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Sample records for extracellular contrast media-enhanced

  1. Differential MR Delayed Enhancement Patterns of Chronic Myocardial Infarction between Extracellular and Intravascular Contrast Media

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Lin, Hung Yu; Liu, Hongyu; Freed, Darren; Arora, Rakesh C.; Tian, Ganghong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Because the distribution volume and mechanism of extracellular and intravascular MR contrast media differ considerably, the enhancement pattern of chronic myocardial infarction with extracellular or intravascular media might also be different. This study aims to investigate the differences in MR enhancement patterns of chronic myocardial infarction between extracellular and intravascular contrast media. Materials and Methods Twenty pigs with myocardial infarction underwent cine MRI, first pass perfusion MRI and delayed enhancement MRI with extracellular or intravascular media at four weeks after coronary occlusion. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was determined with microsphere measurement. The infarction histopathological changes were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson's trichrome method. Results Cine MRI revealed the reduced wall thickening in chronic infarction compared with normal myocardium. Moreover, significant wall thinning in chronic infarction was observed in cine MRI. Peak first-pass signal intensity didn’t significantly differ between chronic infarction and normal myocardium no matter what kinds of contrast media. At the following delayed enhancement phase, extracellular media-enhanced signal intensity was significantly higher in chronic infarction than in normal myocardium. Conversely, intravascular media-enhanced signal intensity was almost equivalent among chronic infarction and normal myocardium. At four weeks after infarction, MBF in chronic infarction approached to that in normal myocardium. Large thick-walled vessels were detected at peri-infarction zones. The cardiomyocytes were replaced by scar tissue consisting of dilated blood vessels and discrete fibers of collagen. Conclusions Chronic infarction was characterized by the significantly reduced wall thickening and the definite wall thinning. First-pass myocardial perfusion defect was not detected in chronic infarction with two media due to the significantly

  2. Differential MR delayed enhancement patterns of chronic myocardial infarction between extracellular and intravascular contrast media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Lin, Hung Yu; Liu, Hongyu; Freed, Darren; Arora, Rakesh C; Tian, Ganghong

    2015-01-01

    Because the distribution volume and mechanism of extracellular and intravascular MR contrast media differ considerably, the enhancement pattern of chronic myocardial infarction with extracellular or intravascular media might also be different. This study aims to investigate the differences in MR enhancement patterns of chronic myocardial infarction between extracellular and intravascular contrast media. Twenty pigs with myocardial infarction underwent cine MRI, first pass perfusion MRI and delayed enhancement MRI with extracellular or intravascular media at four weeks after coronary occlusion. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was determined with microsphere measurement. The infarction histopathological changes were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson's trichrome method. Cine MRI revealed the reduced wall thickening in chronic infarction compared with normal myocardium. Moreover, significant wall thinning in chronic infarction was observed in cine MRI. Peak first-pass signal intensity didn't significantly differ between chronic infarction and normal myocardium no matter what kinds of contrast media. At the following delayed enhancement phase, extracellular media-enhanced signal intensity was significantly higher in chronic infarction than in normal myocardium. Conversely, intravascular media-enhanced signal intensity was almost equivalent among chronic infarction and normal myocardium. At four weeks after infarction, MBF in chronic infarction approached to that in normal myocardium. Large thick-walled vessels were detected at peri-infarction zones. The cardiomyocytes were replaced by scar tissue consisting of dilated blood vessels and discrete fibers of collagen. Chronic infarction was characterized by the significantly reduced wall thickening and the definite wall thinning. First-pass myocardial perfusion defect was not detected in chronic infarction with two media due to the significantly recovered MBF and well-developed collateral vessels

  3. [Contrast media-enhanced and B-imaging ultrasound as a diagnostic and follow-up tool of hepatic echinococcosis in a 19-year-old Turkish woman].

    PubMed

    Stock, K; von Weyhern, C Hann; Lersch, C

    2007-11-01

    A 19-year-old Turkish woman was admitted to the emergency room because of the worsening recurrent pain in the right abdomen radiating to the right shoulder and right flank. Ultrasound examination showed a polycystic mass in the right lobe of the liver surrounded by a capsule. A contrast-enhanced ultrasound examination was done. It revealed, starting in the arterial phase, marginal enhancement near the capsule of the liver lesion. The suspected diagnosis of a hydatid liver disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus was confirmed by serology. The patient was treated with oral albendazole (400 mg, twice daily) for eight weeks. Follow-up ultrasound examinations showed significantly reduced "collapsing" cyst membranes. A hydatid cyst weighing 130 g and 8 cm in diameter was resected by open laparatomy nine weeks after diagnosis. Albendazole treatment was continued for six months and well tolerated by the patient. One year after surgical treatment the serology was negative. Ultrasound examination is the method of choice for the initial diagnosis and follow-up of hepatic echinococcosis. Serology is not always reliable. The treatment depends on the WHO stage of the disease and individual factors.

  4. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce T; Robinson, Joshua D; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam.

  5. Extracellular Polymeric Substances diversity of biofilms grown under contrasted environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Ras, Monique; Lefebvre, Dominique; Derlon, Nicolas; Paul, Etienne; Girbal-Neuhauser, Elisabeth

    2011-02-01

    Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) analysis was undertaken on three biofilms grown under different feeding conditions and offering diverging microbial activities and structural characteristics. EPS were extracted by a multi-method protocol including sonication, Tween and EDTA treatments and were characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Tween and sonication extracts presented higher EPS size diversity compared to EDTA extracts. EPS size diversity also increased with microbial functions within the biofilms and a specific 25-50 kDa cluster was identified only in extracts from biofilms presenting autotrophic activity. Another specific size cluster (180 kDa) occurred in Tween extracts provided from the mechanically stable biofilms. Such specific EPS appear as potential indicators for describing microbial and structural properties of biofilms. This study brings new elements for designing EPS fractionation and shows that size distribution analysis is an interesting tool to relate EPS diversity with macro-scale characteristics of biofilms.

  6. Dehydration-responsive reversible and irreversible changes in the extracellular matrix: comparative proteomics of chickpea genotypes with contrasting tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Deepti; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Ray, Doel; Basu, Debarati; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2011-04-01

    Dehydration is the most crucial environmental factor that limits plant growth, development, and productivity affecting agriculture throughout the world. Studies on genetic variations for dehydration tolerance in plants is crucial because divergent cultivars with contrasting traits aid the identification of key cellular components that confer better adaptability. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic structure that serves as the repository for important signaling components and acts as a front-line defense. To better understand dehydration adaptation, a proteomic study was performed on the extracellular matrix of ICCV-2, a dehydration-susceptible genotype of chickpea. The proteome was generated with ECM-enriched fractions using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis led to the identification of 81 dehydration-responsive proteins. The proteome was then compared with that of JG-62, a tolerant genotype. Comparative proteomics revealed genotype-specific expression of many proteins involved in a variety of cellular functions. Further, the reversible and irreversible changes in the proteomes revealed their differing ability to recover from dehydration-induced damage. We propose that cell wall restructuring and superior homeostasis, particularly the management of reactive oxygen species, may render better dehydration-adaptation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the comprehensive comparison of dehydration-responsive organellar proteome of two genotypes with contrasting tolerance.

  7. Application of extracellular gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents and the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Heverhagen, J T; Krombach, G A; Gizewski, E

    2014-07-01

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious, sometimes fatal disease. Findings in recent years have shown that a causal association between gadolinium containing contrast media and NSF is most likely. Therefore, the regulatory authorities have issued guidelines on the use of gadolinium-containing contrast media which have reduced the number of new cases of NSF to almost zero. However, it is for precisely this reason that the greatest care must still be taken to ensure that these guidelines are complied with. The most important factors are renal function, the quantity of gadolinium administered and coexisting diseases such as inflammation. All of these factors crucially influence the quantity of gadolinium released from the chelat in the body. This free gadolinium is thought to be the trigger for NSF. Other important factors are the stability of the gadolinium complex and furthermore the route of its elimination from the body. Partial elimination via the liver might be an additional protective mechanism. In conclusion, despite the NSF risk, contrast-enhanced MRI is a safe diagnostic procedure which can be used reliably and safely even in patients with severe renal failure, and does not necessarily have to be replaced by other methods.

  8. A comparison of iopromide and iopamidol, two acidoCEST MRI contrast media that measure tumor extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Moon, Brianna F; Jones, Kyle M; Chen, Liu Qi; Liu, Peilu; Randtke, Edward A; Howison, Christine M; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis within tumor and kidney tissues has previously been quantitatively measured using a molecular imaging technique known as acidoCEST MRI. The previous studies used iopromide and iopamidol, two iodinated contrast agents that are approved for clinical CT diagnoses and have been repurposed for acidoCEST MRI studies. We aimed to compare the performance of the two agents for measuring pH by optimizing image acquisition conditions, correlating pH with a ratio of CEST effects from an agent, and evaluating the effects of concentration, endogenous T1 relaxation time and temperature on the pH-CEST ratio correlation for each agent. These results showed that the two agents had similar performance characteristics, although iopromide produced a pH measurement with a higher dynamic range while iopamidol produced a more precise pH measurement. We then compared the performance of the two agents to measure in vivo extracellular pH (pHe) within xenograft tumor models of Raji lymphoma and MCF-7 breast cancer. Our results showed that the pHe values measured with each agent were not significantly different. Also, iopromide consistently measured a greater region of the tumor relative to iopamidol in both tumor models. Therefore, an iodinated contrast agent for acidoCEST MRI should be selected based on the measurement properties needed for a specific biomedical study and the pharmacokinetic properties of a specific tumor model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Equilibrium-phase MR angiography: Comparison of unspecific extracellular and protein-binding gadolinium-based contrast media with respect to image quality.

    PubMed

    Erb-Eigner, Katharina; Taupitz, Matthias; Asbach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare contrast and image quality of whole-body equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR angiography using a non-protein-binding unspecific extracellular gadolinium-based contrast medium with that of two contrast media with different protein-binding properties. 45 patients were examined using either 15 mL of gadobutrol (non-protein-binding, n = 15), 32 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (weakly protein binding, n = 15) or 11 mL gadofosveset trisodium (protein binding, n = 15) followed by equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography of four consecutive anatomic regions. The time elapsed between the contrast injection and the beginning of the equilibrium-phase image acquisition in the respective region was measured and was up to 21 min. Signal intensity was measured in two vessels per region and in muscle tissue. Relative contrast (RC) values were calculated. Vessel contrast, artifacts and image quality were rated by two radiologists in consensus on a five-point scale. Compared with gadobutrol, gadofosveset trisodium revealed significantly higher RC values only when acquired later than 15 min after bolus injection. Otherwise, no significant differences between the three contrast media were found regarding vascular contrast and image quality. Equilibrium-phase high-spatial-resolution MR-angiography using a weakly protein-binding or even non-protein-binding contrast medium is equivalent to using a stronger protein-binding contrast medium when image acquisition is within the first 15 min after contrast injection, and allows depiction of the vasculature with high contrast and image quality. The protein-binding contrast medium was superior for imaging only later than 15 min after contrast medium injection. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Different Resistance to UV-B Radiation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances of Two Cyanobacteria from Contrasting Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjuan; Zhao, Chenxi; Zhang, Daoyong; Mu, Shuyong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of UV-B radiation (UVBR) on photosynthetic activity (Fv/Fm) of aquatic Synechocystis sp. and desert Chroococcus minutus and effects on composition and fluorescence property of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) from Synechocystis sp. and C. minutus were comparatively investigated. The desert cyanobacterium species C. minutus showed higher tolerance of PSII activity (Fv/Fm) to UVBR than the aquatic Synechocystis sp., and the inhibited PSII activity of C. minutus could be fully recovered while that of Synechocystis sp. could be partly recovered. UVBR had significant effect on the yield and biochemical composition of EPS of both species. Protein-like and humic acid-like substances were detected in EPS from Synechocystis sp., and protein-like and phenol-like fluorescent compounds were detected in EPS from C. minutus. Proteins in EPS of desert and aquatic species were significantly decomposed under UVBR, and the latter was more easily decomposed. The polysaccharides were much more resistant to UVBR than the proteins for both species. Polysaccharides of Synechocystis sp. was degraded slightly but those of C. minutus was little decomposed. The higher tolerance to UVBR of the desert cyanobacterium can be attributed to the higher resistance of its EPS to photodegradation induced by UVBR in comparison with the aquatic species. PMID:27597841

  11. Different Resistance to UV-B Radiation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances of Two Cyanobacteria from Contrasting Habitats.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjuan; Zhao, Chenxi; Zhang, Daoyong; Mu, Shuyong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of UV-B radiation (UVBR) on photosynthetic activity (Fv/Fm) of aquatic Synechocystis sp. and desert Chroococcus minutus and effects on composition and fluorescence property of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) from Synechocystis sp. and C. minutus were comparatively investigated. The desert cyanobacterium species C. minutus showed higher tolerance of PSII activity (Fv/Fm) to UVBR than the aquatic Synechocystis sp., and the inhibited PSII activity of C. minutus could be fully recovered while that of Synechocystis sp. could be partly recovered. UVBR had significant effect on the yield and biochemical composition of EPS of both species. Protein-like and humic acid-like substances were detected in EPS from Synechocystis sp., and protein-like and phenol-like fluorescent compounds were detected in EPS from C. minutus. Proteins in EPS of desert and aquatic species were significantly decomposed under UVBR, and the latter was more easily decomposed. The polysaccharides were much more resistant to UVBR than the proteins for both species. Polysaccharides of Synechocystis sp. was degraded slightly but those of C. minutus was little decomposed. The higher tolerance to UVBR of the desert cyanobacterium can be attributed to the higher resistance of its EPS to photodegradation induced by UVBR in comparison with the aquatic species.

