevation of intracellular calcium was prevented by pretreatment of BAECs with gadolinium (100 microM) or by incubation with calcium free saline solution. In contrast, the application of 0.3 microM thapsigargin did not abolish the nitrendipine-induced calcium signal. In additional experiments it was shown that the nitrendipine-induced NO-release (as measured with the oxy-haemoglobin-method could also be inhibited by gadolinium and was absent in calcium-free solution. 5. Thus, nitrendipine elevates intracellular calcium in suspended BAECs in a concentration-dependent manner. This elevation is mainly due to a gadolinium-sensitive calcium influx from the extracellular space rather than a calcium release from intracellular stores. Images Figure 5 PMID:8864521

  5. Copper-Induced Membrane Depolarizations Involve the Induction of Mosaic TRP Channels, Which Activate VDCC Leading to Calcium Increases in Ulva compressa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Melissa; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A.; Moenne, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The marine macroalga Ulva compressa (Chlorophyceae) is a cosmopolitan species, tolerant to heavy metals, in particular to copper. U. compressa was cultivated with 10 μM copper for 12 h and membrane depolarization events were detected. First, seven depolarization events occurred at 4, 8, 12–13, 80, and 86 min, and at 5 and 9 h of copper exposure. Second, bathocuproine sulphonate, a specific copper-chelating compound, was added before incorporating copper to the culture medium. Copper-induced depolarizations were inhibited by bathocuproine at 4, 8, 12–13, 80, and 86 min, but not at 5 and 9 h, indicating that initial events are due to copper ions entry. Third, specific inhibitors of human TRPA1, C4, C5, M8, and V1corresponding to HC030031, ML204, SKF96363, M8B, and capsazepin, respectively, were used to analyze whether copper-induced depolarizations were due to activation of transient receptor potentials (TRPs). Inhibitor effects indicate that the seven depolarizations involved the activation of functional mosaic TRPs that displayed properties similar to human TRPA, C, M, and/or V. Finally, inhibition of copper-induced depolarizations using specific TRP inhibitors suppressed calcium increases at 2, 3, and 12 h due to activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs). Thus, copper induces seven depolarization events that involve activation of mosaic TRPs which, in turn, activates VDCC leading to calcium increases at 2, 3, and 12 h in U. compressa. PMID:27379106

  6. Extracellular Histone Released from Leukemic Cells Increases Their Adhesion to Endothelium and Protects them from Spontaneous and Chemotherapy-Induced Leukemic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Gu, JaYoon; Koh, Youngil; Kim, Inho; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction When leukocytes are stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), they release nuclear contents into the extracellular milieu, called by extracellular traps (ET). The nuclear contents are mainly composed of the histone–DNA complex and neutrophil elastase. This study investigated whether leukemic cells could release ET and the released histone could induce endothelial activation, eventually resulting in leukemic progression. Methods The circulating ET were measured in 80 patients with hematologic diseases and 40 healthy controls. ET formation and ROS levels were investigated during leukemic cell proliferation in vitro. Histone-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression and cell survival were measured by flow cytometry. Results Acute leukemia patients had high levels of ET, which correlated with peripheral blast count. Leukemic cells produced high ROS levels and released extracellular histone, which was significantly blocked by antioxidants. Histone significantly induced 3 endothelial adhesion molecules expression, and promoted leukemic cell adhesion to endothelial cells, which was inhibited by histone inhibitors (heparin, polysialic acid, and activated protein C), neutralizing antibodies against these adhesion molecules, and a Toll like receptor(TLR)9 antagonist. When leukemic cells were co-cultured with endothelial cells, adherent leukemic cells showed better survival than the non-adherent ones, demonstrating that histone-treated endothelial cells protected leukemic cells from both spontaneous and chemotherapy-induced death. Conclusion Our data demonstrate for the first time that extracellular histone can be released from leukemic cells through a ROS-dependent mechanism. The released histone promotes leukemic cell adhesion by inducting the surface expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and eventually protects leukemic cells from cell death. PMID:27706246

  7. Dietary protein-induced increases in urinary calcium are accompanied by similar increases in urinary nitrogen and urinary urea: a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bihuniak, Jessica D; Simpson, Christine A; Sullivan, Rebecca R; Caseria, Donna M; Kerstetter, Jane E; Insogna, Karl L

    2013-03-01

    To determine the usefulness of urinary urea as an index of dietary protein intake, 10 postmenopausal women were enrolled in and completed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over feeding trial from September 2008 to May 2010 that compared 10 days of a 45-g whey supplement with 10 days of a 45-g maltodextrin control. Urinary nitrogen, urinary calcium, urinary urea, and bone turnover markers were measured at days 0, 7, and 10. Paired sample t tests, Pearson's correlation statistic, and simple linear regression were used to assess differences between treatments and associations among urinary metabolites. Urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine rose from 12.3±1.7 g/g (99.6±13.8 mmol/mmol) to 16.8±2.2 g/g (135.5±17.8 mmol/mmol) with whey supplementation, but did not change with maltodextrin. Whey supplementation caused urinary calcium to rise by 4.76±1.84 mg (1.19±0.46 mmol) without a change in bone turnover markers. Because our goal was to estimate protein intake from urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine, we used our data to develop the following equation: protein intake (g/day)=71.221+1.719×(urinary nitrogen, g)/creatinine, g) (R=0.46, R(2)=0.21). As a more rapid and less costly alternative to urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine, we next determined whether urinary urea could predict protein intake and found that protein intake (g/day)=63.844+1.11×(urinary urea, g/creatinine, g) (R=0.58, R(2)=0.34). These data indicate that urinary urea/urinary creatinine is at least as good a marker of dietary protein intake as urinary nitrogen and is easier to quantitate in nutrition intervention trials.

  8. Plasma membrane calcium channels in cancer: Alterations and consequences for cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The study of calcium channels in molecular mechanisms of cancer transformation is still a novel area of research. Several studies, mostly conducted on cancer cell lines, however support the idea that a diversity of plasma membrane channels participates in the remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis, which regulates various cancer hallmarks such as uncontrolled multiplication and increase in migration and invasion abilities. However few is still understood concerning the intracellular signaling cascades mobilized by calcium influx participating to cancer cell behavior. This review intends to gather some of these pathways dependent on plasma membrane calcium channels and described in prostate, breast and lung cancer cell lines. In these cancer cell types, the calcium channels involved in calcium signaling pathways promoting cancer behaviors are mostly non-voltage activated calcium channels and belong to the TRP superfamily (TRPC, TPRPV and TRPM families) and the Orai family. TRP and Orai channels are part of many signaling cascades involving the activation of transmembrane receptors by extracellular ligand from the tumor environment. TRPV can sense changes in the physical and chemical environment of cancer cells and TRPM7 are stretch activated and sensitive to cholesterol. Changes in activation and or expression of plasma-membrane calcium channels affect calcium-dependent signaling processes relevant to tumorigenesis. The studies cited in this review suggest that an increase in plasma membrane calcium channel expression and/or activity sustain an elevated calcium entry (constitutive or under the control of extracellular signals) promoting higher cell proliferation and migration in most cases. A variety of non-voltage-operated calcium channels display change expression and/or activity in a same cancer type and cooperate to the same process relevant to cancer cell behavior, or can be involved in a different sequence of events during the tumorigenesis. This article is part of a

  9. A disulfide bridge in the calcium binding site of a polyester hydrolase increases its thermal stability and activity against polyethylene terephthalate.

    PubMed

    Then, Johannes; Wei, Ren; Oeser, Thorsten; Gerdts, André; Schmidt, Juliane; Barth, Markus; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Elevated reaction temperatures are crucial for the efficient enzymatic degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). A disulfide bridge was introduced to the polyester hydrolase TfCut2 to substitute its calcium binding site. The melting point of the resulting variant increased to 94.7 °C (wild-type TfCut2: 69.8 °C) and its half-inactivation temperature to 84.6 °C (TfCut2: 67.3 °C). The variant D204C-E253C-D174R obtained by introducing further mutations at vicinal residues showed a temperature optimum between 75 and 80 °C compared to 65 and 70 °C of the wild-type enzyme. The variant caused a weight loss of PET films of 25.0 ± 0.8% (TfCut2: 0.3 ± 0.1%) at 70 °C after a reaction time of 48 h. The results demonstrate that a highly efficient and calcium-independent thermostable polyester hydrolase can be obtained by replacing its calcium binding site with a disulfide bridge. PMID:27419048

  10. Is vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7) associated with an increased incidence of hip fracture? An explanation for the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Nobuo; Kitamura, Kei-Ichiro; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Itomura, Miho; Hamazaki, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    High calcium intake may increase hip fracture (HF) incidence. This phenomenon, known as the calcium paradox, might be explained by vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7, VA), the highly specific trans fatty acid (TFA) present in dairy products. First, we ecologically investigated the relationship between 18:1 TFA intake and HF incidence using data from 12 to 13 European countries collected before 2000; then we measured the effects of VA and elaidic acid (18:1t n-9, EA) on osteoblasts from goldfish scales (tissues very similar to mammalian bone), with alkaline phosphatase as a marker; and finally we measured the effect of VA on mRNA expression in the scales for the major bone proteins type I collagen and osteocalcin. HF incidence was significantly correlated with 18:1 TFA intake in men (r=0.57) and women (r=0.65). Incubation with 1μmol/L VA and EA for 48h significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase activity by 25% and 21%, respectively. Incubation of scales with 10μmol/L VA for 48h significantly decreased mRNA expression for type I collagen and osteocalcin (by about 50%). In conclusion, VA may be causatively related to HF and could explain the calcium paradox. It may be prudent to reduce 18:1 TFA intake, irrespective of trans positions, to prevent HF.

  11. Is vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7) associated with an increased incidence of hip fracture? An explanation for the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Nobuo; Kitamura, Kei-Ichiro; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Itomura, Miho; Hamazaki, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    High calcium intake may increase hip fracture (HF) incidence. This phenomenon, known as the calcium paradox, might be explained by vaccenic acid (18:1t n-7, VA), the highly specific trans fatty acid (TFA) present in dairy products. First, we ecologically investigated the relationship between 18:1 TFA intake and HF incidence using data from 12 to 13 European countries collected before 2000; then we measured the effects of VA and elaidic acid (18:1t n-9, EA) on osteoblasts from goldfish scales (tissues very similar to mammalian bone), with alkaline phosphatase as a marker; and finally we measured the effect of VA on mRNA expression in the scales for the major bone proteins type I collagen and osteocalcin. HF incidence was significantly correlated with 18:1 TFA intake in men (r=0.57) and women (r=0.65). Incubation with 1μmol/L VA and EA for 48h significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase activity by 25% and 21%, respectively. Incubation of scales with 10μmol/L VA for 48h significantly decreased mRNA expression for type I collagen and osteocalcin (by about 50%). In conclusion, VA may be causatively related to HF and could explain the calcium paradox. It may be prudent to reduce 18:1 TFA intake, irrespective of trans positions, to prevent HF. PMID:27269708

  12. The cellular transport of calcium in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Wallach, S; Reizenstein, D L; Bellavia, J V

    1966-03-01

    The bidirectional transport of calcium in rat liver was studied using slices labeled with Ca(47) in a closed two compartment system. Steady-state conditions were observed with influx and efflux transfer coefficients of 0.070 and 0.018 per minute, respectively. The rapidly exchanging cell fraction of calcium existed at a concentration three times higher than the average cell concentration of calcium and occupied cell loci comprising less than 25% of the cell mass, suggesting that calcium associated with the cell membranes, nuclei, and mitochondria participated in the rapidly exchanging fraction. At pH 7.4 and 377deg;C, the influx transfer coefficient was 25% above the steady-state condition and accumulation of calcium by the slices occurred. Studies of the effects of varied physical and chemical conditions revealed that the influx transfer coefficient was increased by elevated pH, strontium, certain metabolic inhibitors, and 2 mM concentrations of cyclic adenosinemonophosphate and adenosinetriphosphate. The influx transfer coefficient was decreased by reduced temperature, decreased pH, magnesium, and 10 mM adenosinetriphosphate. The efflux transfer coefficient was increased by elevated pH, strontium, iodoacetate, and adenosinetriphosphate, and was decreased by reduced temperature and by N-ethylmaleimide. These data support the thesis that cell transport of calcium is accomplished by the attachment of calcium atoms to the cell surface and transport through the plasma membrane bound to either specific carriers or to membrane constituents. Conditions which change the affinities, capacities, and mobilities of plasma membrane ligands that bind calcium or cause extracellular chelation of calcium are capable of altering the rate of calcium transport.

