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Sample records for extracellular calcium increases

  1. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  2. Increased extracellular pressure stimulates tumor proliferation by a mechanosensitive calcium channel and PKC-β.

    PubMed

    Basson, Marc D; Zeng, Bixi; Downey, Christina; Sirivelu, Madhu P; Tepe, Jetze J

    2015-02-01

    Large tumors exhibit high interstitial pressure heightened by growth against the constraining stroma. Such pressures could stimulate tumor proliferation via a mechanosensitive ion channel. We studied the effects of 0-80 mmHg increased extracellular pressure for 24 h on proliferation of SW620, Caco-2, and CT-26 colon; MCF-7 breast; and MLL and PC3 prostate cancer cells, and delineated its mechanism in SW620 cells with specific inhibitors and siRNA. Finally, we compared NF-kB, phospho-IkB and cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in the high pressure centers and low pressure peripheries of human tumors. Pressure-stimulated proliferation in all cells. Pressure-driven SW620 proliferation required calcium influx via the T-type Ca(2+) channel Cav3.3, which stimulated PKC-β to invoke the IKK-IkB-NF-kB pathway to increase proliferation and S-phase fraction. The mitotic index and immunoreactivity of NF-kB, phospho-IkB, and cyclin D1 in the center of 28 large human colon, lung, and head and neck tumors exceeded that in tumor peripheries. Extracellular pressure increases [Ca(2+)]i via Cav3.3, driving a PKC-β- IKK- IkB-NF-kB pathway that stimulates cancer cell proliferation. Rapid proliferation in large stiff tumors may increase intratumoral pressure, activating this pathway to stimulate further proliferation in a feedback cycle that potentiates tumor growth. Targeting this pathway may inhibit proliferation in large unresectable tumors.

  3. Role of membrane depolarization and extracellular calcium in increased complement receptor expression during neutrophil (PMN) activation

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.; Wetzler, E.; Birx, D.L.

    1986-03-05

    During PMN activation the surface expression of receptors (R) for C3b and C3bi increases rapidly. This is necessary for optimal cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis. Following stimulation with fMLP or LTB-4, the increased expression of C3bR depends only on the Ca/sup + +/ released from intracellular stores and is not inhibited by 5mM EDTA, while the increase in C3biR also requires extracellular Ca/sup + +/. CR expression also increases when the PMN are depolarized with 140 mM K/sup +/, but with this stimulus, EDTA inhibits C3bR by 67% and C3biR 100%, suggesting that intracellular Ca/sup + +/ stores may not be released. Pertussis toxin caused dose-dependent inhibition of both CR responses to fMLP and also inhibited the increases in both CR induced by K/sup +/. Membrane depolarization (monitored by di-O-C5 fluorescence) due to fMLP was similarly inhibited by toxin but the depolarization due to K/sup +/ was not. The dose of phorbol myristate acetate that maximally increased CR expression, 0.1 ng/ml, did not depolarize the membrane. These results suggest that membrane depolarization is neither necessary nor sufficient for increased CR expression. A Ca/sup + +/ and GTP binding protein-dependent enzyme such as phospholipase C is necessary to the amplify initial signals generated either by release of Ca/sup + +/ stores or by opening voltage dependent Ca/sup + +/ channels following membrane depolarization.

  4. [Pharmacology of the extracellular calcium ion receptor].

    PubMed

    Ruat, Martial

    2003-01-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to family 3 of G-protein coupled receptors. The CaSR, expressed at the surface of the parathyroid cells, controls parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion and is the main regulator of calcium homeostasis. Its activity is regulated by small changes in the physiological concentrations of calcium and magnesium ions present in the serum and extracellular fluids, leading to the stimulation of the phospholipases C and A2. Molecules that potentiate the effect of extracellular calcium are called calcimimetics. They reduce the PTH level in vivo and have been proposed to be of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The blocking of CaSR by a calcilytic molecule results in the increase in serum PTH and might be of interest in the treatment of osteoporosis. The CaSR is also expressed in the thyroid, kidney, bone and in neuronal and glial cell populations, where it should be involved in the complex responses associated with calcium and magnesium ions present in the extracellular fluids.

  5. Elevated extracellular calcium increases expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene via a calcium channel and ERK pathway in human dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Eiji; Kanaya, Sousuke; Hamaji, Nozomu; Sato, Hisae; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2010-04-16

    Dental pulp cells, which have been shown to share phenotypical features with osteoblasts, are capable of differentiating into odontoblast-like cells and generating a dentin-like mineral structure. Elevated extracellular Ca{sup 2+}Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} has been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} signaling in odontogenesis remains unclear. We found that elevated Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} increases bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 gene expression in human dental pulp cells. The increase was modulated not only at a transcriptional level but also at a post-transcriptional level, because treatment with Ca{sup 2+} increased the stability of BMP-2 mRNA in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. A similar increase in BMP-2 mRNA level was observed in other human mesenchymal cells from oral tissue; periodontal ligament cells and gingival fibroblasts. However, the latter cells exhibited considerably lower expression of BMP-2 mRNA compared with dental pulp cells and periodontal ligament cells. The BMP-2 increase was markedly inhibited by pretreatment with an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, and partially inhibited by the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels inhibitor, nifedipine. However, pretreatment with nifedipine had no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation triggered by Ca{sup 2+}, suggesting that the Ca{sup 2+} influx from Ca{sup 2+} channels may operate independently of ERK signaling. Dental pulp cells do not express the transcript of Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptors (CaSR) and only respond slightly to other cations such as Sr{sup 2+} and spermine, suggesting that dental pulp cells respond to Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} to increase BMP-2 mRNA expression in a manner different from CaSR and rather specific for Ca{sub o}{sup 2+} among cations.

  6. Influence of extracellular calcium on allyl alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Younes, M; Pentz, R

    1986-07-01

    The role of calcium in allyl alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated in the isolated haemoglobin-free perfused rat liver. At a Ca++ concentration of 2.5 mmol/l in the perfusate, allyl alcohol (initial concentration 1.17 mmol/l) produced an enhanced release of GPT and SDH from the liver, an increase in the lactate/pyruvate ratio of the perfusate, a decrease in hepatic oxygen consumption and an increase of both hepatic calcium and malondialdehyde content. In the absence of Ca++ in the perfusate, no hepatic calcium accumulation occurred with allyl alcohol, but all other signs of hepatic damage were as severe as with 2.5 mmol/l Ca++. On the other hand, high extracellular Ca++ (5 mmol/l) alone led to a threefold increase of liver calcium but produced only marginal hepatotoxicity and only slightly enhanced the hepatotoxic effects of allyl alcohol. The concentrations of allyl alcohol in the perfusate were not altered at different Ca++ concentrations. In conclusion, the primary allyl alcohol-induced hepatotoxic injury does not appear to depend upon an influx of extracellular calcium.

  7. Another dimension to calcium signaling: a look at extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Aldebaran M

    2005-03-01

    Cell biologists know the calcium ion best as a vital intracellular second messenger that governs countless cellular functions. However, the recent identification of cell-surface detectors for extracellular Ca(2+) has prompted consideration of whether Ca(2+) also functions as a signaling molecule in the extracellular milieu. The cast of Ca(2+) sensors includes the well-characterized extracellular-Ca(2+)-sensing receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor originally isolated from the parathyroid gland. In addition, other receptors, channels and membrane proteins, such as gap junction hemichannels, metabotropic glutamate receptors, HERG K(+) channels and the receptor Notch, are all sensitive to external [Ca(2+)] fluctuations. A recently cloned Ca(2+) sensor (CAS) in Arabidopsis extends this concept to the plant kingdom. Emerging evidence indicates that [Ca(2+)] in the local microenvironment outside the cell undergoes alterations potentially sufficient to exert biological actions through these sensor proteins. The extracellular space might therefore constitute a much more dynamic Ca(2+) signaling compartment than previously appreciated.

  8. The influence of extracellular and intracellular calcium on the secretion of renin

    PubMed Central

    Atchison, Douglas K.; Beierwaltes, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in plasma, extracellular and intracellular calcium can affect renin secretion from the renal juxtaglomerular (JG) cells. Elevated intracellular calcium directly inhibits renin release from JG cells by decreasing the dominant second messenger intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) via actions on calcium-inhibitable adenylyl cyclases and calcium-activated phosphodiesterases. Increased extracellular calcium also directly inhibits renin release by stimulating the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on JG cells, resulting in parallel changes in the intracellular environment and decreasing intracellular cAMP. In vivo, acutely elevated plasma calcium inhibits plasma renin activity (PRA) via parathyroid hormone-mediated elevations in renal cortical interstitial calcium that stimulate the JG cell CaSR. However, chronically elevated plasma calcium or CaSR activation may actually stimulate PRA. This elevation in PRA may be a compensatory mechanism resulting from calcium-mediated polyuria. Thus, changing the extracellular calcium in vitro or in vivo results in inversely related acute changes in cAMP, and therefore renin release, but chronic changes in calcium may result in more complex interactions dependent upon the duration of changes and the integration of the body’s response to these changes. PMID:22538344

  9. Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Cell Membrane Resealing during Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun; Cui, Jianmin; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Sonoporation has been exploited as a novel strategy for intracellular drug and gene delivery. In sonoporation, ultrasound application generates transient pores or openings in the cell membrane that allow entry of extracellular agents normally not permeable to the cell membrane. In order to improve the sonoporation outcome, we seek to obtain improved understanding of the sonoporation mechanism and investigate the factors affecting sonoporation process. We established a voltage clamp technique for real time measurement of sonoporation at single cell level using Xenopus oocytes as a model system. As both cell survival and intracellular delivery efficiency of drug or genes depend on the sonoporation dynamic process, and Calcium plays important roles in cellular processes, we focus on studying of the effect of extracellular Calcium concentration on the formation, extension, and resealing of membrane pores in sonoporation. We obtained experimental results demonstrating that the cell membrane reseals in the order of seconds in the presence of physiological level of extracellular [Ca]. We measured the resealing as function of extracellular [Ca] (0-1.8mM) and observed that the resealing rate decreases as extracellular [Ca] decreases from normal physiological level. No resealing was demonstrated when 1mM EGTA was added in the extracellular medium to chelate the [Ca] extracellularly. Our experimental findings suggest that extracellular Calcium plays an important role in controlling membrane resealing in sonoporation and thus the sonoporation outcome such as cell survival and delivery efficiency.

  10. Calcium-Sensing Receptor: A Key Target for Extracellular Calcium Signaling in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brian L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Though both clinicians and scientists have long recognized the influence of extracellular calcium on the function of muscle and nervous tissue, recent insights reveal that the mechanisms allowing changes in extracellular calcium to alter cellular excitability have been incompletely understood. For many years the effects of calcium on neuronal signaling were explained only in terms of calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels and biophysical charge screening. More recently however, it has been recognized that the calcium-sensing receptor is prevalent in the nervous system and regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal activity via multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the multiplicity of mechanisms by which changes in extracellular calcium alter neuronal signaling and propose that multiple mechanisms are required to describe the full range of experimental observations. PMID:27065884

  11. Extracellular calcium elicits a chemokinetic response from monocytes in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olszak, I. T.; Poznansky, M. C.; Evans, R. H.; Olson, D.; Kos, C.; Pollak, M. R.; Brown, E. M.; Scadden, D. T.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Recruitment of macrophages to sites of cell death is critical for induction of an immunologic response. Calcium concentrations in extracellular fluids vary markedly, and are particularly high at sites of injury or infection. We hypothesized that extracellular calcium participates in modulating the immune response, perhaps acting via the seven-transmembrane calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) on mature monocytes/macrophages. We observed a dose-dependent increase in monocyte chemotaxis in response to extracellular calcium or the selective allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467. In contrast, monocytes derived from mice deficient in CaR lacked the normal chemotactic response to a calcium gradient. Notably, CaR activation of monocytes bearing the receptor synergistically augmented the transmigration response of monocytes to the chemokine MCP-1 in association with increased cell-surface expression of its cognate receptor, CCR2. Conversely, stimulation of monocytes with MCP-1 or SDF-1alpha reciprocally increased CaR expression, suggesting a dual-enhancing interaction of Ca(2+) with chemokines in recruiting inflammatory cells. Subcutaneous administration in mice of Ca(2+), MCP-1, or (more potently) the combination of Ca(2+) and MCP-1, elicited an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of monocytes/macrophages. Thus extracellular calcium functions as an ionic chemokinetic agent capable of modulating the innate immune response in vivo and in vitro by direct and indirect actions on monocytic cells. Calcium deposition may be both consequence and cause of chronic inflammatory changes at sites of injury, infection, and atherosclerosis.

  12. Recent advances in understanding the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Colella, Matilde; Gerbino, Andrea; Hofer, Aldebaran M.; Curci, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), a ubiquitous class C G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is responsible for the control of calcium homeostasis in body fluids. It integrates information about external Ca 2+ and a surfeit of other endogenous ligands into multiple intracellular signals, but how is this achieved? This review will focus on some of the exciting concepts in CaR signaling and pharmacology that have emerged in the last few years. PMID:27803801

  13. Extracellular calcium and cholinergic stimulation of isolated canine parietal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, A H

    1981-01-01

    The role of calcium gating in cholinergic stimulation of the function of parietal cells was studied using cells isolated from canine fundic mucosa by treatment with collagenase and EDTA and enriched by velocity separation in an elutriator rotor. Monitoring the accumulation of [14C[ aminopyrine as an index of parietal cell response, stimulation by carbachol, but not by histamine, was highly dependent upon the concentration of extracellular calcium. Incubation of parietal cells in 0-.1 mM calcium, rather than the usual 1.8 mM concentration, reduced the response to 100 microM carbachol by 92 +/- 2%, whereas histamine stimulation was impaired by 28 +/- 5%. A similar reduction in extracellular calcium suppressed the response to gastrin (100 nM) by 67 +/- 7%. The impairment of cholinergic stimulation found at low extracellular calcium concentrations was rapidly reversed with the readdition of calcium. Lanthanum, which blocks calcium movement across membranes, caused a similar pattern of effects on secretagogue stimulation of aminopyrine accumulation, with 100 microM lanthanum suppressing carbachol stimulation by 83 +/- 2%. This concentration of lanthanum suppressed gastrin stimulation by 40 +/- 7% and histamine stimulation by only 12 +/- 9%. Carbachol, but not histamine nor gastrin, stimulated 45Ca++ uptake. The magnitude of carbachol-stimulated calcium uptake correlated with the parietal cell content of the fractions examined (r = 0.88), and was dose responsive over carbachol concentrations from 1 microM to 1 mM. Atropine (100 nM) caused surmountable inhibition, and these effects of carbachol and atropine on calcium uptake correlated with their effects on oxygen consumption (r = 0.93) and [14C]-aminopyrine accumulation (r = 0.90). Cells preloaded with 45Ca++ lost cellular calcium in a time-dependent fashion; however, this rate of egress was not accelerated by treatment with histamine, gastrin, or carbachol, thus failing to implicate mobilization of intracellular calcium

  14. Physiological role of gap-junctional hemichannels. Extracellular calcium-dependent isosmotic volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Quist, A P; Rhee, S K; Lin, H; Lal, R

    2000-03-06

    Hemichannels in the overlapping regions of apposing cells plasma membranes join to form gap junctions and provide an intercellular communication pathway. Hemichannels are also present in the nonjunctional regions of individual cells and their activity is gated by several agents, including calcium. However, their physiological roles are unknown. Using techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescent dye uptake assay, and laser confocal immunofluorescence imaging, we have examined the extracellular calcium-dependent modulation of cell volume. In response to a change in the extracellular physiological calcium concentration (1.8 to increase in the volume of cells expressing gap-junctional proteins (connexins). Volume change did not occur in cells that were not expressing connexins. However, after the transient or stable transfection of connexin43, volume change did occur. The volume increase was accompanied by cytochalasin D-sensitive higher cell stiffness, which helped maintain cell integrity. These cellular physical changes were prevented by gap-junctional blockers, oleamide and beta-glycyrrhetinic acid, or were reversed by returning extracellular calcium to the normal level. We conclude that nongap-junctional hemichannels regulate cell volume in response to the change in extracellular physiological calcium in an otherwise isosmotic situation.

  15. The involvement of extracellular calcium in hypoxic injury to the isolated rat liver.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Younes, M

    1988-09-01

    Isolated perfused livers from fasted rats were subjected to 30 min of hypoxia followed by 60 min of reoxygenation. At a calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/l in the perfusate, hypoxia induced injury as evidenced by a marked release of GPT and SDH into the perfusate and by an accumulation of calcium in the livers. Omission of calcium from the perfusate attenuated hypoxia-induced enzyme release by about 50% and prevented the increase of hepatic calcium completely. A complete protection of the liver against hypoxic injury was attained in the absence of calcium when Na2 EDTA was added. An influx of calcium from the extracellular to the intracellular fluid seems to be involved in but is not the sole cause of hypoxia-induced hepatic injury.

  16. Extracellular calcium transients and action potential configuration changes related to post-stimulatory potentiation in rabbit atrium.

    PubMed

    Hilgemann, D W

    1986-05-01

    Extracellular calcium transients were monitored with 2 mM tetramethylmurexide at low calcium (250 microM total, 130 microM free), and action potentials were monitored together with developed tension at normal calcium (1.3 mM) during the production and decay of post-stimulatory potentiation in rabbit left atrial strips. At normal calcium, the contractile potentiation produced by a brief burst of 4 Hz stimulation is lost in three to five post-stimulatory excitations, which correlate with a negative staircase of the late action potential. At low calcium, stimulation at 4 Hz for 3-8 s results in a net extracellular calcium depletion of 5-15 microM. At the subsequent potentiated contraction (1-45 s rest), total extracellular calcium increases by 4-8 microM. The contractile response at a second excitation is greatly suppressed and results in little or no further calcium shift; the sequence can be repeated immediately thereafter. Reducing external sodium to 60 mM (sucrose replacement) enhances post-rest contractions, suppresses the late action potential, nearly eliminates loss of contractility and net calcium efflux at post-rest excitations, and markedly reduces extracellular calcium depletion during rapid stimulation. 4-Aminopyridine (1 mM) markedly suppresses the rapid early repolarization of this preparation at post-rest excitations and the loss of contractility at post-rest stimulation from the rested state; during a post-stimulatory potentiation sequence at low calcium, replenishment of extracellular calcium takes several post-stimulatory excitations. Ryanodine (10 nM to 5 microM) abolishes the post-stimulatory contraction at rest periods of greater than 5 s. If the initial repolarization is rapid, ryanodine suppresses the late action potential, calcium efflux during quiescence is greatly accelerated, and subsequent excitations do not result in an accumulation of extracellular calcium. A positive staircase of the early action potential correlates with the magnitude

  17. Effects of extracellular calcium and sodium on depolarization-induced automaticity in guinea pig papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Katzung, B G

    1975-07-01

    Regenerative discharge of action potentials is induced in mammalian papillary muscles by passage of small depolarizing currents. In this paper, the effects of various extracellular calcium and sodium concentrations and of tetrodotoxin on this phenomenon were studied in guinea pig papillary muscles in a sucrose gap chamber. Phase 4 diastolic depolarization was found to be associated with an increase in membrane resistance. The slope of phase 4 depolarization was decreased by reductions in extracellular calcium or sodium concentration. The range of maximum diastolic potentials and the thresholds from which regenerative potentials arose were reduced, especially at the positive limit of potentials, by a reduction in either ion. It was concluded that both calcium and sodium influence diastolic depolarization and participate in the regenerative action potentials of depolarization-induced ventricular automaticity.

  18. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  19. Effects of Extracellular Calcium and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 on Sebaceous Gland Cells In vitro and In vivo.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Seltmann, Holger; Abdel-Naser, M Badawy; Hossini, Amir M; Menon, Gopinathan K; Kubba, Raj

    2017-03-10

    Calcium and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are promoters of epithelial cell functions; however their effects on sebaceous glands are unknown. In this study, morphology, ultrastructure, cell numbers, lipid synthesis and apoptosis of SZ95 sebocytes were assessed in vitro under different concentrations of extracellular calcium with or without 1,25(OH)2D3. Moreover, serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were assessed in acne and non-acne patients (controls). Under conditions of low extracellular calcium, lipogenesis and cell detachment were observed. Increasing extracellular calcium enhanced sebocyte numbers, induced epithelial morphology and reduced lipogenesis. Moreover, a reduction in extracellular calcium reduced E-cadherin and enhanced caspase 3/7 activity (apoptosis), whereas calcium chelation by EGTA (ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) resulted in enhanced lipogenesis. 1,25(OH)2D3 decreased sebaceous lipogenesis, but also induced signs of autophagy. In the clinical study, patients and controls exhibited normal serum calcium levels. Younger acne patients presented lower 1,25(OH)2D3 levels than did older ones. In conclusion, extracellular calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 regulate sebocyte morphology, increase cell numbers, decrease sebaceous lipogenesis and induce cell autophagy in vitro. The increased ionized calcium and the reduced 1,25(OH)2D3 levels detected in the serum of younger patients with acne may contribute respectively to increased sebaceous gland volume and enhanced lipogenesis.

  20. Regulation of BMP2-induced intracellular calcium increases in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenfeng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xue; Chiang, Martin Y M; Li, Bo; Xu, Zichen; Liao, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Although bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is a well-characterized regulator that stimulates osteoblast differentiation, little is known about how it regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. In this study, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]i ) upon BMP2 application, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src activities were measured in the MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell line using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensors. Increase in [Ca(2+) ]i , FAK, and Src activities were observed during BMP2 stimulation. The removal of extracellular calcium, the application of membrane channel inhibitors streptomycin or nifedipine, the FAK inhibitor PF-573228 (PF228), and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) siRNA all blocked the BMP2-stimulated [Ca(2+) ]i increase, while the Src inhibitor PP1 did not. In contrast, a gentle decrease of endoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration was found after BMP2 stimulation, which could be blocked by both streptomycin and PP1. Further experiments revealed that BMP2-induced FAK activation could not be inhibited by PP1, ALP siRNA or the calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine. PF228, but not PP1 or calcium channel inhibitors, suppressed ALP elevation resulting from BMP2 stimulation. Therefore, our results suggest that BMP2 can increase [Ca(2+) ]i through extracellular calcium influx regulated by FAK and ALP and can deplete ER calcium through Src signaling simultaneously. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1725-1733, 2016.

  1. Calcium-sensing receptor regulates stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in response to extracellular calcium in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hua; Yi, Xiao-Qian; Han, Ai-Dong; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis calcium-sensing receptor CAS is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure. Free cytosolic Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) increases in response to a high extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o)) level through a CAS signalling pathway and finally leads to stomatal closure. Multidisciplinary approaches including histochemical, pharmacological, fluorescent, electrochemical, and molecular biological methods were used to discuss the relationship of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO) signalling in the CAS signalling pathway in guard cells in response to Ca(2+)(o). Here it is shown that Ca(2+)(o) could induce H(2)O(2) and NO production from guard cells but only H(2)O(2) from chloroplasts, leading to stomatal closure. In addition, the CASas mutant, the atrbohD/F double mutant, and the Atnoa1 mutant were all insensitive to Ca(2+)(o)-stimulated stomatal closure, as well as H(2)O(2) and NO elevation in the case of CASas. Furthermore, it was found that the antioxidant system might function as a mediator in Ca(2+)(o) and H(2)O(2) signalling in guard cells. The results suggest a hypothetical model whereby Ca(2+)(o) induces H(2)O(2) and NO accumulation in guard cells through the CAS signalling pathway, which further triggers Ca(2+)(i) transients and finally stomatal closure. The possible cross-talk of Ca(2+)(o) and abscisic acid signalling as well as the antioxidant system are discussed.

  2. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  3. Extracellular calcium and CaSR drive osteoinduction in mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth

    2014-06-01

    Bone is the main store of calcium and progenitor cells in the body. During the resorption process, the local calcium concentration reaches 8-40mM, and the surrounding cells are exposed to these fluctuations in calcium. This stimulus is a signal that is detected through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), which modulates chemotactic and proliferative G protein-dependent signaling pathways. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the roles of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) and the CaSR in osteoinduction. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs) were stimulated with 10mM of Ca(2+). Several experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effect of [Ca(2+)]o on chemotaxis, proliferation and differentiation on the osteoblastic lineage. It was found that [Ca(2+)]o induces rBMSCs to migrate and proliferate in a concentration-dependent manner. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence also revealed that 10mM Ca(2+) stimulates overexpression of osteogenic markers in rBMSCs, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein, collagen Ia1 and osteocalcin. Functional assays determining ALP activity and mineralization tests both corroborate the increased expression of these markers in rBMSCs stimulated with Ca(2+). Moreover, CaSR blockage inhibited the cellular response to stimulation with high concentrations of [Ca(2+)]o, revealing that the CaSR is a key modulator of these cellular responses.

  4. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  5. Cyclosporine increases calcium in kidney medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Borowitz, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of rats with 20, 50, or 100 mg/kg of cyclosporine p.o. markedly increased /sup 45/Ca accumulation in kidney slices especially in medulla. The effect was related to dose and duration of treatment, and was also observed in slices of kidney medulla from cyclosporine-treated mice. Total calcium was elevated in kidney medulla of cyclosporine-treated rats so that the effect is not merely an increased exchange but a build-up of calcium in the tissue. No histopathologic evidence of cyclosporine-related cell necrosis was present in mouse kidney, showing that calcium accumulation is not dystrophic in character. Accumulation of /sup 45/Ca in slices of rat heart, liver, or brain was not affected by cyclosporine pretreatment of the animals. It is suggested that cyclosporine-induced changes in calcium metabolism in kidney medulla may influence kidney function.

  6. Calcium sensing receptor modulates extracellular calcium entry and proliferation via TRPC3/6 channels in cultured human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Kexin; Xu, Jia; Zhang, Chengwei; Zhang, Rui; Yang, He; Liao, Chang; Jiao, Jundong

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has been demonstrated to be present in several tissues and cells unrelated to systemic calcium homeostasis, where it regulates a series of diverse cellular functions. A previous study indicated that CaSR is expressed in mouse glomerular mesangial cells (MCs), and stimulation of CaSR induces cell proliferation. However, the signaling cascades initiated by CaSR activation in MCs are currently unknown. In this study, our data demonstrate that CaSR mRNA and protein are expressed in a human mesangial cell line. Activating CaSR with high extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) or spermine induces a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Interestingly, the CaSR activation-induced increase in [Ca2+]i results not only from intracellular Ca2+ release from internal stores but also from canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC)-dependent Ca2+ influx. This increase in Ca2+ was attenuated by treatment with a nonselective TRPC channel blocker but not by treatment with a voltage-gated calcium blocker or Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibitor. Furthermore, stimulation of CaSR by high [Ca2+]o enhanced the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC6 but not TRPC1 and TRPC4, and siRNA targeting TRPC3 and TRPC6 attenuated the CaSR activation-induced [Ca2+]i increase. Further experiments indicate that 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), a known activator of receptor-operated calcium channels, significantly enhances the CaSR activation-induced [Ca2+]i increase. Moreover, under conditions in which intracellular stores were already depleted with thapsigargin (TG), CaSR agonists also induced an increase in [Ca2+]i, suggesting that calcium influx stimulated by CaSR agonists does not require the release of calcium stores. Finally, our data indicate that pharmacological inhibition and knock down of TRPC3 and TRPC6 attenuates the CaSR activation-induced cell proliferation in human MCs. With these data, we conclude that Ca

  7. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor stimulation in human colonic epithelial cells induces intracellular calcium oscillations and proliferation inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rey, Osvaldo; Young, Steven H; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Moyer, Mary P; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2010-10-01

    The extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) is increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions in the gastrointestinal tract, including secretion, proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. However, the signaling mechanisms involved remain poorly defined. Here we examined signaling pathways activated by the CaR, including Ca(2+) oscillations, in individual human colon epithelial cells. Single cell imaging of colon-derived cells expressing the CaR, including SW-480, HT-29, and NCM-460 cells, shows that stimulation of this receptor by addition of aromatic amino acids or by an elevation of the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration promoted striking intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to extracellular Ca(2+) were of sinusoidal pattern and mediated by the phospholipase C/diacylglycerol/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway as revealed by a biosensor that detects the accumulation of diacylglycerol in the plasma membrane. The intracellular calcium oscillations in response to aromatic amino acids were of transient type, that is, Ca(2+) spikes that returned to baseline levels, and required an intact actin cytoskeleton, a functional Rho, Filamin A and the ion channel TRPC1. Further analysis showed that re-expression and stimulation of the CaR in human epithelial cells derived from normal colon and from colorectal adenocarcinoma inhibits their proliferation. This inhibition was associated with the activation of the signaling pathway that mediates the generation of sinusoidal, but not transient, intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. Thus, these results indicate that the CaR can function in two signaling modes in human colonic epithelial cells offering a potential link between gastrointestinal responses and food/nutrients uptake and metabolism.

  8. Intracellular calcium movements of boar spermatozoa during 'in vitro' capacitation and subsequent acrosome exocytosis follow a multiple-storage place, extracellular calcium-dependent model.

    PubMed

    Yeste, M; Fernández-Novell, J M; Ramió-Lluch, L; Estrada, E; Rocha, L G; Cebrián-Pérez, J A; Muiño-Blanco, T; Concha, I I; Ramírez, A; Rodríguez-Gil, J E

    2015-07-01

    This work analysed intracellular calcium stores of boar spermatozoa subjected to 'in vitro' capacitation (IVC) and subsequent progesterone-induced acrosome exocytosis (IVAE). Intracellular calcium was analysed through two calcium markers with different physico-chemical properties, Fluo-3 and Rhod-5N. Indicative parameters of IVC and IVAE were also evaluated. Fluo-3 was located at both the midpiece and the whole head. Rhod-5N was present at the sperm head. This distribution did not change in any of the assayed conditions. Induction of IVC was concomitant with an increase in both head and midpiece Ca(2+) signals. Additionally, while IVC induction was concurrent with a significant (p < 0.05) increase in sperm membrane permeability, no significant changes were observed in O2 consumption and ATP levels. Incubation of boar spermatozoa in the absence of calcium showed a loss of both Ca(2+) labellings concomitantly with the sperm's inability to achieve IVC. The absence of extracellular calcium also induced a severe decrease in the percentage of spermatozoa exhibiting high mitochondrial membrane potential (hMMP). The IVAE was accompanied by a fast increase in both Ca(2+) signalling in control spermatozoa. These peaks were either not detected or much lessened in the absence of calcium. Remarkably, Fluo-3 marking at the midpiece increased after progesterone addition to sperm cells incubated in a medium without Ca(2+) . The simultaneous addition of progesterone with the calcium chelant EGTA inhibited IVAE, and this was accompanied by a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the intensity of progesterone Ca(2+) -induced peak, O2 consumption and ATP levels. Our results suggest that boar spermatozoa present different calcium deposits with a dynamic equilibrium among them and with the extracellular environment. Additionally, the modulation role of the intracellular calcium in spermatozoa function seems to rely on its precise localization in boar spermatozoa.

  9. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Yael; Natale, Frank; Sherrell, Robert M.; LaVigne, Michèle; Starovoytov, Valentin; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity in animals required the production of extracellular matrices that serve to spatially organize cells according to function. In corals, three matrices are involved in spatial organization: (i) an organic ECM, which facilitates cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion; (ii) a skeletal organic matrix (SOM), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate skeleton itself, which provides the structural support for the 3D organization of coral colonies. In this report, we examine the production of these three matrices by using an in vitro culturing system for coral cells. In this system, which significantly facilitates studies of coral cell physiology, we demonstrate in vitro excretion of ECM by primary (nondividing) tissue cultures of both soft (Xenia elongata) and hard (Montipora digitata) corals. There are structural differences between the ECM produced by X. elongata cell cultures and that of M. digitata, and ascorbic acid, a critical cofactor for proline hydroxylation, significantly increased the production of collagen in the ECM of the latter species. We further demonstrate in vitro production of SOM and extracellular mineralized particles in cell cultures of M. digitata. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of Sr/Ca ratios revealed the particles to be aragonite. De novo calcification was confirmed by following the incorporation of 45Ca into acid labile macromolecules. Our results demonstrate the ability of isolated, differentiated coral cells to undergo fundamental processes required for multicellular organization. PMID:18162537

  10. Calcium binding domains and calcium-induced conformational transition of SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin, an extracellular glycoprotein expressed in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Taylor, W.; Paulsson, M.; Sage, H.; Hogan, B.

    1987-11-03

    PSARC, BM-40, and osteonectin are identical or very closely related extracellular proteins of apparent M/sub r/ 43,000 (M/sub r/ 33,000 predicted from sequence). They were originally isolated from parietal endoderm cells, basement membrane producing tumors, and bone, respectively, but are rather widely distributed in various tissues. In view of the calcium binding activity reported for osteonectin, the authors analyzed the SPARC sequence and found two putative calcium binding domains. One is an N-terminal acid region with clusters of glutamic acid residues. This region, although neither ..gamma..-carboxylated nor homologous, resembles the ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of vitamin K dependent proteins of the blood clotting system in charge density, size of negatively charged clusters, and linkage to the rest of the molecule by a cysteine-rich domain. The other region is an EF-hand calcium binding domain located near the C-terminus. A disulfide bond between the E and F helix is predicted from modeling the EF-hand structure with the known coordinates of intestinal calcium binding protein. The disulfide bridge apparently serves to stabilize the isolated calcium loop in the extracellular protein. As observed for cytoplasmic EF-hand-containing proteins and for Gla domain containing proteins, a major conformational transition is induced in BM-40 upon binding of several Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This is accompanied by a 35% increase in ..cap alpha..-helicity. A pronounced sigmoidicity of the dependence of the circular dichroism signal at 220 nm on calcium concentration indicates that the process is cooperative. In view of its properties, abundance, and wide distribution, it is proposed that SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin has a rather general regulatory function in calcium-dependent processes of the extra-cellular matrix.

  11. Extracellular protons acidify osteoclasts, reduce cytosolic calcium, and promote expression of cell-matrix attachment structures.

    PubMed Central

    Teti, A; Blair, H C; Schlesinger, P; Grano, M; Zambonin-Zallone, A; Kahn, A J; Teitelbaum, S L; Hruska, K A

    1989-01-01

    Because metabolic acids stimulate bone resorption in vitro and in vivo, we focused on the cellular events produced by acidosis that might be associated with stimulation of bone remodeling. To this end, we exposed isolated chicken osteoclasts to a metabolic (butyric) acid and observed a fall in both intracellular pH and cytosolic calcium [( Ca2+]i). These phenomena were recapitulated when bone resorptive cells, alkalinized by HCO3 loading, were transferred to a bicarbonate-free environment. The acid-induced decline in osteoclast [Ca2+]i was blocked by either NaCN or Na3VO4, in a Na+-independent fashion, despite the failure of each inhibitor to alter stimulated intracellular acidification. Moreover, K+-induced membrane depolarization also reduced cytosolic calcium in a manner additive to the effect of protons. These findings suggest that osteoclasts adherent to bone lack functional voltage-operated Ca2+ channels, and they reduced [Ca2+]i in response to protons via a membrane residing Ca-ATPase. Most importantly, acidosis enhances formation of podosomes, the contact areas of the osteoclast clear zone, indicating increased adhesion to substrate, an early step in bone resorption. Thus, extracellular acidification of osteoclasts leads to decrements in intracellular pH and calcium, and appears to promote cell-matrix attachment. Images PMID:2547838

  12. Alginate-coated magnetic nanoparticles for noninvasive MRI of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Avram, Liat; Yariv-Shoushan, Shani; Anaby, Debbie; Cohen, Smadar; Segev-Amzaleg, Niva; Frenkel, Dan; Sadan, Ofer; Offen, Daniel; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential to increase the diagnostic capacity of many imaging modalities. MRI is currently regarded as the method of choice for the imaging of deep tissues, and metal ions, such as calcium ions (Ca(2+)), are essential ingredients for life. Despite the tremendous importance of Ca(2+) for the well-being of living systems, the noninvasive determination of the changes in Ca(2+) levels in general, and extracellular Ca(2+) levels in particular, in deep tissues remains a challenge. Here, we describe the preparation and contrast mechanism of a flexible easy to prepare and selective superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) NPs for the noninvasive determination of changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels using conventional MRI. We show that SPIO NPs coated with monodisperse and purified alginate, having a specific molecular weight, provide a tool to selectively determine Ca(2+) concentrations in the range of 250 µm to 2.5 mm, even in the presence of competitive ions. The alginate-coated magnetic NPs (MNPs) aggregate in the presence of Ca(2+) , which, in turn, affects the T2 relaxation of the water protons in their vicinity. The new alginate-coated SPIO NP formulations, which have no effect on cell viability for 24 h, allow the detection of Ca(2+) levels secreted from ischemic cell cultures and the qualitative examination of the change in extracellular Ca(2+) levels in vivo. These results demonstrate that alginate-coated MNPs can be used, at least qualitatively, as a platform for the noninvasive MRI determination of extracellular Ca(2+) levels in myriad in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  13. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  14. Extracellular calcium triggers unique transcriptional programs and modulates staurosporine-induced cell death in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, A. P.; Monteiro, João; Lucchi, Chiara; Kowbel, David J.; Cordeiro, J. M.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Rigden, Daniel J.; Glass, N. L.; Videira, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the intracellular levels of calcium are a common response to cell death stimuli in animals and fungi and, particularly, in the Neurospora crassa response to staurosporine. We highlight the importance of the extracellular availability of Ca2+ for this response. Limitation of the ion in the culture medium further sensitizes cells to the drug and results in increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conversely, an approximately 30-fold excess of external Ca2+ leads to increased drug tolerance and lower ROS generation. In line with this, distinct staurosporine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ signaling profiles were observed in the absence or presence of excessive external Ca2+. High-throughput RNA sequencing revealed that different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ define distinct transcriptional programs. Our transcriptional profiling also pointed to two putative novel Ca2+-binding proteins, encoded by the NCU08524 and NCU06607 genes, and provides a reference dataset for future investigations on the role of Ca2+ in fungal biology. PMID:28357255

  15. Extracellular sodium dependence of the conduction velocity-calcium relationship: evidence of ephaptic self-attenuation.

    PubMed

    George, Sharon A; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Zeitz, Michael; Davalos, Rafael V; Smyth, James W; Poelzing, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Our laboratory previously demonstrated that perfusate sodium and potassium concentrations can modulate cardiac conduction velocity (CV) consistent with theoretical predictions of ephaptic coupling (EpC). EpC depends on the ionic currents and intercellular separation in sodium channel rich intercalated disk microdomains like the perinexus. We suggested that perinexal width (WP) correlates with changes in extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o). Here, we test the hypothesis that increasing [Ca(2+)]o reduces WP and increases CV. Mathematical models of EpC also predict that reducing WP can reduce sodium driving force and CV by self-attenuation. Therefore, we further hypothesized that reducing WP and extracellular sodium ([Na(+)]o) will reduce CV consistent with ephaptic self-attenuation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that increasing [Ca(2+)]o (1 to 3.4 mM) significantly decreased WP Optically mapping wild-type (WT) (100% Cx43) mouse hearts demonstrated that increasing [Ca(2+)]o increases transverse CV during normonatremia (147.3 mM), but slows transverse CV during hyponatremia (120 mM). Additionally, CV in heterozygous (∼50% Cx43) hearts was more sensitive to changes in [Ca(2+)]o relative to WT during normonatremia. During hyponatremia, CV slowed in both WT and heterozygous hearts to the same extent. Importantly, neither [Ca(2+)]o nor [Na(+)]o altered Cx43 expression or phosphorylation determined by Western blotting, or gap junctional resistance determined by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Narrowing WP, by increasing [Ca(2+)]o, increases CV consistent with enhanced EpC between myocytes. Interestingly, during hyponatremia, reducing WP slowed CV, consistent with theoretical predictions of ephaptic self-attenuation. This study suggests that serum ion concentrations may be an important determinant of cardiac disease expression.

  16. Increased intra- and extracellular granzyme expression in patients with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Laorden, M Isabel; Blok, Dana C; Kager, Liesbeth M; Hoogendijk, Arie J; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Lede, Ivar O; Rahman, Wahid; Afroz, Rumana; Ghose, Aniruddha; Visser, Caroline E; Md Zahed, Abu Shahed; Husain, Md Anwar; Alam, Khan Mashrequl; Chandra Barua, Pravat; Hassan, Mahtabuddin; Hossain, Ahmed; Tayab, Md Abu; Day, Nick; Dondorp, Arjen M; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Granzymes (gzms) are proteases mainly found in cytotoxic lymphocytes, but also extracellularly. While the role of gzms in target cell death has been widely characterized, considerable evidence points towards broader roles related to infectious and inflammatory responses. To investigate the expression of the gzms in TB, intracellular gzms A, B and K were measured by flow cytometry in lymphocyte populations from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 18 TB patients and 12 healthy donors from Bangladesh, and extracellular levels of gzmA and B were measured in serum from 58 TB patients and 31 healthy controls. TB patients showed increased expression of gzmA in CD8(+) T, CD4(+) T and CD56(+) T, but not NK, cells, and of gzmB in CD8(+) T cells, when compared to controls. GzmK expression was not altered in TB patients in any lymphocyte subset. The extracellular levels of gzmA and, to a lesser extent, of gzmB, were increased in TB patients, but did not correlate with intracellular gzm expression in lymphocyte subsets. Our results reveal enhanced intra- and extracellular expression of gzmA and B in patients with pulmonary TB, suggesting that gzms are part of the host response to tuberculosis.

  17. Molecular Basis of the Extracellular Ligands Mediated Signaling by the Calcium Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Miller, Cassandra L.; Gorkhali, Rakshya; Zou, Juan; Huang, Kenneth; Brown, Edward M.; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-sensing receptors (CaSRs) play a central role in regulating extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o) homeostasis and many (patho)physiological processes in multiple organs. This regulation is orchestrated by a cooperative response to extracellular stimuli such as small changes in Ca2+, Mg2+, amino acids, and other ligands. In addition, CaSR is a pleiotropic receptor regulating several intracellular signaling pathways, including calcium mobilization and intracellular calcium oscillation. Nearly 200 mutations and polymorphisms have been found in CaSR in relation to a variety of human disorders associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis. In this review, we summarize efforts directed at identifying binding sites for calcium and amino acids. Both homotropic cooperativity among multiple calcium binding sites and heterotropic cooperativity between calcium and amino acid were revealed using computational modeling, predictions, and site-directed mutagenesis coupled with functional assays. The hinge region of the bilobed Venus flytrap (VFT) domain of CaSR plays a pivotal role in coordinating multiple extracellular stimuli, leading to cooperative responses from the receptor. We further highlight the extensive number of disease-associated mutations that have also been shown to affect CaSR's cooperative action via several types of mechanisms. These results provide insights into the molecular bases of the structure and functional cooperativity of this receptor and other members of family C of the G protein-coupled receptors (cGPCRs) in health and disease states, and may assist in the prospective development of novel receptor-based therapeutics. PMID:27746744

  18. Calcium carbonate mineralization: involvement of extracellular polymeric materials isolated from calcifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Claudia; Bozzelli, Paola; Altieri, Fabio; Cacchio, Paola; Del Gallo, Maddalena

    2012-08-01

    This study highlights the role of specific outer bacterial structures, such as the glycocalix, in calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro. We describe the formation of calcite crystals by extracellular polymeric materials, such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) isolated from Bacillus firmus and Nocardia calcarea. Organic matrices were isolated from calcifying bacteria grown on synthetic medium--in the presence or absence of calcium ions--and their effect on calcite precipitation was assessed. Scanning electron microscopy observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed that CPS and EPS fractions were involved in calcium carbonate precipitation, not only serving as nucleation sites but also through a direct role in crystal formation. The utilization of different synthetic media, with and without addition of calcium ions, influenced the biofilm production and protein profile of extracellular polymeric materials. Proteins of CPS fractions with a molecular mass between 25 and 70 kDa were overexpressed when calcium ions were present in the medium. This higher level of protein synthesis could be related to the active process of bioprecipitation.

  19. Effect of extracellular calcium on excitability of guinea pig airway vagal afferent nerves.

    PubMed

    Undem, Bradley J; Oh, Eun Joo; Lancaster, Eric; Weinreich, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    The effect of reducing extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) on vagal afferent excitability was analyzed in a guinea pig isolated vagally innervated trachea-bronchus preparation. Afferent fibers were characterized as either having low-threshold, rapidly adapting mechanosensors (Adelta fibers) or nociceptive-like phenotypes (Adelta and C fibers). The nociceptors were derived from neurons within the jugular ganglia, whereas the low-threshold mechanosensors were derived from neurons within the nodose ganglia. Reducing [Ca(2+)](o) did not affect the excitability of the low-threshold mechanosensors in the airway. By contrast, reducing [Ca(2+)](o) selectively increased the excitability of airway nociceptors as manifested by a substantive increase in action potential discharge in response to mechanical stimulation, and in a subset of fibers, by overtly evoking action potential discharge. This increase in the excitability of nociceptors was not mimicked by a combination of omega-conotoxin and nifedipine or tetraethylammonium. Whole cell patch recordings from airway-labeled and unlabeled neurons in the vagal jugular ganglia support the hypothesis that [Ca(2+)](o) inhibits a nonselective cation conductance in vagal nociceptors that may serve to regulate excitability of the nerve terminals within the airways.

  20. Role of low-voltage-activated calcium current and extracellular calcium in controlling the firing pattern of developing CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Sánchez-Alonso, José Luis; Vicente-Torres, María Ángeles; Colino, Asunción

    2017-03-06

    The firing pattern of individual neurons is an important element for information processing and storing. During the first weeks of development, there is a transitional period during which CA1 pyramidal neurons display burst-spiking behavior in contrast to the adult regular-firing pattern. Spike after-depolarizations (ADPs) constitute a major factor underlying burst-spiking behavior. Using current-clamp recordings, we studied ADP waveforms and firing patterns in CA1 pyramidal neurons of Wistar rats from 9 to 19 postnatal days (P9-19). The percentage of burst-spiking neurons increased up to P16, in correlation with the emergence of an active component in the ADP. The application of low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channel blockers such as nickel or mibefradil suppressed the generation of the active ADP component and burst-spiking behavior. In agreement with the development of the ADP waveform and burst-spiking behavior, voltage-clamp experiments in dissociated pyramidal neurons showed an increase in the LVA calcium current in P16-19 vs P9-12. Finally, we found that a reduction of extracellular calcium levels decreases the percentage of burst-spiking cells due to a reduction in the active component of the ADP. We conclude that a major contribution of LVA calcium channels to ADP determines the bursting capability of CA1 pyramidal neurons during a transitional postnatal period in contrast to adulthood.

  1. Acute uptake inhibition increases extracellular serotonin in the rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Rutter, J J; Auerbach, S B

    1993-06-01

    The effect of acute uptake inhibition on serotonin (5-HT) in the rat central nervous system was monitored by using in vivo dialysis. Peripheral administration of the selective 5-HT uptake blocker, fluoxetine, caused a dose-dependent increase in extracellular 5-HT in both the diencephalon and the striatum. Administration of fluoxetine or sertraline, another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor, caused a prolonged (24 hr) increase in 5-HT and decrease in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. In addition, fluoxetine and sertraline attenuated the 5-HT releasing effect of fenfluramine administered 24 hr later. Local infusion of fluoxetine into the diencephalon caused an increase in 5-HT that was twice as large as the effect of peripheral injection. Peripheral fluoxetine, by enhancing extracellular 5-HT in the raphe, probably resulted in activation of somatodendritic autoreceptors and inhibition of 5-HT neuronal discharge. Thus, the increase in 5-HT in the diencephalon after peripheral fluoxetine presumably reflected a balance between decreased release and inhibition of reuptake. In support of this, after first infusing fluoxetine into the diencephalon to maximally block reuptake, peripheral injection of the uptake inhibitor caused a decrease in 5-HT.

  2. Ubiquitylation functions in the calcium carbonate biomineralization in the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes.

  3. Ubiquitylation Functions in the Calcium Carbonate Biomineralization in the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes. PMID:22558208

  4. Intracellular NAADP increase induced by extracellular NAADP via the P2Y11-like receptor.

    PubMed

    Djerada, Zoubir; Millart, Hervé

    2013-06-28

    The aim of the study was to identify a signalling pathway allowing NAADP-induced intracellular NAADP increase and involving the P2Y11-like receptor. P2Y11-like and β-adrenergic receptors may play important regulatory roles within the cardiovascular system. Both receptors have been shown to be involved in triggering myocardial preconditioning. Using a Langendorff model we report a positive inotropic response induced by extracellular NAADP via P2Y11-like receptor stimulation. In cardiomyocyte cultures, P2Y11-like receptor stimulation by extracellular NAADP ([NAADP]e) increased intracellular cADP-ribose and NAADP concentration as evidenced by direct measurements. NF546, a new selective P2Y11 receptor agonist, increased intracellular cAMP, cADP-ribose and NAADP concentration confirming the involvement of the P2Y11-like receptor in this signalling pathway. NF157, a P2Y11 receptor antagonist, suppressed the increase in intracellular cADPr, NAADP and NAAD induced by either [NAADP]e or NF546. The response profile for intracellular cADP-ribose and NAADP concentration following P2Y11-like stimulation with NF546 was similar to reported data relating β-adrenergic stimulation with isoprenaline. This response represents the signature of the Gs/ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity. Moreover, this study provides a signalling pathway: intracellular NAADP increase induced by extracellular NAADP via metabotropic activity of P2Y11-like receptor. This pathway implying P2Y11-like could take part in the intracellular calcium rise reported for extracellular NAADP.

  5. Extracellular zinc stimulates a calcium-activated chloride conductance through mobilisation of intracellular calcium in renal inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Linley, J E; Simmons, N L; Gray, M A

    2007-01-01

    We have used the perforated patch clamp and fura-2 fluorescence techniques to study the effect of extracellular Zn(2+) on whole-cell Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents (I (CLCA)) in mouse inner medullary collecting duct cells (mIMCD-3). I (CLCA) was spontaneously active in 74% of cells under basal conditions and displayed time and voltage-independent kinetics and an outwardly rectifying current/voltage relationship (I/V). Addition of zinc chloride (10-400 microM) to the bathing solution resulted in a dose-dependent increase in I (CLCA) with little change in Cl(-) selectivity or biophysical characteristics, whereas gadolinium chloride (30 microM) and lanthanum chloride (100 microM) had no significant effect on the whole-cell current. Using fura-2-loaded mIMCD-3 cells, extracellular Zn(2+) (400 microM) stimulated an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) to an elevated plateau. The Zn(2+)-stimulated [Ca(2+)](i) increase was inhibited by thapsigargin (200 nM), the IP(3) receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (10 microM) and removal of bath Ca(2+). Pre-exposure to Zn(2+) (400 microM) markedly attenuated the ATP (100 microM)-stimulated [Ca(2+)](i) increase. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that extracellular Zn(2+) stimulates an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) by a release of calcium from thapsigargin/IP(3) sensitive stores. A possible physiological role for a divalent metal ion receptor, distinct from the extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor, in IMCD cells is discussed.

  6. Copper-induced activation of TRP channels promotes extracellular calcium entry, activation of CaMs and CDPKs, copper entry and membrane depolarization in Ulva compressa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Melissa; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A.; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify channels involved in membrane depolarization, Ulva compressa was incubated with agonists of TRP channels C5, A1 and V1, and the level of intracellular calcium was detected. Agonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 11 min of exposure, respectively, and antagonists of TRPC5, A1, and V1 corresponding to SKF-96365 (SKF), HC-030031 (HC), and capsazepin (CPZ), respectively, inhibited calcium increases indicating that functional TRPs exist in U. compressa. In addition, copper excess induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 12 min which were inhibited by SKF, HC, and CPZ, respectively, indicating that copper activate TRPC5, A1, and V1 channels. Moreover, copper-induced calcium increases were inhibited by EGTA, a non-permeable calcium chelating agent, but not by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ATPase, indicating that activation of TRPs leads to extracellular calcium entry. Furthermore, copper-induced calcium increases were not inhibited by W-7, an inhibitor of CaMs, and staurosporine, an inhibitor of CDPKs, indicating that extracellular calcium entry did not require activation of CaMs and CDPKs. In addition, copper induced membrane depolarization events at 4, 8, and 11 min and these events were inhibited by SKF, HC, CPZ, and bathocuproine, a specific copper chelating agent, indicating that copper entry through TRP channels leads to membrane depolarization. Moreover, membrane depolarization events were inhibited by W-7 and staurosporine, indicating that activation of CaMs and CDPKs is required to allow copper entry through TRPs. Interestingly, copper-induced calcium increases and depolarization events were light-dependent and were inhibited by DCMU, an inhibitor of photosystem II, and ATP-γ-S, a non-hydrolizable analog of ATP, suggesting that ATP derived from photosynthesis is required to activate TRPs. Thus, light-dependent copper-induced activation TRPC5, A1

  7. Copper-induced activation of TRP channels promotes extracellular calcium entry, activation of CaMs and CDPKs, copper entry and membrane depolarization in Ulva compressa.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Melissa; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify channels involved in membrane depolarization, Ulva compressa was incubated with agonists of TRP channels C5, A1 and V1, and the level of intracellular calcium was detected. Agonists of TRPC5, A1 and V1 induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 11 min of exposure, respectively, and antagonists of TRPC5, A1, and V1 corresponding to SKF-96365 (SKF), HC-030031 (HC), and capsazepin (CPZ), respectively, inhibited calcium increases indicating that functional TRPs exist in U. compressa. In addition, copper excess induced increases in intracellular calcium at 4, 9, and 12 min which were inhibited by SKF, HC, and CPZ, respectively, indicating that copper activate TRPC5, A1, and V1 channels. Moreover, copper-induced calcium increases were inhibited by EGTA, a non-permeable calcium chelating agent, but not by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ATPase, indicating that activation of TRPs leads to extracellular calcium entry. Furthermore, copper-induced calcium increases were not inhibited by W-7, an inhibitor of CaMs, and staurosporine, an inhibitor of CDPKs, indicating that extracellular calcium entry did not require activation of CaMs and CDPKs. In addition, copper induced membrane depolarization events at 4, 8, and 11 min and these events were inhibited by SKF, HC, CPZ, and bathocuproine, a specific copper chelating agent, indicating that copper entry through TRP channels leads to membrane depolarization. Moreover, membrane depolarization events were inhibited by W-7 and staurosporine, indicating that activation of CaMs and CDPKs is required to allow copper entry through TRPs. Interestingly, copper-induced calcium increases and depolarization events were light-dependent and were inhibited by DCMU, an inhibitor of photosystem II, and ATP-γ-S, a non-hydrolizable analog of ATP, suggesting that ATP derived from photosynthesis is required to activate TRPs. Thus, light-dependent copper-induced activation TRPC5, A1

  8. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor with cinacalcet increases serum gastrin levels in healthy older subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acidity is postulated to enhance calcium absorption since calcium is better dissolved at low pH. Extracellular calcium stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in humans. Ex vivo studies indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), which is expressed on the surface of human G cells...

  9. Enzymes in the extracellular matrix of Volvox: an inducible, calcium-dependent phosphatase with a modular composition.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, A

    1999-01-15

    The volvocine algae provide the unique opportunity for exploring development of an extracellular matrix. Volvox is the most advanced member of this family and represents the simplest multicellular organism, with differentiated cells, a complete division of labor, and a complex extracellular matrix, which serves structural and enzymatic functions. In Volvox carteri a glycosylated extracellular phosphatase was identified, which is partially released from the extracellular matrix into the growth medium. The phosphatase is synthesized in response to inorganic phosphate starvation and is strictly calcium-dependent. The metalloenzyme has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. Its gene and cDNA have been cloned. Comparisons of genomic and cDNA sequences revealed an extremely intron-rich gene (32 introns). With an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa the Volvox extracellular phosphatase is the largest phosphatase cloned, with no sequence similarity to any other phosphatase. This enzyme exhibits a modular composition. There are two large domains and a small one. The large domains are highly homologous to each other and therefore most likely originated from gene duplication and fusion. At least one EF-hand motif for calcium binding was identified in this extracellular protein. Volvox extracellular phosphatase is the first calcium-dependent extracellular phosphatase to be cloned.

  10. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  11. Food restriction increases NMDA receptor-mediated calcium-calmodulin kinase II and NMDA receptor/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mediated cyclic amp response element-binding protein phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens upon D-1 dopamine receptor stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Haberny, S L; Carr, K D

    2005-01-01

    Biological drive states exert homeostatic control in part by increasing the reinforcing effects of environmental incentive stimuli. An apparent by-product of this adaptive response is the enhanced acquisition of drug self-administration behavior in food-restricted (FR) animals. While previous research has demonstrated increased central sensitivity to rewarding effects of abused drugs and direct dopamine (DA) receptor agonists in FR subjects, the underlying neurobiology is not well understood. Recently, it was demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of the D-1 DA receptor agonist, SKF-82958 produces a stronger activation of striatal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in FR relative to ad libitum (AL) fed rats. The main purpose of the present study was to characterize the involvement and mechanisms of interaction between NMDA receptor function and the augmented cellular responses to D-1 DA receptor stimulation in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of FR rats. In experiment 1, Western immunoblotting was used to demonstrate that i.c.v. injection of SKF-82958 (20 microg) produces greater phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 subunit and calcium-calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) in NAc of FR as compared with AL rats. In experiment 2, pretreatment of subjects with the NMDA antagonist, MK-801 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased SKF-82958-induced activation of CaMK II, ERK1/2 and CREB, and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on activation of all three proteins. In experiment 3, pretreatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor SL-327 (60 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed SKF-82958- induced activation of ERK1/2 and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on CREB activation. These results point to specific neuroadaptations in the NAc of FR rats whereby D-1 DA receptor stimulation leads to increased NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation and consequent increases in NMDA receptor-dependent CaMK II and ERK1

  12. Calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium channels in the medial striatum increases at eye opening.

    PubMed

    Evans, R C; Herin, G A; Hawes, S L; Blackwell, K T

    2015-04-01

    Influx of calcium through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is essential for striatal function and plasticity. VGCCs expressed in striatal neurons have varying kinetics, voltage dependences, and densities resulting in heterogeneous subcellular calcium dynamics. One factor that determines the calcium dynamics in striatal medium spiny neurons is inactivation of VGCCs. Aside from voltage-dependent inactivation, VGCCs undergo calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI): inactivating in response to an influx of calcium. CDI is a negative feedback control mechanism; however, its contribution to striatal neuron function is unknown. Furthermore, although the density of VGCC expression changes with development, it is unclear whether CDI changes with development. Because calcium influx through L-type calcium channels is required for striatal synaptic depression, a change in CDI could contribute to age-dependent changes in striatal synaptic plasticity. Here we use whole cell voltage clamp to characterize CDI over developmental stages and across striatal regions. We find that CDI increases at the age of eye opening in the medial striatum but not the lateral striatum. The developmental increase in CDI mostly involves L-type channels, although calcium influx through non-L-type channels contributes to the CDI in both age groups. Agents that enhance protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of calcium channels reduce the magnitude of CDI after eye opening, suggesting that the developmental increase in CDI may be related to a reduction in the phosphorylation state of the L-type calcium channel. These results are the first to show that modifications in striatal neuron properties correlate with changes to sensory input.

  13. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Liliana F; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R; Guilak, Farshid; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2015-09-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  14. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R.; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  15. Poliovirus protein 2BC increases cytosolic free calcium concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, R; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus-infected cells undergo an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations from the 4th h postinfection. The protein responsible for this effect was identified by the expression of different poliovirus nonstructural proteins in HeLa cells by using a recombinant vaccinia virus system. Synthesis of protein 2BC enhances cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in a manner similar to that observed in poliovirus-infected cells. To identify the regions in 2BC involved in modifying cytoplasmic calcium levels, several 2BC variants were generated. Regions present in both 2B and 2C are necessary to augment cellular free calcium levels. Therefore, in addition to inducing proliferation of membranous vesicles, poliovirus protein 2BC also alters cellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:9223520

  16. Calcium regulates estrogen increase in permeability of cultured CaSki epithelium by eNOS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gorodeski, G I

    2000-11-01

    Estrogen increases baseline transepithelial permeability across CaSki cultures and augments the increase in permeability in response to hypertonic gradients. In estrogen-treated cells, lowering cytosolic calcium abrogated the hypertonicity-induced augmented increase in permeability and decreased baseline permeability to a greater degree than in estrogen-deprived cells. Steady-state levels of cytosolic calcium in estrogen-deprived cells were higher than in estrogen-treated cells. Increases in extracellular calcium increased cytosolic calcium more in estrogen-deprived cells than in estrogen-treated cells. However, in estrogen-treated cells, increasing cytosolic calcium was associated with greater increases in permeability in response to hypertonic gradients than in estrogen-deprived cells. Lowering cytosolic calcium blocked the estrogen-induced increase in nitric oxide (NO) release and in the in vitro conversion of L-[(3)H]arginine to L-[(3)H]citrulline. Treatment with estrogen upregulated mRNA of the NO synthase isoform endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). These results indicate that cytosolic calcium mediates the responses to estrogen and suggest that the estrogen increase in permeability and the augmented increase in permeability in response to hypertonicity involve an increase in NO synthesis by upregulation of the calcium-dependent eNOS.