  12. An adaptive model for rapid and direct estimation of extravascular extracellular space in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, Azimeh N V; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Ewing, James R; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan

    2017-02-14

    Extravascular extracellular space (ve ) is a key parameter to characterize the tissue of cerebral tumors. This study introduces an artificial neural network (ANN) as a fast, direct, and accurate estimator of ve from a time trace of the longitudinal relaxation rate, ΔR1 (R1  = 1/T1 ), in DCE-MRI studies. Using the extended Tofts equation, a set of ΔR1 profiles was simulated in the presence of eight different signal to noise ratios. A set of gain- and noise-insensitive features was generated from the simulated ΔR1 profiles and used as the ANN training set. A K-fold cross-validation method was employed for training, testing, and optimization of the ANN. The performance of the optimal ANN (12:6:1, 12 features as input vector, six neurons in hidden layer, and one output) in estimating ve at a resolution of 10% (error of ±5%) was 82%. The ANN was applied on DCE-MRI data of 26 glioblastoma patients to estimate ve in tumor regions. Its results were compared with the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) of ve . The two techniques showed a strong agreement (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Results implied that the perfected ANN was less sensitive to noise and outperformed the MLE method in estimation of ve .

  13. Single breath-hold assessment of ventricular volumes using 32-channel coil technology and an extracellular contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Parish, Victoria; Hussain, Tarique; Beerbaum, Philip; Greil, Gerald; Nagel, Eike; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Uribe, Sergio

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a single breath-hold 3D cine balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) sequence after gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) injection for volumetric cardiac assessment. Fifteen adult patients routinely referred for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) underwent quantitative ventricular volumetry on a clinical 1.5T MR-scanner using a 32-channel cardiac coil. A stack of 2D cine b-SSFP slices covering the ventricles was used as reference, followed by a single breath-hold 3D cine balanced SSFP protocol acquired before and after administration of Gd-DTPA. The acquisition was accelerated using SENSE in both phase encoding directions. Volumetric and contrast-to-noise data for each technique were assessed and compared. The 3D cine protocol was accomplished within one breath-hold (mean acquisition time 20 sec; spatial resolution 2.1 x 2.1 x 10 mm; temporal resolution 51 msec). The contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and myocardium was 234 determined for the multiple 2D cine data, and could be increased for the 3D acquisition from 136 (3D precontrast) to 203 (3D postcontrast) after injecting Gd-DTPA. In addition the endocardial definition was significantly improved in postcontrast 3D cine b-SSFP. There was no significant difference for left and right ventricular volumes between standard 2D and 3D postcontrast cine b-SSFP. However, Bland-Altman plots showed greater bias and scatter when comparing 2D with 3D cine b-SSFP without contrast. 3D cine b-SSFP imaging of the heart using 32 channel coil technology and spatial undersampling allows reliable volumetric assessment within a single breath-hold after application of Gd-DTPA. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Influence of radiographic contrast media on the nitric oxide release from human arterial and venous endothelial cells on extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Franke, R P; Fuhrmann, R; Jung, F

    2013-01-01

    Radiographic contrast media (RCM) can vary widely in their physicochemical properties, e.g. the iodine concentration, osmolality, molecule structure, chemotoxicity, hydrophilicity, electric charge and viscosity. Besides the necessary effect of Roentgen ray absorption, which provides contrast-rich images of vessels, RCMs can have varying adverse effects. As one possible cause of microcirculatory disorders, changes in morphology and function of endothelial cells are discussed. Therefore, RCM media-induced release of nitric oxide from arterial as well as from venous endothelial cells in contact with two commercially available RCMs (Iodixanol and Iomeprol) was investigated. NO concentrations started to increase slightly in the HUVEC control cultures after 3 min incubation time, however, NO concentrations in the cultures incubated with Iomeprol 350 and Iodixanol 320 did not change over time (Iomeprol 350: p = 0.4905; Iodixanol 320: p = 0.784). On the whole, the time-dependent NO release differed for the three groups (RCM × time: p = 0.00224). This difference was due to the fact that, after incubation with the two contrast agents (Iodixanol 320: p = 0.0003; Iomeprol 350: p = 0.0168), less NO was released by the exposed HUVEC at 3 minutes and after 12 hours than by the control cells. In the control cultures of arterial endothelial cells as well as in cultures incubated with 30% v/v Iodixanol supplemented culture medium the NO release did not change. In those cultures of arterial endothelial cells supplemented with 30% v/v Iomeprol the NO release was significantly less than in control cultures and in cultures supplemented with Iodixanol (p = 0.021; p = 0.043). Inspite of a missing shear stress in our static plane vessel wall model there was a RCM-dependent difference in NO release from endothelial cells in vitro. The NO release from venous endothelial cells differed significantly from the NO release from arterial endothelial cells. While the administration of Iomeprol

  15. Contrasting extracellular enzyme activities of particle-associated bacteria from distinct provinces of the North Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, Carol; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Amann, Rudolf; Passow, Uta

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities play a key role in the marine carbon cycle, processing much of phytoplankton-derived organic matter. The composition of these communities varies by depth, season, and location in the ocean; the functional consequences of these compositional variations for the carbon cycle are only beginning to be explored. We measured the abilities of microbial communities in the large-particle fraction (retained by a 10-μm pore-size cartridge filter) to enzymatically hydrolyze high molecular weight substrates, and therefore initiate carbon remineralization in four distinct oceanic provinces: the boreal polar (BPLR), the Arctic oceanic (ARCT), the North Atlantic drift (NADR), and the North Atlantic subtropical (NAST) provinces. Since we expected the large-particle fraction to include phytoplankton cells, we measured the hydrolysis of polysaccharide substrates (laminarin, fucoidan, xylan, and chondroitin sulfate) expected to be associated with phytoplankton. Hydrolysis rates and patterns clustered into two groups, the BPLR/ARCT and the NADR/NAST. All four substrates were hydrolyzed by the BPLR/ARCT communities; hydrolysis rates of individual substrate varied by factors of ca. 1–4. In contrast, chondroitin was not hydrolyzed in the NADR/NAST, and hydrolytic activity was dominated by laminarinase. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of the large-particle fraction post-incubation showed a substantial contribution (15–26%) of CF319a-positive cells (Bacteroidetes) to total DAPI-stainable cells. Concurrent studies of microbial community composition and of fosmids from these same stations also demonstrated similarities between BPLR and ARCT stations, which were distinct from the NADR/NAST stations. Together, these data support a picture of compositionally as well as functionally distinct communities across these oceanic provinces. PMID:23248623

  16. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  17. Contrasting Effects of Acidic pH on the Extracellular and Intracellular Activities of the Anti-Gram-Positive Fluoroquinolones Moxifloxacin and Delafloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Sandrine; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to currently marketed fluoroquinolones, which are zwitterionic, delafloxacin is an investigational fluoroquinolone with an anionic character that is highly active against Gram-positive bacteria. We have examined the effect of acidic pH on its accumulation in Staphylococcus aureus and in human THP-1 cells, in parallel with its activity against extracellular and intracellular S. aureus. Moxifloxacin was used as a comparator. Delafloxacin showed MICs 3 to 5 log2 dilutions lower than those of moxifloxacin for a collection of 35 strains with relevant resistance mechanisms and also proved to be 10-fold more potent against intracellular S. aureus ATCC 25923. In medium at pH 5.5, this difference was further enhanced, with the MIC decreasing by 5 log2 dilutions. In infected cells incubated in acidic medium, the relative potency was 10-fold higher than that at neutral pH and the maximal relative efficacy reached a bactericidal effect at 24 h. These results can be explained by a 10-fold increase in delafloxacin accumulation in both bacteria and cells at acidic pH, making delafloxacin one of the most efficient drugs tested in this model. Opposite effects were seen for moxifloxacin with respect to both activity and accumulation. As reported for zwitterionic fluoroquinolones, delafloxacin was found associated with the soluble fraction in homogenates of eukaryotic cells. Taken together, these properties may confer to delafloxacin an advantage for the eradication of S. aureus in acidic environments, including intracellular infections. PMID:21135179

  18. Comparison of hepatocellular carcinoma conspicuity on hepatobiliary phase images with gadoxetate disodium vs. delayed phase images with extracellular cellular contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Yeon; Wu, En-Haw; Park, Seong Ho; Wang, Z Jane; Hope, Thomas A; Yee, Judy; Zhao, Li-Qin; Chang, Wei-Chou; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2016-08-01

    To compare the conspicuity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on hepatobiliary phase of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced vs. delayed phase of gadodiamide-enhanced MR images, relative to liver function. We retrospectively identified 86 patients with newly diagnosed HCC between 2010 and 2013 and recorded the severity of liver disease by Child-Pugh class (CPC). 38 patients had gadodiamide-enhanced 5-min delayed and 48 had gadoxetate disodium-enhanced 20-min delayed hepatobiliary MR images. The conspicuity of 86 HCCs (mean size, 2.7 cm) was graded visually on a 3-point scale and quantified by liver-to-tumor contrast ratios (LTC). The relative liver parenchymal enhancement (RPE) was measured. For different CPCs, we compared the conspicuity of HCC and RPE between gadodiamide and gadoxetate. In patients with CPC A, the visual conspicuity and LTC of the 27 HCCs imaged with gadodiamide were significantly lower than those of the 38 HCCs with gadoxetate (P < 0.01, <0.01, respectively). RPE was lower in gadodiamide scans than gadoxetate scans (P < 0.01). Conversely, in patients with CPC B and C, HCCs appeared more frequently as definite hypointensity when imaged with gadodiamide (72.7%, 8/11) than gadoxetate (20%, 2/10, P = 0.03). LTC (mean 18.1 vs. 7.5, P = 0.04) and RPE (mean 75.5 vs. 45.4, P = 0.04) was significantly higher in the gadodiamide than gadoxetate scans. In patients with compromised liver function, hypointensity of HCC is more conspicuous in the gadodiamide delayed phase than the gadoxetate hepatobiliary phase. This likely reflects the high extracellular accumulation of gadodiamide and poor hepatocyte uptake of gadoxetate in patients with compromised liver function.

  19. Brain tumor enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging at 3 tesla: intraindividual comparison of two high relaxivity macromolecular contrast media with a standard extracellular gd-chelate in a rat brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Fries, Peter; Runge, Val M; Bücker, Arno; Schürholz, Hellmut; Reith, Wolfgang; Robert, Philippe; Jackson, Carney; Lanz, Titus; Schneider, Günther

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate lesion enhancement (LE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) properties of P846, a new intermediate sized, high relaxivity Gd-based contrast agent at 3 Tesla in a rat brain glioma model, and to compare this contrast agent with a high relaxivity, macromolecular compound (P792), and a standard extracellular Gd-chelate (Gd-DOTA). Seven rats with experimental induced brain glioma were evaluated using 3 different contrast agents, with each MR examination separated by at least 24 hours. The time between injections assured sufficient clearance of the agent from the tumor, before the next examination. P792 (Gadomelitol, Guerbet, France) and P846 (a new compound from Guerbet Research) are macromolecular and high relaxivity contrast agents with no protein binding, and were compared with the extracellular agent Gd-DOTA (Dotarem, Guerbet, France). T1w gradient echo sequences (TR/TE 200 milliseconds/7.38 milliseconds, flip angle = 90 degrees , acquisition time: 1:42 minutes:sec, voxel size: 0.2 x 0.2 x 2.0 mm, FOV = 40 mm, acquisition matrix: 256 x 256) were acquired before and at 5 consecutive time points after each intravenous contrast injection in the identical slice orientation, using a dedicated 4-channel head array animal coil. The order of contrast media injection was randomized, with however Gd-DOTA used either as the first or second contrast agent. Contrast agent dose was adjusted to compensate for the different T1 relaxivities of the 3 agents. Signal-to-noise ratio, CNR, and LE were evaluated using region-of-interest analysis. A veterinary histopathologist confirmed the presence of a glioma in each subject, after completion of the imaging study. P792 showed significantly less LE as compared with Gd-DOTA within the first 7 minutes after contrast agent injection (P < 0.05) with, however, reaching comparable LE values at 9 minutes after injection (P = 0.07). However, P792 provided significantly less CNR as compared with Gd-DOTA (P < 0

  20. Assessing Student Scientific Expression Using Media: The Media-Enhanced Science Presentation Rubric (MESPR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Michael S.; Chessin, Debby A.; Sumrall, William J.; Rutherford, Angela S.; Moore, Virginia J.