  13. By Releasing ADP, Acanthamoeba castellanii Causes an Increase in the Cytosolic Free Calcium Concentration and Apoptosis in Wish Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, A.; Tozzi, M. G.; Costa, M.; Delogu, G.; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by soluble molecules that may participate in acanthamoebal cytopathogenicity has yet to be fully characterized. We demonstrate here that Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites constitutively release ADP in the medium. Cell-free supernatants prepared from A. castellanii, by interaction with specific P2y2 purinoceptors expressed on the Wish cell membrane, caused a biphasic rise in [Ca2+]i, extensive cell membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal disorganization, and the breakdown of nuclei. Cell damage induced by amoebic supernatants was blocked by the P2y2 inhibitor Suramin. The same results were found in Wish cells exposed to purified ADP. These findings suggest that pathogenic free-living A. castellanii may have a cytopathic effect on human epithelial cells through ADP release, by a process that begins with a rise of cytosolic free-calcium concentration, and culminates in apoptosis. PMID:11349088

  14. Extracellular UDP and P2Y6 function as a danger signal to protect mice from vesicular stomatitis virus infection through an increase in IFN-β production.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruimei; Tan, Binghe; Yan, Yan; Ma, Xiaobin; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Zhi; Liu, Mingyao; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides that constitute a "danger signal" play an important role in the regulation of immune responses. However, the function and mechanism of extracellular UDP and P2Y6 in antiviral immunity remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo protection of UDP/P2Y6 signaling in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection. First, we demonstrated that VSV-infected cells secrete UDP from the cytoplasm as a danger signal to arouse surrounding cells. Meanwhile, expression of the UDP-specific receptor P2Y6 also was enhanced by VSV. Consequently, UDP protects RAW 264.7 cells, murine embryonic fibroblasts, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and L929 cells from VSV and GFP lentivirus infection. This protection can be blocked by the P2Y6 selective antagonist MRS2578 or IFN-α/β receptor-blocking Ab. VSV-induced cell death and virus replication were both enhanced significantly by knocking down and knocking out P2Y6 in different cells. Mechanistically, UDP facilitates IFN-β secretion through the p38/JNK- and ATF-2/c-Jun-signaling pathways, which are crucial in promoting antiviral immunity. Interestingly, UDP was released through a caspase-cleaved pannexin-1 channel in VSV-induced apoptotic cells and protected cells from infection through P2Y6 receptor in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Furthermore, UDP also protected mice from VSV infection through P2Y6 receptors in an acute neurotropic infection mouse model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the important role of extracellular UDP and P2Y6 as a danger signal in antiviral immune responses and suggest a potential therapeutic role for UDP/P2Y6 in preventing and controlling viral diseases.

  15. Reduced Expression of the Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Is Associated with Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) to Promote Vascular Remodeling in the Pathogenesis of Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, La-mei; Tang, Na; Zhong, Hua; Liu, Yong-min; Li, Zhen; Feng, Qian; He, Fang

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), remodeling of the vasculature, and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play important roles in the development of essential hypertension (EH), which is defined as high blood pressure (BP) in which secondary causes, such as renovascular disease, are absent. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is involved in the regulation of BP. However, the underlying mechanisms by which the CaSR regulates BP are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of the CaSR in EH was investigated using male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and rat and human plasma samples. The percentages of medial wall thickness to external diameter (WT%), total vessel wall cross-sectional area to the total area (WA%) of thoracic arteries, as well as the percentage of wall area occupied by collagen to total vessel wall area (CA%) were determined. Tissue protein expression and plasma concentrations of the CaSR, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), renin, and angiotensin II (Ang II) were additionally assessed. WT%, WA%, and CA% were found to increase with increasing BP, whereas the plasma concentration of CaSR was found to decrease. With increasing BP, the levels of smooth muscle actin and calponin decreased, whereas those of osteopontin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen increased. The CaSR level negatively correlated with the levels of cAMP and Ang II, but positively correlated with those of renin. Our data suggest that reduced expression of the CaSR is correlated with activation of the RAS, which induces increased vascular remodeling and VSMC proliferation, and thereby associated with EH in the SHR model and in the Han Chinese population. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of EH. PMID:27391973

  16. [Chronic kidney disease and cellular calcium homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Lajdová, I; Okša, A; Spustová, A; Dzúrik, R

    2012-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium represents a critical signaling mediator in a number of biological systems. Calcium cations (Ca2+) are an important ubiquitous messenger, controlling a broad range of cellular processes. Free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is controlled by mechanisms that regulate Ca2+ entry from the extracellular space and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, and by the activity of ATP-dependent Ca2+ pumps and antiporters that move Ca2+ back into stores or out of cells. Chronic kidney disease is associated with a significant elevation in [Ca2+]i which is toxic to the cells and may be responsible for a multiple organ dysfunction. Disturbances in cellular calcium homeostasis in patients with chronic kidney disease represent a complex process. Our studies elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms of altered cellular calcium homeostasis in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells which represent the model of nonexcitable cells in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results demonstrate that [Ca2+]i is significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells already in early stages of chronic kidney disease. The calcium concentration of intracellular stores and the capacitative calcium entry into the cells of these patients are significantly higher in comparison with healthy volunteers. Also the pore-forming P2X7 receptors participate in increased [Ca2+]i in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with chronic kidney disease. An altered P2X7 receptor function and increased P2X7 receptor expression may contribute to the complex disturbances in intracellular calcium homeostasis in chronic kidney disease. On the other hand, the activity of plasmatic membrane Ca2+-ATPases which is responsible for removing excessive calcium out of the cell, was found to be decreased by 25 % when compared to healthy subjects. It means that not only the mechanisms of entry, but also of the removal are impaired by the disease. All these alterations in

  17. Artemisinin Induces Calcium-Dependent Protein Secretion in the Protozoan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nagamune, Kisaburo; Beatty, Wandy L.; Sibley, L. David

    2007-01-01

    Intracellular calcium controls several crucial cellular events in apicomplexan parasites, including protein secretion, motility, and invasion into and egress from host cells. The plant compound thapsigargin inhibits the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), resulting in elevated calcium and induction of protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. Artemisinins are natural products that show potent and selective activity against parasites, making them useful for the treatment of malaria. While the mechanism of action is uncertain, previous studies have suggested that artemisinin may inhibit SERCA, thus disrupting calcium homeostasis. We cloned the single-copy gene encoding SERCA in T. gondii (TgSERCA) and demonstrate that the protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum in the parasite. In extracellular parasites, TgSERCA partially relocalized to the apical pole, a highly active site for regulated secretion of micronemes. TgSERCA complemented a calcium ATPase-defective yeast mutant, and this activity was inhibited by either thapsigargin or artemisinin. Treatment of T. gondii with artemisinin triggered calcium-dependent secretion of microneme proteins, similar to the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin. Artemisinin treatment also altered intracellular calcium in parasites by increasing the periodicity of calcium oscillations and inducing recurrent, strong calcium spikes, as imaged using Fluo-4 labeling. Collectively, these results demonstrate that artemisinin perturbs calcium homeostasis in T. gondii, supporting the idea that Ca2+-ATPases are potential drug targets in parasites. PMID:17766463

  18. Calcium-dependent proteasome activation is required for axonal neurofilament degradation.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Youn; Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Suh, Duk Joon; Park, Hwan Tae

    2013-12-25

    Even though many studies have identified roles of proteasomes in axonal degeneration, the molecular mechanisms by which axonal injury regulates proteasome activity are still unclear. In the present study, we found evidence indicating that extracellular calcium influx is an upstream regulator of proteasome activity during axonal degeneration in injured peripheral nerves. In degenerating axons, the increase in proteasome activity and the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins were significantly suppressed by extracellular calcium chelation. In addition, electron microscopic findings revealed selective inhibition of neurofilament degradation, but not microtubule depolymerization or mitochondrial swelling, by the inhibition of calpain and proteasomes. Taken together, our findings suggest that calcium increase and subsequent proteasome activation are an essential initiator of neurofilament degradation in Wallerian degeneration.

  19. Transient Increased Calcium and Calcitriol Requirements After Discontinuation of Human Synthetic Parathyroid Hormone 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gafni, Rachel I; Guthrie, Lori C; Kelly, Marilyn H; Brillante, Beth A; Christie, C Michele; Reynolds, James C; Yovetich, Nancy A; James, Robert; Collins, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic human PTH 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism maintains eucalcemia and converts quiescent bone to high-turnover bone. However, the skeletal and metabolic effects of drug discontinuation have not been reported. Nine subjects with hypoparathyroidism received subcutaneous injections of hPTH 1-34 two to three times daily for 19.8 to 61.3 months and then transitioned back to calcium and calcitriol. Biochemistries and bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were assessed at baseline, while on treatment, and at follow-up 3 to 12 months after drug discontinuation. Two subjects developed hypocalcemia when hPTH 1-34 was abruptly discontinued. Thus, to avoid hypocalcemia, subjects were slowly weaned from hPTH 1-34 over several weeks. When hPTH 1-34 was stopped, subjects were requiring two to three times pretreatment doses of calcitriol and calcium to maintain blood calcium levels. Doses were gradually reduced over many weeks until calcium levels were stable on doses similar to baseline. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP), N-telopeptide (NTX), and osteocalcin (OC) increased significantly with hPTH 1-34; at follow-up, BSAP and NTX had returned to baseline while OC was still slightly elevated. During treatment, BMD was unchanged at the hip and lateral spine but declined at the anterior-posterior (AP) spine, radius, and total body. During weaning, BMD increased, with the hip and lateral spine exceeding pre-hPTH 1-34 values and the whole body returning to baseline. AP spine was increased non-significantly compared to baseline at follow-up. hPTH 1-34 must be gradually weaned in hypoparathyroid patients with high doses of oral medications given to avoid hypocalcemia. The transient increased requirements accompanied by increased BMD after long-term hPTH 1-34 therapy suggest a reversal of the expanded remodeling space favoring bone formation as the skeleton returns to a low-turnover state, reminiscent of the hungry

  20. Effect of ethionine on hepatic mitochondrial and microsomal calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Zinermon, W.D.; Latoni, L.

    1988-02-01

    Ethionine, an ethyl analog of methionine, produces a variety of physiological and pathological effects in animals. These range from acute effects in the liver, kidney, pancreas, and other organs to liver carcinogenesis. Female rats when injected with ethionine exhibit a rapid decrease in hepatic adenosine triphosphate levels followed by a marked inhibition of RNA and protein synthesis and accumulation of triglycerides. Since calcium transport in mitochondria and microsomes is ATP dependent, it becomes interesting to find out if ethionine administration has any effect on subcellular calcium transport. Calcium has recently gained an increased controversy regarding its role in chemical induced lethal cell damage. Certain groups believe that influx of extracellular calcium across the damaged plasma membrane might actually mediate the irreversible damage to the cell, whereas according to other, entry of calcium into the cell is secondary to the damage. The present study was carried out to investigate the calcium (/sup 45/Ca) transport in mitochondria and microsomes following ethionine administration. The effect of carbon tetrachloride on calcium uptake in ethionine treated rats was also studied.

  1. Urbanization of black South African women may increase risk of low bone mass due to low vitamin D status, low calcium intake, and high bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Marlena C; Kruger, Iolanthé M; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Kruger, Annamarie

    2011-10-01

    Globally, rural to urban migration is accompanied by changes in dietary patterns and lifestyle that have serious health implications, including development of low bone mass. We hypothesized that serum 25 (OH) vitamin D3 (25[OH]D3) levels will be lower, bone turnover higher, and nutrition inadequate in urban postmenopausal black women, increasing risk for low bone mass. We aimed to assess the prevalence of risk factors for low bone mass in 1261 black women from rural and urban areas in the North West Province of South Africa (Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology-South Africa project). Fasting blood samples were taken; and participants were interviewed to complete questionnaires on self-reported diseases, fractures, and dietary intakes. Bone health markers were assessed in a subgroup of 658 women older than 45 years. Specific lifestyle risk factors identified were inactivity, smoking, injectable progestin contraception use, and high alcohol consumption. Dietary risk factors identified were low calcium and high animal protein, phosphorous, and sodium intakes. The 25(OH)D3 and C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) levels were significantly higher in the rural vs the urban women older than 50 years. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels increased with age in both groups. The 25(OH)D levels were inversely correlated with CTX and PTH in rural women. In urban women, PTH and CTX were correlated while dietary calcium was inversely correlated with CTX and PTH with 25(OH)D3. The combination of low dietary calcium (<230 mg/d), marginally insufficient 25(OH)D3 status, and raised PTH may result in increased bone resorption. Further research is required to assess bone health and fracture risk in black African women.