  17. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C.; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S.; Irace, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk. Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods. We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women. Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:26937904

  18. Expression of OsCAS (Calcium-Sensing Receptor) in an Arabidopsis Mutant Increases Drought Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Xu, Mengmeng; Wei, Rongrong; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaS), which is localized in the chloroplasts, is a crucial regulator of extracellular calcium-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis. It has homologs in Oryza sativa and other plants. These sequences all have a rhodanese-like protein domain, which has been demonstrated to be associated with specific stress conditions. In this study, we cloned the Oryza sativa calcium-sensing receptor gene (OsCAS) and demonstrated that OsCAS could sense an increase of extracellular Ca2+ concentration and mediate an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. The OsCAS gene was transformed into an Arabidopsis CaS knockout mutant (Salk) and overexpressed in the transgenic plants. OsCAS promoted stomatal closure. We screened homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis plants and determined physiological indices such as the oxidative damage biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA), relative membrane permeability (RMP), proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, after 21 days of drought treatment. Our results revealed lower RMP and MDA contents and a higher Proline content in transgenic Arabidopsis plants after drought stress, whereas the opposite was observed in Salk plants. With respect to chlorophyll fluorescence, the electron transport rate and effective PSII quantum yield decreased in all lines under drought stress; however, in the transgenic plants these two parameters changed fewer and were higher than those in wild-type and Salk plants. The quantum yield of regulated energy dissipation and nonregulated energy dissipation in PSII were higher in Salk plants, whereas these values were lower in the transgenic plants than in the wild type under drought stress. The above results suggest that the transgenic plants showed better resistance to drought stress by decreasing damage to the cell membrane, increasing the amount of osmoprotectants, and maintaining a relatively high photosynthetic capacity. In conclusion, OsCAS is an extracellular calcium-sensing receptor

  19. Novel phosphate-activated macrophages prevent ectopic calcification by increasing extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Hamczyk, Magda R.; Andrés, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus is an essential nutrient involved in many pathobiological processes. Less than 1% of phosphorus is found in extracellular fluids as inorganic phosphate ion (Pi) in solution. High serum Pi level promotes ectopic calcification in many tissues, including blood vessels. Here, we studied the effect of elevated Pi concentration on macrophage polarization and calcification. Macrophages, present in virtually all tissues, play key roles in health and disease and display remarkable plasticity, being able to change their physiology in response to environmental cues. Methods and results High-throughput transcriptomic analysis and functional studies demonstrated that Pi induces unpolarized macrophages to adopt a phenotype closely resembling that of alternatively-activated M2 macrophages, as revealed by arginine hydrolysis and energetic and antioxidant profiles. Pi-induced macrophages showed an anti-calcifying action mediated by increased availability of extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate. Conclusion We conclude that the ability of Pi-activated macrophages to prevent calcium-phosphate deposition is a compensatory mechanism protecting tissues from hyperphosphatemia-induced pathologic calcification. PMID:28362852

  20. Accumulation of extracellular calcium at the endplate of mouse diaphragm after ecothiopate in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, P. F.; Ferry, C. B.; Smith, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    1. Experiments were carried out to investigate the accumulation from the extracellular medium of 45Ca2+ by the endplate region of skeletal muscle. 2. Mouse diaphragm muscle was incubated in physiological saline labelled with 45Ca at 37 degrees C for periods of up to 1.5 h. 3. The muscle was divided into junctional and non-junctional portions and the Ca from the extracellular fluid accumulated at the endplate determined from the 45Ca content of the portions. 4. The accumulation of extracellular Ca at the endplate region of muscles incubated in pysiological saline alone was nil, but there was accumulation in the presence of the anticholinesterase ecothiopate iodide 0.5 x 10(-6) M (ECO). Stimulation of the phrenic nerve at 0.02 Hz caused no further increase in accumulation but reduced the amount of spontaneous fasciculation. In tetrodotoxin (TTX) 10(-6) M, the accumulation was halved, and in 3.5 mM Mg2+ the accumulation was nil. Carbachol 10(-4) M resulted in an accumulation of Ca similar to that in ECO. 5. It is concluded that there was an accumulation of extracellular Ca following excitation of the nerve by stimulation at a low frequency and during the spontaneous fasciculations, and about half of the accumulation of extracellular Ca after ECO in the experiments was due to the postsynaptic action of ACh released non-quantally from the nerve terminals. PMID:2804548

  1. Calcium intake increases risk of prostate cancer among Singapore Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Lesley M.; Wong, Alvin S.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Yu, Mimi C.

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of dairy products, the primary source of calcium in Western diets, has been found to be positively associated with prostate cancer. In an Asian diet, non-dairy foods are the major contributors of calcium. Thus, a study of dietary calcium and prostate cancer in Asians can better inform on whether calcium, as opposed to other dairy components is responsible for the dairy foods-prostate cancer association. We examined calcium intake and prostate cancer risk among 27,293 men of the Singapore Chinese Health Study that was established between 1993 and 1998. As of December 31, 2007, 298 incident prostate cancer cases had been diagnosed among the cohort members. Diet was assessed at baseline with a validated 165-item food frequency questionnaire. It is hypothesized that there is greater net absorption of calcium in smaller individuals. Therefore, the calcium-prostate cancer association was also assessed in stratified analyses by median body mass index (BMI). Vegetables were the largest contributor of daily calcium intake in the study population. Overall, we observed a modest, statistically nonsignificant 25% increase in prostate cancer risk for the 4th (median = 659 mg/day) versus 1st (median=211 mg/day) quartiles of calcium intake after adjustment for potential confounders. The association became considerably stronger and achieved statistical significance (hazard ratio=2.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.34; P for trend=0.01) for men with below median (22.9 kg/m2) BMI. Dietary calcium may be a risk factor for prostate cancer even at relatively low intake. PMID:20516117

  2. Release of calcium from endolysosomes increases calcium influx through N-type calcium channels: Evidence for acidic store-operated calcium entry in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liang; Geiger, Nicholas H; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Churchill, Grant C; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-12-01

    Neurons possess an elaborate system of endolysosomes. Recently, endolysosomes were found to have readily releasable stores of intracellular calcium; however, relatively little is known about how such 'acidic calcium stores' affect calcium signaling in neurons. Here we demonstrated in primary cultured neurons that calcium released from acidic calcium stores triggered calcium influx across the plasma membrane, a phenomenon we have termed "acidic store-operated calcium entry (aSOCE)". aSOCE was functionally distinct from store-operated calcium release and calcium entry involving endoplasmic reticulum. aSOCE appeared to be governed by N-type calcium channels (NTCCs) because aSOCE was attenuated significantly by selectively blocking NTCCs or by siRNA knockdown of NTCCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that NTCCs co-immunoprecipitated with the lysosome associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and that aSOCE is accompanied by increased cell-surface expression levels of NTCC and LAMP1 proteins. Moreover, we demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of LAMP1 or Rab27a, both of which are key proteins involved in lysosome exocytosis, attenuated significantly aSOCE. Taken together our data suggest that aSOCE occurs in neurons, that aSOCE plays an important role in regulating the levels and actions of intraneuronal calcium, and that aSOCE is regulated at least in part by exocytotic insertion of N-type calcium channels into plasma membranes through LAMP1-dependent lysosome exocytosis.

  3. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E.; Bravo-San Pedro, José M.; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M.; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24 h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3 h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection. PMID:24184327

  4. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2014-02-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection.

  5. Calcium carbonate formation on mica supported extracellular polymeric substance produced by Rhodococcus opacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra; Czemierska, Magdalena; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from Rhodococcus opacus bacterial strain was used as a matrix for calcium carbonate precipitation using the vapour diffusion method. The total exopolymer and water-soluble exopolymer fraction of different concentrations were spread on the mica surface by the spin-coating method. The obtained layers were characterized using the atomic force microscopy measurement and XPS analysis. The effects of polymer concentration, initial pH of calcium chloride solution and precipitation time on the obtained crystals properties were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the precipitated minerals. It was found that the type of precipitated CaCO3 polymorph and the crystal size depend on the kind of EPS fraction. The obtained results indicates that the water soluble fraction favours vaterite dissolution and calcite growth, whereas the total EPS stabilizes vaterite and this effect is stronger at basic pH. It seems to be due to different contents of the functional group of EPS fractions.

  6. Release of O2- and LTC4 by murine eosinophils: role of intra- and extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    de Andres, B; del Pozo, V; Martin, E; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1990-01-01

    Using an experimental model of mouse peritoneal eosinophilia, we investigated the role of Ca2+ in the in vitro activation of these cells challenged with specific Mesocestoides corti antigen. We have detected LTC4, a metabolite derived from arachidonic acid by way of 5'lipo-oxygenase and superoxide anion from the oxidative burst, as inflammatory mediators produced by activated eosinophils. Preincubation with hyperimmune mice serum increases the amount of LTC4 and superoxide anion in response to the antigenic extract. Release of O2- is inhibited by Verapamil (a voltage-gated calcium channel) and Quin 2 (an intracellular trapped chelator of calcium). Also, LTC4 produced by preincubated eosinophils challenged with M. corti is dramatically inhibited by Quin 2. Our results suggest an intact mechanism for calcium control for the release of these inflammatory mediators by eosinophils, after specific antigenic stimulation. PMID:1689695

  7. Regulation of mouse lung development by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaR.

    PubMed

    Finney, Brenda A; del Moral, Pierre M; Wilkinson, William J; Cayzac, Sebastien; Cole, Martin; Warburton, David; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2008-12-15

    Postnatal lung function is critically dependent upon optimal embryonic lung development. As the free ionized plasma calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) of the fetus is higher than that of the adult, the process of lung development occurs in a hypercalcaemic environment. In the adult, [Ca(2+)](o) is monitored by the G-protein coupled, extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), but neither its ontogeny nor its potential role in lung development are known. Here, we demonstrate that CaR is expressed in the mouse lung epithelium, and that its expression is developmentally regulated, with a peak of expression at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and a subsequent decrease by E18, after which the receptor is absent. Experiments carried out using the lung explant culture model in vitro show that lung branching morphogenesis is sensitive to [Ca(2+)](o), being maximal at physiological adult [Ca(2+)](o) (i.e. 1.0-1.3 mM) and lowest at the higher, fetal (i.e. 1.7 mM) [Ca(2+)](o). Administration of the specific CaR positive allosteric modulator, the calcimimetic R-568, mimics the suppressive effects of high [Ca(2+)](o) on branching morphogenesis while both phospholipase C and PI3 kinase inhibition reverse these effects. CaR activation suppresses cell proliferation while it enhances intracellular calcium signalling, lung distension and fluid secretion. Conditions which are restrictive either to branching or to secretion can be rescued by manipulating [Ca(2+)](o) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fetal Ca(2+)(o), acting through a developmentally regulated CaR, is an important extrinsic factor that modulates the intrinsic lung developmental programme. Our observations support a novel role for the CaR in preventing hyperplastic lung disease in utero.

  8. Vertebrate extracellular calcium-sensing receptor evolution: selection in relation to life history and habitat.

    PubMed

    Herberger, Amanda L; Loretz, Christopher A

    2013-03-01

    Ionic calcium (Ca(2+)) supports essential functions within physiological systems, and consequently its concentration is homeostatically regulated within narrow bounds in the body fluids of animals through endocrine effects at ion-transporting osmoregulatory tissues. In vertebrates, extracellular Ca(2+) is detected at the cell surface by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. Interestingly, the taxonomic distribution of CaSRs is restricted to vertebrates, with some CaSR-like receptors apparently present in non-vertebrate chordates. Since bone is a known Ca(2+) storage site and is characteristically restricted to the vertebrate lineage, we hypothesized a functional association of CaSR with vertebrate skeleton that may have an ancient origin. Protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate CaSRs and related GPCRs of the glutamate receptor-like family expose similarities and indel differences among these receptors, and reveal the evolutionary history of CaSRs. Evolutionary selection was tested statistically by evaluating the relationship between non-synonymous (replacement, dN) versus synonymous (silent, dS) amino acid substitution rates (as dN/dS) of protein-coding DNA sequences among branches of the estimated protein phylogeny. On a background of strong purifying selection (dN/dS<1) in the CaSR phylogeny, statistical evidence for adaptive evolution (dN/dS>1) was detected on some branches to major clades in the CaSR phylogeny, especially to the tetrapod vertebrate CaSRs and chordate CaSR-like branches. Testing also revealed overall purifying selection at the codon level. At some sites relaxation from strong purifying selection was seen, but evidence for adaptive evolution was not detected for individual sites. The results suggest purifying selection of CaSRs, and of adaptive evolution among some major vertebrate clades, reflecting clade specific differences in natural history

  9. Regulation of transepithelial ion transport and intracellular calcium by extracellular ATP in human normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, S. J.; Paradiso, A. M.; Boucher, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    1 The role of extracellular nucleotides in regulation of ion transport activities (short circuit current, Isc) of human respiratory epithelia was studied. 2 Application of nucleotides to the apical or basolateral membrane of human nasal epithelium induced a concentration-dependent increase in Isc. 3 The rank order of potency of purine- or pyrimidine-induced changes in Isc of normal human nasal epithelium when applied to the apical membrane (UTP greater than or equal to ATP greater than ATP gamma S greater than 2MeSATP greater than ADP beta S much greater than beta gamma MeATP greater than or equal to alpha beta MeATP) or basolateral membrane (2MeSATP greater than UTP greater than ATP greater than ATP gamma S greater than alpha beta MeATP greater than beta gamma MeATP) is consistent with involvement of a P2 purinoceptor. A similar rank order of potencies was observed for nucleotide effects on intracellular calcium measured by Fura-2 fluorescence using microspectrofluorimetry. 4 Similar nucleotide potency in the regulation of ion transport and intracellular calcium in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelium (UTP greater than or equal to ATP) was observed, suggesting purinoceptors might be used to stimulate ion transport processes that would promote hydration of airway secretions and facilitate their clearance from CF lungs. 5 These data provide evidence for the regulation of ion transport by P2 purinoceptors in normal and cystic fibrosis human airway epithelium. PMID:1718521

  10. Extracellular calcium acts as a “third messenger” to regulate enzyme and alkaline secretion

    PubMed Central

    Caroppo, Rosa; Gerbino, Andrea; Fistetto, Gregorio; Colella, Matilde; Debellis, Lucantonio; Hofer, Aldebaran M.; Curci, Silvana

    2004-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the functional consequences of stimulation with Ca2+-mobilizing agonists are derived exclusively from the second messenger action of intracellular Ca2+, acting on targets inside the cells. However, during Ca2+ signaling events, Ca2+ moves in and out of the cell, causing changes not only in intracellular Ca2+, but also in local extracellular Ca2+. The fact that numerous cell types possess an extracellular Ca2+ “sensor” raises the question of whether these dynamic changes in external [Ca2+] may serve some sort of messenger function. We found that in intact gastric mucosa, the changes in extracellular [Ca2+] secondary to carbachol-induced increases in intracellular [Ca2+] were sufficient and necessary to elicit alkaline secretion and pepsinogen secretion, independent of intracellular [Ca2+] changes. These findings suggest that extracellular Ca2+ can act as a “third messenger” via Ca2+ sensor(s) to regulate specific subsets of tissue function previously assumed to be under the direct control of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:15240573

  11. Vitamin D supplementation increases calcium absorption without a threshold effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maximal calcium absorption in response to vitamin D has been proposed as a biomarker for vitamin D sufficiency. Our objective was to determine whether there is a threshold beyond which increasing doses of vitamin D, or concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], no longer increase cal...

  12. Mechanical stimulation evokes rapid increases in extracellular adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ashley E; Nguyen, Michael D; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical perturbations can release ATP, which is broken down to adenosine. In this work, we used carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure mechanically stimulated adenosine in the brain by lowering the electrode 50 μm. Mechanical stimulation evoked adenosine in vivo (average: 3.3 ± 0.6 μM) and in brain slices (average: 0.8 ± 0.1 μM) in the prefrontal cortex. The release was transient, lasting 18 ± 2 s. Lowering a 15-μm-diameter glass pipette near the carbon-fiber microelectrode produced similar results as lowering the actual microelectrode. However, applying a small puff of artificial cerebral spinal fluid was not sufficient to evoke adenosine. Multiple stimulations within a 50-μm region of a slice did not significantly change over time or damage cells. Chelating calcium with EDTA or blocking sodium channels with tetrodotoxin significantly decreased mechanically evoked adenosine, signifying that the release is activity dependent. An alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, did not affect mechanically stimulated adenosine; however, the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1,2 and 3 (NTDPase) inhibitor POM-1 significantly reduced adenosine so a portion of adenosine is dependent on extracellular ATP metabolism. Thus, mechanical perturbations from inserting a probe in the brain cause rapid, transient adenosine signaling which might be neuroprotective. We have discovered immediate changes in adenosine concentration in the prefrontal cortex following mechanical stimulation. The adenosine increase lasts only about 20 s. Mechanically stimulated adenosine was activity dependent and mostly because of extracellular ATP metabolism. This rapid, transient increase in adenosine may help protect tissue and would occur during implantation of any electrode, such as during deep brain stimulation.

  13. [Calcium supplementation and the possible increase in cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Montero Sáez, Abelardo; Formiga, Francesc; Pujol Farriols, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of osteoporosis treatment is to prevent the occurrence of fragility fractures, and thereby reduce morbidity and mortality. Among the various approaches to the treatment of this disease include ensuring proper calcium intake and to obtain adequate levels of vitamin D. Virtually all clinical trials with drugs used to treat osteoporosis systematically include calcium and vitamin D supplements. In light of the recent publication of clinical trials and meta-analyses, a possible increase in cardiovascular risk, particularly in the form of a myocrdial infarction, is hypothesised in patients taking calcium supplements. However, data published to date are inconclusive. Until the development of new scientific evidence, it seems reasonable to recommend, whenever practicable and individualized for each patient, increasing calcium intake with food and reserve supplements for patients with very low calcium intake in the diet. It would also be advisable for the administration of total daily dose to be fractionated throughout the day and with meals, and to obtain appropriate levels of vitamin D (25-hydroxycholecalciferol or calcidiol), along with the basic treatment for osteoporosis that is decided to be prescribed to patients.

  14. Mechanical transients of single toad stomach smooth muscle cells. Effects of lowering temperature and extracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Smooth muscle's slow, economical contractions may relate to the kinetics of the crossbridge cycle. We characterized the crossbridge cycle in smooth muscle by studying tension recovery in response to a small, rapid length change (i.e., tension transients) in single smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach (Bufo marinus). To confirm that these tension transients reflect crossbridge kinetics, we examined the effect of lowering cell temperature on the tension transient time course. Once this was confirmed, cells were exposed to low extracellular calcium [( Ca2+]o) to determine whether modulation of the cell's shortening velocity by changes in [Ca2+]o reflected the calcium sensitivity of one or more steps in the crossbridge cycle. Single smooth muscle cells were tied between an ultrasensitive force transducer and length displacement device after equilibration in temperature-controlled physiological saline having either a low (0.18 mM) or normal (1.8 mM) calcium concentration. At the peak of isometric force, after electrical stimulation, small, rapid (less than or equal to 1.8% cell length in 3.6 ms) step stretches and releases were imposed. At room temperature (20 degrees C) in normal [Ca2+]o, tension recovery after the length step was described by the sum of two exponentials with rates of 40-90 s-1 for the fast phase and 2-4 s-1 for the slow phase. In normal [Ca2+]o but at low temperature (10 degrees C), the fast tension recovery phase slowed (apparent Q10 = 1.9) for both stretches and releases whereas the slow tension recovery phase for a release was only moderately affected (apparent Q10 = 1.4) while unaffected for a stretch. Dynamic stiffness was determined throughout the time course of the tension transient to help correlate the tension transient phases with specific step(s) in the crossbridge cycle. The dissociation of tension and stiffness, during the fast tension recovery phase after a release, was interpreted as evidence that this recovery phase resulted from

  15. Understanding spatial and temporal patterning of astrocyte calcium transients via interactions between network transport and extracellular diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrahman, E.; Maruyama, D.; Olariu, E.; Fink, C. G.; Zochowski, M.

    2017-02-01

    Astrocytes form interconnected networks in the brain and communicate via calcium signaling. We investigate how modes of coupling between astrocytes influence the spatio-temporal patterns of calcium signaling within astrocyte networks and specifically how these network interactions promote coordination within this group of cells. To investigate these complex phenomena, we study reduced cultured networks of astrocytes and neurons. We image the spatial temporal patterns of astrocyte calcium activity and quantify how perturbing the coupling between astrocytes influences astrocyte activity patterns. To gain insight into the pattern formation observed in these cultured networks, we compare the experimentally observed calcium activity patterns to the patterns produced by a reduced computational model, where we represent astrocytes as simple units that integrate input through two mechanisms: gap junction coupling (network transport) and chemical release (extracellular diffusion). We examine the activity patterns in the simulated astrocyte network and their dependence upon these two coupling mechanisms. We find that gap junctions and extracellular chemical release interact in astrocyte networks to modulate the spatiotemporal patterns of their calcium dynamics. We show agreement between the computational and experimental findings, which suggests that the complex global patterns can be understood as a result of simple local coupling mechanisms.

  16. Cell cavities increase tortuosity in brain extracellular space.

    PubMed

    Tao, A; Tao, L; Nicholson, C

    2005-06-21

    Brain extracellular space (ECS) forms hindered pathways for molecular diffusion in chemical signaling and drug delivery. Hindrance is quantified by the tortuosity lambda; the tortuosity obtained from simulations using uniformly spaced convex cells is significantly lower than that measured experimentally. To attempt to account for the difference in results, this study employed a variety of ECS models based on an array of cubic cells containing open rectangular cavities that provided the ECS with dead-space microdomains. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that, in such ECS models, lambda can equal or exceed the typical experimental value of about 1.6. The simulations further revealed that lambda is relatively independent of cavity shape and the number of cavities per cell. It mainly depends on the total ECS volume fraction alpha, the cavity volume fraction alpha(c), and whether the cavity is located at the center of a cell face or formed at the junction of multiple cells. To describe the results from the different ECS models, an expression was obtained that related lambda to alpha, alpha(c), and an empirical exit factor beta that correlated with the ease with which a molecule could leave a cavity and its vicinity.

  17. P2X7 receptor-pannexin 1 hemichannel association: effect of extracellular calcium on membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Poornima, V; Madhupriya, M; Kootar, S; Sujatha, G; Kumar, Arvind; Bera, Amal Kanti

    2012-03-01

    Activation of P2X(7) receptor (P2X(7)R) and pannexin have been implicated in membrane permeabilization associated with ischemic cell death and many other inflammatory processes. P2X(7)R has a unique property of forming large pore upon repeated or prolonged application of agonist like ATP or 2', 3'-(4-benzoyl) benzoyl ATP. It has been proposed that pannexin 1 (panx1) hemichannel associates with P2X(7)R to form large pore, though the actual mechanism is not yet understood. Calcium concentration in extracellular milieu drops in many patho-physiological conditions, e.g. ischemia, when P2X(7)R/pannexin is also known to be activated. Therefore, we hypothesize that extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](o)) plays an important role in the coupling of P2X(7)R-panx1 and subsequent membrane permeabilization. In this study we show that membrane permeability of the P2X(7)R and panx1 expressing N2A cell increases in ([Ca(2+)](o))-free solution. In [Ca(2+)](o)-free solution, fluorescent dye calcein trapped cells exhibited time-dependent dye leakage resulting in about 50% decrease of fluorescence intensity in 30 min. Control cells in 2 mM [Ca(2+)](o) did not show such leakage. Like N2A cells, mixed culture of neuron and glia, derived from hippocampal progenitor cells showed similar dye leakage. Dye leakage was blocked either by pannexin-specific blocker, carbenoxolone or P2X(7)R antagonists, Brilliant Blue G, and oxidized ATP. Furthermore P2X(7)R and panx1 were co-immunoprecipitated. The amount of P2X(7)R protein pulled-down with panx1, increased by twofold when cells were incubated 30 min in [Ca(2+)](o)-free buffer. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the activation and association of P2X(7)R-panx1, triggered by the removal of [Ca(2+)](o).

  18. Expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human osteoblastic MG-63 cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Ye, C.; Vassilev, P. M.; Sanders, J. L.; Brown, E. M.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown the expression of the extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor (CaR) in osteoblast-like cell lines, and others have documented its expression in sections of murine, bovine, and rat bone. The existence of the CaR in osteoblasts remains controversial, however, since some studies have failed to document its expression in the same osteoblast-like cell lines. The goals of the present study were twofold. 1) We sought to determine whether the CaR is expressed in the human osteoblast-like cell line, MG-63, which has recently been reported by others not to express this receptor. 2) We investigated whether the CaR, if present in MG-63 cells, is functionally active, since most previous studies have not proven the role of the CaR in mediating known actions of Ca2+o on osteoblast-like cells. We used immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with the specific, affinity-purified anti-CaR antiserum 4637 as well as Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR using a riboprobe and PCR primers specific for the human CaR, respectively, to show readily detectable CaR protein and mRNA expression in MG-63 cells. Finally, we employed the patch-clamp technique to show that an elevation in Ca2+o as well as the specific, allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467 (0.5 microM), but not its less active stereoisomer NPS S-467 (0.5 microM), activate an outward K+ channel in MG-63 cells, strongly suggesting that the CaR in MG-63 cells is not only expressed but is functionally active.

  19. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical ...

  20. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor is required for cholecystokinin secretion in response to L-phenylalanine in acutely isolated intestinal I cells.

    PubMed

    Liou, Alice P; Sei, Yoshitatsu; Zhao, Xilin; Feng, Jianying; Lu, Xinping; Thomas, Craig; Pechhold, Susanne; Raybould, Helen E; Wank, Stephen A

    2011-04-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has recently been recognized as an L-amino acid sensor and has been implicated in mediating cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion in response to aromatic amino acids. We investigated whether direct detection of L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) by CaSR results in CCK secretion in the native I cell. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of duodenal I cells from CCK-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice demonstrated CaSR gene expression. Immunostaining of fixed and fresh duodenal tissue sections confirmed CaSR protein expression. Intracellular calcium fluxes were CaSR dependent, stereoselective for L-Phe over D-Phe, and responsive to type II calcimimetic cinacalcet in CCK-eGFP cells. Additionally, CCK secretion by an isolated I cell population was increased by 30 and 62% in response to L-Phe in the presence of physiological (1.26 mM) and superphysiological (2.5 mM) extracellular calcium concentrations, respectively. While the deletion of CaSR from CCK-eGFP cells did not affect basal CCK secretion, the effect of L-Phe or cinacalcet on intracellular calcium flux was lost. In fact, both secretagogues, as well as superphysiological Ca(2+), evoked an unexpected 20-30% decrease in CCK secretion compared with basal secretion in CaSR(-/-) CCK-eGFP cells. CCK secretion in response to KCl or tryptone was unaffected by the absence of CaSR. The present data suggest that CaSR is required for hormone secretion in the specific response to L-Phe by the native I cell, and that a receptor-mediated mechanism may inhibit hormone secretion in the absence of a fully functional CaSR.

  1. Does extracellular calcium determine what pool of GABA is the target for alpha-latrotoxin?

    PubMed

    Storchak, L G; Linetska, M V; Himmelreich, N H

    2002-04-01

    Presynaptic neurotoxin alpha-latrotoxin, from the venom of Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, causes massive [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain synaptosomes, irrespective of calcium presence in the extracellular medium. Whether the binding of alpha-latrotoxin to Ca(2+)-dependent (neurexin 1 alpha) or to Ca(2+)-independent (latrophilin) receptor triggers [(3)H]GABA release by the same mechanisms or different ones, inducing either exocytotic process or outflow by mobile membrane GABA transporter, is unknown. We examined alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release from synaptosomes which cytosolic [(3)H]GABA pool was depleted either by applying competitive inhibitors of the GABA transporter, nipecotic acid and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, or by permeation with digitonin. We also compared the effect of the GABA transporter inhibitors on depolarisation-evoked and alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release using as depolarising agents 4-aminopyridine and high KCl in the Ca(2+)-containing and in Ca(2+)-free medium, respectively. Incubation of synaptosomes with nipecotic acid induced the essential acceleration of unstimulated [(3)H]GABA release and deep inhibition of high KCl-evoked Ca(2+)-independent [(3)H]GABA release. In contrast, at the similar conditions the effect of alpha-latrotoxin was greatly augmented with respect to the control response. Another way to assay what GABA pool was involved in alpha-latrotoxin-induced release lays in an analysis of the effects of depolarisation and alpha-latrotoxin in consecutive order. The preliminary 4-aminopyridine-stimulated [(3)H]GABA release attenuated the toxin effect. But when depolarisation occurred in Ca(2+)-free medium, no influence on alpha-latrotoxin effect was revealed. Employing digitonin-permeated synaptosomes, we have shown that alpha-latrotoxin could stimulate [3H]GABA release in the medium with 1mM EGTA, this effect of the toxin was blocked by concanavalin A and was ATP-dependent. The latter suggests that alpha

  2. β-phenylethylamine Requires the Dopamine Transporter to Increase Extracellular Dopamine in C. elegans Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Murad; Wickramasekara, Rochelle N.; Carvelli, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    β-phenylethylamine (βPEA) is an endogenous amine that has been shown to increase the synaptic levels of dopamine (DA). A number of in vitro and behavioral studies suggest the dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a role in the effects generated by βPEA, however the mechanism through which βPEA affects DAT has not yet been elucidated. Here, we used Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans DAT (DAT-1) expressing LLC-pk1 cells and neuronal cultures to investigate whether the βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA required DAT-1. Our data show that βPEA increases extracellular dopamine both in DAT-1 transfected cells and cultures of differentiated neurons. RTI-55, a cocaine homologue and DAT inhibitor, completely blocked the βPEA-induced effect in transfected cells. However in neuronal cultures, RTI-55 only partly inhibited the increase of extracellular DA generated by βPEA. These results suggest that βPEA requires DAT-1 and other, not yet identified proteins, to increase extracellular DA when tested in a native system. Furthermore, our results suggest that βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA does not require functional monoamine vesicles as genetic ablation of the C. elegans homologue vesicular monoamine transporter, cat-1, did not compromise the ability of βPEA to increase extracellular DA. Finally, our electrophysiology data show that βPEA caused fast-rising and self-inactivating amperometric currents in a subset of wild-type DA neurons but not in neurons isolated from dat-1 knockout animals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that in both DA neurons and heterogeneous cultures of differentiated C. elegans neurons, βPEA releases cytoplasmic DA through DAT-1 to ultimately increase the extracellular concentration of DA. PMID:24161617

  3. PAR-1-Stimulated Factor IXa Binding to a Small Platelet Subpopulation Requires a Pronounced and Sustained Increase of Cytoplasmic Calcium

    PubMed Central

    London, Fredda S.; Marcinkiewicz, Mariola; Walsh, Peter N.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that only a subpopulation of PAR-1-stimulated platelets binds coagulation factor IXa, since confirmed by other laboratories. Since calcium changes have been implicated in exposure of procoagulant aminophospholipids, we have now examined calcium fluxes in this subpopulation by measuring fluorescence changes in Fura Red/AM-loaded platelets following PAR-1 stimulation. While fluorescence changes in all platelets indicated calcium release from internal stores and influx of external calcium, a subpopulation of platelets displayed a pronounced increase in calcium transients by 15 seconds and positive factor IXa binding by 2 minutes, with calcium transients sustained for 45 minutes. Pretreatment of platelets with Xestospongin C to inhibit IP3-mediated dense tubule calcium release, and the presence of impermeable calcium channel blockers nifedipine, SKF96365 or LaCl3, inhibited PAR-1-induced development of a subpopulation with pronounced calcium transients, factor IXa binding, and platelet support of FXa generation, suggesting the importance of both release of calcium from internal stores and influx of extracellular calcium. When platelets were stimulated in EDTA for 5 to 20 minutes before addition of calcium, factor IXa binding sites developed on a smaller subpopulation but with unchanged rate indicating sustained opening of calcium channels and continued availability of signaling elements required for binding site exposure. While pretreatment of platelets with 100 μM BAPTA/AM (Kd 160 nM) had minimal effects, 100 μM 5, 5′-dimethylBAPTA/AM (Kd 40 nM) completely inhibited the appearance and function of the platelet subpopulation, indicating the importance of minor increases of cytoplasmic calcium. We conclude that PAR-1-stimulated development of factor IXa binding sites in a subpopulation of platelets is dependent upon release of calcium from internal stores leading to sustained and pronounced calcium transients. PMID:16752917

  4. Calciotropic hormones and lipolysis of human adipose tissue: role of extracellular calcium as conditioning but not regulating factor.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Jobst, W; Minne, H; Faulhaber, J D

    1980-01-01

    The influences of different calcium concentrations (0, 0.924 and 2.772 mMol/l) on lipolysis of in vitro incubated human adipose tissue slices or adipocytes were studied under the conditions of stimulation with isoproterenol and parathyroid hormone preparations or inhibition by insulin. Extractive bovine PTH (as well as synthetic PTH 1--34) stimulated glycerol release in a biphasic pattern similarly to isoproterenol; PTH was about half as potent as isoproterenol. The optimal conditions for lipolysis were observed using a calcium concentration of 0.924 mMol/l, whereas lipolysis was distinctly impaired at concentrations of 0 or 2.772 mMol/l; this was true for basal as well as isoproterenol- and PTH stimulated lipolysis or the inhibitory effect of insulin. In contrast to partially purified extractive calcitonin, pure synthetic calcitonin did not inhibit lipolysis. Isoproterenol- and PTH-administrations led to cAMP accumulation in the adipose tissue, this process was also diminished at the non-optimal calcium concentrations. The results suggest a conditioning, but not a regulating significance of extracellular calcium for lipolysis, whereas the importance of the lipolytic potency of PTH remains to be elucidated.

  5. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Shan-Li; Sun, Ming-Rui; Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin; Xu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3

  6. Effect of extracellular calcium, pH and borate on growth oscillations in Lilium formosanum pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Holdaway-Clarke, Terena L; Weddle, Nicole M; Kim, SaRa; Robi, Amsale; Parris, Colleen; Kunkel, Joseph G; Hepler, Peter K

    2003-01-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)), protons (H(+)), and borate (B(OH)(4)(-)) are essential ions in the control of tip growth of pollen tubes. All three ions may interact with pectins, a major component of the expanding pollen tube cell wall. Ca(2+ )is thought to bind acidic residues, and cross-link adjacent pectin chains, thereby strengthening the cell wall. Protons are loosening agents; in pollen tube walls they may act through the enzyme pectin methylesterase (PME), and either reduce demethylation or stimulate hydrolysis of pectin. Finally, borate cross-links monomers of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), and thus stiffens the cell wall. It is demonstrated here that changing the extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+), H(+) and borate affect not only the average growth rate of lily pollen tubes, but also influence the period of growth rate oscillations. The most dramatic effects are observed with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and borate, both of which markedly reduce the rate of growth of oscillating pollen tubes. Protons are less active, except at pH 7.0 where growth is inhibited. It is noteworthy, especially with borate, that the faster growing tubes exhibit the shorter periods of oscillation. The results are consistent with the idea that binding of Ca(2+) and borate to the cell wall may act at a similar level to alter the mechanical properties of the apical cell wall, with optimal concentrations being high enough to impart sufficient rigidity to the wall so as to prevent bursting in the face of cell turgor, but low enough to allow the wall to stretch quickly during periods of accelerating growth.

  7. Extracellular norepinephrine in the medial hypothalamus increases during feeding in chicks: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Utimura, D; Kato, H; Kubo, T; Sugahara, K

    2000-11-01

    Norepinephrinergic function in the medial hypothalamus is important for the regulation of feeding behavior in chicks as well as in rats. This study was conducted to clarify the variation of extracellular norepinephrine (NE) in the medial hypothalamus, including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN), during feeding behavior of layer-type chicks. To measure extracellular NE and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol (MHPG), a major metabolite of NE, we used microdialysis and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. After the collection of baseline samples, food-deprived animals were allowed access to the food for 3 h. Extracellular NE significantly increased during the first hour of access to food, and then returned to baseline levels. MHPG also increased during the feeding, but its increase continued throughout the remainder of the experiment. This study suggests that the variation of NE in the medial hypothalamus may be involved in the control of feeding in layer-type chicks.

  8. Acetylcholine increases intracellular calcium of arterial chemoreceptor cells of adult cats.

    PubMed

    Shirahata, M; Fitzgerald, R S; Sham, J S

    1997-11-01

    Acetylcholine increases intracellular calcium of arterial chemoreceptor cells of adult cats. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2388-2395, 1997. Several neurotransmitters have been reported to play important roles in the chemoreception of the carotid body. Among them acetylcholine (ACh) appears to be involved in excitatory processes in the cat carotid body. As one of the steps to elucidate possible roles of ACh in carotid body chemoreception in the cat, we examined the effect of ACh on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) of cultured carotid body cells. The carotid body from adult cats was dissociated and cultured for up to 2 wk. [Ca2+]i was measured from clusters of cells with a microfluorometric technique using Indo-1 AM. Experiments were performed at 37 degrees C, and cells were continuously superfused with modified Krebs solutions equilibrated with 5% CO2-16% O2-79% N2. ACh (100 mu M) caused a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in approximately 70% of clusters, and the responses to 1-300 mu M of ACh were concentration dependent. The magnitude and kinetics of the ACh response were mimicked by the application of nicotine, whereas muscarinic agonists, pilocarpine, and muscarine failed to evoke a similar response. ACh-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on extracellular Ca2+: it was greatly reduced or completely abolished by a transient removal of extracellular Ca2+. The response was consistently but only partially reduced by caffeine (5 mM) or nifedipine (10 mu M). The effect of mecamylamine (100 mu M) was inhibitory but small. Moreover, the increase in [Ca2+]i in response to ACh was also observed in some clusters that did not respond to high K (100 mM) Krebs. These results suggest that ACh increases [Ca2+]i of cultured carotid body cells by activating neuronal nicotinic ACh receptors, leading to Ca2+ influx via nicotinic channels. In addition, other pathways such as Ca2+ influx through L-type calcium channels, perhaps secondary to membrane depolarization, and Ca2

  9. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate activates calcium mobilization in human phagocytic leukocytes and neutrophil/monocyte progenitor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, D S; Lazarus, H M; Shurin, S B; Stoll, S E; Dubyak, G R

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the ability of extracellular ATP to elicit intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in a broad range of human leukocytes at particular stages of hematopoietic differentiation. The average cytosolic [Ca2+] in various leukocyte populations was measured in Fura 2-loaded cell suspensions while the cytosolic [Ca2+] in individual, Indo 1-loaded leukocytes was assayed by flow cytometric methods. Utilizing normal blood- and marrow-derived cells, human leukemic cell lines, and mononuclear cell fractions derived from the blood of patients with various leukemias, we have found that ATP-induced Ca2+ mobilization appears restricted to leukocytes of neutrophil/monocyte ontogeny. Significant ATP-induced increases in cytosolic [Ca2+] were observed in neutrophils, monocytes, and myeloid progenitor cells as immature as myeloblasts, but not in lymphocytes. Extensive characterization of the ATP-induced changes in [Ca2+] observed in the HL-60 promyelocytic cell line have indicated these Ca2+-mobilizing effects of ATP can be correlated with an activation of inositol phospholipid breakdown via the occupation of P2-purinergic receptors Significantly, of the various agonists (FMLP, platelet-activating factor, LTB4, and ATP) which elicit equivalent and maximal Ca2+ mobilization in mature neutrophils and monocytes, ATP was the most efficacious stimulant of Ca2+ mobilization in immature neutrophil/monocyte precursors. Thus, expression of putative P2-purinergic receptors for ATP appears to precede expression of other receptor types known to activate the inositol phospholipid signaling cascades in terminally differentiated phagocytes. PMID:2708526

  10. Adolescence: How do we increase intestinal calcium absorption to allow for bone mineral mass accumulation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase in calcium absorptive efficiency (fractional absorption of dietary calcium) during adolescence is associated with a rapid increase in total body bone mineral mass (BMM) accumulation. This increase occurs across a range of calcium intakes. It appears to be principally mediated by hormonal...

  11. Cholinergic modulation of extracellular ATP-induced cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in cochlear outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Wikström, M A; Lawoko, G; Heilbronn, E

    1998-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) of the mammalian cochlea modulate the inner hair cell (IHC) mechanoelectrical transduction of sound. They are contacted by synapsing efferent neurons from the CNS, their main efferent neurotransmitter being acetylcholine (ACh). OHC function and in particular their control of [Ca2+]i is highly important and is modulated by ACh and also by other substances including extracellular (EC) ATP. OHC carry at their efferent synapse a not yet completely identified neuronal type of ionotropic ACh receptor (AChR), with an unusual pharmacology, which is, in vivo and in vitro, reversibly blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-bgtx). The AChR mediates a fast influx of Ca2+ into OHC which, in turn, activates a closeby located outwardly-directed Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-channel, thus shortly hyperpolarizing the cell. A cloned homomeric alpha 9 nAChR mimicks the function and pharmacology of this receptor. We here report results from a study designed to observe only slower effects triggered by EC ATP and the ACh-AChR system. EC presence of ATP at OHC increases [Ca2+]i by activating both P2x and P2y purinoceptors and also by indirect activation of OHC L-type Ca(2+)-channels. The L-type channel activation is responsible for a large part of the [Ca2+]i increase. Simultaneous EC presence of ACh and ATP at OHC was found to depress ATP-induced effects on OHC [Ca2+]i, an effect that is completely blocked in the presence of alpha-bgtx. Our observations suggest that the ACh-AChR system is involved in the modulation of the observed EC ATP-triggered events; possibly the OHC AChR is able to act both in its well known rapid ionotropic way, but also, perhaps after modification in a slower, metabotropic way interfering with the EC ATP-induced [Ca2+]i increase.

  12. Inhibition of Extracellular Calcium Influx Results in Enhanced IL-12 Production in LPS-Treated Murine Macrophages by Downregulation of the CaMKKβ-AMPK-SIRT1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanfeng; Yang, Yongjun; Chen, Xiaoli; Fan, Shijun; Chen, Qian; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Activated macrophages are the primary sources of IL-12, a key cytokine bridging innate and adaptive immunity. However, macrophages produce low amounts of IL-12 upon stimulation and the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we found a new calcium-dependent mechanism that controlled IL-12 production in LPS-treated murine macrophages. First, LPS was demonstrated to induce extracellular calcium entry in murine peritoneal macrophages and inhibition of calcium influx resulted in marked enhancement in IL-12 production. Then, withdrawal of extracellular calcium was found to suppress CaMKKβ and AMPK activation triggered by LPS while chemical inhibition or genetic knockdown of these two kinases augmented LPS induced IL-12 production. AMPK activation increased the NAD+/NADH ratio and activated Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent deacetylating enzyme and negative regulator of inflammation. Chemical inhibitor or siRNA of SIRT1 enhanced IL-12 release while its agonist suppressed IL-12 production. Finally, it was found that SIRT1 selectively affected the transcriptional activity of NF-κB which thereby inhibited IL-12 production. Overall, our study demonstrates a new role of transmembrane calcium mobilization in immunity modulation such that inhibition of calcium influx leads to impaired activation of CaMKKβ-AMPK-SIRT1 signaling pathway which lifts restriction on NF-κB activation and results in enhanced IL-12 production. PMID:27313401

  13. Lithium prevents early cytosolic calcium increase and secondary injurious calcium overload in glycolytically inhibited endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bosche, Bert; Schäfer, Matthias; Graf, Rudolf; Härtel, Frauke V.; Schäfer, Ute; Noll, Thomas

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We investigate free calcium as a central signalling element in endothelial cells. •Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduces cellular ATP. •This manoeuvre leads to a biphasic increase and overload of free calcium. •Pre-treatment with lithium for 24 h abolishes both phases of the calcium increase. •This provides a new strategy to protect endothelial calcium homeostasis and barrier function. -- Abstract: Cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is a central signalling element for the maintenance of endothelial barrier function. Under physiological conditions, it is controlled within narrow limits. Metabolic inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion, however, induces [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload, which results in barrier failure. In a model of cultured porcine aortic endothelial monolayers (EC), we addressed the question of whether [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload can be prevented by lithium treatment. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ATP were analysed using Fura-2 and HPLC, respectively. The combined inhibition of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by 2-desoxy-D-glucose (5 mM; 2-DG) plus sodium cyanide (5 mM; NaCN) caused a significant decrease in cellular ATP content (14 ± 1 nmol/mg protein vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg protein in the control, n = 6 culture dishes, P < 0.05), an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (278 ± 24 nM vs. 71 ± 2 nM in the control, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05), and the formation of gaps between adjacent EC. These observations indicate that there is impaired barrier function at an early state of metabolic inhibition. Glycolytic inhibition alone by 10 mM 2-DG led to a similar decrease in ATP content (14 ± 2 nmol/mg vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg in the control, P < 0.05) with a delay of 5 min. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} response of EC was biphasic with a peak after 1 min (183 ± 6 nM vs. 71 ± 1 nM, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05) followed by a sustained increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. A 24-h pre-treatment with 10 mM of lithium

  14. T-type calcium channels contribute to calcium disturbances in brain during hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Odackal, John; Sherpa, Ang D; Patel, Nisha; Colbourn, Robert; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-11-01

    Disturbance of calcium homeostasis is implicated in the normal process of aging and brain pathology prevalent in the elderly such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies demonstrated that applying a hyponatremic iso-osmotic (low-NaCl) artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to rodent hippocampus causes extracellular calcium to rapidly decrease. Restoring normonatremia after low-NaCl treatment causes a rapid increase in extracellular calcium that overshoots baseline. This study examined the amplitude, timing, and mechanism of these surprising calcium changes. We also tested whether hyponatremia increased calcium entry into brain cells or calcium binding to chondroitin sulfate (CS), a negatively charged constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that may be occupied by sodium during normonatremia. We report three major findings. First we show that CS does not contribute to extracellular calcium changes during low-NaCl treatments. Second, we show that the time to minimum extracellular calcium during low-NaCl treatment is significantly shorter than the time to maximum extracellular calcium in recovery from low-NaCl treatment. Third, we show that the decrease in extracellular calcium observed during hyponatremia is attenuated by ML 218, a highly selective T-type calcium channel blocker. Together these data suggest that calcium rapidly enters cells at the onset of low-NaCl treatment and is extruded from cells when normonatremia is restored. Calcium binding to CS does not significantly contribute to calcium changes in brain during hyponatremia. Differences in timing suggest that extracellular calcium changes during and in recovery from hyponatremia occur by distinct mechanisms or by a multistep process. Finally, partial block of extracellular calcium influx by ML 218 suggests that T-type channels are involved in calcium entering cells during hyponatremia. Given the high prevalence of hyponatremia among elderly patients and the

  15. Expression of a functional extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Xiong Yali; He Chaoxia; Hu Qinghua . E-mail: qinghuaa@jhmi.edu

    2006-03-31

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) regulates the functions of many cell types through a G protein-coupled [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}-sensing receptor (CaR). Whether the receptor is functionally expressed in vascular endothelial cells is largely unknown. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), RT-PCR yielded the expected 555-bp product corresponding to the CaR, and CaR protein was demonstrated by fluorescence immunostaining and Western blot. RT-PCR also demonstrated the expression in HAEC of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR lacking exon 5. Although stimulation of fura 2-loaded HAEC by several CaR agonists (high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}, neomycin, and gadolinium) failed to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), the CaR agonist spermine stimulated an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} that was diminished in buffer without Ca{sup 2+} and was abolished after depletion of an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} pool with thapsigargin or after blocking IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} release with xestospongin C and with high concentration ryanodine, respectively. Spermine stimulated an increase in DAF-FM fluorescence in HAEC, consistent with NO production. Both the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and in NO production were reduced or absent in HAEC transfected with siRNA specifically targeted to the CaR. HAEC express a functional CaR that responds to the endogenous polyamine spermine with an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, primarily due to release of IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores, leading to the production of NO. Expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR may result in the absence of a functional response to other known CaR agonists in HAEC.

  16. Redox-sensitive extracellular gates formed by auxiliary beta subunits of calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xu-Hui; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2003-06-01

    An important step to understanding ion channels is identifying the structural components that act as the gates to ion movement. Here we describe a new channel gating mechanism, produced by the beta3 auxiliary subunits of Ca2+-activated, large-conductance BK-type K+ channels when expressed with their pore-forming alpha subunits. BK beta subunits have a cysteine-rich extracellular segment connecting two transmembrane segments, with small cytosolic N and C termini. The extracellular segments of the beta3 subunits form gates to block ion permeation, providing a mechanism by which current can be rapidly diminished upon cellular repolarization. Furthermore, this gating mechanism is abolished by reduction of extracellular disulfide linkages, suggesting that endogenous mechanisms may regulate this gating behavior. The results indicate that auxiliary beta subunits of BK channels reside sufficiently close to the ion permeation pathway defined by the alpha subunits to influence or block access of small molecules to the permeation pathway.

  17. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Actions of Orthosteric and Allosteric Ligands on Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1α*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jason Y.; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Zhang, Li; Hamelberg, Donald; Hall, Randy A.; Brown, Edward M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α), a member of the family C G protein-coupled receptors, is emerging as a potential drug target for various disorders, including chronic neuronal degenerative diseases. In addition to being activated by glutamate, mGluR1α is also modulated by extracellular Ca2+. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Moreover, it has long been challenging to develop receptor-specific agonists due to homologies within the mGluR family, and the Ca2+-binding site(s) on mGluR1α may provide an opportunity for receptor-selective targeting by therapeutics. In the present study, we show that our previously predicted Ca2+-binding site in the hinge region of mGluR1α is adjacent to the site where orthosteric agonists and antagonists bind on the extracellular domain of the receptor. Moreover, we found that extracellular Ca2+ enhanced mGluR1α-mediated intracellular Ca2+ responses evoked by the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate. Conversely, extracellular Ca2+ diminished the inhibitory effect of the mGluR1α orthosteric antagonist (S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine. In addition, selective positive (Ro 67-4853) and negative (7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester) allosteric modulators of mGluR1α potentiated and inhibited responses to extracellular Ca2+, respectively, in a manner similar to their effects on the response of mGluR1α to glutamate. Mutations at residues predicted to be involved in Ca2+ binding, including E325I, had significant effects on the modulation of responses to the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate and the allosteric modulator Ro 67-4853 by extracellular Ca2+. These studies reveal that binding of extracellular Ca2+ to the predicted Ca2+-binding site in the extracellular domain of mGluR1α modulates not only glutamate-evoked signaling but also the actions of both orthosteric ligands and allosteric modulators on mGluR1α. PMID:24280223

  18. The common inhaled anesthetic isoflurane increases aggregation of huntingtin and alters calcium homeostasis in a cell model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiujun; Liang Ge; Yang Hui; Wang Shouping; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Wei Huafeng

    2011-02-01

    Isoflurane is known to increase {beta}-amyloid aggregation and neuronal damage. We hypothesized that isoflurane will have similar effects on the polyglutamine huntingtin protein and will cause alterations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. We tested this hypothesis in striatal cells from the expanded glutamine huntingtin knock-in mouse (STHdh{sup Q111/Q111}) and wild type (STHdh{sup Q7/Q7}) striatal neurons. The primary cultured neurons were exposed for 24 h to equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium and with or without xestospongin C, a potent endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist. Aggregation of huntingtin protein, cell viability, and calcium concentrations were measured. Isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane all increased the aggregation of huntingtin in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells, with isoflurane having the largest effect. Isoflurane induced greater calcium release from the ER and relatively more cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} huntingtin cells than in the wild type STHdh{sup Q7/Q7} striatal cells. However, sevoflurane and desflurane caused less calcium release from the ER and less cell damage. Xestospongin C inhibited the isoflurane-induced calcium release from the ER, aggregation of huntingtin, and cell damage in the STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} cells. In summary, the Q111 form of huntingtin increases the vulnerability of striatal neurons to isoflurane neurotoxicity through combined actions on the ER IP{sub 3} receptors. Calcium release from the ER contributes to the anesthetic induced huntingtin aggregation in STHdh{sup Q111/Q111} striatal cells.

  19. Effect of glutamate and extracellular calcium on uptake of inorganic lead (Pb2+) in immortalized mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Loikkanen, J; Naarala, J; Vähäkangas, K H; Savolainen, K M

    2006-01-25

    We have previously shown that although glutamate alone has no effects on viability of mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 cells, it clearly enhances Pb2+-induced cytotoxicity. It is likely that Pb2+ must enter cells to exert most of its toxic effects. Pb2+ is known to substitute for Ca2+ in many cellular processes. Therefore, we studied the uptake mechanisms of Pb2+ into GT1-7 neuronal cells with a special focus on the role of extracellular calcium (Ca2+), voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) and glutamate. Basal uptake of Pb2+ (1 microM or 10 microM), i.e. without any external stimulus, clearly increased in nominally Ca2+-free buffer and was partially abolished by 13 mM Ca2+ when compared to uptake in the presence of a physiological concentration of extracellular Ca2+ (1.3 mM). Depolarization by 25 mM K+, or antagonists of VSCCs, verapamil (10 microM) or flunarizine (10 microM) had no clear effect on basal Pb2+ uptake. Glutamate (1 mM) increased Pb2+ uptake, but only when cells were treated with 1 microM Pb2+ in the presence of 1.3 mM Ca2+. Our data suggest that Pb2+ competes for the same cellular uptake pathways with Ca2+, although not via VSCCs. In addition, enhancement of Pb2+-induced neurotoxicity by glutamate may be due to increased neuronal uptake of Pb2+.

  20. Calcium-independent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 by cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, M.; Takei, T.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that cyclic strain induces extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) activation in endothelial cells (EC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Ca2+ on the activation of ERK1/2. Bovine aortic EC were pretreated with a chelator of extracellular Ca2+, ethylaneglycol-bis(aminoethylether)-tetra-acetate (EGTA), a depleter of Ca2+ pools, 2,5-Di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone (BHQ), or a Ca2+ channel blocker, GdCl3, and subjected to an average 10 % strain at a rate of 60 cycles/min for 10 min. BHQ and GdCl3 did not inhibit the strain-induced ERK1/2 activation. Chelation of normal extracellular Ca2+ (1.8 mM) medium with EGTA (3 mM) acutely stimulated baseline phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2, thereby obscuring any strain-induced activation of ERK1/2. However, in EC preincubated for 24 hours in Ca2+-free medium, elevated baseline phosphorylation was minimally activated by EGTA (200 microM) such that cyclic strain stimulated ERK1/2 in the presence or absence of BHQ. These results suggest a Ca2+ independence of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway by cyclic strain. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  1. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jay; Nakata, Paul A; McConn, Michele; Brock, Amanda; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2007-07-01

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical calcium concentrations to wild-type, but contains no oxalate crystals. In this study, equal number of male and female mice were randomly grouped and then fed one of four 45Ca-containing diets: M. truncatula extrinsically or intrinsically labeled, and cod5 extrinsically or intrinsically labeled. Absorption of the tracer was determined in the legs one day after consumption. The absorption was similar in the M. truncatula and cod5 extrinsically labeled diets; however, in the intrinsically labeled diets, calcium absorption was 22.87% (P < 0.001) higher in mice fed cod5. Our study presents the first genetic evidence demonstrating the nutritional impact of removing oxalate crystals from foods.

  2. Intrastriatal taurine increases striatal extracellular dopamine in a tetrodotoxin-sensitive manner in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Ahtee, L

    1996-07-19

    In vivo effects of locally administered taurine on striatal dopamine release and metabolism were studied by microdialysis in freely moving rats. Concentrations of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in striatal dialysates were quantified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) using electrochemical detection. Infusion of 150 mM taurine into the striatum for 2 h induced a 2.5-fold increase in the extracellular dopamine concentration. Extracellular DOPAC concentration increased nearly 2-fold. Taurine infusion initially decreased HVA to 70% but afterwards increased it to 140% of the control. When taurine was infused simultaneously with 1 microM tetrodotoxin starting 60 min after tetrodotoxin, the output of dopamine did not differ from that in the presence of tetrodotoxin alone. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of taurine on dopamine metabolites as well. Tetrodotoxin-sensitivity of the effects of taurine on dopamine and its metabolites suggests that intrastriatal taurine elevates extracellular dopamine by releasing it from neuronal pool.

  3. Acute isoproterenol induces anxiety-like behavior in rats and increases plasma content of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Leo, Giuseppina; Guescini, Michele; Genedani, Susanna; Stocchi, Vilberto; Carone, Chiara; Filaferro, Monica; Sisti, Davide; Marcoli, Manuela; Maura, Guido; Cortelli, Pietro; Guidolin, Diego; Fuxe, Kjell; Agnati, Luigi Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Several clinical observations have demonstrated a link between heart rate and anxiety or panic disorders. In these patients, β-adrenergic receptor function was altered. This prompted us to investigate whether the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol, at a dose that stimulates peripheral β-adrenergic system but has no effects at the central nervous system, can induce anxiety-like behavior in rats. Moreover, some possible messengers involved in the peripheral to brain communication were investigated. Our results showed that isoproterenol (5 mg kg(-1) i.p.) increased heart rate, evoked anxiety-like behavior, did not result in motor impairments and increased extracellular vesicle content in the blood. Plasma corticosterone level was unmodified as well as vesicular Hsp70 content. Vesicular miR-208 was also unmodified indicating a source of increased extracellular vesicles different from cardiomyocytes. We can hypothesize that peripheral extracellular vesicles might contribute to the β-adrenergic receptor-evoked anxiety-like behavior, acting as peripheral signals in modulating the mental state.

  4. Extracellular Vpr protein increases cellular permissiveness to human immunodeficiency virus replication and reactivates virus from latency.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D N; Refaeli, Y; Weiner, D B

    1995-01-01

    The vpr gene product of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus is a virion-associated regulatory protein that has been shown using vpr mutant viruses to increase virus replication, particularly in monocytes/macrophages. We have previously shown that vpr can directly inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell differentiation, events linked to the control of HIV replication, and also that the replication of a vpr mutant but not that of wild-type HIV type 1 (HIV-1) was compatible with cellular proliferation (D. N. Levy, L. S. Fernandes, W. V. Williams, and D. B. Weiner, Cell 72:541-550, 1993). Here we show that purified recombinant Vpr protein, in concentrations of < 100 pg/ml to 100 ng/ml, increases wild-type HIV-1 replication in newly infected transformed cell lines via a long-lasting increase in cellular permissiveness to HIV replication. The activity of extracellular Vpr protein could be completely inhibited by anti-Vpr antibodies. Extracellular Vpr also induced efficient HIV-1 replication in newly infected resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Extracellular Vpr transcomplemented a vpr mutant virus which was deficient in replication in promonocytic cells, restoring full replication competence. In addition, extracellular Vpr reactivated HIV-1 expression in five latently infected cell lines of T-cell, B-cell, and promonocytic origin which normally express very low levels of HIV RNA and protein, indicating an activation of translational or pretranslational events in the virus life cycle. Together, these results describe a novel pathway governing HIV replication and a potential target for the development of anti-HIV therapeutics. PMID:7815499

  5. Increased digitalis-like activity in human cerebrospinal fluid after expansion of the extracellular fluid volume

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.A.; Martin, A.M.; Malave, S.

    1985-08-12

    The present study was designed to determine whether acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume influenced the digitalis-like activity of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), previously described. Human CSF samples, drawn before and 30 minutes after the intravenous infusion of 1 liter of either saline or glucose solutions, were assayed for digitalis-like activity by inhibition of either the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into human erythrocytes or by the activity of a purified Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase. The CSF inhibitory activity on both systems significantly increased after the infusion of sodium solutions but did not change after the infusion of glucose. These results indicate that the digitalis-like factor of human CSF might be involved in the regulation of the extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte content and thereby in some of the physiological responses to sodium loading. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... You'll also find calcium in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables (especially collard and turnip greens, ... can enjoy good sources of calcium such as dark green, leafy vegetables, broccoli, chickpeas, and calcium-fortified ...

  7. Dependence of the carbon-tetrachloride--induced death of cultured hepatocytes on the extracellular calcium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Casini, A.F.; Farber, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The role of extracellular Ca/sup 2/+ ions in the killing of liver cells by CCl/sub 4/ was studied in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. The dependence of in vitro cell killing on the metabolism of CCl/sub 4/ was first examined in order to document the similarity between the action of CCl/sub 4/ on cultured hepatocytes and the action of CCl/sub 4/ on liver cells in the intact animal. Cells prepared from male rats pretreated with phenobarbital were more sensitive to CCl/sub 4/ than cells prepared from either male or female rats. The killing of hepatocytes by CCl/sub 4/ was prevented by addition of SKF 525A to the culture medium. This protection was accompanied by evidence of decreased CCl/sub 4/ metabolism as assessed by the extent of covalent binding of 14C-CCl/sub 4/ metabolites to total cellular lipids and proteins, and by the extent of formation of conjugated dienes accompanying the peroxidation of phospholipids isolated from total cell lipids. The extent of killing of the hepatocytes by CCl/sub 4/ was dependent on the Ca/sup 2/+ concentration in the tissue culture medium. The results of this study indicate that it is the presence of extracellular Ca/sup 2/+ that converts initially nonlethal cell injury into irreversible cell injury in CCl/sub 4/-treated cells. This action of Ca/sup 2/+ most likely represents an influx into the cell across an injured permeability barrier at the plasma membrane, in accord with the accumulation of large quantities of Ca/sup 2/+ in CCl/sub 4/-intoxicated liver cells in the intact animal. The relation between this alteration in Ca/sup 2/+ homeostasis and the metabolism of CCl/sub 4/ is discussed.

  8. Comparative expression of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the mouse, rat, and human kidney.

    PubMed

    Graca, J A Z; Schepelmann, M; Brennan, S C; Reens, J; Chang, W; Yan, P; Toka, H; Riccardi, D; Price, S A

    2016-03-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was cloned over 20 years ago and functionally demonstrated to regulate circulating levels of parathyroid hormone by maintaining physiological serum ionized calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]). The receptor is highly expressed in the kidney; however, intrarenal and intraspecies distribution remains controversial. Recently, additional functions of the CaSR receptor in the kidney have emerged, including parathyroid hormone-independent effects. It is therefore critical to establish unequivocally the localization of the CaSR in the kidney to relate this to its proposed physiological roles. In this study, we determined CaSR expression in mouse, rat, and human kidneys using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry (using 8 different commercially available and custom-made antibodies), and proximity ligation assays. Negative results in mice with kidney-specific CaSR ablation confirmed the specificity of the immunohistochemistry signal. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed CaSR expression in the thick ascending limb, distal tubule, and collecting duct of all species, with the thick ascending limb showing the highest levels. Within the collecting ducts, there was significant heterogeneity of expression between cell types. In the proximal tubule, lower levels of immunoreactivity were detected by immunohistochemistry and proximity ligation assays. Proximity ligation assays were the only technique to demonstrate expression within glomeruli. This study demonstrated CaSR expression throughout the kidney with minimal discrepancy between species but with significant variation in the levels of expression between cell and tubule types. These findings clarify the intrarenal distribution of the CaSR and enable elucidation of the full physiological roles of the receptor within this organ.