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated an assessment designed to dually promote student understanding of the experimental method and student ability to include digital and visual qualities in their presentations of scientific experiment results. The rubric, the Media-Enhanced Science Presentation Rubric (MESPR) focuses teacher-student dialogue along the…

  1. Assessing Student Scientific Expression Using Media: The Media-Enhanced Science Presentation Rubric (MESPR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, Michael S.; Chessin, Debby A.; Sumrall, William J.; Rutherford, Angela S.; Moore, Virginia J.

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated an assessment designed to dually promote student understanding of the experimental method and student ability to include digital and visual qualities in their presentations of scientific experiment results. The rubric, the Media-Enhanced Science Presentation Rubric (MESPR) focuses teacher-student dialogue along the…

  2. Contrasting changes in extracellular dopamine and glutamate along the rostrocaudal axis of the anterior cingulate cortex of the rat following an acute d-amphetamine or dopamine challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Elizabeth S.; Heal, David J.; Clare Stanford, S.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence for functional specificity of subregions along the rostrocaudal axis of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The subregion-specific distribution of dopaminergic afferents and glutamatergic efferents along the ACC make these obvious candidates for coding such regional responses. We investigated this possibility using microdialysis in freely-moving rats to compare changes in extracellular dopamine and glutamate in the rostral (‘rACC': Cg1 and Cg3 (prelimbic area)) and caudal (‘cACC’: Cg1 and Cg2) ACC induced by systemic or local administration of d-amphetamine. Systemic administration of d-amphetamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a transient increase in extracellular dopamine in the rACC, but an apparent increase in the cACC of the same animals was less clearly defined. Local infusion of d-amphetamine increased dopamine efflux in the rACC, only. Glutamate efflux in the rACC was increased by local infusion of dopamine (5–50 μM), which had negligible effect in the cACC, but only systemic administration of d-amphetamine increased glutamate efflux and only in the cACC. The asymmetry in the neurochemical responses within the rACC and cACC, to the same experimental challenges, could help explain why different subregions are recruited in the response to specific environmental and somatosensory stimuli and should be taken into account when studying the regulation of neurotransmission in the ACC. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled ‘CNS Stimulants’. PMID:24747182

  3. Influence of radiographic contrast media (Iodixanol and Iomeprol) on the endothelin-1 release from human arterial and venous endothelial cells cultured on an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Franke, R P; Fuhrmann, R; Hiebl, B; Jung, F

    2012-01-01

    Various radiographic contrast media (RCM) are available for visualization of blood vessels in interventional cardiology which can vary widely in their physicochemical properties thereby influencing different functions of blood cells. In the in vitro study described here the influence of two RCMs on arterial as well as on venous endothelial cells was compared to control cultures and examined under statical culture conditions, thus eliminating the influence of RCM viscosity almost completely. The supplementation of the culture medium with RCM (30% v/v) resulted in clearly different reactions of the endothelial cells exposed. Exposition to Iodixanol supplemented culture medium was followed by endothelin-1 release from venous endothelial cells which was equivalent to the endothelin-1 release from venous control cultures. Compared to control cultures, venous endothelial cells exposed to culture medium supplemented with Iomeprol displayed a completely different reaction, the increase in endothelin-1 secretion was missing completely after a 12 hours exposure. Following a 12 hours exposure to both RCMs there were no longer endothelial cells adherent, neither in venous nor in arterial endothelial cell cultures. The study showed that not the wall shear stress was responsible for the differing effects visible after 1.5 min, 5 min, and 12 hours exposure to culture media supplemented with RCM but differences in chemotoxicity of the RCM applied.

  4. T1 mapping of the myocardium: intra-individual assessment of post-contrast T1 time evolution and extracellular volume fraction at 3T for Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial T1 relaxation time (T1 time) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) are altered in patients with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to perform an intra-individual assessment of normal T1 time and ECV for two different contrast agents. Methods A modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) sequence was acquired at 3 T in 24 healthy subjects (8 men; 28 ± 6 years) at mid-ventricular short axis pre-contrast and every 5 min between 5-45 min after injection of a bolus of 0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; Magnevist®) (exam 1) and 0.1 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA; Multihance®) (exam 2) during two separate scanning sessions. T1 times were measured in myocardium and blood on generated T1 maps. ECVs were calculated as ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood*1−hematocrit. Results Mean pre-contrast T1 relaxation times for myocardium and blood were similar for both the first and second CMR exam (p > 0.5). Overall mean post-contrast myocardial T1 time was 15 ± 2 ms (2.5 ± 0.7%) shorter for Gd-DTPA at 0.15 mmol/kg compared to Gd-BOPTA at 0.1 mmol/kg (p < 0.01) while there was no significant difference for T1 time of blood pool (p > 0.05). Between 5 and 45 minutes after contrast injection, mean ECV values increased linearly with time for both contrast agents from 0.27 ± 0.03 to 0.30 ± 0.03 (p < 0.0001). Mean ECV values were slightly higher (by 0.01, p < 0.05) for Gd-DTPA compared to Gd-BOPTA. Inter-individual variation of ECV was higher (CV 8.7% [exam 1, Gd-DTPA] and 9.4% [exam 2, Gd-BOPTA], respectively) compared to variation of pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time (CV 4.5% [exam 1] and 3.0% [exam 2], respectively). ECV with Gd-DTPA was highly correlated to ECV by Gd-BOPTA (r = 0.803; p < 0.0001). Conclusion In comparison to pre-contrast myocardial T1 relaxation time, variation in ECV values of normal subjects is larger. However, absolute differences in ECV

  5. Release of extracellular ATP by bacteria during growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is used as an intracellular energy source by all living organisms. It plays a central role in the respiration and metabolism, and is the most important energy supplier in many enzymatic reactions. Its critical role as the energy storage molecule makes it extremely valuable to all cells. Results We report here the detection of extracellular ATP in the cultures of a variety of bacterial species. The levels of the extracellular ATP in bacterial cultures peaked around the end of the log phase and decreased in the stationary phase of growth. Extracellular ATP levels were dependent on the cellular respiration as bacterial mutants lacking cytochrome bo oxidase displayed lower extracellular ATP levels. We have also shown that Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella actively depleted extracellular ATP and an ATP supplement in culture media enhanced the stationary survival of E. coli and Salmonella. In addition to E. coli and Salmonella the presence of the extracellular ATP was observed in a variety of bacterial species that contain human pathogens such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus. Conclusion Our results indicate that extracellular ATP is produced by many bacterial species during growth and extracellular ATP may serve a role in the bacterial physiology. PMID:24364860

  6. Extracellular ATP signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kiwamu; Gilroy, Simon; Jones, Alan M.; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) induces a number of cellular responses in plants and animals. Some of the molecular components for purinergic signaling in animal cells appear to be lacking in plant cells, although some cellular responses are similar in both systems [e.g. increased levels of cytosolic free calcium, nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS)]. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast purinergic signaling mechanisms in animal and plant cells. This comparison will aid our overall understanding of plant physiology and also provide details of the general fundamentals of extracellular ATP signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:20817461

  7. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate and adenosine in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stagg, J; Smyth, M J

    2010-09-30

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is actively released in the extracellular environment in response to tissue damage and cellular stress. Through the activation of P2X and P2Y receptors, extracellular ATP enhances tissue repair, promotes the recruitment of immune phagocytes and dendritic cells, and acts as a co-activator of NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasomes. The conversion of extracellular ATP to adenosine, in contrast, essentially through the enzymatic activity of the ecto-nucleotidases CD39 and CD73, acts as a negative-feedback mechanism to prevent excessive immune responses. Here we review the effects of extracellular ATP and adenosine on tumorigenesis. First, we summarize the functions of extracellular ATP and adenosine in the context of tumor immunity. Second, we present an overview of the immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic effects of extracellular adenosine. Third, we present experimental evidence that extracellular ATP and adenosine receptors are expressed by tumor cells and enhance tumor growth. Finally, we discuss recent studies, including our own work, which suggest that therapeutic approaches that promote ATP-mediated activation of inflammasomes, or inhibit the accumulation of tumor-derived extracellular adenosine, may constitute effective new means to induce anticancer activity.

  8. Patterns of extracellular enzyme activities and microbial metabolism in an Arctic fjord of Svalbard and in the northern Gulf of Mexico: contrasts in carbon processing by pelagic microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    The microbial community composition of polar and temperate ocean waters differs substantially, but the potential functional consequences of these differences are largely unexplored. We measured bacterial production, glucose metabolism, and the abilities of microbial communities to hydrolyze a range of polysaccharides in an Arctic fjord of Svalbard (Smeerenburg Fjord), and thus to initiate remineralization of high-molecular weight organic matter. We compared these data with similar measurements previously carried out in the northern Gulf of Mexico in order to investigate whether differences in the spectrum of enzyme activities measurable in Arctic and temperate environments are reflected in “downstream” aspects of microbial metabolism (metabolism of monomers and biomass production). Only four of six polysaccharide substrates were hydrolyzed in Smeerenburg Fjord; all were hydrolyzed in the upper water column of the Gulf. These patterns are consistent on an interannual basis. Bacterial protein production was comparable at both locations, but the pathways of glucose utilization differed. Glucose incorporation rate constants were comparatively higher in Svalbard, but glucose respiration rate constants were higher in surface waters of the Gulf. As a result, at the time of sampling ca. 75% of the glucose was incorporated into biomass in Svalbard, but in the northern Gulf of Mexico most of the glucose was respired to CO2. A limited range of enzyme activities is therefore not a sign of a dormant community or one unable to further process substrates resulting from extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis. The ultimate fate of carbohydrates in marine waters, however, is strongly dependent upon the specific capabilities of heterotrophic microbial communities in these disparate environments. PMID:24198812

  9. Patterns of extracellular enzyme activities and microbial metabolism in an Arctic fjord of Svalbard and in the northern Gulf of Mexico: contrasts in carbon processing by pelagic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Arnosti, Carol; Steen, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    The microbial community composition of polar and temperate ocean waters differs substantially, but the potential functional consequences of these differences are largely unexplored. We measured bacterial production, glucose metabolism, and the abilities of microbial communities to hydrolyze a range of polysaccharides in an Arctic fjord of Svalbard (Smeerenburg Fjord), and thus to initiate remineralization of high-molecular weight organic matter. We compared these data with similar measurements previously carried out in the northern Gulf of Mexico in order to investigate whether differences in the spectrum of enzyme activities measurable in Arctic and temperate environments are reflected in "downstream" aspects of microbial metabolism (metabolism of monomers and biomass production). Only four of six polysaccharide substrates were hydrolyzed in Smeerenburg Fjord; all were hydrolyzed in the upper water column of the Gulf. These patterns are consistent on an interannual basis. Bacterial protein production was comparable at both locations, but the pathways of glucose utilization differed. Glucose incorporation rate constants were comparatively higher in Svalbard, but glucose respiration rate constants were higher in surface waters of the Gulf. As a result, at the time of sampling ca. 75% of the glucose was incorporated into biomass in Svalbard, but in the northern Gulf of Mexico most of the glucose was respired to CO2. A limited range of enzyme activities is therefore not a sign of a dormant community or one unable to further process substrates resulting from extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis. The ultimate fate of carbohydrates in marine waters, however, is strongly dependent upon the specific capabilities of heterotrophic microbial communities in these disparate environments.

  10. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  11. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... of page Side effects and adverse and allergic reactions Barium Sulfate Contrast Materials You should tell your ... You are at greater risk of an adverse reaction to barium-sulfate contrast materials if: you have ...

  12. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  13. The pulmonary extracellular lining.