  2. Calcium Carbonate

    MedlinePlus

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  3. Calcium - urine

    MedlinePlus

    High levels of urine calcium (above 300 mg/day) may be due to: Chronic kidney disease High vitamin D levels Leaking of calcium from the kidneys into the urine, which causes calcium kidney stones Sarcoidosis Taking ...

  4. The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 106, 1976: Decreased absorption of calcium, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus by humans due to increased fiber and phosphorus consumption as wheat bread.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, J G; Faradji, B; Abadi, P; Ismail-Beigi, F

    1991-07-01

    During a 20 day period of high fiber consumption in the form of bread made partly from wheaten wholemeal, two men developed negative balances of calcium, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus due to increased fecal excretion of each element. The fecal losses correlated closely with fecal dry matter and phosphorus. Fecal dry matter, in turn, was directly proportional to fecal fiber excretion. Balances of nitrogen remained positive. Mineral elements were well-utilized by the same subjects during a 20 day period of white bread consumption.

  5. Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Breast Physiology and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonnam; Wysolmerski, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and in breast cancer cells. During lactation, activation of the CaSR in mammary epithelial cells increases calcium transport into milk and inhibits parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) secretion into milk and into the circulation. The ability to sense changes in extracellular calcium allows the lactating breast to actively participate in the regulation of systemic calcium and bone metabolism, and to coordinate calcium usage with calcium availability during milk production. Interestingly, as compared to normal breast cells, in breast cancer cells, the regulation of PTHrP secretion by the CaSR becomes rewired due to a switch in its G-protein usage such that activation of the CaSR increases instead of decreases PTHrP production. In normal cells the CaSR couples to Gαi to inhibit cAMP and PTHrP production, whereas in breast cancer cells, it couples to Gαs to stimulate cAMP and PTHrP production. Activation of the CaSR on breast cancer cells regulates breast cancer cell proliferation, death and migration, in part, by stimulating PTHrP production. In this article, we discuss the biology of the CaSR in the normal breast and in breast cancer, and review recent findings suggesting that the CaSR activates a nuclear pathway of PTHrP action that stimulates cellular proliferation and inhibits cell death, helping cancer cells adapt to elevated extracellular calcium levels. Understanding the diverse actions mediated by the CaSR may help us better understand lactation physiology, breast cancer progression and osteolytic bone metastases. PMID:27746743

  6. The protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation and increases sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 levels

    SciTech Connect

    King, Taj D.; Gandy, Johanna C.; Bijur, Gautam N. . E-mail: gautam@uab.edu

    2006-11-01

    The ubiquitously expressed protein glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is constitutively active, however its activity is markedly diminished following phosphorylation of Ser21 of GSK3{alpha} and Ser9 of GSK3{beta}. Although several kinases are known to phosphorylate Ser21/9 of GSK3, for example Akt, relatively much less is known about the mechanisms that cause the dephosphorylation of GSK3 at Ser21/9. In the present study KCl-induced plasma membrane depolarization of SH-SY5Y cells, which increases intracellular calcium concentrations caused a transient decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473, and GSK3 at Ser21/9. Overexpression of the selective protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, inhibitor-2, increased basal GSK3 phosphorylation at Ser21/9 and significantly blocked the KCl-induced dephosphorylation of GSK3{beta}, but not GSK3{alpha}. The phosphorylation of Akt was not affected by the overexpression of inhibitor-2. GSK3 activity is known to affect sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2) levels. Overexpression of inhibitor-2 or treatment of cells with the GSK3 inhibitors lithium and SB216763 increased the levels of SERCA2. These results indicate that the protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation induced by KCl and that GSK3 activity regulates SERCA2 levels.

  7. Saponarin activates AMPK in a calcium-dependent manner and suppresses gluconeogenesis and increases glucose uptake via phosphorylation of CRTC2 and HDAC5.

    PubMed

    Seo, Woo-Duck; Lee, Ji Hae; Jia, Yaoyao; Wu, Chunyan; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2015-11-15

    This study investigated the molecular mechanism of saponarin, a flavone glucoside, in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. Saponarin suppressed the rate of gluconeogenesis and increased cellular glucose uptake in HepG2 and TE671 cells by regulating AMPK. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we showed that saponarin did not directly interact with the AMPK protein. Instead, saponarin increased intracellular calcium levels and induced AMPK phosphorylation, which was diminished by co-stimulation with STO-609, an inhibitor of CAMKKβ. Transcription of hepatic gluconeogenesis genes was upregulated by nuclear translocation of CRTC2 and HDAC5, coactivators of CREB and FoxO1 transcription factors, respectively. This nuclear translocation was inhibited by increased phosphorylation of CRTC2 and HDAC5 by saponarin-induced AMPK in HepG2 cells and suppression of CREB and FoxO1 transactivation activities in cells stimulated by saponarin. The results from a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the reduced binding of CRTC2 on the PEPCK and G6Pase promoters. In TE671 cells, AMPK phosphorylated HDAC5, which suppressed nuclear penetration and upregulated GLUT4 transcription, leading to enhanced glucose uptake. Collectively, these results suggest that saponarin activates AMPK in a calcium-dependent manner, thus regulating gluconeogenesis and glucose uptake.

  8. Evidence for a GTP-dependent increase in membrane permeability for calcium in NG108-15 microsomes.

    PubMed

    Jean, T; Heppel, L A; Klee, C B

    1989-11-15

    The effect of GTP on Ca2+ uptake and release was studied in a microsomal fraction isolated from neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells. GTP did not alter the ATP-dependent initial uptake of Ca2+ but markedly enhanced the efflux of Ca2+ from microsomes. GTP-dependent Ca2+ release requires the presence of millimolar concentration of Mg2+. The effect of GTP was not mimicked by other nucleotides and was competitively blocked by the thiophosphate analogue of GTP, GTP gamma S but not by the non-hydrolyzable nucleotide GMP-PNP. Addition of an inhibiting concentration of GTP gamma S after completion of GTP-induced calcium release did not result in a re-uptake of Ca2+, showing the irreversibility of the releasing effect of GTP. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis of Ca2+-dependent GTP-induced opening of a channel responsible for vectorial transport of Ca2+ ions from one intracellular compartment to another. A model is proposed suggesting that the GTP-binding protein is a GTP-specific diacylglycerol kinase.

  9. The Evolution of the Four Subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: Ancient Roots, Increasing Complexity, and Multiple Losses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels (Cavs) are large transmembrane proteins responsible for crucial physiological processes in excitable cells. They are assisted by three auxiliary subunits that can modulate their electrical behavior. Little is known about the evolution and roles of the various subunits of Cavs in nonbilaterian animals and in nonanimal lineages. For this reason, we mapped the phyletic distribution of the four channel subunits and reconstructed their phylogeny. Although alpha subunits have deep evolutionary roots as ancient as the split between plants and opistokonths, beta subunits appeared in the last common ancestor of animals and their close-relatives choanoflagellates, gamma subunits are a bilaterian novelty and alpha2/delta subunits appeared in the lineage of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. We note that gene losses were extremely common in the evolution of Cavs, with noticeable losses in multiple clades of subfamilies and also of whole Cav families. As in vertebrates, but not protostomes, Cav channel genes duplicated in Cnidaria. We characterized by in situ hybridization the tissue distribution of alpha subunits in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a nonbilaterian animal possessing all three Cav subfamilies common to Bilateria. We find that some of the alpha subunit subtypes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. Further, all six sea anemone alpha subunit subtypes are conserved in stony corals, which separated from anemones 500 MA. This unexpected conservation together with the expression patterns strongly supports the notion that these subtypes carry unique functional roles. PMID:25146647

  10. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  11. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  12. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 22/Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular (Ca) (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ((Ca)i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: (Ca)i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular (Ca) to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in (Ca)i, suggesting that the source of the increase in (Ca)i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases (Ca)i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation.

  13. Calcium-dependent and calcium-sensitizing pathways in the mature and immature ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Clyman, Ronald I; Waleh, Nahid; Kajino, Hiroki; Roman, Christine; Mauray, Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Studies performed in sheep and baboons have shown that after birth, the normoxic muscle media of ductus arteriosus (DA) becomes profoundly hypoxic as it constricts and undergoes anatomic remodeling. We used isolated fetal lamb DA (pretreated with inhibitors of prostaglandin and nitric oxide production) to determine why the immature DA fails to remain tightly constricted during the hypoxic phase of remodeling. Under normoxic conditions, mature DA constricts to 70% of its maximal active tension (MAT). Half of its normoxic tension is due to Ca(2+) entry through calcium L-channels and store-operated calcium (SOC) channels. The other half is independent of extracellular Ca(2+) and is unaffected by inhibitors of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release (ryanodine) or reuptake [cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)]. The mature DA relaxes slightly during hypoxia (to 60% MAT) due to decreases in calcium L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibitors of Rho kinase and tyrosine kinase inhibit both Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent DA tension. Although Rho kinase activity may increase during gestation, immature DA develop lower tensions than mature DA, primarily because of differences in the way they process Ca(2+). Calcium L-channel expression increases with advancing gestation. Under normoxic conditions, differences in calcium L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry account for differences in tension between immature (60% MAT) and mature (70% MAT) DA. Under hypoxic conditions, differences in both calcium L-channel-dependent and calcium L-channel-independent Ca(2+) entry, account for differences in tension between immature (33% MAT) and mature (60% MAT) DA. Stimulation of Ca(2+) entry through reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange or CPA-induced SOC channel activity constrict the DA and eliminate differences between immature and mature DA during both hypoxia and normoxia.

  14. The effect of compressive loading magnitude on in situ chondrocyte calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Madden, Ryan M J; Han, Sang-Kuy; Herzog, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte metabolism is stimulated by deformation and is associated with structural changes in the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), suggesting that these cells are involved in maintaining tissue health and integrity. Calcium signaling is an initial step in chondrocyte mechanotransduction that has been linked to many cellular processes. Previous studies using isolated chondrocytes proposed loading magnitude as an important factor regulating this response. However, calcium signaling in the intact cartilage differs compared to isolated cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of loading magnitude on chondrocyte calcium signaling in intact cartilage. We hypothesized that the percentage of cells exhibiting at least one calcium signal increases with increasing load. Fully intact rabbit femoral condyle and patellar bone/cartilage samples were incubated in calcium-sensitive dyes and imaged continuously under compressive loads of 10-40 % strain. Calcium signaling was primarily associated with the dynamic loading phase and greatly increased beyond a threshold deformation of about 10 % nominal tissue strain. There was a trend toward more cells exhibiting calcium signaling as loading magnitude increased (p = 0.133). These results provide novel information toward identifying mechanisms underlying calcium-dependent signaling pathways related to cartilage homeostasis and possibly the onset and progression of osteoarthritis.