  9. Transcranial direct-current stimulation increases extracellular dopamine levels in the rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tomoko; Takano, Yuji; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hironaka, Naoyuki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Hanakawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Katsumi; Honda, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive procedure that achieves polarity-dependent modulation of neuronal membrane potentials. It has recently been used as a functional intervention technique for the treatment of psychiatric and neurological diseases; however, its neuronal mechanisms have not been fully investigated in vivo. Objective/Hypothesis: To investigate whether the application of cathodal or anodal tDCS affects extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat striatum. Methods: Stimulation and in vivo microdialysis were carried out under urethane anesthesia, and microdialysis probes were slowly inserted into the striatum. After the collection of baseline fractions in the rat striatum, cathodal or anodal tDCS was applied continuously for 10 min with a current intensity of 800 μA from an electrode placed on the skin of the scalp. Dialysis samples were collected every 10 min until at least 400 min after the onset of stimulation. Results: Following the application of cathodal, but not anodal, tDCS for 10 min, extracellular dopamine levels increased for more than 400 min in the striatum. There were no significant changes in extracellular serotonin levels. Conclusion: These findings suggest that tDCS has a direct and/or indirect effect on the dopaminergic system in the rat basal ganglia. PMID:23596399

  10. Vitamin D does not increase calcium absorption in young women: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J Christopher; Jindal, Prachi S; Smith, Lynette M

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly said that vitamin D should be used to increase calcium absorption. We tested this statement in a dose-response study of vitamin D on calcium absorption. A total of 198 white and African American women, aged 25 to 45 years, with vitamin D insufficiency, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) <20 ng/mL, were randomized in a double-blind study to vitamin D3 400, 800, 1600, 2400 IU, or placebo. A calcium supplement was given to increase mean calcium intake at baseline from 706 mg/d to 1031 mg/d. Calcium absorption was measured at baseline and after 12 months using a single isotope method with radiocalcium45 and 100 mg of calcium. Mean baseline serum 25OHD was 13.4 ng/mL (33.5 nmol/L) and increased to 40 ng/mL (100 nmol/L) on the highest dose of 2400 IU. Using a multivariate regression analysis with significant predictors, baseline absorption, calcium intake, and weight, there was no increase in 12-month calcium absorption compared with baseline on any dose of vitamin D in either whites or African Americans. There was no significant relationship between 12-month calcium absorption and final serum 25OHD. In an analysis of calcium absorption and serum 25OHD at baseline, serum 25OHD levels were divided into groups: 0 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 15, or 16 to 20 ng/mL. There was no evidence of a threshold decrease in calcium absorption or serum 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2 D) amongst the lowest groups. Vitamin D doses up to 2400 IU daily did not increase calcium absorption. No threshold level of serum 25OHD for calcium absorption was found at baseline or in the longitudinal study, suggesting that active transport of calcium is saturated at very low serum 25OHD levels <5 ng/mL. There is no need to recommend vitamin D for increasing calcium absorption in normal subjects. Very efficient calcium absorption at very low levels of serum 25OHD explains why people do not develop osteomalacia provided that dietary intakes of calcium and phosphorus are adequate.

  11. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in a sodium/calcium exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jun; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Lee, Changkeun; Huang, Yihe; Faraldo-Gomez, Jose D.; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-05-16

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3:1Na+/Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamics and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. Lastly, these calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport.

  12. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in the sodium-calcium exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ChangKeun; Huang, Yihe; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3Na+:1Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamics and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. These calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport. PMID:27183196

  13. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in a sodium/calcium exchanger

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Jun; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Lee, Changkeun; ...

    2016-05-16

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3:1Na+/Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamicsmore » and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. Lastly, these calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport.« less

  14. Increased extracellular concentrations of norepinephrine in cortex and hippocampus following vagus nerve stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Roosevelt, Rodney W; Smith, Douglas C; Clough, Richard W; Jensen, Robert A; Browning, Ronald A

    2006-11-13

    The vagus nerve is an important source of afferent information about visceral states and it provides input to the locus coeruleus (LC), the major source of norepinephrine (NE) in the brain. It has been suggested that the effects of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve on learning and memory, mood, seizure suppression, and recovery of function following brain damage are mediated, in part, by the release of brain NE. The hypothesis that left vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) at the cervical level results in increased extracellular NE concentrations in the cortex and hippocampus was tested at four stimulus intensities: 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mA. Stimulation at 0.0 and 0.25 mA had no effect on NE concentrations, while the 0.5 mA stimulation increased NE concentrations significantly in the hippocampus (23%), but not the cortex. However, 1.0 mA stimulation significantly increased NE concentrations in both the cortex (39%) and hippocampus (28%) bilaterally. The increases in NE were transient and confined to the stimulation periods. VNS did not alter NE concentrations in either structure during the inter-stimulation baseline periods. No differences were observed between NE levels in the initial baseline and the post-stimulation baselines. These findings support the hypothesis that VNS increases extracellular NE concentrations in both the hippocampus and cortex.

  15. The Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor in the Intestine: Evidence for Regulation of Colonic Absorption, Secretion, Motility, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lieqi; Cheng, Catherine Y.; Sun, Xiangrong; Pedicone, Alexandra J.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Cheng, Sam X.

    2016-01-01

    Different from other epithelia, the intestinal epithelium has the complex task of providing a barrier impeding the entry of toxins, food antigens, and microbes, while at the same time allowing for the transfer of nutrients, electrolytes, water, and microbial metabolites. These molecules/organisms are transported either transcellularly, crossing the apical and basolateral membranes of enterocytes, or paracellularly, passing through the space between enterocytes. Accordingly, the intestinal epithelium can affect energy metabolism, fluid balance, as well as immune response and tolerance. To help accomplish these complex tasks, the intestinal epithelium has evolved many sensing receptor mechanisms. Yet, their roles and functions are only now beginning to be elucidated. This article explores one such sensing receptor mechanism, carried out by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In addition to its established function as a nutrient sensor, coordinating food digestion, nutrient absorption, and regulating energy metabolism, we present evidence for the emerging role of CaSR in the control of intestinal fluid homeostasis and immune balance. An additional role in the modulation of the enteric nerve activity and motility is also discussed. Clearly, CaSR has profound effects on many aspects of intestinal function. Nevertheless, more work is needed to fully understand all functions of CaSR in the intestine, including detailed mechanisms of action and specific pathways involved. Considering the essential roles CaSR plays in gastrointestinal physiology and immunology, research may lead to a translational opportunity for the development of novel therapies that are based on CaSR's unique property of using simple nutrients such as calcium, polyamines, and certain amino acids/oligopeptides as activators. It is possible that, through targeting of intestinal CaSR with a combination of specific nutrients, oral solutions that are both inexpensive and practical may be

  16. Effects of acidification and increased extracellular potassium on dynamic muscle contractions in isolated rat muscles.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Kristian; Højfeldt, Grith Westergaard; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2010-12-15

    Since accumulation of both H(+) and extracellular K(+) have been implicated in the reduction in dynamic contractile function during intense exercise, we investigated the effects of acidification and high K(+) on muscle power and the force-velocity relation in non-fatigued rat soleus muscles. Contractions were elicited by supramaximal electrical stimulation at 60 Hz. Force-velocity (FV) curves were obtained by fitting data on force and shortening velocity at different loads to the Hill equation. Acidification of the muscles by incubation with up to 24 mm lactic acid produced no significant changes in maximal power (P(max)) at 30 °C. More pronounced acidification, obtained by increasing CO(2) levels in the equilibration gas from 5% to 53%, markedly decreased P(max) and maximal isometric force (F(max)), increased the curvature of the FV relation, but left maximal shortening velocity (V(max)) unchanged. Increase of extracellular K(+) from 4 to 10 mm caused a depression of 58% in P(max) and 52% in F(max), but had no significant effect on V(max) or curvature of the FV curve. When muscles at 10 mM K(+) were acidified by 20 mm lactic acid, P(max) and F(max) recovered completely to the initial control level at 4 mm K(+). CO(2) acidification also induced significant recovery of dynamic contractions, but not entirely to control levels. These results demonstrate that in non-fatigued muscles severe acidification can be detrimental to dynamic contractile function, but in muscles depolarised by exposure to high extracellular [K(+)], approaching the [K(+)] level seen during intense fatiguing exercise, acidification can have positive protective effects on dynamic muscle function.

  17. Bradykinin and histamine-induced cytosolic calcium increase in capillary endothelial cells of bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Vinet, Raúl; Cortés, Magdalena P; Alvarez, Rocío; Delpiano, Marco A

    2014-09-01

    We have assessed the effect of bradykinin and histamine on the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i ) of bovine adrenal medulla capillary endothelial cells (BAMCECs). To measure [Ca(2+)]i changes in BAMCECs the intracellular fluorescent probe, fluo-3 AM, was used. Bradykinin (3 µM) produced a transient monophasic increase in [Ca(2+)]i , which was depressed by B1650 (0.1 µM), a B2-bradykinin receptor antagonist (D-Arg-[Hyp(3), Thi(5,8) , D-Phe(7)]-Bradykinin). Similarly, increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by histamine was also depressed by tripolidine (0.1 µM), an H1-histamine receptor antagonist. [Ca(2+)]i increase induced by both agonists was unaffected in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or presence of antagonists of voltage operated Ca(2+) channels (VOCCs). Thapsigargin (1 µM) did not abolish the increase of [Ca(2+)]i produced by bradykinin, but abolished that of histamine. In contrast, caffeine (100 µM), abolished the [Ca(2+)]i response induced by bradykinin (3 µM), but did not affect the [Ca(2+)]i increase induced by histamine (100 µM). The results indicate the presence of B2 bradykinin- and H1 histamine-receptors in BAMCECs. Liberation of Ca(2+) induced by both agonists occurs through 2 different intracellular mechanisms. While bradykinin activates a sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum (SER) containing a SER Ca(2+) -ATPase (SERCA) thapsigargin-insensitive, histamine activates a SER containing a SERCA thapsigargin-sensitive. We suggest that the increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by bradykinin and histamine could be of physiological relevance, modulating adrenal gland microcirculation.

  18. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor reciprocally regulates the secretion of BMP-2 and the BMP antagonist Noggin in colonic myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Peiris, Dinithi; Pacheco, Ivan; Spencer, Craig; MacLeod, R John

    2007-03-01

    To understand whether postprandial extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+)) changes were related to intestinal epithelial homeostasis, we performed array analysis on extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR)-expressing colonic myofibroblasts (18Co cells) and observed increases in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 transcripts. The present experiments demonstrated that regulated secretion of BMP-2 occurs in response to CaSR activation of these cells and revealed a new property of BMP-2 on the intestinal barrier. Activation by Ca(o)(2+), spermine, GdCl(3), or neomycin sulfate of 18Co cells or primary isolates of myofibroblasts from the normal human colon stimulated both the synthesis (RT-PCR) and secretion (ELISA) of BMP-2. Transient transfection with short interfering RNA against CaSR completely inhibited BMP-2 secretion. Transient transfection with dominant negative CaSR (R185Q) increased the EC(50) of Ca(o)(2+) (5.7 vs. 2.3 mM). Upregulation of BMP-2 transcript and secretion occurring within 3 h of CaSR activation was prevented by actinomycin D. CaSR-mediated BMP-2 synthesis and secretion required phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation (as assessed by phospho-Akt generation). Exogenous BMP-2 and conditioned medium from CaSR-stimulated 18Co cells accelerated restitution in wounded postconfluent Caco-2 cells. Exogenous BMP-2 and conditioned medium from CaSR-stimulated 18Co cells increased the transepithelial resistance of low- and high-resistance T-84 epithelial monolayers. CaSR stimulation of T-84 epithelia and colonic myofibroblasts downregulated the BMP family antagonist Noggin, as assessed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Together, our data suggest that the CaSR mediates the effective concentration of BMP-2 in the intestine, which leads to enhanced repair and barrier development.

  19. Increased intracellular free calcium and sensitivity to angiotensin II in platelets of preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Oeney, T; Hauck, U; Distler, A; Philipp, T

    1989-04-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by a generalized vasoconstriction and increased vascular sensitivity to angiotensin II. Intracellular free calcium, implicated in vascular smooth muscle contraction, has been found to be elevated in platelets of other hypertensive disorders. We therefore measured intracellular free calcium concentrations by using the fluorescent probe quin-2 in platelets of six patients with preeclampsia and compared them to measurements in ten normotensive pregnant women and ten age-matched nonpregnant women. Intracellular free calcium was also determined in the preeclamptic women after delivery. We found that intracellular free calcium was slightly elevated in normal pregnancy (102 +/- 13 nmol/L v 87 +/- 17 nmol/L) but was markedly increased in preeclampsia (138 +/- 13 nmol/L, P less than .05). This increase disappeared six weeks after delivery (84 + 10 nmol/L, P less than .01). To investigate whether the increased intracellular free calcium was related to angiotensin II, the platelets were exposed to thrombin and angiotensin II in vitro. Exposure to thrombin and angiotensin II caused a dose-dependent increase in intracellular free calcium. The intracellular response to thrombin was not significantly different in the three groups. However, stimulation with angiotensin II revealed an increased response in intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia (P less than .05) that disappeared after delivery. Our findings show a sustained increase in platelet intracellular free calcium in preeclampsia and suggest a functional alteration of the angiotensin II receptor in this disease.

  20. Extracellular Volume Overload and Increased Vasoconstriction in Patients With Recurrent Intradialytic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Van Buren, Peter Noel; Zhou, Yunyun; Neyra, Javier A.; Xiao, Guanghua; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Inrig, Jula; Toto, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Intradialytic hypertension (IH) occurs frequently in some hemodialysis patients and increases mortality risk. We simultaneously compared pre-dialysis, post-dialysis and changes in extracellular volume and hemodynamics in recurrent IH patients and controls. Methods We performed a case-control study among prevalent hemodialysis patients with recurrent IH and hypertensive hemodialysis controls. We used bioimpedance spectroscopy and impedance cardiography to compare pre-dialysis, post-dialysis, and intradialytic change in total body water (TBW) and extracellular water (ECW), as well as cardiac index (CI) and total peripheral resistance index (TPRI). Results The ECW/TBW was 0.453 (0.05) pre-dialysis and 0.427 (0.04) post-dialysis in controls vs. 0.478 (0.03) and 0.461 (0.03) in IH patients (p=0.01 post-dialysis). The ECW/TBW change was −0.027 (0.03) in controls and −0.013 (0.02) in IH patients (p=0.1). In controls, pre- and post-dialysis TPRI were 3254 (994) and 2469 (529) dynes/sec/cm2/m2 vs. 2983 (747) and 3408 (980) dynes/sec/cm2/m2 in IH patients (p=0.002 post-dialysis). There were between-group differences in TPRI change (0=0.0001), but not CI (p=0.09). Conclusions Recurrent intradialytic hypertension is associated with higher post-dialysis extracellular volume and TPRI. Intradialytic TPRI surges account for the vasoconstrictive state post-dialysis, but intradialytic fluid shifts may contribute to post-hemodialysis volume expansion. PMID:27832647

  1. Stimulation by leukotriene D4 of increases in the cytosolic concentration of calcium in dimethylsulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Baud, L; Goetzl, E J; Koo, C H

    1987-01-01

    The C6-sulfidopeptide leukotrienes C4 (LTC4) and D4 (LTD4) evoked increases in the cytosolic concentration of intracellular calcium ([Ca+2]i) in dimethylsulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells, as assessed by the fluorescence of quin-2. The increases in [Ca+2]i reached a peak within 15-90 s, attained 50% of the maximum level at 1.2 nM LTD4 and 60 nM LTC4, were greater in maximal magnitude for LTD4 than LTC4, and subsided in 5-7 min. Flow cytometric evaluation of the LTD4-induced increases in [Ca+2]i, reflected in increases in the fluorescence of intracellular indo-1, revealed that a mean of 77% of differentiated HL-60 cells responded, as contrasted with lesser increases in only 50% of undifferentiated HL-60 cells. The capacity of pretreatment of HL-60 cells with LTD4 to prevent subsequent responses of [Ca+2]i to LTC4 and LTD4, and the finding that the serine-borate inhibitor of conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 suppressed concurrently both LTC4-induced rises in [Ca+2]i and increases in adherence to Sephadex G-25 indicated that the responses of HL-60 cells to LTC4 required conversion to LTD4. That pertussis toxin and a chemical antagonist of LTD4 reduced the [Ca+2]i response suggested a dependence on LTD4 receptors. The LTD4-induced increases in [Ca+2]i were dependent on extracellular calcium and diminished by lanthanum, but not affected by nifedipine nor associated with changes in membrane potential, as measured with the fluorescent probe 3,3'-dipentyloxacarbocyanine. Thus, the increase in [Ca+2]i in HL-60 cells, which is coupled to an increase in adherence, appears to involve LTD4 receptor-specific and voltage-independent calcium channels in the plasma membrane. PMID:3477571

  2. Bromelain surface modification increases the diffusion of silica nanoparticles in the tumor extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Alessandro; Haddix, Seth G; Taghipour, Nima; Scaria, Shilpa; Taraballi, Francesca; Cevenini, Armando; Yazdi, Iman K; Corbo, Claudia; Palomba, Roberto; Khaled, Sm Z; Martinez, Jonathan O; Brown, Brandon S; Isenhart, Lucas; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-10-28

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br-MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br-MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Bromelain Surface Modification Increases the Diffusion of Silica Nanoparticles in the Tumor Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br–MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br–MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25119793

  4. Activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by proanthocyanidin-rich fraction from Croton celtidifolius (Euphorbiaceae): involvement of extracellular calcium influx in rat thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    DalBó, Silvia; Goulart, Suelen; Horst, Heros; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria

    2008-06-01

    The present study investigates the mechanisms related to the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in the relaxant effects of a proanthocyanidin-rich fraction (PRF), obtained from Croton celtidifolius Baill barks, in rat thoracic aorta rings with endothelium. In vessels pre-contracted with phenylephrine (Phe), PRF (0.1 - 100 microg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent relaxation. This effect was significantly reduced by endothelium denudation, by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine, and by 1H[1,2,3]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin. However, the vasorelaxant effect was not altered by indomethacin, atropine, tetraethylammonium, and charybdotoxin plus apamin. In thoracic aorta rings pre-contracted with phorbol-12,13-dibuyrate, PRF also induced a concentration-dependent relaxation. The PRF-induced relaxation disappeared in the absence of extracellular calcium in the medium and decreased significantly in the presence of lanthanum. A sulfhydryl alkylating agent, N-ethylmaleimide, and a phospholipase C (PLC) blocker, neomycin, significantly decreased PRF-induced vasorelaxation. In vessels pre-contracted with Phe, the PRF-induced vasorelaxant effect was not altered by quinacrine and ONO-RS-082, genistein and thyrphostin A-23, GF109203, and pertussis toxin and cholera toxin. The results suggest that the PRF-induced vasorelaxant effect is endothelium-dependent and involves the NO/cGMP pathway. We hypothesize that the activation of eNOS is due to an increase of intracellular calcium derived from PLC activation and an N-ethylmaleimide sensitive pathway.

  5. Co-occurring increases of calcium and organellar reactive oxygen species determine differential activation of antioxidant and defense enzymes in Ulva compressa (Chlorophyta) exposed to copper excess.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alberto; Vera, Jeannette; Castro, Jorge; Dennett, Geraldine; Mellado, Macarena; Morales, Bernardo; Correa, Juan A; Moenne, Alejandra

    2010-10-01

    In order to analyse copper-induced calcium release and (reactive oxygen species) ROS accumulation and their role in antioxidant and defense enzymes activation, the marine alga Ulva compressa was exposed to 10 µM copper for 7 d. The level of calcium, extracellular hydrogen peroxide (eHP), intracellular hydrogen peroxide (iHP) and superoxide anions (SA) as well as the activities of ascorbate peroxidase (AP), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were determined. Calcium release showed a triphasic pattern with peaks at 2, 3 and 12 h. The second peak was coincident with increases in eHP and iHP and the third peak with the second increase of iHP. A delayed wave of SA occurred after day 3 and was not accompanied by calcium release. The accumulation of iHP and SA was mainly inhibited by organellar electron transport chains inhibitors (OETCI), whereas calcium release was inhibited by ryanodine. AP activation ceased almost completely after the use of OETCI. On the other hand, GR and GST activities were partially inhibited, whereas defense enzymes were not inhibited. In contrast, PAL and LOX were inhibited by ryanodine, whereas AP was not inhibited. Thus, copper stress induces calcium release and organellar ROS accumulation that determine the differential activation of antioxidant and defense enzymes.

  6. Hypoxic increase in nitric oxide generation of rat sensory neurons requires activation of mitochondrial complex II and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Henrich, M; Paddenberg, R; Haberberger, R V; Scholz, A; Gruss, M; Hempelmann, G; Kummer, W

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that sensory neurons of rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) respond to hypoxia with an activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) resulting in enhanced NO production associated with mitochondria which contributes to resistance against hypoxia. Extracellular calcium is essential to this effect. In the present study on rat DRG slices, we set out to determine what types of calcium channels operate under hypoxia, and which upstream events contribute to their activation, thereby focusing upon mitochondrial complex II. Both the metallic ions Cd2+ and Ni2+, known to inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels and T-type channels, respectively, and verapamil and nifedipine, typical blocker of L-type calcium channels completely prevented the hypoxic neuronal NO generation. Inhibition of complex II by thenoyltrifluoroacetone at the ubiquinon binding site or by 3-nitropropionic acid at the substrate binding site largely diminished hypoxic-induced NO production while having an opposite effect under normoxia. An additional blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels entirely abolished the hypoxic response. The complex II inhibitor malonate inhibited both normoxic and hypoxic NO generation. These data show that complex II activity is required for increased hypoxic NO production. Since succinate dehydrogenase activity of complex II decreased at hypoxia, as measured by histochemistry and densitometry, we propose a hypoxia-induced functional switch of complex II from succinate dehydrogenase to fumarate reductase, which subsequently leads to activation of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in increased NO production by eNOS.

  7. Extracellular Self-DNA (esDNA), but Not Heterologous Plant or Insect DNA (etDNA), Induces Plasma Membrane Depolarization and Calcium Signaling in Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Maize (Zea mays)

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Francesca; Guglielmotto, Michela; Capuzzo, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular self-DNA (esDNA) is produced during cell and tissue damage or degradation and has been shown to induce significant responses in several organisms, including plants. While the inhibitory effects of esDNA have been shown in conspecific individuals, little is known on the early events involved upon plant esDNA perception. We used electrophysiology and confocal laser scanning microscopy calcium localization to evaluate the plasma membrane potential (Vm) variations and the intracellular calcium fluxes, respectively, in Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and maize (Zea mays) plants exposed to esDNA and extracellular heterologous DNA (etDNA) and to etDNA from Spodoptera littoralis larvae and oral secretions. In both species, esDNA induced a significant Vm depolarization and an increased flux of calcium, whereas etDNA was unable to exert any of these early signaling events. These findings confirm the specificity of esDNA to induce plant cell responses and to trigger early signaling events that eventually lead to plant response to damage. PMID:27690017

  8. Extracellular Self-DNA (esDNA), but Not Heterologous Plant or Insect DNA (etDNA), Induces Plasma Membrane Depolarization and Calcium Signaling in Lima Bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Barbero, Francesca; Guglielmotto, Michela; Capuzzo, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E

    2016-09-29

    Extracellular self-DNA (esDNA) is produced during cell and tissue damage or degradation and has been shown to induce significant responses in several organisms, including plants. While the inhibitory effects of esDNA have been shown in conspecific individuals, little is known on the early events involved upon plant esDNA perception. We used electrophysiology and confocal laser scanning microscopy calcium localization to evaluate the plasma membrane potential (Vm) variations and the intracellular calcium fluxes, respectively, in Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and maize (Zea mays) plants exposed to esDNA and extracellular heterologous DNA (etDNA) and to etDNA from Spodoptera littoralis larvae and oral secretions. In both species, esDNA induced a significant Vm depolarization and an increased flux of calcium, whereas etDNA was unable to exert any of these early signaling events. These findings confirm the specificity of esDNA to induce plant cell responses and to trigger early signaling events that eventually lead to plant response to damage.

  9. Expression of the high capacity calcium-binding domain of calreticulin increases bioavailable calcium stores in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Tsou, Pei-Lan; Robertson, Dominique; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of cytosolic calcium levels in both plants and animals is achieved by a system of Ca2+-transport and storage pathways that include Ca2+ buffering proteins in the lumen of intracellular compartments. To date, most research has focused on the role of transporters in regulating cytosolic calcium. We used a reverse genetics approach to modulate calcium stores in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our goals were two-fold: to use the low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ binding characteristics of the C-domain of calreticulin to selectively increase Ca2+ storage in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to determine if those alterations affected plant physiological responses to stress. The C-domain of calreticulin is a highly acidic region that binds 20-50 moles of Ca2+ per mole of protein and has been shown to be the major site of Ca2+ storage within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. A 377-bp fragment encoding the C-domain and ER retention signal from the maize calreticulin gene was fused to a gene for the green fluorescent protein and expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of a heat shock promoter. Following induction on normal medium, the C-domain transformants showed delayed loss of chlorophyll after transfer to calcium depleted medium when compared to seedlings transformed with green fluorescent protein alone. Total calcium measurements showed a 9-35% increase for induced C-domain transformants compared to controls. The data suggest that ectopic expression of the calreticulin C-domain increases Ca2+ stores, and that this Ca2+ reserve can be used by the plant in times of stress.

  10. PDGF-mediated protection of SH-SY5Y cells against Tat toxin involves regulation of extracellular glutamate and intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuhui; Yao Honghong; Peng Fuwang; Callen, Shannon; Buch, Shilpa

    2009-10-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) protein Tat has been implicated in mediating neuronal apoptosis, one of the hallmark features of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Mitigation of the toxic effects of Tat could thus be a potential mechanism for reducing HIV toxicity in the brain. In this study we demonstrated that Tat-induced neurotoxicity was abolished by NMDA antagonist-MK801, suggesting the role of glutamate in this process. Furthermore, we also found that pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF exerted protection against Tat toxicity by decreasing extracellular glutamate levels. We also demonstrated that extracellular calcium chelator EGTA was able to abolish PDGF-mediated neuroprotection, thereby underscoring the role of calcium signaling in PDGF-mediated neuroprotection. We also showed that Erk signaling pathway was critical for PDGF-mediated protection of cells. Additionally, blocking calcium entry with EGTA resulted in suppression of PDGF-induced Erk activation. These findings thus underscore the role of PDGF-mediated calcium signaling and Erk phosphorylation in the protection of cells against HIV Tat toxicity.

  11. ICP/OES application for assessing cadmium uptake (or toxicity) in glomerular cells: influence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Ohayon-Courtès, Céline; Passagne, Isabelle; De Portal, Caroline; Pouvreau, Carole; Cambar, Jean; L'Azou, Béatrice

    2007-05-01

    The risks of metals for health are highlighted by their chemical stability and their persistence in the environment. Chronic exposure to low cadmium (Cd) concentrations results in renal dysfunction mainly. Cd has been regarded primarily as a renal tubular toxicant, but glomerular structures may also be affected. Since the cellular environment may influence metal toxicity, differences concerning Cd uptake and toxicity were evaluated according to calcium (Ca) medium concentrations. An optimized inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry method (ICP/OES) was developed under defined conditions, as a selective analytical tool to determine cadmium uptake in glomerular mesangial cells. The performance characteristics of the analytical system were evaluated for both Cd and Ca by calibration (50 to 250 microg/L and 1 to 5 mg/L), linearity (r2 .9968 and .9943), limits of detection (1 microg/L and 0.1 mg/L) and quantitation (3 microg/L and 0.3 mg/L), accuracy with spiking, and repeatability (1.2 and 2.9%) with matrix matched standards. Total intracellular Cd content was significantly threefold lower in 0.175 mM Ca medium (Ca-free Eagle's minimum essential medium [EMEM] medium with 5% fetal bovine serum [FBS]) than in EMEM medium (1.8 mM Ca) with respectively 0.16 and 0.37 microg/mg proteins after 24 h of Cd (1 microM) exposure. Similar differences were obtained in cytotoxicity studies with a fourfold reduction in the mortality index (IC50). Complementary assays using Ca-spiked medium reinforced that Cd cytotoxicity and uptake were significantly dependent on the concentration of extracellular Ca. These findings suggest direct link between Cd uptake and toxicity, underlining the relevance of the analytical method.

  12. A protein disulfide isomerase gene fusion expression system that increases the extracellular productivity of Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Kajino, T; Ohto, C; Muramatsu, M; Obata, S; Udaka, S; Yamada, Y; Takahashi, H

    2000-02-01

    We have developed a versatile Bacillus brevis expression and secretion system based on the use of fungal protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a gene fusion partner. Fusion with PDI increased the extracellular production of heterologous proteins (light chain of immunoglobulin G, 8-fold; geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, 12-fold). Linkage to PDI prevented the aggregation of the secreted proteins, resulting in high-level accumulation of fusion proteins in soluble and biologically active forms. We also show that the disulfide isomerase activity of PDI in a fusion protein is responsible for the suppression of the aggregation of the protein with intradisulfide, whereas aggregation of the protein without intradisulfide was prevented even when the protein was fused to a mutant PDI whose two active sites were disrupted, suggesting that another PDI function, such as chaperone-like activity, synergistically prevented the aggregation of heterologous proteins in the PDI fusion expression system.

  13. Amantadine increases L-DOPA-derived extracellular dopamine in the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Arai, Akira; Kannari, Kazuya; Shen, Huo; Maeda, Tetsuya; Suda, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Muneo

    2003-05-16

    We investigated the effect of amantadine on L-DOPA-derived extracellular dopamine (DA) levels and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity in the striatum of rats with nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg amantadine increased the cumulative amount of extracellular DA in the striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats treated with 10 mg/kg benserazide and 50 mg/kg L-DOPA to 250% of that without amantadine (P<0.01). Under pretreatment with 10 mg/kg benserazide, AADC activity after 30 mg/kg amantadine administration was reduced to 43% of controls (P<0.01). Amantadine-induced increase in L-DOPA-derived extracellular DA provides the basis for the clinical usefulness of amantadine in combination with L-DOPA. However, the effect of amantadine on L-DOPA-derived extracellular DA may not be caused by changes in AADC activity.

  14. Calcium increases Xylella fastidiosa surface attachment, biofilm formation, and twitching motility.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luisa F; Cobine, Paul A; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms inside xylem vessels, a process thought to be influenced by the chemical composition of xylem sap. In this work, the effect of calcium on the production of X. fastidiosa biofilm and movement was analyzed under in vitro conditions. After a dose-response study with 96-well plates using eight metals, the strongest increase of biofilm formation was observed when medium was supplemented with at least 1.0 mM CaCl(2). The removal of Ca by extracellular (EGTA, 1.5 mM) and intracellular [1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM), 75 μM] chelators reduced biofilm formation without compromising planktonic growth. The concentration of Ca influenced the force of adhesion to the substrate, biofilm thickness, cell-to-cell aggregation, and twitching motility, as shown by assays with microfluidic chambers and other assays. The effect of Ca on attachment was lost when cells were treated with tetracycline, suggesting that Ca has a metabolic or regulatory role in cell adhesion. A double mutant (fimA pilO) lacking type I and type IV pili did not improve biofilm formation or attachment when Ca was added to the medium, while single mutants of type I (fimA) or type IV (pilB) pili formed more biofilm under conditions of higher Ca concentrations. The concentration of Ca in the medium did not significantly influence the levels of exopolysaccharide produced. Our findings indicate that the role of Ca in biofilm formation may be related to the initial surface and cell-to-cell attachment and colonization stages of biofilm establishment, which rely on critical functions by fimbrial structures.

  15. Increased cerebral extracellular adenosine and decreased PGE2 during ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM.

    PubMed

    Watson, C S; White, S E; Homan, J H; Kimura, K A; Brien, J F; Fraher, L; Challis, J R; Bocking, A D

    1999-04-01

    Adenosine and PGE2 are neuromodulators, both of which inhibit fetal breathing movements (FBM). Although circulating PGE2 has been implicated as a mediator of ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM in the late-gestation ovine fetus, a role for adenosine has not been examined. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of maternal ethanol infusion on ovine fetal cerebral extracellular fluid adenosine and PGE2 concentrations by using in utero microdialysis and to relate any changes to ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM. Dialysate samples were obtained from the fetal parietal cortex over 70 h after surgery to determine steady-state extracellular fluid adenosine and PGE2 concentrations. On each of postoperative days 3 and 4, after a 2-h baseline period, ewes received a 1-h infusion of ethanol (1 g/kg maternal body wt) or an equivalent volume of saline, and the fetus was monitored for a further 11 h with 30-min dialysate samples collected throughout. Immediately after surgery, dialysate PGE2 and adenosine concentrations were 3.7 +/- 0.7 and 296 +/- 127 nM, respectively. PGE2 did not change over the 70 h, whereas adenosine decreased to 59 +/- 14 nM (P < 0.05) at 4 h and then remained unchanged. Ethanol decreased dialysate PGE2 concentration for 2 h (3.3 +/- 0.3 to 1.9 +/- 0.4 nM; P < 0.05) and increased adenosine concentration for 6 h (87 +/- 13 to a maximum of 252 +/- 59 nM, P < 0.05). Ethanol decreased FBM incidence from 47 +/- 7 to 16 +/- 5% (P < 0.01) for 8 h. Saline infusion did not change dialysate adenosine or PGE2 concentrations or FBM incidence. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that fetal cerebral adenosine, and not PGE2, is the primary mediator of ethanol-induced inhibition of FBM at 123 days of gestation in sheep.

  16. Increased dependency of cardiac pacemaker activity on extracellular Ca after adrenergic blockade in the frog heart.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Y

    1986-01-01

    The frog sinus venosus shows spontaneous regular pacemaker activity, even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. When an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent (phentolamine) is applied, the rate of pacemaker activity, height of action potential, rate of slow diastolic depolarization, and the maximum diastolic potential become strongly dependent upon the extracellular Ca2+ concentration.

  17. Intrinsic stiffness of extracellular matrix increases with age in skeletal muscles of mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren K; Kayupov, Erdan; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L; Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2014-08-15

    Advanced age is associated with increases in muscle passive stiffness, but the contributors to the changes remain unclear. Our purpose was to determine the relative contributions of muscle fibers and extracellular matrix (ECM) to muscle passive stiffness in both adult and old animals. Passive mechanical properties were determined for isolated individual muscle fibers and bundles of muscle fibers that included their associated ECM, obtained from tibialis anterior muscles of adult (8-12 mo old) and old (28-30 mo old) mice. Maximum tangent moduli of individual muscle fibers from adult and old muscles were not different at any sarcomere length tested. In contrast, the moduli of bundles of fibers from old mice was more than twofold greater than that of fiber bundles from adult muscles at sarcomere lengths >2.5 μm. Because ECM mechanical behavior is determined by the composition and arrangement of its molecular constituents, we also examined the effect of aging on ECM collagen characteristics. With aging, muscle ECM hydroxyproline content increased twofold and advanced glycation end-product protein adducts increased threefold, whereas collagen fibril orientation and total ECM area were not different between muscles from adult and old mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ECM of tibialis anterior muscles from old mice has a higher modulus than the ECM of adult muscles, likely driven by an accumulation of densely packed extensively crosslinked collagen.

  18. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  19. Enhancement of rat bladder contraction by artificial sweeteners via increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Jaydip; Elliott, Ruth A. . E-mail: rae5@leicester.ac.uk; Doshani, Angie; Tincello, Douglas G.

    2006-12-01

    Introduction: Consumption of carbonated soft drinks has been shown to be independently associated with the development of overactive bladder symptoms (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.18, 2.22) [Dallosso, H.M., McGrother, C.W., Matthews, R.J., Donaldson, M.M.K., 2003. The association of diet and other lifestyle factors with overactive bladder and stress incontinence: a longitudinal study in women. BJU Int. 92, 69-77]. We evaluated the effects of three artificial sweeteners, acesulfame K, aspartame and sodium saccharin, on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle strips. Methods: Strips of detrusor muscle were placed in an organ bath and stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the absence and presence of atropine, and with {alpha},{beta} methylene ATP, potassium, calcium and carbachol. Results: Sweeteners 10{sup -7} M to 10{sup -2} M enhanced the contractile response to 10 Hz EFS compared to control (p < 0.01). The atropine-resistant response to EFS was marginally increased by acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M, aspartame 10{sup -7} M and sodium saccharin 10{sup -7} M. Acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M increased the maximum contractile response to {alpha},{beta} methylene ATP by 35% ({+-} 9.6%) (p < 0.05) and to KCl by 12% ({+-} 3.1%) (p < 0.01). Sodium saccharin also increased the response to KCl by 37% ({+-} 15.2%) (p < 0.05). These sweeteners shifted the calcium concentration-response curves to the left. Acesulfame K 10{sup -6} M increased the log EC{sub 5} from -2.79 ({+-} 0.037) to -3.03 ({+-} 0.048, p < 0.01) and sodium saccharin 10{sup -7} M from -2.74 ({+-} 0.03) to 2.86 ({+-} 0.031, p < 0.05). The sweeteners had no significant effect on the contractile response to carbachol but they did increase the amplitude of spontaneous bladder contractions. Discussion: These results suggest that low concentrations of artificial sweeteners enhanced detrusor muscle contraction via modulation of L-type Ca{sup +2} channels.

  20. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  1. Absence of K-Ras Reduces Proliferation and Migration But Increases Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Cuesta, Cristina; Eleno, Nélida; Crespo, Piero; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of Ras-GTPases in the development of renal fibrosis has been addressed in the last decade. We have previously shown that H- and N-Ras isoforms participate in the regulation of fibrosis. Herein, we assessed the role of K-Ras in cellular processes involved in the development of fibrosis: proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins synthesis. K-Ras knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (K-ras(-/-) ) stimulated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) exhibited reduced proliferation and impaired mobility than wild-type fibroblasts. Moreover, an increase on ECM production was observed in K-Ras KO fibroblasts in basal conditions. The absence of K-Ras was accompanied by reduced Ras activation and ERK phosphorylation, and increased AKT phosphorylation, but no differences were observed in TGF-β1-induced Smad signaling. The MEK inhibitor U0126 decreased cell proliferation independently of the presence of K-ras but reduced migration and ECM proteins expression only in wild-type fibroblasts, while the PI3K-AKT inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and ECM synthesis in both types of fibroblasts. Thus, our data unveil that K-Ras and its downstream effector pathways distinctively regulate key biological processes in the development of fibrosis. Moreover, we show that K-Ras may be a crucial mediator in TGF-β1-mediated effects in this cell type. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2224-2235, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Calcium overload increases oxidative stress in old rat gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Capel, F; Demaison, L; Maskouri, F; Diot, A; Buffiere, C; Patureau Mirand, P; Mosoni, L

    2005-09-01

    In order to challenge in vivo muscle Ca2+ homeostasis and analyze consequences on mitochondrial H2O2 release (MHR) and sarcopenia, we injected Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (200 microg/kg, ip) in adult and old rats and measured gastrocnemius mass and mitochondrial Ca2+ content (MCC) using radioactive Ca2+ 48 h after injection. In a second experiment performed in old rats, we measured isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) activity as an index of MCC, MHR, mitochondrial respiration, citrate synthase, COX and antioxydant enzyme activities 24 h after a 150 microg/kg injection. In adult rats, muscle mass and MCC were unchanged by A23187. In old rats, MCC increased 24 h after injection as reflected by a significant increase in ICDH activity; measured MCC tended to increase at 48 h. MHR and Mn-SOD activity were significantly increased at 24 h, and GPX activity was reduced. Muscle mass was unchanged but was negatively correlated with MCC in control and treated old rats. In conclusion, in old rats, A23187 probably induced a mitochondrial Ca2+ overload responsible for the observed increase in MHR without leading to muscle atrophy on a short term basis.

  3. Electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced relaxations turn into contractions upon removal of extracellular calcium in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Melike Hacer; Ozturk, Elif Inci; Uma, Serdar

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the effect of blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCC) and in addition the removal of extracellular Ca(2+), on EFS-induced relaxations in rings of rat mesenteric artery. EFS applied to the tissues precontracted with phenylephrine caused relaxations which were markedly inhibited by nifedipine (10(-7)M) and tetraethylammonium (TEA) (1mM). Addition of LTCC opener BAY K 8644 (10(-7)M) failed to enhance the relaxations. Upon removal of Ca(2+), EFS with the same stimulation parameters produced frequency-dependent transient contractions. Tetrodotoxin (10(-6)M), capsaicin (10(-5)M) and removal of endothelium did not alter these contractions suggesting that they were not neural in origin and endothelium-derived contracting factors were unlikely to be involved. However, they were increased by nearly 40% in response to BAY K 8644 (10(-7)M) and were inhibited by nifedipine (10(-7)M), indicating that activation of the LTCCs was essential. Inositol triphosphate (InsP3) receptor antagonist 2-APB (10(-4)M) significantly reduced, and high concentration of caffeine (20mM) almost totally suppressed the contractions. These results suggest that in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) EFS through membrane depolarization, evokes the opening of the LTCCs which subsequently leads to the release of Ca(2+) from internal stores via InsP3 receptors, a phenomenon known as Ca(2+) channel-induced Ca(2+) release (CCICR), to trigger vasoconstriction. That activation of LTCCs causes arterial relaxation or contraction depending on the Ca(2+) status apparently exemplifies how the same messenger fulfils opposing physiological functions in a given cell.

  4. Canine distemper virus infection of primary hippocampal cells induces increase in extracellular glutamate and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Jean-Marc; Plattet, Philippe; Majcherczyk, Paul; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo; Hirling, Harald

    2007-11-01

    The canine distemper virus (CDV) belongs to the Morbillivirus genus which includes important human pathogens like the closely related measles virus. CDV infection can reach the nervous system where it causes serious malfunctions. Although this pathology is well described, the molecular events in brain infection are still poorly understood. Here we studied infection in vitro by CDV using a model of dissociated cell cultures from newborn rat hippocampus. We used a recombinant CDV closely related to the neurovirulent A75/17 which also expresses the enhanced green fluorescent protein. We found that infected neurons and astrocytes could be clearly detected, and that infection spreads only slowly to neighboring cells. Interestingly, this infection causes a massive cell death of neurons, which includes also non-infected neurons. Antagonists of NMDA-type or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propinate (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors could slow down this neuron loss, indicating an involvement of the glutamatergic system in the induction of cell death in infected and non-infected cells. Finally, we show that, following CDV infection, there is a steady increase in extracellular glutamate in infected cultures. These results indicate that CDV infection induces excitotoxic insults on neurons via glutamatergic signaling.

  5. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems.

  6. Increasing extracellular potassium results in subthalamic neuron activity resembling that seen in a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ulf; Zhou, Fu-Wen; Henning, Jeannette; Battefeld, Arne; Wree, Andreas; Köhling, Rüdiger; Haas, Stefan Jean-Pierre; Benecke, Reiner; Rolfs, Arndt; Gimsa, Ulrike

    2008-06-01

    Abnormal neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although altered extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) and sensitivity to [K+]o modulates neuronal activity, little is known about the potassium balance in the healthy and diseased STN. In vivo measurements of [K+]o using ion-selective electrodes demonstrated a twofold increase in the decay time constant of lesion-induced [K+]o transients in the STN of adult Wistar rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) median forebrain bundle lesion, employed as a model of PD, compared with nonlesioned rats. Various [K+]o concentrations (1.5-12.5 mM) were applied to in vitro slice preparations of three experimental groups of STN slices from nonlesioned control rats, ipsilateral hemispheres, and contralateral hemispheres of lesioned rats. The majority of STN neurons of nonlesioned rats and in slices contralateral to the lesion fired spontaneously, predominantly in a regular pattern, whereas those in slices ipsilateral to the lesion fired more irregularly or even in bursts. Experimentally increased [K+]o led to an increase in the number of spontaneously firing neurons and action potential firing rates in all groups. This was accompanied by a decrease in the amplitude of post spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and the amplitude and duration of the posttrain AHP. Lesion effects in ipsilateral neurons at physiological [K+]o resembled the effects of elevated [K+]o in nonlesioned rats. Our data suggest that changed potassium sensitivity due to conductivity alterations and delayed clearance may be critical for shaping STN activity in parkinsonian states.

  7. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell.

  8. ALK1 heterozygosity increases extracellular matrix protein expression, proliferation and migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Eleno, Nélida; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological situation in which excessive amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) are deposited in the tissue. Myofibroblasts play a crucial role in the development and progress of fibrosis as they actively synthesize ECM components such as collagen I, fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cause organ fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) plays a major role in tissue fibrosis. Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is a type I receptor of TGF-β1 with an important role in angiogenesis whose function in cellular biology and TGF-β signaling is well known in endothelial cells, but its role in fibroblast biology and its contribution to fibrosis is poorly studied. We have recently demonstrated that ALK1 regulates ECM protein expression in a mouse model of obstructive nephropathy. Our aim was to evaluate the role of ALK1 in several processes involved in fibrosis such as ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration in ALK1(+/+) and ALK1(+/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) after TGF-β1 stimulations and inhibitors. ALK1 heterozygous MEFs show increased expression of ECM proteins (collagen I, fibronectin and CTGF/CCN2), cell proliferation and migration due to an alteration of TGF-β/Smad signaling. ALK1 heterozygous disruption shows an increase of Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation that explains the increases in CTGF/CCN2, fibronectin and collagen I, proliferation and cell motility observed in these cells. Therefore, we suggest that ALK1 plays an important role in the regulation of ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration.

  9. Modulation of iron metabolism by iron chelation regulates intracellular calcium and increases sensitivity to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Yalcintepe, Leman; Halis, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Increased intracellular iron levels can both promote cell proliferation and death, as such; iron has a “two-sided effect” in the delicate balance of human health. Though the role of iron in the development of cancer remains unclear, investigations of iron chelators as anti-tumor agents have revealed promising results. Here, we investigated the influence of iron and desferrioxamine (DFO), the iron chelating agent on intracellular calcium in a human leukemia cell line, K562. Iron uptake is associated with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Therefore, we showed that iron also caused dose-dependent ROS generation in K562 cells. The measurement of intracellular calcium was determined using Furo-2 with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The iron delivery process to the cytoplasmic iron pool was examined by monitoring the fluorescence of cells loaded with calcein-acetoxymethyl. Our data showed that iron increased intracellular calcium, and this response was 8 times higher when cells were incubated with DFO. K562 cells with DFO caused a 3.5 times increase of intracellular calcium in the presence of doxorubicin (DOX). In conclusion, DFO induces intracellular calcium and increases their sensitivity to DOX, a chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:26773173

  10. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... milligrams) of calcium each day. Get it from: Dairy products. Low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese, and cottage ... lactase that helps digest the sugar (lactose) in dairy products, and may have gas, bloating, cramps, or ...

  11. Computational modeling of neurons: intensity-duration relationship of extracellular electrical stimulation for changes in intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert D; Willits, Rebecca K; Harkins, Amy B

    2016-01-01

    In many instances of extensive nerve damage, the injured nerve never adequately heals, leaving lack of nerve function. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to increase the rate and orient the direction of neurite growth, and is a promising therapy. However, the mechanism in which ES affects neuronal growth is not understood, making it difficult to compare existing ES protocols or to design and optimize new protocols. We hypothesize that ES acts by elevating intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) via opening voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). In this work, we have created a computer model to estimate the ES Ca(2+) relationship. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, we modeled a small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron that includes one Na(+) channel, two K(+) channels, and three VDCCs to estimate [Ca(2+)]i in the soma and growth cone. As expected, the results show that an ES that generates action potentials (APs) can efficiently raise the [Ca(2+)]i of neurons. More interestingly, our simulation results show that sub-AP ES can efficiently raise neuronal [Ca(2+)]i and that specific high-voltage ES can preferentially raise [Ca(2+)]i in the growth cone. The intensities and durations of ES on modeled growth cone calcium rise are consistent with directionality and orientation of growth cones experimentally shown by others. Finally, this model provides a basis to design experimental ES pulse parameters, including duration, intensity, pulse-train frequency, and pulse-train duration to efficiently raise [Ca(2+)]i in neuronal somas or growth cones.

  12. Computational modeling of neurons: intensity-duration relationship of extracellular electrical stimulation for changes in intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert D.; Willits, Rebecca K.

    2015-01-01

    In many instances of extensive nerve damage, the injured nerve never adequately heals, leaving lack of nerve function. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to increase the rate and orient the direction of neurite growth, and is a promising therapy. However, the mechanism in which ES affects neuronal growth is not understood, making it difficult to compare existing ES protocols or to design and optimize new protocols. We hypothesize that ES acts by elevating intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) via opening voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs). In this work, we have created a computer model to estimate the ES Ca2+ relationship. Using COMSOL Multiphysics, we modeled a small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron that includes one Na+ channel, two K+ channels, and three VDCCs to estimate [Ca2+]i in the soma and growth cone. As expected, the results show that an ES that generates action potentials (APs) can efficiently raise the [Ca2+]i of neurons. More interestingly, our simulation results show that sub-AP ES can efficiently raise neuronal [Ca2+]i and that specific high-voltage ES can preferentially raise [Ca2+]i in the growth cone. The intensities and durations of ES on modeled growth cone calcium rise are consistent with directionality and orientation of growth cones experimentally shown by others. Finally, this model provides a basis to design experimental ES pulse parameters, including duration, intensity, pulse-train frequency, and pulse-train duration to efficiently raise [Ca2+]i in neuronal somas or growth cones. PMID:26510759

  13. Monocytes increase human cardiac myofibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling through TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Lipon, Brodie D; Svystonyuk, Daniyil A; Teng, Guoqi; Guzzardi, David G; Silva, Claudia; Yong, V Wee; Fedak, Paul W M

    2016-03-15

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myofibroblasts remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM), preventing mechanical complications. However, prolonged myofibroblast activity leads to dysregulation of the ECM, maladaptive remodeling, fibrosis, and heart failure (HF). Chronic inflammation is believed to drive persistent myofibroblast activity; however, the mechanisms are unclear. We assessed the influence of peripheral blood monocytes on human cardiac myofibroblast activity in a three-dimensional (3D) ECM microenvironment. Human cardiac myofibroblasts isolated from surgical biopsies of the right atrium and left ventricle were seeded into 3D collagen matrices. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human donors and cocultured with myofibroblasts. Monocytes increased myofibroblast activity measured by collagen gel contraction (baseline: 57.6 ± 5.9% vs. coculture: 65.2 ± 7.1% contraction; P < 0.01) and increased local ECM remodeling quantified by confocal microscopy. Under coculture conditions that allow indirect cellular interaction via paracrine factors but prevent direct cell-cell contact, monocytes had minimal effects on myofibroblast activity (17.9 ± 11.1% vs. 6.4 ± 7.0% increase, respectively; P < 0.01). When cells were cultured under direct contact conditions, multiplex analysis of the coculture media revealed an increase in the paracrine factors TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 compared with baseline (122.9 ± 10.1 pg/ml and 3,496.0 ± 190.4 pg/ml, respectively, vs. 21.5 ± 16.3 pg/ml and 183.3 ± 43.9 pg/ml; P < 0.001). TGF-β blockade abolished the monocyte-induced increase in cardiac myofibroblast activity. These data suggest that direct cell-cell interaction between monocytes and cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast activity and increases remodeling of local matrix. Peripheral blood monocyte interaction with human cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates myofibroblast activity through release of TGF-β1

  14. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-02

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

  15. Intracellular calcium elevation induced by extracellular application of cyclic-ADP-ribose or oxytocin is temperature-sensitive in rodent NG108-15 neuronal cells with or without exogenous expression of human oxytocin receptors.

    PubMed

    Amina, S; Hashii, M; Ma, W-J; Yokoyama, S; Lopatina, O; Liu, H-X; Islam, M S; Higashida, H

    2010-05-01

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase and/or CD38 are activated after oxytocin receptor stimulation in the hypothalamus and pituitary in adult mice, leading to facilitation of oxytocin secretion. Although cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphoribose (cADPR) primarily acts as an intracellular second messenger, it has been suggested that extracellular cADPR stimulates intracellular ryanodine receptors after internalisation via the nucleotide-transporting capacity of CD38 in fibroblasts and astrocytes. However, little is known about whether extracellular cADPR activates neurones. To address this question, we used a model neuronal cell line, NG108-15 mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid cells possessing CD38 but not oxytocin receptors, and measured cytosolic free calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)). Extracellular application of cADPR to NG108-15 cells elevated [Ca(2+)](i) at 35 degrees C. The elevation was significantly enhanced when measured at 40 degrees C. The cADPR and heat-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase were blocked under extracellular Ca(2+)-free conditions and by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an antagonist of melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 2 (TRPM2) cation channels. Reverse transcriptation-polymerase chain reaction analyses indicated that TRPM2 channels were expressed in NG108-15 cells. Application of oxytocin elevated [Ca(2+)](i) in NG108-15 cells transformed to transiently express cloned human oxytocin receptors. The oxytocin-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response was also enhanced by heat. These results indicate that the extracellular application of cADPR, together with heat, activates cation influx downstream of oxytocin receptor signalling in NG108-15 neuronal cells, and suggest the possible involvement of TRPM2 channels in oxytocin release in the mammalian brain.

  16. 2,4,6-Trimethyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]benzenesulfonamide increases calcium influx in lipopolisaccharide-pre-treated arteries

    PubMed Central

    Grześk, Elżbieta; Szadujkis-Szadurska, Katarzyna; Bloch-Bogusławska, Elżbieta; Wiciński, Michał; Malinowski, Bartosz; KołTan, Sylwia; Tejza, Barbara; Pujanek, Maciej; GrześK, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that 2,4,6-trimethyl-N-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]benzenesulfonamide (m-3M3FBS) activates phospholipase C (PLC) and stimulates apoptosis in smooth muscle cells, which may increase vascular reactivity. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the physiological effects of the direct stimulation of PLC by m-3M3FBS on vascular smooth muscle reactivity in arteries pre-treated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as a model of septic shock. Experiments were performed on isolated and perfused tail arteries of Wistar rats. The contraction force in the model was measured by assessing increases in perfusion pressure at a constant flow. Parameters describing the concentration-response curves (CRCs) obtained for phenylephrine and arginine-vasopressin in the presence of LPS confirmed a decrease in vessels reactivity. In comparison with the controls, m-3M3FBS treatment caused a significant increase in LPS-untreated as well as pre-treated arteries. Furthermore, in the presence of m-3M3FBS, calcium influx from intra- as well as extracellular calcium stores was significantly higher for LPS-untreated and pre-treated arteries. The results of the present study suggested that m-3M3FBS significantly increased the reactivity of vascular smooth muscle cells pre-treated with LPS by increasing the calcium influx from intra- and extracellular calcium stores. Further studies investigating this mechanism are required to evaluate whether this pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy to treat sepsis. PMID:28352364

  17. A calcium-dependent potassium current is increased by a single-gene mutation in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, T M; Kung, C

    1987-01-01

    The membrane currents of wild type Paramecium tetraurelia and the behavioral mutant teaA were analyzed under voltage clamp. The teaA mutant was shown to have a greatly increased outward current which was blocked completely by the combined use of internally delivered Cs+ and external TEA+. This, along with previous work (Satow, Y., Kung, C., 1976, J. Exp. Biol. 65:51-63) identified this as a K+ current. It was further found to be a calcium-activated K+ current since this increased outward K+ current cannot be elicited when the internal calcium is buffered with injected EGTA. The mutation pwB, which blocks the inward calcium current, also blocks this increased outward K+ current in teaA. This shows that this mutant current is activated by calcium through the normal depolarization-sensitive calcium channel. While tail current decay kinetic analysis showed that the apparent inactivation rates for this calcium-dependent K+ current are the same for mutant and wild type, the teaA current activates extremely rapidly. It is fully activated within 2 msec. This early activation of such a large outward current causes a characteristic reduction in the amplitude of the action potential of the teaA mutant. The teaA mutation had no effect on any of the other electrophysiological parameters examined. The phenotype of the teaA mutant is therefore a general decrease in responsiveness to depolarizing stimuli because of a rapidly activating calcium-dependent K+ current which prematurely repolarizes the action potential.

  18. Does Potassium Citrate Medical Therapy Increase the Risk of Calcium Phosphate Stone Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, Victor; Haleblian, George E.; Robinson, Marnie R.; Pierre, Sean A.; Sur, Roger L.; Preminger, Glenn M.

    2007-04-01

    Potassium citrate has been extensively used in the treatment of recurrent nephrolithiasis. Recent evidence suggests that it may contribute to increasing urinary pH and, as such, increase the risk of calcium phosphate stone formation. We performed a retrospective review of our patients to further investigate this phenomenon.

  19. Aquaporin-4 Deficient Mice have Increased Extracellular Space Without Tortuosity Change

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaoming; Hrabětová, Sabina; Nicholson, Charles; Manley, Geoffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the major water channel expressed at fluid-tissue barriers throughout the brain and plays a crucial role in cerebral water balance. To assess whether these channels influence brain extracellular space (ECS) under resting physiological conditions, we used the established real-time iontophoresis method with tetramethylammonium (TMA+) to measure three diffusion parameters: ECS volume fraction (α), tortuosity (λ), and TMA+ loss (k’). In vivo measurements were performed in the somatosensory cortex of AQP4 deficient (AQP4-/-) mice and wild-type controls with matched age. Mice lacking AQP4 showed a 28% increase in α (0.23 ± 0.007 vs. 0.18 ± 0.003) with no differences in λ (1.62 ± 0.04 vs. 1.61 ± 0.02) and k’ (0.0045 ± 0.0001 1/sec vs. 0.0031 ± 0.0009 1/sec). Additional recordings in brain slices showed similarly elevated α in AQP4-/- mice, and no differences in λ and k’ between the two genotypes. This is the first direct comparison of ECS properties in adult mice lacking AQP4 water channels with wild-type animals and demonstrates a significant enlargement of the volume fraction but no difference in hindrance to TMA+ diffusion, expressed as tortuosity. These findings provide direct evidence for involvement of AQP4 in modulation of the ECS volume fraction and provide a basis for future modeling of water and ion transport in the central nervous system. PMID:18495879

  20. Extracellular ATP Hydrolysis Inhibits Synaptic Transmission by Increasing pH Buffering in the Synaptic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Howlett, Marcus H.C.; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca2+ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic modulation

  1. Increasing serotonin concentrations alter calcium and energy metabolism in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Jimena; Moore, Spencer A E; Weaver, Samantha R; Cronick, Callyssa M; Olsen, Megan; Prichard, Austin P; Schnell, Brian P; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    A 4×4 Latin square design in which varied doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/kg) of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP, a serotonin precursor) were intravenously infused into late-lactation, non-pregnant Holstein dairy cows was used to determine the effects of serotonin on calcium and energy metabolism. Infusion periods lasted 4 days, with a 5-day washout between periods. Cows were infused at a constant rate for 1 h each day. Blood was collected pre- and 5, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min post-infusion, urine was collected pre- and post-infusion, and milk was collected daily. All of the 5-HTP doses increased systemic serotonin as compared to the 0 mg/kg dose, and the 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg doses increased circulating glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) concentrations. Treatment of cows with either 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg 5-HTP doses decreased urine calcium elimination, and the 1.5 mg/kg dose increased milk calcium concentrations. No differences were detected in the heart rates, respiration rates, or body temperatures of the cows; however, manure scores and defecation frequency were affected. Indeed, cows that received 5-HTP defecated more, and the consistency of their manure was softer. Treatment of late-lactation dairy cows with 5-HTP improved energy metabolism, decreased loss of calcium into urine, and increased calcium secretion into milk. Further research should target the effects of increasing serotonin during the transition period to determine any benefits for post-parturient calcium and glucose metabolism.

  2. The hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) increases cortical extracellular glutamate levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, Jennifer L; Schmidt, Dennis; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2003-08-07

    Activation of the cerebral cortex is seen during hallucinations. The 5-HT(2A/C) agonist 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) is a potent hallucinogen that has been proposed to act by targeting 5-HT(2A) heteroceptors on thalamocortical neurons and eliciting release of glutamate from these cells, which in turn drives cortical neurons. We used in vivo microdialysis to determine if DOI increases extracellular glutamate levels. Systemic administration of DOI significantly increased extracellular glutamate levels in the somatosensory cortex of the freely-moving rat. Similarly, intracortical administration of DOI by reverse dialysis increased cortical extracellular glutamate levels. No consistent changes in either extracellular GABA or glycine levels were observed in response to DOI. The increase in glutamate levels elicited by intracortical DOI was blocked by treatment with the selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist MDL 100,907. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated regulation of glutamate release is the mechanism through which hallucinogens activate the cerebral cortex.