    PubMed Central

    George, G; Hook, G E

    1984-01-01

    The extracellular lining of the lungs is reviewed. The pulmonary extracellular lining is a complex mixture of phospholipids, proteins and carbohydrates which is absolutely essential for the maintenance of normal pulmonary functions such as gas exchange. Without the lining the lungs would collapse. Alterations in the pulmonary extracellular lining may underlie some disease conditions induced by toxic agents, especially those which interfere with the formation of pulmonary surfactant. The extracellular lining could be used to detect and monitor damage and disease caused by agents toxic to the lungs. The lining contains many hydrolytic enzymes which may act to detoxify certain toxic agents such as those which contain ester groups. The pulmonary extracellular lining could play a significant role mediating the toxic action of inhaled agents as well as the removal of those agents from the lungs. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6376100

  14. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  15. Contrastive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Carl

    Contrastive analysis is viewed as an interlinguistic, bidirectional phenomenon which is concerned with both the form and function of language. As such, contrastive analysis must view language psycholinguistically and sociolinguistically as a system to be both described and acquired. Due to the need for a psychological component in the analysis,…

  16. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  17. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  18. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  19. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites on Extracellular Corneal Epithelial Cell Maspin

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Malathi; Mirza, Shama P.; Twining, Sally S.

    2011-01-01

    Maspin, a 42-kDa non classical serine protease inhibitor (serpin) is expressed by epithelial cells of various tissues including the cornea. The protein localizes to the nucleus and cytosol, and is present in the extracellular space. While extracellular maspin regulates corneal stromal fibroblast adhesion and inhibits angiogenesis during wound healing in the cornea, the molecular mechanism of its extracellular functions is unclear. We hypothesized that identifying post-translational modifications of maspin, such as phosphorylation, may help decipher its mode of action. The focus of this study was on the identification of phosphorylation sites on extracellular maspin, since the extracellular form of the molecule is implicated in several functions. Multi-stage fragmentation mass spectrometry was used to identify sites of phosphorylation on extracellular corneal epithelial cell maspin. A total of eight serine and threonine phosphorylation sites (Thr50, Ser97, Thr118, Thr157, Ser240, Ser298, Thr310, Ser316) were identified on the extracellular forms of the molecule. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on extracellular maspin was not detected on extracellular maspin from corneal epithelial cell, in contrast to breast epithelial cells. This study provides the basis for further investigation into the functional role of phosphorylation of corneal epithelial maspin. PMID:21365746

  20. Contrast cystography.

    PubMed

    Essman, Stephanie C

    2005-02-01

    Cystography is a radiographic study performed to aid in evaluation of the urinary bladder for extramural, mural, or intraluminal lesions. These lesions may primarily involve the urinary bladder or may be an extension of disease from adjacent organs. Cystography is easy to perform with relatively few complications. Different types of cystography (positive versus negative contrast) may be used depending on the type of information that the clinician hopes to obtain. Although a valuable technique, it is important to correlate the findings on cystography with other clinical information to arrive at the final diagnosis.

  1. The extracellular electrical resistivity in cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gleixner, Raimund; Fromherz, Peter

    2006-04-01

    The interaction of cells in a tissue depends on the nature of the extracellular matrix. The electrical properties of the narrow extracellular space are unknown. Here we consider cell adhesion mediated by extracellular matrix protein on a solid substrate as a model system. We culture human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells on silica coated with fibronectin and determine the electrical resistivity in the cell-solid junction rhoJ=rJdJ by combining measurements of the sheet resistance rJ and of the distance dJ between membrane and substrate. The sheet resistance is obtained from phase fluorometry of the voltage-sensitive dye ANNINE-5 by alternating-current stimulation from the substrate. The distance is measured by fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. We change the resistivity of the bath in a range from 66 Omega cm to 750 Omega cm and find that the sheet resistance rJ is proportionally enhanced, but that the distance is invariant around dJ=75 nm. In all cases, the resulting resistivity rhoJ is indistinguishable from the resistivity of the bath. A similar result is obtained for rat neurons cultured on polylysine. On that basis, we propose a "bulk resistivity in cell adhesion" model for cell-solid junctions. The observations suggest that the electrical interaction between cells in a tissue is determined by an extracellular space with the electrical properties of bulk electrolyte.

  2. Extracellular histones inhibit efferocytosis.

    PubMed

    Friggeri, Arnaud; Banerjee, Sami; Xie, Na; Cui, Huachun; De Freitas, Andressa; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Dupont, Hervé; Abraham, Edward; Liu, Gang

    2012-07-18

    The uptake and clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, a process called efferocytosis, is a major component in the resolution of inflammation. Increased concentrations of extracellular histones are found during acute inflammatory states and appear to contribute to organ system dysfunction and mortality. In these studies, we examined the potential role of histones in modulating efferocytosis. We found that phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils or thymocytes by macrophages was significantly diminished in the presence of histones H3 or H4, but not histone H1. Histone H3 demonstrated direct binding to macrophages, an effect that was diminished by preincubation of macrophages with the opsonins growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor (EGF) 8 (MFG-E8). Incubation of histone H3 with soluble α(v)β₅ integrin and Mer, but not with α(v)β₃, diminished its binding to macrophages. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages in vivo was diminished in the presence of histone H3. Incubation of histone H3 with activated protein C, a treatment that degrades histones, abrogated its inhibitory effects on efferocytosis under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The present studies demonstrate that histones have inhibitory effects on efferocytosis, suggesting a new mechanism by which extracellular histones contribute to acute inflammatory processes and tissue injury.

  3. Extracellular metalloproteases from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Lan

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial extracellular metalloproteases (BEMPs) are a large group of metal-containing proteases secreted by heterotrophic bacteria. In this review, the diversity, structural characteristics, mechanisms of maturation, physiological roles, and applications of BEMPs are described. BEMPs are distributed among nine families of metalloproteases because of differences in primary sequences and structural characteristics. Until now, all of the BEMPs identified have been endoproteases harboring one catalytic Zn(2+) in the active centers. BEMPs are usually synthesized as inactive zymogens with a propeptide that is covalently linked to and inhibits the catalytic domain. The removal of the propeptides of BEMPs is dependent on other proteases or an autocleavage process. The main physiological function of BEMPs is to degrade environmental proteins and peptides for bacterial heterotrophic nutrition. As extracellular proteases, BEMPs vary greatly in enzymology properties to adapt to their respective environments. BEMPs have been widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In order to broaden the application of BEMPs, it is essential to explore novel BEMPs and apply gene/protein engineering to improve the production and properties of promising BEMPs.

  4. Extracellular Histones Inhibit Efferocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Friggeri, Arnaud; Banerjee, Sami; Xie, Na; Cui, Huachun; de Freitas, Andressa; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Dupont, Hervé; Abraham, Edward; Liu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The uptake and clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, a process called efferocytosis, is a major component in the resolution of inflammation. Increased concentrations of extracellular histones are found during acute inflammatory states and appear to contribute to organ system dysfunction and mortality. In these studies, we examined the potential role of histones in modulating efferocytosis. We found that phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils or thymocytes by macrophages was significantly diminished in the presence of histones H3 or H4, but not histone H1. Histone H3 demonstrated direct binding to macrophages, an effect that was diminished by preincubation of macrophages with the opsonins growth arrest–specific gene 6 (Gas6) and milk fat globule–epidermal growth factor (EGF) 8 (MFG-E8). Incubation of histone H3 with soluble αvβ5 integrin and Mer, but not with αvβ3, diminished its binding to macrophages. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages in vivo was diminished in the presence of histone H3. Incubation of histone H3 with activated protein C, a treatment that degrades histones, abrogated its inhibitory effects on efferocytosis under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The present studies demonstrate that histones have inhibitory effects on efferocytosis, suggesting a new mechanism by which extracellular histones contribute to acute inflammatory processes and tissue injury. PMID:22495510

  5. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  6. Extracellular matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  7. Wingful, an extracellular feedback inhibitor of Wingless

    PubMed Central

    Gerlitz, Offer; Basler, Konrad

    2002-01-01

    Secreted peptide signals control many fundamental processes during animal development. Proper responses to these signals require cognate inducible feedback antagonists. Here we report the identification of a novel Drosophila Wingless (Wg) target gene, wingful (wf), and show that it encodes a potent extracellular feedback inhibitor of Wg. In contrast to the cytoplasmic protein Naked cuticle (Nkd), the only known Wg feedback antagonist, Wf functions during larval stages, when Nkd function is dispensable. We propose that Wf may provide feedback control for the long-range morphogen activities of Wg. PMID:12000788

  8. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    PubMed

    Seper, Andrea; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R; Röhm, Marc; Grutsch, Andreas; Reidl, Joachim; Urban, Constantin F; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  9. Vibrio cholerae Evades Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by the Activity of Two Extracellular Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Seper, Andrea; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R.; Röhm, Marc; Grutsch, Andreas; Reidl, Joachim; Urban, Constantin F.; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation. PMID:24039581

  10. Extracellular slime associated with Proteus mirabilis during swarming.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, S J; Stewart, K R; Williams, F D

    1983-01-01

    Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to visualize the extracellular slime of Proteus mirabilis swarm cells. Slime was observed with phase-contrast microscopy after fixation in hot sulfuric acid-sodium borate. Ruthenium red was used to stain slime for transmission electron microscopy. Copious quantities of extracellular slime were observed surrounding swarm cells; the slime appeared to provide a matrix through which the cells could migrate. Swarm cells were always found embedded in slime. These observations support the argument that swarming of P. mirabilis is associated with the production of large quantities of extracellular slime. Examination of nonswarming mutants of P. mirabilis revealed that a number of morphological changes, including cell elongation and increased flagellum synthesis, were required for swarm cell migration. It is still unclear whether extracellular slime production also is required for migration. Images PMID:6341364

  11. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  12. Commercial Cow Milk Contains Physically Stable Extracellular Vesicles Expressing Immunoregulatory TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Miranda B.; Broeren, Mathijs G. A.; van Caam, Arjan P. M.; Koenders, Marije I.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; van den Berg, Wim B.; de Vries, Marieke; van der Kraan, Peter M.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, have been identified in all biological fluids and rediscovered as an important part of the intercellular communication. Breast milk also contains extracellular vesicles and the proposed biological function is to enhance the antimicrobial defense in newborns. It is, however, unknown whether extracellular vesicles are still present in commercial milk and, more importantly, whether they retained their bioactivity. Here, we characterize the extracellular vesicles present in semi-skimmed cow milk available for consumers and study their effect on T cells. Methods and Results Extracellular vesicles from commercial milk were isolated and characterized. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles contained several immunomodulating miRNAs and membrane protein CD63, characteristics of exosomes. In contrast to RAW 267.4 derived extracellular vesicles the milk-derived extracellular vesicles were extremely stable under degrading conditions, including low pH, boiling and freezing. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles were easily taken up by murine macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, we found that they can facilitate T cell differentiation towards the pathogenic Th17 lineage. Using a (CAGA)12-luc reporter assay we showed that these extracellular vesicles carried bioactive TGF-β, and that anti-TGF-β antibodies blocked Th17 differentiation. Conclusion Our findings show that commercial milk contains stable extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, and carry immunoregulatory cargo. These data suggest that the extracellular vesicles present in commercial cow milk remains intact in the gastrointestinal tract and exert an immunoregulatory effect. PMID:25822997

  13. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Wang, Steven X.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  14. Extracellular RNA in aging.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, Douglas F; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Evans, Michele K

    2017-03-01

    Since the discovery of extracellular RNA (exRNA) in circulation and other bodily fluids, there has been considerable effort to catalog and assess whether exRNAs can be used as markers for health and disease. A variety of exRNA species have been identified including messenger RNA and noncoding RNA such as microRNA (miRNA), small nucleolar RNA, transfer RNA, and long noncoding RNA. Age-related changes in exRNA abundance have been observed, and it is likely that some of these transcripts play a role in aging. In this review, we summarize the current state of exRNA profiling in various body fluids and discuss age-related changes in exRNA abundance that have been identified in humans and other model organisms. miRNAs, in particular, are a major focus of current research and we will highlight and discuss the potential role that specific miRNAs might play in age-related phenotypes and disease. We will also review challenges facing this emerging field and various strategies that can be used for the validation and future use of exRNAs as markers of aging and age-related disease. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1385. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1385 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  15. Contrast Adaptation Contributes to Contrast-Invariance of Orientation Tuning of Primate V1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Lionel G.; Barone, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies in rodents and carnivores have shown that orientation tuning width of single neurons does not change when stimulus contrast is modified. However, in these studies, stimuli were presented for a relatively long duration (e. g., 4 seconds), making it possible that contrast adaptation contributed to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Our first purpose was to determine, in marmoset area V1, whether orientation tuning is still contrast-invariant with the stimulation duration is comparable to that of a visual fixation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed extracellular recordings and examined orientation tuning of single-units using static sine-wave gratings that were flashed for 200 msec. Sixteen orientations and three contrast levels, representing low, medium and high values in the range of effective contrasts for each neuron, were randomly intermixed. Contrast adaptation being a slow phenomenon, cells did not have enough time to adapt to each contrast individually. With this stimulation protocol, we found that the tuning width obtained at intermediate contrast was reduced to 89% (median), and that at low contrast to 76%, of that obtained at high contrast. Therefore, when probed with briefly flashed stimuli, orientation tuning is not contrast-invariant in marmoset V1. Our second purpose was to determine whether contrast adaptation contributes to contrast-invariance of orientation tuning. Stationary gratings were presented, as previously, for 200 msec with randomly varying orientations, but the contrast was kept constant within stimulation blocks lasting >20 sec, allowing for adaptation to the single contrast in use. In these conditions, tuning widths obtained at low contrast were still significantly less than at high contrast (median 85%). However, tuning widths obtained with medium and high contrast stimuli no longer differed significantly. Conclusions/Significance Orientation tuning does not appear to be contrast-invariant when