  15. An intercellular regenerative calcium wave in porcine coronary artery endothelial cells in primary culture

    PubMed Central

    Domenighetti, Andrea Alberto; Bény, Jean-Louis; Chabaud, Fabienne; Frieden, Maud

    1998-01-01

    A regenerative calcium wave is an increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) which extends beyond the stimulated cells without decrement of amplitude, kinetics of [Ca2+]i increase and speed of propagation. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that such a wave could be evoked by bradykinin stimulation and by scraping cultured endothelial cells from porcine coronary arteries. Calcium imaging was performed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-2. A wound or a delivery of bradykinin to two to three cells on growing clusters of ≈300 cells caused an increase in [Ca2+]i which was propagated throughout the cluster in a regenerative manner over distances up to 400 μm. This wave spread through gap junctions since it was inhibited by the cell uncoupler palmitoleic acid. The same experiments performed in confluent cultures caused a rise in [Ca2+]i which failed to propagate in a regenerative way. The wave propagation probably failed because the confluent cells were less dye coupled than the growing cells. This was confirmed by immunohistology which detected a dramatic decrease in the number of connexin 40 gap junctions in the confluent cultures. The regenerative propagation of the wave was blocked by inhibitors of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) and phospholipase C (PLC), and by suppression of extracellular calcium, but not by clamping the membrane potential with high-potassium solution. We conclude that regenerative intercellular calcium waves exist in cultured islets but not in confluent cultures of endothelial cells. An increase in [Ca2+]i is not sufficient to trigger a regenerative propagation. The PLC pathway, CICR and extracellular calcium are all necessary for a fully regenerated propagation. PMID:9782162

  16. Two distinct phases of calcium signalling under flow

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Lu, Shaoying; Zheng, Shuai; Jiang, Zonglai; Wang, Yingxiao

    2011-01-01

    Aims High shear stress (HSS) can have significant impact on angiogenesis and atherosclerosis in collateral arteries near the bifurcation and curvature regions. Here, we investigate the spatiotemporal pattern of HSS-induced intracellular calcium alteration. Methods and results Genetically encoded biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer were targeted in the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to visualize the subcellular calcium dynamics in bovine aortic endothelial cells under HSS (65 dyn/cm2). Upon HSS application, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) increased immediately and maintained a sustained high level, while the ER-stored calcium had a significant decrease only after 300 s. The perturbation of calcium influx across the plasma membrane (PM) by the removal of extracellular calcium or the blockage of membrane channels inhibited the early phase of [Ca2+]i increase upon HSS application, which was further shown to be sensitive to the magnitudes of shear stress and the integrity of cytoskeletal support. In contrast, Src, phospholipase C(PLC), and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) can regulate the late phase of HSS-induced [Ca2+]i increase via the promotion of the ER calcium efflux. Conclusion The HSS-induced [Ca2+]i increase consists of two well-co-ordinated phases with different sources and mechanisms: (i) an early phase due to the calcium influx across the PM which is dependent on the mechanical impact and cytoskeletal support and (ii) a late phase originated from the ER-calcium efflux which is regulated by the Src, PLC, and IP3R signalling pathway. Therefore, our work presented new molecular-level insights into systematic understanding of mechanotransduction in cardiovascular systems. PMID:21285296

  17. Growth control in colon epithelial cells: gadolinium enhances calcium-mediated growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K; Varani, James

    2012-12-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1-5 μM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet.

  18. Resolution of intracellular calcium metabolism in intact segments of rabbit aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, R.D.; Hai, C.M.

    1986-07-01

    A new method, based on computer-assisted kinetic analysis of /sup 45/Ca efflux data, was used to measure calcium contents and fluxes for extracellular and intracellular compartments in intact segments of rabbit aorta. After a 1-hour loading period, efflux data were collected for 8 hours using a flow-through tissue chamber. These long-term effluxes were necessary because information on intracellular calcium metabolism was concentrated in the slow components of the efflux curves while earlier components appeared to be dominated by washout of extracellular calcium. Intracellular compartments were identified as those whose calcium contents were altered by 10 microM phenylephrine. This method complements previous approaches by providing simultaneous estimates of compartmental calcium contents and fluxes without requiring the assumption of isotopic equilibrium and without recourse to standard wash techniques for removal of extracellular calcium. In normal, calcium-containing, bicarbonate-buffered physiological salt solution these compartments contained a total of approximately 300 nmol Ca/g wet aorta. Of this total, 55 nmol/g were associated with the slowest resolvable compartment whose turnover time was 170 minutes and whose exchange flux was 0.32 nmol min-1g-1. Two other intracellular compartments had turnover times of 30 minutes. One of these was phenylephrine releasable and contained 145 nmol/g; it exchanged calcium at 4.9 nmol min-1g-1. In normal physiological salt solution the plasma membrane was, surprisingly, not rate limiting for Ca efflux; and in 10 microM phenylephrine the membrane Ca flux was even greater, increasing 3.5-fold compared to control.

  19. Role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofouling of reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Kang, Seoktae; Elimelech, Menachem

    2009-06-15

    This study elucidates the mechanisms by which extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) impact permeate water flux and salt rejection during biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. RO fouling experiments were conducted with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, EPS extracted from PAO1 biofilms, and dead PAO1 cells fixed in formaldehyde. While a biofouling layer of dead bacterial cells decreases salt rejection and permeate flux by a biofilm-enhanced osmotic pressure mechanism, the EPS biofouling layer adversely impacts permeate flux by increasing the hydraulic resistance to permeate flow. During controlled fouling experiments with extracted EPS in a simulated wastewater solution, polysaccharides adsorbed on the RO membranes much more effectively than proteins (adsorption efficiencies of 61.2-88.7% and 11.6-12.4% for polysaccharides and proteins, respectively). Controlled fouling experiments with EPS in sodium chloride solutions supplemented with 0.5 mM calcium ions (total ionic strength of 15 mM) indicate that calcium increases the adsorption efficiency of polysaccharides and DNA by 2- and 3-fold, respectively. The increased adsorption of EPS onto the membrane resulted in a significant decrease in permeate water flux. Corroborating with these calcium effects, atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements demonstrated that addition of calcium ions to the feed solution results in a marked increase in the adhesion forces between a carboxylated particle probe and the EPS layer. The increase in the interfacial adhesion forces is attributed to specific EPS-calcium interactions that play a major role in biofouling of RO membranes.

  20. Role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofouling of reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Kang, Seoktae; Elimelech, Menachem

    2009-06-15

    This study elucidates the mechanisms by which extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) impact permeate water flux and salt rejection during biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. RO fouling experiments were conducted with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, EPS extracted from PAO1 biofilms, and dead PAO1 cells fixed in formaldehyde. While a biofouling layer of dead bacterial cells decreases salt rejection and permeate flux by a biofilm-enhanced osmotic pressure mechanism, the EPS biofouling layer adversely impacts permeate flux by increasing the hydraulic resistance to permeate flow. During controlled fouling experiments with extracted EPS in a simulated wastewater solution, polysaccharides adsorbed on the RO membranes much more effectively than proteins (adsorption efficiencies of 61.2-88.7% and 11.6-12.4% for polysaccharides and proteins, respectively). Controlled fouling experiments with EPS in sodium chloride solutions supplemented with 0.5 mM calcium ions (total ionic strength of 15 mM) indicate that calcium increases the adsorption efficiency of polysaccharides and DNA by 2- and 3-fold, respectively. The increased adsorption of EPS onto the membrane resulted in a significant decrease in permeate water flux. Corroborating with these calcium effects, atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements demonstrated that addition of calcium ions to the feed solution results in a marked increase in the adhesion forces between a carboxylated particle probe and the EPS layer. The increase in the interfacial adhesion forces is attributed to specific EPS-calcium interactions that play a major role in biofouling of RO membranes. PMID:19603652

  1. Antitranspirant-induced increases in leaf water potential increase tuber calcium and decrease tuber necrosis in water-stressed potato plants.

    PubMed

    Win, K; Berkowitz, G A; Henninger, M

    1991-05-01

    Experiments were undertaken with field-grown potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants to test the hypothesis that altering leaf:tuber water potential gradients within a plant subjected to low soil moisture will allow greater Ca accumulation in tubers and reverse Ca deficiency-related tuber necrosis. Antitranspirant formulations containing a wax emulsion and a spreader/sticker surfactant increased leaf water potential during a drought episode, significantly reducing the potential gradient that develops between leaf and tuber during a period of stress. Increased leaf water potential in treated plants was associated with decreased leaf Ca and increased tuber Ca. Tuber necrosis was found to be reduced in treated plants, thus increasing tuber quality.

  2. Stimulation of phosphatidic acid of calcium influx and cyclic GMP synthesis in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ohsako, S; Deguchi, T

    1981-11-10

    Phosphatidic acid added to the medium markedly elevated intracellular cyclic GMP content in cultured neuroblastoma N1E 115 cells. There was a significant elevation of cyclic GMP with 1 micrograms/ml and a maximum (70-fold) elevation with 100 micrograms/ml of phosphatidic acid. Other natural phospholipids did not increase, or increased only slightly, the cyclic GMP content in the cells. The elevation of cyclic GMP content by phosphatidic acid was absolutely dependent on extracellular calcium. Phosphatidic acid stimulated the influx of calcium into neuroblastoma cells 2- to 5-fold. The pattern of the calcium influx induced by phosphatidic acid was comparable to that of cyclic GMP elevation. The stimulation of calcium influx by phosphatidic acid was also observed in cultured heart cells, indicating that phosphatidic acid acts as a calcium ionophore or opens a specific calcium-gate in a variety of cell membranes. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with phospholipase C increased 32Pi labeling of phosphatidic acid, stimulated the influx of calcium, and elevated the cyclic GMP content in the cells. Thus exogenous as well as endogenous phosphatidic acid stimulates the translocation of calcium across cell membranes and, as a consequence, induces the synthesis of cyclic GMP in the neuroblastoma cells.

  3. Adrenomedullin increases the short-circuit current in the rat prostate: Receptors, chloride channels, the effects of cAMP and calcium ions and implications on fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Liao, S B; Cheung, K H; Cheung, M P L; Wong, P F; O, W S; Tang, F

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have investigated the effects of adrenomedullin on chloride and fluid secretion in the rat prostate. The presence of adrenomedullin (ADM) in rat prostate was confirmed using immunostaining, and the molecular species was determined using gel filtration chromatography coupled with an enzyme-linked assay for ADM. The effects of ADM on fluid secretion were studied by short-circuit current technique in a whole mount preparation of the prostate in an Ussing chamber. The results indicated that the ADM level was higher in the ventral than the dorso-lateral prostate and the major molecular species was the active peptide. ADM increased the short-circuit current through both the cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride channels in the ventral lobe, but only through the calcium-activated channels in the dorso-lateral lobe. These stimulatory effects were blocked by the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, hCGRP8-37. We conclude that ADM may regulate prostatic fluid secretion through the chloride channels, which may affect the composition of the seminal plasma bathing the spermatozoa and hence fertility.

  4. Calcium-dependent activation of Pyk2 by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Rust, Randy T; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Millhorn, David E

    2002-02-01

    The Pyk2 tyrosine kinase can be activated by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent mechanisms. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O(2)) induced a rapid and persistent tyrosine phosphorylation of Pyk2 in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Hypoxia and KCl-depolarization increased the phosphotyrosine content of Pyk2 by twofold and fourfold, respectively. Both of these effects were abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium. There was a modest activation of MAPK in parallel with the onset of Pyk2 phosphorylation. However, there was no detectable activation of either JNK or c-src, two other known downstream targets of Pyk2. Thus, exposure to hypoxia may selectively target specific subsets of Pyk2 signalling pathways. PMID:11781137

  5. Overexpression of KAI1 induces autophagy and increases MiaPaCa-2 cell survival through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chun-Yan; Yan, Jun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Li, Qing-Fang; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wang, Li-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Wang, Hua

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} We first investigate the effects of KAI1 on autophagy in MiaPaCa-2 cells. {yields} Our findings demonstrate that KAI1 induces autophagy, which in turn inhibits KAI1-induced apoptosis. {yields} This study also supplies a possible novel therapeutic method for the treatment of pancreatic cancer using autophagy inhibitors. -- Abstract: KAI1, a metastasis-suppressor gene belonging to the tetraspanin family, is known to inhibit cancer metastasis without affecting the primary tumorigenicity by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathway. Recent studies have shown that hypoxic conditions of solid tumors induce high-level autophagy and KAI1 expression. However, the relationship between autophagy and KAI1 remains unclear. By using transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, we found that KAI1 can induce autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2. KAI1-induced autophagy was confirmed by the expression of autophagy-related proteins LC3 and Beclin 1. KAI1 induces autophagy through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinases rather than that of AKT. KAI1-induced autophagy protects MiaPaCa-2 cells from apoptosis and proliferation inhibition partially through the downregulation of poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caspase-3 activation.