  3. Increased Extracellular Glutamate In the Nucleus Accumbens Promotes Excessive Ethanol Drinking in Ethanol Dependent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Griffin III, William C; Haun, Harold L; Hazelbaker, Callan L; Ramachandra, Vorani S; Becker, Howard C

    2014-01-01

    Using a well-established model of ethanol dependence and relapse, this study examined adaptations in glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and their role in regulating voluntary ethanol drinking. Mice were first trained to drink ethanol in a free-choice, limited access (2 h/day) paradigm. One group (EtOH mice) received repeated weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure with intervening weeks of test drinking sessions, whereas the remaining mice (CTL mice) were similarly treated but did not receive CIE treatment. Over repeated cycles of CIE exposure, EtOH mice exhibited significant escalation in drinking (up to ∼3.5 g/kg), whereas drinking remained relatively stable at baseline levels (2–2.5 g/kg) in CTL mice. Using in vivo microdialysis procedures, extracellular glutamate (GLUEX) levels in the NAc were increased approximately twofold in EtOH mice compared with CTL mice, and this difference was observed 7 days after final CIE exposure, indicating that this hyperglutamatergic state persisted beyond acute withdrawal. This finding prompted additional studies examining the effects of pharmacologically manipulating GLUEX in the NAc on ethanol drinking in the CIE model. The non-selective glutamate reuptake antagonist, threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA), was bilaterally microinjected into the NAc and found to dose-dependently increase drinking in nondependent (CTL) mice to levels attained by dependent (EtOH) mice. TBOA also further increased drinking in EtOH mice. In contrast, reducing glutamatergic transmission in the NAc via bilateral injections of the metabotropic glutamate receptor-2/3 agonist LY379268 reduced drinking in dependent (EtOH) mice to nondependent (CTL) levels, whereas having a more modest effect in decreasing ethanol consumption in CTL mice. Taken together, these data support an important role of glutamatergic transmission in the NAc in regulating ethanol drinking. Additionally, these results indicate that

  4. Endogenous dopamine increases extracellular concentrations of glutamate and GABA in striatum of the freely moving rat: involvement of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Expósito, I; Del Arco, A; Segovia, G; Mora, F

    1999-07-01

    Interactions between endogenous dopamine, glutamate, GABA, and taurine were investigated in striatum of the freely moving rat by using microdialysis. Intrastriatal infusions of the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor nomifensine (NMF) were used to increase the endogenous extracellular dopamine. NMF produced a dose-related increase in extracellular dopamine and also increased extracellular concentrations of glutamate, GABA, and taurine. Extracellular increases of dopamine were significantly correlated with extracellular increases of glutamate and GABA, but not taurine. To investigate whether the increased extracellular dopamine produced by NMF was responsible for the concomitant increase of glutamate and GABA, D1, and D2 receptor antagonists were used. Dopamine receptor antagonists D1 (SCH23390) and D2 (sulpiride) significantly attenuated the increases of glutamate and GABA produced by NMF. These data suggest that endogenous dopamine, through both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, plays a role in releasing glutamate and GABA in striatum of the freely moving rat.

  5. Plum and Soy Aglycon Extracts Superior at Increasing Bone Calcium Retention in Ovariectomized Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived polyphenols have been shown to influence bone turnover and bone properties in the estrogen-depleted state. We used a crossover design in ovariectomized rats (n = 16 rats for each diet) to investigate the effect of supplementation of two doses each of blueberry, plum, grape, grape seed extract, and resveratrol on bone. We tested the aglycon and glucoside forms of genistein to quantify differences in efficacy on bone calcium retention. Rats were given an intravenous dose of 45Ca to prelabel bone, and bone calcium retention was assessed by urinary excretion of 45Ca:Ca ratio during an intervention period compared with nonintervention. Genistein aglycon increased bone calcium retention significantly (p < 0.05) more than the glucoside (22% vs 13%, respectively). Plum extract (0.45% w/w total dietary polyphenols) and resveratrol (0.2% w/w total dietary polyphenols) were also effective, increasing bone calcium retention by 20% (p = 0.0153) and 14% (p = 0.0012), respectively. Several polyphenolic-rich diets improved bone calcium retention. PMID:24894797

  6. Broiler chicks fed low-calcium diets. 2. Increased sensitivity to copper toxicity.

    PubMed

    Leach, R M; Rosenblum, C I; Amman, M J; Burdette, J

    1990-11-01

    Young broiler chicks were more sensitive to copper toxicity when they were fed diets deficient or marginal in calcium content. Growth rate was depressed and liver copper concentration was increased under these conditions. Chicks fed a casein-gelatin diet were more sensitive to copper toxicity than those fed a corn-soybean meal diet. Addition of phytic acid to the casein-gelatin basal diet enhanced copper toxicity as evidenced by effects on growth rate and liver copper content. Measurements of intestinal and biliary copper content suggested that the influence of calcium on copper toxicity was mediated via intestinal absorption rather than through influences on copper excretion.

  7. A fungal homologue of neuronal calcium sensor-1, Bbcsa1, regulates extracellular acidification and contributes to virulence in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanhua; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Kudia, Ramsha A; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2012-07-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor proteins and their homologues participate in transducing extracellular signals that affect intracellular Ca(2+) levels, which in turn regulate enzyme activities, secretion, gene expression and other biological processes. The filamentous fungus Beauveria bassiana is a broad-host-range pathogen of insects that acidifies the extracellular milieu during growth and pathogenesis towards target hosts. A collection of B. bassiana random insertion mutants were screened on pH indicator plates and one mutant was isolated that displayed reduced acidification. The random insertion site was mapped to a gene that displayed homology to the neuronal calcium sensor/frequenin protein family and was designated Bbcsa1. To validate the role of Bbcsa1 in B. bassiana, a targeted gene-knockout was constructed. Data confirmed that Bbcsa1 was not an essential gene and the ΔBbcsa1 strain displayed delayed acidification of the medium when grown in Czapek-Dox medium, as compared with the wild-type parent. HPLC profiling of secreted metabolites did not detect any major changes in the production of organic acids, although downregulation of the membrane H(+) pump/ATPase was noted in the mutant. A slight growth-deficient phenotype was observed for the ΔBbcsa1 strain on Czapek-Dox and potato dextrose media, which was accentuated at high calcium concentrations (500 mM) and 1.5 M sorbitol, but was unaffected by EDTA or SDS. Perturbations in vacuole morphology were also noted for the mutant. Insect bioassays using Galleria mellonella as the target host revealed decreased virulence in the ΔBbcsa1 mutant when applied topically, representing the natural route of infection, but no significant effect was observed when fungal cells were directly injected into target hosts. These results suggest that Bbcsa1 participates in pre-penetration or early penetration events, but is dispensable once the insect cuticle has been breached.

  8. Increased phase synchronization of spontaneous calcium oscillations in epileptic human versus normal rat astrocyte cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázsi, Gábor; Cornell-Bell, Ann H.; Moss, Frank

    2003-06-01

    Stochastic synchronization analysis is applied to intracellular calcium oscillations in astrocyte cultures prepared from epileptic human temporal lobe. The same methods are applied to astrocyte cultures prepared from normal rat hippocampus. Our results indicate that phase-repulsive coupling in epileptic human astrocyte cultures is stronger, leading to an increased synchronization in epileptic human compared to normal rat astrocyte cultures.

  9. Calcium channel antagonists increase morphine-induced analgesia and antagonize morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L; Amigo, M

    1988-04-13

    The influence of calcium channel blockers on morphine-induced analgesia and on tolerance to the chronic administration of the opiate was investigated in mice. The effects of a test dose of morphine were significantly increased by the administration of diltiazem, flunarizine, nicardipine and verapamil. In contrast, nifedipine induced an antagonistic effect. The calcium channel antagonists did not change the reaction time to thermal stimulation in mice (hot plate test). The administration of nifedipine, flunarizine and verapamil reduced the intensity of the tolerance induced by a single dose of morphine administered in a slow release preparation. Diltiazem induced a non-significant decrease of the process. The present results are in accordance with the known interaction of acute and chronic morphine administration with the intracellular calcium concentration in neurones of the central nervous system.

  10. AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce extracellular vesicles that increase neighboring fibroblast cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Dzik, Luciana M.; Iglesia, Rebeca P.; Cruz, Mário C.; Zelanis, André; de Siqueira, Adriane S.; Serrano, Solange M.T.; Goldberg, Gary S.; Jaeger, Ruy G.; Freitas, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play important roles in tumor development. Many components of these structures, including microvesicles and exosomes, have been defined. However, mechanisms by which extracellular vesicles affect tumor progression are not fully understood. Here, we investigated vesicular communication between mammary carcinoma cells and neighboring nontransformed mammary fibroblasts. Nonbiased proteomic analysis found that over 1% of the entire proteome is represented in these vesicles, with the neuroblast differentiation associated protein AHNAK and annexin A2 being the most abundant. In particular, AHNAK was found to be the most prominent component of these vesicles based on peptide number, and appeared necessary for their formation. In addition, we report here that carcinoma cells produce vesicles that promote the migration of recipient fibroblasts. These data suggest that AHNAK enables mammary carcinoma cells to produce and release extracellular vesicles that cause disruption of the stroma by surrounding fibroblasts. This paradigm reveals fundamental mechanisms by which vesicular communication between carcinoma cells and stromal cells can promote cancer progression in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27374178

  11. Enhanced expression of extracellular calcium sensing receptor in monocyte-differentiated versus undifferentiated HL-60 cells: potential role in regulation of a nonselective cation channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Ye, C.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Sanders, J. L.; Vassilev, P. M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) have been used widely as a model for studying the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. After treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], HL-60 cells differentiate into cells with the phenotype of monocytes/macrophages. We previously showed that peripheral blood monocytes and the murine J774 monocytic cell line express the CaR, and myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and myeloid cells in peripheral blood other than monocytes express lower levels of the CaR. Therefore, we investigated whether undifferentiated HL-60 cells express a functional G protein-coupled, extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(o))-sensing receptor (CaR) and if the expression of the CaR increases as these cells differentiate along the monocytic lineage. The use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with CaR-specific primers, followed by sequencing of the amplified products, identified an authentic CaR transcript in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis using a CaR-specific antiserum detected low levels of CaR protein expression in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. The levels of CaR protein increased considerably following treatment of the cells with PMA (50 nM) or 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (100 nM) for 5 days. Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe identified CaR transcripts in undifferentiated HL-60 cells, but CaR mRNA levels did not change appreciably after treatment with either agent, suggesting that upregulation of CaR protein occurs at a translational level. PMA-treated HL-60 cells expressed a nonselective cation channel (NCC), and the calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467, but not its less active stereoisomer, NPS S-467, as well as the polycationic CaR agonist, neomycin, activated this NCC, demonstrating that the CaR expressed in these cells is functionally active. Therefore, HL-60 cells exhibit an increase in Ca

  12. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Nachum; Shaltiel, Galit; Daniely, Michal; Meiron, Oren E; Shechter, Assaf; Abrams, Steven A; Niv, Eva; Shapira, Yami; Sagi, Amir

    2014-10-01

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (CCC) using the dual stable isotope technique. The study was conducted in the Unit of Clinical Nutrition, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel. The study population included 15 early postmenopausal women aged 54.9 ± 2.8 (mean ± SD) years with no history of major medical illness or metabolic bone disorder, excess calcium intake, or vitamin D deficiency. Standardized breakfast was followed by randomly provided CCC or ACC capsules containing 192 mg elemental calcium labeled with 44Ca at intervals of at least 3 weeks. After swallowing the capsules, intravenous CaCl2 labeled with 42Ca on was administered on each occasion. Fractional calcium absorption (FCA) of ACC and CCC was calculated from the 24-hour urine collection following calcium administration. The results indicated that FCA of ACC was doubled (± 0.96 SD) on average compared to that of CCC (p < 0.02). The higher absorption of the synthetic stable ACC may serve as a more efficacious way of calcium supplementation.

  13. Increasing urinary calcium excretion after ceftriaxone and cephalothin therapy in adults: possible association with urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Otunctemur, Alper; Ozbek, Emin; Polat, Emre Can; Cekmen, Mustafa; Dursun, Murat; Cakir, Suleyman Sami

    2014-04-01

    In children, stone formation after ceftriaxone (CTRX) therapy by increasing calcium excretion was showed in the literature. In this study, we investigated the effect of CTRX, cephalothin (CP) and ampicillin (AS) therapy on urinary calcium excretion in adults. 180 participants included in the study who divided into six equal groups. The groups were; (1) CTRX therapy in stone free patients, (2) CTRX therapy in patients who have urinary stone; (3) CP therapy in stone free patients, (4) CP therapy in patients with urinary stone, (5) AS therapy in stone free patients, (6) AS therapy in patients with urinary stone. The patients received 2 g/day intravenous CTRX, CP and AS for 5 days in all groups respectively. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics and blood biochemistry between the groups. Before and 5 days after the antibiotic therapies, the participants were evaluated by 24-h urinary calcium to creatinine ratio. Results were compared between the groups statistically by ANOVA and Tukey test. After drug therapies in group 2 and 4, the excretion of calcium to creatinine ratio in 24-h urine was more than the other groups. We found that both groups of two drugs therapy with or without stones (groups 1, 2, 3, 4), have significantly increased calcium to creatinine ratio in 24-h urine (p < 0.05). We did not find statistically difference in groups 5 and 6, after AS therapy. As a result of the study, we suggest that the patients who have taken antibiotic therapy with CTRX or CP, have an increased risk for the urolithiasis. In addition, we think that these drugs should be used carefully especially in patients with urolithiasis.

  14. Acamprosate blocks the increase in dopamine extracellular levels in nucleus accumbens evoked by chemical stimulation of the ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cano-Cebrián, M J; Zornoza-Sabina, T; Guerri, C; Polache, A; Granero, L

    2003-10-01

    Recently, we have shown that acamprosate is able to modulate extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and may act as an antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Neurochemical studies show that chemical stimulation (using NMDA) of the ventral subiculum (vSub) of the hippocampus produces robust and sustained increases in extracellular DA levels in the NAc, an effect mediated through ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors. The present study examines whether acamprosate locally infused in the NAc of rats could block or attenuate the increase in NAc extracellular DA elicited by chemical stimulation (with 5 mM NMDA) of the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus. The stimulation of the vSub during perfusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid in NAc induced a significant and persistent increase in NAc DA levels. Reverse dialysis of 0.05 mM acamprosate in NAc blocked the increase in DA evoked by the chemical stimulation of the vSub. These data support the possibility that the antagonism at the NMDA receptors in NAc can explain, at least in part, the mechanism of action of this drug.

  15. Genetically modified Medicago truncatula lacking calcium oxalate has increased calcium bioavailability and partially rescues vitamin D receptor knockout mice phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How the distribution and sequestered form of plant macro/micro-nutrients influence their bioavailability, and ultimately impact human health, is poorly understood. The legume Medicago truncatula has a portion of its tissue calcium sequestered in the form of the calcium oxalate crystal, which reduces...

  16. Impact of Increasing Dietary Calcium Levels on Calcium Excretion and Vitamin D Metabolites in the Blood of Healthy Adult Cats

    PubMed Central

    Paßlack, Nadine; Schmiedchen, Bettina; Raila, Jens; Schweigert, Florian J.; Stumpff, Friederike; Kohn, Barbara; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary calcium (Ca) concentrations might affect regulatory pathways within the Ca and vitamin D metabolism and consequently excretory mechanisms. Considering large variations in Ca concentrations of feline diets, the physiological impact on Ca homeostasis has not been evaluated to date. In the present study, diets with increasing concentrations of dicalcium phosphate were offered to ten healthy adult cats (Ca/phosphorus (P): 6.23/6.02, 7.77/7.56, 15.0/12.7, 19.0/17.3, 22.2/19.9, 24.3/21.6 g/kg dry matter). Each feeding period was divided into a 10-day adaptation and an 8-day sampling period in order to collect urine and faeces. On the last day of each feeding period, blood samples were taken. Results Urinary Ca concentrations remained unaffected, but faecal Ca concentrations increased (P < 0.001) with increasing dietary Ca levels. No effect on whole and intact parathyroid hormone levels, fibroblast growth factor 23 and calcitriol concentrations in the blood of the cats were observed. However, the calcitriol precursors 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3, which are considered the most useful indicators for the vitamin D status, decreased with higher dietary Ca levels (P = 0.013 and P = 0.033). Increasing dietary levels of dicalcium phosphate revealed an acidifying effect on urinary fasting pH (6.02) and postprandial pH (6.01) (P < 0.001), possibly mediated by an increase of urinary phosphorus (P) concentrations (P < 0.001). Conclusions In conclusion, calcitriol precursors were linearly affected by increasing dietary Ca concentrations. The increase in faecal Ca excretion indicates that Ca homeostasis of cats is mainly regulated in the intestine and not by the kidneys. Long-term studies should investigate the physiological relevance of the acidifying effect observed when feeding diets high in Ca and P. PMID:26870965

  17. Deletion of aquaporin-4 increases extracellular K(+) concentration during synaptic stimulation in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Haj-Yasein, Nadia Nabil; Bugge, Cecilie Elisabeth; Jensen, Vidar; Østby, Ivar; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Hvalby, Øivind; Nagelhus, Erlend Arnulf

    2015-07-01

    The coupling between the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and K(+) transport has attracted much interest. In this study, we assessed the effect of Aqp4 deletion on activity-induced [K(+)]o changes in acute slices from hippocampus and corpus callosum of adult mice. We show that Aqp4 deletion has a layer-specific effect on [K(+)]o that precisely mirrors the known effect on extracellular volume dynamics. In CA1, the peak [K(+)]o in stratum radiatum during 20 Hz stimulation of Schaffer collateral/commissural fibers was significantly higher in Aqp4 (-/-) mice than in wild types, whereas no differences were observed throughout the [K(+)]o recovery phase. In stratum pyramidale and corpus callosum, neither peak [K(+)]o nor post-stimulus [K(+)]o recovery was affected by Aqp4 deletion. Our data suggest that AQP4 modulates [K(+)]o during synaptic stimulation through its effect on extracellular space volume.

  18. The Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Motility, Pseudopod and Uropod Formation, Chemotaxis and the Cortical Localization of Myosin II in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lusche, Daniel F.; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular Ca++, a ubiquitous cation in the soluble environment of cells both free living and within the human body, regulates most aspects of amoeboid cell motility, including shape, uropod formation, pseudopod formation, velocity and turning in Dictyostelium discoideum. Hence it affects the efficiency of both basic motile behavior and chemotaxis. Extracellular Ca++ is optimal at 10 mM. A gradient of the chemoattractant cAMP generated in the absence of added Ca++ only affects turning, but in combination with extracellular Ca++, enhances the effects of extracellular Ca++. Potassium, at 40 mM, can substitute for Ca++. Mg++, Mn++, Zn++ and Na+ cannot. Extracellular Ca++, or K+, also induce the cortical localization of myosin II in a polar fashion. The effects of Ca++, K+ or a cAMP gradient do not appear to be similarly mediated by an increase in the general pool of free cytosolic Ca++. These results suggest a model, in which each agent functioning through different signaling systems, converge to affect the cortical localization of myosin II, which in turn effects the behavioral changes leading to efficient cell motility and chemotaxis. PMID:19363786

  19. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  20. Depression of serum calcium by increased plasma free fatty acids in the rat: a mechanism for hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lee, K H; Napier, T W; Fournier, P O; Duchainey, D; Axelrod, L

    1985-10-01

    Some patients with hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis have marked hypocalcemia and high levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs). This study tests the hypothesis that increased plasma FFAs can significantly reduce the calcium level in vivo, a phenomenon which is different from local formation of calcium soaps due to lipolysis of adipose tissue lipids. Free fatty acid elevation was induced in rats by the administration of heparin and by the infusion of triglycerides. The results show that, compared with controls, induction of elevated FFA (from 1.57 +/- 0.08 mEq/L to 5.64 +/- 0.35, mean +/- SEM) causes the concentration of calcium to fall rapidly (from 9.04 +/- 0.06 mg/dl to 8.42 +/- 0.10, p less than 0.001). There is a significant (p less than 0.001) positive correlation between spontaneous baseline concentration of FFA and the responsiveness of calcium concentration to FFA challenge. At near-normal levels of FFA there is a significant (p less than 0.001) correlation between the magnitude of increased FFA concentration and decreased calcium concentration. Additional studies in vivo and in vitro show that elevated plasma triglycerides per se did not interfere with measurement of calcium concentration; however, FFA-albumin complexes bind calcium and lower its measured value. These findings suggest that (a) changes in the concentration of FFA occurring spontaneously may affect measured serum calcium concentration; (b) the observed depression of serum calcium concentration may be due in part to intravascular sequestration of calcium by FFA, but increased flux of circulating calcium-FFA complexes into extravascular and intracellular sites may also be important; (c) the markedly increased FFA concentration in some patients with acute pancreatitis may contribute significantly to hypocalcemia and calcium flux in these patients. As parathyroid hormone secretion, function, or integrity may be impaired in pancreatitis, the depressant effect of FFA could be even

  1. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2 + o)-sensing receptor in the clonal osteoblast-like cell lines, UMR-106 and SAOS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Kifor, O.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2 + o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. More recent data have suggested the presence of this receptor in additional tissues, such as brain, intestine and skin. In this study, we examined the expression of the CaR in the rat and human osteosarcoma cell lines, UMR-106 and SAOS-2, respectively, which possess osteoblast-like characteristics. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in UMR-106 and SAOS-2 cells. The use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, also identified CaR transcripts in each cell line. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the osteoblast-like cell lines, UMR-106 and SAOS-2, possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those in parathyroid and kidney.

  2. Morphine sensitization increases the extracellular level of glutamate in CA1 of rat hippocampus via μ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Kadivar, Mehdi; Afrouzi, Hossein; Naghdi, Nasser

    2011-04-25

    Repeated administration of abuse drugs such as morphine elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect plastic changes requiring regulation of glutamatergic system in the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus, a brain region rich in glutamatergic neurons. Sensitization was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine, once daily for 3 days followed by 5 days free of the opioid treatment. The results showed that extracellular glutamate concentration in the CA1 was decreased following administration of morphine in non-sensitized rats. However, morphine-induced behavioral sensitization significantly increased the extracellular glutamate concentration in this area. The enhancement of glutamate in morphine sensitized rats was prevented by administration of naloxone 30 min before each of three daily doses of morphine. These results suggest an adaptation of the glutamatergic neuronal transmission in the hippocampus after morphine sensitization and it is postulated that opioid receptors may play an important role in this effect.

  3. Extracellular calcium is involved in egg yolk-induced head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Yang, D H; McMillan, A G; Standley, N T; Shannon, P; Xu, Z Z

    2012-10-15

    Head-to-head agglutination of bull sperm occurs when semen is highly diluted in an egg yolk-citrate diluent without streptomycin. The objectives were to investigate causes of sperm agglutination and the underlying mechanism. Aliquots of bull semen were diluted in a base diluent (BD) supplemented with various test components and the percentage of agglutinated sperm (% AggSp) was quantified at 1, 5, 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. When sperm were incubated at 22 °C, no agglutination was observed in BD for up to 72 h, whereas the % AggSp was 5.0, 41.7, 72.2, 91.1, and 92.8% in BD + 5% egg yolk (BD + EY) at 1, 5, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. However, no sperm agglutination was observed in BD + EY if incubation temperature was 37 °C. Addition of 5 or 10 mM ethylenebis (oxyethyleneni-trilo) tetra-acetic acid to BD + EY reduced the % AggSp from 95% to <5% at 72 h (P < 0.001), but addition of 5 mM CaCl(2) to BD failed to induce sperm agglutination in the absence of egg yolk, implicating calcium and other factors in egg yolk. Addition of the citrate-soluble fraction (CSF) of egg yolk to BD induced sperm agglutination similar to whole egg yolk, whereas water- and saline-soluble fractions of egg yolk were ineffective. The sperm-agglutinating efficacy of CSF (the % AggSp = 95% at 72 h) was reduced by dialysis (20%; P < 0.05), partially restored by addition of 5 mM CaCl2 (70%; P < 0.05), but the calcium effect was neutralized by addition of 5 mM ethylenebis (oxyethyleneni-trilo) tetra-acetic acid (1.7%; P < 0.05), again implicating calcium. Addition of 30 μM of a protein kinase A inhibitor (H-89) to an agglutinating diluent failed to inhibit sperm agglutination, whereas addition of 2 mM of a cAMP analogue, dbcAMP, to a nonagglutinating diluent failed to induce sperm agglutination. Agglutination status had no effect on sperm plasma membrane/acrosome status and mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, calcium and other component(s) in the CSF of egg yolk induced head

  4. Increased red cell calcium, decreased calcium adenosine triphosphatase, and altered membrane proteins during fava bean hemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient (Mediterranean variant) individuals.

    PubMed

    Turrini, F; Naitana, A; Mannuzzu, L; Pescarmona, G; Arese, P

    1985-08-01

    RBCs from four glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient (Mediterranean variant) subjects were studied during fava bean hemolysis. In the density-fractionated RBC calcium level, Ca2+-ATPase activity, reduced glutathione level, and ghost protein pattern were studied. In the bottom fraction, containing most heavily damaged RBCs, calcium level ranged from 143 to 244 mumol/L RBCs (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 17 +/- 5 mumol/L RBCs). The Ca2+-ATPase activity ranged from 0.87 to 1.84 mumol ATP consumed/g Hb/min (healthy G6PD-deficient controls: 2.27 +/- 0.4). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of ghosts showed: (1) the presence of high mol wt aggregates (in three cases they were reduced by dithioerythritol; in one case, only partial reduction was possible); (2) the presence of multiple, scattered new bands; and (3) the reduction of band 3. Oxidant-mediated damage to active calcium extrusion, hypothetically associated with increased calcium permeability, may explain the large increase in calcium levels. They, in turn, could activate calcium-dependent protease activity, giving rise to the profound changes in the ghost protein pattern.

  5. Cerebral extracellular lactate increase is predominantly nonischemic in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Bouzat, Pierre; Messerer, Mahmoud; Bloch, Jocelyne; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endogenous lactate is an important substrate for neurons. This study aimed to examine cerebral lactate metabolism and its relationship with brain perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective cohort of 24 patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) was studied. Brain lactate metabolism was assessed by quantification of elevated CMD lactate samples (>4 mmol/L); these were matched to CMD pyruvate and PbtO2 values and dichotomized as glycolytic (CMD pyruvate >119 μmol/L vs. low pyruvate) and hypoxic (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg vs. nonhypoxic). Using perfusion computed tomography (CT), brain perfusion was categorized as oligemic, normal, or hyperemic, and was compared with CMD and PbtO2 data. Samples with elevated CMD lactate were frequently observed (41±8%), and we found that brain lactate elevations were predominantly associated with glycolysis and normal PbtO2 (73±8%) rather than brain hypoxia (14±6%). Furthermore, glycolytic lactate was always associated with normal or hyperemic brain perfusion, whereas all episodes with hypoxic lactate were associated with diffuse oligemia. Our findings suggest predominant nonischemic cerebral extracellular lactate release after TBI and support the concept that lactate may be used as an energy substrate by the injured human brain. PMID:23963367

  6. Increased 10-year cardiovascular disease and mortality risk scores in asymptomatic patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hasan; Yencilek, Faruk; Erihan, Ismet Bilger; Okan, Binnur; Sarica, Kemal

    2011-12-01

    Both the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and event rate are increased in patients with urolithiasis. Screening is recommended to all patients who have high cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to document 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in asymptomatic patients with urolithiasis. Consecutive 200 patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis were compared with 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Ten-year cardiovascular disease risk was calculated with the Framingham Risk Score and mortality risk with SCORE risk score. Calcium, oxalate, and citrate excretion were studied as urinary stone risk factors. The results indicate that patients with urolithiasis had higher total cholesterol (p < 0.0001), lower HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.0001), and higher systolic blood pressure (p < 0.0001) and hsCRP (p < 0.0001) compared with controls. Patients with urolithiasis had a higher Framingham Risk Scores [OR 8.36 (95% CI 3.81-18.65), p = 0.0001] and SCORE risk score [OR 3.02 (95% CI 1.30-7.02), p = 0.0006] compared with controls. The Framingham and SCORE risk score were significantly correlated with urinary calcium (p = 0.0001, r = 0.460, and p = 0.005, r = 0.223, respectively) and oxalate excretion (p = 0.0001, r = 0.516, p = 0.001, r = 0.290, respectively). In multiple linear regression analysis, urinary calcium and oxalate excretion, age, sex, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, hsCRP and smoking were the independent predictors of 10-year cardiovascular disease risk and urinary calcium and oxalate excretion, age, sex, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose for 10-year cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis carry high risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. All patients should be screened at the initial diagnosis of urolithiasis for the risk factors.

  7. Juice of Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) inhibits oxytocin-induced increase of the intracellular calcium concentration in human myometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Simões-Wüst, A P; Grãos, M; Duarte, C B; Brenneisen, R; Hamburger, M; Mennet, M; Ramos, M H; Schnelle, M; Wächter, R; Worel, A M; von Mandach, U

    2010-10-01

    The use of preparations from Bryophyllum pinnatum in tocolysis is supported by both clinical (retrospective comparative studies) and experimental (using uterus strips) evidence. We studied here the effect of B. pinnatum juice on the response of cultured human myometrial cells to stimulation by oxytocin, a hormone known to be involved in the control of uterine contractions by increasing the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In this work, [Ca2+]i was measured online during stimulation of human myometrial cells (hTERT-C3 and M11) with oxytocin, which had been pre-incubated in the absence or in the presence of B. pinnatum juice. Since no functional voltage-gated Ca2+ channels could be detected in these myometrial cells, the effect of B. pinnatum juice was as well studied in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which are known to have such channels and can be depolarised with KCl. B. pinnatum juice prevented the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in hTERT-C3 human myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner, achieving a ca. 80% inhibition at a 2% concentration. Comparable results were obtained with M11 human primary myometrial cells. In hTERT-C3 cells, prevention of the oxytocin-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was independent of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration and of voltage-dependent Ca2+-channels. B. pinnatum juice delayed, but did not prevent the depolarization-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, the data suggest a specific and concentration-dependent effect of B. pinnatum juice on the oxytocin signalling pathway, which seems to corroborate its use in tocolysis. Such a specific mechanism would explain the rare and minor side-effects in tocolysis with B. pinnatum as well as its high therapeutic index.

  8. Endogenous glutamate increases extracellular concentrations of dopamine, GABA, and taurine through NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in striatum of the freely moving rat: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Segovia, G; Del Arco, A; Mora, F

    1997-10-01

    Interactions between glutamate (Glu), dopamine (DA), GABA, and taurine (Tau) were investigated in striatum of the freely moving rat by using microdialysis. Intrastriatal infusions of the selective Glu uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-3,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) were used to increase the endogenous extracellular [Glu]. Correlations between extracellular [Glu] and extracellular [DA], [GABA], and [Tau], and the effects of a selective blockade of ionotropic Glu receptors, were studied. PDC (1, 2, and 4 mM) produced a dose-related increase in extracellular [Glu]. At the highest dose of PDC, [Glu] increased from 1.55 +/- 0.35 to 6.11 +/- 0.88 microM. PDC also increased extracellular [DA], [GABA], and [Tau]. The increasing [Glu] was correlated significantly with increasing [DA], [GABA], and [Tau]. PDC also decreased extracellular concentrations of DA metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylacetic acid (HVA). Perfusion with the NMDA-receptor antagonist 3-[(R)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (1 mM) or the AMPA/kainate-receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) (1 mM) attenuated the increases produced by PDC (4 mM) on [DA], [GABA], and [Tau], and decreases in [DOPAC] and [HVA]. DNQX also attenuated the increases in [Glu] induced by PDC. These data show that endogenous Glu plays a role in modulating the extracellular concentrations of DA, GABA, and Tau in striatum of the freely moving rat.

  9. Milk calcium taken with cheese increases bone mineral density and bone strength in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ken; Takada, Yukihiro; Matsuyama, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Aoe, Seiichiro; Yano, Hideo; Toba, Yasuhiro

    2002-11-01

    We investigated the calcium bioavailability of milk calcium, taken with or without cheese. Twenty-four 6-week-old male rats for a meal-feeding experiment were trained to consume an AIN-76 diet within 2 h (2 times per day) for 2 weeks. The rats were then divided into three experimental groups, each fed 2 types of experimental diets: Control group, Cheese group, and Ca-Cheese group. The rats were each alternately given 2 types of experimental diets at 2-h meal-feeding for 31 days. The breaking force and energy of the femur in the Ca-Cheese group were significantly higher than in the control group. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and the femur in the Ca-Cheese group was also significantly higher than in the other two groups. These results indicate that milk calcium taken with cheese increases bone strength and BMD efficiently, results that may be useful for the prevention of osteoporosis.

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  11. Increased Calcium Supplementation Postpartum Is Associated with Breastfeeding among Chinese Mothers: Finding from Two Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Yun; Binns, Colin W.; Lee, Andy H.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium supplementation status during the postpartum period among Chinese lactating women is still unclear. The objective of this study is to utilize data from two population-based prospective cohort studies to examine the calcium supplementation status and to identify whether breastfeeding is associated with increased calcium supplementation among Chinese mothers after child birth. Information from 1540 mothers on breastfeeding and calcium supplementation measured at discharge, 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum were extracted to evaluate the association between breastfeeding and calcium supplementation postpartum. A generalized linear mixed model was applied to each study initially to account for the inherent correlation among repeated measurements, adjusting for socio-demographic, obstetric factors and calcium supplementation during pregnancy. In addition, breastfeeding status measured at different follow-up time points was treated as a time dependent variable in the longitudinal analysis. Furthermore, the effect sizes of the two cohort studies were pooled using fixed effect model. Based on the two cohort studies, the pooled likelihood of taking calcium supplementation postpartum among breastfeeding mothers was 4.02 times (95% confidence interval (2.30, 7.03)) higher than that of their non-breastfeeding counterparts. Dietary supplementation intervention programs targeting different subgroups should be promoted in Chinese women, given currently a wide shortage of dietary calcium intake and calcium supplementation postpartum. PMID:27735835

  12. Increased Calcium Supplementation Postpartum Is Associated with Breastfeeding among Chinese Mothers: Finding from Two Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Yun; Binns, Colin W; Lee, Andy H

    2016-10-09

    The calcium supplementation status during the postpartum period among Chinese lactating women is still unclear. The objective of this study is to utilize data from two population-based prospective cohort studies to examine the calcium supplementation status and to identify whether breastfeeding is associated with increased calcium supplementation among Chinese mothers after child birth. Information from 1540 mothers on breastfeeding and calcium supplementation measured at discharge, 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum were extracted to evaluate the association between breastfeeding and calcium supplementation postpartum. A generalized linear mixed model was applied to each study initially to account for the inherent correlation among repeated measurements, adjusting for socio-demographic, obstetric factors and calcium supplementation during pregnancy. In addition, breastfeeding status measured at different follow-up time points was treated as a time dependent variable in the longitudinal analysis. Furthermore, the effect sizes of the two cohort studies were pooled using fixed effect model. Based on the two cohort studies, the pooled likelihood of taking calcium supplementation postpartum among breastfeeding mothers was 4.02 times (95% confidence interval (2.30, 7.03)) higher than that of their non-breastfeeding counterparts. Dietary supplementation intervention programs targeting different subgroups should be promoted in Chinese women, given currently a wide shortage of dietary calcium intake and calcium supplementation postpartum.

  13. Calcium Pre-Rinse Greatly Increases Overnight Salivary Fluoride after a 228 ppm Fluoride Rinse

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, G.L.; Chow, L.C.; Carey, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Large increases in salivary fluoride were reported 1 h after a calcium pre-rinse/NaF rinse. Aims This study examined the persistence of these increases. Methods 12 subjects rinsed in the evening with water, with a 228 μg/g (ppm) F rinse or with 150 mmol/l calcium lactate followed by a 228 μg/g F rinse. In a second experiment these same patients rinsed with a 912 μg/g F rinse. Saliva samples were obtained the morning after rinsing, centrifuged and the supernatants analyzed. Results The Ca pre-rinse/228 μg/g F rinse induced an increase in overnight salivary F over the 912 μg/g F rinse (≈2.5 times) and a statistically significant increase over the 228 μg/g F rinse (≈5.5 times). Conclusions The results suggest that a Ca pretreatment may increase the cariostatic effect of topical F agents. PMID:18781069

  14. Triiodothyronine increases calcium loss in a bed rest antigravity model for space flight.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Bray, George A; Rood, Jennifer; Most, Marlene M; Ryan, Donna H

    2008-12-01

    Bed rest has been used as a model to simulate the effects of space flight on bone metabolism. Thyroid hormones accelerate bone metabolism. Thus, supraphysiologic doses of this hormone might be used as a model to accelerate bone metabolism during bed rest and potentially simulate space flight. The objective of the study was to quantitate the changes in bone turnover after low doses of triiodothyronine (T(3)) added to short-term bed rest. Nine men and 5 women were restricted to bed rest for 28 days with their heads positioned 6 degrees below their feet. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or oral T(3) at doses of 50 to 75 microg/d in a single-blind fashion. Calcium balance was measured over 5-day periods; and T(3), thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone, immunoreactive parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and urinary deoxypyridinoline were measured weekly. Triiodothyronine increased 2-fold in the men and 5-fold in the women during treatment, suppressing both thyroxine and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Calcium balance was negative by 300 to 400 mg/d in the T(3)-treated volunteers, primarily because of the increased fecal loss that was not present in the placebo group. Urinary deoxypyridinoline to creatinine ratio, a marker of bone resorption, increased 60% in the placebo group during bed rest, but more than doubled in the T(3)-treated subjects (P < .01), suggesting that bone resorption was enhanced by treatment with T(3). Changes in serum osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, markers of bone formation, were similar in T(3)- and placebo-treated subjects. Triiodothyronine increases bone resorption and fecal calcium loss in subjects at bed rest.

  15. Acute stress-mediated increases in extracellular glutamate levels in the rat amygdala: differential effects of antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Leah R; Grillo, Claudia A; Piroli, Gerardo G; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Reagan, Lawrence P; Fadel, Jim

    2007-05-01

    Depressive illness is associated with changes in amygdalar volume, and stressful life events are known to precipitate depressive episodes in this patient population. Stress affects amygdalar synaptic plasticity and several neurotransmitter systems have been implicated in stress-mediated changes in the brain, including the glutamatergic system. However, the role of the glutamatergic system in stress-mediated plasticity in the amygdala remains to be determined. Accordingly the current study examined the stress modulation of extracellular glutamate levels in the basolateral nucleus (BLA) and the central nucleus (CeA) of the amygdala by in vivo microdialysis. Acute stress increased extracellular glutamate levels in the BLA and CeA, although the dynamics of these stress-mediated changes were dramatically different in these amygdalar nuclei. Tetrodotoxin administration reduced basal, and completely eliminated stress-mediated increases in glutamate efflux in the amygdala, demonstrating that stress effects are dependent on local axonal depolarization. Moreover, stress-mediated increases in glutamate efflux in the BLA were inhibited by the antidepressant tianeptine but not by the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Collectively, these data demonstrate that stress-induced modulation of glutamate neurochemistry reflects a fundamental pathological change that may contribute to the aetiology and progression of depressive illness, and suggest that some antidepressants such as tianeptine may elicit their clinical effects by modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  16. Human Keratinocytes Respond to Extracellular UTP by Induction of Hyaluronan Synthase 2 Expression and Increased Hyaluronan Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Tiina; Kärnä, Riikka; Rauhala, Leena; Bart, Genevieve; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Oikari, Sanna; Tammi, Markku I; Tammi, Raija H

    2017-03-24

    The release of nucleotides into extracellular space is triggered by insults like wounding and ultraviolet radiation, resulting in stimulatory or inhibitory signals via plasma membrane nucleotide receptors. As similar insults are known to activate hyaluronan synthesis we explored the possibility that extracellular UTP or its breakdown products UDP and UMP act as mediators for hyaluronan synthase (HAS) activation in human epidermal keratinocytes. UTP increased hyaluronan both in the pericellular matrix and in the culture medium of HaCaT cells. 10-100 μm UTP strongly up-regulated HAS2 expression, although the other hyaluronan synthases (HAS1, HAS3) and hyaluronidases (HYAL1, HYAL2) were not affected. The HAS2 response was rapid and transient, with the maximum stimulation at 1.5 h. UDP exerted a similar effect, but higher concentrations were required for the response, and UMP showed no stimulation at all. Specific siRNAs against the UTP receptor P2Y2, and inhibitors of UDP receptors P2Y6 and P2Y14, indicated that the response to UTP was mediated mainly through P2Y2 and to a lesser extent via UDP receptors. UTP increased the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, CREB, and Ser-727 of STAT3 and induced nuclear translocation of pCaMKII. Inhibitors of PKC, p38, ERK, CaMKII, STAT3, and CREB partially blocked the activation of HAS2 expression, confirming the involvement of these pathways in the UTP-induced HAS2 response. The present data reveal a selective up-regulation of HAS2 expression by extracellular UTP, which is likely to contribute to the previously reported rapid activation of hyaluronan metabolism in response to tissue trauma or ultraviolet radiation.

  17. Increased extracellular dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels contribute to enhanced subthalamic nucleus neural activity during exhausting exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Y; Liu, X

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the mechanism underlying the enhanced subthalamic nucleus (STN) neural activity during exhausting exercise from the perspective of monoamine neurotransmitters and changes of their corresponding receptors. Rats were randomly divided into microdialysis and immunohistochemistry study groups. For microdialysis study, extracellular fluid of the STN was continuously collected with a microdialysis probe before, during and 90 min after one bout of exhausting exercise. Dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were subsequently detected with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For immunohistochemistry study, the expression of DRD2 and HT2C receptors in the STN, before, immediately after and 90 min after exhaustion was detected through immunohistochemistry technique. Microdialysis study results showed that the extracellular DA and 5-HT neurotransmitters increased significantly throughout the procedure of exhausting exercise and the recovery period (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry study results showed that the expression levels of DRD2 and HT2C in the rat STN immediately after exhausting exercise and at the time point of 90 min after exhaustion were both higher than those of the rest condition, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Our results suggest that the increased extracellular DA and 5-HT in the STN might be one important factor leading to the enhanced STN neural activity and the development of fatigue during exhausting exercise. This study may essentially offer useful evidence for better understanding of the mechanism of the central type of exercise-induced fatigue. PMID:26424920

  18. Increased intracellular calcium activates serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) through a calmodulin-calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase pathway in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Seiji; Okayama, Naotsuka; Shimizu, Manabu; Itoh, Makoto

    2003-04-04

    SGK1 is one of the protein-serine/threonine kinases that is activated by insulin in a PI3K-dependent manner. Although SGK1 mediates a variety of biological activities, the mechanisms regulating its activity remain unclear. In this study, we examined the potential roles of calcium signaling in the activation of SGK1. Treatment of CHO-IR cells with a cell-permeable calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, abolished the insulin-induced activation of SGK1. Increasing intracellular calcium concentration by treating cells with thapsigargin or ionomycin induced a 6-8 fold increase in SGK1 activation. This was not affected by a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin, but was completely inhibited by the calmodulin inhibitors, W 7 and W 5. Co-transfection of CHO cells with FLAG-SGK1 and CaMKK revealed the direct association of CaMKK with SGK1. These results suggest a calcium-triggered signaling cascade in which an increase in intracellular calcium concentration directly stimulates SGK1 through CaMKK.

  19. Sucrose increases calcium-dependent protein kinase and phosphatase activities in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Raíces, M; MacIntosh, G C; Ulloa, R M; Gargantini, P R; Vozza, N F; Téllez-Inón, M T

    2003-09-01

    The effect of sucrose on tuber formation, calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and phosphatase activities was analysed using in vitro cultured potato plants. In short treatments, sucrose induced CDPK and phosphatase activities. In long treatments, sucrose induced tuber formation in the absence of other tuber inducing stimuli. Sorbitol caused a minor increase in CDPK activity and affected plant morphology but did not induce tuber development. The addition of the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine precluded sucrose-induced tuberization. Altogether, our results suggest that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events are involved in sucrose-induced tuber development.

  20. Root carbon inputs to the rhizosphere stimulate extracellular enzyme activity and increase nitrogen availability in temperate forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.; Dragoni, D.; Drake, J. E.; Finzi, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    The mobilization of nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter in temperate forest soils is controlled by the microbial production and activity of extracellular enzymes. The exudation of carbon (C) by tree roots into the rhizosphere may subsidize the microbial production of extracellular enzymes in the rhizosphere and increase the access of roots to N. The objective of this research was to investigate whether rates of root exudation and the resulting stimulation of extracellular enzyme activity in the rhizosphere (i.e., rhizosphere effect) differs between tree species that form associations with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This research was conducted at two temperate forest sites, the Harvard Forest (HF) in Central MA and the Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) in Southern IN. At the HF, we measured rates of root exudation and the rhizosphere effects on enzyme activity, N cycling, and C mineralization in AM and ECM soils. At the MMSF, we recently girdled AM and ECM dominated plots to examine the impact of severing belowground C allocation on rhizosphere processes. At both sites, the rhizosphere effect on proteolytic, chitinolytic and ligninolytic enzyme activities was greater in ECM soils than in AM soils. In particular, higher rates of proteolytic enzyme activity increased the availability of amino acid-N in ECM rhizospheres relative to the bulk soils. Further, this stimulation of enzyme activity was directly correlated with higher rates of C mineralization in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil. Although not significantly different between species, root exudation of C comprised 3-10% of annual gross primary production at the HF. At the MMSF, experimental girdling led to a larger decline in soil respiration and enzyme activity in ECM plots than in AM plots. In both ECM and AM soils, however, girdling resulted in equivalent rates of enzyme activity in rhizosphere and corresponding bulk soils. The results of this study contribute to the

  1. Alcohol-induced apoptosis of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: role of extracellular and intracellular calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Weiming; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2004-01-16

    Exposure of canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to ethanol (10, 25 and 100 mM) for 1, 3 and 5 days induced apoptosis with its typical characteristics of nuclear shrinkage, condensation, and DNA breakage as well as formation of apoptotic bodies observed by fluorescence staining, terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and comet assays. Such effects of alcohol on cerebral VSMCs were time- and concentration-dependent. The threshold ethanol concentration for induction of the apoptotic process was found to be 10 mM. Extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ chelators, i.e. ethylglycol-bisbeta-aminoethylether-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, 5 mM) and 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid AM (BAPTA, 10(-6) M), respectively, ameliorated greatly the number of cerebral VSMCs which underwent apoptosis. Verapamil, however, failed to inhibit apoptosis of cerebral VSMCs. From these new findings, we suggest that alcohol-induced apoptosis may contribute to alcohol-induced brain-vascular damage and stroke. In addition, our findings point to potential caution for humans who imbibe two or more standard drinks per day or who undergo 'binge drinking'.

  2. High concentration of insulin promotes apoptosis of primary cultured rat ovarian granulosa cells via its increase in extracellular HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiao-Rong; Sun, Zhou-Jun; Hu, Guo-Hua; Wang, Rong-Hui

    2015-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age. Insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia is a prevalent finding in women with PCOS, which indicates that insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia may be an important player in the pathogenesis of the PCOS. However, the underlying mechanism of insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia on the pathogenesis of the PCOS remains elusive. In this study, we found an increased high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in the serum from women with PCOS having insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, we discovered that high concentration of insulin, which mimics insulin resistance model, promoted apoptosis in primary cultured rat ovarian granulosa cells (GCs) via its effect on the increase in extracellular HMGB1. Our data presented the first evidence that increased HMGB1 induced by insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia promoted apoptosis of ovarian GCs, which provided new molecular basis for the PCOS pathogenesis.

  3. N-acetyl-L-cysteine and cysteine increase intracellular calcium concentration in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Md. Ashraful; Ahn, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine have been implicated in a number of human neutrophils' functional responses. However, though Ca2+ signaling is one of the key signalings contributing to the functional responses of human neutrophils, effects of NAC and cysteine on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in human neutrophils have not been investigated yet. Thus, this study was carried out with an objective to investigate the effects of NAC and cysteine on [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils. We observed that NAC (1 µM ~ 1 mM) and cysteine (10 µM ~ 1 mM) increased [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In NAC pre-supplmented buffer, an additive effect on N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils was observed. In Ca2+-free buffer, NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase in human neutrophils completely disappeared, suggesting that NAC- and cysteine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils occur through Ca2+ influx. NAC- and cysteine-induced [Ca2+]i increase was effectively inhibited by calcium channel inhibitors SKF96365 (10 µM) and ruthenium red (20 µM). In Na+-free HEPES, both NAC and cysteine induced a marked increase in [Ca2+]i in human neutrophils, arguing against the possibility that Na+-dependent intracellular uptake of NAC and cysteine is necessary for their [Ca2+]i increasing activity. Our results show that NAC and cysteine induce [Ca2+]i increase through Ca2+ influx in human neutrophils via SKF96365- and ruthenium red-dependent way. PMID:27610031

  4. Stimulation of high affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptors potentiates the depolarization-induced increase of intraneuronal ionized calcium content in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    De Erausquin, G; Brooker, G; Costa, E; Wojcik, W J

    1992-09-01

    In the treatment of spasticity, the therapeutic cerebrospinal fluid levels of (+/-)-baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist, are below 1 microM. However, the mechanism of the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen remains unknown, because, for the most part, the action of (+/-)-baclofen on GABAB receptors requires micromolar concentrations. Using fura-2 fluorescence microscopy, intracellular ionized calcium was measured in cerebellar granule neurons. Stimulation of a high affinity GABAB receptor potentiated by 2-3-fold the rise in intracellular calcium observed after depolarization of the cell with a Krebs Ringer's buffered solution containing 40 mM K+. Both GABA (100 nM) and (+/-)-baclofen (10-100 nM) stimulated this high affinity receptor. The potentiation of the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium by (+/-)-baclofen (100 nM) was completely blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (200 microM). Also, the intracellular calcium response induced by the activation of high affinity GABAB receptors was prevented by dantrolene (10 microM). The cerebellar granule neurons contained calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) stores. Caffeine (3 mM) and ryanodine (100 microM) potentiated the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium, and this response to both drugs was blocked by dantrolene (10 microM). Because dantrolene does not prevent the rise in intracellular calcium after cell depolarization (this calcium originated from the influx of extracellular calcium), (+/-)-baclofen acting via the high affinity GABAB receptor indirectly activates the CICR stores, allowing the influx of extracellular calcium to trigger the release of calcium from these dantrolene-sensitive CICR stores. Thus, this high affinity GABAB receptor might become activated during persistent depolarization caused by pathological states and could be a mechanism to be studied for the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen in spasticity.

  5. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  6. Interaction between Calcium Ions and Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Activity against Sf9 Cells (Spodoptera frugiperda, Lepidoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Monette, R.; Potvin, L.; Baines, D.; Laprade, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of calcium ions and modulators of calcium movement on Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal protein toxicity were investigated with Sf9 cells (Spodoptera frugiperda, fall armyworm) by a new B. thuringiensis toxicity assay based on measurement of fluorescence of ethidium homodimer, a high-affinity DNA stain. CryIC toxicity was substantially stimulated by extracellular calcium in a dose-dependent way (in the millimolar range), while toxicity enhancement could not be replicated when calcium was replaced by barium. This incremental toxicity was reduced by cobalt and lanthanum ions, two inorganic-calcium transport inhibitors. Methoxyverapamil, a voltage-dependent calcium channel blocker, and nifedipine, an inhibitor of dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channels, had no effect on CryIC toxin activity, but BAY K 8644, an L-type calcium channel activator, increased CryIC activity at high concentrations of extracellular calcium. While A23187, a calcium ionophore, and TMB-8, an inhibitor of intracellular-calcium mobilization, did not change CryIC-induced mortality, thapsigargin, an inhibitor of calcium uptake in intracellular stores, and more particularly trifluoperazine, which inhibits calcium-calmodulin-dependent processes, increased CryIC-mediated toxicity. The incremental effect of extracellular calcium on CryIC-induced toxicity was consistent with an increased concentration of intracellular calcium. PMID:16535509

  7. Formulation and sensory evaluation of Prosopis alba (Algarrobo) pulp cookies with increased iron and calcium dialyzabilities.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, C; Drago, S; Sabbag, N; Sanchez, H; Freyre, M

    2006-03-01

    Prosopis alba (algarrobo) is an important indigenous specie, which fruits are used as food and feed since ancient times. Cookies containing algarrobo pulp (AP) with increased iron and calcium availabilities were formulated and sensory evaluated. AP is preferred as food ingredient because of its high sugar content and pleasant flavour. Formulated cookies mean proximal composition was 8.9 g/100 g protein, 7.2 g/100 g dietary fiber, 25 g/100 g total sugar, and 18.5 g/100 g crude fat with iron and calcium contents 30 ppm and 340 ppm, respectively. Ascorbic (AA) and citric (CA) acids at different mM acid: mM Fe were added in order to increase mineral availabilities being evaluated by an in vitro method. Those ratios were 5:1 and 10:1 for AA:Fe whereas for CA:Fe were 50:1 and 100:1 and combinations of them. After chosen the best AA:Fe and CA:Fe ratios (5:1 and 50:1, respectively), sensory evaluation with trained sensory panel and a consumer acceptability test with one hundred and seventy untrained judges were carried out. Acceptability test showed that 77.65% of the people (< 25 years old 41.76%, 25-50 years old 20.00% and > 50 years old 15.89%) tasting final formulated cookies indicated that they "like very much" or "moderately like" and there were not consumers rejecting them.

  8. Calcium intake is not associated with increased coronary artery calcification: The Framingham Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate calcium intake is known to protect the skeleton. However, studies that have reported adverse effects of calcium supplementation on vascular events have raised widespread concern. We assessed the association between calcium intake (from diet and supplements) and coronary artery calcification...

  9. Increased pressure-induced tone in rat parenchymal arterioles vs. middle cerebral arteries: role of ion channels and calcium sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Marilyn J; Sweet, Julie; Chan, Siu-Lung; Tavares, Matthew J; Gokina, Natalia; Brayden, Joseph E

    2014-07-01

    Brain parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are high-resistance vessels that branch off pial arteries and perfuse the brain parenchyma. PAs are the target of cerebral small vessel disease and have been shown to have greater pressure-induced tone at lower pressures than pial arteries. We investigated mechanisms by which brain PAs have increased myogenic tone compared with middle cerebral arteries (MCAs), focusing on differences in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) calcium and ion channel function. The amount of myogenic tone and VSM calcium was measured using Fura 2 in isolated and pressurized PAs and MCAs. Increases in intraluminal pressure caused larger increases in tone and cytosolic calcium in PAs compared with MCAs. At 50 mmHg, myogenic tone was 37 ± 5% for PAs vs. 6.5 ± 4% for MCAs (P < 0.01), and VSM calcium was 200 ± 20 nmol/l in PAs vs. 104 ± 15 nmol/l in MCAs (P < 0.01). In vessels permeabilized with Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin, PAs were not more sensitive to calcium, suggesting calcium sensitization was not at the level of the contractile apparatus. PAs were 30-fold more sensitive to the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine than MCAs (EC50 for PAs was 3.5 ± 0.4 vs. 82.1 ± 2.1 nmol/l for MCAs;P < 0.01); however, electrophysiological properties of the VDCC were not different in VSM. PAs had little to no response to the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor iberiotoxin, whereas MCAs constricted ∼15%. Thus increased myogenic tone in PAs appears related to differences in ion channel activity that promotes VSM membrane depolarization but not to a direct sensitization of the contractile apparatus to calcium.

  10. Contribution of pannexin 1 and connexin 43 hemichannels to extracellular calcium-dependent transport dynamics in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yosuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Akaogi, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuhisa; Ishibashi, Megumi; Uchida, Yasuo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2015-04-01

    Dysregulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport function is thought to exacerbate neuronal damage in acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of pannexin (Px) and/or connexin (Cx) hemichannel(s)-mediated transport of organic anions and cations in human BBB endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and to identify inhibitors of hemichannel opening in hCMEC/D3 cells in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), a condition mimicking acute ischemic stroke. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), the cells showed increased uptake and efflux transport of organic ionic fluorescent dyes. Classic hemichannel inhibitors markedly inhibited the enhanced uptake and efflux. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics confirmed Px1 and Cx43 protein expression in plasma membrane of hCMEC/D3 cells. Knockdown of Px1 and Cx43 with the small interfering RNAs significantly inhibited the enhanced uptake and efflux of organic anionic and cationic fluorescent dyes. Clinically used cilnidipine and progesterone, which have neuroprotective effects in animal ischemia models, were identified as inhibitors of hemichannel opening. These findings suggest that altered transport dynamics at the human BBB in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) is at least partly attributable to opening of Px1 and Cx43 hemichannels. Therefore, we speculate that Px1 and Cx43 may be potential drug targets to ameliorate BBB transport dysregulation during acute ischemia.

  11. Modulation by extracellular ATP of L-type calcium channels in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal cell.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, A. D.; Kwan, Y. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate ([ATP]zero) on the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cells, isolated by enzymatic dissociation, were investigated by use of whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. 2. The application of [ATP]zero (2 microM-1 mM) produced an inhibitory effect on the L-type Ca2+ channel current peak amplitude (10 mM Ba2+ as charge carrier) in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner with an IC50 of 100 microM and a Hill coefficient of 1.83. 3. The presence of the adenosine receptor antagonists, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM) did not affect the [ATP]zero-induced inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine (100 microM) had little effect on the basal Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine 500 microM, caused 23% inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current, which was abolished by 0.1 microM DPCPX. 4. The presence of the P2-purinoceptor antagonists, suramin (1, 10 and 100 microM), reactive blue 2 (1 and 10 microM) and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 50 and 100 microM) failed to affect the inhibitory action of [ATP]zero on Ca2+ channel currents. 5. The relative rank order of potency of different nucleotides and nucleosides, at a concentration of 100 microM, on the inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents is as follows: adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) = alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (alpha,beta MeATP) > > 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) > or = adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S) > > uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) = adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) > adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) > or = adenosine. 6. These results suggest that [ATP]zero may play an important role in the heart beat by inhibiting the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in single SAN cells. This inhibitory effect is not due to the formation of adenosine resulting from the enzymatic degradation of [ATP]zero. Based on the relative order of inhibitory

  12. [Methods of increasing the activity of extracellular esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and proteases of wine yeast].

    PubMed

    Abdurazakova, S Kh; Salomov, Kh T

    1975-01-01

    Upon regular fermentation changes in the activity of the enzymes esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and protease of the yeast Saccharomyces mini of the Parkent I race were examined. The maximum activity of the enzymes occurred in the stationary phase of the yeast growth. An increase in the activity of the above enzymes was shown possible during a prolonged stabilization of the stationary conditions in the process of a continuous chemostat cultivation of wine yeast.

  13. Increased extracellular pressure provides a novel adjuvant stimulus for enhancement of conventional dendritic cell maturation strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, David H.; Shiratsuchi, Hiroe; Basson, Marc D.

    2009-09-11

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategies have gained increasing popularity in recent years. Methods for ex vivo generation of immunocompetent mature DCs still require optimization. DCs have been shown to phenotypically mature under elevated pressure. We compared the effects of pressure on DC maturation with LPS- and cytokine-stimulation. Human monocyte-derived immature or LPS- and cytokine-matured DCs were exposed to ambient or 40 mmHg increased pressure for 12 h, then assessed for expression of CD80, CD86, CD40, MHC-I/II, and inflammatory cytokine production. DCs were also evaluated for capacity to stimulate T-cell proliferation by co-culture with allogeneic lymphocytes. Pressure significantly increased cytokine production and expression of all surface molecules on immature DC other than MHC-I and CD40. Pressure/LPS-treated DCs displayed further upregulation of MHC-I, CD40, and IL-12p70. Cytokine-matured DCs appeared less responsive to pressure. T-cell proliferation correlated with MHC expression. Results suggest mechanical stimulation of DCs may provide a useful adjuvant to TLR-agonist maturation strategies.

  14. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis and increased cytosolic calcium are both necessary but not sufficient for activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morton, Andrew; Marland, Jamie R K; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. By definition this mode is triggered by neuronal activity; however, key questions regarding its mechanism of activation remain unaddressed. To determine the basic requirements for ADBE triggering in central nerve terminals, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. ADBE was monitored both optically and morphologically by observing uptake of the fluid phase markers tetramethylrhodamine-dextran and horse radish peroxidase respectively. Ablation of SV fusion with tetanus toxin resulted in the arrest of ADBE, but had no effect on other calcium-dependent events such as activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation, indicating that SV exocytosis is necessary for triggering. Furthermore, the calcium chelator EGTA abolished ADBE while leaving SV exocytosis intact, demonstrating that ADBE is triggered by intracellular free calcium increases outside the active zone. Activity-dependent dynamin I dephosphorylation was also arrested in EGTA-treated neurons, consistent with its proposed role in triggering ADBE. Thus, SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient individually to trigger ADBE. Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis (ADBE) is the dominant synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis mode in central nerve terminals during intense neuronal activity. To determine the minimal requirements for ADBE triggering, we decoupled SV fusion events from activity-dependent calcium influx using either clostridial neurotoxins or buffering of intracellular calcium. We found that SV fusion and increased cytoplasmic free calcium are both necessary but not sufficient to trigger ADBE.

  15. Increased vitamin D and calcium intake associated with reduced mammographic breast density among premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Fair, Alecia Malin; Lewis, Toni J; Sanderson, Maureen; Dupont, William D; Fletcher, Sarah; Egan, Kathleen M; Disher, Anthony C

    2015-10-01

    Vitamin D has been identified as a weak protective factor for postmenopausal breast cancer (relative risk, ~0.9), whereas high breast density has been identified as a strong risk factor (relative risk, ~4-6). To test the hypothesis that there is an association between vitamin D intake, but not circulating vitamin D levels, and mammographic breast density among women in our study, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 165 screening mammography patients at Nashville General Hospital's Breast Health Center, a public facility serving medically indigent and underserved women. Dietary and total (dietary plus supplements) vitamin D and calcium intakes were estimated by the Harvard African American Food Frequency Questionnaire, and blood samples were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Average percent breast density for the left and right breasts combined was estimated from digitized films using an interactive thresholding method available through Cumulus software. After statistical adjustment for age, race, and body mass index, the results revealed that there were significant trends of decreasing breast density with increasing vitamin D and calcium intake among premenopausal but not among postmenopausal women. There was no association between serum vitamin D and breast density in premenopausal or postmenopausal women. Confirmation of our findings in larger studies may assist in clarifying the role of vitamin D in breast density.