  16. Salt stress represses production of extracellular proteases in Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Liu, R F; Huang, C L; Feng, H

    2015-05-11

    Bacillus pumilus is able to secrete subtilisin-like prote-ases, one of which has been purified and characterized biochemically, demonstrating great potential for use in industrial applications. In the current study, the biosynthesis and transcription of extracellular pro-teases in B. pumilus (BA06) under salt stress were investigated using various methods, including a proteolytic assay, zymogram analysis, and real-time PCR. Our results showed that total extracellular proteolytic activity, both in fermentation broth and on milk-containing agar plates, was considerably repressed by salt in a dosage-dependent manner. As Bacillus species usually secret multiple extracellular proteases, a vari-ety of individual extracellular protease encoding genes were selected for real-time PCR analysis. It was shown that proteases encoded by the aprE and aprX genes were the major proteases in the fermentation broth in terms of their transcripts in B. pumilus. Further, transcription of aprE, aprX, and epr genes was indeed repressed by salt stress. In con-trast, transcription of other genes (e.g., vpr and wprA) was not repressed or significantly affected by the salt. Conclusively, salt stress represses total extracellular proteolytic activity in B. pumilus, which can largely be ascribed to suppression of the major protease-encoding genes (aprE, aprX) at the transcriptional level. In contrast, transcription of other pro-tease-encoding genes (e.g., vpr, wprA) was not repressed by salt stress.

  17. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  18. Functional aspects of extracellular cyclophilins.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Henrik; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia

    2014-07-01

    The cyclophilin family of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerases includes several isoforms found to be secreted in response to different stimuli, thus existing both in the interior and the exterior of cells. The extracellular fractions of the cyclophilins CypA and CypB are involved in the control of cell-cell communication. By binding to the cell membrane receptor CD147 and cell surface heparans they elicit a variety of intracellular signaling cascades involved in inflammatory processes. Increased levels of cyclophilins in inflammatory tissues and body fluids are considered as an inflammatory response to injury. Thus, the extracellular portion of cyclophilins probably plays an important role in human diseases associated with acute or chronic inflammation like rheumatoid arthritis, sepsis, asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Specific inhibition of the cyclophilins in the extracellular space may open an effective therapeutic approach for treating inflammatory diseases.

  19. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  20. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Pomatto, Margherita A. C.; Gai, Chiara; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous population of microparticles released by virtually all living cells which have been recently widely investigated in different biological fields. They are typically composed of two primary types (exosomes and microvesicles) and are recently commanding increasing attention as mediators of cellular signaling. Indeed, these vesicles can affect recipient cells by carrying and delivering complex cargos of biomolecules (including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids), protected from enzymatic degradation in the environment. Their importance has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of several organs, in particular in kidney, where different cell types secrete extracellular vesicles that mediate their communication with downstream urinary tract cells. Over the past few years, evidence has been shown that vesicles participate in kidney development and normal physiology. Moreover, EVs are widely demonstrated to be implicated in cellular signaling during renal regenerative and pathological processes. Although many EV mechanisms are still poorly understood, in particular in kidney, the discovery of their role could help to shed light on renal biological processes which are so far elusive. Lastly, extracellular vesicles secreted by renal cells gather in urine, thus becoming a great resource for disease or recovery markers and a promising non-invasive diagnostic instrument for renal disease. In the present review, we discuss the most recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in renal physiopathology and their potential implication in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:28638822

  1. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Pomatto, Margherita A C; Gai, Chiara; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous population of microparticles released by virtually all living cells which have been recently widely investigated in different biological fields. They are typically composed of two primary types (exosomes and microvesicles) and are recently commanding increasing attention as mediators of cellular signaling. Indeed, these vesicles can affect recipient cells by carrying and delivering complex cargos of biomolecules (including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids), protected from enzymatic degradation in the environment. Their importance has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of several organs, in particular in kidney, where different cell types secrete extracellular vesicles that mediate their communication with downstream urinary tract cells. Over the past few years, evidence has been shown that vesicles participate in kidney development and normal physiology. Moreover, EVs are widely demonstrated to be implicated in cellular signaling during renal regenerative and pathological processes. Although many EV mechanisms are still poorly understood, in particular in kidney, the discovery of their role could help to shed light on renal biological processes which are so far elusive. Lastly, extracellular vesicles secreted by renal cells gather in urine, thus becoming a great resource for disease or recovery markers and a promising non-invasive diagnostic instrument for renal disease. In the present review, we discuss the most recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in renal physiopathology and their potential implication in diagnosis and therapy.

  3. The optimal contrast media policy in CT of the liver. Part I: Technical notes.

    PubMed

    Rengo, Marco; Bellini, Davide; De Cecco, Carlo N; Osimani, Marcello; Vecchietti, Fabrizio; Caruso, Damiano; Maceroni, Marco M; Lucchesi, Paola; Iafrate, Franco; Paolantonio, Pasquale; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Latest developments of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), which is today considered a real volumetric technique, have revolutionized abdominal imaging. Technological improvements such as higher spatial resolution, larger volume coverage and higher temporal resolution, have reduced scan times allowing CT studies of the abdomen within a single breath-hold. Furthermore, the increased number of slices, the submillimetric collimation, and the use of multiple dynamic post-contrast phases per single examination, may all contribute to increase the radiation exposure of single patients. The aim of this review is to discuss different parameters affecting contrast media enhancement, as vascular enhancement, parenchymal enhancement and timing, in order to minimize the amount of contrast medium injected and the radiation exposure.

  4. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  5. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  6. Analysis of Yeast Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Oliveira, Debora L; Vargas, Gabriele; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Franzen, Anderson J; Frasés, Susana; Miranda, Kildare; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are important carriers of biologically active components in a number of organisms, including fungal cells. Experimental characterization of fungal EVs suggested that these membranous compartments are likely involved in the regulation of several biological events. In fungal pathogens, these events include mechanisms of disease progression and/or control, suggesting potential targets for therapeutic intervention or disease prophylaxis. In this manuscript we describe methods that have been used in the last 10 years for the characterization of EVs produced by yeast forms of several fungal species. Experimental approaches detailed in this chapter include ultracentrifugation methods for EV fractionation, chromatographic approaches for analysis of EV lipids, microscopy techniques for analysis of both intracellular and extracellular vesicular compartments, interaction of EVs with host cells, and physical chemical analysis of EVs by dynamic light scattering.

  7. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  8. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  9. Complex extracellular matrices promote tissue-specific stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Philp, Deborah; Chen, Silvia S; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Orenstein, Jan; Margolis, Leonid; Kleinman, Hynda K

    2005-02-01

    Most cells in tissues contact an extracellular matrix on at least one surface. These complex mixtures of interacting proteins provide structural support and biological signals that regulate cell differentiation and may be important for stem cell differentiation. In this study, we have grown a rhesus monkey embryonic stem cell line in the presence of various extracellular matrix components in monolayer, in a NASA-developed rotating wall vessel bioreactor in vitro, and subcutaneously in vivo. We find that individual components of the extracellular matrix, such as laminin-1 or collagen I, do not influence the growth or morphology of the cells. In contrast, a basement membrane extract, Matrigel, containing multiple extracellular matrix components, induces the cells within 4 days to form immature glandular- and tubular-like structures, many of which contain a lumen with polarized epithelium and microvilli. Such structures were seen in vitro when the cells were grown in the bioreactor and when the cells were injected into mice. These tubular- and glandular-like structures were polarized epithelia based on immunostaining for laminin and cytokeratin. The cell aggregates and tumors also contained additional mixed populations of cells, including mesenchymal cells and neuronal cells, based on immunostaining with vimentin and neuronal markers. An extract of cartilage, containing multiple cartilage matrix components, promoted chondrogenesis in vivo where alcian blue-stained cartilage nodules could be observed. Some of these nodules stained with von Kossa, indicating that they had formed calcified cartilage. We conclude that extracellular matrices can promote the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into differentiated cells and structures that are similar to the tissue from which the matrix is derived. Such preprogramming of cell differentiation with extracellular matrices may be useful in targeting stem cells to repair specific damaged organs.

  10. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  11. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  12. Mass spectrometry of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Stanly, Christopher; Vilasi, Annalisa; Fiume, Immacolata; Capasso, Giovambattista; Turiák, Lilla; Buzas, Edit I; Vékey, Károly

    2016-01-01

    The review briefly summaries main features of extracellular vesicles, a joint terminology for exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic vesicles. These vesicles are in the center of interest in biology and medical sciences, and form a very active field of research. Mass spectrometry (MS), with its specificity and sensitivity, has the potential to identify and characterize molecular composition of these vesicles; but as yet there are only a limited, but fast-growing, number of publications that use MS workflows in this field. MS is the major tool to assess protein composition of extracellular vesicles: qualitative and quantitative proteomics approaches are both reviewed. Beside proteins, lipid and metabolite composition of vesicles might also be best assessed by MS techniques; however there are few applications as yet in this respect. The role of alternative analytical approaches, like gel-based proteomics and antibody-based immunoassays, are also mentioned. The objective of the review is to give an overview of this fast-growing field to help orient MS-based research on extracellular vesicles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Extracellular Vesicles in Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2017-07-03

    Accumulating evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. These vesicles include exosomes, ectosomes (ie, microparticles, extracellular vesicles, microvesicles, and shedding vesicles), and apoptotic bodies. Exosomes are generated by inward budding of the membrane (endocytosis), subsequent forming of multivesicular bodies, and release by exocytosis. Ectosomes are formed by outward blebbing from the plasma membrane and are then released by proteolytic cleavage from the cell surface. Apoptotic bodies are generated on apoptotic cell shrinkage and death. Extracellular vesicles are released when the cells are activated or undergo apoptosis under inflammatory conditions. The number and types of released EVs are different according to the pathophysiological status of the disease. Therefore, EVs can be novel biomarkers for various lung diseases. EVs contain several molecules, including proteins, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA; they transfer these molecules to distant recipient cells. Circulating EVs modify the targeted cells and influence the microenvironment of the lungs. For this unique capability, EVs are expected to be a new drug delivery system and a novel therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of extracellular superoxide dismutase in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Qin, Zhenyu; Laude, Karine; Kim, Ha Won; McCann, Louise; Folz, J Rodney; Dikalov, Sergey; Fukai, Tohru; Harrison, David G

    2006-09-01

    We previously found that angiotensin II-induced hypertension increases vascular extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD), and proposed that this is a compensatory mechanism that blunts the hypertensive response and preserves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. To test this hypothesis, we studied ecSOD-deficient mice. ecSOD(-/-) and C57Blk/6 mice had similar blood pressure at baseline; however, the hypertension caused by angiotensin II was greater in ecSOD(-/-) compared with wild-type mice (168 versus 147 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.01). In keeping with this, angiotensin II increased superoxide and reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in small mesenteric arterioles to a greater extent in ecSOD(-/-) than in wild-type mice. In contrast to these findings in resistance vessels, angiotensin II paradoxically improved endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, reduced intracellular and extracellular superoxide, and increased NO production in aortas of ecSOD(-/-) mice. Whereas aortic expression of endothelial NO synthase, Cu/ZnSOD, and MnSOD were not altered in ecSOD(-/-) mice, the activity of Cu/ZnSOD was increased by 80% after angiotensin II infusion. This was associated with a concomitant increase in expression of the copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD in the aorta but not in the mesenteric arteries. Moreover, the angiotensin II-induced increase in aortic reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity was diminished in ecSOD(-/-) mice as compared with controls. Thus, during angiotensin II infusion, ecSOD reduces hypertension, minimizes vascular superoxide production, and preserves endothelial function in resistance arterioles. We also identified novel compensatory mechanisms involving upregulation of copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD, increased Cu/ZnSOD activity, and decreased reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity in larger vessels. These compensatory mechanisms preserve large vessel function when ecSOD is absent in

  15. The Contrastive Analysis Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardhaugh, Ronald

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the strong contrastive analysis hypothesis, which claims predictive powers for contrastive analysis, and the weak hypothesis, which claims only that contrastive analysis can help account for observed difficulties in second language learning. The strong hypothesis is found untenable, and difficulties with the weak hypothesis are discussed…

  16. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  17. Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    While the use of contrast agents in other imaging modalities (X ray, MRI, PET, …) has been routinely accepted for many years, the development and commercialization of contrast agents designed specifically for ultrasound imaging has occurred only very recently. As in the other imaging modalities, the injection of contrast agents during an ultrasound examination is intended to facilitate the detection and diagnosis of specific pathologies. Contrast agents efficiency is based on the backscattering of ultrasound by microbubbles. These microparticules are intravenously injected in the blood flow. After an introduction and generalities on ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) the microbubble physics in an acoustic field will be developed. Second, physics characteristics of contrast agents will be compared (bubbles with or without shell, gas nature, size distribution). Influence of acoustic pressure on the behaviour of the microparticules (linear, non linear and destruction) will be discussed. Finally, a review of specific imaging adapted to contrast agent properties as harmonic imaging, pulse inversion imaging will be presented.