  6. Calcium-mediated increased expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 acts through NF-κB and PGE2/EP4 receptor signaling pathways in cementoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Sousuke; Nemoto, Eiji; Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2013-10-01

    We reported previously that cementoblasts are provided with sensing mechanisms for extracellular Ca2+ and that elevated extracellular Ca2+ increases fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) gene and protein expression levels via a cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (PKA) dependent pathway. In the present study, we found that stimulation of murine cementoblasts with 10 mM CaCl2 induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) biosynthesis. NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor, significantly reduced CaCl2-induced increase in Fgf-2 gene expression, indicating that PGE2 synthesized by COX-2 may be involved in FGF-2 induction. The inhibitory effect of NS-398 was restored completely by the addition of PGE2 receptor 4 (E-prostanoid receptor 4, called EP4) agonist, but not agonists for EP1, EP2, and EP3. Furthermore, EP4 antagonist significantly reduced CaCl2-induced Fgf-2 induction, suggesting that it is mediated by EP4 activation. However, stimulation with EP4 agonist alone in the absence of CaCl2 had no effect on the Fgf-2 induction, indicating that EP4 signaling alone is not sufficient. CaCl2 also upregulated gene expression levels of Ep4 and Cox-2, as well as Fgf-2 and induction of these genes was abolished by pretreatment with BMS-345541, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, indicating that NF-κB signaling triggered by CaCl2 is indispensable for FGF-2 induction. Furthermore, CaCl2-induced Fgf-2 induction was synergistically enhanced by the addition of EP4 agonist. This indicates that the signaling triggered via CaCl2 and its combination with EP4 agonist may be useful as a novel strategy for periodontal regeneration.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of ciliary beating and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1994-01-01

    A novel system for measuring, simultaneously, ciliary beating and intracellular free calcium is presented. The advantages and dynamic nature of the system are demonstrated by measuring the effects of the calcium ionophore lonomycin and of extracellular ATP on ciliated rabbit trachea. The results are discussed with regard to the ciliary and calcium stimulation. PMID:7919010

  8. Carboxy-terminally truncated dengue virus envelope glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface and secreted extracellularly exhibit increased immunogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Men, R H; Bray, M; Lai, C J

    1991-03-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing C-terminally truncated E's that ranged in length from 9 to 99% of the N-terminal sequence were constructed. The overall antigenicity of the E products was analyzed by radioimmunoprecipitation, using dengue virus hyperimmune mouse ascitic fluid (HMAF) or an anti-E peptide serum. Truncated E that was 79% or less in length did not bind HMAF efficiently, whereas E constructs greater than 79% were able to bind HMAF with high efficiency. The first 392 amino acids of the dengue type 4 virus E sequence, including the Arg-392 following the 79% E C terminus, appeared to be critical for proper antigenic structure required for efficient binding by HMAF. Truncated E's ranging from 59 to 81% in length were secreted extracellularly, whereas smaller or larger E's were retained intracellularly. Secreted E's contained carbohydrate side chains that were resistant to endoglycosidase H digestion, suggesting that the transport of E occurs via a pathway from the rough endoplasmic reticulum through the Golgi complex. 79% E-RKG (which possessed the three additional amino acids immediately downstream of 79% E) was expressed at a high concentration on the surface of recombinant virus-infected cells presumably being inserted into the plasma membrane by a hydrophobic C-terminal membrane anchor. Evaluation in mice of the protective efficacy of the various vaccinia virus E recombinants indicated that only truncated E's that were recognized efficiently by HMAF induced a high level of resistance to dengue virus encephalitis. 79% E-RKG which is expressed at a high concentration on the surface of infected cells was highly immunogenic when tested for induction of an E antibody response. This suggests that cell surface expression of 79% E-RKG was responsible for its enhanced immunogenicity. Finally, passive immunization studies indicated that serum antibodies to E played a major role in the complete or nearly complete resistance to dengue virus challenge induced

  9. Long-term hypoxia increases calcium affinity of BK channels in ovine fetal and adult cerebral artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Mike T; Thorington, Glyne U; Wilson, Sean M; Longo, Lawrence D; Hessinger, David A

    2015-04-01

    Acclimatization to high-altitude, long-term hypoxia (LTH) reportedly alters cerebral artery contraction-relaxation responses associated with changes in K(+) channel activity. We hypothesized that to maintain oxygenation during LTH, basilar arteries (BA) in the ovine adult and near-term fetus would show increased large-conductance Ca(2+) activated potassium (BK) channel activity. We measured BK channel activity, expression, and cell surface distribution by use of patch-clamp electrophysiology, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy, respectively, in myocytes from normoxic control and LTH adult and near-term fetus BA. Electrophysiological data showed that BK channels in LTH myocytes exhibited 1) lowered Ca(2+) set points, 2) left-shifted activation voltages, and 3) longer dwell times. BK channels in LTH myocytes also appeared to be more dephosphorylated. These differences collectively make LTH BK channels more sensitive to activation. Studies using flow cytometry showed that the LTH fetus exhibited increased BK β1 subunit surface expression. In addition, in both fetal groups confocal microscopy revealed increased BK channel clustering and colocalization to myocyte lipid rafts. We conclude that increased BK channel activity in LTH BA occurred in association with increased channel affinity for Ca(2+) and left-shifted voltage activation. Increased cerebrovascular BK channel activity may be a mechanism by which LTH adult and near-term fetal sheep can acclimatize to long-term high altitude hypoxia. Our findings suggest that increasing BK channel activity in cerebral myocytes may be a therapeutic target to ameliorate the adverse effects of high altitude in adults or of intrauterine hypoxia in the fetus.

  10. Oxidative stress-induced calcium signalling in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Greene, Vilma; Cao, Hong; Schanne, Francis A X; Bartelt, Diana C

    2002-05-01

    The effects of oxidative stress on levels of calcium ion (Ca(2+)) in Aspergillus nidulans were measured using strains expressing aequorin in the cytoplasm (Aeq(cyt)) and mitochondria (Aeq(mt)). When oxidative stress was induced by exposure to 10-mM H(2)O(2), the mitochondrial calcium response (Ca(mt)(2+)) was greater than the change in cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(c)(2+)). The Ca(mt)(2+) response to H(2)O(2) was dose dependent, while the increase in [Ca(c)(2+)] did not change with increasing H(2)O(2). The increase in both [Ca(c)(2+)] and [Ca(mt)(2+)] in response to oxidative stress was enhanced by exposure of cells to Ca(2+). The presence of chelator in the external medium only partially inhibited the Ca(mt)(2+) and Ca(c)(2+) responses to oxidative stress. Reagents that alter calcium fluxes had varied effects on the Ca(mt)(2+) response to peroxide. Ruthenium red blocked the increase in [Ca(mt)(2+)], while neomycin caused an even greater increase in [Ca(mt)(2+)]. Treatment with ruthenium red and neomycin had no effect on the Ca(c)(2+) response. Bafilomycin A and oligomycin had no effect on either the mitochondrial or cytoplasmic response. Inhibitors of both voltage-regulated calcium channels and intracellular calcium release channels inhibited the Ca(2+)-dependent component of the Ca(mt)(2+) response to oxidative stress. We conclude that the more significant Ca(2+) response to oxidative stress occurs in the mitochondria and that both intracellular and extracellular calcium pools can contribute to the increases in [Ca(c)(2+)] and [Ca(mt)(2+)] induced by oxidative stress.

  11. The speed of swelling kinetics modulates cell volume regulation and calcium signaling in astrocytes: A different point of view on the role of aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Mola, Maria Grazia; Sparaneo, Angelo; Gargano, Concetta Domenica; Spray, David C; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Scemes, Eliana; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory volume decrease (RVD) is a process by which cells restore their original volume in response to swelling. In this study, we have focused on the role played by two different Aquaporins (AQPs), Aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and Aquaporin-1 (AQP1), in triggering RVD and in mediating calcium signaling in astrocytes under hypotonic stimulus. Using biophysical techniques to measure water flux through the plasma membrane of wild-type (WT) and AQP4 knockout (KO) astrocytes and of an astrocyte cell line (DI TNC1) transfected with AQP4 or AQP1, we here show that AQP-mediated fast swelling kinetics play a key role in triggering and accelerating RVD. Using calcium imaging, we show that AQP-mediated fast swelling kinetics also significantly increases the amplitude of calcium transients inhibited by Gadolinium and Ruthenium Red, two inhibitors of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels, and prevented by removing extracellular calcium. Finally, inhibition of TRPV4 or removal of extracellular calcium does not affect RVD. All together our study provides evidence that (1) AQP influenced swelling kinetics is the main trigger for RVD and in mediating calcium signaling after hypotonic stimulus together with TRPV4, and (2) calcium influx from the extracellular space and/or TRPV4 are not essential for RVD to occur in astrocytes.

  12. Evidence that cytosolic calcium increases are not sufficient to stimulate phospholipid scrambling in human T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wurth, Georjeana A; Zweifach, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Phospholipid scrambling, the disruption of normal plasma-membrane asymmetry, occurs during apoptotic and necrotic cell death and during the activation of platelets and neutrophils. It is currently believed that phospholipid scrambling is triggered simply by increases in bulk cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. We have presented evidence previously that the styryl dye FM1-43 is sensitive to phospholipid scrambling in Jurkat human leukaemic T-lymphocytes. Here we have used FM1-43, in combination with fura 2 and the Ca(2+)-elevating agents ionomycin and thapsigargin, in imaging experiments to test the idea that increases in bulk cytosolic [Ca(2+)] stimulate scrambling. Intracellular Ca(2+) increases of approximately 2 microM accompanied ionomycin-stimulated scrambling in approximately 50% of cells, and scrambling occurred in >99% of cells in which intracellular Ca(2+) rose to 4 microM. Chelating intracellular Ca(2+) with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid or EGTA suppressed both ionomycin-stimulated intra cellular Ca(2+) increases and scrambling, demonstrating that intracellular Ca(2+) increases are necessary for ionomycin-stimulated scrambling. However, elevating intracellular Ca(2+) to 2-4 microM with thapsigargin, a drug that depletes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and triggers Ca(2+) entry via Ca(2+)-release-activated Ca(2+) channels, did not trigger scrambling, as assessed with either FM1-43 or FITC-labelled annexin V. These results suggest that increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] are necessary but not sufficient to stimulate scrambling in lymphoyctes, and indicate that ionomycin has an additional effect that is required to stimulate scrambling. PMID:11879198

  13. Calcium mobilisation following shell damage in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, J K; Ramesh, K; Melzner, F; Sundh, H; Sundell, K

    2016-06-01

    Shell growth of oysters requires calcium uptake from the environment and transport to the area of shell formation. A shell regeneration assay in combination with radiolabelled calcium was used to investigate uptake and distribution of calcium to different tissues and hemolymph fractions in Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia, Ostreoida). Oysters were notched at the shell margin and subsequently sampled for hemolymph and grading of shell regeneration during a two week experimental period. Half of the oysters were additionally exposed to (45)Ca and sampled for hemolymph and tissues. Total plasma calcium concentrations increased in notched oysters compared to controls on 1, 2 and 7days after notching. A decrease in plasma calcium levels was apparent on day 4, for both total and ionic calcium. The shell regeneration assay in the notched oysters resulted in a visible deposition of CaCO3 onto the regenerate from day 7 onwards. This was coinciding with an increased uptake of total calcium on days 11 and 14 as well as free, i.e. ionic and ligand-bound calcium, on day 14. At day 1, notching also increased calcium uptake into the mantle tissues, in areas above the notch and near the hinge. During the experiment, both the total hemocyte count and the number of granulocytes increased in notched compared to control oysters. The present study suggests that induced shell damage results in a dynamic regulation of the calcium uptake from the environment and the distribution of calcium within the body, starting directly after notching. Increases in both total calcium concentrations and uptake rates coincided with the visible depositions of CaCO3 on the regenerate shell. C. gigas was found to transport calcium mainly in the ionic form in the hemolymph, with only minor parts being bound to proteins or smaller ligands. Hemolymph measurement also revealed that C. gigas is able to regulate the extracellular concentrations of calcium and potassium. The changes in plasma calcium

  14. Calcium alginate matrix increases the stability and recycling capability of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zainab; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-07-01