  16. TFEB-mediated increase in peripheral lysosomes regulates store-operated calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Sbano, Luigi; Bonora, Massimo; Marchi, Saverio; Baldassari, Federica; Medina, Diego L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles mainly involved in catabolic processes. In addition, lysosomes can expel their contents outside of the cell via lysosomal exocytosis. Some of the key steps involved in these important cellular processes, such as vesicular fusion and trafficking, require calcium (Ca2+) signaling. Recent data show that lysosomal functions are transcriptionally regulated by transcription factor EB (TFEB) through the induction of genes involved in lysosomal biogenesis and exocytosis. Given these observations, we investigated the roles of TFEB and lysosomes in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. We studied the effect of transient modulation of TFEB expression in HeLa cells by measuring the cytosolic Ca2+ response after capacitative Ca2+ entry activation and Ca2+ dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and directly in lysosomes. Our observations show that transient TFEB overexpression significantly reduces cytosolic Ca2+ levels under a capacitative influx model and ER re-uptake of calcium, increasing the lysosomal Ca2+ buffering capacity. Moreover, lysosomal destruction or damage abolishes these TFEB-dependent effects in both the cytosol and ER. These results suggest a possible Ca2+ buffering role for lysosomes and shed new light on lysosomal functions during intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:28084445

  17. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Facilitate Vesicle Endocytosis by Increasing Presynaptic Calcium Channel Expression at a Central Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi-cheng; Ge, Jian-long; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Hao, Mei; Wu, Yi-chen; Lin, Yi-an; La, Ting; Yao, Pan-tong; Mei, Yan-ai; Feng, Yi; Xue, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests significant biological effects caused by extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF). Although exo-endocytosis plays crucial physical and biological roles in neuronal communication, studies on how ELF-EMF regulates this process are scarce. By directly measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance at a large mammalian central nervous synapse, the calyx of Held, we report for the first time that ELF-EMF critically affects synaptic transmission and plasticity. Exposure to ELF-EMF for 8 to 10 days dramatically increases the calcium influx upon stimulation and facilitates all forms of vesicle endocytosis, including slow and rapid endocytosis, endocytosis overshoot and bulk endocytosis, but does not affect the RRP size and exocytosis. Exposure to ELF-EMF also potentiates PTP, a form of short-term plasticity, increasing its peak amplitude without impacting its time course. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms and found that calcium channel expression, including the P/Q, N, and R subtypes, at the presynaptic nerve terminal was enhanced, accounting for the increased calcium influx upon stimulation. Thus, we conclude that exposure to ELF-EMF facilitates vesicle endocytosis and synaptic plasticity in a calcium-dependent manner by increasing calcium channel expression at the nerve terminal. PMID:26887777

  18. Stable cavitation induces increased cytoplasmic calcium in L929 fibroblasts exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Akira; Higashiyama, Satoru; Yoshida, Kenji; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Ushida, Takashi

    2011-12-01

    An increase in cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(2+) increase) is a second messenger that is often observed under ultrasound irradiation. We hypothesize that cavitation is a physical mechanism that underlies the increase in Ca(2+) in these experiments. To control the presence of cavitation, the wave type was controlled in a sonication chamber. One wave type largely contained a traveling wave (wave type A) while the other wave type largely contained a standing wave (wave type B). Fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis of a sound field produced by the wave types ascertained that stable cavitation was present only under wave type A ultrasound irradiation. Under the two controlled wave types, the increase in Ca(2+) in L929 fibroblasts was observed with fluorescence imaging. Under wave type A ultrasound irradiation, an increase in Ca(2+) was observed; however, no increase in Ca(2+) was observed under wave type B ultrasound irradiation. We conclude that stable cavitation is involved in the increase of Ca(2+) in cells subjected to pulsed ultrasound.

  19. Stem cell and extracellular matrix-related molecules increase following melatonin treatment in the skin of postmenopausal rats.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Serap; Oktem, Gulperi; Uysal, Aysegul; Soner, Burak Cem; Arbak, Serap; Ince, Umit

    2014-08-01

    The menopause has a negative effect in the skin. Melatonin affects skin functions and structures through actions mediated by cell-surface and putative-nuclear receptors expressed in skin cell. We have therefore determined the effects of melatonin treatment on stem cell in the epidermis and extracellular matrix related molecules in the dermis the skin of postmenopausal rats. A total of 45 female rats were divided into 5 groups: control group, group A [ovariectomy (OVX)], group B (OVX +10 mg/kg/day melatonin), group C (OVX +30 mg/kg/day melatonin), group S (sham operated + 10 mg/kg/day melatonin). Ventral skin samples were excised at 12th week after ovariectomy. Hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid- methylamine silver, elastic van Gieson staining techniques were used to measure histomorphometrically the thickness of elastic fibers and basement membrane, depths of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous fat layer. Immunohistochemical staining methods were used for fibroblast growth factor β (FGF β), collagen type I, fibronectin, β-catenin, c-kit, c-Myc evaluation. Epidermal thickness, subcutaneous fat layer, and elastic fibers were significantly decreased in group C, and there was a significant increase after melatonin treatment. Although there was no difference in dermal thickness of group C, melatonin also significantly increased the dermal thickness. High FGF β, type I collagen, fibronectin, β-catenin, c-Myc immunoreactivity developed following melatonin in all groups. Thus melatonin treatment of postmenopausal rats was mostly due to the decrease of stem cell and extracellular matrix-related molecules in the skin.

  20. Calcium and bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Huang, Christopher L.-H.; Sun, Li; Friedman, Peter A.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Zaidi, Mone

    2013-01-01

    Calcium transport and calcium signaling are of basic importance in bone cells. Bone is the major store of calcium and a key regulatory organ for calcium homeostasis. Bone, in major part, responds to calcium-dependent signals from the parathyroids and via vitamin D metabolites, although bone retains direct response to extracellular calcium if parathyroid regulation is lost. Improved understanding of calcium transporters and calcium-regulated cellular processes has resulted from analysis of genetic defects, including several defects with low or high bone mass. Osteoblasts deposit calcium by mechanisms including phosphate and calcium transport with alkalinization to absorb acid created by mineral deposition; cartilage calcium mineralization occurs by passive diffusion and phosphate production. Calcium mobilization by osteoclasts is mediated by acid secretion. Both bone forming and bone resorbing cells use calcium signals as regulators of differentiation and activity. This has been studied in more detail in osteoclasts, where both osteoclast differentiation and motility are regulated by calcium. PMID:21674636

  1. Lysergic acid diethylamide and [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine increase extracellular glutamate in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Muschamp, John W; Regina, Meredith J; Hull, Elaine M; Winter, Jerrold C; Rabin, Richard A

    2004-10-08

    The ability of hallucinogens to increase extracellular glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. The hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a time-dependent increase in PFC glutamate that was blocked by the 5-HT(2A) antagonist M100907 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, the 5-HT(2A/C) agonist [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM; 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.), which is a phenethylamine hallucinogen, increased glutamate to 206% above saline-treated controls. When LSD (10 microM) was directly applied to the PFC by reverse dialysis, a rapid increase in PFC glutamate levels was observed. Glutamate levels in the PFC remained elevated after the drug infusion was discontinued. These data provide direct evidence in vivo for the hypothesis that an enhanced release of glutamate is a common mechanism in the action of hallucinogens.

  2. Mouse osteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1) expresses extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor and its agonists stimulate chemotaxis and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Butters, R. R. Jr; Sugimoto, T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Osteoblasts appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone remodeling in the "reversal" phase following osteoclastic resorption and preceding bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for osteoblasts in the vicinity, leading us to determine whether such osteoblasts express the CaR. In this study, we used the mouse osteoblastic, clonal cell line MC3T3-E1. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in MC3T3-E1 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific riboprobe and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of MC3T3-E1 cells to high Ca2+o (up to 4.8 mM) or the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin and gadolinium (Gd3+), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 possesses both CaR protein and mRNA very similar, if not identical, to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, the CaR in these osteoblasts could play a key role in regulating bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local release of Ca2+o.

  3. Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in a mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line (J774): potential mediator of the actions of Ca2+o on the function of J774 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Kifor, O.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Bai, M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone remodeling and may play a role in the "reversal" phase following osteoclastic resorption and preceding bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for bone marrow mononuclear cells in the vicinity, leading us to investigate whether such mononuclear cells express the CaR. In this study, we used the mouse J774 cell line, which exhibits a pure monocyte-macrophage phenotype. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using polyclonal antisera specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in J774 cells. The use of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with CaR-specific primers, including a set of intron-spanning primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, also identified CaR transcripts in J774 cells. Exposure of J774 cells to high Ca2+o (2.8 mM or more) or the polycationic CaR agonist, neomycin (100 microM), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in J774 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the monocyte-macrophage cell line, J774, possesses both CaR protein and mRNA very similar, if not identical, to those in parathyroid and kidney.

  4. Increased extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} lead to adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow stromal cells by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Seigo; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2015-02-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common progenitors for both adipocyte and osteoblast. An increase in marrow adipogenesis is associated with age-related osteopenia and anemia. Both extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) are versatile signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of cell functions, including proliferation and differentiation. We have recently reported that upon treatment of BMSCs with insulin and dexamethasone, both high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} enhanced adipocyte accumulation, which suggested that increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} caused by bone resorption may accelerate adipocyte accumulation in aging and diabetic patients. In this study, we used primary mouse BMSCs to investigate the mechanisms by which high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} may enhance adipocyte accumulation. In the process of adipocyte accumulation, two important keys are adipocyte differentiation and the proliferation of BMSCs, which have the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Use of MTT assay and real-time RT-PCR revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (ionomycin)-dependent adipocyte accumulation is caused by enhanced proliferation of BMSCs but not enhanced differentiation into adipocytes. Using fura-2 fluorescence-based approaches, we showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} (addition of CaCl{sub 2}) leads to increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Flow cytometric methods revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK independently of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The inhibition of ERK by U0126 and PD0325901 enhanced the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes. These data suggest that increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} provides the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes by the suppression of ERK activity independently of increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, which results in BMSC proliferation. - Highlights:

  5. Role of serotonin and/or norepinephrine in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Pachmerhiwala, Rashida; Bhide, Nirmal; Straiko, Megan; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    The acute administration of MDMA has been shown to promote glycogenolysis and increase the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum. In the present study the role of serotonergic and/or noradrenergic mechanisms in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis was assessed. The relationship of these responses to the hyperthermia produced by MDMA also was examined. The administration of MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a significant and sustained increase of 65-100% in the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum, as well as in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and a 35% decrease in brain glycogen content. Peripheral blood glucose was modestly increased by 32% after MDMA treatment. Treatment of rats with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose in the striatum but had no effect on MDMA-induced glycogenolysis or hyperthermia. Treatment with prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) did not alter the glucose or glycogen responses to MDMA but completely suppressed MDMA-induced hyperthermia. Finally, propranolol (3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis but did not alter MDMA-induced hyperthermia. The present results suggest that MDMA increases extracellular glucose in multiple brain regions, and that this response involves both serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. Furthermore, β-adrenergic and α-adrenergic receptors appear to contribute to MDMA-induced glycogenolysis and hyperthermia, respectively. Finally, hyperthermia, glycogenolysis and elevated extracellular glucose appear to be independent, unrelated responses to acute MDMA administration. PMID:20633550

  6. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation is increased in psoriasis and induces human β-defensin-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Yu, Hsin-Su; Yen, Feng-Lin; Lin, Chi-Ling; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lan, Cheng-Che E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been implicated in the development of certain immune-mediated diseases, but their role in psoriasis has not been clearly defined. Human β-defensin-2 (HBD-2) is an important antimicrobial peptide overexpressed in psoriasis epidermis. We evaluated whether the amount of NETs is increased in psoriasis and determined the effect of NETs on HBD-2 production in epidermal keratinocytes. Using fluorescent microscopy, we found that patients with psoriasis (n = 48) had higher amount of NETotic cells in their peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (n = 48) and patients with eczema (n = 35). Psoriasis sera showed increased ability to induce NET formation in control neutrophils but normal NET degradation ability. The amount of NETs in the peripheral blood correlated with psoriasis disease severity. NETosis was also observed in the majority (18 of 20) of psoriasis skin specimens. Furthermore, NETs induced HBD-2 mRNA and protein production in keratinocytes, and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed strong expression of HBD-2 in psoriasis lesional skin. In summary, NET formation is increased in peripheral blood and lesional skin of psoriasis patients and correlates with disease severity. Additionally, NET-induced HBD-2 production may provide a novel mechanism for the decreased susceptibility of psoriasis plaques to microbial infections. PMID:27493143

  7. Moderate increases in intracellular calcium activate neuroprotective signals in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bickler, P E; Fahlman, C S

    2004-01-01

    Although large increases in neuronal intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) are lethal, moderate increases in [Ca(2+)](i) of 50-200 nM may induce immediate or long-term tolerance of ischemia or other stresses. In neurons in rat hippocampal slice cultures, we determined the relationship between [Ca(2+)](i), cell death, and Ca(2+)-dependent neuroprotective signals before and after a 45 min period of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Thirty minutes before OGD, [Ca(2+)](i) was increased in CA1 neurons by 40-200 nM with 1 nM-1 microM of a Ca(2+)-selective ionophore (calcimycin or ionomycin-"Ca(2+) preconditioning"). Ca(2+) preconditioning greatly reduced cell death in CA1, CA3 and dentate during the following 7 days, even though [Ca(2+)](i) was similar (approximately 2 microM) in preconditioned and control neurons 1 h after the OGD. When pre-OGD [Ca(2+)](i) was lowered to 25 nM (10 nM ionophore in Ca(2+)-free medium) or increased to 8 microM (10 microM ionophore), more than 90% of neurons died. Increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein protein kinase B (Akt) and the MAP kinase ERK (p42/44) were present in preconditioned slices after OGD. Reducing Ca(2+) influx, inhibiting calmodulin, and preventing Akt or MAP kinase p42/44 upregulation prevented Ca(2+) preconditioning, supporting a specific role for Ca(2+) in the neuroprotective process. Further, in continuously oxygenated cultured hippocampal/cortical neurons, preconditioning for 30 min with 10 nM ionomycin reduced cell death following a 4 microM increase in [Ca(2+)](i) elicited by 1 microM ionomycin. Thus, a zone of moderately increased [Ca(2+)](i) before a potentially lethal insult promotes cell survival, uncoupling subsequent large increases in [Ca(2+)](i) from initiating cell death processes.

  8. Calpain, Atg5 and Bak play important roles in the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy induced by influx of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mei; Zhang, Tian; Sun, Lei; Luo, Yan; Liu, De-Hua; Xie, Shu-Tao; Song, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Guo-Fan; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-04-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) signals are involved in important checkpoints in cell death pathways and promote both apoptosis and autophagy. However, the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in response to Ca(2+) level elevation is poorly understood. Here, we provided evidence that the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) triggered by Trichokonin VI (TK VI), an antimicrobial peptide, induced calpain-dependent apoptosis and autophagy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Remarkably, TK VI preferentially induced apoptosis that was associated with calpain-mediated Bax and Atg5 cleavage, which resulted in the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release. Interestingly, truncated, but not full-length Atg5, associated with Bcl-xL and promoted the intrinsic pathway. Moreover, TK VI treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, an effect in which Bak might play a major role. This accumulation of ROS resulted in the subsequent disposal of damaged mitochondria within autophagosomes via Atg5-mediated and mitochondria-selective autophagy. Both the inhibition of calpain activity and Bax deficiency activated a switch that promoted an enhancement of autophagy. The inhibition of both apoptosis and autophagy significantly attenuated the TK VI cytotoxicity, indicating that the two processes had stimulatory effects during TK VI-meditated cell death. These results suggested that calpain, Bak and Atg5 were molecular links between autophagy and apoptosis and revealed novel aspects of the crosstalk between these two processes. The potential of TK VI is proposed as a promising anticancer agent for its well-characterized activity of Ca(2+) agonist and as a possible novel therapeutic strategy that acts on cancer cell mitochondria.

  9. Structure and expression of fibulin-2, a novel extracellular matrix protein with multiple EGF-like repeats and consensus motifs for calcium binding

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A new protein, fibulin-2, was predicted from sequence analysis of cDNA clones obtained from a mouse fibroblast library. This protein consists of a 1195-residue polypeptide preceded by a 26-residue signal peptide. The COOH-terminal region of 787 amino acids contained three anaphylatoxin-related segments (domain I), 11 EGF-like repeats (domain II), 10 of which had a consensus motif for calcium-binding, and a 115- residue globular domain III. Except for two additional EGF-like repeats, this COOH-terminal region showed 43% sequence identity with the previously described fibulin-1 (BM-90). The NH2-terminal 408 residues, unique to fibulin-2, showed no sequence homology to other known proteins and presumably form two additional domains that differ in their cysteine content. Recombinant fibulin-2 was produced and secreted by human cell clones as a disulfide-bonded trimer. Rotary shadowing visualized the protein as three 40-45 nm long rods which are connected at one end in a globe-like structure. No significant immunological cross-reaction could be detected between fibulin-1 and fibulin-2. Production of the fibulin-2 was demonstrated by Northern blots and radioimmunoassay in fibroblasts but not in several tumor cell lines. Together with the observation that the serum level of fibulin-2 is 1,000-fold lower than that of fibulin-1, the data indicate that these two isoforms are not always coordinately expressed. This is also suggested by Northern blots of tissue mRNAs and by immunofluorescence localizations using mouse tissues. The latter studies also demonstrated an extracellular localization for fibulin-2 in basement membranes and other connective tissue compartments. PMID:8245130

  10. Spontaneous calcium waves in Bergman glia increase with age and hypoxia and may reduce tissue oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Claus; Brazhe, Alexey; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Glial calcium (Ca(2+)) waves constitute a means to spread signals between glial cells and to neighboring neurons and blood vessels. These waves occur spontaneously in Bergmann glia (BG) of the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo. Here, we tested three hypotheses: (1) aging and reduced blood oxygen saturation alters wave activity; (2) glial Ca(2+) waves change cerebral oxygen metabolism; and (3) neuronal and glial wave activity is correlated. We used two-photon microscopy in the cerebellar cortexes of adult (8- to 15-week-old) and aging (48- to 80-week-old) ketamine-anesthetized mice after bolus loading with OGB-1/AM and SR101. We report that the occurrence of spontaneous waves is 20 times more frequent in the cerebellar cortex of aging as compared with adult mice, which correlated with a reduction in resting brain oxygen tension. In adult mice, spontaneous glial wave activity increased on reducing resting brain oxygen tension, and ATP-evoked glial waves reduced the tissue O(2) tension. Finally, although spontaneous Purkinje cell (PC) activity was not associated with increased glia wave activity, spontaneous glial waves did affect intracellular Ca(2+) activity in PCs. The increased wave activity during aging, as well as low resting brain oxygen tension, suggests a relationship between glial waves, brain energy homeostasis, and pathology.

  11. Cardiac L-type calcium current is increased in a model of hyperaldosteronism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fernandez, Beatriz; Miana, María; De Las Heras, Natalia; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Fernandez-Velasco, María; Bas, Manuel; Ballesteros, Sandra; Lahera, Vicente; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Delgado, Carmen

    2009-06-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the importance of aldosterone as an independent risk factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. It has been postulated that aldosterone could contribute to ventricular arrhythmogeneity by modulation of cardiac ionic channels. The aim of this study was to analyse ex vivo the electrophysiological characteristics of the L-type cardiac calcium current (I(CaL)) in a model of hyperaldosteronism in the rat. Aldosterone was administered for 3 weeks, and cardiac collagen deposition and haemodynamic parameters were analysed. In addition, RT-PCR and patch-clamp techniques were applied to study cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channels in isolated cardiomyocytes. Administration of aldosterone induced maladaptive cardiac remodelling that was related to increased collagen deposition, diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, ventricular myocytes isolated from the aldosterone-treated group showed increased I(CaL) density and conductance and prolongation of the action potential duration. No changes in kinetics or in voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of I(CaL) were observed, but relative expression of Ca(V)1.2 mRNA levels was higher in cardiomyocytes isolated from the aldosterone-treated group. The present study demonstrates that aldosterone treatment induces myocardial fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophy, increase of I(CaL) density, upregulation of L-type Ca(2+) channels and prolongation of action potential duration. It could be proposed that aldosterone, through these mechanisms, might exert pro-arrhythmic effects in the pathological heart.

  12. Acetylcholine induces voltage-independent increase of cytosolic calcium in mouse myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Giovannelli, A; Grassi, F; Mattei, E; Mileo, A M; Eusebi, F; Giovanelli, A

    1991-01-01

    Electrophysiological, biochemical, and Ca2+ imaging studies of cultured mouse myotubes were used to investigate whether the neurotransmitter acetylcholine causes an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) through activation of a second messenger system. Bath applications of acetylcholine to myotubes (i) elicited a significant membrane current even in a Na(+)-free Ca2+ medium, when the current was carried mainly by calcium ions; (ii) caused a rapid and transient cytosolic accumulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; (iii) evoked a conspicuous alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive long-lasting [Ca2+]i enhancement even in the presence of Cd2+; and (iv) transiently increased [Ca2+]i when cells were equilibrated in a Ca(2+)-free atropine-containing medium. We propose that, in addition to opening ion channels, the nicotinic action of acetylcholine on the muscle cell membrane increases [Ca2+]i through activation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate second messenger system and mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Images PMID:1946425

  13. Increased liver-specific proteins in circulating extracellular vesicles as potential biomarkers for drug- and alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Im, Eun-Ju; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Mezey, Esteban; Song, Byoung-Joon; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Drug- and alcohol-induced liver injury are a leading cause of liver failure and transplantation. Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a source of biomarkers because they contain unique proteins reflecting the identity and tissue-specific origin of the EV proteins. This study aimed to determine whether potentially hepatotoxic agents, such as acetaminophen (APAP) and binge alcohol, can increase the amounts of circulating EVs and evaluate liver-specific EV proteins as potential biomarkers for liver injury. The circulating EVs, isolated from plasma of APAP-exposed, ethanol-fed mice, or alcoholic hepatitis patients versus normal control counterparts, were characterized by proteomics and biochemical methods. Liver specific EV proteins were analyzed by immunoblots and ELISA. The amounts of total and liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs from APAP-treated mice significantly increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Proteomic analysis of EVs from APAP-exposed mice revealed that the amounts of liver-specific and/or hepatotoxic proteins were increased compared to those of controls. Additionally, the increased protein amounts in EVs following APAP exposure returned to basal levels when mice were treated with N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. Similar results of increased amounts and liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs were also observed in mice exposed to hepatotoxic doses of thioacetamide or d-galactosamine but not by non-hepatotoxic penicillin or myotoxic bupivacaine. Additionally, binge ethanol exposure significantly elevated liver-specific proteins in circulating EVs from mice and alcoholics with alcoholic hepatitis, compared to control counterparts. These results indicate that circulating EVs in drug- and alcohol-mediated hepatic injury contain liver-specific proteins that could serve as specific biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. PMID:28225807

  14. M1 muscarinic receptors increase calcium current and phosphoinositide turnover in guinea-pig ventricular cardiocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, M P; Alloatti, G; Eva, C; Oberto, A; Levi, R C

    1993-01-01

    1. Physiological and molecular evidence for the presence and functional role of M1 muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) in adult guinea-pig ventricular cells is presented. 2. Whole-cell clamp measurements of the L-type calcium current (ICa) in isolated myocytes were performed. Caesium was used to suppress potassium currents. ICa was increased by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in cells pretreated with pertussis toxin which blocked the M2 mAChR-triggered cascade of intracellular signalling, while it was not changed in untreated cells. 3. If the M2-mediated regulation of ICa was blocked by directly saturating the cell with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette, application of carbachol induced a further small increase of the current above the level reached after cAMP perfusion. This increase was more pronounced in cells pretreated with pertussis toxin. 4. The carbachol-induced increase of ICa was blocked by the selective M1 mAChR antagonist pirenzepine. 5. The application of high concentrations of carbachol increased the accumulation of [3H]inositol monophosphate up to 240% above control levels. This increase was reduced by application of pirenzepine. 6. The expression of M1 receptor mRNA in ventricular cardiocytes was shown by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. 7. These results suggest that M1 mAChR regulation of ICa can be a component of the paradoxical positive inotropism induced by high concentrations of muscarinic agonists. Images Fig. 11 PMID:8120813

  15. Effects of altered crystalline structure and increased initial compressive strength of calcium sulfate bone graft substitute pellets on new bone formation.

    PubMed

    Urban, Robert M; Turner, Thomas M; Hall, Deborah J; Infanger, Susan I; Cheema, Naveed; Lim, Tae-Hong; Moseley, Jon; Carroll, Michael; Roark, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A new, modified calcium sulfate has been developed with a different crystalline structure and a compressive strength similar to many calcium phosphate materials, but with a resorption profile only slightly slower than conventional surgical-grade calcium sulfate. A canine bilateral defect model was used to compare restoration of defects treated with the modified calcium sulfate compared to treatment using conventional calcium sulfate pellets after 6, 13, and 26 weeks. The modified calcium sulfate pellets were as effective as conventional calcium sulfate pellets with regard to the area fraction and compressive strength of newly formed bone in the treated bone defects. Mechanical testing demonstrated that the initial compressive strength of the modified material was increased nearly three-fold compared to that of conventional surgical-grade calcium sulfate. This increase potentially allows for its use in a broader range of clinical applications, such as vertebral and subchondral defects.

  16. Secular decline of seawater calcium increases seawater buffering and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, M.; Sigman, D. M.; Higgins, J. A.; Haug, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model (Millero and Pierrot, 1998) to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] (Hain et al., 2015). We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increase in seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  17. Royal Jelly Constituents Increase the Expression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase through Histone Acetylation in Monocytic THP-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Makino, Junya; Ogasawara, Rie; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Mitsugi, Yukari; Yamaguchi, Eiji; Itoh, Akichika; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-04-22

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is one of the main SOD isozymes and plays an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases by accelerating the dismutation reaction of superoxide. Royal jelly includes 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10H2DA, 2), which regulates the expression of various types of genes in epigenetics through the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) antagonism. The expression of EC-SOD was previously reported to be regulated epigenetically through histone acetylation in THP-1 cells. Therefore, we herein evaluated the effects of the royal jelly constituents 10-hydroxydecanoic acid (10HDA, 1), sebacic acid (SA, 3), and 4-hydroperoxy-2-decenoic acid ethyl ester (4-HPO-DAEE, 4), which is a derivative of 2, on the expression of EC-SOD in THP-1 cells. The treatment with 1 mM 1, 2, or 3 or 100 μM 4 increased EC-SOD expression and histone H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Moreover, the enrichment of acetylated histone H4 was observed in the proximal promoter region of EC-SOD and was caused by the partial promotion of ERK phosphorylation (only 4) and inhibition of HDAC activities, but not by the expression of HDACs. Overall, 4 exerted stronger effects than 1, 2, or 3 and has potential as a candidate or lead compound against atherosclerosis.

  18. Hunting increases phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II in adult barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is "off" in adults.

  19. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  20. Arginine vasopressin increases cellular free calcium concentration and adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate production in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, S.; Okada, K.; Saito, T.

    1988-09-01

    The role of calcium (Ca) in the cellular action of arginine vasopressin (AVP) was examined in rat renal papillary collecting tubule cells in culture. AVP increased both the cellular free Ca concentration ((Ca2+)i) using fura-2, and cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. AVP-induced cellular Ca mobilization was totally blocked by the antagonist to the antidiuretic action of AVP, and somewhat weakened by the antagonist to the vascular action of AVP. 1-Deamino-8-D-AVP (dDAVP). an antidiuretic analog of AVP, also increased (Ca2+) significantly. Cellular Ca mobilization was not obtained with cAMP, forskolin (a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase), or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. The early phase of (Ca2+)i depended on the intracellular Ca pool, since an AVP-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was obtained in cells pretreated with Ca-free medium containing 1 mM EGTA, verapamil, or cobalt, which blocked cellular Ca uptake. Also, AVP increased /sup 45/Ca2+ influx during the initial 10 min, which initiated the sustained phase of cellular Ca mobilization. However, cellular cAMP production induced by AVP during the 10-min observation period was diminished in the cells pretreated with Ca-free medium, verapamil, or cobalt, but was still significantly higher than the basal level. This was also diminished by a high Ca concentration in medium. These results indicate that 1) AVP concomitantly regulates cellular free Ca as well as its second messenger cAMP production; 2) AVP-induced elevation of cellular free Ca is dependent on both the cellular Ca pool and extracellular Ca; and 3) there is an optimal level of extracellular Ca to modulate the AVP action in renal papillary collecting tubule cells.

  1. Calcium spike-mediated digital signaling increases glutamate output at the visual threshold of retinal bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Lipin, Mikhail Y.

    2014-01-01

    Most retinal bipolar cells (BCs) transmit visual input from photoreceptors to ganglion cells using graded potentials, but some also generate calcium or sodium spikes. Sodium spikes are thought to increase temporal precision of light-evoked BC signaling; however, the role of calcium spikes in BCs is not fully understood. Here we studied how calcium spikes and graded responses mediate neurotransmitter release from Mb-type BCs, known to produce both. In dark-adapted goldfish retinal slices, light induced spikes in 40% of the axon terminals of intact Mbs; in the rest, light generated graded responses. These light-evoked membrane potentials were used to depolarize axotomized Mb terminals where depolarization-evoked calcium current (ICa) and consequent exocytosis-associated membrane capacitance increases (ΔCm) could be precisely measured. When evoked by identical dim light intensities, spiking responses transferred more calcium (QCa) and triggered larger exocytosis with higher efficiency (ΔCm/QCa) than graded potentials. QCa was translated into exocytosis linearly when transferred with spikes and supralinearly when transferred with graded responses. At the Mb output (ΔCm), spiking responses coded light intensity with numbers and amplitude whereas graded responses coded with amplitude, duration, and steepness. Importantly, spiking responses saturated exocytosis within scotopic range but graded potentials did not. We propose that calcium spikes in Mbs increase signal input-output ratio by boosting Mb glutamate release at threshold intensities. Therefore, spiking Mb responses are suitable to transfer low-light-intensity signals to ganglion cells with higher gain, whereas graded potentials signal for light over a wider range of intensities at the Mb output. PMID:25339710

  2. Increasing Superoxide Production and the Labile Iron Pool in Tumor Cells may Sensitize Them to Extracellular Ascorbate.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark Frederick; Contreras, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Low millimolar concentrations of ascorbate are capable of inflicting lethal damage on a high proportion of cancer cells lines, yet leave non-transformed cell lines unscathed. Extracellular generation of hydrogen peroxide, reflecting reduction of molecular oxygen by ascorbate, has been shown to mediate this effect. Although some cancer cell lines express low catalase activity, this cannot fully explain the selective sensitivity of cancer cells to hydrogen peroxide. Ranzato and colleagues have presented evidence for a plausible new explanation of this sensitivity - a high proportion of cancers, via NADPH oxidase complexes or dysfunctional mitochondria, produce elevated amounts of superoxide. This superoxide, via a transition metal-catalyzed transfer of an electron to the hydrogen peroxide produced by ascorbate, can generate deadly hydroxyl radical (Haber-Weiss reaction). It thus can be predicted that concurrent measures which somewhat selectively boost superoxide production in cancers will enhance their sensitivity to i.v. ascorbate therapy. One way to achieve this is to increase the provision of substrate to cancer mitochondria. Measures which inhibit the constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activity in cancers (such as salsalate and mTORC1 inhibitors, or an improvement of tumor oxygenation), or that inhibit the HIF-1-inducible pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (such as dichloroacetate), can be expected to increase pyruvate oxidation. A ketogenic diet should provide more lipid substrate for tumor mitochondria. The cancer-killing activity of 42°C hyperthermia is to some degree contingent on an increase in oxidative stress, likely of mitochondrial origin; reports that hydrogen peroxide synergizes with hyperthermia in killing cancer cells suggest that hyperthermia and i.v. ascorbate could potentiate each other's efficacy. A concurrent enhancement of tumor oxygenation might improve results by decreasing HIF-1 activity while increasing the interaction of ascorbic

  3. Extracellular magnesium regulates nuclear and perinuclear free ionized calcium in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relation to alcohol and central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Altura, B M; Zhang, A; Cheng, T P; Altura, B T

    2001-02-01

    Quantitative digital imaging microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and multiple molecular fluorescent probes were utilized to test the hypothesis that cerebral vascular muscle cell nuclear ([Ca(2+)](n)), perinuclear ([Ca(2+)](pn)), and cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) levels are regulated by the concentration of extracellular free magnesium ions ([Mg(2+)](o)). Primary cultured canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells were loaded with either fura-2/AM, indo-1/AM, or fluo-3/AM, and the subcellular Ca(2+) responses to stepwise reduction in [Mg(2+)](o) (i.e., from 1.36 to 0.17 mM) were analyzed over time. With normal 1.36 mM [Mg(2+)](o)-containing incubation media, basal mean [Ca(2+)](i) was 89.6+/-15 nM. Lowering [Mg(2+)](o) to 1.07, 0.88, 0.48, and 0.17 mM resulted in rapid (<4 min) increments in [Ca(2+)](i) going to 213+/-43, 368+/-67, 471+/-77, and 642+/-98 nM, respectively; the longer the exposure time (up to 30 min) to lowered [Mg(2+)](o), the higher the [Ca(2+)](i). Restoration of [Mg(2+)](o) to normal caused decreases in [Ca(2+)](i) to 215.9+/-42.3 nM, but only complete removal of [Ca(2+)](o) returned [Ca(2+)](i) to basal levels. Results show that basal [Ca(2+)](pn) (282+/-92 nM) exceeds basal cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (61+/-27.8 nM) and [Ca(2+)](n) (20+/-7.6 nM). However, reduction of normal [Mg(2+)](o) to 0.48 mM resulted in dramatic, rapid rises in all subcellular compartments, where [Ca(2+)](pn) (1503+/-102 nM)>cytoplasmic Ca(2+) (688+/-49 nM) approximately equal to [Ca(2+)](n) (674+/-12 nM). Nuclear Ca(2+) rose dramatically (e.g., 35-40 times basal levels). Both verapamil (1 microM) and Ni(2+) (5 mM) prevented, completely, the rises in Ca(2+) in all compartments, suggesting that Mg(2+)-dependent Ca(2+) accumulation may be dependent on nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi, and cytoplasmic L-type voltage membrane-regulated Ca(2+) channels. The normally low [Ca(2+)](n) suggests that Ca(2+) does not transport passively across the nuclear

  4. Yeast respond to hypotonic shock with a calcium pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batiza, A. F.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the transgenic AEQUORIN calcium reporter system to monitor the cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypotonic shock. Such a shock generates an almost immediate and transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt which is eliminated by gadolinium, a blocker of stretch-activated channels. In addition, this transient rise in [Ca2+]cyt is initially insensitive to 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), an extracellular calcium chelator. However, BAPTA abruptly attenuates the maintenance of that transient rise. These data show that hypotonic shock generates a stretch-activated channel-dependent calcium pulse in yeast. They also suggest that the immediate calcium influx is primarily generated from intracellular stores, and that a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt depends upon extracellular calcium.

  5. Increased maternofetal calcium flux in parathyroid hormone-related protein-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Bond, H; Dilworth, M R; Baker, B; Cowley, E; Requena Jimenez, A; Boyd, R D H; Husain, S M; Ward, B S; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D

    2008-01-01

    The role of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in fetal calcium homeostasis and placental calcium transport was examined in mice homozygous for the deletion of the PTHrP gene (PTHrP−/− null; NL) compared to PTHrP+/+ (wild-type; WT) and PTHrP+/− (heterozygous; HZ) littermates. Fetal blood ionized calcium was significantly reduced in NL fetuses compared to WT and HZ groups at 18 days of pregnancy (dp) with abolition of the fetomaternal calcium gradient. In situ placental perfusion of the umbilical circulation at 18 dp was used to measure unidirectional clearance of 45Ca across the placenta in maternofetal (CaKmf) and fetoplacental (CaKfp) directions; CaKfp was < 5% of CaKmf for all genotypes. At 18 dp, CaKmf across perfused placenta and intact placenta (CaKmf(intact)) were similar and concordant with net calcium accretion rates in vivo. CaKmf was significantly raised in NL fetuses compared to WT and HZ littermates. Calcium accretion was significantly elevated in NL fetuses by 19 dp. Placental calbindin-D9K expression in NL fetuses was marginally enhanced (P < 0.07) but expression of TRPV6/ECaC2 and plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) isoforms 1 and 4 were unaltered. We conclude that PTHrP is an important regulator of fetal calcium homeostasis with its predominant effect being on unidirectional maternofetal transfer, probably mediated by modifying placental calbindin-D9K expression. In situ perfusion of mouse placenta is a robust methodology for allowing detailed dissection of placental transfer mechanisms in genetically modified mice. PMID:18258656

  6. Testosterone induces an intracellular calcium increase by a nongenomic mechanism in cultured rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Ibarra, Cristian; Estrada, Manuel; Chiong, Mario; Soto, Dagoberto; Parra, Valentina; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Lavandero, Sergio

    2006-03-01

    Androgens are associated with important effects on the heart, such as hypertrophy or apoptosis. These responses involve the intracellular androgen receptor. However, the mechanisms of how androgens activate several membrane signaling pathways are not fully elucidated. We have investigated the effect of testosterone on intracellular calcium in cultured rat cardiac myocytes. Using fluo3-AM and epifluorescence microscopy, we found that exposure to testosterone rapidly (1-7 min) led to an increase of intracellular Ca2+, an effect that persisted in the absence of external Ca2+. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that these effects occurred before translocation of the intracellular androgen receptor to the perinuclear zone. Pretreatment of the cells with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethylester and thapsigargin blocked this response, suggesting the involvement of internal Ca2+ stores. U-73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, and xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, abolished the Ca2+ signal. The rise in intracellular Ca2+ was not inhibited by cyproterone, an antagonist of intracellular androgen receptor. Moreover, the cell impermeant testosterone-BSA complex also produced the Ca2+ signal, indicating its origin in the plasma membrane. This effect was observed in cultured neonatal and adult rat cardiac myocytes. Pertussis toxin and the adenoviral transduction of beta- adrenergic receptor kinase carboxy terminal peptide, a peptide inhibitor of betagamma-subunits of G protein, abolished the testosterone-induced Ca2+ release. In summary, this is the first study of rapid, nongenomic intracellular Ca2+ signaling of testosterone in cardiac myocytes. Using various inhibitors and testosterone-BSA complex, the mechanism for the rapid, testosterone-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ is through activation of a plasma membrane receptor associated with a Pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein-phospholipase C

  7. Induction of extracellular ATP mediates increase in intracellular thioredoxin in RAW264.7 cells exposed to low-dose γ-rays.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kitami, Akihiro; Kawano, Ayumi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Kojima, Shuji

    2011-09-15

    We previously showed that low doses (0.25-0.5 Gy) of γ-rays elevated thioredoxin (Trx-1) in various organs of mice after whole-body irradiation. Also, it is reported that extracellular ATP, which is released in response to various stresses, regulates the expression of intracellular antioxidants through activation of P2 receptors. We have recently found that low-dose γ-rays induce ATP release from the exposed cells. However, it is not yet clear whether the radiation-induced extracellular ATP modulates the cellular redox balance. Here, we investigated whether γ-ray irradiation-induced release of extracellular ATP contributes to the induction of the cellular antioxidant Trx-1, using mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Irradiation with γ-rays or exogenously added ATP increased the expression of Trx-1, and in both cases the increase was blocked by pretreatment with an ectonucleotidase, apyrase. Then, the involvement of ATP-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the increase in antioxidant capacity was examined. ATP stimulation promoted the generation of intracellular ROS and also increased Trx-1 expression. The increase in Trx-1 expression was significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants. In conclusion, the γ-ray irradiation-induced release of extracellular ATP may, at least in part, contribute to the production of ROS via purinergic signaling, leading to promotion of intracellular antioxidants as an adaptive response to an oxidative stress.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells under Stress Increase Osteosarcoma Migration and Apoptosis Resistance via Extracellular Vesicle Mediated Communication

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhaneni, Krishna C.; Hassler, Meeves-Yoni; Abraham, Anu; Whitt, Jason; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Atfi, Azeddine; Pochampally, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow are involved in the growth and metastasis of solid tumors but the mechanism remains unclear in osteosarcoma (OS). Previous studies have raised the possibility that OS cells may receive support from associated MSCs in the nutrient deprived core of the tumors through the release of supportive macromolecules and growth factors either in vesicular or non-vesicular forms. In the present study, we used stressed mesenchymal stem cells (SD-MSCs), control MSCs and OS cells to examine the hypothesis that tumor-associated MSCs in nutrient deprived core provide pro-proliferative, anti-apoptotic, and metastatic support to nearby tumor cells. Assays to study of the effects of SD-MSC conditioned media revealed that OS cells maintained proliferation when compared to OS cells grown under serum-starved conditions alone. Furthermore, OS cells in MSCs and SD-MSC conditioned media were significantly resistant to apoptosis and an increased wound healing rate was observed in cells exposed to either conditioned media or EVs from MSCs and SD-MSCs. RT-PCR assays of OS cells incubated with extracellular vesicles (EVs) from SD-MSCs revealed microRNAs that could potentially target metabolism and metastasis associated genes as predicted by in silico algorithms, including monocarboxylate transporters, bone morphogenic receptor type 2, fibroblast growth factor 7, matrix metalloproteinase-1, and focal adhesion kinase-1. Changes in the expression levels of focal adhesion kinase, STK11 were confirmed by quantitative PCR assays. Together, these data indicate a tumor supportive role of MSCs in osteosarcoma growth that is strongly associated with the miRNA content of the EVs released from MSCs under conditions that mimic the nutrient deprived core of solid tumors. PMID:27812189

  9. Regional increase of extracellular potassium leads to electrical instability and reentry occurrence through the spatial heterogeneity of APD restitution.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Veniamin Y; Uzelac, Ilija; Wikswo, John P

    2011-07-01

    The heterogeneities of electrophysiological properties of cardiac tissue are the main factors that control both arrhythmia induction and maintenance. Although the local increase of extracellular potassium ([K(+)](o)) due to coronary occlusion is a well-established metabolic response to acute ischemia, the role of local [K(+)](o) heterogeneity in phase 1a arrhythmias has yet to be determined. In this work, we created local [K(+)](o) heterogeneity and investigated its role in fast pacing response and arrhythmia induction. The left marginal vein of a Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart was cannulated and perfused separately with solutions containing 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 mM of K(+). The fluorescence dye was utilized to map the voltage distribution. We tested stimulation rates, starting from 400 ms down to 120 ms, with steps of 5-50 ms. We found that local [K(+)](o) heterogeneity causes action potential (AP) alternans, 2:1 conduction block, and wave breaks. The effect of [K(+)](o) heterogeneity on electrical stability and vulnerability to arrhythmia induction was largest during regional perfusion with 10 mM of K(+). We detected three concurrent dynamics: normally propagating activation when excitation waves spread over tissue perfused with normal K(+), alternating 2:2 rhythm near the border of [K(+)](o) heterogeneity, and 2:1 aperiodicity when propagation was within the high [K(+)](o) area. [K(+)](o) elevation changed the AP duration (APD) restitution and shifted the restitution curve toward longer diastolic intervals and shorter APD. We conclude that spatial heterogeneity of the APD restitution, created with regional elevation of [K(+)](o), can lead to AP instability, 2:1 block, and reentry induction.

  10. Effect of increasing the colloidal calcium phosphate of milk on the texture and microstructure of yogurt.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, T; Horne, D; Lucey, J A

    2011-11-01

    The effect of increasing the colloidal calcium phosphate (CCP) content on the physical, rheological, and microstructural properties of yogurt was investigated. The CCP content of heated (85°C for 30 min) milk was increased by increasing the pH by the addition of alkali (NaOH). Alkalized milk was dialyzed against pasteurized skim milk at approximately 4°C for 72 h to attempt to restore the original pH and soluble Ca content. By adjustment of the milk to pH values 7.45, 8.84, 10.06, and 10.73, the CCP content was increased to approximately 107, 116, 123, and 128%, respectively, relative to the concentration in heated milk. During fermentation of milk, the storage modulus (G') and loss tangent values of yogurts were measured using dynamic oscillatory rheology. Large deformation rheological properties were also measured. The microstructure of yogurt was observed using fluorescence microscopy, and whey separation was determined. Acid-base titration was used to evaluate changes in the CCP content in milk. Total Ca and casein-bound Ca increased with an increase in the pH value of alkalization. During acidification, elevated buffering occurred in milk between pH values 6.7 to 5.2 with an increase in the pH of alkalization. When acidified milk was titrated with alkali, elevated buffering occurred in milk between pH values 5.6 to 6.4 with an increase in the pH of alkalization. The high residual pH of milk after dialysis could be responsible for the decreased contents of soluble Ca in these milks. The pH of gelation was higher in all dialyzed samples compared with the heated control milk, and the gelation pH was higher with an increase in CCP content. The sample with highest CCP content (128%) exhibited gelation at very high pH (6.3), which could be due to alkali-induced CN micellar disruption. The G' values at pH 4.6 were similar in gels with CCP levels up to 116%; at higher CCP levels, the G' values at pH 4.6 greatly decreased. Loss tangent values at pH 5.1 were similar

  11. Increased calcium deposits and decreased Ca2+ -ATPase in erythrocytes of ascitic broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhao, Lihong; Geng, Guangrui; Ma, Liqin; Dong, Shishan; Xu, Tong; Wang, Jianlin; Wang, Huiyu; Tian, Yong; Qiao, Jian

    2011-06-01

    The decrease of erythrocyte deformability may be one of the predisposing factors for pulmonary hypertension and ascites in broiler chickens. In mammals, the cytoplasmic calcium is a major regulator of erythrocyte deformability. In this study, the erythrocyte deformability was measured, and the precise locations of Ca2+ and Ca2+ -ATPase in the erythrocytes were investigated in chickens with ascites syndrome induced by low ambient temperature. The results showed that ascitic broilers had higher filtration index of erythrocyte compared with control groups, indicating a decrease in erythrocyte deformability in ascitic broilers. The more calcium deposits were observed in the erythrocytes of ascitic broilers compared with those of the age-matched control birds. The Ca2+ -ATPase reactive grains were significantly decreased on the erythrocyte membranes of ascitic broilers. Our data suggest that accumulation of intracellular calcium and inhibition of Ca2+ -ATPase might be important factors for the reduced deformability of the erythrocytes of ascitic broilers.

  12. Increases in cellular calcium concentration stimulate pepsinogen secretion from dispersed chief cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, J.P.; Berger, S.; Cosowsky, L.; Straus, E.

    1986-05-29

    Intracellular calcium concentration ((Ca)i) and pepsinogen secretion from dispersed chief cells from guinea pig stomach were determined before and after stimulation with calcium ionophores. (Ca)i was measured using the fluorescent probe quin2. Basal (Ca)i was 105 +/- 4 nM. Pepsinogen secretion was measured with a new assay using /sup 125/I-albumin substrate. This assay is 1000-fold more sensitive than the widely-used spectrophotometric assay, technically easy to perform, rapid, and relatively inexpensive. The kinetics and stoichiometry of ionophore-induced changes in (Ca)i and pepsinogen secretion were similar. These data support a role for calcium as a cellular mediator of pepsinogen secretion.

  13. Extracellular calcium (Ca2+(o))-sensing receptor in a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2): potential mediator of the actions of Ca2+(o) on the function of ST2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+(o)) homeostasis by mediating the actions of Ca2+(o) on parathyroid gland and kidney. Bone marrow stromal cells support the formation of osteoclasts from their progenitors as well as the growth of hematopoietic stem cells by secreting humoral factors and through cell to cell contact. Stromal cells also have the capacity to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Bone resorption by osteoclasts probably produces substantial local increases in Ca2+(o) that could provide a signal for stromal cells in the immediate vicinity, leading us to determine whether such stromal cells express the CaR. In this study, we used the murine bone marrow-derived, stromal cell line, ST2. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in ST2 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in ST2 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific probe and by RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of ST2 cells to high Ca2+(o) (4.8 mM) or to the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin (300 microM) or gadolinium (100 microM), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in ST2 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, ST2, possesses both CaR protein and messenger RNA that are very similar if not identical to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, as ST2 cells have the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, the CaR in stromal cells could participate in bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local, osteoclast-mediated release of Ca2+(o) and, thereafter, initiating bone formation after their differentiation into osteoblasts.

  14. Models for nutrition education to increase consumption of calcium and dairy products among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Yvonne L; Hawkins, Anita S; Holt, Mckessa L; Hossain, Mian B; Rowel, Randolph H; Sydnor, Kim L; Divers, Shaquana P

    2006-04-01

    Calcium and dairy consumption are documented to be low among African Americans and have demonstrated benefits to bone growth, overall nutritional status, and health throughout the life cycle. There is also an emerging relationship to the prevention of obesity. This low consumption has been attributed to both cultural and community/environmental barriers. Using a life course construct and an ecological model of health behavior, this paper will illustrate why nutrition education and food consumption behavior at one stage of the life cycle may influence health status at that stage as well as influence health and consumption of calcium and dairy products at subsequent stages. The life course construct recognizes that both past and present behavior and experiences (in this case food and nutrient intake) are shaped by the wider social, economic, and cultural context and therefore may provide clues to current patterns of health and disease. The ecological model, concerned with constructs of environmental change, behavior, and policies that may help people make choices in their daily life, complements the life course approach when examining the potential influence of nutrition education provided by federally funded food and nutrition programs on calcium and dairy consumption behavior across the life cycle. The "critical period model" within the life course construct is operative for calcium, a nutrient for which adequate intake is critically important during adolescence when peak bone density development, necessary for later protection against osteoporosis, is important.

  15. Cost containment using cysteine HCl acidification to increase calcium/phosphate solubility in hyperalimentation solutions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, G L; Baumgartner, T G; Fischlschweiger, W; Sitren, H S; Thakker, K M; Cerda, J J

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if (1) the calcium/phosphate insoluble product was inversely related to pH [when cysteine HC1 (CH) was added as neonatal supplementation at 0.5 mM/kg/day to hyperalimentation (HAL) solutions] and (2) the potential cost savings to the hospital. The pH of the HAL solutions was adjusted by adding various amounts of CH to the HAL solution. HAL solutions containing 27 mEq of calcium/liter and 30 mEq (15 mM) of phosphate/liter were compounded. Ten-milliliter aliquots were analyzed at 0, 12, 24, and 48 hr. All samples (n = 56) were filtered (0.22 mu), viewed with 7-10,000 X magnification scanning electron microscopy, and qualitatively analyzed with a Philips Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis System equipped with a SW9100 Microprocessor. Calcium/phosphate insoluble product was present in the 0-, 12-, 24-, and 48-hr samples from the CH-free solutions. The solutions containing 759 mg (4.17 mM)/liter of CH however, remained free of precipitant. This investigation demonstrated that addition of CH to HAL can foster significant cost containment (projected $82,000/yr tangible hospital savings) by the elimination of current calcium/phosphate separation procedures for neonates on parenteral nutrition.

  16. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx.

  17. Extracellular superoxide dismutase in cultured astrocytes: decrease in cell-surface activity and increase in medium activity by lipopolysaccharide-stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iitsuka, Ichiro; Motoyoshi-Yamashiro, Akiko; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Kannan-Hayashi, Yukiko; Fujimoto, Yuka; Takano, Katsura; Murakami, Koji; Yoneda, Yukio; Nakamura, Yoichi

    2012-10-01

    Under pathological conditions such as ischemia/reperfusion, a large amount of superoxide anion (O(2) (-)) is produced and released in brain. Among three isozymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD), extracellular (EC)-SOD, known to be excreted outside cells and bound to extracellular matrix, should play a role to detoxify O(2) (-) in extracellular space; however, a little is known about EC-SOD in brain. In order to evaluate the SOD activity in extracellular space of CNS as direct as possible, we attempted to measure the cell-surface SOD activity on primary cultured rat brain cells by the inhibition of color development of a water-soluble tetrazolium due to O(2) (-) generation by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine added into extracellular medium of intact cells. The cell-surface SOD activity on cultured neuron and microglia was below the detection limit; however, that on cultured astrocyte was high enough to measure. By means of RT-PCR, all mRNA of three isozymes of SOD could be detected in the three types of the cells examined; however, the semi-quantitative analysis revealed that the level of EC-SOD mRNA in astrocytes was significantly higher than that in neurons and microglia. When astrocytes were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 12-24 h, the cell-surface SOD activity decreased to a half, whereas the activity recovered after 36-48 h. The decrease in the activity was dependent on the LPS concentration. On the other hand, the SOD activity in the medium increased by the LPS-stimulation in a dose dependent manner; suggesting that the SOD protein localized on cell-surface, probably EC-SOD, was released into the medium. These results suggest that EC-SOD of astrocyte play a role for detoxification of extracellular O(2) (-) and the regulation of EC-SOD in astrocytes may contribute to the defensive mechanism against oxidative stress in brain.

  18. The protective effect of supplemental calcium on colonic permeability depends on a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Schepens, Marloes A A; ten Bruggencate, Sandra J M; Schonewille, Arjan J; Brummer, Robert-Jan M; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M J

    2012-04-01

    An increased intestinal permeability is associated with several diseases. Previously, we have shown that dietary Ca decreases colonic permeability in rats. This might be explained by a calcium-phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity, which protects against an acidic pH due to microbial fermentation. Therefore, we investigated whether dietary phosphate is a co-player in the effect of Ca on permeability. Rats were fed a humanised low-Ca diet, or a similar diet supplemented with Ca and containing either high, medium or low phosphate concentrations. Chromium-EDTA was added as an inert dietary intestinal permeability marker. After dietary adaptation, short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) were added to all diets to stimulate fermentation, acidify the colonic contents and induce an increase in permeability. Dietary Ca prevented the scFOS-induced increase in intestinal permeability in rats fed medium- and high-phosphate diets but not in those fed the low-phosphate diet. This was associated with higher faecal water cytotoxicity and higher caecal lactate levels in the latter group. Moreover, food intake and body weight during scFOS supplementation were adversely affected by the low-phosphate diet. Importantly, luminal buffering capacity was higher in rats fed the medium- and high-phosphate diets compared with those fed the low-phosphate diet. The protective effect of dietary Ca on intestinal permeability is impaired if dietary phosphate is low. This is associated with a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity. Dragging phosphate into the colon and thereby increasing the colonic phosphate concentration is at least part of the mechanism behind the protective effect of Ca on intestinal permeability.

  19. Increased central nervous system production of extracellular matrix components and development of hydrocephalus in transgenic mice overexpressing transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Wyss-Coray, T.; Feng, L.; Masliah, E.; Ruppe, M. D.; Lee, H. S.; Toggas, S. M.; Rockenstein, E. M.; Mucke, L.

    1995-01-01

    A number of important neurological diseases, including HIV-1 encephalitis, Alzheimer's disease, and brain trauma, are associated with increased cerebral expression of the multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). To determine whether overexpression of TGF-beta 1 within the central nervous system (CNS) can contribute to the development of neuropathological alterations, a bioactive form of TGF-beta 1 was expressed in astrocytes of transgenic mice. Transgenic mice with high levels of cerebral TGF-beta 1 expression developed a severe communicating hydrocephalus, seizures, motor incoordination, and early runting. While unmanipulated heterozygous transgenic mice from a low expressor line showed no such alterations, increasing TGF-beta 1 expression in this line by injury-induced astroglial activation or generation of homozygous offspring did result in the abnormal phenotype. Notably, astroglial overexpression of TGF-beta 1 consistently induced a strong upmodulation of the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and fibronectin in the CNS, particularly in the vicinity of TGF-beta 1-expressing perivascular astrocytes, but was not associated with obvious CNS infiltration by hematogenous cells. While low levels of extracellular matrix protein expression may assist in CNS wound repair and regeneration, excessive extracellular matrix deposition could result in the development of hydrocephalus. As an effective inducer of extracellular matrix components, TGF-beta 1 may also contribute to the development of other neuropathological alterations, eg, the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7604885

  20. The R-enantiomer of citalopram counteracts escitalopram-induced increase in extracellular 5-HT in the frontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Mørk, A; Kreilgaard, M; Sánchez, C

    2003-08-01

    The selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, is a racemic mixture of an S(+)- and R(-)-enantiomer, escitalopram and R-citalopram, respectively. The present study compares the effects of escitalopram, R-citalopram and citalopram on extracellular levels of 5-HT in the frontal cortex of freely moving rats. In addition, co-injection of escitalopram and R-citalopram (ratios 1:2 and 1:4) were assessed. In some experiments escitalopram and R-citalopram were infused into the frontal cortex by reverse microdialysis. Finally, the extracellular level of escitalopram in the frontal cortex was studied after administration of escitalopram alone or in combination with R-citalopram. Escitalopram (1.0-3.9 mg/kg, s.c.) produced a greater maximal increase in extracellular 5-HT than citalopram (2.0-8.0 mg/kg, s.c.). R-citalopram (15.6 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect the 5-HT levels. When co-injected, R-citalopram counteracted the escitalopram-induced increase in extracellular 5-HT levels. Local infusion of the two enantiomers into the frontal cortex produced a similar inhibitory response. R-citalopram did not influence the extracellular levels of escitalopram and therefore does not exert its effect via a pharmacokinetic interaction with escitalopram. In conclusion, the 5-HT-reuptake inhibitory activity of citalopram resides in escitalopram, and the R-enantiomer counteracts this effect. This observation would predict an improved clinical profile of escitalopram compared to citalopram.

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  2. Effect of increased calcium intake on cardiac and vascular Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in oral contraceptive-treated female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, L A; Soladoye, A O

    2006-11-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the influence of increased dietary calcium on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in heart and aorta of female Sprague-Dawley rats treated with oral contraceptive (OC) steroids. Rats were grouped as control (CR), OC-treated and OC+calcium-treated. OC-treated and OC+calcium-treated received a combination of OC steriods (ethinyloestradiol and norgestrel; ig). OC+calcium-treated rats were fed with 2.5% calcium diet, while OC-treated and CR groups were fed on 0.9% calcium diet. The activity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in heart and aorta was significantly lower in OC-treated rats than those in the other groups. OC treatment caused significant increase in plasma glucose and significant decrease in plasma K+ as compared to control group. Decrease in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity and plasma K+ was abrogated by increased calcium intake, while increase in plasma glucose was not normalized by calcium supplementation. Plasma levels of Na+, lipid peroxidation index and ascorbic acid were comparable among the three groups. These results showed that OC treatment could lead to impaired activity of cardiac and vascular Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, possibly due to reduced plasma K+ level and these effects could be abolished by high calcium diet.

  3. The effect of increasing dairy calcium intake of adolescent girls on changes in body fat and weight.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Joan M; McMahon, Donald J; Laughlin, Ann; Hanson, Corrine; Desmangles, Jean Claude; Begley, Margaret; Schwartz, Misty

    2017-03-15

    Background: Overweight is epidemic in adolescents and is a major concern because it tracks into adulthood. Evidence supports the efficacy of high-calcium, high-dairy diets in achieving healthy weight in adults. However, no randomized controlled trials of the effect of dairy food on weight and body fat in adolescents have been reported to our knowledge.Objective: The aim was to determine whether increasing calcium intake to recommended amounts with dairy foods in adolescent girls with habitually low calcium intakes would decrease body fat gain compared with girls who continued their low calcium intake. Participants had above-the-median body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)).Design: We enrolled 274 healthy postmenarcheal 13- to 14-y-old overweight girls who had calcium intakes of ≤600 mg/d in a 12-mo randomized controlled trial. Girls were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to 1 of 2 groups within each of 3 BMI percentiles: 50th to <70th, 70th to <85th, and 85th to <98th. The assignments were 1) dairy, which included low-fat milk or yogurt servings providing ≥1200 mg Ca/d or 2) control, which included the usual diet of ≤600 mg Ca/d.Results: We failed to detect a statistically significant difference between groups in percentage of body fat gain over 12 mo (mean ± SEM: dairy 0.40% ± 0.53% > control; P < 0.45). The effect of the intervention did not differ by BMI percentile stratum. There was no difference in weight change between the 2 groups.Conclusion: Our findings that the dairy group gained body fat similar to the control group provide no support for dairy food as a stratagem to decrease body fat or weight gain in overweight adolescent girls. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01066806.