  18. Extracellular Protons Regulate the Extracellular Cation Selectivity of the Sodium Pump

    PubMed Central

    Milanick, Mark A.; Arnett, Krista L.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of 0.3–10 nM extracellular protons (pH 9.5–8.0) on ouabain-sensitive rubidium influx were determined in 4,4′-diisocyanostilbene-2, 2′-disulfonate (DIDS)-treated human and rat erythrocytes. This treatment clamps the intracellular H. We found that rubidium binds much better to the protonated pump than the unprotonated pump; 13-fold better in rat and 34-fold better in human erythrocytes. This clearly shows that protons are not competing with rubidium in this proton concentration range. Bretylium and tetrapropylammonium also bind much better to the protonated pump than the unprotonated pump in human erythrocytes and in this sense they are potassium-like ions. In contrast, guanidinium and sodium bind about equally well to protonated and unprotonated pump in human red cells. In rat red cells, protons actually make sodium bind less well (about sevenfold). Thus, protons have substantially different effects on the binding of rubidium and sodium. The effect of protons on ouabain binding in rat red cells was intermediate between the effects of protons on rubidium binding and on sodium binding. Remarkably, all four cationic inhibitors (bretylium, guanidinium, sodium, and tetrapropylammonium) had similar apparent inhibitory constants for the unprotonated pump (∼5–10 mM). The Kd for proton binding to the human pump, with the empty transport site facing extracellularly is 13 nM, whereas the extracellular transport site loaded with sodium is 9.5 nM, and with rubidium is 0.38 nM. In rat red cells there is also a substantial difference in the Kd for proton binding to the sodium-loaded pump (14.5 nM) and the rubidium-loaded pump (0.158 nM). These data suggest that important rearrangements occur at the extracellular pump surface as the pump moves between conformations in which the outward facing transport site has sodium bound, is empty, or has rubidium bound and that guanidinium is sodium-like and bretylium and tetrapropylammonium are rubidium-like. PMID

  19. The Extracellular Electrical Resistivity in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Gleixner, Raimund; Fromherz, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of cells in a tissue depends on the nature of the extracellular matrix. The electrical properties of the narrow extracellular space are unknown. Here we consider cell adhesion mediated by extracellular matrix protein on a solid substrate as a model system. We culture human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells on silica coated with fibronectin and determine the electrical resistivity in the cell-solid junction \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\rho}_{{\\mathrm{J}}}=r_{{\\mathrm{J}}}d_{{\\mathrm{J}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} by combining measurements of the sheet resistance \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}r_{{\\mathrm{J}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and of the distance \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}d_{{\\mathrm{J}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} between membrane and substrate. The sheet resistance is obtained from phase fluorometry of the voltage-sensitive dye ANNINE-5 by alternating-current stimulation from the substrate. The distance is measured by fluorescence interference contrast microscopy. We change the resistivity of the bath in a range from \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}66\\hspace{.167em}{\\Omega}\\hspace{.167em

  20. The evolution of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P; Adams, Josephine C

    2010-12-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or "adhesome" also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology.

  1. The Evolution of Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or “adhesome” also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology. PMID:21160071

  2. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Gary

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  3. Micro- and macrorheology of jellyfish extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J M

    2012-01-04

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish.

  4. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  5. Micro- and Macrorheology of Jellyfish Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish. PMID:22225792

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa binds to extracellular matrix deposited by human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Esco, Miechia A; Hazlett, Linda D; Kurpakus-Wheater, Michelle

    2002-12-01

    To measure the effect of extracellular matrix substrate, pH, and O(2) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa binding. Extracellular matrix substrates were prepared from human corneal epithelial cells cultured in 2% or 20% O(2). P. aeruginosa strains ATCC 19660 or PAO1 (suspended in pH 7.0 or 7.5 buffer) were cultured on extracellular matrix substrates in 2% or 20% O(2). The mean number of adherent bacteria per counted per field +/- SEM (n = 15) was determined for combinations of bacteria, extracellular matrix substrate, pH, and O(2). Binding in the presence of antibodies directed against laminin-5 was also measured. Extracellular matrix substrates produced by cells cultured in 20% O(2), combined with an environment of pH 7.0, provided the least favorable conditions for binding of strain 19660. In contrast, extracellular matrix substrates produced by cells cultured in 2% O(2), combined with an environment of pH 7.0, provided the most favorable conditions for binding of strain 19660. Binding of PAO1, however, as a function of extracellular matrix substrate and pH, did not similarly compare with binding of strain 19660. Antibodies against laminin-5 chains served to increase the number of strain 19660 bacteria bound to extracellular matrix substrates compared with the control. The extracellular matrix secreted by hypoxic corneal epithelial cells is a substrate for binding of P. aeruginosa. Results in previous studies have shown that hypoxic extracellular matrix contains less laminin-5 protein than normoxic matrix. The antibody studies in this report suggest that the decrease in laminin-5 content in hypoxic matrix, relative to matrix secreted by normoxic corneal epithelium, may be responsible for increased bacterial adhesion.

  7. [Extracellular ribonuclease from Bacillus thuringiensis].

    PubMed

    Chepurnova, N K; Liakhov, D L; Rechinskiĭ, V O; Karpeĭskiĭ, M Ia

    1988-04-01

    The ability of the strain Bacillus thuringiensis var. subtoxicus to produce extracellular ribonuclease (ribonuclease Bt) was studied. It was found that the culture medium possesses a RNA-depolymerizing activity whose maximum is observed 4-5 hours after the beginning of the linear growth phase. A three-step chromatography of the culture extract on phosphocellulose resulted in a homogeneous enzyme with a molecular mass of 12000 Da. The enzyme showed the maximum activity towards RNA at pH 8.5, catalyzed the hydrolysis of polyribonucleotides and guanosine-2',3'-cyclophosphate. Hence, the enzyme can be related to base-nonspecific cyclizing ribonucleases showing the guanylic specificity towards nucleoside-2',3'-cyclophosphates.

  8. Extracellular Matrix: Functions in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Claudia S.; Franco, Santos J.; Müller, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    An astonishing number of extracellular matrix glycoproteins are expressed in dynamic patterns in the developing and adult nervous system. Neural stem cells, neurons, and glia express receptors that mediate interactions with specific extracellular matrix molecules. Functional studies in vitro and genetic studies in mice have provided evidence that the extracellular matrix affects virtually all aspects of nervous system development and function. Here we will summarize recent findings that have shed light on the specific functions of defined extracellular matrix molecules on such diverse processes as neural stem cell differentiation, neuronal migration, the formation of axonal tracts, and the maturation and function of synapses in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:21123393

  9. Stroke and Circulating Extracellular RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; Shah, Ravi; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Murthy, Venkatesh; Gerstein, Mark; Rozowsky, Joel; Kitchen, Robert; Larson, Martin G.; Levy, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— There is increasing interest in extracellular RNAs (ex-RNAs), with numerous reports of associations between selected microRNAs (miRNAs) and a variety of cardiovascular disease phenotypes. Previous studies of ex-RNAs in relation to risk for cardiovascular disease have investigated small numbers of patients and assayed only candidate miRNAs. No human studies have investigated links between novel ex-RNAs and stroke. Methods— We conducted unbiased next-generation sequencing using plasma from 40 participants of the FHS (Framingham Heart Study; Offspring Cohort Exam 8) followed by high-throughput polymerase chain reaction of 471 ex-RNAs. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction included 331 of the most abundant miRNAs, 43 small nucleolar RNAs, and 97 piwi-interacting RNAs in 2763 additional FHS participants and explored the relations of ex-RNAs and prevalent (n=63) and incident (n=51) stroke and coronary heart disease (prevalent=286, incident=69). Results— After adjustment for multiple cardiovascular disease risk factors, 7 ex-RNAs were associated with stroke prevalence or incidence; there were no ex-RNA associated with prevalent or incident coronary heart disease. Statistically significant ex-RNA associations with stroke were specific, with no overlap between prevalent and incident events. Conclusions— This is the largest study of ex-RNAs in relation to stroke using an unbiased approach in an observational cohort and the first large study to examine human small noncoding RNAs beyond miRNAs. These results demonstrate that when studied in a large observational cohort, extracellular miRNAs are associated with stroke risk. PMID:28289238

  10. Ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an important role in imaging of the mediastinum and abdominal organs. Since the introduction of US contrast agents (UCA) for transabdominal US, attempts have been made to apply contrast-enhanced US techniques also to EUS. Since 2003, specific contrast-enhanced imaging was possible using EUS. Important studies have been published regarding contrast-enhanced EUS and the characterization of focal pancreatic lesions, lymph nodes, and subepithelial tumors. In this manuscript, we describe the relevant UCA, their application, and specific image acquisition as well as the principles of image tissue characterization using contrast-enhanced EUS. Safety issues, potential future developments, and EUS-specific issues are reviewed. PMID:27824024

  11. Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Morcos, S K; Thomsen, H S

    2001-01-01

    Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) are more likely to develop in patients with asthma, a history of allergy or contrast reaction and in those who are debilitated or medically unstable. These reactions can be divided into renal and general, and the latter are subdivided into acute and delayed. Acute general reactions can be minor, intermediate or severe. Fatal reactions are rare. The introduction of low-osmolality agents has caused an overall reduction in the number of non-fatal contrast reactions. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute adverse side effects to ICM is invaluable and may prevent a reaction from becoming severe. Familiarity with cardiopulmonary resuscitation is essential for successful management of life-threatening reactions. Contrast-media-induced renal impairment can be reduced with the use of low-osmolality contrast media and extracellular volume expansion. The use of ICM in diabetic patients receiving metformin should be carried out with care to avoid metformin-induced lactic acidosis. However, this problem is mainly observed in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

  12. Protective Effects of Repetitive Injections of Radiographic Contrast Media on the Subsequent Tolerance to Ischemia in the Isolated Rat Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Falck, Geir; Bruvold, Morten; Schjott, Jan; Jynge, Per

    2000-11-15

    Purpose: Despite detailed knowledge of the effects of X-ray contrast media on cardiac function, no studies have examined the effect of contrast media injections on the subsequent tolerance to ischemia in the heart.Methods: Isolated perfused rat hearts were exposed to repetitive injections of iohexol, iodixanol, or ioxaglate before 30 min of global ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. These groups were compared with control (no pretreatment) and ischemic preconditioning known to reduce infarct size. Physiologic variables and infarct size were measured. Results: Pretreatment with iodixanol reduced infarct size significantly compared with control and thus afforded protection against ischemia. Injections with iohexol and ioxaglate reduced infarct size, although not significantly, compared with control.Conclusion: Pretreatment of the isolated rat heart with commonly used contrast media enhances the cardiac tolerance to subsequent ischemia. The mechanism behind this protective effect could not be determined, but could involve stretching of the heart and/or generation of nitric oxide.