    Exploration of microbial pool from extremely diversified ecosystem is significantly important for various industrial applications. Bacterial communities from extreme habitats including volcanic vents, hot springs, and industrial sectors are eagerly explored for the isolation of thermophiles. Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29, isolated from blast furnace site of a steel processing industry, is capable of producing thermostable endo-β-1,4-xylanase. In the current study, this enzyme was immobilized within calcium alginate beads using entrapment technique. Amalgamation of sodium alginate (40.0 gL(-1)) and calcium chloride (0.4 M) was used for the formation of immobilized beads. It was observed that temperature (50 °C) and pH (7.0) optima of immobilized enzyme remained same, but enzyme-substrate reaction time increased from 5.0 to 30.0 min as compared to free enzyme. Diffusion limit of high molecular weight xylan (corncob) caused a decline in V max of immobilized enzyme from 4773 to 203.7 U min(-1), whereas K m value increased from 0.5074 to 0.5722 mg ml(-1) with reference to free enzyme. Immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase showed its stability even at high temperatures as compared to free enzyme and retained 18 and 9 % residual activity at 70 and 80 °C, respectively. Immobilized enzyme also exhibited sufficient recycling efficiency up to five reaction cycles which indicated that this enzyme can be a plausible candidate in paper and pulp industry. PMID:26001519

  15. Low-calcium diets increase both production and clearance of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Bunker, J.E.; Kamimura, M.; Wong, P.F. )

    1990-02-01

    Administration of large doses of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) to animals induces 1,25(OH)2D3 side-chain oxidative pathways. This study determined if the elevated plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 seen in rats fed low-Ca diets is associated not only with an increased production rate (PR) but also with an increased metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of the hormone. In vitamin D-replete rats fed a Ca-deficient diet for 3-4 wk, the PR increased 21-fold, plasma levels 15-fold, and the MCR by 37%. The increased MCR in Ca-deficient rats was associated with a 48% increase in hepatic microsomal UDP glucuronyl transferase enzyme activity, whereas 1,25(OH)2D3 catabolism by homogenates of liver and small intestinal mucosa was unchanged. In contrast to the effects of low-Ca diets, acute (7 h) pharmacological elevation of plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 to 1.5 ng/ml in normal rats did not influence the MCR. Thus chronically elevated 1,25(OH)2D3 levels are necessary to stimulate clearance. In conclusion, 1,25(OH)2D3 clearance in rats can be stimulated not only by chronic pharmacological doses of 1,25(OH)2D3 but also by the physiological stimulus of a low-Ca diet. Hence, plasma 1,25(OH)2D3 levels can be regulated by changes in both PR and MCR.

  16. The Effects of Dietary Supplements of Calcium, Vitamin D and Estrogen Hormone on Serum Levels of OPG and RANKL Cytokines and their Relationship with Increased Bone Density in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Piri, Fatemeh; Moayeri, Ardeshir; Moradipour, Ayat; Derakhshan, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Osteoprotegerin (OPG)-Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) pathway is one of the contributing factors in the regulation of osteogenesis and bone resorption routes. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of various dietary supplements on this pathway. Materials and Methods The samples for this study (24 newborn rats) were divided in three groups according to the experiment applied for each group. Rats were given special diet according to their group plan for six weeks. Blood samples were collected to measure their serum levels of OPG and RANKL and all organs of rats were used to measure their bone density too. The results were analysed using appropriate statistical analysing tests. Results Levels of whole-body bone mineral density in calcium plus vitamin D plus Estrogen (Ca + D + E) group and calcium plus vitamin D (Ca + D) group were significantly increased compared to control group. Mineral density was highest in calcium plus vitamin D plus Estrogen group and was about 0.1357 g/cm2. RANKL had a significant decrease in calcium plus vitamin D plus Estrogen group compared to control and calcium plus vitamin D groups. There was a significant increase in the mean calcium and OPG in both experimental groups rather than control. Also, significant increase in estrogen was observed in Ca + D group than the control group. Conclusion The results showed that intake of calcium and vitamin D and estrogen at determined dose led to an increase in OPG and RANKL cytokines reduction which ultimately led to an increase in bone mineral density. But Ca, D and E synergies were more effective in increasing bone mineral density compared to only the use of Ca and D. PMID:27790417

  17. The Nucleation and growth of Calcium Phosphate by Amelogenin

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Howard, Christopher J.; Larson, Jenna L.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Simmer, Jim; Paine, Michael L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2007-06-15

    The nucleation processes involved in calcium phosphate formation in tooth enamel are not well understood but are believed to involve proteins in the extracellular matrix. The ability of one enamel protein, amelogenin, to promote the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate was studied in an in vitro system involving metastable supersaturated solutions. It was found that recombinant amelogenin (rM179 and rp(H)M180) promoted the nucleation of calcium phosphate compared to solutions without protein. The amount of calcium phosphate increased with increasing supersaturation of the solutions and increasing protein concentrations up to 6.5 µg/ml. At higher protein concentrations, the amount of calcium phosphate decreased. The kinetics of nucleation were studied in situ and in real time using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and showed that the protein reduced the induction time for nucleation compared to solutions without protein. This work shows a nucleation role for amelogenin in vitro which may be promoted by the association of amelogenin into nanosphere templates, exposing charged functionality at the surface. This research was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the US-DOE. A portion of the research was performed in the EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE-OBER at PNNL.

  18. Extracellular Transglucosylase and α-Amylase of Streptococcus equinus1

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Ernest W.; Hartman, Paul A.

    1971-01-01

    Culture filtrates of Streptococcus equinus 1091 contained α-amylase and transglucosylase. The effects of calcium carbonate, age of inoculum, concentration of maltose, and duration of the fermentation on α-amylase and transglucosylase production were determined. The extracellular α-amylase was purified 48-fold and was free of transglucosylase activity. The α-amylase (amylose substrate) required Cl− for maximum activity; ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) partially inhibited activity, but CaCl2 prevented EDTA inhibition. The temperature optimum was 38 C at pH 7.0, and the pH optimum was 7.0 at 37 C in the presence of CaCl2. Predominant final products of amylose hydrolysis, in order of decreasing prevalence, were maltose, maltotriose, maltotetraose, and glucose. The α-amylase showed no evidence of multiple attack. The extracellular transglucosylase was purified 27-fold, but a small amount of α-amylase remained. Transglucosylase activity (amylose substrate) was not increased in the presence of CaCl2. The temperature optimum was 37 C at pH 6.5, and the pH optimum was 6.0 at 37 C. Carbohydrates that served as acceptors for the transglucosylase to degrade amylose were, in order of decreasing acceptor efficiency: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-sorbose, maltose, sucrose, and trehalose. The extracellular transglucosylase of S. equinus 1091 synthesized higher maltodextrins in the medium when the cells were grown in the presence of maltose. Images PMID:4995651

  19. Cytosolic calcium rises and related events in ergosterol-treated Nicotiana cells.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Parul; Chiltz, Annick; Luini, Estelle; Vandelle, Elodie; Pugin, Alain; Roblin, Gabriel

    2011-07-01

    The typical fungal membrane component ergosterol was previously shown to trigger defence responses and protect plants against pathogens. Most of the elicitors mobilize the second messenger calcium, to trigger plant defences. We checked the involvement of calcium in response to ergosterol using Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi cells expressing apoaequorin in the cytosol. First, it was verified if ergosterol was efficient in these cells inducing modifications of proton fluxes and increased expression of defence-related genes. Then, it was shown that ergosterol induced a rapid and transient biphasic increase of free [Ca²⁺](cyt) which intensity depends on ergosterol concentration in the range 0.002-10 μM. Among sterols, this calcium mobilization was specific for ergosterol and, ergosterol-induced pH and [Ca²⁺](cyt) changes were specifically desensitized after two subsequent applications of ergosterol. Specific modulators allowed elucidating some events in the signalling pathway triggered by ergosterol. The action of BAPTA, LaCl₃, nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, U73122 and ruthenium red suggested that the first phase was linked to calcium influx from external medium which subsequently triggered the second phase linked to calcium release from internal stores. The calcium influx and the [Ca²⁺](cyt) increase depended on upstream protein phosphorylation. The extracellular alkalinization and ROS production depended on calcium influx but, the ergosterol-induced MAPK activation was calcium-independent. ROS were not involved in cytosolic calcium rise as described in other models, indicating that ROS do not systematically participate in the amplification of calcium signalling. Interestingly, ergosterol-induced ROS production is not linked to cell death and ergosterol does not induce any calcium elevation in the nucleus.

  20. Smoking, calcium, calcium antagonists, and aging.

    PubMed

    Nicita-Mauro, V

    1990-01-01

    Aging is characterized, besides other changes, by a progressive increase in calcium content in the arterial wall, which is enhanced by diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, arterial hypertension, and tabagism. As to tabagism, experiments in animals have shown that nicotine can increase calcium content of the arterial wall, and clinical studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking induces peripheral vasoconstriction, with consequent increase in blood pressure levels. In order to study the role of calcium ions in the pathogenesis of the vasoconstrictive lesions caused by "acute" smoking, the author has studied the peripheral vascular effects of the calcium-channel antagonist nifedipine, a dihydropyridine derivative, and calcitonin, a hypocalcemizing hormone which possess vasoactive actions on 12 elderly regular smokers (mean age 65.8 years). The results demonstrated that both nifedipine (10 mg sublingually 20 min before smoking) and salmon calcitonin (100 MRC U/daily intramuscularly for three days) are able to prevent peripheral vasoconstriction evaluated by Doppler velocimetry, as well as the increase of blood pressure induced by smoking. On the basis of our results, the author proposes that cigarette smoking-induced vasoconstriction is a calcium-mediated process, which can be hindered by drugs with calcium antagonist action. PMID:2226675

  1. Calcium distribution in aortic smooth muscle cells of deoxycorticosterone-hypertensive rats. A quantitative cytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, P A; Yang, F

    1988-04-01

    The effect of deoxycorticosterone (DOC)-induced hypertension on the calcium content within the aorta was studied before the increase in pressure (one week) and after the pressure had reached hypertensive levels (4 weeks). The volume density of free calcium detected ultrastructurally by pyroantimonate precipitation was quantitated by stereological techniques in aortic smooth muscle cells. An increase in the volume density of electron opaque precipitate was observed in the cytoplasm at one week of DOC treatment when neither the systolic blood pressure, the thickness of the media nor volume fraction of medial smooth muscle as compared to the extracellular space was increased significantly. The total aortic calcium as measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy was not increased at one week. By 4 weeks when the rats were hypertensive, the cytoplasmic free calcium in the smooth muscle cells and the number of peripherally-located cytoplasmic vesicles with precipitate was increased significantly. Total aortic calcium was also increased significantly in the DOC-saline group but not in the DOC group drinking tap water or in the saline drinking controls. An elevation of calcium within the cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cells may precede the development of hypertension and play a role in the pathogenesis of the increased blood pressure, increased medial thickness and hypertrophy of the vascular smooth muscle cells.

  2. Oxaliplatin administration increases expression of the voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ-1 subunit in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ken; Tsuboi, Mayuko; Kambe, Toshie; Abe, Kenji; Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Utsunomiya, Iku; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-02-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various types of cancer including colorectal cancer. Acute cold hyperalgesia is a serious side effect of oxaliplatin treatment. Although the therapeutic drug pregabalin is beneficial for preventing peripheral neuropathic pain by targeting the voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ-1 (Cavα2δ-1) subunit, the effect of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity is uncertain. To analyze the contribution of the Cavα2δ-1 subunit to the development of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity, Cavα2δ-1 subunit expression in the rat spinal cord was analyzed after oxaliplatin treatment. Behavioral assessment using the acetone spray test showed that 6 mg/kg oxaliplatin-induced cold hypersensitivity 2 and 4 days later. Oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity 4 days after treatment was significantly inhibited by pregabalin (50 mg/kg, p.o.). Oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment increased the expression level of Cavα2δ-1 subunit mRNA and protein in the spinal cord 2 and 4 days after treatment. Immunohistochemistry showed that oxaliplatin increased Cavα2δ-1 subunit protein expression in superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn 2 and 4 days after treatment. These results suggest that oxaliplatin treatment increases Cavα2δ-1 subunit expression in the superficial layers of the spinal cord and may contribute to functional peripheral acute cold hypersensitivity.