  4. Eplerenone inhibits the intracrine and extracellular actions of angiotensin II on the inward calcium current in the failing heart. On the presence of an intracrine renin angiotensin aldosterone system

    PubMed Central

    De Mello, Walmor C.; Gerena, Yamil

    2009-01-01

    The influence of chronic administration of eplerenone on the intracrine as well as on the extracellular action of angiotensin II (Ang II) on L-type inward calcium current was investigated in the failing heart of cardiomyopathic hamsters (TO-2).For this, eplerenone (200 mg/kg/day) was administered orally to 2 month-old cardiomyopathic hamsters for a period of 3 months. Measurements of the peak inward calcium current (ICa) was performed in single cells under voltage clamp using the whole cell configuration. The results indicated that eplerenone suppressed the intracrine action of Ang II (10−8 M) on peak ICa density. Moreover, the intracellular dialysis of the peptide did not change the time course of ICa inactivation in animals treated chronically with eplerenone. The extracellular administration of Ang II (10−8 M) incremented the peak ICa density by only 20±8% (n=30) compared with 38±4% (n=35) (P<0.05) obtained in age-matched cardiomyopathic hamsters not exposed to eplerenone. Interestingly, the inhibitory of eplerenone (10− 7 M) on the intracrine action of Ang II was also found, in vitro, but required an incubation period of, at least, 24 h. The inhibitory action of eplerenone on the intracellular action of Ang II was partially reversed by exposing the eplerenone-treated cells to aldosterone (10 nM) for a period of 24 h what supports the view that: a) the mineralocorticoid receptor(MR) was involved in the modulation of the intracrine action of the peptide; b) the effect of eplerenone on the intracrine as well as on the extracellular action of Ang II was related ,in part, to a decreased expression of membrane-bound and intracellular AT1 receptors. In conclusion: a) eplerenone inhibits the intracrine action of Ang II on inward calcium current and reduces drastically the effect of extracellular Ang II on ICa; b) aldosterone is able to revert the effect of eplerenone; c) the mineralocorticoid receptor is an essential component of the intracrine renin

  5. Dietary Intervention with Vitamin D, Calcium and Whey Protein Reduced Fat Mass and Increased Lean Mass in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, S.M.K.; Chang, E.; Li, J.; Burlage, C.; Zou, M.; Buhman, K. K.; Koser, S.; Donkin, S.S.; Teegarden, D.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to determine the effects and the mechanisms of inclusion of dietary whey protein, high calcium and high vitamin D intake with either a high sucrose or high fat base diets on body composition of rodents. Male Wistar rats were assigned to either no whey protein, suboptimal calcium (0.25%) and vitamin D (400 IU/kg) diet (LD) or a diet containing whey protein, high calcium (1.5%) and vitamin D (10,000 IU/kg) diet (HD) and either high fat (40% of energy) or high sucrose (60%) base diets for 13 weeks. Liver tissue homogenates were used to determine [14C]glucose and [14C]palmitate oxidation. mRNA expression of enzymes related to energy metabolism in liver, adipose and muscle as well as regulators of muscle mass and insulin receptor were assessed. The results demonstrated that there was reduced accumulation of body fat mass (P = 0.01) and greater lean mass (P = 0.03) for the HD compared to LD fed group regardless of the background diet. There were no consistent differences between the LD and HD groups across background diets in substrate oxidation and mRNA expression for enzymes measured that regulate energy metabolism, myostatin or muscle VEGF. However, there was an increase in insulin receptor mRNA expression in muscle in the HD compared to the LD groups. In conclusion, elevated whey protein, calcium and vitamin D intake resulted in reduced accumulation of body fat mass and increased lean mass, with a commensurate increase in insulin receptor expression, regardless of the level of calories from fat or sucrose. PMID:19083488

  6. Dietary intervention with vitamin D, calcium, and whey protein reduced fat mass and increased lean mass in rats.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shamim M K; Chang, Eugene; Li, Jia; Burlage, Catherine; Zou, Mi; Buhman, Kimberly K; Koser, Stephanie; Donkin, Shawn S; Teegarden, Dorothy

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the effects and the mechanisms of inclusion of dietary whey protein, high calcium, and high vitamin D intake with either a high-sucrose or high-fat base diets on body composition of rodents. Male Wistar rats were assigned to either no whey protein, suboptimal calcium (0.25%), and vitamin D (400 IU/kg) diet (LD), or a diet containing whey protein, high calcium (1.5%), and vitamin D (10 000 IU/kg) diet (HD), and either high-fat (40% of energy) or high-sucrose (60%) base diets for 13 weeks. Liver tissue homogenates were used to determine [(14)C]glucose and [(14)C]palmitate oxidation. mRNA expression of enzymes related to energy metabolism in liver, adipose, and muscle, as well as regulators of muscle mass and insulin receptor was assessed. The results demonstrated that there was reduced accumulation of body fat mass (P = .01) and greater lean mass (P = .03) for the HD- compared to LD-fed group regardless of the background diet. There were no consistent differences between the LD and HD groups across background diets in substrate oxidation and mRNA expression for enzymes measured that regulate energy metabolism, myostatin, or muscle vascular endothelial growth factor. However, there was an increase in insulin receptor mRNA expression in muscle in the HD compared to the LD groups. In conclusion, elevated whey protein, calcium, and vitamin D intake resulted in reduced accumulation of body fat mass and increased lean mass, with a commensurate increase in insulin receptor expression, regardless of the level of calories from fat or sucrose.

  7. Increased inflammation and intracellular calcium caused by ultrafine carbon black is independent of transition metals or other soluble components

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D; Stone, V; Findlay, P; MacNee, W; Donaldson, K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Particulate air pollution has been shown to cause adverse health effects, and the ultrafine particle component has been implicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an ultrafine particle exerted its effects through transition metals or other soluble factors released from the surface of the particles.
METHODS—Both in vitro and in vivo models were used to test the imflammogenicity of carbon black (CB) and ultrafine carbon black (UfCB) and the role of transition metals was investigated by treating the particles with desferrioxamine mesylate (desferal), a transition metal chelator. Rats were instilled with particles and the cell population assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Calcium homeostasis in macrophages was assessed with a fluorimetric technique.
RESULTS—UfCB was inflammogenic compared with CB when instilled into Wistar rat lungs, an effect which could not be ameliorated by desferal treatment of the particles. Particle leachates produced no significant inflammation in vivo. In vitro experiments showed that the cytosolic calcium ion concentration in Mono Mac 6 cells was increased significantly after UfCB treatment and treatment of particles with desferal did not alter these effects. Particle leachates had no effect on cytosolic calcium ion concentration. Iron was not detected in leachates of the particles with the desferal assay, however, ng/mg of particles were detectable in citrate leachates with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).
CONCLUSIONS—The increased inflammogenicity of UfCB compared with CB cannot be explained by soluble transition metals released from or by accumulation of iron at the particle surface. Differences may be accounted for by increased surface area or particle number.


Keywords: ultrafine; calcium; transition metals PMID:10984341

  8. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  10. The roles of calcium-sensing receptor and calcium channel in osteogenic differentiation of undifferentiated periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Koori, Katsuaki; Maeda, Hidefumi; Fujii, Shinsuke; Tomokiyo, Atsushi; Kawachi, Giichiro; Hasegawa, Daigaku; Hamano, Sayuri; Sugii, Hideki; Wada, Naohisa; Akamine, Akifumi

    2014-09-01

    Elevated extracellular calcium has been shown to promote the differentiation of osteoblasts. However, the way that calcium affects the osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem/progenitor cells (PDLSCs) remains unclear. Our aim has been to investigate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of a calcium-exposed human PDLSC line (cell line 1-17) that we have recently established and to elucidate the roles of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) in this process. Proliferation activity was investigated by WST-1 assay, and gene and protein expression was examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase plus the polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining, respectively. Calcification assay was performed by von Kossa and Alizarin red staining. Treatment with 5 mM CaCl2 significantly induced proliferation, bone-related gene expression, and calcification in cell line 1-17. During culture with 5 mM CaCl2, this cell line up-regulated the gene expression of CaSR, which was reduced after 7 days. Simultaneous treatment with NPS2143, a CaSR inhibitor, and calcium significantly further increased bone-related gene expression and calcification as compared with CaCl2 exposure alone. The L-VDCC inhibitor, nifedipine, significantly suppressed osteogenic differentiation of cell line 1-17 treated with 5 mM CaCl2 and promoted the expression of CaSR, as compared with calcium treatment alone. Thus, elevated extracellular calcium promotes the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of a PDLSC line. Antagonizing CaSR further enhances the effect of calcium on osteogenic differentiation, with CaSR expression being regulated by L-VDCC under extracellular calcium. Extracellular calcium might therefore modulate the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs through reciprocal adjustments of CaSR and L-VDCC.

  11. High ω-3:ω-6 fatty acids ratio increases fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in human ectopic endometrial cells

    PubMed Central

    Khanaki, Korosh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Darabi, Masoud; Mehdizadeh, Amir; Shabani, Mahdi; Rahimipour, Ali; Nouri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis, a common chronic inflammatory disorder, is defined by the atypical growth of endometrium- like tissue outside of the uterus. Secretory phospholipase A2 group IIa (sPLA2-IIa) and fatty acid binding protein4 (FABP4) play several important roles in the inflammatory diseases. Objective: Due to reported potential anti-inflammatory effects of ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on fatty acid binding protein 4 and extracellular secretory phospholipase A2IIa in cultured endometrial cells. Materials and Methods: Ectopic and eutopic endometrial tissues obtained from 15 women were snap frozen. After thawing and tissue digestion, primary mixed stromal and endometrial epithelial cell culture was performed for 8 days in culture mediums supplemented with normal and high ratios of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA. sPLA2-IIa in the culture medium and FABP4 level was determined using enzyme immuno assay (EIA) technique. Results: Within ectopic endometrial cells group, the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa were remarkably increased under high ω-3 PUFA exposure compared with control condition (p=0.014 and p=0.04 respectively). Conclusion: ω-3 PUFAs may increase the level of cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa in ectopic endometrial cells, since sPLAIIa and FABP4 may affect endometriosis via several mechanisms, more relevant studies are encouraged to know the potential effect of increased cellular FABP4 and extracellular sPLA2-IIa on endometriosis. PMID:25709631

  12. Astrocytes increase ATP exocytosis mediated calcium signaling in response to microgroove structures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay V; Raymond, Michael; Pace, Fabiano; Certo, Anthony; Zuidema, Jonathan M; McKay, Christopher A; Gilbert, Ryan J; Lu, X Lucas; Wan, Leo Q

    2015-01-19

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form glial scars, which inhibit axonal regeneration, leading to long-term functional deficits. Engineered nanoscale scaffolds guide cell growth and enhance regeneration within models of spinal cord injury. However, the effects of micro-/nanosize scaffolds on astrocyte function are not well characterized. In this study, a high throughput (HTP) microscale platform was developed to study astrocyte cell behavior on micropatterned surfaces containing 1 μm spacing grooves with a depth of 250 or 500 nm. Significant changes in cell and nuclear elongation and alignment on patterned surfaces were observed, compared to on flat surfaces. The cytoskeleton components (particularly actin filaments and focal adhesions) and nucleus-centrosome axis were aligned along the grooved direction as well. More interestingly, astrocytes on micropatterned surfaces showed enhanced mitochondrial activity with lysosomes localized at the lamellipodia of the cells, accompanied by enhanced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and calcium activities. These data indicate that the lysosome-mediated ATP exocytosis and calcium signaling may play an important role in astrocytic responses to substrate topology. These new findings have furthered our understanding of the biomechanical regulation of astrocyte cell-substrate interactions, and may benefit the optimization of scaffold design for CNS healing.

  13. Loss-of-function mutation of the calcium sensor CBL1 increases aluminum sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ligaba-Osena, Ayalew; Fei, Zhangjun; Liu, Jiping; Xu, Yimin; Shaff, Jon; Lee, Sung-Chul; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Kochian, Leon; Piñeros, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Despite the physiological importance of aluminum (Al) phytotoxicity for plants, it remained unknown if, and how, calcineurin B-like calcium sensors (CBLs) and CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) are involved in Al resistance. We performed a comparative physiological and whole transcriptome investigation of an Arabidopsis CBL1 mutant (cbl1) and the wild-type (WT). cbl1 plants exudated less Al-chelating malate, accumulated more Al, and displayed a severe root growth reduction in response to Al. Genes involved in metabolism, transport, cell wall modification, transcription and oxidative stress were differentially regulated between the two lines, under both control and Al stress treatments. Exposure to Al resulted in up-regulation of a large set of genes only in WT and not cbl1 shoots, while a different set of genes were down-regulated in cbl1 but not in WT roots. These differences allowed us, for the first time, to define a calcium-regulated/dependent transcriptomic network for Al stress responses. Our analyses reveal not only the fundamental role of CBL1 in the adjustment of central transcriptomic networks involved in maintaining adequate physiological homeostasis processes, but also that a high shoot-root dynamics is required for the proper deployment of Al resistance responses in the root.

  14. Parathyroid hormone suppression by intravenous 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. A role for increased sensitivity to calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Delmez, J A; Tindira, C; Grooms, P; Dusso, A; Windus, D W; Slatopolsky, E

    1989-01-01

    Numerous in vitro studies in experimental animals have demonstrated a direct suppressive effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) on parathyroid hormone (PTH) synthesis. We therefore sought to determine whether such an effect could be demonstrated in uremic patients undergoing maneuvers designed to avoid changes in serum calcium concentrations. In addition, the response of the parathyroid gland in patients undergoing hypercalcemic suppression (protocol I) and hypocalcemic stimulation (protocol II) before and after 2 wk of intravenous 1,25(OH)2D was evaluated. In those enlisted in protocol I, PTH values fell from 375 +/- 66 to 294 +/- 50 pg (P less than 0.01) after 1,25(OH)2D administration. During hypercalcemic suppression, the "set point" (PTH max + PTH min/2) for PTH suppression by calcium fell from 5.24 +/- 0.14 to 5.06 +/- 0.15 mg/dl (P less than 0.05) with 1,25(OH)2D. A similar decline in PTH levels after giving intravenous 1,25(OH)2D was noted in protocol II patients. During hypocalcemic stimulation, the parathyroid response was attenuated by 1,25(OH)2D. We conclude that intravenous 1,25(OH)2D directly suppresses PTH secretion in uremic patients. This suppression, in part, appears to be due to increased sensitivity of the gland to ambient calcium levels. PMID:2703535

  15. Extracellular GABA in globus pallidus increases during the induction of oral tremor by haloperidol but not by muscarinic receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E; Podurgiel, Samantha J; Kovner, Rotem; Randall, Patrick A; Salamone, John D

    2012-09-01

    Tremulous jaw movements in rats can be induced by several conditions associated with parkinsonism and tremorogenesis, including dopamine depletion, dopamine antagonism, and cholinomimetic drugs. Previous research indicates that neostriatal mechanisms are involved in the generation of tremulous jaw movements, but the striatal output pathways involved in these movements remain uncertain. One important pathway for striatal output is the GABAergic striatopallidal system. The present studies were undertaken to determine if extracellular levels of GABA in globus pallidus are associated with the induction of tremulous jaw movements by either a dopamine D2 antagonist (haloperidol) or a cholinomimetic (the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine). The first experiment studied the effects of both acute and repeated (i.e. 8 days) administration of the D2 antagonist haloperidol. In the second experiment, the effect of acute administration of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine on GABA levels in the globus pallidus was examined. In both experiments, behavioral observations of tremulous jaw movements were conducted in parallel with the collection of microdialysis samples. Acute and repeated haloperidol treatment induced tremulous jaw movements, and significantly elevated extracellular GABA in globus pallidus. Pooling across all treatment groups, there was a significant positive correlation between pallidal GABA levels and the number of tremulous jaw movements induced during the first three samples collected after injection. However, injection of 4.0mg/kg pilocarpine had no effect on pallidal GABA release, despite the robust induction of tremulous jaw movements. These results indicate that the tremulous jaw movements induced by dopamine D2 antagonism and those induced through muscarinic receptor stimulation may be generated via distinct mechanisms.

  16. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  17. Selective increases of extracellular brain concentrations of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids in relation to deterioration of neurological status in acute (ischemic) liver failure.

    PubMed

    Michalak, A; Butterworth, R F

    1997-12-01

    Previous reports based on studies in brain tissue from humans and experimental animals suggest that aromatic amino acids (AAAs) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA's) accumulate in brain in acute liver failure. In order to assess these changes in relation to the severity of neurological impairment and to the degree of hyperammonemia, AAAs and BCAAs were measured in vivo by cerebral microdialysis in frontal cortex of rats at various stages during the development of hepatic encephalopathy due to acute liver failure resulting from portacaval anastomosis followed by hepatic artery ligation. Extracellular brain concentrations of AAAs and of valine and leucine were elevated 2 to 4-fold following hepatic devascularization and these increases were significantly correlated to arterial ammonia concentration (r= 0.71-0.84, p<0.05). Extracellular concentrations of tyrosine paralleled the deterioration of neurological status in acute liver failure rats. In view of their role as precursors of monoamine neurotransmitters, ammonia-induced alterations of intracellular/extracellular brain concentration ratios for AAAs could account for altered neuronal excitability and contribute to the encephalopathy characteristic of acute liver failure.

  18. Nuclear Membranes ETB Receptors Mediate ET-1-induced Increase of Nuclear Calcium in Human Left Ventricular Endocardial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jules, Farah; Avedanian, Levon; Al-Khoury, Johny; Keita, Ramatoulaye; Normand, Alexandre; Bkaily, Ghassan; Jacques, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    In fetal human left ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (EECLs), both plasma membrane (PM) ET(A)R and ET(B)R were reported to mediate ET-1-induced increase of intracellular calcium [Ca](i); however, this effect was mediated by ET(A)R in right EECs (EECRs). In this study, we verified whether, as for the PM, nuclear membranes (NMs) ET-1 receptors activation in EECLs and EECRs induce an increase of nuclear calcium ([Ca](n)) and if this effect is mediated through the same receptor type as in PM. Using a plasmalemma-perforated technique and 3D confocal microscopy, our results showed that, as in PM intact cells, superfusion of nuclei of both cell types with cytosolic ET-1 induced a concentration-dependent sustained increase of [Ca](n). In EECRs, the ET(A)R antagonist prevented the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) without affecting EECLs. However, in both cell types, the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) was prevented by the ETBR antagonist. In conclusion, both NMs' ET(A)R and ET(B)R mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 on [Ca](n) in EECRs. In contrast, only NMs' ET(B)R activation mediated the effect of cytosolic ET-1 in EECLs. Hence, the type of NMs' receptors mediating the effect of ET-1 on [Ca](n) are different from those of PM mediating the increase in [Ca](i).

  19. Diminished Vision in Healthy Aging Is Associated with Increased Retinal L-Type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Ion Influx

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, David; Goebel, Dennis; Berkowitz, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive evidence implicates an increase in hippocampal L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC) expression, and ion influx through these channels, in age-related cognitive declines. Here, we ask if this “calcium hypothesis" applies to the neuroretina: Is increased influx via L-VGCCs related to the well-documented but poorly-understood vision declines in healthy aging? In Long-Evans rats we find a significant age-related increase in ion flux through retinal L-VGCCs in vivo (manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI)) that are longitudinally linked with progressive vision declines (optokinetic tracking). Importantly, the degree of retinal Mn2+ uptake early in adulthood significantly predicted later visual contrast sensitivity declines. Furthermore, as in the aging hippocampus, retinal expression of a drug-insensitive L-VGCC isoform (α1D) increased – a pattern confirmed in vivo by an age-related decline in sensitivity to L-VGCC blockade. These data highlight mechanistic similarities between retinal and hippocampal aging, and raise the possibility of new treatment targets for minimizing vision loss during healthy aging. PMID:23457553

  20. Hypochlorhydria‐induced calcium malabsorption does not affect fracture healing but increases post‐traumatic bone loss in the intact skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Haffner‐Luntzer, Melanie; Heilmann, Aline; Heidler, Verena; Liedert, Astrid; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Yorgan, Timur Alexander; vom Scheidt, Annika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Efficient calcium absorption is essential for skeletal health. Patients with impaired gastric acidification display low bone mass and increased fracture risk because calcium absorption is dependent on gastric pH. We investigated fracture healing and post‐traumatic bone turnover in mice deficient in Cckbr, encoding a gastrin receptor that affects acid secretion by parietal cells. Cckbr−/− mice display hypochlorhydria, calcium malabsorption, and osteopenia. Cckbr−/− and wildtype (WT) mice received a femur osteotomy and were fed either a standard or calcium‐enriched diet. Healed and intact bones were assessed by biomechanical testing, histomorphometry, micro‐computed tomography, and quantitative backscattering. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) serum levels were determined by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Fracture healing was unaffected in Cckbr−/− mice. However, Cckbr−/− mice displayed increased calcium mobilization from the intact skeleton during bone healing, confirmed by significantly elevated PTH levels and osteoclast numbers compared to WT mice. Calcium supplementation significantly reduced secondary hyperparathyroidism and bone resorption in the intact skeleton in both genotypes, but more efficiently in WT mice. Furthermore, calcium administration improved bone healing in WT mice, indicated by significantly increased mechanical properties and bone mineral density of the fracture callus, whereas it had no significant effect in Cckbr−/− mice. Therefore, under conditions of hypochlorhydria‐induced calcium malabsorption, calcium, which is essential for callus mineralization, appears to be increasingly mobilized from the intact skeleton in favor of fracture healing. Calcium supplementation during fracture healing prevented systemic calcium mobilization, thereby maintaining bone mass and improving fracture healing in healthy individuals whereas the effect was limited by gastric hypochlorhydria. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society

  1. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, T R; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    2000-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the influence of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content ([Ca](SRT)) and free SR [Ca] ([Ca](SR)) on the fraction of SR calcium released during voltage clamp steps in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. [Ca](SRT), as measured by caffeine application, was progressively increased by conditioning pulses. Sodium was absent in both the intracellular and in the extracellular solutions to block sodium/calcium exchange. Total cytosolic calcium flux during the transient was inferred from I(Ca), [Ca](SRT), [Ca](i), and cellular buffering characteristics. Fluxes via the calcium current (I(Ca)), the SR calcium pump, and passive leak from the SR were evaluated to determine SR calcium release flux (J(rel)). Excitation-contraction (EC) coupling was characterized with respect to both gain (integral J(rel)/integral I(Ca)) and fractional SR calcium release. Both parameters were virtually zero for a small, but measurable [Ca](SRT). Gain and fractional SR calcium release increased steeply and nonlinearly with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). We conclude that potentiation of EC coupling can be correlated with both [Ca](SRT) and [Ca](SR). While fractional SR calcium release was not linearly dependent upon [Ca](SR), intra-SR calcium may play a crucial role in regulating the SR calcium release process. PMID:10620297

  2. Increased extracellular water measured by bioimpedance and by increased serum levels of atrial natriuretic peptide in RA patients-signs of volume overload.

    PubMed

    Straub, Rainer H; Ehrenstein, Boris; Günther, Florian; Rauch, Luise; Trendafilova, Nadezhda; Boschiero, Dario; Grifka, Joachim; Fleck, Martin

    2016-04-26

    The aim of the study is to investigate water compartments in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Acute inflammatory episodes such as infection stimulate water retention, chiefly implemented by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This is an important compensatory mechanism due to expected water loss (sweating etc.). Since SNS and HPA axis are activated in RA, inflammation might be accompanied by water retention. Using bioimpedance analysis, body composition was investigated in 429 controls and 156 treatment-naïve RA patients between January 2008 and December 2014. A group of 34 RA patients was tested before and after 10 days of intensified therapy. Levels of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) and expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in synovial tissue were investigated in 15 controls and 14 RA patients. Extracellular water was higher in RA patients than controls (mean ± SEM: 49.5 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.1, % of total body water, p < 0.0001). Plasma levels of proANP were higher in RA than controls. RA patients expressed ANP in synovial tissue, but synovial fluid levels and synovial tissue superfusate levels were much lower than plasma levels indicating systemic origin. Systolic/diastolic blood pressure was higher in RA patients than controls. Extracellular water levels did not change in RA patients despite 10 days of intensified treatment. This study demonstrates signs of intravascular overload in RA patients. Short-term intensification of anti-inflammatory therapy induced no change of a longer-lasting imprinting of water retention indicating the requirement of additional treatment. The study can direct attention to the area of volume overload.

  3. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  4. Purinergic stimulation of rabbit ciliated airway epithelia: control by multiple calcium sources.

    PubMed Central

    Korngreen, A; Priel, Z

    1996-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of average intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and ciliary beat frequency (CBF) were carried out on ciliated rabbit tracheal cells in order to determine quantitatively the role of calcium in the regulation of mucus-transporting cilia. 2. Extracellular ATP caused a rapid increase in both [Ca2+]i and CBF in the 0.1-1000 microM concentration range. The rise in [Ca2+]i levelled off to an elevated [Ca2+]i plateau while the cilia remained in a high activation state. The magnitude of the rise in [Ca2+]i and CBF as well as the value of the elevated [Ca2+]i plateau and the value of the sustained CBF were dependent on the concentration of ATP in the solution. 3. No correlation was found between the mean values of [Ca2+]i and CBF at rest but a sigmoidal relationship was found to exist between the maximal rises of these parameters following excitation with extracellular ATP. This sigmoidal correlation incorporated the experiments where [Ca2+]i rise was induced by depletion of internal calcium stores with thapsigargin or by entry of calcium induced by ionomycin. 4. Extracellular ATP caused both the release of calcium from internal stores and calcium influx from the extracellular solution. The release of calcium was identified as originating from a thapsigargin-sensitive and a thapsigargin-insensitive calcium store. It is suggested that the release of calcium from these stores induces the initial rise in CBF. 5. The sustained activation of the cilia and elevated calcium plateau were found to be the result of the extracellular ATP-induced calcium influx. This calcium influx was insensitive to the voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitors verapamil and diltiazem, but was completely eliminated by lowering the extracellular calcium concentration to 0.1 microM. 6. We propose that the initial jump in the CBF is mediated by the calcium released from a thapsigargin-insensitive calcium store adjacent to the cilia, while the later, and longer, rise in

  5. Extracellular calcium-sensing-receptor (CaR)-mediated opening of an outward K(+) channel in murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells: evidence for expression of a functional CaR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, C. P.; Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Sanders, J. L.; Vassilev, P. M.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The existence in osteoblasts of the G-protein-coupled extracellular calcium (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) that was originally cloned from parathyroid and kidney remains controversial. In our recent studies, we utilized multiple detection methods to demonstrate the expression of CaR transcripts and protein in several osteoblastic cell lines, including murine MC3T3-E1 cells. Although we and others have shown that high Ca(o)(2+) and other polycationic CaR agonists modulate the function of MC3T3-E1 cells, none of these actions has been unequivocally shown to be mediated by the CaR. Previous investigations using neurons and lens epithelial cells have shown that activation of the CaR stimulates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Because osteoblastic cells express a similar type of channel, we have examined the effects of specific "calcimimetic" CaR activators on the activity of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel in MC3T3-E1 cells as a way of showing that the CaR is not only expressed in those cells but is functionally active. Patch-clamp analysis in the cell-attached mode showed that raising Ca(o)(2+) from 0.75 to 2.75 mmol/L elicited about a fourfold increase in the open state probability (P(o)) of an outward K(+) channel with a conductance of approximately 92 pS. The selective calcimimetic CaR activator, NPS R-467 (0.5 micromol/L), evoked a similar activation of the channel, while its less active stereoisomer, NPSS-467 (0.5 micromol/L), did not. Thus, the CaR is not only expressed in MC3T3-E1 cells, but is also functionally coupled to the activity of a Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel. This receptor, therefore, could transduce local or systemic changes in Ca(o)(2+) into changes in the activity of this ion channel and related physiological processes in these and perhaps other osteoblastic cells.

  6. The role of calcium in the regulation of renin secretion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Renin is the enzyme which is the rate-limiting step in the formation of the hormone angiotensin II. Therefore, the regulation of renin secretion is critical in understanding the control of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and its many biological and pathological actions. Renin is synthesized, stored in, and released from the juxtaglomerular (JG) cells of the kidney. While renin secretion is positively regulated by the “second messenger” cAMP, unlike most secretory cells, renin secretion from the JG cell is inversely related to the extracellular and intracellular calcium concentrations. This novel relationship is referred to as the “calcium paradox.” This review will address observations made over the past 30 years regarding calcium and the regulation of renin secretion, and focus on recent observations which address this scientific conundrum. These include 1) receptor-mediated pathways for changing intracellular calcium; 2) the discovery of a calcium-inhibitable isoform of adenylyl cyclase associated with renin in the JG cells; 3) calcium-sensing receptors in the JG cells; 4) calcium-calmodulin-mediated signals; 5) the role of phosphodiesterases; and 6) connexins, gap junctions, calcium waves, and the cortical extracellular calcium environment. While cAMP is the dominant second messenger for renin secretion, calcium appears to modulate the integrated activities of the enzymes, which balance cAMP synthesis and degradation. Thus this review concludes that calcium modifies the amplitude of cAMP-mediated renin-signaling pathways. While calcium does not directly control renin secretion, increased calcium inhibits and decreased calcium amplifies cAMP-stimulated renin secretion. PMID:19640903

  7. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium increases the intracellular free calcium concentration in rat cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    SUN, MEIQUN; LIU, HONGLI; MIN, SHENGPING; WANG, HONGTAO; WANG, XIAOJING

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is involved in the activation of astrocytes. A previous study showed that CNTF-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) contributed to the increase of the calcium current and the elevation of corresponding ion channels in cortical neurons. On this basis, it is reasonable to assume that CNTF-ACM may increase the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neurons. In the present study, the effects of CNTF-ACM on [Ca2+]i in rat cortical neurons were determined, and on this basis, the aim was to investigate the potential active ingredients in ACM that are responsible for this biological process. As expected, the data indicated that CNTF-ACM resulted in a clear elevation of [Ca2+]i in neurons. Additionally, the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) contained in the CNTF-ACM was found to participate in the upregulation of [Ca2+]i. Taken together, CNTF induces the production of active factors (at least including FGF-2) released from astrocytes, which finally potentiate the increase of [Ca2+]i in cortical neurons. PMID:27073624

  8. Parvalbumin overexpression alters immune-mediated increases in intracellular calcium, and delays disease onset in a transgenic model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, D. R.; Ho, B. K.; Siklos, L.; Alexianu, M. E.; Mosier, D. R.; Mohamed, A. H.; Otsuka, Y.; Kozovska, M. E.; McAlhany, R. E.; Smith, R. G.; Appel, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular calcium is increased in vulnerable spinal motoneurons in immune-mediated as well as transgenic models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine whether intracellular calcium levels are influenced by the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, we developed transgenic mice overexpressing parvalbumin in spinal motoneurons. ALS immunoglobulins increased intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release at motoneuron terminals in control animals, but not in parvalbumin overexpressing transgenic mice. Parvalbumin transgenic mice interbred with mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) transgenic mice, an animal model of familial ALS, had significantly reduced motoneuron loss, and had delayed disease onset (17%) and prolonged survival (11%) when compared with mice with only the mSOD1 transgene. These results affirm the importance of the calcium binding protein parvalbumin in altering calcium homeostasis in motoneurons. The increased motoneuron parvalbumin can significantly attenuate the immune-mediated increases in calcium and to a lesser extent compensate for the mSOD1-mediated 'toxic-gain-of-function' in transgenic mice.

  9. Calcium signaling in lymphocytes and ELF fields. Evidence for an electric field metric and a site of interaction involving the calcium ion channel.

    PubMed

    Liburdy, R P

    1992-04-13

    Calcium influx increased during mitogen-activated signal transduction in thymic lymphocytes exposed to a 22 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field (E induced = 1.7 mV/cm, 37 degrees C, 60 min). To distinguish between an electric or a magnetic field dependence a special multi-ring annular cell culture plate based on Faraday's Law of Induction was employed. Studies show a dependence on the strength of the induced electric field at constant magnetic flux density. Moreover, exposure to a pure 60 Hz electric field or to a magnetically-induced electric field of identical strength resulted in similar changes in calcium transport. The first real-time monitoring of [Ca2+]i during application of a 60 Hz electric field revealed an increase in [Ca2+]i observed 100 s after mitogen stimulation; this suggests that the plateau phase rather than the early phase of calcium signaling was influenced. The hypothesis was tested by separating, in time, the early release of calcium from intracellular stores from the influx of extracellular calcium. In calcium-free buffer, 60 Hz field exerted little influence on the early release of calcium from intracellular stores. In contrast, addition of extracellular calcium during exposure enhanced calcium influx through the plasma membrane. Alteration of the plateau phase of calcium signaling implicates the calcium channel as a site of field interaction. In addition, an electric field exposure metric is mechanistically consistent with a cell-surface interaction site.

  10. Comparison of side effects of pentagastrin test and calcium stimulation test in patients with increased basal calcitonin concentration: the gender-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Ubl, Philipp; Gincu, Tatiana; Keilani, Mohammad; Ponhold, Lothar; Crevenna, Richard; Niederle, Bruno; Hacker, Marcus; Li, Shuren

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the side effects of the pentagastrin test and the calcium stimulation test in patients with increased basal calcitonin concentration, especially the gender-specific differences of side effects. A total of 256 patients (123 females and 133 males, mean age of 56 ± 27 years, range 21-83 years) had both pentagastrin and calcium stimulation tests. All patients filled in a questionnaire regarding the side effects within 30 min after completion of the stimulation tests. The differences of side effects between female and male patients as well as between the pentagastrin stimulation test and the calcium stimulation test were evaluated. Warmth feeling was the most frequent occurring side effect in all patients who had both pentagastrin and calcium stimulation tests, followed by nausea, altered gustatory sensation, and dizziness. The incidences of urgency to micturate (p < 0.05) and dizziness (p < 0.05) were significantly increased in the female patients as compared to male patients by calcium stimulation test. Significant higher incidences of urgency to micturate (p < 0.05) and warmth feeling (p < 0.05) were found by calcium stimulation test as compared with those by pentagastrin test in female patients. The incidences of nausea (p < 0.05) and abdominal cramping (p < 0.05) in male patients were significantly higher by pentagastrin stimulation test than by calcium stimulation test. There is a significant gender-specific difference in side effects induced by calcium stimulation test. Female patients have fewer side effects by pentagastrin test than by calcium stimulation test. Male patients may tolerate the calcium stimulation test better than the pentagastrin test.

  11. Increase in cone biomass and terpenophenolics in hops ( Humulus lupulus L.) by treatment with prohexadione-calcium.

    PubMed

    Kavalier, Adam R; Pitra, Nicholi J; Koelling, Jared M; Coles, Mark C; Kennelly, Edward J; Matthews, Paul D

    2011-06-22

    Humulus lupulus L. (hop), a specialty crop bred for flavor characteristics of the inflorescence, is an essential ingredient in beer. Hop inflorescences, commonly known as hop cones, contain terpenophenolic compounds, which are important for beer flavoring and of interest in biomedical research. Hop breeders focus their efforts on increasing cone biomass and terpenophenolic content. As an alternative to traditional breeding, hops were treated with prohexadione-calcium (Pro-Ca), a growth inhibitor previously shown to have positive agronomic effects in several crops. Application of Pro-Ca to hop plants during cone maturation induced increases in cone biomass production by 1.5-19.6% and increased terpenophenolic content by 9.1-87.3%; however, some treatments also induced significant decreases in terpenophenolic content. Induced changes in cone biomass production and terpenophenolic accumulation were most dependent on cultivar and the developmental stage at which plants were treated.

  12. Calcium accentuates injury induced by ethanol in human gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Smith, G S; Deshpande, Y; Wolff, A B; Rieckenberg, C; Miller, T A

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism(s) whereby ethanol induces cellular injury remains poorly understood. Furthermore, the role of calcium in gastric mucosal injury under in vitro conditions is poorly defined. The major objectives of this study were to (1) define the temporal relationship between intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol and cellular injury, (2) characterize the mechanism(s) whereby ethanol increases cellular calcium content, and (3) determine whether calcium removal would attenuate ethanol-induced cellular injury. Human gastric cells (AGS) were used for all experiments. Sustained intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol, but not transient changes, preceded and directly correlated with cellular injury. Cells exposed to damaging concentrations of ethanol demonstrated an initial calcium surge that appeared to be a consequence of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) generation and subsequent internal store release followed by a sustained plateau resulting from extracellular calcium influx through store-operated calcium channels. Finally, both morphologic (cellular injury) and functional (clearance of bovine serum albumin) changes induced by ethanol were significantly attenuated when extracellular Ca(+&plus) influx was prevented, and further decreased when intracellular Ca(++) stores were depleted. These data indicate that calcium plays a significant role in cellular injury induced by ethanol.

  13. Sodium entry through endothelial store-operated calcium entry channels: regulation by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningyong; Cioffi, Donna L; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Rich, Thomas C; Stevens, Troy

    2015-02-15

    Orai1 interacts with transient receptor potential protein of the canonical subfamily (TRPC4) and contributes to calcium selectivity of the endothelial cell store-operated calcium entry current (ISOC). Orai1 silencing increases sodium permeability and decreases membrane-associated calcium, although it is not known whether Orai1 is an important determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. We test the hypothesis that, upon activation of store-operated calcium entry channels, Orai1 is a critical determinant of cytosolic sodium transitions. Activation of store-operated calcium entry channels transiently increased cytosolic calcium and sodium, characteristic of release from an intracellular store. The sodium response occurred more abruptly and returned to baseline more rapidly than did the transient calcium rise. Extracellular choline substitution for sodium did not inhibit the response, although 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 reduced it by ∼50%. After this transient response, cytosolic sodium continued to increase due to influx through activated store-operated calcium entry channels. The magnitude of this sustained increase in cytosolic sodium was greater when experiments were conducted in low extracellular calcium and when Orai1 expression was silenced; these two interventions were not additive, suggesting a common mechanism. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and YM-58483 inhibited the sustained increase in cytosolic sodium, only in the presence of Orai1. These studies demonstrate that sodium permeates activated store-operated calcium entry channels, resulting in an increase in cytosolic sodium; the magnitude of this response is determined by Orai1.

  14. Calcium isotope evidence for dramatic increase of continental weathering during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (Early Jurassic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Jean-Michel; Suan, Guillaume; Tacail, Théo; Simon, Laurent; Martin, Jeremy E.; Mattioli, Emanuela; Balter, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    The early Toarcian was punctuated by pulses of massive carbon injection that are thought to have triggered, through increased greenhouse conditions, elevated continental discharge and nutrient input, marine anoxia, seawater acidification and species extinctions. Nevertheless, the mode and tempo of changes in continental weathering across this interval remains highly debated, leading to considerable uncertainty about the main causes of these perturbations. In this study we present calcium isotope measurements (δ44/40Ca) of well-preserved brachiopods and bulk rock samples from the hemipelagic strata of Pliensbachian-Toarcian age of Peniche in Portugal in order to constrain changes in the calcium cycle and hence changes in continental weathering during the early Toarcian. The data reveal a similar trend as carbon isotope data from the same section and show negative excursions of about 0.5‰ at the Pliensbachian-Toarcian transition (Pl-To) and at the base of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T-OAE) interval. The comparison of δ44/40Ca ratios recorded in brachiopods and bulk rock corrected for variable dolomite contribution indicates that these excursions reflect changes in the global isotopic composition of seawater rather than changes in the dominant mineralogy of calcifying organisms or in hydrological budget of the considered basin. Box modeling results suggest that the Pl-To and T-OAE δ44/40Ca excursions can be explained by a transient 90% decrease of carbonate accumulation due to seawater acidification followed by a 500% increase in continental weathering rates. The sharp increases in continental weathering inferred from the δ44/40Ca ratios seem overall consistent with lower Toarcian sedimentological and biotic records that document rapid crises in carbonate production followed by episodes of increased calcium carbonate burial. Nevertheless, the maximum of carbonate burial recorded by most NW European basinal successions occurs several hundreds of kyrs after

  15. Higher Urinary Sodium, a Proxy for Intake, Is Associated with Increased Calcium Excretion and Lower Hip Bone Density in Healthy Young Women with Lower Calcium Intakes

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Jennifer L.; Barr, Susan I.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed 24-h urinary sodium (Na) and its relationship with urinary calcium (Ca) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the whole body, lumbar spine and total hip in a cross-sectional study. 102 healthy non-obese women completed timed 24-h urine collections which were analyzed for Na and Ca. Dietary intakes were estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were grouped as those with lower vs. higher calcium intake by median split (506 mg/1000 kcal). Dietary Na intake correlated with 24-h urinary loss. Urinary Na correlated positively with urinary Ca for all participants (r = 0.29, p < 0.01) and among those with lower (r = 0.37, p < 0.01) but not higher calcium intakes (r = 0.19, p = 0.19). Urinary Na was inversely associated with hip aBMD for all participants (r = −0.21, p = 0.04) and among women with lower (r = −0.36, p < 0.01) but not higher (r = −0.05, p = 0.71) calcium intakes. Urinary Na also entered a regression equation for hip aBMD in women with lower Ca intakes, contributing 5.9% to explained variance. In conclusion, 24-h urinary Na (a proxy for intake) is associated with higher urinary Ca loss in young women and may affect aBMD, particularly in those with lower calcium intakes. PMID:22254088

  16. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  17. Increase of calcium and reduction of lactose concentration in milk by treatment with kefir grains and eggshell.

    PubMed

    Fina, Brenda L; Brun, Lucas R; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Dairy products are the main source of calcium (Ca), but the loss of the consumption habit contributes to low consumption in adulthood, which leads to osteoporosis and increased fracture risk. Domestic use of kefir is straightforward and the eggshell is a natural discarded source of Ca. This paper proposes the development of an enriched Ca reduced lactose milk using eggshell and kefir. During the in vitro preparation, the pH, Ca and lactose contents were measured. Ca intestinal absorption of untreated milk and milk with kefir was compared. Finally, human volunteers consumed this dairy product and 24-h urine Ca was measured. Results showed that the beverage has lower lactose and higher Ca than untreated milk and milk with kefir. Intestinal Ca absorption was not different between both milks and an increase in urinary Ca excretion was observed in humans. This study provides a methodology to prepare at home a dairy product that could contribute to improve the Ca intake in adults.

  18. DC electric fields direct breast cancer cell migration, induce EGFR polarization, and increase the intracellular level of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Ma, Xiuli; Lin, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Migration of cancer cells leads to invasion of primary tumors to distant organs (i.e., metastasis). Growing number of studies have demonstrated the migration of various cancer cell types directed by applied direct current electric fields (dcEF), i.e., electrotaxis, and suggested its potential implications in metastasis. MDA-MB-231 cell, a human metastatic breast cancer cell line, has been shown to migrate toward the anode of dcEF. Further characterizations of MDA-MB-231 cell electrotaxis and investigation of its underlying signaling mechanisms will lead to a better understanding of electrically guided cancer cell migration and metastasis. Therefore, we quantitatively characterized MDA-MB-231 cell electrotaxis and a few associated signaling events. Using a microfluidic device that can create well-controlled dcEF, we showed the anode-directing migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, surface staining of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and confocal microscopy showed the dcEF-induced anodal EGFR polarization in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we showed an increase of intracellular calcium ions in MDA-MB-231 cells upon dcEF stimulation. Altogether, our study provided quantitative measurements of electrotactic migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, and demonstrated the electric field-mediated EGFR and calcium signaling events, suggesting their involvement in breast cancer cell electrotaxis.

  19. Extracellular glucose increases the coupling capacity of the yeast V H+-ATPase and the resistance of its H+ transport activity to nitrate inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Camila C; Monteiro, Renan M; Freitas, Flavia P; Retamal, Claudio; Teixeira, Layz R S; Palma, Livia M; Silva, Flavia E; Façanha, Arnoldo R; Okorokova-Façanha, Anna L; Okorokov, Lev A

    2012-01-01

    V H(+)-ATPase has an important role in a variety of key physiological processes. This enzyme is reversibly activated/partly inactivated by the addition/exhaustion of extracellular glucose. The current model of its regulation assumes the reversible disassembly/reassembly of ∼60-70% of the V1 and V0 membrane complexes, which are responsible for ATP hydrolysis and H(+) conductance, respectively. The number of assembled complexes determines the pump activity because disassembled complexes are inactive. The model predicts the identical catalytic properties for the activated and semi-active enzymes molecules. To verify the model predictions we have isolated total membranes from yeast spheroplasts that were pre-incubated either with or without glucose. Nitrate treatment of membranes revealed the similar ATPase inhibition for two enzyme states, suggesting that they have identical structures that are essential for ATP hydrolysis. However, H(+) transport was inhibited more than the ATPase activities, indicating a nitrate uncoupling action, which was significantly higher for the nonactivated enzyme. This finding suggests that the structure of the non-activated enzyme, which is essential for H(+) transport, is less stable than that of the activated enzyme. Moreover, the glucose activation of the pump increases i) its coupling capacity; ii) its K(M) for ATP hydrolysis and ATP affinity for H(+) transport; iii) the Vmax for H(+) transport in comparison with the Vmax for ATP hydrolysis and iv) the immune reactivity of catalytic subunit A and regulatory subunit B by 9.3 and 2.4 times, respectively. The protein content of subunits A and B was not changed by extracellular glucose. We propose that instead of the dissociation/reassociation of complexes V1 and V0, changes in the extracellular glucose concentration cause reversible and asymmetrical modulations in the immune reactivity of subunits A and B by their putative biochemical modifications. This response asymmetrically

  20. Copper elicits an increase in cytosolic free calcium in cultured tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroki; Kudo, Tomoko; Kamada, Hiroshi; Kimura, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Hamamoto, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    At concentrations greater than 0.1 mM, CuSO(4) provoked a rapid and sustained increase in the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)), in tobacco suspension culture cells expressing apoaequorin, a Ca(2+)-sensitive photoprotein. The increase was suppressed by treatment with LaCl(3), indicating that the increase is due to an influx of Ca(2+) from the apoplast through plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels. Although stimulation of H(2)O(2) production upon the CuSO(4) treatment (0.1 mM) was observed, treatment with catalase did not inhibit the increase in [Ca(2+)](cyt), and treatment with H(2)O(2) dose-dependently suppressed or delayed the increase. These results suggested that active oxygen species generated through copper-mediated reactions, or copper-mediated oxidative damages to plasma membrane, are not responsible for the increase. Treatment with sulfhydryl reagents, which alkylate or oxidize thiol groups, or acidification of the culture medium suppressed the increase in [Ca(2+)](cyt). These results demonstrated that copper causes an influx of Ca(2+) through plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels, and that plasma membrane thiol groups play an important role in activating the Ca(2+) channels.

  1. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X.; Smith, Roger D.; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  2. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X; Smith, Roger D; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  3. In vitro Determination of Extracellular Proteins from Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Juliano S.; Santiago, André S.; Toledo, Marcelo A. S.; Horta, Maria A. C.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Anete P.

    2016-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes economic losses in important agricultural crops. Xylem vessel occlusion caused by biofilm formation is the major mechanism underlying the pathogenicity of distinct strains of X. fastidiosa. Here, we provide a detailed in vitro characterization of the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa. Based on the results, we performed a comparison with a strain J1a12, which cannot induce citrus variegated chlorosis symptoms when inoculated into citrus plants. We then extend this approach to analyze the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa in media supplemented with calcium. We verified increases in extracellular proteins concomitant with the days of growth and, consequently, biofilm development (3–30 days). Outer membrane vesicles carrying toxins were identified beginning at 10 days of growth in the 9a5c strain. In addition, a decrease in extracellular proteins in media supplemented with calcium was observed in both strains. Using mass spectrometry, 71 different proteins were identified during 30 days of X. fastidiosa biofilm development, including proteases, quorum-sensing proteins, biofilm formation proteins, hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, chaperones, toxins, antitoxins, and extracellular vesicle membrane components. PMID:28082960

  4. A Specific Transitory Increase in Intracellular Calcium Induced by Progesterone Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis in Mouse Sperm.

    PubMed

    Romarowski, Ana; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Ramírez-Gómez, Héctor V; Puga Molina, Lis del C; Treviño, Claudia L; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Darszon, Alberto; Buffone, Mariano G

    2016-03-01

    During capacitation, sperm acquire the ability to undergo the acrosome reaction (AR), an essential step in fertilization. Progesterone produced by cumulus cells has been associated with various physiological processes in sperm, including stimulation of AR. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) is necessary for AR to occur. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal correlation between the changes in [Ca(2+)]i and AR in single mouse spermatozoa in response to progesterone. We found that progesterone stimulates an [Ca(2+)]i increase in five different patterns: gradual increase, oscillatory, late transitory, immediate transitory, and sustained. We also observed that the [Ca(2+)]i increase promoted by progesterone starts at either the flagellum or the head. We validated the use of FM4-64 as an indicator for the occurrence of the AR by simultaneously detecting its fluorescence increase and the loss of EGFP in transgenic EGFPAcr sperm. For the first time, we have simultaneously visualized the rise in [Ca(2+)]i and the process of exocytosis in response to progesterone and found that only a specific transitory increase in [Ca(2+)]i originating in the sperm head promotes the initiation of AR.

  5. Increased Calcium-Sensing Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Hippocampus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gardenal, Emanuela; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein coupled, 7-transmembrane domain receptor ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, brain including. The role of CaSR in the CNS is not well understood; its expression is increasing during development, which has been implicated in memory formation and consolidation, and CaSR localization in nerve terminals has been related to synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. There is an emerging evidence of CaSR involvement in neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, where the over-production of β-amyloid peptides was reported to activate CaSR. In the present study, we performed CaSR immunohistochemical and densitometry analysis in the triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). We found an increase in the expression of CaSR in hippocampal CA1 area and in dentate gyrus in the 3xTg-AD mice when compared to non-transgenic control animals. This increase was significant at 9 months of age and further increased at 12 and 18 months of age. This increase paralleled the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques with age. Increased expression of CaSR favors β-amyloidogenic pathway following direct interactions between β-amyloid and CaSR and hence may contribute to the pathological evolution of the AD. In the framework of this paradigm CaSR may represent a novel therapeutic target.

  6. Increased Calcium-Sensing Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Hippocampus of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gardenal, Emanuela; Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Rodríguez, José J.

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein coupled, 7-transmembrane domain receptor ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, brain including. The role of CaSR in the CNS is not well understood; its expression is increasing during development, which has been implicated in memory formation and consolidation, and CaSR localization in nerve terminals has been related to synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. There is an emerging evidence of CaSR involvement in neurodegenerative disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, where the over-production of β-amyloid peptides was reported to activate CaSR. In the present study, we performed CaSR immunohistochemical and densitometry analysis in the triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). We found an increase in the expression of CaSR in hippocampal CA1 area and in dentate gyrus in the 3xTg-AD mice when compared to non-transgenic control animals. This increase was significant at 9 months of age and further increased at 12 and 18 months of age. This increase paralleled the accumulation of β-amyloid plaques with age. Increased expression of CaSR favors β-amyloidogenic pathway following direct interactions between β-amyloid and CaSR and hence may contribute to the pathological evolution of the AD. In the framework of this paradigm CaSR may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:28261055

  7. Young adolescents who respond to an inulin-type fructan substantially increase total absorbed calcium and daily calcium accretion to the skeleton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium absorption and whole-body bone mineral content are greater in young adolescents who receive 8 g/d of Synergy, a mixture of inulin-type fructans (ITF), compared with those who received a maltodextrin control. Not all adolescents responded to this intervention, however. We evaluated 32 respond...

  8. Increased calcium content and inhomogeneity of mineralization render bone toughness in osteoporosis: mineralization, morphology and biomechanics of human single trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Busse, Björn; Hahn, Michael; Soltau, Markus; Zustin, Jozef; Püschel, Klaus; Duda, Georg N; Amling, Michael

    2009-12-01

    The differentiation and degree of the effects of mineral content and/or morphology on bone quality remain, to a large extent, unanswered due to several microarchitectural particularities in spatial measuring fields (e.g., force transfer, trajectories, microcalli). Therefore, as the smallest basic component of cancellous bone, we focused on single trabeculae to investigate the effects of mineralization and structure, both independently and in superposition. Transiliac Bordier bone cores and T12 vertebrae were obtained from 20 females at autopsy for specimen preparation, enabling radiographical analyses, histomorphometry, Bone Mineral Density Distribution (BMDD) analyses, and trabecular singularization to be performed. Evaluated contact X-rays and histomorphometric limits from cases with osteoporotic vertebral fractures generated two subdivisions, osteoporotic (n=12, Ø 78 years) and non-osteoporotic (n=8, Ø 49 years) cases, based on fracture appearance and bone volume (BV/TV). Measurements of trabecular number (Tb.N.), trabecular separation (Tb.Sp.), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.), trabecular bone pattern factor (TBPf) and eroded surface (ES/BS) were carried out to provide detailed structural properties of the investigated groups. The mechanical properties of 400 rod-like single vertebral trabeculae, assessed by three-point bending, were matched with mineral properties as quantified by BMDD analyses of cross-sectioned rod-like and plate-like trabeculae, both in superposition and independently. Non-osteoporotic iliac crests and vertebrae displayed linear dependency on structure parameters, whereas osteoporotic compartments proved to be non-correlated with bone structure. Independent of trabecular thickness, osteoporotic rod-like trabeculae showed decreases in Young's modulus, fracture load, yield strength, ultimate stress, work to failure and bending stiffness, along with significantly increased mean calcium content and calcium width. Non-osteoporotic trabeculae

  9. Pre-harvest calcium application increases biomass and delays senescence of broccoli microgreens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microgreen consumption has been steadily increasing in recent years due to consumer awareness of their unique color, rich flavor, and concentrated bioactive compounds such as vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. However, industrial production and marketing is limited by their short shelf-life assoc...

  10. Fish-bone peptide increases calcium solubility and bioavailability in ovariectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Won-Kyo; Lee, Bae-Jin; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2006-01-01

    Fish-bone peptides (FBP) with a high affinity to Ca were isolated using hydroxyapatite affinity chromatography, and FBP II with a high ratio of phosphopeptide was fractionated in the range of molecular weight 5.0-1.0 kDa by ultramembrane filtration. In vitro study elucidated that FBP II could inhibit the formation of insoluble Ca salts in neutral pH. In vivo effects of FBP II on Ca bioavailability were further examined in the ovariectomised rat. During the experimental period, Ca retention was increased and loss of bone mineral was decreased by FBP II supplementation in ovariectomised rats. After the low-Ca diet, the FBP II diet, including both normal level of Ca and vitamin D, significantly decreased Ca loss in faeces and increased Ca retention compared with the control diet. The levels of femoral total Ca, bone mineral density, and strength were also significantly increased by the FBP II diet to levels similar to those of the casein phosphopeptide diet group (no difference; P>0.05). In the present study, the results proved the beneficial effects of fish-meal in preventing Ca deficiency due to increased Ca bioavailability by FBP intake.

  11. Cytoplasmic calcium increases in response to changes in the gravity vector in hypocotyls and petioles of Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Masatsugu; Furuichi, Takuya; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2008-02-01

    Plants respond to a large variety of environmental signals, including changes in the gravity vector (gravistimulation). In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, gravistimulation is known to increase the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)). However, organs responsible for the [Ca(2+)](c) increase and the underlying cellular/molecular mechanisms remain to be solved. In this study, using Arabidopsis seedlings expressing apoaequorin, a Ca(2+)-sensitive luminescent protein in combination with an ultrasensitive photon counting camera, we clarified the organs where [Ca(2+)](c) increases in response to gravistimulation and characterized the physiological and pharmacological properties of the [Ca(2+)](c) increase. When the seedlings were gravistimulated by turning 180 degrees, they showed a transient biphasic [Ca(2+)](c) increase in their hypocotyls and petioles. The second peak of the [Ca(2+)](c) increase depended on the angle but not the speed of rotation, whereas the initial peak showed diametrically opposite characters. This suggests that the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase is specific for changes in the gravity vector. The potential mechanosensitive Ca(2+)-permeable channel (MSCC) inhibitors Gd(3+) and La(3+), the Ca(2+) chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), and the endomembrane Ca(2+)-permeable channel inhibitor ruthenium red suppressed the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase, suggesting that it arises from Ca(2+) influx via putative MSCCs in the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Moreover, the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase was attenuated by actin-disrupting drugs cytochalasin B and latrunculin B but not by microtubule-disrupting drugs oryzalin and nocodazole, implying that actin filaments are partially involved in the hypothetical activation of Ca(2+)-permeable channels. These results suggest that the second [Ca(2+)](c) increase via MSCCs is a gravity response in the hypocotyl and

  12. Extracellular glutamate increases in the lateral hypothalamus during meal initiation, and GABA peaks during satiation: microdialysis measurements every 30 s.

    PubMed

    Rada, Pedro; Mendialdua, Ainhoa; Hernandez, Luis; Hoebel, Bartley G

    2003-04-01

    Glutamate injected into the lateral hypothalamus can initiate eating, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) can stop it. This leads to the hypothesis that glutamate inputs are active at the beginning of a meal, and GABA is released at the end. To test this theory, the authors used microdialysis to sample glutamate and GABA simultaneously before, during, and after a meal. Food-deprived rats ate a meal of chow. Glutamate increased during the first third of the meal, then decreased to below baseline while the rats were still eating. GABA also increased at the start of the meal but continued rising and peaked during the last third of the meal. Glutamate may drive a hypothalamic system for eating, and GABA may oppose it.

  13. Suppression of phospholipase Cγ1 phosphorylation by cinnamaldehyde inhibits antigen-induced extracellular calcium influx and degranulation in mucosal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kageyama-Yahara, Natsuko; Wang, Xiaoyu; Katagiri, Tatsuo; Wang, Ping; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2011-12-16

    Antigen-IgE-mediated mucosal mast-cell activation is critical in the development of food allergies. Cinnamaldehyde, a major constituent of Cinnamomi cortex, dose-dependently inhibited the antigen-IgE-induced degranulation of mucosal-type bone-marrow derived mast cells (mBMMCs) and RBL-2H3 cells. Cinnamaldehyde also suppressed the elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) level that is induced by the extracellular Ca(2+) influx in antigen-IgE-stimulated mBMMCs. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ1, which is a crucial activation switch for the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in mast cells, was attenuated by cinnamaldehyde. Together, our results demonstrated that cinnamaldehyde suppressed the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and the degranulation of mucosal mast cells by inhibiting the activity of the IgE receptor-PLCγ-Ca(2+) influx pathway. These findings suggest that cinnamaldehyde may have therapeutic potential in mucosal mast cell-related allergic diseases, such as food allergies.

  14. Calcium, obesity, and the role of the calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Pia; Villalobos, Elisa; Reyes, Marcela; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2014-10-01

    The elevated prevalence of obesity worldwide is a challenging public health problem. Dietary calcium intake is frequently below recommendations, and evidence gathered for more than a decade suggests that inadequate calcium intake may be related to increased body weight and/or body fat, although a consensus has yet to be reached. Whole-body energy balance and the cellular mechanisms involved have been proposed to explain this relationship, and increasing evidence from epidemiological, clinical, and basic research lends support to the hypothesis that calcium is linked to the regulation of body weight. This review provides a critical appraisal of evidence from studies that examined several different aspects of this issue. Different mechanisms are highlighted and, based on recent work, new perspectives are offered, which incorporate the concept of obesity-associated inflammation and the possible role of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor.

  15. Effect of calcium on moving-bed biofilm reactor biofilms.

    PubMed

    Goode, C; Allen, D G

    2011-03-01

    The effect of calcium concentration on the biofilm structure, microbiology, and treatment performance was evaluated in a moving-bed biofilm reactor. Three experiments were conducted in replicate laboratory-scale reactors to determine if wastewater calcium is an important variable for the design and optimization of these reactors. Biofilm structural properties, such as thickness, oxygen microprofiles, and the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were affected by increasing calcium concentrations. Above a threshold concentration of calcium between 1 and 50 mg/L, biofilms became thicker and denser, with a shift toward increasingly proteinaceous EPS at higher calcium concentrations up to 200 mgCa2+/L. At 300 mgCa2+/L, biofilms were found to become primarily composed of inorganic calcium precipitates. Microbiology was assessed through microscopy, denaturing grade gel electrophoresis, and enumeration of higher organisms. Higher calcium concentrations were found to change the bacterial community and promote the abundant growth of filamentous organisms and various protazoa and metazoan populations. The chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency was improved for reactors at calcium concentrations of 50 mg/L and above. Reactor effluents for the lowest calcium concentration (1 mgCa2+/L) were found to be turbid (>50 NTU), as a result of the detachment of small and poorly settling planktonic biomass, whereas higher concentrations promoted settling of the suspended phase. In general, calcium was found to be an important variable causing significant changes in biofilm structure and reactor function.

  16. Increased cytosolic calcium stimulates exocytosis in bovine lactotrophs. Direct evidence from changes in membrane capacitance

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique has been used to measure changes in membrane capacitance (Cm) of bovine lactotrophs in order to monitor fluctuations in cell surface area associated with exo- and endocytosis. Cells were prepared by an enrichment procedure and cultured for up to 14 d before use. Under whole-cell recording, cell cytoplasm was dialyzed with various Ca2(+)-containing solutions. The resting Cm of 6.05 +/- 1.68 pF was found to correlate well with squared cell radius, suggesting a specific Cm of 0.8 microF/cm2. Discrete Cm steps of 2-10 fF were recorded, which most likely reflect single fusion and retrieval events of prolactin-containing granules (0.2-0.6 microns in diameter). High Ca2+ resulted in a Cm increase of 20-50% from the resting value, demonstrating a role for [Ca2+]i in stimulus-secretion coupling. Spontaneous Cm changes have also been recorded, which presumably reflect prolactin secretion supported by a tonic influx of Ca2+ through the membrane. This is supported by the following findings: addition of Co2+ diminished or reversed the spontaneous Cm changes and decreased resting [Ca2+]i; and membrane depolarization increased Cm, indicating the role of voltage-activated channels in stimulus-secretion coupling. As bovine lactotrophs have been found to be largely devoid of spontaneous electrical activity, a mechanism involving modulation of a tonic Ca2+ influx is proposed; this is shown to provide adequate control of basal and triggered secretion monitored by Cm. PMID:2037838

  17. A common NOS1AP genetic polymorphism is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in users of dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthijs L; Visser, Loes E; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    2009-01-01

    AIM Recently, a polymorphism in the NOS1AP gene (rs10494366), a regulator of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), was associated with QTc prolongation. Both nNOS and calcium channel blockers (CCBs) regulate intracellular calcium levels and have an important role in cardiovascular homeostasis. The aim was to investigate whether this polymorphism is associated with cardiovascular mortality in users of CCBs. METHODS The data from the Rotterdam study, a population-based closed cohort study of Caucasian individuals of ≥55 years of age, were used. We identified 1113 participants in the Rotterdam Study who were prescribed CCBs for the first time between 1991 and 2005. All-cause and cardiovascular mortality was assessed in participants who were prescribed CCBs with different NOS1AP rs10494366 genotypes using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS In participants starting on dihydropyridine CCBs (amlodipine, nifedipine and others) all-cause mortality (n = 79) risks were higher in participants with the TG [hazard ratio (HR) 2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24, 5.34] or the GG genotype (HR 3.18, 95% CI 1.18, 8.58) than in participants with the referent TT genotype. Cardiovascular mortality (n = 54) risks were 3.51 (95% CI 1.41, 8.78) for the TG genotype and 6.00 (95% CI 1.80, 20.0) for the GG genotype. No differences in all-cause mortality or cardiovascular mortality were seen in participants starting with the nondihydropyridine CCBs verapamil or diltiazem. CONCLUSION The minor G allele of rs10494366 in the NOS1AP gene is associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in Caucasian users of dihydropyridine CCBs. The mechanism underlying the observed association is unknown. PMID:19076153

  18. Important role of PLC-γ1 in hypoxic increase in intracellular calcium in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vishal R; Song, Tengyao; Joseph, Leroy; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    An increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) induces hypoxic cellular responses in the lungs; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We report, for the first time, that acute hypoxia significantly enhances phospholipase C (PLC) activity in mouse resistance pulmonary arteries (PAs), but not in mesenteric arteries. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining reveal the expression of PLC-γ1 protein in PAs and PASMCs, respectively. The activity of PLC-γ1 is also augmented in PASMCs following hypoxia. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of mitochondrial complex III Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents hypoxia from increasing PLC-γ1 activity in PASMCs. Myxothiazol, a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, reduces the hypoxic response as well. The PLC inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analog U73433, attenuates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in PAs and hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs. PLC-γ1 knockdown suppresses its protein expression and the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Hypoxia remarkably increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) production, which is blocked by U73122. The IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or xestospongin-C inhibits the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). PLC-γ1 knockdown or U73122 reduces H(2)O(2)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs and contraction in PAs. 2-APB and xestospongin-C produce similar inhibitory effects. In conclusion, our findings provide novel evidence that hypoxia activates PLC-γ1 by increasing RISP-dependent mitochondrial ROS production in the complex III, which causes IP(3) production, IP(3)R opening, and Ca(2+) release, playing an important role in hypoxic Ca(2+) and contractile responses in PASMCs.