  13. Phenazine virulence factor binding to extracellular DNA is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K.; Tavallaie, Roya; Ibugo, Amaye I.; Panchompoo, Janjira; Sehar, Shama; Aldous, Leigh; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; Thomas, Shane R.; Kumar, Naresh; Gooding, J. Justin; Manefield, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics necessitates the identification of novel leads for infection control. Interference with extracellular phenomena, such as quorum sensing, extracellular DNA integrity and redox active metabolite release, represents a new frontier to control human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and hence reduce mortality. Here we reveal that the extracellular redox active virulence factor pyocyanin produced by P. aeruginosa binds directly to the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of DNA and intercalates with DNA nitrogenous base pair regions. Binding results in local perturbations of the DNA double helix structure and enhanced electron transfer along the nucleic acid polymer. Pyocyanin binding to DNA also increases DNA solution viscosity. In contrast, antioxidants interacting with DNA and pyocyanin decrease DNA solution viscosity. Biofilms deficient in pyocyanin production and biofilms lacking extracellular DNA show similar architecture indicating the interaction is important in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. PMID:25669133

  14. Heat treatment of peach fruit: modifications in the extracellular compartment and identification of novel extracellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Claudia A; Budde, Claudio O; Borsani, Julia; Lombardo, Verónica A; Lauxmann, Martin A; Andreo, Carlos S; Lara, María V; Drincovich, María F

    2012-11-01

    Ripening of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) fruit is accompanied by dramatic cell wall changes that lead to softening. Post-harvest heat treatment is effective in delaying softening and preventing some chilling injury symptoms that this fruit exhibits after storage at low temperatures. In the present work, the levels of twelve transcripts encoding proteins involved in cell wall metabolism, as well as the differential extracellular proteome, were examined after a post-harvest heat treatment (HT; 39 °C for 3 days) of "Dixiland" peach fruit. A typical softening behaviour, in correlation with an increase in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase-1 (PpACO1), was observed for peach maintained at 20 °C for 3 days (R3). Six transcripts encoding proteins involved in cell wall metabolism significantly increased in R3 with respect to peach at harvest, while six showed no modification or even decreased. In contrast, after HT, fruit maintained their firmness, exhibiting low PpACO1 level and significant lower levels of the twelve cell wall-modifying genes than in R3. Differential proteomic analysis of apoplastic proteins during softening and after HT revealed a significant decrease of DUF642 proteins after HT; as well as an increase of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC) after softening. The presence of GAPC in the peach extracellular matrix was further confirmed by in situ immunolocalization and transient expression in tomato fruit. Though further studies are required to establish the function of DUF642 and GAPC in the apoplast, this study contributes to a deeper understanding of the events during peach softening and after HT with a focus on this key compartment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Ferrimagnetic susceptibility contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bach-Gansmo, T

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on superparamagnetic particles have been in clinical development for more than 5 years, and the complexity of their effects is still not elucidated. The relaxivities are frequently used to give an idea of their efficacy, but these parameters can only be used if they are concentration independent. For large superparamagnetic systems, the evolution of the transverse magnetization is biexponential, after an initial loss of magnetization. Both these characteristics of large superparamagnetic systems should lead to prudence in using the relaxivities as indicators of contrast medium efficacy. Susceptibility induced artefacts have been associated with the use of superparamagnetic contrast agents since the first imaging evaluation took place. The range of concentrations where good contrast effect was achieved without inducing artefacts, as well as blurring and metal artefacts were evaluated. The influence of motion on the induction of artefacts was studied, and compared to the artefacts induced by a paramagnetic agent subject to motion. With a suitable concentration of a negative contrast agent, a signal void could be achieved in the region prone to motion, and no artefacts were induced. If the concentration was too high, a displacement of the region close to the contrast agent was observed. The artefacts occurred in a volume surrounding the contrast agent, i.e., also outside the imaging plane. In comparison a positive, paramagnetic contrast agent induced heavy artefacts in the phase encoding direction, appearing as both high intensity regions and black holes, in a mosaic pattern. Clinical trials of the oral contrast agent OMP for abdominal MR imaging showed this agent to be safe and efficacious. OMP increased the diagnostic efficacy of abdominal MR imaging in 2 of 3 cases examined, with a significant decrease in motion artefacts. Susceptibility contrast agents may also be of use in the evaluation of small lesions in the liver. Particulate material

  16. Describing contrast across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Sohaib Ali; Iqbal, Muhammad Zafar; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin

    2017-06-01

    Due to its sensitive nature against illumination and noise distributions, contrast is not widely used for image description. On the contrary, the human perception of contrast along different spatial frequency bandwidths provides a powerful discriminator function that can be modeled in a robust manner against local illumination. Based upon this observation, a dense local contrast descriptor is proposed and its potential in different applications of computer vision is discussed. Extensive experiments reveal that this simple yet effective description performs well in comparison with state of the art image descriptors. We also show the importance of this description in multiresolution pansharpening framework.

  17. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  18. Influence of extracellular zinc on M1 microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Youichirou; Aratake, Takaaki; Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kumiko; Tsuda, Masayuki; Yawata, Toshio; Ueba, Tetuya; Saito, Motoaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular zinc, which is released from hippocampal neurons in response to brain ischaemia, triggers morphological changes in microglia. Under ischaemic conditions, microglia exhibit two opposite activation states (M1 and M2 activation), which may be further regulated by the microenvironment. We examined the role of extracellular zinc on M1 activation of microglia. Pre-treatment of microglia with 30–60 μM ZnCl2 resulted in dose-dependent increases in interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) secretion when M1 activation was induced by lipopolysaccharide administration. In contrast, the cell-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, the radical scavenger Trolox, and the P2X7 receptor antagonist A438079 suppressed the effects of zinc pre-treatment on microglia. Furthermore, endogenous zinc release was induced by cerebral ischaemia–reperfusion, resulting in increased expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and the microglial M1 surface marker CD16/32, without hippocampal neuronal cell loss, in addition to impairments in object recognition memory. However, these effects were suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. These findings suggest that extracellular zinc may prime microglia to enhance production of pro-inflammatory cytokines via P2X7 receptor activation followed by reactive oxygen species generation in response to stimuli that trigger M1 activation, and that these inflammatory processes may result in deficits in object recognition memory. PMID:28240322

  19. Extracellularly activatable nanocarriers for drug delivery to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanoparticles for drug delivery to tumors need to satisfy two seemingly conflicting requirements: they should maintain physical and chemical stability during circulation and be able to interact with target cells and release drug at desired locations with no substantial delay. Unique microenvironment of tumors and externally-applied stimuli provide a useful means to maintain a balance between the two requirements. Areas covered We discuss nanoparticulate drug carriers that maintain stable structures in normal conditions but respond to stimuli for spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. We first define the desired effects of extracellular activation of nanoparticles and frequently used stimuli and review examples of extracellularly activated nanoparticles. Expert opinion Several challenges remain in developing extracellularly activatable nanoparticles. First, some of the stimuli-responsive NPs undergo incremental changes in response to stimuli, losing circulation stability. Second, the applicability of stimuli in clinical settings is limited due to the occasional occurrence of the activating conditions in normal tissues. Third, the construction of stimuli-responsive nanoparticles involves increasing complexity in nanoparticle structure and production methods. Future efforts are needed to identify new targeting conditions and increase the contrast between activated and non-activated NPs, while keeping the production methods simple and scalable. PMID:24950343

  20. Extracellular Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R. J.; Roe, K. L.; Voelker, B. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are important to the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. Previous studies have shown that biological ROS production in the ocean may be significant. We examined the ability of five common species of diatoms to produce and break down ROS in the presence and absence of light by suspending cells on filters and measuring downstream ROS concentrations using chemiluminescence probes. Results show a wide range of rates (undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1) and suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways. H2O2 decay appears to be mediated primarily by active cell processes, while O2- appears to occur through a combination of active and passive cell processes. Extracellular H2O2 production and decay were also determined for twelve species of heterotrophic bacteria using two different methodologies. Measured decay rates were consistent despite methodological differences. By contrast, large variability of production rates was observed could vary significantly even among between replicates of the same species measured using the same methodology. Although production rates cannot be stated with certainty, it is likely that extracellular H2O2 production occurs in most bacterial species.

  1. Control of basal extracellular adenosine concentration in rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Mark J; Atterbury, Alison; Dale, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    To re-examine how the basal extracellular concentration of adenosine is regulated in acutely isolated cerebellar slices we have combined electrophysiological and microelectrode biosensor measurements. In almost all cases, synaptic transmission was tonically inhibited by adenosine acting via A1 receptors. By contrast, in most slices, the biosensors did not measure an adenosine tone but did record a spatially non-uniform extracellular tone of the downstream metabolites (inosine and hypoxanthine). Most of the extracellular hypoxanthine arose from the metabolism of inosine by ecto-purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). Adenosine kinase was the major determinant of adenosine levels, as its inhibition increased both adenosine concentration and A1 receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. Breakdown of adenosine by adenosine deaminase was the major source of the inosine/hypoxanthine tone. However adenosine deaminase played a minor role in determining the level of adenosine at synapses, suggesting a distal location. Blockade of adenosine transport (by NBTI/dipyridamole) had inconsistent effects on basal levels of adenosine and synaptic transmission. Unexpectedly, application of NBTI/dipyridamole prevented the efflux of adenosine resulting from block of adenosine kinase at only a subset of synapses. We conclude that there is spatial variation in the functional expression of NBTI/dipyridamole-sensitive transporters. The increased spatial and temporal resolution of the purine biosensor measurements has revealed the complexity of the control of adenosine and purine tone in the cerebellum. PMID:17446223

  2. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  3. Contrast Transmission In Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, L. W., Jr.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Jackovich, J. E.

    1983-09-01

    While the propagation of visible and infrared radiation in adverse weather has been studied by many investigators, the effect of rain on contrast transmission or visual range have received little attention. A theoretical and experimental program examining contrast transmission in adverse weather will be described in this paper. Measurements of contrast transmission were made using bar targets consisting of parallel flourescent light bulbs. The bulb spacing is four times the bulb diameter. Data is obtained by photographing the target from a distance of two hundred meters using a camera fitted with an eight-hundred millimeter lens under both clear and obscured conditions. The negatives are then analyzed using a microdensitometer and contrast is defined by C = (I MAX - i MAX + i MIN)-1 where I-MAX and I-MIN are the intensity maximum and minimum, respectively. In addition to contrast measurements, simultaneous measurements of atmospheric transmission, snow particle phase function, and all relevant weather parameters are made. A computer model, based on scattering theory, has been developed for predicting contrast transmission. The model computes zero, first and second order scattering contributions in a three-dimensional atmosphere using phase function computations based on Mie theory.

  4. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  5. Extracellular vesicles in parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marcilla, Antonio; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Trelis, Maria; de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Osuna, Antonio; Bernal, Dolores; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Almeida, Igor C.; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect billions of people and are considered a major public health issue. Close to 400 species are estimated to parasitize humans, of which around 90 are responsible for great clinical burden and mortality rates. Unfortunately, they are largely neglected as they are mainly endemic to poor regions. Of relevance to this review, there is accumulating evidence of the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in parasitic diseases, acting both in parasite–parasite inter-communication as well as in parasite–host interactions. EVs participate in the dissemination of the pathogen and play a role in the regulation of the host immune systems. Production of EVs from parasites or parasitized cells has been described for a number of parasitic infections. In this review, we provide the most relevant findings of the involvement of EVs in intercellular communication, modulation of immune responses, involvement in pathology, and their potential as new diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents in some of the major human parasitic pathogens. PMID:25536932

  6. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  7. Lamotrigine, carbamazepine and phenytoin differentially alter extracellular levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shagufta; Fowler, Leslie J; Whitton, Peter S

    2005-02-01

    We have studied the effects of treatment with the anticonvulsants lamotrigine (LTG), phenytoin (PHN) and carbamazepine (CBZ) on basal and stimulated extracellular aspartate (ASP), glutamate (GLU), taurine (TAU), GABA, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) in the hippocampus of freely moving rats using microdialysis. All of the drugs investigated have had inhibition of Na(+) channel activity implicated as their principal mechanism of action. Neither LTG (10-20 mg/kg), PHN (20-40 mg/kg) or CBZ (10-20 mg/kg) had an effect on the basal extracellular concentrations of any of the amino acids studied with the exception of glutamate, which was decreased at the highest LTG dose. However, when amino acid transmitter levels were increased with 50 microM veratridine, LTG was found to cause a dose-dependent decrease in dialysate levels of all four amino acids, with the effect being most pronounced for glutamate. In contrast, PHN decreased extracellular aspartate levels but had no effect on evoked-extracellular GLU, TAU or GABA. Somewhat unexpectedly, CBZ did not alter the stimulated increase in the excitatory amino acids, GLU and ASP, but, rather surprisingly for an antiepileptic drug, markedly decreased that of the inhibitory substances TAU and GABA. The three drugs had differing effects on basal extracellular 5-HT and DA. LTG caused a dose-dependent decrease in both, while CBZ and PHN both increased extracellular 5-HT and DA. When extracellular 5-HT and DA was evoked by veratridine LTG had no significant effect on this, while PHN but not CBZ increased stimulated extracellular 5-HT and both PHN and CBZ augmented DA. Thus, the effects of the three drugs studied seemed to depend on whether extracellular transmitter levels are evoked or basal and the particular transmitter in question. This suggests that there are marked differences in the neurochemical mechanisms of antiepileptic drug action of the three compounds studied.