  3. Obesity-associated proinflammatory cytokines increase calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) protein expression in primary human adipocytes and LS14 human adipose cell line.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Mariana; Fuentes, Cecilia; Mattar, Pamela; Tobar, Nicolas; Hugo, Eric; Ben-Jonathan, Nira; Rojas, Cecilia; Martínez, Jorge

    2010-08-15

    Obesity-associated health complications are thought to be in part due to the low-grade proinflammatory state that characterizes this disease. The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), which is expressed in human adipose cells, plays an important role in diseases involving inflammation. To assess the relevance of this protein in adipose pathophysiology, we evaluated its expression in adipocytes under obesity-related proinflammatory conditions. As in primary adipose cells, we established that LS14, a recently described human adipose cell line, expresses the CaSR. Differentiated LS14 and primary adipose cells were exposed overnight to cytokines typically involved in obesity-related inflammation (interleukin (IL)1beta, IL6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha). The cytokines increased CaSR abundance in differentiated adipocytes. We incubated LS14 cells with medium previously conditioned (CM) by adipose tissue from subjects with a wide range of body mass index (BMI). Cells exposed to CM from subjects of higher BMI underwent a greater increase in CaSR protein, likely resulting from the greater proinflammatory cytokines secreted from obese tissue. Our observations that proinflammatory factors increase CaSR levels in adipocytes, and the reported ability of CaSR to elevate cytokine levels, open new aspects in the study of obesity inflammatory state pathophysiology, providing a potential novel therapeutic prevention and treatment target.

  4. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  5. Increased Resting Intracellular Calcium Modulates NF-κB-dependent Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase Gene Expression in Dystrophic mdx Skeletal Myotubes*

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, Francisco; López, Jose R.; Henríquez, Carlos; Molinski, Tadeusz; Allen, Paul D.; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by dystrophin mutations, characterized by chronic inflammation and severe muscle wasting. Dystrophic muscles exhibit activated immune cell infiltrates, up-regulated inflammatory gene expression, and increased NF-κB activity, but the contribution of the skeletal muscle cell to this process has been unclear. The aim of this work was to study the pathways that contribute to the increased resting calcium ([Ca2+]rest) observed in mdx myotubes and its possible link with up-regulation of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory gene expression in dystrophic muscle cells. [Ca2+]rest was higher in mdx than in WT myotubes (308 ± 6 versus 113 ± 2 nm, p < 0.001). In mdx myotubes, both the inhibition of Ca2+ entry (low Ca2+ solution, Ca2+-free solution, and Gd3+) and blockade of either ryanodine receptors or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors reduced [Ca2+]rest. Basal activity of NF-κB was significantly up-regulated in mdx versus WT myotubes. There was an increased transcriptional activity and p65 nuclear localization, which could be reversed when [Ca2+]rest was reduced. Levels of mRNA for TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 were similar in WT and mdx myotubes, whereas inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased 5-fold. Reducing [Ca2+]rest using different strategies reduced iNOS gene expression presumably as a result of decreased activation of NF-κB. We propose that NF-κB, modulated by increased [Ca2+]rest, is constitutively active in mdx myotubes, and this mechanism can account for iNOS overexpression and the increase in reactive nitrogen species that promote damage in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells. PMID:22549782

  6. Increased resting intracellular calcium modulates NF-κB-dependent inducible nitric-oxide synthase gene expression in dystrophic mdx skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Altamirano, Francisco; López, Jose R; Henríquez, Carlos; Molinski, Tadeusz; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-06-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by dystrophin mutations, characterized by chronic inflammation and severe muscle wasting. Dystrophic muscles exhibit activated immune cell infiltrates, up-regulated inflammatory gene expression, and increased NF-κB activity, but the contribution of the skeletal muscle cell to this process has been unclear. The aim of this work was to study the pathways that contribute to the increased resting calcium ([Ca(2+)](rest)) observed in mdx myotubes and its possible link with up-regulation of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory gene expression in dystrophic muscle cells. [Ca(2+)](rest) was higher in mdx than in WT myotubes (308 ± 6 versus 113 ± 2 nm, p < 0.001). In mdx myotubes, both the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry (low Ca(2+) solution, Ca(2+)-free solution, and Gd(3+)) and blockade of either ryanodine receptors or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors reduced [Ca(2+)](rest). Basal activity of NF-κB was significantly up-regulated in mdx versus WT myotubes. There was an increased transcriptional activity and p65 nuclear localization, which could be reversed when [Ca(2+)](rest) was reduced. Levels of mRNA for TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 were similar in WT and mdx myotubes, whereas inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased 5-fold. Reducing [Ca(2+)](rest) using different strategies reduced iNOS gene expression presumably as a result of decreased activation of NF-κB. We propose that NF-κB, modulated by increased [Ca(2+)](rest), is constitutively active in mdx myotubes, and this mechanism can account for iNOS overexpression and the increase in reactive nitrogen species that promote damage in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells. PMID:22549782

  7. Increasing extracellular H2O2 produces a bi-phasic response in intracellular H2O2, with peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation only triggered once the cellular H2O2-buffering capacity is overwhelmed.

    PubMed

    Tomalin, Lewis Elwood; Day, Alison Michelle; Underwood, Zoe Elizabeth; Smith, Graham Robert; Dalle Pezze, Piero; Rallis, Charalampos; Patel, Waseema; Dickinson, Bryan Craig; Bähler, Jürg; Brewer, Thomas Francis; Chang, Christopher Joh-Leung; Shanley, Daryl Pierson; Veal, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species, such as H2O2, can damage cells but also promote fundamental processes, including growth, differentiation and migration. The mechanisms allowing cells to differentially respond to toxic or signaling H2O2 levels are poorly defined. Here we reveal that increasing external H2O2 produces a bi-phasic response in intracellular H2O2. Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are abundant peroxidases which protect against genome instability, ageing and cancer. We have developed a dynamic model simulating in vivo changes in Prx oxidation. Remarkably, we show that the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of Prx does not provide any significant protection against external rises in H2O2. Instead, our model and experimental data are consistent with low levels of extracellular H2O2 being efficiently buffered by other thioredoxin-dependent activities, including H2O2-reactive cysteines in the thiol-proteome. We show that when extracellular H2O2 levels overwhelm this buffering capacity, the consequent rise in intracellular H2O2 triggers hyperoxidation of Prx to thioredoxin-resistant, peroxidase-inactive form/s. Accordingly, Prx hyperoxidation signals that H2O2 defenses are breached, diverting thioredoxin to repair damage. PMID:26944189

  8. Increasing extracellular H2O2 produces a bi-phasic response in intracellular H2O2, with peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation only triggered once the cellular H2O2-buffering capacity is overwhelmed.

    PubMed

    Tomalin, Lewis Elwood; Day, Alison Michelle; Underwood, Zoe Elizabeth; Smith, Graham Robert; Dalle Pezze, Piero; Rallis, Charalampos; Patel, Waseema; Dickinson, Bryan Craig; Bähler, Jürg; Brewer, Thomas Francis; Chang, Christopher Joh-Leung; Shanley, Daryl Pierson; Veal, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species, such as H2O2, can damage cells but also promote fundamental processes, including growth, differentiation and migration. The mechanisms allowing cells to differentially respond to toxic or signaling H2O2 levels are poorly defined. Here we reveal that increasing external H2O2 produces a bi-phasic response in intracellular H2O2. Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are abundant peroxidases which protect against genome instability, ageing and cancer. We have developed a dynamic model simulating in vivo changes in Prx oxidation. Remarkably, we show that the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of Prx does not provide any significant protection against external rises in H2O2. Instead, our model and experimental data are consistent with low levels of extracellular H2O2 being efficiently buffered by other thioredoxin-dependent activities, including H2O2-reactive cysteines in the thiol-proteome. We show that when extracellular H2O2 levels overwhelm this buffering capacity, the consequent rise in intracellular H2O2 triggers hyperoxidation of Prx to thioredoxin-resistant, peroxidase-inactive form/s. Accordingly, Prx hyperoxidation signals that H2O2 defenses are breached, diverting thioredoxin to repair damage.

  9. Store-operated calcium signaling in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Regina A; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-10-01

    Calcium signals in neutrophils are initiated by a variety of cell-surface receptors, including formyl peptide and other GPCRs, FcRs, and integrins. The predominant pathway by which calcium enters immune cells is termed SOCE, whereby plasma membrane CRAC channels allow influx of extracellular calcium into the cytoplasm when intracellular ER stores are depleted. The identification of 2 key families of SOCE regulators, STIM calcium "sensors" and ORAI calcium channels, has allowed for genetic manipulation of SOCE pathways and provided valuable insight into the molecular mechanism of calcium signaling in immune cells, including neutrophils. This review focuses on our current knowledge of the molecules involved in neutrophil SOCE and how study of these molecules has further informed our understanding of the role of calcium signaling in neutrophil activation.

  10. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-11-27

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC.

  11. Calcium oxalate crystals increased enolase-1 secretion from renal tubular cells that subsequently enhanced crystal and monocyte invasion through renal interstitium

    PubMed Central

    Chiangjong, Wararat; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals cause kidney stone disease by still unclear mechanisms. The present study aimed to characterize changes in secretion of proteins from basolateral compartment of renal tubular epithelial cells after exposure to COM crystals and then correlated them with the stone pathogenesis. Polarized MDCK cells were cultivated in serum-free medium with or without 100 μg/ml COM crystals for 20 h. Secreted proteins collected from the lower chamber (basolateral compartment) were then resolved in 2-D gels and visualized by Deep Purple stain (n = 5 gels/group). Spot matching and intensity analysis revealed six protein spots with significantly altered levels in COM-treated samples. These proteins were then identified by tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS), including enolase-1, phosphoglycerate mutase-1, actinin, 14-3-3 protein epsilon, alpha-tubulin 2, and ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The increased enolase-1 level was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Functional analysis revealed that enolase-1 dramatically induced COM crystal invasion through ECM migrating chamber in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, enolase-1 bound onto U937 monocytic cell surface markedly enhanced cell migration through the ECM migrating chamber. In summary, our data indicated that the increased secretory enolase-1 induced by COM crystals played an important role in crystal invasion and inflammatory process in renal interstitium. PMID:27045290

  12. L-Type Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channel Currents of Cerebral Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells are Increased by 2-Week Hindlimb Unweighting in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Xue, Jun-Hui; Bai, Yun-Gang; Xie, Man-Jiang; Bao, Jun-Xiang; Ma, Jin

    2008-06-01

    To investigate alterations of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (CaL) in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from rats subjected to a two-week simulated weightlessness, and influence of Bay K 8644 (an agonist of CaL) to the channel currents. Tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of microgravity. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record CaL currents before and after Bay K 8644 treatment, with intracellular Ca2+ concentration maintained physiological level. The corresponding parameters such as steady state activation and inactivation curves were also recorded. Whole-cell CaL current densities increased obviously, and sensitivity of CaL to Bay K 8644 also increased in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells from suspension group. But membrane capacitance (Cm), access resistance (Ra), and other parameters of CaL such as steady state activation / inactivation curves have no significant changes compared with those of control group. These results suggest that enhanced CaL function of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells induced by simulated microgravity may be one of the electrophysiological mechanisms that mediate enhanced vasoreactivity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells during adaptation to simulated weightlessness in rats.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Regulates Epidermal Barrier Response and Desmosomal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Anna; Crumrine, Debra; Meyer, Jason M.; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ fluxes direct keratinocyte differentiation, cell-to-cell adhesion, migration, and epidermal barrier homeostasis. We previously showed that intracellular Ca2+ stores constitute a major portion of the calcium gradient especially in the stratum granulosum. Loss of the calcium gradient triggers epidermal barrier homeostatic responses. In this report, using unfixed ex vivo epidermis and human epidermal equivalents we show that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ is released in response to barrier perturbation, and that this release constitutes the major shift in epidermal Ca2+ seen after barrier perturbation. We find that ER Ca2+ release correlates with a transient increase in extracellular Ca2+. Lastly, we show that ER calcium release resulting from barrier perturbation triggers transient desmosomal remodeling, seen as an increase in extracellular space and a loss of the desmosomal intercellular midline. Topical application of thapsigargin, which inhibits the ER Ca2+ ATPase activity without compromising barrier integrity, also leads to desmosomal remodeling and loss of the midline structure. These experiments establish the ER Ca2+ store as a master regulator of the Ca2+ gradient response to epidermal barrier perturbation, and suggest that ER Ca2+ homeostasis also modulates normal desmosomal reorganization, both at rest and after acute barrier perturbation. PMID:27255610