  19. Calcium-dependent inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The inactivation of calcium channels in mammalian pituitary tumor cells (GH3) was studied with patch electrodes under voltage clamp in cell- free membrane patches and in dialyzed cells. The calcium current elicited by depolarization from a holding potential of -40 mV passed predominantly through one class of channels previously shown to be modulated by dihydropyridines and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation (Armstrong and Eckert, 1987). When exogenous calcium buffers were omitted from the pipette solution, the macroscopic calcium current through those channels inactivated with a half time of approximately 10 ms to a steady state level 40-75% smaller than the peak. Inactivation was also measured as the reduction in peak current during a test pulse that closely followed a prepulse. Inactivation was largely reduced or eliminated by (a) buffering free calcium in the pipette solution to less than 10(-8) M; (b) replacing extracellular calcium with barium; (c) increasing the prepulse voltage from +10 to +60 mV; or (d) increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP, either 'directly' with dibutyryl-cAMP or indirectly by activating adenylate cyclase with forskolin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Thus, inactivation of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels in GH3 cells only occurs when membrane depolarization leads to calcium ion entry and intracellular accumulation. PMID:2849631

  20. Extracellular accumulation of potently microbicidal bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and p15s in an evolving sterile rabbit peritoneal inflammatory exudate.

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, Y; Foreman, A; Shu, C; Zarember, K; Levy, O; Elsbach, P; Weiss, J

    1995-01-01

    To what extent the host defense role of granule-associated antibacterial proteins and peptides of PMN includes extracellular action has not been established. To address this question, we have analyzed the antibacterial activity of cell-free (ascitic) fluid (AF) obtained from glycogen-induced sterile inflammatory rabbit peritoneal exudates in which > 95% of the accumulating cells are PMN. AF, but not plasma collected in parallel, exhibits potent activity toward serum-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Total and specific antibacterial activity of AF increases during the first 12 h after injection of glycogen in parallel with the influx of PMN. At maximum, > 99% of 10(7) encapsulated Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are killed in 30 min/ml of AF. Neutralizing antibodies against the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) of PMN abolishes activity of AF toward encapsulated E. coli but has no effect on activity vs staphylococci. However, BPI alone (approximately 1 microgram/ml in AF) can only account for < or = 20% of AF activity toward E. coli. AF also contains 15 kD PMN proteins (p15s) that act in synergy with BPI. Purified BPI and p15s, in amounts present in AF, reconstitute the growth-inhibitory activity of AF toward encapsulated E. coli. These findings show for the first time an extracellular function of endogenous BPI, providing, together with the p15s, a potent microbicidal system toward Gram-negative bacteria resistant to plasma-derived proteins and phagocytes in inflammatory exudates. Images PMID:7706499

  1. Increased Obesity-Associated Circulating Levels of the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Osteopontin, Chitinase-3 Like-1 and Tenascin C Are Associated with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Izaguirre, Maitane; Hernández-Lizoain, José Luis; Baixauli, Jorge; Martí, Pablo; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Background Excess adipose tissue represents a major risk factor for the development of colon cancer with inflammation and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling being proposed as plausible mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate whether obesity can influence circulating levels of inflammation-related extracellular matrix proteins in patients with colon cancer (CC), promoting a microenvironment favorable for tumor growth. Methods Serum samples obtained from 79 subjects [26 lean (LN) and 53 obese (OB)] were used in the study. Enrolled subjects were further subclassified according to the established diagnostic protocol for CC (44 without CC and 35 with CC). Anthropometric measurements as well as circulating metabolites and hormones were determined. Circulating concentrations of the ECM proteins osteopontin (OPN), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40), tenascin C (TNC) and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) were determined by ELISA. Results Significant differences in circulating OPN, YKL-40 and TNC concentrations between the experimental groups were observed, being significantly increased due to obesity (P<0.01) and colon cancer (P<0.05). LCN-2 levels were affected by obesity (P<0.05), but no differences were detected regarding the presence or not of CC. A positive association (P<0.05) with different inflammatory markers was also detected. Conclusions To our knowledge, we herein show for the first time that obese patients with CC exhibit increased circulating levels of OPN, YKL-40 and TNC providing further evidence for the influence of obesity on CC development via ECM proteins, representing promising diagnostic biomarkers or target molecules for therapeutics. PMID:27612200

  2. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, John C.; Jackson, Joshua G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca2+ signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca2+ channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca2+ indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca2+ signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca2+ through reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca2+ signaling in astrocytic processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the

  3. Calcium polycarbophil, a water absorbing polymer, increases bowel movement and prevents sennoside-induced diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Yamada, T; Iwanaga, Y; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Kato, H; Mizumoto, A; Itoh, Z

    2000-07-01

    The effects of calcium polycarbophil (CP), a water-absorbing polymer, on bowel movement were examined in comparison with known laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents in dogs, a species that resembles humans for stool output. CP increased stool frequency, fecal water content and fecal weight in a dose-dependent manner, but did not induce diarrhea. Sennoside and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC-Na) increased fecal water content and induced diarrhea at lower doses than that which enhanced stool frequency. Trimebutine decreased stool frequency, fecal weight and fecal water content, resulting in inhibition rather than stimulation of defecation. In sennoside-induced diarrhea, loperamide and CP improved stool consistency and this was accompanied by reduced fecal moisture and frequency of diarrhea. In contrast, CMC-Na aggravated stool consistency with increased fecal water content and frequency of diarrhea, and trimebutine had little noticeable effect apart from reducing fecal weight. Our results show that CP has both laxative and anti-diarrheal effects in dogs and differed from conventional laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents. CP may be a suitable agent for treatment of idiopathic constipation, secretory diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome with alternating constipation and diarrhea and with either predominating in terms of less side effects such as diarrhea or constipation.

  4. Aluminum-induced dreierketten chain cross-links increase the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline calcium aluminosilicate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Guoqing; Myers, Rupert J.; Li, Jiaqi; Maboudian, Roya; Carraro, Carlo; Shapiro, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-03-01

    The incorporation of Al and increased curing temperature promotes the crystallization and cross-linking of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C-(A-)S-H), which is the primary binding phase in most contemporary concrete materials. However, the influence of Al-induced structural changes on the mechanical properties at atomistic scale is not well understood. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based high-pressure X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the influence of dreierketten chain cross-linking on the anisotropic mechanical behavior of C-(A-)S-H. We show that the ab-planar stiffness is independent of dreierketten chain defects, e.g. vacancies in bridging tetrahedra sites and Al for Si substitution. The c-axis of non-cross-linked C-(A-)S-H is more deformable due to the softer interlayer opening but stiffens with decreased spacing and/or increased zeolitic water and Ca2+ of the interlayer. Dreierketten chain cross-links act as ‘columns’ to resist compression, thus increasing the bulk modulus of C-(A-)S-H. We provide the first experimental evidence on the influence of the Al-induced atomistic configurational change on the mechanical properties of C-(A-)S-H. Our work advances the fundamental knowledge of C-(A-)S-H on the lowest level of its hierarchical structure, and thus can impact the way that innovative C-(A-)S-H-based cementitious materials are developed using a ‘bottom-up’ approach.

  5. Desnitro-imidacloprid activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase cascade via the nicotinic receptor and intracellular calcium mobilization in N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2002-11-01

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is the principal neonicotinoid (the only major new class of synthetic insecticides of the past three decades). The excellent safety profile of IMI is not shared with a metabolite, desnitro-IMI (DNIMI), which displays high toxicity to mammals associated with agonist action at the alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in brain. This study examines the hypothesis that IMI, DNIMI, and (-)-nicotine activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade via primary interaction with the alpha4beta2 nAChR in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. These three nicotinic agonists induce phosphorylation of ERK (p44/p42) in a concentration-dependent manner with an optimal incubation period of 30 min. DNIMI (1 microM)-induced ERK activation is blocked by nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin and muscarinic antagonist atropine. This activation is prevented by intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM but not by removal of external Ca(2+) using EGTA and Ca(2+)-free medium. 2-Aminoethoxy-diphenylborate, a blocker for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, inhibits DNIMI-induced ERK activation but a high level of ryanodine (to block ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release) does not. The inhibitor U-73122 for phospholipase C (to suppress IP(3) production) prevents ERK activation evoked by DNIMI. Inhibitors for protein kinase C (PKC) (GF109203X) and ERK kinase (PD98059) block this activation whereas an inhibitor (H-89) for cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase does not. Thus, neonicotinoids activate the ERK cascade triggered by primary action at the alpha4beta2 nAChR with an involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization possibly mediated by IP(3). It is further suggested that intracellular Ca(2+) activates a sequential pathway from PKC to ERK.

  6. Correlations in distribution and concentration of calcium, copper and iron with zinc in isolated extracellular deposits associated with age-related macular degeneration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flinn, Jane M; Kakalec, Peter; Tappero, Ryan; Jones, Blair F.; Lengyel, Imre

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is abundantly enriched in sub-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) deposits, the hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and is thought to play a role in the formation of these deposits. However, it is not known whether Zn is the only metal relevant for sub-RPE deposit formation. Because of their involvement in the pathogenesis of AMD, we determined the concentration and distribution of calcium (Ca), iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) and compared these with Zn in isolated and sectioned macular (MSD), equatorial (PHD) and far peripheral (FPD) sub-RPE deposits from an 86 year old donor eye with post mortem diagnosis of early AMD. The sections were mounted on Zn free microscopy slides and analyzed by microprobe synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF). Metal concentrations were determined using spiked sectioned sheep brain matrix standards, prepared the same way as the samples. The heterogeneity of metal distributions was examined using pixel by pixel comparison. The orders of metal concentrations were Ca ⋙ Zn > Fe in all three types of deposits but Cu levels were not distinguishable from background values. Zinc and Ca were consistently present in all deposits but reached highest concentration in MSD. Iron was present in some but not all deposits and was especially enriched in FPD. Correlation analysis indicated considerable variation in metal distribution within and between sub-RPE deposits. The results suggest that Zn and Ca are the most likely contributors to deposit formation especially in MSD, the characteristic risk factor for the development of AMD in the human eye.

  7. A calcium-gated lid and a large beta-roll sandwich are revealed by the crystal structure of extracellular lipase from Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Meier, Reto; Drepper, Thomas; Svensson, Vera; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Baumann, Ulrich

    2007-10-26

    Lipase LipA from Serratia marcescens is a 613-amino acid enzyme belonging to family I.3 of lipolytic enzymes that has an important biotechnological application in the production of a chiral precursor for the coronary vasodilator diltiazem. Like other family I.3 lipases, LipA is secreted by Gram-negative bacteria via a type I secretion system and possesses 13 copies of a calcium binding tandem repeat motif, GGXGXDXUX (U, hydrophobic amino acids), in the C-terminal part of the polypeptide chain. The 1.8-A crystal structure of LipA reveals a close relation to eukaryotic lipases, whereas family I.1 and I.2 enzymes appear to be more distantly related. Interestingly, the structure shows for the N-terminal lipase domain a variation on the canonical alpha/beta hydrolase fold in an open conformation, where the putative lid helix is anchored by a Ca(2+) ion essential for activity. Another novel feature observed in this lipase structure is the presence of a helical hairpin additional to the putative lid helix that exposes a hydrophobic surface to the aqueous medium and might function as an additional lid. The tandem repeats form two separated parallel beta-roll domains that pack tightly against each other. Variations of the consensus sequence of the tandem repeats within the second beta-roll result in an asymmetric Ca(2+) binding on only one side of the roll. The analysis of the properties of the beta-roll domains suggests an intramolecular chaperone function.

  8. Chronic fluoxetine treatment increases NO bioavailability and calcium-sensitive potassium channels activation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Camila A; Ferreira, Nathanne S; Mestriner, Fabiola L; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Evora, Paulo R B; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Carneiro, Fernando S; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-10-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), has effects beyond its antidepressant properties, altering, e.g., mechanisms involved in blood pressure and vasomotor tone control. Although many studies have addressed the acute impact of fluoxetine on the cardiovascular system, there is a paucity of information on the chronic vascular effects of this SSRI. We tested the hypothesis that chronic fluoxetine treatment enhances the vascular reactivity to vasodilator stimuli by increasing nitric oxide (NO) signaling and activation of potassium (K+) channels. Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (I) vehicle (water for 21 days) or (II) chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day in the drinking water for 21 days). Fluoxetine treatment increased endothelium-dependent and independent vasorelaxation (analyzed by mesenteric resistance arteries reactivity) as well as constitutive NO synthase (NOS) activity, phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine1177 and NO production, determined by western blot and fluorescence. On the other hand, fluoxetine treatment did not alter vascular expression of neuronal and inducible NOS or guanylyl cyclase (GC). Arteries from fluoxetine-treated rats exhibited increased relaxation to pinacidil. Increased acetylcholine vasorelaxation was abolished by a calcium-activated K+ channel (KCa) blocker, but not by an inhibitor of KATP channels. On the other hand, vascular responses to Bay 41-2272 and 8-bromo-cGMP were similar between the groups. In conclusion, chronic fluoxetine treatment increases endothelium-dependent and independent relaxation of mesenteric resistance arteries by mechanisms that involve increased eNOS activity, NO generation, and KCa channels activation. These effects may contribute to the cardiovascular effects associated with chronic fluoxetine treatment.

  9. Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium appear to be required for the migration of adherent human neutrophils [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Mar;110(3):861

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Human neutrophils exhibit multiple increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i) spontaneously and in response to the chemoattractant N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (Jaconi, M. E. E., R. W. Rivest, W. Schlegel, C. B. Wollheim, D. Pittet, and P. D. Lew. 1988. J. Biol. Chem. 263:10557-10560). The function of these repetitive increases in [Ca2+]i, as well as the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, remain unresolved. We have used microspectrofluorometry to measure [Ca2+]i in single fura-2-loaded human neutrophils as they moved on poly-D-lysine-coated glass in the presence of serum. To investigate the role of Ca2+ in human neutrophil migration, we examined cells in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+, as well as intracellular Ca2(+)-buffered and Ca2(+)- depleted cells. In the presence of extracellular Ca2+, multiple increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i were frequently observed, and at least one such transient increase in [Ca2+]i occurred in every moving cell during chemokinesis, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis. In addition, neutrophils that extended pseudopodia and assumed a polarized morphology after plating onto a surface were always observed to exhibit [Ca2+]i transients even in the absence of chemoattractant. In contrast, a [Ca2+]i transient was observed in only one of the nonpolarized stationary cells that were examined (n = 15). Although some cells exhibited relatively periodic increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i, resembling the regular oscillations that have been observed in some cell types, many others exhibited increases and decreases in [Ca2+]i that varied in their timing, magnitude, and duration. Buffering of [Ca2+]i or removal of extracellular Ca2+ damped out or blocked transient increases in [Ca2+]i and reduced or inhibited the migration of neutrophils. Under these conditions, polarized cells were often observed to make repeated attempts at migration, but they remained anchored at their rear. These data suggest

  10. Increase in the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations by switching from calcium carbonate to lanthanum carbonate.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Toru; Kawakami, Junko; Mikami, Noriko; Wakai, Haruki; Ishii, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kazunari; Iwamura, Masatsugu; Hida, Miho; Kurata, Yasuhisa

    2014-06-01

    It is widely known that dialysis patients who are administered vitamin D preparations have a better prognosis than patients who are not. In this study, of 22 patients on maintenance dialysis who had been administered calcium (Ca) carbonate in our hospital, we investigated the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations after the phosphorus (P) binder was switched from Ca carbonate to the newly developed lanthanum carbonate (LC). After completely switching to LC, the dosage amount of oral vitamin D3 preparation (alfacalcidol equivalent) was significantly increased from 0.094 μg/day to 0.375 μg/day (P = 0.0090). No significant changes were observed in the values of serum corrected Ca, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone and P after switching. The administration of LC enabled complete cessation of the administration of Ca carbonate preparations, and increased the dosage amount of vitamin D3 preparations. Therefore, LC may be a useful P binder to improve patient prognosis.

  11. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular free calcium level and arachidonic acid release from cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Legere, R.H.; Majerus, B.J.; Petrali, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanism of action of the alkylating agent bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM) was studied using the in thai vitro mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG 108-1 S clonal p cell line model. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, cell viability remained high (>80% of untreated control) up to 9 hr and then declined steadily to about 40% of control after 20-24 hr. During the early period of SM exposure, when there was no significant cell viability loss, the following effects were observed. The cellular glutathione level decreased 20% after 1 hr and 34% after 6 hr. Between 2 and 6 hr, there was a time-dependent increase (about 10 to 30%) in intracellular free calcium (Ca2+), which was localized to the limiting membrane of swollen endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, to euchromatin areas of the nucleus, and to areas of the cytosol and plasma membrane. Moreover,there was also a time-dependent increase in the release of isotopically labeled arachidonic acid ((3H)AA) from cellular membranes. Increase in (3H)AA release was 28% at 3 hr and about 60-80% between 6 and 9 hr. This increase in I3HIAA release was inhibited by quinacrine (20 uM), which is a phospholipase (PLA2) inhibitor. At 16 hr after SM exposure, there was a large increase (about 200% of control) in I3HIAA release, which was coincident with a 50% loss of cell viability. These results suggest a Ca2+-mediated toxic mechanism of SM via PLA2 activation and arachidonate release.

  12. Extracellular cGMP Modulates Learning Biphasically by Modulating Glycine Receptors, CaMKII and Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Malaguarnera, Michele; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that extracellular cGMP modulates the ability to learn a Y maze task, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. Here we show that extracellular cGMP, at physiological concentrations, modulates learning in the Y maze in a biphasic way by modulating the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Extracellular cGMP reduces glycine receptors activation inducing a voltage-dependent calcium-channels-mediated increase of calcium in Purkinje neurons. This calcium increase modulates CaMKII phosphorylation in a biphasic way. When basal calcium concentration is low extracellular cGMP reduces CaMKII phosphorylation, increasing nitric oxide synthase activity, the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function and learning ability. When basal calcium is normal extracellular cGMP increases CaMKII phosphorylation, reducing nitric oxide synthase activity, the pathway function and learning. These data unveil new mechanisms modulating learning in the Y maze and likely other learning types which may be therapeutic targets to improve learning in pathological situations associated with altered cGMP levels. PMID:27634333

  13. Calcium wave of tubuloglomerular feedback.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2006-08-01

    ATP release from macula densa (MD) cells into the interstitium of the juxtaglomerular (JG) apparatus (JGA) is an integral component of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism that controls the glomerular filtration rate. Because the cells of the JGA express a number of calcium-coupled purinergic receptors, these studies tested the hypothesis that TGF activation triggers a calcium wave that spreads from the MD toward distant cells of the JGA and glomerulus. Ratiometric calcium imaging of in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from rabbits was performed with fluo-4/fura red and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Activation of TGF by increasing tubular flow rate at the MD rapidly produced a significant elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in extraglomerular mesangial cells (by 187.6 +/- 45.1 nM) and JG renin granular cells (by 281.4 +/- 66.6 nM). Subsequently, cell-to-cell propagation of the calcium signal at a rate of 12.6 +/- 1.1 microm/s was observed upstream toward proximal segments of the afferent arteriole and adjacent glomeruli, as well as toward intraglomerular elements including the most distant podocytes (5.9 +/- 0.4 microm/s). The same calcium wave was observed in nonperfusing glomeruli, causing vasoconstriction and contractions of the glomerular tuft. Gap junction uncoupling, an ATP scavenger enzyme cocktail, and pharmacological inhibition of P(2) purinergic receptors, but not adenosine A(1) receptor blockade, abolished the changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and propagation of the calcium wave. These studies provided evidence that both gap junctional communication and extracellular ATP are integral components of the TGF calcium wave.

  14. High vitamin D and calcium intakes increase bone mineral (Ca and P) content in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingming; Sergeev, Igor N

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone formation, mineralization, and remodeling. Recent studies demonstrated that an increased body mass can be detrimental to bone health. However, whether an increase in dietary vitamin D and calcium intakes in obesity is beneficial to bone health has not been established. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of increased vitamin D and calcium intakes, alone or in combination, on bone status in a high-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. We hypothesized that DIO in growing mice affects bone mineral status and that high vitamin D and calcium intakes will promote mineralization of the growing bone in obesity via Ca(2+) regulatory hormones, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Male mice were fed high vitamin D3 (10 000 IU/kg), high calcium (1.2%), or high vitamin D3 plus high-calcium diets containing 60% energy as fat for 10 weeks. Bone weight, specific gravity, mineral (Ca and P), and collagen (hydroxyproline) content were measured in the femur and the tibia. Regulators of Ca(2+) metabolism and markers of bone status (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 1,25(OH)2D3, and osteocalcin) were measured in blood plasma. Diet-induced obese mice exhibited lower bone Ca and P content and relative bone weight compared with the normal-fat control mice, whereas collagen (hydroxyproline) content was not different between the two groups. High vitamin D3 and calcium intakes significantly increased bone Ca and P content and relative bone weight in DIO mice, which was accompanied by an increase in 1,25(OH)2D3 and a decrease in PTH and osteocalcin concentrations in blood. The findings obtained indicate that increased vitamin D and calcium intakes are effective in increasing mineral (Ca and P) content in the growing bone of obese mice and that the hormonal mechanism of this effect may involve the vitamin D-PTH axis.

  15. Myofibrillar calcium sensitivity of isometric tension is increased in human dilated cardiomyopathies: role of altered beta-adrenergically mediated protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M R; Buck, S H; Stoker, S W; Greaser, M L; Mentzer, R M

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of alterations in myofibrillar function in human dilated cardiomyopathies, we determined isometric tension-calcium relations in permeabilized myocytesized myofibrillar preparations (n = 16) obtained from left ventricular biopsies from nine patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) during cardiac transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation. Similar preparations (n = 10) were obtained from six normal hearts used for cardiac transplantation. Passive and maximal Ca2+-activated tensions were similar for the two groups. However, the calcium sensitivity of isometric tension was increased in DCM compared to nonfailing preparations ([Ca2+]50=2.46+/-0.49 microM vs 3.24+/-0.51 microM, P < 0.001). In vitro treatment with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) decreased calcium sensitivity of tension to a greater degree in failing than in normal preparations. Further, isometric tension-calcium relations in failing and normal myofibrillar preparations were similar after PKA treatment. These findings suggest that the increased calcium sensitivity of isometric tension in DCM may be due at least in part to a reduction of the beta-adrenergically mediated (PKA-dependent) phosphorylation of myofibrillar regulatory proteins such as troponin I and/or C-protein. PMID:8690789

  16. Indole-3-acetic acid-induced oxidative burst and an increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration in rice suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T H; Umemura, Kenji; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-08-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the major natural auxin involved in the regulation of a variety of growth and developmental processes such as division, elongation, and polarity determination in growing plant cells. It has been shown that dividing and/or elongating plant cells accompanies the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a number of reports have suggested that hormonal actions can be mediated by ROS through ROS-mediated opening of ion channels. Here, we surveyed the link between the action of IAA, oxidative burst, and calcium channel activation in a transgenic cells of rice expressing aequorin in the cytosol. Application of IAA to the cells induced a rapid and transient generation of superoxide which was followed by a transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c). The IAA-induced [Ca(2+)]c elevation was inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers and a Ca(2+) chelator. Furthermore, ROS scavengers effectively blocked the action of IAA on [Ca(2+)]c elevation.

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 signaling enhances TRPM1 calcium channel function and increases melanin content in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sulochana; Markandeya, Yogananda; Maddodi, Nityanand; Dhingra, Anuradha; Vardi, Noga; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2013-05-01

    Mutations in TRPM1, a calcium channel expressed in retinal bipolar cells and epidermal melanocytes, cause complete congenital stationary night blindness with no discernible skin phenotype. In the retina, TRPM1 activity is negatively coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (mGluR6) signaling through Gαo and TRPM1 mutations result in the loss of responsiveness of TRPM1 to mGluR6 signaling. Here, we show that human melanocytes express mGluR6, and treatment of melanocytes with L-AP4, a type III mGluR-selective agonist, enhances Ca(2+) uptake. Knockdown of TRPM1 or mGluR6 by shRNA abolished L-AP4-induced Ca(2+) influx and TRPM1 currents, showing that TRPM1 activity in melanocytes is positively coupled to mGluR6 signaling. Gαo protein is absent in melanocytes. However, forced expression of Gαo restored negative coupling of TRPM1 to mGluR6 signaling, but treatment with pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gi /Go proteins, did not affect basal or mGluR6-induced Ca(2+) uptake. Additionally, chronic stimulation of mGluR6 altered melanocyte morphology and increased melanin content. These data suggest differences in coupling of TRPM1 function to mGluR6 signaling explain different cellular responses to glutamate in the retina and the skin.

  18. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 signaling enhances TRPM1 calcium channel function and increases melanin content in human melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Sulochana; Markandeya, Yogananda; Maddodi, Nityanand; Dhingra, Anuradha; Vardi, Noga; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in TRPM1, a calcium channel expressed in retinal bipolar cells and epidermal melanocytes, cause complete congenital stationary night blindness with no discernible skin phenotype. In the retina, TRPM1 activity is negatively coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (mGluR6) signaling through Gαo and TRPM1 mutations result in the loss of responsiveness of TRPM1 to mGluR6 signaling. Here, we show that human melanocytes express mGluR6 and treatment of melanocytes with L-AP4, a type III mGluR-selective agonist, enhances Ca2+ uptake. Knockdown of TRPM1 or mGluR6 by shRNA abolished L-AP4-induced Ca2+ influx and TRPM1 currents showing that TRPM1 activity in melanocytes is positively coupled to mGluR6 signaling. Gαo protein is absent in melanocytes. However, forced expression of Gαo restored negative coupling of TRPM1 to mGluR6 signaling, but treatment with and pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gi/Go proteins, did not affect basal or mGluR6-induced Ca2+ uptake. Additionally, chronic stimulation of mGluR6 altered melanocyte morphology and increased melanin content. These data suggest differences in coupling of TRPM1 function to mGluR6 signaling explain different cellular responses to glutamate in the retina and the skin. PMID:23452348

  19. Aluminum-induced dreierketten chain cross-links increase the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline calcium aluminosilicate hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Guoqing; Myers, Rupert J.; Li, Jiaqi; Maboudian, Roya; Carraro, Carlo; Shapiro, David A.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of Al and increased curing temperature promotes the crystallization and cross-linking of calcium (alumino)silicate hydrate (C-(A-)S-H), which is the primary binding phase in most contemporary concrete materials. However, the influence of Al-induced structural changes on the mechanical properties at atomistic scale is not well understood. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based high-pressure X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the influence of dreierketten chain cross-linking on the anisotropic mechanical behavior of C-(A-)S-H. We show that the ab-planar stiffness is independent of dreierketten chain defects, e.g. vacancies in bridging tetrahedra sites and Al for Si substitution. The c-axis of non-cross-linked C-(A-)S-H is more deformable due to the softer interlayer opening but stiffens with decreased spacing and/or increased zeolitic water and Ca2+ of the interlayer. Dreierketten chain cross-links act as ‘columns’ to resist compression, thus increasing the bulk modulus of C-(A-)S-H. We provide the first experimental evidence on the influence of the Al-induced atomistic configurational change on the mechanical properties of C-(A-)S-H. Our work advances the fundamental knowledge of C-(A-)S-H on the lowest level of its hierarchical structure, and thus can impact the way that innovative C-(A-)S-H-based cementitious materials are developed using a ‘bottom-up’ approach. PMID:28281635

  20. GABAB receptors increase intracellular calcium concentrations in chromaffin cells through two different pathways: their role in catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed

    Parramón, M; González, M P; Herrero, M T; Oset-Gasque, M J

    1995-05-01

    The activation of GABAB receptors of adrenal chomaffin cells produces an increase of [Ca2+]i measured by fura-2 AM techniques. GABAB agonists 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid or (-)baclofen, at concentrations of 0.5 mM, increased basal Ca2+ values 332 +/- 60.9 and 306 +/- 40.5 nM, respectively, in cells suspended in a 2.5 mM Ca2+ buffer. The GABAB-induced increase of [Ca2+]i seemed to have two different components. The first was due to an entry from the extracellular medium mainly through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels as the dihydropiridine nifedipine 50 microM was able to decrease it more than 60%, while omega-conotoxin, which blocks N-type channels, did not produce any change in the GABAB-evoked Ca2+ increment. The second component was due to a release of Ca2+ from intracellular pools and was about one-third of the total GABAB-induced increase of [Ca2+]i. GABAB receptors stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive and not the caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ store. In a low-Ca2+ buffer after treatment with 2 microM angiotensin II, neither 0.5 mM 3-APPA nor baclofen were able to produce an additional increase of [Ca2+]i, whereas 4 mM caffeine had no effect on GABAB response. This intracellular Ca2+ mobilization could be due to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation produced by the activation of GABAB receptors. In fact, the specific agonists after 10 minutes incubation produced a dose-dependent increase of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The maximal effect was obtained at 100 microM baclofen and 3-APPA, and it was 3.63 +/- 0.75 and 3.2 +/- 1.5 times the basal levels (7.3 +/- 0.3 pmol/10(6) cells), respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Effects of calcium levels on colonial aggregation and buoyancy of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wen; Zhao, Jie; Li, Jian-Hong; Li, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Li-Hua; Wu, Min

    2011-02-01

    Colonial aggregation of Microcystis plays a key role in bloom formation. Limited studies have been reported about effects of environmental factors on the aggregation of Microcystis. Calcium is an important chemical element in water system. In this study, we investigated the effects of a low- (0.015 g l⁻¹) and a high-concentration of calcium (0.100 g l⁻¹) on the aggregation and buoyancy of a colonial strain M. aeruginosa XW01. Results show that compared to the low concentration of calcium, the high-calcium condition results in bigger colonial size, higher level of buoyancy and increased production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) of M. aeruginosa XW01. Increased production of EPS induced by the high-calcium concentration should contribute to the colonial aggregation and buoyancy of M. aeruginosa XW01. These results suggest that an increase in calcium concentration may be beneficial for Microcystis blooms occurring in a soft water lake.

  2. Senescent human fibroblasts show increased glycolysis and redox homeostasis with extracellular metabolomes that overlap with those of irreparable DNA damage, aging, and disease.

    PubMed

    James, Emma L; Michalek, Ryan D; Pitiyage, Gayani N; de Castro, Alice M; Vignola, Katie S; Jones, Janice; Mohney, Robert P; Karoly, Edward D; Prime, Stephen S; Parkinson, Eric Kenneth

    2015-04-03

    Cellular senescence can modulate various pathologies and is associated with irreparable DNA double-strand breaks (IrrDSBs). Extracellular senescence metabolomes (ESMs) were generated from fibroblasts rendered senescent by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or 20 Gy of γ rays (IrrDSBsen) and compared with those of young proliferating cells, confluent cells, quiescent cells, and cells exposed to repairable levels of DNA damage to identify novel noninvasive markers of senescent cells. ESMs of PEsen and IrrDSBsen overlapped and showed increased levels of citrate, molecules involved in oxidative stress, a sterol, monohydroxylipids, tryptophan metabolism, phospholipid, and nucleotide catabolism, as well as reduced levels of dipeptides containing branched chain amino acids. The ESM overlaps with the aging and disease body fluid metabolomes, supporting their utility in the noninvasive detection of human senescent cells in vivo and by implication the detection of a variety of human pathologies. Intracellular metabolites of senescent cells showed a relative increase in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose-phosphate pathway, and, consistent with this, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase transcripts. In contrast, tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme transcript levels were unchanged and their metabolites were depleted. These results are surprising because glycolysis antagonizes senescence entry but are consistent with established senescent cells entering a state of low oxidative stress.

  3. Conservation of body calcium by increased dietary intake of potassium: A potential measure to reduce the osteoporosis process during prolonged exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nechay, Bohdan R.

    1989-01-01

    During the 1988 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, it was proposed that the loss of skeletal calcium upon prolonged exposure to microgravity could be explained, in part, by a renal maladjustment characterized by an increased urinary excretion of calcium. It was theorized that because the conservation of body fluids and electrolytes depends upon the energy of adenosine triphosphate and enzymes that control the use of its energy for renal ion transport, an induction of renal sodium and potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na + K ATPase) by oral loading with potassium would increase the reabsorption of sodium directly and that of calcium indirectly, leading to improved hydration and to reduced calcium loss. Preliminary studies showed the following. Rats drinking water containing 0.2 M potassium chloride for six to 13 days excreted in urine 22 muEq of calcium and 135 muEq of sodium per 100 grams of body weight per day. The corresponding values for control rats drinking tap water were 43 muEq and 269 muEq respectively. Renal Na + K ATPase activity in potassium loaded rats was higher than in controls. Thus, oral potassium loading resulted in increased Na + K ATPase activity and diminished urinary excretion of calcium and of sodium as predicted by the hypothesis. An extension of these studies to humans has the potential of resulting in development of harmless, non-invasive, drug-free, convenient measures to reduce bone loss and other electrolyte and fluid problems in space travelers exposed to prolonged periods of microgravity.

  4. Extracellular acidic sulfur-containing amino acids and gamma-glutamyl peptides in global ischemia: postischemic recovery of neuronal activity is paralleled by a tetrodotoxin-sensitive increase in cysteine sulfinate in the CA1 of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andiné, P; Orwar, O; Jacobson, I; Sandberg, M; Hagberg, H

    1991-07-01

    An excessive activation of the excitatory amino acid system has been proposed as one possible mediator of the ischemia-induced delayed death of CA1 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. Using dialytrodes in the CA1 of the rat, we have investigated multiple-unit activity and extracellular changes in acidic sulfur-containing amino acids and gamma-glutamyl peptides during ischemia (20-min, four-vessel occlusion) and during 8 h of reflow. Multiple-unit activity was abolished during ischemia and for the following 1 h, but then recovered, gradually reaching preischemic levels after 8 h of reflow. Extracellular cysteate, cysteine sulfinate, and gamma-glutamyltaurine increased (1.5- to threefold) during ischemia, and extracellular glutathione and gamma-glutamylaspartate plus gamma-glutamylglutamine increased during early reflow (two- to threefold). The recovery of neuronal activity at 4-8 h was paralleled by an increase in extracellular cysteine sulfinate (2.5-fold at 8 h of reflow). Perfusion with 10 microM tetrodotoxin at 8 h of reflow abolished the multiple-unit activity and reduced extracellular cysteine sulfinate. Considering the glutamate-like properties of cysteine sulfinate, the observed postischemic increase may be involved in the development of the delayed neuronal death.

  5. Physical exercise in aging human skeletal muscle increases mitochondrial calcium uniporter expression levels and affects mitochondria dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Sandra; Mammucari, Cristina; Romanello, Vanina; Barberi, Laura; Pietrangelo, Laura; Fusella, Aurora; Mosole, Simone; Gherardi, Gaia; Höfer, Christian; Löfler, Stefan; Sarabon, Nejc; Cvecka, Jan; Krenn, Matthias; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Protasi, Feliciano; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Age-related sarcopenia is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass with decline in specific force, having dramatic consequences on mobility and quality of life in seniors. The etiology of sarcopenia is multifactorial and underlying mechanisms are currently not fully elucidated. Physical exercise is known to have beneficial effects on muscle trophism and force production. Alterations of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis regulated by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) have been recently shown to affect muscle trophism in vivo in mice. To understand the relevance of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in aging and to investigate the effect of physical exercise on MCU expression and mitochondria dynamics, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from 70-year-old subjects 9 weeks trained with either neuromuscular electrical stimulation (ES) or leg press. Here, we demonstrate that improved muscle function and structure induced by both trainings are linked to increased protein levels of MCU Ultrastructural analyses by electron microscopy showed remodeling of mitochondrial apparatus in ES-trained muscles that is consistent with an adaptation to physical exercise, a response likely mediated by an increased expression of mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. Altogether these results indicate that the ES-dependent physiological effects on skeletal muscle size and force are associated with changes in mitochondrial-related proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis and mitochondrial shape. These original findings in aging human skeletal muscle confirm the data obtained in mice and propose MCU and mitochondria-related proteins as potential pharmacological targets to counteract age-related muscle loss.

  6. Porous calcium carbonate as a carrier material to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds.

    PubMed

    Lundin Johnson, Maria; Noreland, David; Gane, Patrick; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Ridgway, Cathy; Millqvist Fureby, Anna

    2017-03-15

    Two different food grade functionalised porous calcium carbonates (FCC), with different pore size and pore size distributions, were characterised and used as carrier materials to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble flavouring compounds in aqueous solution. The loading level was varied between 1.3% by weight (wt%) and 35 wt%, where the upper limit of 35 wt% was the total maximum loading capacity of flavouring compound in FCC based on the fraction of the total weight of FCC plus flavouring compound. Flavouring compounds (l-carvone, vanillin, and curcumin) were selected based on their difference in hydrophilicity and capacity to crystallise. Release kinetic studies revealed that all flavouring compounds showed an accelerated release when loaded in FCC compared to dissolution of the flavouring compound itself in aqueous medium. The amorphous state and/or surface enlargement of the flavouring compound inside or on FCC explains the faster release. The flavouring compounds capable of crystallising (vanillin and curcumin) were almost exclusively amorphous within the porous FCC material as determined by X-ray powder diffraction one week after loading and after storing the loaded FCC material for up to 9 months at room temperature. A small amount of crystalline vanillin and curcumin was detected in the FCC material with large pores and high flavouring compound loading (≥30 wt%). Additionally, two different loading strategies were evaluated, loading by dissolving the flavouring compound in acetone or loading by a hot melt method. Porosimetry data showed that the melt method was more efficient in filling the smallest pores (<100 nm). The main factor influencing the release rate appears to be the amorphous state of the flavouring compound and the increase in exposed surface area. The confinement in small pores prevents crystallisation of the flavouring compounds during storage, providing a stable amorphous form retaining high release rate also after storage.

  7. Increased Expression of the Large Conductance, Calcium-Activated K+ (BK) Channel in Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Samuel T.; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Velinov, Milen; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic J protein co-chaperone that opposes neurodegeneration. Mutations in CSPα (i.e., Leu115 to Arg substitution or deletion (Δ) of Leu116) cause adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease. We have previously demonstrated that CSPα limits the expression of large conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels in neurons, which may impact synaptic excitability and neurotransmission. Here we show by western blot analysis that expression of the pore-forming BKα subunit is elevated ~2.5 fold in the post-mortem cortex of a 36-year-old patient with the Leu116∆ CSPα mutation. Moreover, we find that the increase in BKα subunit level is selective for ANCL and not a general feature of neurodegenerative conditions. While reduced levels of CSPα are found in some postmortem cortex specimens from Alzheimer’s disease patients, we find no concomitant increase in BKα subunit expression in Alzheimer’s specimens. Both CSPα monomer and oligomer expression are reduced in synaptosomes prepared from ANCL cortex compared with control. In a cultured neuronal cell model, CSPα oligomers are short lived. The results of this study indicate that the Leu116∆ mutation leads to elevated BKα subunit levels in human cortex and extend our initial work in rodent models demonstrating the modulation of BKα subunit levels by the same CSPα mutation. While the precise sequence of pathogenic events still remains to be elucidated, our findings suggest that dysregulation of BK channels may contribute to neurodegeneration in ANCL. PMID:25905915

  8. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children.

    PubMed

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness.A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression.HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05).Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern.

  9. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  10. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children

    PubMed Central

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness. A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression. HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern. PMID:27583886

  11. Increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor induces sequestration of extracellular signal-related kinases and selective attenuation of specific epidermal growth factor-mediated signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Habib, Amyn A; Chun, Soo Jin; Neel, Benjamin G; Vartanian, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Increased expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is common in cancer and correlates with neoplastic progression. Although the biology of this receptor has been the subject of intense investigation, surprisingly little is known about how increased expression of the wild-type EGFR affects downstream signal transduction in cells. We show that increasing the expression of the receptor results in dramatic shifts in signaling with attenuation of EGF-induced Ras, extracellular signal-related kinases (ERKs), and Akt activation, as well as amplification of STAT1 and STAT3 signaling. In this study, we focus on the mechanism of attenuated ERK signaling and present evidence suggesting that the mechanism of attenuated ERK signaling in EGFR-overexpressing cells is a sequestration of ERKs at the cell membrane in EGFR-containing complexes. Increased expression of the EGFR results in an aberrant localization of ERKs to the cell membrane. Furthermore, ERKs become associated with the EGFR in a physical complex in EGFR-overexpressing cells but not in control cells. The EGFR-ERK association is detected in unstimulated cells or on exposure to a low concentration of EGF; under these conditions, ERK activation is minimal. Exposure of these cells to saturating concentrations of EGF results in a decreased membrane localization of ERKs, a concomitant dissociation of ERKs from the EGFR, and restores ERK activation. A similar association can be detected between the EGFR and MEK1 in receptor-overexpressing cells, suggesting that multiple components of the ERK signaling pathway may become trapped in complexes with the EGFR. These findings can be demonstrated in cells transfected to express high levels of the EGFR as well as in cancer cells which naturally overexpress the EGFR and, thus, may be representative of altered EGFR signaling in human cancer.

  12. Elevation of body temperature is an essential factor for exercise-increased extracellular heat shock protein 72 level in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Naito, Hisashi; Akin, Senay; Ichinoseki-Sekine, Noriko; Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Kakigi, Ryo; Sugiura, Takao; Powers, Scott K; Katamoto, Shizuo; Demirel, Haydar A

    2008-05-01

    This study examined whether the exercise-increased extracellular heat shock protein 72 (eHsp72) levels in rats was associated with body temperature elevation during exercise. In all, 26 female Sprague-Dawley rats (3 mo old) were assigned randomly to control (CON; n = 8), exercise under warm temperature (WEx; n = 9), or exercise under cold temperature (CEx; n = 9). The WEx and CEx were trained at 25 degrees C or 4 degrees C, respectively, for nine days using a treadmill. Before and immediately after the final exercise bout, the colonic temperatures were measured as an index of body temperature. The animals were subsequently anesthetized, and blood samples were collected and centrifuged. Plasma samples were obtained to assess their eHsp72 levels. Only the colonic temperature in WEx was increased significantly (P < 0.05) by exercise. The eHsp72 level in WEx was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of either the CON or CEx. However, no significant difference was found between CON and CEx. Regression analyses revealed that the eHsp72 level increased as a function of the body temperature. In another experiment, the eHsp72 level of animals with body temperature that was passively elevated through similar kinetics to those of the exercise was studied. Results of this experiment showed that mere body temperature elevation was insufficient to induce eHsp72 responses. Collectively, our results suggest that body temperature elevation during exercise is important for induction of exercise-increased eHsp72. In addition, the possible role of body temperature elevation is displayed when the exercise stressor is combined with it.

  13. Direct contact between sympathetic neurons and rat cardiac myocytes in vitro increases expression of functional calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, S; Barnett, J V; Sen, L; Galper, J B; Smith, T W; Marsh, J D

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that direct contact between sympathetic neurons and myocytes regulates expression and function of cardiac Ca channels, we prepared cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with and without sympathetic ganglia. Contractile properties of myocytes were assessed by an optical-video system. Contractility-pCa curves showed a 60% greater increase in contractility for innervated myocytes compared with control cells at 6.3 mM [Ca]0 (n = 8, P less than 0.05). Cells grown in medium conditioned by growth of ganglia and myocytes were indistinguishable physiologically from control cells. [Bay K 8644]-contractility curves revealed a 60 +/- 10% enhancement of the contractility response at 10(-6) M for innervated cells compared with control cells. The increased response to Bay K 8644 was not blocked by alpha- or beta-adrenergic antagonists. Moreover, increased efficacy of Bay K 8644 was maintained for at least 24 h after denervation produced by removal of ganglia from the culture. Dihydropyridine binding sites were assessed with the L channel-specific radioligand 3[H]PN200-110. PN200-110 binding sites were increased by innervation (51 +/- 5 to 108 +/- 20 fmol/mg protein, P less than 0.01), with no change in KD. Peak current-voltage curves were determined by whole-cell voltage clamp techniques for myocytes contacted by a neuron, control myocytes, and myocytes grown in conditioned medium. Current density of L-type Ca channels was significantly higher in innervated myocytes (10.5 +/- 0.4 pA/pF, n = 5) than in control myocytes (5.9 +/- 0.3 pA/pF, n = 8, P less than 0.01) or myocytes grown in conditioned medium (6.2 +/- 0.2 pA/pF, n = 10, P less than 0.01). Thus, physical contact between a sympathetic neuron and previously uninnervated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes increases expression of functional L-type calcium channels as judged by contractile responses to Ca0 and Bay K 8644, as well as by electrophysiological and radioligand binding properties

  14. Calcium supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... TYPES OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS Forms of calcium include: Calcium carbonate: Over-the-counter (OTC) antacid products, such as Tums and Rolaids, contain calcium carbonate. These sources of calcium do not cost much. ...

  15. Clodronate stimulates bone formation as well as inhibits bone resorption and increases bone mineral density in rats fed a low-calcium diet.

    PubMed

    Horie, Daisuke; Takahashi, Mariko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi

    2003-03-01

    The pharmacological actions of bisphosphonates are due to the inhibitory effects on bone resorption, but little is known about the bisphosphonate action on bone formation. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the actions of bisphosphonates, clodronate, on bone formation in the experimental in vivo and in vitro rat models. The bone mineral density (BMD) was decreased in the rats fed a low-calcium diet (0.05% Ca) for 6 days compared with the rats fed a normal-calcium diet (0.5% Ca). The decrease in BMD was suppressed in the 2 mgP/day and the 4 mgP/day clodronate administrations. Bone formation rate (BFR) in rats fed a low-calcium diet was significantly increased compared with the rats fed a normal-calcium diet, and the 2 mgP clodronate administration further increased the BFR. In the cultured rat bone marrow cells, the area of mineralized nodules was significantly increased at 10(-7) and 10(-6) M clodronate, but high concentration of clodronate decreased the area. From these results, it is concluded that clodronate stimulates bone formation when the drug was given to a rat with a relatively lower dose that is sufficient to prevent bone resorption and that this effect may be due to the stimulatory effect on the differentiation process of osteoblasts.

  16. Binding of ( sup 125 I)iodipine to parathyroid cell membranes: Evidence of a dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.I.; Fitzpatrick, L.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The parathyroid cell is unusual, in that an increase in extracellular calcium concentrations inhibits PTH release. Calcium channels are glycoproteins that span cell membranes and allow entry of extracellular calcium into cells. We have demonstrated that the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791, which opens calcium channels, inhibits PTH release and that the antagonist (-)202-791, which closes calcium channels, stimulates PTH release. To identify the calcium channels responsible for these effects, we used a radioligand that specifically binds to calcium channels. Bovine parathyroid cell membranes were prepared and incubated under reduced lighting with (125I) iodipine (SA, 2000 Ci/mmol), which recognizes 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels. Bound ligand was separated from free ligand by rapid filtration through Whatman GF/B filters. Nonspecific binding was measured by the inclusion of nifedipine at 10 microM. Specific binding represented approximately 40% of the total binding. The optimal temperature for (125I) iodipine binding was 4 C, and binding reached equilibrium by 30 min. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) was approximately 550 pM, and the maximum number of binding sites was 780 fmol/mg protein. Both the calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and antagonist (-)202-791 competitively inhibited (125I) iodipine binding, with 50% inhibition concentrations of 20 and 300 nM, respectively. These data indicate the presence of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels on parathyroid cell membranes.

  17. Increase in membrane thickness during development compensates for eggshell thinning due to calcium uptake by the embryo in falcons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilla, Aurora M.; van Dongen, Stefan; Herrel, Anthony; Francesch, Amadeu; Martínez de Aragón, Juan; Malone, Jim; José Negro, Juan

    2010-02-01

    We compared membrane thickness of fully developed eggs with those of non-developed eggs in different endangered falcon taxa. To our knowledge, membrane thickness variation during development has never been examined before in falcons or any other wild bird. Yet, the egg membrane constitutes an important protective barrier for the developing embryo. Because eggshell thinning is a general process that occurs during bird development, caused by calcium uptake by the embryo, eggs are expected to be less protected and vulnerable to breakage near the end of development. Thus, egg membranes could play an important protective role in the later stages of development by getting relatively thicker. We used linear mixed models to explore the variation in membrane thickness ( n = 378 eggs) in relation to developmental stage, taxon, female age, mass and identity (73 females), egg-laying sequence (105 clutches) and the study zone. Our results are consistent with the prediction that egg membranes are thicker in fully developed eggs than in non-developed eggs, suggesting that the increase in membrane thickness during development may compensate for eggshell thinning. In addition, our data shown that thicker membranes are associated with larger, heavier and relatively wider eggs, as well as with eggs that had thinner eggshells. Egg-laying sequence, female age and the study zone did not explain the observed variation of membrane thickness in the falcon taxa studied. As we provide quantitative data on membrane thickness variation during development in falcons not subjected to contamination or food limitation (i.e. bred under captive conditions), our data may be used as a reference for studies on eggs from natural populations. Considering the large variation in membrane thickness and the multiple factors affecting on it and its importance in the protection of the embryo, we encourage other researchers to include measurements on membranes in studies exploring eggshell thickness variation.

  18. Melatonin increases intracellular calcium in the liver, muscle, white adipose tissues and pancreas of diabetic obese rats.

    PubMed

    Agil, A; Elmahallawy, E K; Rodríguez-Ferrer, J M; Adem, A; Bastaki, S M; Al-Abbadi, I; Fino Solano, Y A; Navarro-Alarcón, M

    2015-08-01

    Melatonin, a widespread substance with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, has been found to act as an antidiabetic agent in animal models, regulating the release and action of insulin. However, the molecular bases of this antidiabetic action are unknown, limiting its application in humans. Several studies have recently shown that melatonin can modify calcium (Ca(2+)) in diabetic animals, and Ca(2+) has been reported to be involved in glucose homeostasis. The objective of the present study was to assess whether the antidiabetic effect of chronic melatonin at pharmacological doses is established via Ca(2+) regulation in different tissues in an animal model of obesity-related type 2 diabetes, using Zücker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and their lean littermates, Zücker lean (ZL) rats. After the treatments, flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine Ca(2+) levels in the liver, muscle, main types of internal white adipose tissue, subcutaneous lumbar fat, pancreas, brain, and plasma. This study reports for the first time that chronic melatonin administration (10 mg per kg body weight per day for 6 weeks) increases Ca(2+) levels in muscle, liver, different adipose tissues, and pancreas in ZDF rats, although there were no significant changes in their brain or plasma Ca(2+) levels. We propose that this additional peripheral dual action mechanism underlies the improvement in insulin sensitivity and secretion previously documented in samples from the same animals. According to these results, indoleamine may be a potential candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with obesity.

  19. Increase in membrane thickness during development compensates for eggshell thinning due to calcium uptake by the embryo in falcons.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Aurora M; Van Dongen, Stefan; Herrel, Anthony; Francesch, Amadeu; Martínez de Aragón, Juan; Malone, Jim; Negro, Juan José

    2010-02-01

    We compared membrane thickness of fully developed eggs with those of non-developed eggs in different endangered falcon taxa. To our knowledge, membrane thickness variation during development has never been examined before in falcons or any other wild bird. Yet, the egg membrane constitutes an important protective barrier for the developing embryo. Because eggshell thinning is a general process that occurs during bird development, caused by calcium uptake by the embryo, eggs are expected to be less protected and vulnerable to breakage near the end of development. Thus, egg membranes could play an important protective role in the later stages of development by getting relatively thicker. We used linear mixed models to explore the variation in membrane thickness (n = 378 eggs) in relation to developmental stage, taxon, female age, mass and identity (73 females), egg-laying sequence (105 clutches) and the study zone. Our results are consistent with the prediction that egg membranes are thicker in fully developed eggs than in non-developed eggs, suggesting that the increase in membrane thickness during development may compensate for eggshell thinning. In addition, our data shown that thicker membranes are associated with larger, heavier and relatively wider eggs, as well as with eggs that had thinner eggshells. Egg-laying sequence, female age and the study zone did not explain the observed variation of membrane thickness in the falcon taxa studied. As we provide quantitative data on membrane thickness variation during development in falcons not subjected to contamination or food limitation (i.e. bred under captive conditions), our data may be used as a reference for studies on eggs from natural populations. Considering the large variation in membrane thickness and the multiple factors affecting on it and its importance in the protection of the embryo, we encourage other researchers to include measurements on membranes in studies exploring eggshell thickness variation.

  20. Purinergically induced membrane fluidization in ciliary cells: characterization and control by calcium and membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Alfahel, E; Korngreen, A; Parola, A H; Priel, Z

    1996-02-01

    To examine the role of membrane dynamics in transmembrane signal transduction, we studied changes in membrane fluidity in mucociliary tissues from frog palate and esophagus epithelia stimulated by extracellular ATP. Micromolar concentrations of ATP induced strong changes in fluorescence polarization, possibly indicating membrane fluidization. This effect was dosage dependent, reaching a maximum at 10-microM ATP. It was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (or Mg2+), though it was insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels. It was inhibited by thapsigargin and by ionomycin (at low extracellular Ca2+ concentration), both of which deplete Ca2+ stores. It was inhibited by the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors quinidine, charybdotoxin, and apamine and was reduced considerably by replacement of extracellular Na+ with K+. Hyperpolarization, or depolarization, of the mucociliary membrane induced membrane fluidization. The degree of membrane fluidization depended on the degree of hyperpolarization or depolarization of the ciliary membrane potential and was considerably lower than the effect induced by extracellular ATP. These results indicate that appreciable membrane fluidization induced by extracellular ATP depends both on an increase in intracellular Ca2+, mainly from its internal stores, and on hyperpolarization of the membrane. Calcium-dependent potassium channels couple the two effects. In light of recent results on the enhancement of ciliary beat frequency, it would appear that extracellular ATP-induced changes both in ciliary beat frequency and in membrane fluidity are triggered by similar signal transduction pathways.

  1. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis studies on the distribution change of intra- and extracellular calcium in the elongation zone of horizontally reoriented soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, Manabu; Suzuki, Suechika

    2015-10-01

    To clarify the contribution of Ca to the gravitropic response, quantitative X-ray microanalyses were performed on cryosections of roots of soybean seedlings reoriented horizontally from their original vertical orientation. After reorientation, the roots bent gradually toward the ground at the elongation zone. The concentrations of Ca in the cell walls, cytoplasmic matrices and central vacuoles of cortical cells were measured in the upper and lower halves of the elongation zone at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min after reorientation. The Ca concentration did not significantly change in the cytoplasmic matrices or vacuoles. Additionally, the Ca concentration did not change significantly in cell walls at 30 min after reorientation; however, beyond 30 min, this concentration significantly increased gradually in the lower half of the elongation zone and decreased in the upper half of the elongation zone, indicating a typical asymmetrical distribution of Ca. These results suggest that Ca moves apoplastically in soybean roots to produce an asymmetrical Ca distribution in the elongation zone, which contributes to root curvature. The possible role of Ca in accelerating or repressing the effect of auxin is also discussed in this study.

  2. Hypoxia-increased expression of genes involved in inflammation, dedifferentiation, pro-fibrosis, and extracellular matrix remodeling of human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wiafe, Bridget; Adesida, Adetola; Churchill, Thomas; Adewuyi, Esther Ekpe; Li, Zack; Metcalfe, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO) is characterized by exaggerated stretch, hydrodynamic pressure, and inflammation which cause significant damage and fibrosis to the bladder wall. Several studies have implicated hypoxia in its pathophysiology. However, the isolated progressive effects of hypoxia on bladder cells are not yet defined. Sub-confluent normal human bladder smooth muscle cells (hbSMC) were cultured in 3% O2 tension for 2, 24, 48, and 72 h. RNA, cellular proteins, and secreted proteins were used for gene expression analysis, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Transcription of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α and HIF2α were transiently induced after 2 h of hypoxia (p < 0.05), whereas HIF3 was upregulated after 72 h (p < 0.005). HIF1 and HIF3α proteins were significantly induced after 2 and 72 h, respectively. VEGF mRNA increased significantly after 24 and 72 h (p < 0.005). The inflammatory cytokines, TGFB (protein and mRNA), IL 1β, 1L6, and TNFα (mRNA) demonstrated a time-dependent increased expression. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was downregulated after 72 h (p < 0.05). Evidence of smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation included increased αSMA, vimentin, and desmin. Evidence of pro-fibrotic changes included increased CTGF, SMAD 2, and SMAD 3 as well as collagens 1, 2, 3, and 4, fibronectin, aggrecan, and TIMP 1 transcripts (p < 0.05). Total collagen proteins also increased time-dependently (p < 0.05). Together, these results show that exposure of hbSMC to low oxygen tension results in intense hypoxic cascade, including inflammation, de-differentiation, pro-fibrotic changes, and increased extracellular matrix expression. This elucidates mechanisms of hypoxia-driven bladder deterioration in bladder cells, which is important in tailoring in vivo experiments and may ultimately translate into improved clinical outcomes.

  3. The effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on nicotinic receptors: Intracellular calcium increase, calpain/caspase 3 activation, and functional upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Rates, Sara; Camarasa, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    Previous work by our group demonstrated that homomeric alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) play a role in the neurotoxicity induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), as well as the binding affinity of this drug to these receptors. Here we studied the effect of MDMA on the activation of nAChR subtypes, the consequent calcium mobilization, and calpain/caspase 3 activation because prolonged Ca{sup 2+} increase could contribute to cytotoxicity. As techniques, we used fluorimetry in Fluo-4-loaded PC12 cells and electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes. MDMA produced a rapid and sustained increase in calcium without reaching the maximum effect induced by ACh. It also concentration-dependently inhibited the response induced by ACh, nicotine, and the specific alpha7 agonist PNU 282987 with IC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. Similarly, MDMA induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes transfected with human alpha7 but not with alpha4beta2 nAChR and inhibited ACh-induced currents in both receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The calcium response was inhibited by methyllycaconitine (MLA) and alpha-bungarotoxin but not by dihydro-beta-erythroidine. These results therefore indicate that MDMA acts as a partial agonist on alpha7 nAChRs and as an antagonist on the heteromeric subtypes. Subsequently, calcium-induced Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum and entry through voltage-operated calcium channels are also implicated as proved using specific antagonists. In addition, treatment with MDMA for 24 h significantly increased basal Ca{sup 2+} levels and induced an increase in alpha-spectrin breakdown products, which indicates that calpain and caspase 3 were activated. These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with MLA. Moreover, pretreatment with MDMA induced functional upregulation of calcium responses to specific agonists of both heteromeric and alpha7 nAChR. Sustained calcium entry and calpain activation could favor the

  4. The effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on nicotinic receptors: intracellular calcium increase, calpain/caspase 3 activation, and functional upregulation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ratés, Sara; Camarasa, Jordi; Sánchez-García, Ana I; Gandía, Luis; Escubedo, Elena; Pubill, David

    2010-05-01

    Previous work by our group demonstrated that homomeric alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) play a role in the neurotoxicity induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), as well as the binding affinity of this drug to these receptors. Here we studied the effect of MDMA on the activation of nAChR subtypes, the consequent calcium mobilization, and calpain/caspase 3 activation because prolonged Ca(2+) increase could contribute to cytotoxicity. As techniques, we used fluorimetry in Fluo-4-loaded PC12 cells and electrophysiology in Xenopus oocytes. MDMA produced a rapid and sustained increase in calcium without reaching the maximum effect induced by ACh. It also concentration-dependently inhibited the response induced by ACh, nicotine, and the specific alpha7 agonist PNU 282987 with IC(50) values in the low micromolar range. Similarly, MDMA induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes transfected with human alpha7 but not with alpha4beta2 nAChR and inhibited ACh-induced currents in both receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The calcium response was inhibited by methyllycaconitine (MLA) and alpha-bungarotoxin but not by dihydro-beta-erythroidine. These results therefore indicate that MDMA acts as a partial agonist on alpha7 nAChRs and as an antagonist on the heteromeric subtypes. Subsequently, calcium-induced Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum and entry through voltage-operated calcium channels are also implicated as proved using specific antagonists. In addition, treatment with MDMA for 24 h significantly increased basal Ca(2+) levels and induced an increase in alpha-spectrin breakdown products, which indicates that calpain and caspase 3 were activated. These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with MLA. Moreover, pretreatment with MDMA induced functional upregulation of calcium responses to specific agonists of both heteromeric and alpha7 nAChR. Sustained calcium entry and calpain activation could favor the activation of Ca(2

  5. The Acquisition of a Memory Phenotype by Murine CD4+ T Cells Is Accompanied by a Loss in Their Capacity to Increase Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Hertogh-Huijbregts, Anita

    1992-01-01

    During the process of aging, the fraction of CD4+ T Cells with a naive phenotype, that is, Pgp-1- CD45RBHighMEL-14+, decreases in favor of CD4+ T memory cells. Total CD4+ T cells from aged mice displayed a diminished calcium response to anti-CD3 and even ionomycin as compared to the cells from young mice, and this was related to the changed composition of the CD4+ T-cell population. Regardless the age of the donor mice, naive CD4+ T cells effectively increased intracellular calcium, whereas memory CD4+ T cells were impaired in this regard. In addition, a heterogeneity in the differentiation stage of the naive CD4+ T cells was shown by the observation that calcium mobilization in naive CD4+ T cells from young mice was more profound than that in their aged counterparts. These data thus indicate that during the acquisition of a memory phenotype, murine CD4+ T cells lose the capacity to increase intracellular calcium, which in turn may be responsible for the decreased level of IL-2 production by these cells. PMID:1364177

  6. Increased calcium in neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum is not associated with cell loss in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tuckett, Emma; Gosetti, Troy; Hayes, Alan; Rybalka, Emma; Verghese, Elizabeth

    2015-09-09

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease resulting from mutation of the X-linked dystrophin gene. In addition to skeletal muscle pathology, cognitive deficits have been identified in patients with DMD. There is a lack of research investigating the pathological mechanisms underlying the neurological deficits apparent in DMD. The current study assessed whether increases in calcium contributed towards neuronal cell loss or histopathological changes in the genetically homologous mdx mouse model of DMD in sections from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum at 24 days, 12 weeks and 9 months of age. Alizarin S staining showed a significant increase in calcium-positive neurons in the mdx cerebral cortex at 24 days and 9 months and the cerebellum at 24 days, 12 weeks and 9 months compared with age-matched controls. However, neuronal cell counts of haemotoxylin and eosin-stained sections showed that altered calcium levels did not lead to neuronal cell loss. A better understanding of how the disruption of calcium regulation affects the function of neurons may explain the neurological deficits apparent in mdx mice and patients with DMD.

  7. Enhanced accumulation of adipocytes in bone marrow stromal cells in the presence of increased extracellular and intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Nakamura, Kyoko; Itoh, Seigo; Iesaki, Takafumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances adipocyte accumulation in the presence of adipogenic inducers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances both proliferation and adipocyte differentiation in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppresses the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlling [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} may govern the balance of adipocyte and osteoblast development. -- Abstract: The bone marrow stroma contains osteoblasts and adipocytes that have a common precursor: the pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Local bone marrow Ca{sup 2+} levels can reach high concentrations due to bone resorption, which is one of the notable features of the bone marrow stroma. Here, we describe the effects of high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} on the accumulation of adipocytes in the bone marrow stroma. Using primary mouse BMSCs, we evaluated the level of adipocyte accumulation by measuring Oil Red O staining and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhanced the accumulation of adipocytes following treatment with both insulin and dexamethasone together but not in the absence of this treatment. This enhanced accumulation was the result of both the accelerated proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Using the fura-2 method, we also showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppressed the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation due to increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. These data suggest a new role for extracellular Ca{sup 2+} in the bone marrow stroma: increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels, which in turn enhances the accumulation of

  8. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  9. Zinc modulation of calcium activity at the photoreceptor terminal: a calcium imaging study.

    PubMed

    Anastassov, Ivan; Shen, Wen; Ripps, Harris; Chappell, Richard L

    2013-07-01

    There is abundant experimental evidence that zinc ions (Zn(2+)) are present in the synaptic vesicles of vertebrate photoreceptors, and that they are co-released with glutamate. Here we show that increasing the concentration of extracellular zinc (2 μM-2 mM) suppresses the entry of calcium into the synaptic terminals of isolated salamander double cones. The resultant dose-dependent curve was fit by an inverse Hill equation having an IC50 of 38 μM, and Hill coefficient of 1.1. Because there is currently no reliable way to measure the concentration of extracellular zinc, it is not known whether the zinc released under normal circumstances is of physiological significance. In an attempt to circumvent this problem we used zinc chelators to reduce the available pool of endogenous zinc. This enabled us to determine how the absence of zinc affected calcium entry. We found that when intra- or extra-cellular zinc was chelated by 250 μM of membrane-permeable TPEN or 500 μM of membrane-impermeable histidine, there was a significant rise in the depolarization-induced intracellular calcium level within photoreceptor terminals. This increase in internal [Ca(2+)] will undoubtedly lead to a concomitant increase in glutamate release. In addition, we found that blocking the L-type calcium channels that are expressed on the synaptic terminals of photoreceptors with 50 μM nicardipine or 100 μM verapamil abolished the effects of zinc chelation. These findings are a good indication that, when released in vivo, the zinc concentration is sufficient to suppress voltage-gated calcium channels, and reduce the rate of glutamate release from photoreceptor terminals.

  10. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  11. Improving the cytoplasmic maturation of bovine oocytes matured in vitro with intracellular and/or extracellular antioxidants is not associated with increased rates of embryo development.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Frigoni, Nathália A S; Leão, Beatriz C S; Dall'Acqua, Priscila Chediek; Mingoti, Gisele Z

    2016-11-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a normal process that occurs in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. However, an increase in ROS levels during in vitro production of bovine embryos induces oxidative stress, leading to failed embryonic development. Therefore, we investigated whether supplementation of IVM medium with intracellular (cysteine and cysteamine; C + C) and/or extracellular (catalase; CAT) antioxidants improves the culture system, affects the mitochondrial membrane potential, affects the intracellular levels of ROS and glutathione (GSH) in the bovine oocytes at the end of maturation, and thereby affects the subsequent embryonic development. At the end of IVM, the metaphase II rates were unaffected by the treatments (76.7 ± 1.7% to 80.6 ± 5.2%; P > 0.05). The intracellular ROS levels, expressed in arbitrary fluorescence units, found in the oocytes treated with intracellular antioxidants (C + C and C + C + CAT groups; 1.06, averaged) were as low as those observed in immature oocytes (0 hour: 1.00 ± 0.12). Among mature oocytes, higher (P < 0.05) ROS levels were found in the control group (1.91 ± 0.10) when compared to the ROS levels found in oocytes treated with antioxidants. Intracellular GSH levels in all groups were lower (0.17 ± 0.09 to 0.51 ± 0.05; P < 0.05) than those in immature oocytes (1.00 ± 0.08), although GSH levels in the C + C group (0.51 ± 0.05) were greater (P < 0.05) than in the control, CAT, and C + C + CAT groups (0.23; averaged). The mitochondrial membrane potential in all groups was improved (1.6; averaged; P < 0.05) compared to the membrane potential observed in the immature oocytes (1.00 ± 0.05), with the exception of the C + C group (0.94 ± 0.03). There was no effect (P > 0.05) of antioxidant supplementation on embryonic development to the blastocyst stage (36.1%; averaged); however, there was an increased tendency (P = 0.0689) to obtain a higher

  12. Increases in Intracellular Calcium Triggered by Channelrhodopsin-2 Potentiate the Response of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor mGluR7*

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, John H.; Herin, Greta Ann; Nagel, Georg; Bamberg, Ernst; Scheschonka, Astrid; Betz, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7a (mGluR7a), a heptahelical Gαi/o-coupled protein, has been shown to be important for presynaptic feedback inhibition at central synapses and certain forms of long term potentiation and long term depression. The intracellular C terminus of mGluR7a interacts with calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and calmodulin antagonists have been found to abolish presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release in neurons and mGluR7a-induced activation of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK) channels in HEK293 cells. Here, we characterized the Ca2+ dependence of mGluR7a signaling in Xenopus oocytes by using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), a Ca2+-permeable, light-activated ion channel for triggering Ca2+ influx, and a GIRK3.1/3.2 concatemer to monitor mGluR7a responses. Application of the agonist (S)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (l-AP4) (1–100 μm) caused a dose-dependent inward current in high K+ solutions due to activation of GIRK channels by G-protein βγ subunits released from mGluR7a. Elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ by light stimulation of ChR2 markedly increased the amplitude of l-AP4 responses, and this effect was attenuated by the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester). l-AP4 responses were potentiated by submembranous [Ca2+] levels within physiological ranges and with a threshold close to resting [Ca2+]i values, as determined by recording the endogenous Xenopus Ca2+-activated chloride conductance. Together, these results show that l-AP4-dependent mGluR7a signaling is potentiated by physiological levels of [Ca2+]i, consistent with a model in which presynaptic mGluR7a acts as a coincidence detector of Ca2+ influx and glutamate release. PMID:18599484

  13. The Mechanical Environment Modulates Intracellular Calcium Oscillation Activities of Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, Charles; Follonier Castella, Lysianne; Smith, Eric A.; Talele, Nilesh; Chow, Melissa L.; Garonna, Adriano; Hinz, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblast contraction is fundamental in the excessive tissue remodeling that is characteristic of fibrotic tissue contractures. Tissue remodeling during development of fibrosis leads to gradually increasing stiffness of the extracellular matrix. We propose that this increased stiffness positively feeds back on the contractile activities of myofibroblasts. We have previously shown that cycles of contraction directly correlate with periodic intracellular calcium oscillations in cultured myofibroblasts. We analyze cytosolic calcium dynamics using fluorescent calcium indicators to evaluate the possible impact of mechanical stress on myofibroblast contractile activity. To modulate extracellular mechanics, we seeded primary rat subcutaneous myofibroblasts on silicone substrates and into collagen gels of different elastic modulus. We modulated cell stress by cell growth on differently adhesive culture substrates, by restricting cell spreading area on micro-printed adhesive islands, and depolymerizing actin with Cytochalasin D. In general, calcium oscillation frequencies in myofibroblasts increased with increasing mechanical challenge. These results provide new insight on how changing mechanical conditions for myofibroblasts are encoded in calcium oscillations and possibly explain how reparative cells adapt their contractile behavior to the stresses occurring in normal and pathological tissue repair. PMID:23691248

  14. Effect of calcium on the hemolytic activity of Stichodactyla helianthus toxin sticholysin II on human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Celedón, Gloria; González, Gustavo; Lissi, Eduardo; Cerda, Tania; Martinez, Diana; Soto, Carmen; Pupo, Mario; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, Maria E; Alvarez, Carlos

    2009-11-01

    Sticholysin II (St II) is a toxin from the sea anemona Stichodactyla helianthus that produces erythrocytes lysis at low concentration and its activity depends on the presence of calcium. Calcium may act modifying toxin interaction with erythrocyte membranes or activating cellular processes which may result in a modified St II lytic action. In this study we are reporting that, in the presence of external K(+), extracellular calcium decreased St II activity on erythrocytes. On the other hand an increase of intracellular calcium promotes Sty II lytic activity. The effect of intracellular calcium was specifically studied in relation to membrane lipid translocation elicited by scramblases and how this action influence St II lytic activity on erythrocytes. We used 0.5 mmol/L calcium and 10 mmol/L A23187, as calcium ionophore, for scramblases activation and found increased St II activity associated to increase of intracellular calcium. N-ethyl maleimide (activator) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (inhibitor) were used as scramblases modulators in the assays which produced an increase and a decrease of the calcium effect, respectively. Results reported suggest an improved St II membrane pore-forming capacity promoted by intracellular calcium associated to membrane phospholipids translocation.

  15. Calcium sensitivity and the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart are increased in titin N2B region-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Peng, Jun; Radke, Michael; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2010-09-01

    Previous work suggests that titin-based passive tension is a factor in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart, by increasing length-dependent activation (LDA) through an increase in calcium sensitivity at long sarcomere length. We tested this hypothesis in a mouse model (N2B KO model) in which titin-based passive tension is elevated as a result of the excision of the N2B element, one of cardiac titin's spring elements. LDA was assessed by measuring the active tension-pCa (-log[Ca(2+)]) relationship at sarcomere length (SLs) of 1.95, 2.10, and 2.30 microm in WT and N2B KO skinned myocardium. LDA was positively correlated with titin-based passive tension due to an increase in calcium sensitivity at the longer SLs in the KO. For example, at pCa 6.0, the KO:WT tension ratio was 1.28+/-0.07 and 1.42+/-0.04 at SLs of 2.1 and 2.3 microm, respectively. There was no difference in protein expression or total phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins. We also measured the calcium sensitivity after PKA treating the skinned muscle and found that titin-based passive tension was also now correlated with LDA, with a slope that was significantly increased compared to no PKA treatment. Finally, we performed isolated heart experiments and measured the Frank-Starling relation (slope of developed wall stress-LV volume relation) as well as diastolic stiffness (slope of diastolic wall stress-volume relation). The FSM was more pronounced in the N2B KO hearts and the slope of the FSM correlated with diastolic stiffness. These findings support that titin-based passive tension triggers an increase in calcium sensitivity at long sarcomere length, thereby playing an important role in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart.

  16. Calcium sensitivity and the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart are increased in titin N2B region deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Peng, Jun; Radke, Michael; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2010-01-01

    Previous work suggests that titin-based passive tension is a factor in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart, by increasing length-dependent activation (LDA) through an increase in calcium sensitivity at long sarcomere length. We tested this hypothesis in a mouse model (N2B KO model) in which titin-based passive tension is elevated as a result of the excision of the N2B element, one of cardiac titin’s spring elements. LDA was assessed by measuring the active tension-pCa (−log[Ca2+]) relationship at sarcomere length (SLs) of 1.95, 2.10 and 2.30 µm in WT and N2B KO skinned myocardium. LDA was positively correlated with titin-based passive tension, due to an increase in calcium sensitivity at the longer SLs in the KO. For example, at pCa 6.0 the KO:WT tension ratio was 1.28 ± 0.07 and 1.42 ± 0.04 at SLs of 2.1 and 2.3 µm, respectively. There was no difference in protein expression or phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins. We also measured the calcium sensitivity after PKA treating the skinned muscle and found that titin-based passive tension was also now correlated with LDA, with a slope that was significantly increased compared to no PKA treatment. Finally, we performed isolated heart experiments and measured the Frank-Starling relation (slope of developed wall stress-LV volume relation) as well as diastolic stiffness (slope of diastolic wall stress – volume relation). The FSM was more pronounced in the N2B KO hearts and the slope of the FSM correlated with diastolic stiffness. These findings support that titin-based passive tension triggers an increase in calcium sensitivity at long sarcomere length, thereby playing an important role in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. PMID:20507834

  17. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia.

  18. Mice deficient for the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-r show physiological and structural hallmarks of increased hippocampal excitability, but no increased susceptibility to seizures in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brenneke, F; Bukalo, O; Dityatev, A; Lie, A A

    2004-01-01

    Recognition molecules provide important cues for neuronal survival, axonal fasciculation, axonal pathfinding, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and regeneration. Our previous studies revealed a link between perisomatic inhibition and the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-R (TN-R). Therefore, we here studied neuronal excitability and epileptic susceptibility in mice constitutively deficient in TN-R. In vitro analysis of populational spikes in hippocampal slices of TN-R-deficient mice revealed a significant increase in multiple spikes in the CA1 region, as compared with wild-type mice. This difference between genotypes was only partially reduced after blockade of GABA(A) receptors with picrotoxin, indicating a deficit in GABAergic inhibition and an increase in intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells in TN-R-deficient mice. Using a battery of immunohistochemical markers and histological stainings, we were able to identify two abnormalities in the hippocampus of TN-R-deficient mice possibly related to increased excitability: the high number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes and low number of calretinin-positive interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 regions. In order to test whether the revealed abnormalities give rise to increased susceptibility to seizures in TN-R-deficient mice, we used the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. No genotype-specific differences were found with regard to the time-course of pilocarpine-induced and spontaneous seizures, neuronal cell loss, aberrant sprouting and distribution of synaptic and inhibitory interneuron markers. However, pilocarpine-induced astrogliosis and reduction in calretinin-positive interneurons were less pronounced in TN-R mutants, thereby resulting in an occlusion of effects induced by TN-R deficiency and pilocarpine. Thus, TN-R-deficient mutants show several electrophysiological and morphological hallmarks of increased neuronal excitability, which, however, do not give rise to more

  19. Disruptions in the Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate by Neurons and Glia in the Rat Striatum Two Days after Diffuse Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hinzman, Jason M.; Thomas, Theresa Currier; Quintero, Jorge E.; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Disrupted regulation of extracellular glutamate in the central nervous system contributes to and can exacerbate the acute pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previously, we reported increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum of anesthetized rats 2 days after diffuse brain injury. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for increased extracellular glutamate, we used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) coupled with specific pharmacological agents targeted at in vivo neuronal and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate. After TBI, extracellular glutamate was significantly increased in the striatum by (∼90%) averaging 4.1±0.6 μM compared with sham 2.2±0.4 μM. Calcium-dependent neuronal glutamate release, investigated by local application of an N-type calcium channel blocker, was no longer a significant source of extracellular glutamate after TBI, compared with sham. In brain-injured animals, inhibition of glutamate uptake with local application of an excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor produced significantly greater increase in glutamate spillover (∼ 65%) from the synapses compared with sham. Furthermore, glutamate clearance measured by locally applying glutamate into the extracellular space revealed significant reductions in glutamate clearance parameters in brain-injured animals compared with sham. Taken together, these data indicate that disruptions in calcium-mediated glutamate release and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate contribute to increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum 2 days after diffuse brain injury. Overall, these data suggest that therapeutic strategies used to regulate glutamate release and uptake may improve excitatory circuit function and, possibly, outcomes following TBI. PMID:22233432

  20. Cameleon calcium indicator reports cytoplasmic calcium dynamics in Arabidopsis guard cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. J.; Kwak, J. M.; Chu, S. P.; Llopis, J.; Tsien, R. Y.; Harper, J. F.; Schroeder, J. I.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) acts as a stimulus-induced second messenger in plant cells and multiple signal transduction pathways regulate [Ca2+]cyt in stomatal guard cells. Measuring [Ca2+]cyt in guard cells has previously required loading of calcium-sensitive dyes using invasive and technically difficult micro-injection techniques. To circumvent these problems, we have constitutively expressed the pH-independent, green fluorescent protein-based calcium indicator yellow cameleon 2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (Miyawaki et al. 1999; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 2135-2140). This yellow cameleon calcium indicator was expressed in guard cells and accumulated predominantly in the cytoplasm. Fluorescence ratio imaging of yellow cameleon 2.1 allowed time-dependent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt in Arabidopsis guard cells. Application of extracellular calcium or the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients in guard cells. [Ca2+]cyt changes could be semi-quantitatively determined following correction of the calibration procedure for chloroplast autofluorescence. Extracellular calcium induced repetitive [Ca2+]cyt transients with peak values of up to approximately 1.5 microM, whereas ABA-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients had peak values up to approximately 0.6 microM. These values are similar to stimulus-induced [Ca2+]cyt changes previously reported in plant cells using ratiometric dyes or aequorin. In some guard cells perfused with low extracellular KCl concentrations, spontaneous calcium transients were observed. As yellow cameleon 2.1 was expressed in all guard cells, [Ca2+]cyt was measured independently in the two guard cells of single stomates for the first time. ABA-induced, calcium-induced or spontaneous [Ca2+]cyt increases were not necessarily synchronized in the two guard cells. Overall, these data demonstrate that that GFP-based cameleon calcium indicators are suitable to measure [Ca2+]cyt changes in guard cells and enable the pattern of [Ca

  1. Calcium-sensing receptors.

    PubMed

    Goodman, William G

    2004-01-01

    It is now known that variations in extracellular calcium concentration exert diverse physiologic effects in a variety of tissues that are mediated by a calcium-sensing receptor (CaSRs). In parathyroid tissue, the CaSR represents the molecular mechanism by which parathyroid cells detect changes in blood ionized calcium concentration, modulate parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion accordingly, and thus maintain serum calcium levels within a narrow physiologic range. In the kidney, the CaSR regulates renal calcium excretion and influences the transepithelial movement of water and other electrolytes. More generally, activation of the CaSR represents an important signal transduction pathway in intestine, placenta, brain, and perhaps bone. Some of these actions involve cell cycle regulation, changes that may be relevant to understanding the pathogenesis of parathyroid gland hyperplasia in secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by chronic kidney disease. The CaSR represents an appealing target for therapeutic agents designed to modify parathyroid gland function in vivo, offering the prospect of novel therapies for selected disorders of bone and mineral metabolism. Other receptors capable of responding to extracellular calcium ions also have been identified, but the functional importance of these interactions remains to be determined.

  2. Regulation of melatonin production and intracellular calcium concentrations in the trout pineal organ.

    PubMed

    Meissl, H; Kroeber, S; Yáñez, J; Korf, H W

    1996-12-01

    The present in vitro study correlates measurements of the melatonin production from trout pineal organs with those of the intracellular calcium concentration in pinealocytes. Melatonin production increases with decreasing irradiance and shows maximal values in darkness. Some pinealocytes exhibit spontaneous calcium oscillations, although most of them have a stable basal calcium concentration. Diminishing extracellular calcium and enhancing magnesium reduces melatonin release in the light-and dark-adapted state. The application of Co2+ decreases melatonin secretion in the mesopic and scotopic range, reversibly blocks spontaneous calcium oscillations, reduces the basal intracellular calcium concentration in non-oscillating pinealocytes, and inhibits the KCl-induced rise in intracellular calcium. Application of glutamate, norepinephrine, isoproterenol, or dopamine has no significant effect on melatonin secretion. Norepinephrine does not influence the calcium concentration in any of the trout pinealocytes. Treatment with the GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol causes a slight reduction of melatonin release in the mesopic and scotopic range of illumination, without affecting intracellular calcium concentrations. Thus, Co2+ and low calcium/high magnesium buffer reduce melatonin release through an action on the calcium concentration in trout pinealocytes and not through a blockade of synaptic transmission. All the data show that the trout pineal organ synthesizes and releases melatonin in relation to the irradiance of the incident light and that neuronal inputs have a minor, if any, influence on melatonin synthesis.

  3. Calcium-activated conductance in skate electroreceptors: current clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Clusin, W T; Bennett, M V

    1977-02-01

    When current clamped, skate electroreceptor epithelium produces large action potentials in response to stimuli that depolarize the lumenal faces of the receptor cells. With increasing stimulus strength these action potentials become prolonged. When the peak voltage exceeds about 140 mV the repolarizing phase is blocked until the end of the stimulus. Perfusion experiments show that the rising phase of the action potential results from an increase in calcium permeability in the lumenal membranes. Perfusion of the lumen with cobalt or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA blocks the action potential. Perfusion of the lumen with a solution containing 10 mM Ca and 20 mM EGTA initially slows the repolarizing process at all voltages and lowers the potential at which it is blocked. With prolonged perfusion, repolarization is blocked at all voltages. When excitability is abolished by perfusion with cobalt, or with a zero calcium solution containing EGTA, no delayed rectification occurs. We suggest that repolarization during the action potential depends on an influx of calcium into the cytoplasm, and that the rate of repolarization depends on the magnitude of the inward calcium current. Increasingly large stimuli reduce the rate of repolarization by reducing the driving force for calcium, and then block repolarization by causing the lumenal membrane potential to exceed ECa. Changes in extracellular calcium affect repolarization in a manner consistent with the resulting change in ECa.

  4. [Do cows drink calcium?].

    PubMed

    Geishauser, T; Lechner, S; Plate, I; Heidemann, B

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how well cows drink the Propeller calcium drink, and it's effect on blood calcium concentration. Drinking was tested in 120 cows right after calving, before cows drank anything else. 60 cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or 20 liters of water. Cows drank the Propeller as good as water. 72% of all cows drank all 20 liters, 18% drank on average 8.2 liters and 10% drank less than 1 liter. Blood calcium concentration was studied in 16 cows right after calving. Eight cows each were offered 20 liters of Propeller calcium drink or no calcium drink. Blood calcium significantly increased ten minutes after Propeller intake and stayed significantly elevated for 24 hours. Without calcium drink blood calcium levels decreased significantly. Advantages of the new Propeller calcium drink over calcium gels or boli could be that cows now drink calcium themselves and that the Propeller increases blood calcium concentration rapidly and long lasting.

  5. Hormone-induced increase in free cytosolic calcium and glycogen phosphorylase activation in rat hepatocytes incubated in normal and low-calcium media.

    PubMed Central

    Binet, A; Berthon, B; Claret, M

    1985-01-01

    The action of alpha 1-adrenergic agonists (noradrenaline in the presence of propranolol), vasopressin and angiotensin on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, was determined by using the fluorescent dye quin2 in isolated rat liver cells. In the presence of external Ca2+ (1.8 mM), 1 microM-noradrenaline induced an increase in [Ca2+]i up to about 800 nM without apparent delay, whereas 10 nM-vasopressin and 1 nM-angiotensin increased [Ca2+]i to values higher than 1500 nM with a lag period of about 6s. The successive addition of the hormones and of their specific antagonists indicated that the actions of the three Ca2+-mobilizing hormones occurred without apparent desensitization (over 6 min) and via independent receptors. The relative contributions of internal and external Ca2+ pools to the cell response were determined by studying the hormone-mediated [Ca2+]i increase and glycogen phosphorylase activation in low-Ca2+ media (22 microM). In this medium: (1) [Ca2+]i was lowered and the hormones initiated a transient instead of a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i; subsequent addition (2 min) of a second hormone promoted a lesser increase in [Ca2+]i; in contrast, the subsequent addition (2 min) of Ca2+ (1.8 mM) caused [Ca2+]i to increase to a value close to that initiated by the hormone in control conditions, the amplitude of the latter response being dependent on the concentration of Ca2+ added to the medium; (2) returning to normal Ca2+ (1.8 mM) restored the resting [Ca2+]i and allowed the hormone added 2 min later to promote a large increase in [Ca2+]i whose final amplitude was also dependent on the concentration of Ca2+ added beforehand. Similar results were found when the same protocol was applied to the glycogen phosphorylase activation. It is concluded that Ca2+ influx is required for a maximal and sustained response and to reload the hormone-sensitive stores. PMID:4026798

  6. Copper-Induced Membrane Depolarizations Involve the Induction of Mosaic TRP Channels, Which Activate VDCC Leading to Calcium Increases in Ulva compressa

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Melissa; González, Alberto; Sáez, Claudio A.; Moenne, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The marine macroalga Ulva compressa (Chlorophyceae) is a cosmopolitan species, tolerant to heavy metals, in particular to copper. U. compressa was cultivated with 10 μM copper for 12 h and membrane depolarization events were detected. First, seven depolarization events occurred at 4, 8, 12–13, 80, and 86 min, and at 5 and 9 h of copper exposure. Second, bathocuproine sulphonate, a specific copper-chelating compound, was added before incorporating copper to the culture medium. Copper-induced depolarizations were inhibited by bathocuproine at 4, 8, 12–13, 80, and 86 min, but not at 5 and 9 h, indicating that initial events are due to copper ions entry. Third, specific inhibitors of human TRPA1, C4, C5, M8, and V1corresponding to HC030031, ML204, SKF96363, M8B, and capsazepin, respectively, were used to analyze whether copper-induced depolarizations were due to activation of transient receptor potentials (TRPs). Inhibitor effects indicate that the seven depolarizations involved the activation of functional mosaic TRPs that displayed properties similar to human TRPA, C, M, and/or V. Finally, inhibition of copper-induced depolarizations using specific TRP inhibitors suppressed calcium increases at 2, 3, and 12 h due to activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs). Thus, copper induces seven depolarization events that involve activation of mosaic TRPs which, in turn, activates VDCC leading to calcium increases at 2, 3, and 12 h in U. compressa. PMID:27379106

  7. Connexin 40 and ATP-dependent intercellular calcium wave in renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toma, Ildikó; Bansal, Eric; Meer, Elliott J; Kang, Jung Julie; Vargas, Sarah L; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2008-06-01

    Endothelial intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) plays an important role in the function of the juxtaglomerular vasculature. The present studies aimed to identify the existence and molecular elements of an endothelial calcium wave in cultured glomerular endothelial cells (GENC). GENCs on glass coverslips were loaded with Fluo-4/Fura red, and ratiometric [Ca(2+)](i) imaging was performed using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Mechanical stimulation of a single GENC caused a nine-fold increase in [Ca(2+)](i), which propagated from cell to cell throughout the monolayer (7.9 +/- 0.3 microm/s) in a regenerative manner (without decrement of amplitude, kinetics, and speed) over distances >400 microm. Inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels with nifedipine had no effect on the above parameters, but the removal of extracellular calcium reduced Delta[Ca(2+)](i) by 50%. Importantly, the gap junction uncoupler alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid or knockdown of connexin 40 (Cx40) by transfecting GENCs with Cx40 short interfering RNA (siRNA) almost completely eliminated Delta[Ca(2+)](i) and the calcium wave. Breakdown of extracellular ATP using a scavenger cocktail (apyrase and hexokinase) or nonselective inhibition of purinergic P2 receptors with suramin, had similar blocking effects. Scraping cells off along a line eliminated physical contact between cells but did not effect calcium wave propagation. Using an ATP biosensor technique, we detected a significant elevation in extracellular ATP (Delta = 76 +/- 2 microM) during calcium wave propagation, which was abolished by Cx40 siRNA treatment (Delta = 6 +/- 1 microM). These studies suggest that connexin 40 hemichannels and extracellular ATP are key molecular elements of the glomerular endothelial calcium wave, which may serve important juxtaglomerular functions.

  8. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels mediate Raf-independent activation of extracellular regulated kinase in response to glucagon-like peptide-1 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Edith; Pritchard, Catrin; Herbert, Terence P

    2002-12-13

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a G(s)-coupled receptor agonist that exerts multiple effects on pancreatic beta-cells, including the stimulation of insulin gene expression and secretion. In this report, we show that treatment of the mouse pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 with GLP1 leads to the glucose-dependent activation of Erk. These effects are mimicked by forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, and blocked by H89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Additionally, we provide evidence that GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk requires an influx of calcium through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk is blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but GLP1 does not induce the activation of A-Raf, B-Raf, C-Raf, or Ras. Additionally, dominant negative forms of Ras(N17) and Rap1(N17) fail to block GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk. In conclusion, our results indicate that, in the presence of stimulatory concentrations of glucose, GLP1 stimulates the activation of Erk through a mechanism dependent on MEK but independent of both Raf and Ras. This requires 1) the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, 2) an influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and 3) the activation of CaM kinase II.

  9. Niflumic acid inhibits chloride conductance of rat skeletal muscle by directly inhibiting the CLC-1 channel and by increasing intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Liantonio, A; Giannuzzi, V; Picollo, A; Babini, E; Pusch, M; Conte Camerino, D

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Given the crucial role of the skeletal muscle chloride conductance (gCl), supported by the voltage-gated chloride channel CLC-1, in controlling muscle excitability, the availability of ligands modulating CLC-1 are of potential medical as well as toxicological importance. Here, we focused our attention on niflumic acid (NFA), a molecule belonging to the fenamates group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Experimental approach: Rat muscle Cl− conductance (gCl) and heterologously expressed CLC-1 currents were evaluated by means of current-clamp (using two-microelectrodes) and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Fura-2 fluorescence was used to determine intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, in native muscle fibres. Key results: NFA inhibited native gCl with an IC50 of 42 μM and blocked CLC-1 by interacting with an intracellular binding site. Additionally, NFA increased basal [Ca2+]i in myofibres by promoting a mitochondrial calcium efflux that was not dependent on cyclooxygenase or CLC-1. A structure-activity study revealed that the molecular conditions that mediate the two effects are different. Pretreatment with the Ca-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine partially inhibited the NFA effect. Therefore, in addition to direct channel block, NFA also inhibits gCl indirectly by promoting PKC activation. Conclusions and Implications: These cellular effects of NFA on skeletal muscle demonstrate that it is possible to modify CLC-1 and consequently gCl directly by interacting with channel proteins and indirectly by interfering with the calcium-dependent regulation of the channel. The effect of NFA on mitochondrial calcium stores suggests that NSAIDs, widely used drugs, could have potentially dangerous side-effects. PMID:17128287

  10. Plasma membrane calcium channels in cancer: Alterations and consequences for cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The study of calcium channels in molecular mechanisms of cancer transformation is still a novel area of research. Several studies, mostly conducted on cancer cell lines, however support the idea that a diversity of plasma membrane channels participates in the remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis, which regulates various cancer hallmarks such as uncontrolled multiplication and increase in migration and invasion abilities. However few is still understood concerning the intracellular signaling cascades mobilized by calcium influx participating to cancer cell behavior. This review intends to gather some of these pathways dependent on plasma membrane calcium channels and described in prostate, breast and lung cancer cell lines. In these cancer cell types, the calcium channels involved in calcium signaling pathways promoting cancer behaviors are mostly non-voltage activated calcium channels and belong to the TRP superfamily (TRPC, TPRPV and TRPM families) and the Orai family. TRP and Orai channels are part of many signaling cascades involving the activation of transmembrane receptors by extracellular ligand from the tumor environment. TRPV can sense changes in the physical and chemical environment of cancer cells and TRPM7 are stretch activated and sensitive to cholesterol. Changes in activation and or expression of plasma-membrane calcium channels affect calcium-dependent signaling processes relevant to tumorigenesis. The studies cited in this review suggest that an increase in plasma membrane calcium channel expression and/or activity sustain an elevated calcium entry (constitutive or under the control of extracellular signals) promoting higher cell proliferation and migration in most cases. A variety of non-voltage-operated calcium channels display change expression and/or activity in a same cancer type and cooperate to the same process relevant to cancer cell behavior, or can be involved in a different sequence of events during the tumorigenesis. This article is part of a

  11. Long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of the anaesthetized rat is accompanied by an increase in extracellular glutamate: real-time measurements using a novel dialysis electrode.

    PubMed Central

    Errington, M L; Galley, P T; Bliss, T V P

    2003-01-01

    We have used a glutamate-specific dialysis electrode to obtain real-time measurements of changes in the concentration of glutamate in the extracellular space of the hippocampus during low-frequency stimulation and following the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). In the dentate gyrus, stimulation of the perforant path at 2 Hz for 2 min produced a transient increase in glutamate current relative to the basal value at control rates of stimulation (0.033 Hz). This activity-dependent glutamate current was significantly enhanced 35 and 90 min after the induction of LTP. The maximal 2 Hz signal was obtained during post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). There was also a more gradual increase in the basal level of extracellular glutamate following the induction of LTP. Both the basal and activity-dependent increases in glutamate current induced by tetanic stimulation were blocked by local infusion of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist D-APV. In areas CA1 and CA3 we were unable to detect a 2 Hz glutamate signal either before or after the induction of LTP, possibly owing to a more avid uptake of glutamate in the pyramidal cell fields. These results demonstrate that LTP in the dentate gyrus is associated with a greater concentration of extracellular glutamate following activation of potentiated synapses, either because potentiated synapses release more transmitter per impulse, or because of reduced uptake by glutamate transporters. We present arguments favouring increased release rather than decreased uptake. PMID:12740113

  12. By Releasing ADP, Acanthamoeba castellanii Causes an Increase in the Cytosolic Free Calcium Concentration and Apoptosis in Wish Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, A.; Tozzi, M. G.; Costa, M.; Delogu, G.; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by soluble molecules that may participate in acanthamoebal cytopathogenicity has yet to be fully characterized. We demonstrate here that Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites constitutively release ADP in the medium. Cell-free supernatants prepared from A. castellanii, by interaction with specific P2y2 purinoceptors expressed on the Wish cell membrane, caused a biphasic rise in [Ca2+]i, extensive cell membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal disorganization, and the breakdown of nuclei. Cell damage induced by amoebic supernatants was blocked by the P2y2 inhibitor Suramin. The same results were found in Wish cells exposed to purified ADP. These findings suggest that pathogenic free-living A. castellanii may have a cytopathic effect on human epithelial cells through ADP release, by a process that begins with a rise of cytosolic free-calcium concentration, and culminates in apoptosis. PMID:11349088

  13. Extracellular UDP and P2Y6 function as a danger signal to protect mice from vesicular stomatitis virus infection through an increase in IFN-β production.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruimei; Tan, Binghe; Yan, Yan; Ma, Xiaobin; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Zhi; Liu, Mingyao; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides that constitute a "danger signal" play an important role in the regulation of immune responses. However, the function and mechanism of extracellular UDP and P2Y6 in antiviral immunity remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo protection of UDP/P2Y6 signaling in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection. First, we demonstrated that VSV-infected cells secrete UDP from the cytoplasm as a danger signal to arouse surrounding cells. Meanwhile, expression of the UDP-specific receptor P2Y6 also was enhanced by VSV. Consequently, UDP protects RAW 264.7 cells, murine embryonic fibroblasts, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and L929 cells from VSV and GFP lentivirus infection. This protection can be blocked by the P2Y6 selective antagonist MRS2578 or IFN-α/β receptor-blocking Ab. VSV-induced cell death and virus replication were both enhanced significantly by knocking down and knocking out P2Y6 in different cells. Mechanistically, UDP facilitates IFN-β secretion through the p38/JNK- and ATF-2/c-Jun-signaling pathways, which are crucial in promoting antiviral immunity. Interestingly, UDP was released through a caspase-cleaved pannexin-1 channel in VSV-induced apoptotic cells and protected cells from infection through P2Y6 receptor in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Furthermore, UDP also protected mice from VSV infection through P2Y6 receptors in an acute neurotropic infection mouse model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the important role of extracellular UDP and P2Y6 as a danger signal in antiviral immune responses and suggest a potential therapeutic role for UDP/P2Y6 in preventing and controlling viral diseases.

  14. Transient Increased Calcium and Calcitriol Requirements After Discontinuation of Human Synthetic Parathyroid Hormone 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) Replacement Therapy in Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Gafni, Rachel I; Guthrie, Lori C; Kelly, Marilyn H; Brillante, Beth A; Christie, C Michele; Reynolds, James C; Yovetich, Nancy A; James, Robert; Collins, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic human PTH 1-34 (hPTH 1-34) replacement therapy in hypoparathyroidism maintains eucalcemia and converts quiescent bone to high-turnover bone. However, the skeletal and metabolic effects of drug discontinuation have not been reported. Nine subjects with hypoparathyroidism received subcutaneous injections of hPTH 1-34 two to three times daily for 19.8 to 61.3 months and then transitioned back to calcium and calcitriol. Biochemistries and bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were assessed at baseline, while on treatment, and at follow-up 3 to 12 months after drug discontinuation. Two subjects developed hypocalcemia when hPTH 1-34 was abruptly discontinued. Thus, to avoid hypocalcemia, subjects were slowly weaned from hPTH 1-34 over several weeks. When hPTH 1-34 was stopped, subjects were requiring two to three times pretreatment doses of calcitriol and calcium to maintain blood calcium levels. Doses were gradually reduced over many weeks until calcium levels were stable on doses similar to baseline. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP), N-telopeptide (NTX), and osteocalcin (OC) increased significantly with hPTH 1-34; at follow-up, BSAP and NTX had returned to baseline while OC was still slightly elevated. During treatment, BMD was unchanged at the hip and lateral spine but declined at the anterior-posterior (AP) spine, radius, and total body. During weaning, BMD increased, with the hip and lateral spine exceeding pre-hPTH 1-34 values and the whole body returning to baseline. AP spine was increased non-significantly compared to baseline at follow-up. hPTH 1-34 must be gradually weaned in hypoparathyroid patients with high doses of oral medications given to avoid hypocalcemia. The transient increased requirements accompanied by increased BMD after long-term hPTH 1-34 therapy suggest a reversal of the expanded remodeling space favoring bone formation as the skeleton returns to a low-turnover state, reminiscent of the hungry

  15. Age-related increases in calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity in the cochlear nucleus of hearing impaired C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Idrizbegovic, Esma; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Willott, James F; Canlon, Barbara

    2004-09-01

    Aging C57BL/6J (C57) mice (1-30 months old), were used to study calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity (parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin) in the cochlear nucleus. A quantitative stereological method, the optical fractionator was used to determine the total number of neurons, and the total number of immunostained neurons in the posteroventral- and dorsal cochlear nuclei (PVCN and DCN). A statistically significant age-related decrease of the total number of neurons was found in the PVCN and DCN using Nissl staining. In the DCN, an age-related increase in the total number of parvalbumin-positive neurons was found, while no changes in the total number of calbindin or calretinin positive neurons were demonstrated. In the PVCN, the total number of parvalbumin, calbindin, or calretinin positive neurons remained stable with increasing age. The percentage of parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin positive neurons significantly increased in the DCN, and the percentage of parvalbumin and calbindin-positive neurons increased in the PVCN. These findings imply that there is a relative up-regulation of calcium-binding proteins in neurons that had not previously expressed these proteins. This plastic response in the profoundly hearing impaired C57 mouse may be a survival strategy for cochlear nucleus neurons.

  16. Urbanization of black South African women may increase risk of low bone mass due to low vitamin D status, low calcium intake, and high bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Marlena C; Kruger, Iolanthé M; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Kruger, Annamarie

    2011-10-01

    Globally, rural to urban migration is accompanied by changes in dietary patterns and lifestyle that have serious health implications, including development of low bone mass. We hypothesized that serum 25 (OH) vitamin D3 (25[OH]D3) levels will be lower, bone turnover higher, and nutrition inadequate in urban postmenopausal black women, increasing risk for low bone mass. We aimed to assess the prevalence of risk factors for low bone mass in 1261 black women from rural and urban areas in the North West Province of South Africa (Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology-South Africa project). Fasting blood samples were taken; and participants were interviewed to complete questionnaires on self-reported diseases, fractures, and dietary intakes. Bone health markers were assessed in a subgroup of 658 women older than 45 years. Specific lifestyle risk factors identified were inactivity, smoking, injectable progestin contraception use, and high alcohol consumption. Dietary risk factors identified were low calcium and high animal protein, phosphorous, and sodium intakes. The 25(OH)D3 and C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) levels were significantly higher in the rural vs the urban women older than 50 years. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels increased with age in both groups. The 25(OH)D levels were inversely correlated with CTX and PTH in rural women. In urban women, PTH and CTX were correlated while dietary calcium was inversely correlated with CTX and PTH with 25(OH)D3. The combination of low dietary calcium (<230 mg/d), marginally insufficient 25(OH)D3 status, and raised PTH may result in increased bone resorption. Further research is required to assess bone health and fracture risk in black African women.

  17. Intersection of two signalling pathways: extracellular nucleotides regulate pollen germination and pollen tube growth via nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Stuart A; Torres, Jonathan; Rivera, Amy L; Cintolesi, Viviana A; Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2009-01-01

    Plant and animal cells release or secrete ATP by various mechanisms, and this activity allows extracellular ATP to serve as a signalling molecule. Recent reports suggest that extracellular ATP induces plant responses ranging from increased cytosolic calcium to changes in auxin transport, xenobiotic resistance, pollen germination, and growth. Although calcium has been identified as a secondary messenger for the extracellular ATP signal, other parts of this signal transduction chain remain unknown. Increasing the extracellular concentration of ATPgammaS, a poorly-hydrolysable ATP analogue, inhibited both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, while the addition of AMPS had no effect. Because pollen tube elongation is also sensitive to nitric oxide, this raised the possibility that a connection exists between the two pathways. Four approaches were used to test whether the germination and growth effects of extracellular ATPgammaS were transduced via nitric oxide. The results showed that increases in extracellular ATPgammaS induced increases in cellular nitric oxide, chemical agonists of the nitric oxide signalling pathway lowered the threshold of extracellular ATPgammaS that inhibits pollen germination, an antagonist of guanylate cyclase, which can inhibit some nitric oxide signalling pathways, blocked the ATPgammaS-induced inhibition of both pollen germination and pollen tube elongation, and the effects of applied ATPgammaS were blocked in nia1nia2 mutants, which have diminished NO production. The concurrence of these four data sets support the conclusion that the suppression of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation by extracellular nucleotides is mediated in part via the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

  18. Calcium restriction prolongs metaphase in dividing Tradescantia stamen hair cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Agents that lower extracellular calcium concentration (EGTA) or modulate calcium transport (lanthanum or D600) have been applied to dividing stamen hair cells of Tradescantia and analyzed for their ability to change the following: (a) the time required to progress from nuclear envelope breakdown to the onset of anaphase (metaphase transit time), (b) the time required to progress from anaphase to the initiation of the cell plate, and (c) the rate of chromosome motion in anaphase. Control cells complete metaphase in 32 min, initiate a cell plate in 19 min, and display a chromosome motion rate of 1.45 micron/min. If cells are treated with a calcium-EGTA buffer (pCa 8) for 4 h, the metaphase transit time is increased to 53 min without any change in the time of cell plate formation or the rate of chromosome motion. Lanthanum and D600, under conditions in which their access to the plasmalemma has been facilitated by pretreating the cells with cutinase, also markedly extend metaphase and in several instances permanently arrest cells. Lanthanum, however, produce little or no change in cell plate initiation or the rate of chromosome motion. Microscopic observations of the mitotic apparatus in calcium-stressed cells reveal normal chromatin condensation and metaphase progression. Chromosomes partly untwine but remain attached at their kinetochores. It is suggested that a flux of calcium, derived from the extracellular compartment, may cause the final splitting of sister chromosomes and trigger the onset of anaphase. However, once anaphase has begun, chromosome motion and cell plate initiation proceed normally even under conditions of extracellular calcium restriction. PMID:3921550

  19. The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 106, 1976: Decreased absorption of calcium, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus by humans due to increased fiber and phosphorus consumption as wheat bread.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, J G; Faradji, B; Abadi, P; Ismail-Beigi, F

    1991-07-01

    During a 20 day period of high fiber consumption in the form of bread made partly from wheaten wholemeal, two men developed negative balances of calcium, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus due to increased fecal excretion of each element. The fecal losses correlated closely with fecal dry matter and phosphorus. Fecal dry matter, in turn, was directly proportional to fecal fiber excretion. Balances of nitrogen remained positive. Mineral elements were well-utilized by the same subjects during a 20 day period of white bread consumption.

  20. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  1. Effect of ethionine on hepatic mitochondrial and microsomal calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Zinermon, W.D.; Latoni, L.

    1988-02-01

    Ethionine, an ethyl analog of methionine, produces a variety of physiological and pathological effects in animals. These range from acute effects in the liver, kidney, pancreas, and other organs to liver carcinogenesis. Female rats when injected with ethionine exhibit a rapid decrease in hepatic adenosine triphosphate levels followed by a marked inhibition of RNA and protein synthesis and accumulation of triglycerides. Since calcium transport in mitochondria and microsomes is ATP dependent, it becomes interesting to find out if ethionine administration has any effect on subcellular calcium transport. Calcium has recently gained an increased controversy regarding its role in chemical induced lethal cell damage. Certain groups believe that influx of extracellular calcium across the damaged plasma membrane might actually mediate the irreversible damage to the cell, whereas according to other, entry of calcium into the cell is secondary to the damage. The present study was carried out to investigate the calcium (/sup 45/Ca) transport in mitochondria and microsomes following ethionine administration. The effect of carbon tetrachloride on calcium uptake in ethionine treated rats was also studied.

  2. Impact of Calcium Signaling during Infection of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells. PMID:25464500

  3. The Protein Phosphatase-1/Inhibitor-2 Complex Differentially Regulates GSK-3 Dephosphorylation and Increases Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase 2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    King, Taj D.; Gandy, Johanna C.; Bijur, Gautam N.

    2007-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed protein glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is constitutively active, however its activity is markedly diminished following phosphorylation of Ser21 of GSK3α and Ser9 of GSK3β. Although several kinases are known to phosphorylate Ser21/9 of GSK3, for example Akt, relatively much less is known about the mechanisms that cause the dephosphorylation of GSK3 at Ser21/9. In the present study KCl-induced plasma membrane depolarization of SH-SY5Y cells, which increases intracellular calcium concentrations caused a transient decrease in the phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 and Ser473, and GSK3 at Ser21/9. Overexpression of the selective protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, inhibitor-2, increased basal GSK3 phosphorylation at Ser21/9 and significantly blocked the KCl-induced dephosphorylation of GSK3β, but not GSK3α. The phosphorylation of Akt was not affected by the overexpression of inhibitor-2. GSK3 activity is known to affect sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2 (SERCA2) levels. Overexpression of inhibitor-2 or treatment of cells with the GSK3 inhibitors lithium and SB216763 increased the levels of SERCA2. These results indicate that the protein phosphatase-1/inhibitor-2 complex differentially regulates GSK3 dephosphorylation induced by KCl and that GSK3 activity regulates SERCA2 levels. PMID:16987514

  4. The Evolution of the Four Subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: Ancient Roots, Increasing Complexity, and Multiple Losses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels (Cavs) are large transmembrane proteins responsible for crucial physiological processes in excitable cells. They are assisted by three auxiliary subunits that can modulate their electrical behavior. Little is known about the evolution and roles of the various subunits of Cavs in nonbilaterian animals and in nonanimal lineages. For this reason, we mapped the phyletic distribution of the four channel subunits and reconstructed their phylogeny. Although alpha subunits have deep evolutionary roots as ancient as the split between plants and opistokonths, beta subunits appeared in the last common ancestor of animals and their close-relatives choanoflagellates, gamma subunits are a bilaterian novelty and alpha2/delta subunits appeared in the lineage of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. We note that gene losses were extremely common in the evolution of Cavs, with noticeable losses in multiple clades of subfamilies and also of whole Cav families. As in vertebrates, but not protostomes, Cav channel genes duplicated in Cnidaria. We characterized by in situ hybridization the tissue distribution of alpha subunits in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a nonbilaterian animal possessing all three Cav subfamilies common to Bilateria. We find that some of the alpha subunit subtypes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. Further, all six sea anemone alpha subunit subtypes are conserved in stony corals, which separated from anemones 500 MA. This unexpected conservation together with the expression patterns strongly supports the notion that these subtypes carry unique functional roles. PMID:25146647

  5. Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Breast Physiology and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonnam; Wysolmerski, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and in breast cancer cells. During lactation, activation of the CaSR in mammary epithelial cells increases calcium transport into milk and inhibits parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) secretion into milk and into the circulation. The ability to sense changes in extracellular calcium allows the lactating breast to actively participate in the regulation of systemic calcium and bone metabolism, and to coordinate calcium usage with calcium availability during milk production. Interestingly, as compared to normal breast cells, in breast cancer cells, the regulation of PTHrP secretion by the CaSR becomes rewired due to a switch in its G-protein usage such that activation of the CaSR increases instead of decreases PTHrP production. In normal cells the CaSR couples to Gαi to inhibit cAMP and PTHrP production, whereas in breast cancer cells, it couples to Gαs to stimulate cAMP and PTHrP production. Activation of the CaSR on breast cancer cells regulates breast cancer cell proliferation, death and migration, in part, by stimulating PTHrP production. In this article, we discuss the biology of the CaSR in the normal breast and in breast cancer, and review recent findings suggesting that the CaSR activates a nuclear pathway of PTHrP action that stimulates cellular proliferation and inhibits cell death, helping cancer cells adapt to elevated extracellular calcium levels. Understanding the diverse actions mediated by the CaSR may help us better understand lactation physiology, breast cancer progression and osteolytic bone metastases. PMID:27746743

  6. Effect of calcium on melatonin secretion in chick pineal gland I.

    PubMed

    Pablos, M I; Agapito, M T; Gutierrez-Baraja, R; Reiter, R J; Recio, J M

    1996-10-18

    Melatonin is the neurohormone which is synthesized by the pineal gland and secreted rhythmically. The role of calcium in the activation of melatonin production remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that calcium input participates in the regulation of chick pineal gland. Pineal glands from Gallus domesticus were perifuse with Krebs medium (controls) or with Krebs medium plus drugs (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or calcium ionophore A23187). When EGTA was added to the perifusion medium, free extracellular calcium concentrations were dramatically decreased and melatonin synthesis was decreased. On the other hand, when the calcium ionophore A23187 was added to the perifusion medium, chick pineal glands exhibited a marked increase in secretion of melatonin. No effects were observed when chick pineal glands were treated with drugs during or after the time of the natural peak levels. We propose that calcium input from extracellular medium and output from intracellular calcium reserves are primary mechanisms in the activation of melatonin synthesis in the chick pineal gland.

  7. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  8. Increased O2 consumption and positive inotropy caused by cyclic GMP reduction are not altered after L-type calcium channel blockade.

    PubMed

    Leone, R J; Naim, K L; Scholz, P M; Weiss, H R

    1998-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased O2 consumption and inotropy after reduction of myocardial cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are mediated through L-type calcium channels. Anesthetized, open-chest New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups. Hearts were exposed to control vehicle (n = 8); LY83583 (LY, 10(-3) mol/l, guanylate cyclase inhibitor, (n = 9); nifedipine (nif, 10(-4) mol/l, L-type calcium channel blocker, n = 8), or nif+LY (n = 6). Vehicle or compound was applied topically to the epicardium for 15 min. Subepicardial (EPI) blood flow increased (from 213 +/- 22 to 323 +/- 24 ml/ min/100 g) in the presence of LY, as did subendocardial (ENDO) blood flow (from 238 +/- 20 to 333 +/- 38 ml/min/ 100 g). O2 consumption increased in the presence of LY:18.0 +/- 1.0 (EPI) and 17.0 +/- 0.6 (ENDO) ml O2/min/100 g as compared with 9.5 +/- 2.0 (EPI) and 10.6 +/- 2.5 (ENDO) in the control group. The increase in O2 consumption with LY was undiminished in the presence of nif (nif+LY group 21.0 +/- 3.0 ml O2/min/100 g EPI and 22.1 +/- 3.8 ENDO). Nif alone decreased left ventricular dP/dtmax from (2,762 +/- 197 to 2,413 +/- 316 mm Hg/s) and maximal rate of change in wall thickness (dW/dtmax from 13.5 +/- 2.0 to 9.5 +/- 0.8 mm/s), while percent change of wall thickness (from 21.3 +/- 3.3 to 31.3 +/- 7.2) and dW/dtmax (from 13.3 +/- 3.0 to 15.3 +/- 2.3 mm/s) increased in the nif+LY group. Thus, the positive O2 consumption and inotropic effects of decreasing cGMP were undiminished by nif. These results suggest that the cGMP reduction induced increases in O2 consumption and that inotropy may not be mediated through L-type calcium channels.

  9. Role of intracellular calcium in cellular volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.M.; Chase, H.S. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular calcium in epithelial cell volume regulation using cells isolated from the toad urinary bladder. A suspension of cells was prepared by treatment of the bladder with collagenase followed by ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. The cells retained their ion-transporting capabilities: ouabain (1 mM) and amiloride (10 microM) inhibited cellular uptake of /sup 86/Rb and /sup 22/Na, respectively. Using a Coulter counter to measure cellular volume, we found that we could swell cells either by reducing the extracellular osmolality or by adding the permeant solute urea (45 mM) isosmotically. Under both conditions, cells first swelled and then returned to their base-line volume, in spite of the continued presence of the stimulus to swell. Volume regulation was inhibited when cells were swelled at low extracellular (Ca) (100 nM) and was retarded in cells preloaded with the calcium buffer quin 2. Swelling increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ((Ca)i), as measured by quin 2 fluorescence: (Ca)i increased 35 +/- 9 nM (n = 6) after hypotonic swelling and 42 +/- 3 nM (n = 3) after urea swelling. Reducing extracellular (Ca) to less than 100 nM prevented the swelling-induced increase in (Ca)i, suggesting that the source of the increase in (Ca)i was extracellular. This result was confirmed in measurements of cellular uptake of 45Ca: the rate of uptake was significantly higher in swollen cells compared with control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 fmol . cell-1 X 5 min-1). Our experiments provide the first demonstration that cellular swelling increases (Ca)i. This increase is likely to play a critical role in cellular volume regulation.

  10. Antitranspirant-induced increases in leaf water potential increase tuber calcium and decrease tuber necrosis in water-stressed potato plants.

    PubMed

    Win, K; Berkowitz, G A; Henninger, M

    1991-05-01

    Experiments were undertaken with field-grown potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants to test the hypothesis that altering leaf:tuber water potential gradients within a plant subjected to low soil moisture will allow greater Ca accumulation in tubers and reverse Ca deficiency-related tuber necrosis. Antitranspirant formulations containing a wax emulsion and a spreader/sticker surfactant increased leaf water potential during a drought episode, significantly reducing the potential gradient that develops between leaf and tuber during a period of stress. Increased leaf water potential in treated plants was associated with decreased leaf Ca and increased tuber Ca. Tuber necrosis was found to be reduced in treated plants, thus increasing tuber quality.

  11. Overexpression of KAI1 induces autophagy and increases MiaPaCa-2 cell survival through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chun-Yan; Yan, Jun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Li, Qing-Fang; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Wang, Li-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Wang, Hua

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} We first investigate the effects of KAI1 on autophagy in MiaPaCa-2 cells. {yields} Our findings demonstrate that KAI1 induces autophagy, which in turn inhibits KAI1-induced apoptosis. {yields} This study also supplies a possible novel therapeutic method for the treatment of pancreatic cancer using autophagy inhibitors. -- Abstract: KAI1, a metastasis-suppressor gene belonging to the tetraspanin family, is known to inhibit cancer metastasis without affecting the primary tumorigenicity by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathway. Recent studies have shown that hypoxic conditions of solid tumors induce high-level autophagy and KAI1 expression. However, the relationship between autophagy and KAI1 remains unclear. By using transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, we found that KAI1 can induce autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2. KAI1-induced autophagy was confirmed by the expression of autophagy-related proteins LC3 and Beclin 1. KAI1 induces autophagy through phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinases rather than that of AKT. KAI1-induced autophagy protects MiaPaCa-2 cells from apoptosis and proliferation inhibition partially through the downregulation of poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caspase-3 activation.

  12. Relationship of intracellular calcium and oxygen radicals to Cisplatin-related renal cell injury.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Nakao, Takafumi; Kunimura, Naoshi; Kohda, Yuka; Gemba, Munekazu

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium in nephrotoxicity related to an antitumor agent, cisplatin. In this study, we employed cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK1). Cisplatin at 500 microM significantly increased the production of ROS 5 h and caused cell injury. This agent significantly increased the intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner 1 h or more after exposure. DPPD (N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine), an antioxidant, inhibited a cisplatin-related increase in active oxygen production and cell injury but did not inhibit an early increase in the [Ca2+]i level. An intracellular calcium-chelating compound BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetra(acetoxymethyl) ester) inhibited an increase in ROS production and cell injury induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, BAPTA-AM suppressed the rise of [Ca2+]i level in 1 h after exposure; however, an extracellular calcium chelator EGTA and a calcium antagonist nicardipine did not inhibit the rise in [Ca2+]i level in the early phase. An NADPH oxidase inhibitor inhibited a cisplatin-related increase in ROS production and cell disorder. These results suggest that cisplatin-related calcium release from the site of intracellular calcium storage in the early phase causes oxidative stress in renal tubular epithelial cells. Cisplatin may increase the intracellular production of ROS via NADPH oxidase.

  13. Calcium Oxalate Induces Renal Injury through Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Ma, Junhai; Shi, Wei; Su, Yu; Fu, Xu; Yang, Yanlin; Lu, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) plays a role in calcium-oxalate-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods. HK-2 cells and rats were treated with calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals with or without pretreatment with the CaSR-specific agonist gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or the CaSR-specific antagonist NPS2390. Changes in oxidative stress (OS) in HK-2 cells and rat kidneys were assessed. In addition, CaSR, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), and p38 expression was determined. Further, crystal adhesion assay was performed in vitro, and the serum urea and creatinine levels and crystal deposition in the kidneys were also examined. Results. CaOx increased CaSR, ERK, JNK, and p38 protein expression and OS in vitro and in vivo. These deleterious changes were further enhanced upon pretreatment with the CaSR agonist GdCl3 but were attenuated by the specific CaSR inhibitor NPS2390 compared with CaOx treatment alone. Pretreatment with GdCl3 further increased in vitro and in vivo crystal adhesion and renal hypofunction. In contrast, pretreatment with NPS2390 decreased in vitro and in vivo crystal adhesion and renal hypofunction. Conclusions. CaOx-induced renal injury is related to CaSR-mediated OS and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, which subsequently leads to CaOx crystal adhesion. PMID:27965733

  14. Dilution of boar ejaculates with BTS containing HEPES in place of bicarbonate immediately after ejaculation can reduce the increased inducibility of the acrosome reaction by treatment with calcium and calcium ionophore A23187, which is potentially associated with boar subfertility.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tetsuma; Imaeda, Noriaki; Yamada, Hiroto; Takasu, Masaki; Taguchi, Kazuo; Katoh, Tsutomu

    2010-06-01

    The present study investigated whether substitution of HEPES for bicarbonate in BTS (BTS-H) used to dilute boar ejaculates immediately after ejaculation could reduce the increased inducibility of the acrosome reaction by calcium and calcium ionophore A23187. When an ejaculate was split, diluted 5-fold with regular BTS (BTS-B) and BTS-H and stored at 17 C for 12 h or 60 h, the extender or storage time had no significant influence on sperm motility or viability measured by the eosin-nigrosin method. When spermatozoa diluted serially with BTS-B and stored (36 h) were stimulated with Ca2+ (3 mM) and A23187 (0.3 microM), the proportion of spermatozoa that underwent the acrosome reaction (% acrosome reactions) significantly increased as the magnifications of dilution increased (bicarbonate content almost unchanged by dilution). By contrast, the % acrosome rea