  14. Extracellular lactate as a dynamic vasoactive signal in the rat retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Shigeki; Katsumura, Kozo; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Puro, Donald G

    2006-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that extracellular lactate regulates the function of pericyte-containing retinal microvessels. Although abluminally positioned pericytes appear to adjust capillary perfusion by contracting and relaxing, knowledge of the molecular signals that regulate the contractility of these mural cells is limited. Here, we focused on lactate because this metabolic product is in the retinal extracellular space under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In microvessels freshly isolated from the adult rat retina, we used perforated-patch pipettes to monitor ionic currents, fura-2 to measure calcium levels, and time-lapse photography to visualize changes in mural cell contractility and lumen diameter. During lactate exposure, pericyte calcium rose; these cells contracted, and lumens constricted. This contractile response appears to involve a cascade of events resulting in the inhibition of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs), the decreased of which function causes pericyte calcium to increase and contraction to be triggered. On the basis of our observation that gap junction uncouplers minimized the lactate-induced rise in pericyte calcium, we propose that the NCXs inhibited by lactate are predominately located in the endothelium. Indicative of the importance of endothelial/pericyte gap junctions, uncouplers of these junctions switched the pericyte response to lactate from contraction to relaxation. In addition, we observed that hypoxia, which closes microvascular gap junctions, also switched lactate's effect from vasocontraction to vasorelaxation. Thus the response of pericyte-containing retinal microvessels to extracellular lactate is metabolically modulated. The ability of lactate to serve as a vasoconstrictor when energy supplies are ample and a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions may be an efficient mechanism to link capillary function with local metabolic need. PMID:16299264

  15. Calcium-dependent expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Hovsepian, Anahit; Tepel, Martin; Thilo, Florian

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether extracellular calcium may regulate the expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels in patients with chronic kidney disease. Using quantitative in-cell Western assay we compared the expression of TRPC3 channel protein in monocytes from 20 patients with chronic kidney disease and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. TRPC3 channels were identified by immunoblotting using specific antibodies and TRPC3 protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. We observed a significant increase of TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease compared to healthy control subjects (normalized expression, 0.42±0.06 vs. 0.19±0.03; p<0.01). Expression of TRPC3 was significantly inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rates (Spearman r=-0.41) or serum calcium concentration (Spearman r=-0.34). During a hemodialysis session serum calcium concentrations significantly increased, whereas the expression of TRPC3 channels and calcium influx significantly decreased. In vitro studies confirmed that higher calcium concentrations but not magnesium, barium nor sodium concentrations significantly decreased TRPC3 expression in human monocytes. This study indicates that reduced extracellular calcium concentrations up-regulate TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  16. Calcium signal induced by mechanical perturbation of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Xia, S L; Ferrier, J

    1995-06-01

    Multinucleated osteoclasts from rabbit long bone, 1-6 days in culture, respond to mechanical perturbation with a transient increase of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), as measured with the fluorescent indicator fluo-3 on a confocal laser scanning microscope. In experiments with different extracellular calcium concentrations (from 11.8 mM to calcium-free), the incidence, the magnitude, and the duration of [Ca2+]i responses decreases with decreasing bathing [Ca2+]. Following mechanical perturbation, a thapsigargin-induced [Ca2+]i response has a lower magnitude than the thapsigargin-induced response without mechanical perturbation. In thapsigargin-pretreated osteoclasts the mechanical perturbation-induced rise in [Ca2+]i is larger and longer than in control cells. Ni2+ inhibits the incidence and decreases both the magnitude and the duration of the responses, while nifedipine, verapamil, and Gd3+ have no effect. These measurements show that rabbit osteoclasts transduce a mechanical perturbation of the cell membrane into a [Ca2+]i signal via both a calcium influx and an internal calcium release.

  17. Astrocytes Modulate Neural Network Activity by Ca2+-Dependent Uptake of Extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fushun; Smith, Nathan A.; Xu, Qiwu; Fujita, Takumi; Baba, Akemichi; Matsuda, Toshio; Takano, Takahiro; Bekar, Lane; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are electrically nonexcitable cells that display increases in cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) in response to various neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. However, the physiological role of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling remains controversial. We show here that astrocytic Ca2+ signaling ex vivo and in vivo stimulated the Na+,K+-ATPase (Na+- and K+-dependent adenosine triphosphatase), leading to a transient decrease in the extracellular potassium ion (K+) concentration. This in turn led to neuronal hyperpolarization and suppressed baseline excitatory synaptic activity, detected as a reduced frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents. Synaptic failures decreased in parallel, leading to an increase in synaptic fidelity. The net result was that astrocytes, through active uptake of K+, improved the signal-to-noise ratio of synaptic transmission. Active control of the extracellular K+ concentration thus provides astrocytes with a simple yet powerful mechanism to rapidly modulate network activity. PMID:22472648

  18. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  19. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay.

    PubMed

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca(2+) signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  20. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca2+ signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders. PMID:26296072

  1. Calcium and ROS: A mutual interplay.

    PubMed

    Görlach, Agnes; Bertram, Katharina; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger involved in intra- and extracellular signaling cascades and plays an essential role in cell life and death decisions. The Ca(2+) signaling network works in many different ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range due to the action of buffers, pumps and exchangers on the plasma membrane as well as in internal stores. Calcium signaling pathways interact with other cellular signaling systems such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered to be potentially detrimental byproducts of aerobic metabolism, it is now clear that ROS generated in sub-toxic levels by different intracellular systems act as signaling molecules involved in various cellular processes including growth and cell death. Increasing evidence suggests a mutual interplay between calcium and ROS signaling systems which seems to have important implications for fine tuning cellular signaling networks. However, dysfunction in either of the systems might affect the other system thus potentiating harmful effects which might contribute to the pathogenesis of various disorders.

  2. The paradoxical role of urinary macromolecules in the aggregation of calcium oxalate: a further plea to increase diuresis in stone metaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, J M; Affolter, B

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to get information on aggregation (AGN) of urinary calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx) which seems to occur in stone formation despite a protecting coat of urinary macromolecules (UMs). CaOx crystallization was directly produced in urine, control and albumin solution by Ox titration and was spectrophotometrically followed. A rapid decrease of optical density indicating AGN was absent in 14 of 15 freshly voided urines of 5 healthy controls. However, in the presence of UM-coated hydroxyapatite all urines with relative high sodium concentration, being an indicator of concentrated urine, showed a pronounced AGN which was abolished when these urines were diluted. Albumin relatively found to be an inhibitor of AGN showed after temporary adsorption on Ca Phosphate (CaP) massive self-AGN and changed to a promoter of CaOx AGN. Self-AGN after adsorption on surfaces especially of CaP, being an important compound of Randall's plaques, can thus explain this paradoxical behavior of UMs. Aggregated UMs probably bridge zones of electrostatic repulsion between UM-coated crystals with identical electrical surface charge. These zones extend by urine dilution which decreases ionic strength. Diminution of urinary concentration by increasing diuresis seems, therefore, to be important in stone metaphylaxis.

  3. The paradoxical role of urinary macromolecules in the aggregation of calcium oxalate: a further plea to increase diuresis in stone metaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, J M; Affolter, B

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to get information on aggregation (AGN) of urinary calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx) which seems to occur in stone formation despite a protecting coat of urinary macromolecules (UMs). CaOx crystallization was directly produced in urine, control and albumin solution by Ox titration and was spectrophotometrically followed. A rapid decrease of optical density indicating AGN was absent in 14 of 15 freshly voided urines of 5 healthy controls. However, in the presence of UM-coated hydroxyapatite all urines with relative high sodium concentration, being an indicator of concentrated urine, showed a pronounced AGN which was abolished when these urines were diluted. Albumin relatively found to be an inhibitor of AGN showed after temporary adsorption on Ca Phosphate (CaP) massive self-AGN and changed to a promoter of CaOx AGN. Self-AGN after adsorption on surfaces especially of CaP, being an important compound of Randall's plaques, can thus explain this paradoxical behavior of UMs. Aggregated UMs probably bridge zones of electrostatic repulsion between UM-coated crystals with identical electrical surface charge. These zones extend by urine dilution which decreases ionic strength. Diminution of urinary concentration by increasing diuresis seems, therefore, to be important in stone metaphylaxis. PMID:26920852

  4. [Calcium and health].

    PubMed

    Ortega Anta, Rosa M; Jiménez Ortega, Ana I; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-04-07

    An adequate intake of calcium is only not limited to avoid the risk of osteoporosis and its benefits in longterm bone health, but also it has been linked to protection against various major diseases, such as hypertension, cancer, kidney stones, insulin resistance, diabetes... and several investigations suggest its importance in preventing and controlling obesity. Studies conducted in Spanish representative samples show that a high percentage of adults and children (> 75%) don't achieve the recommended intake of calcium. Moreover, are growing trends among the population suggesting that calcium intake and dairy consumption (main food source of the mineral) are high, and even excessive, in many individuals. This misconception results in that the calcium intake is increasingly far from the recommended one. The maximum tolerable intake of the mineral is fixed at 2.500 mg/day, but this intake is unusual, and it's more disturbing and frequent, to find intakes below the recommended calcium intakes (1.000 and 1.200 mg/day in adults, men and women, respectively). Data from different studies highlight the risk of an inadequate calcium intake and the damages that may affect the health in a long term. It is not about transmitting indiscriminate guidelines in order to increase the intake of calcium / dairy, but the recommended intakes must be met to achieve both the nutritional and health benefits. Also activities for demystification of misconceptions are need, increasingly frequent, that may impair health population.

  5. Nicotine enhancement of dopamine release by a calcium-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy J

    2004-12-15

    A major factor underlying compulsive tobacco use is nicotine-induced modulation of dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward pathway (Wise and Rompre, 1989). An established biochemical mechanism for nicotine-enhanced dopamine release is by activating presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (Wonnacott, 1997). Prolonged application of 10(-7) to 10(-5) m nicotine to striatal synaptosomes promoted a sustained efflux of [3H]dopamine. This nicotine effect was mediated by non-alpha7 nAChRs, because it was blocked by 5 mum mecamylamine but was resistant to 100 nm alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBgTx). Dopamine release was diminished by omitting Na+ or by applying peptide calcium channel blockers, indicating that nAChRs trigger release by depolarizing the nerve terminals. However, because alpha7 receptors rapidly desensitize in the continuous presence of agonists, a repetitive stimulation protocol was used to evaluate the possible significance of desensitization. This protocol produced a transient increase in [3H]dopamine released by depolarization and a significant increase in the response to hypertonic solutions that measure the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles. The nicotine-induced increase in the size of the readily releasable pool was blocked by alphaBgTx and by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through alpha7 nAChRs specifically enhances synaptic vesicle mobilization at dopamine terminals. Thus, nicotine enhances dopamine release by two complementary actions mediated by discrete nAChR subtypes and suggest that the alpha7 nAChR-mediated pathway is tightly and specifically coupled to refilling of the RRP of vesicles in dopamine terminals.

  6. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1)*

    PubMed Central

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S.; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted. PMID:26004777

  7. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1).

    PubMed

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-07-10

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted.

  8. Lipoxin A4 Stimulates Calcium-Activated Chloride Currents and Increases Airway Surface Liquid Height in Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Mazen; Costello, Richard W.; McNally, Paul; Chiron, Raphaël; Harvey, Brian J.; Urbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterised by a deficit in epithelial Cl− secretion which in the lung leads to airway dehydration and a reduced Airway Surface Liquid (ASL) height. The endogenous lipoxin LXA4 is a member of the newly identified eicosanoids playing a key role in ending the inflammatory process. Levels of LXA4 are reported to be decreased in the airways of patients with CF. We have previously shown that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, LXA4 produced a rapid and transient increase in intracellular Ca2+. We have investigated, the effect of LXA4 on Cl− secretion and the functional consequences on ASL generation in bronchial epithelial cells obtained from CF and non-CF patient biopsies and in bronchial epithelial cell lines. We found that LXA4 stimulated a rapid intracellular Ca2+ increase in all of the different CF bronchial epithelial cells tested. In non-CF and CF bronchial epithelia, LXA4 stimulated whole-cell Cl− currents which were inhibited by NPPB (calcium-activated Cl− channel inhibitor), BAPTA-AM (chelator of intracellular Ca2+) but not by CFTRinh-172 (CFTR inhib