  8. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  9. Regulation of innate immunity by extracellular nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, Stefania; Gatta, Lucia; Pontecorvo, Laura; Vitiello, Laura; la Sala, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) is the most abundant among extracellular nucleotides and is commonly considered as a classical danger signal, which stimulates immune responses in the presence of tissue injury. In fact, increased nucleotide concentration in the extracellular space is generally closely associated with tissue stress or damage. However non-lytic nucleotide release may also occur in many cell types under a variety of conditions. Extracellular nucleotides are sensed by a class of plasma membrane receptors called P2 purinergic receptors (P2Rs). P2 receptors are expressed by all immunological cells and their activation elicits different responses. Extracellular ATP can act as an initiator or terminator of immune responses being able to induce different effects on immune cells depending on the pattern of P2 receptors engaged, the duration of the stimulus and its concentration in the extracellular milieu. Millimolar (high) concentrations of extracellular ATP, induce predominantly proinflammatory effects, while micromolar (low) doses exert mainly tolerogenic/immunosuppressive action. Moreover small, but significant differences in the pattern of P2 receptor expression in mice and humans confer diverse capacities of ATP in regulating the immune response. PMID:23358447

  10. Extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Chantal M; Loyer, Xavier; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amabile, Nicolas

    2017-02-02

    Membrane vesicles released in the extracellular space are composed of a lipid bilayer enclosing soluble cytosolic material and nuclear components. Extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, exosomes, and microvesicles (also known previously as microparticles). Originating from different subcellular compartments, the role of extracellular vesicles as regulators of transfer of biological information, acting locally and remotely, is now acknowledged. Circulating vesicles released from platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells contain potential valuable biological information for biomarker discovery in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Extracellular vesicles also accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques, where they affect major biological pathways, including inflammation, proliferation, thrombosis, calcification, and vasoactive responses. Extracellular vesicles also recapitulate the beneficial effect of stem cells to treat cardiac consequences of acute myocardial infarction, and now emerge as an attractive alternative to cell therapy, opening new avenues to vectorize biological information to target tissues. Although interest in microvesicles in the cardiovascular field emerged about 2 decades ago, that for extracellular vesicles, in particular exosomes, started to unfold a decade ago, opening new research and therapeutic avenues. This Review summarizes current knowledge on the role of extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease, and their emerging potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents.

  11. Extracellular Vesicles in Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2017-05-12

    Metabolic syndrome defines a cluster of interrelated risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. These factors include metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperglycemia, elevated triglyceride levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and obesity, mainly central adiposity. In this context, extracellular vesicles (EVs) may represent novel effectors that might help to elucidate disease-specific pathways in metabolic disease. Indeed, EVs (a terminology that encompasses microparticles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies) are emerging as a novel mean of cell-to-cell communication in physiology and pathology because they represent a new way to convey fundamental information between cells. These microstructures contain proteins, lipids, and genetic information able to modify the phenotype and function of the target cells. EVs carry specific markers of the cell of origin that make possible monitoring their fluctuations in the circulation as potential biomarkers inasmuch their circulating levels are increased in metabolic syndrome patients. Because of the mixed components of EVs, the content or the number of EVs derived from distinct cells of origin, the mode of cell stimulation, and the ensuing mechanisms for their production, it is difficult to attribute specific functions as drivers or biomarkers of diseases. This review reports recent data of EVs from different origins, including endothelial, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, hepatocytes, adipocytes, skeletal muscle, and finally, those from microbiota as bioeffectors of message, leading to metabolic syndrome. Depicting the complexity of the mechanisms involved in their functions reinforce the hypothesis that EVs are valid biomarkers, and they represent targets that can be harnessed for innovative therapeutic approaches. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Proteomics of extracellular vesicles: Exosomes and ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Almost all bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic cells shed extracellular vesicles either constitutively or in a regulated manner. These nanosized membrane vesicles are spherical, bilayered proteolipids that harbor specific subsets of proteins, DNAs, RNAs, and lipids. Recent research has facilitated conceptual advancements in this emerging field that indicate that extracellular vesicles act as intercellular communicasomes by transferring signals to their target cell via surface ligands and delivering receptors and functional molecules. Recent progress in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles derived from diverse cell types and body fluids has resulted in the identification of several thousand vesicular proteins that provide us with essential clues to the molecular mechanisms involved in vesicle cargo sorting and biogenesis. Furthermore, cell-type- or disease-specific vesicular proteins help us to understand the pathophysiological functions of extracellular vesicles and contribute to the discovery of diagnostic and therapeutic target proteins. This review focuses on the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles (i.e., exosomes and ectosomes), EVpedia (a free web-based integrated database of high-throughput data for systematic analyses of extracellular vesicles; http://evpedia.info), and the intravesicular protein-protein interaction network analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles. The goal of this article is to encourage further studies to construct a comprehensive proteome database for extracellular vesicles that will help us to not only decode the biogenesis and cargo-sorting mechanisms during vesicle formation but also elucidate the pathophysiological roles of these complex extracellular organelles.

  13. Mitogenic properties of major extracellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, J P; Hatzfeld, A; Hatzfeld, J

    1991-08-01

    The major plasma and extracellular matrix proteins are multifunctional molecules. Some, such as fibrinogen or C3, have one domain that binds adhesion receptors and another that specifically binds and activates a separate, mitogenic receptor. In this review, Jean-Pierre Lévesque, Antoinette Hatzfeld and Jacques Hatzfeld describe adhesion and mitogenic receptors that bind to distinct domains of the same extracellular matrix protein and discuss the possibility of common ancestral genes for cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, integrins, immunoglobulins, growth factors and their receptors.

  14. Prototype vein contrast enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, Herbert D.; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Vrancken, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    A proof-of-principle prototype Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE) has been designed and constructed. The VCE is an instrument that makes vein access easier by capturing an infrared image of peripheral veins, enhancing the vein-contrast using software image processing, and projecting the enhanced vein-image back onto the skin using a modified commercial projector. The prototype uses software alignment to achieve alignment accuracy between the captured infrared image and the projected visible image of better than 0.06 mm. Figure 1 shows the prototype demonstrated in our laboratory.

  15. Contrasting Views on Censorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riel, Arthur R., Jr.

    This paper asserts that public demands for book censorship are but one aspect of a deep public dissatisfaction with the educational establishment, and develops the thesis that the cause of this dissatisfaction is the contrast in world views and religions of those in the educational establishment and the censors. The educational establishment…

  16. Phonation in Tonal Contrasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Jianjing

    2013-01-01

    Phonation is used in many tonal languages, but how it should be incorporated into tonal systems is not well understood. The purpose of this dissertation thus is to examine the role of phonation in tonal contrasts, and to investigate how phonation and pitch interact in the tonal space. This dissertation presents close studies of tonal contrasts…

  17. Simultaneous blur contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Shernaaz M.; Webster, Michael A.; Taylor, John; Jaikumar, Jaikishan; Verma, Richa

    2001-06-01

    How well-focused an image appears can be strongly influenced by the surroundings context. A blurred surround can cause a central image to appear too sharp, while sharped surrounds can induce blur. We examined some spatial properties and stimulus selectivities of this 'simultaneous blur contrast.' Observers adjusted the focus of a central test image by a 2AFC staircase procedure that varied the slope of the image amplitude spectrum. The test were surrounded by 8 identical images with biased spectra, that were presented concurrently with the test for 0.5 sec on a uniform gray background. Contrast effects were comparable in magnitude for image sizes ranging from 1-deg to 4-deg in visual angle, but were stronger for test that were viwe4 in the periphery rather than fixated directly. Consistent biases were found for different types of grayscale images, including natural images, filtered noise, and simple edges. However, effects were weaker when surrounds and tests were drawn from different images, or differed in contrast-polarity or color, and thus do not depend on blur or on average spatial- frequency content per se. These induction effects may in part reflect a manifestation of selective contrast gain control

  18. Contrast enhancement of transparencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulman, A. R.; Lee, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    System can enhance or reduce contrast of photographic transparency for printing or projection by using constructive and destructive interference of collimated laser beam. System is potentially less expensive than electronic CRT methods and is more accurate than trial-and-error manual techniques.

  19. Heterologous production of death ligands' and death receptors' extracellular domains: structural features and efficient systems.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Michiro

    2012-08-01

    The extracellular domains of death ligands and those of death receptors are closely related to many serious human diseases through the initiation of apoptosis. Recombinant production of the extracellular domains has been investigated due to demand for a large amount of purified samples, which are a prerequisite for their biochemical characterization and constitute the fundamentals of medical applications. This review focuses on the recombinant production of extracellular domains of the major members of death ligand and death receptor families using non-mammalian expression systems with an emphasis on Fas ligand and Fas receptor. In contrast to the efficient production of the functional extracellular domains of TRAIL, TNFα and LTα by intracellular expression systems using Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris, that of Fas ligand requires the secretory expression systems using P. pastoris or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the productivity in P. pastoris was largely dependent on tag sequence, potential N-glycosylation site and expressed protein region. On the other hand, the exploitation of insect cell systems is generally useful for the preparation of functional extracellular domains of death receptors containing many disulfide bridges in the absence of extended secondary structure, and a Bombyx mori larvae secretion system presented a superior productivity for human Fas receptor extracellular domain. Based on the results obtained so far, further efforts should be devoted to the artificial control of death ligand - death receptor interactions in order to make a contribution to medicine, represented by the development of novel biopharmaceuticals.

  20. Uptake of heavy metals to the extracellular and intracellular compartments in three species of aquatic bryophyte.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M D; López, J; Carballeira, A

    1999-09-01

    Shoot tips of Fontinalis antipyretica, Scapania undulata, and Fissidens polyphyllus were maintained for 60 min with solutions containing 0, 1, 10, 50, 100, or 200 ppm of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, or Zn. A sequential extraction procedure was then used to estimate the amounts of the corresponding metal, and of K and Mg, in the extracellular compartment (extraction with NiCl(2) or EDTA), the intracellular compartment (subsequent extraction with cold dilute HNO(3)), and the particulate fraction (subsequent extraction with hot concentrated HNO(3)). In most cases more metal was taken up to the extracellular compartment than to the intracellular compartment, while particulate-fraction content was negligible. The relationship between metal concentration in the water and metal content in the extracellular compartment was well modeled with a Michaelis-Menten-type equation. Results suggest that in S. undulata extracellular cation-binding sites have a high metal affinity, while in F. polyphyllus it is relatively low. However, postincubation intracellular contents were highest in the latter species. The ranking of the six metals by amounts taken up into the intracellular compartment was the same for all three bryophyte species. Uptake of heavy metals led to considerable losses of intracellular K (probably due to effects on plasma membrane properties), and of extracellular Mg (probably due to displacement from cation-binding sites). Losses of intracellular K were most marked in S. undulata, followed by F. antipyretica. By contrast, S. undulata was the species from which losses of extracellular Mg were lowest.

  1. Extracellular matrix proteins of dentine.

    PubMed

    Butler, W T; Ritchie, H H; Bronckers, A L

    1997-01-01

    Bone and dentine extracellular matrix proteins are similar, consisting primarily of type I collagen, acidic proteins and proteoglycans. Although collagen forms the lattice for deposition of calcium and phosphate for formation of carbonate apatite, the non-collagenous proteins are believed to control initiation and growth of the crystals. Despite this similarity, dentine contains three unique proteins apparently absent from bone and other tissue: dentine phosphophoryn (DPP), dentine matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentine sialoprotein (DSP). DPP and DMP1 are acidic phosphoproteins probably involved in the control of mineralization processes. DPP may localize in gap regions of collagen and initiate apatite crystal formation by binding large quantities of calcium in a conformation that promotes this process. Extensive studies have been conducted in our laboratory on the nature, biosynthesis, localization and gene structure of DSP. Immunolocalization studies showed that rat DSP, a 53 kDa sialic acid-rich glycoprotein, was synthesized by young and mature odontoblasts, and by dental pulp cells and pre-ameloblasts, but not by ameloblasts, osteoblasts, chondrocytes or other cell types. The cDNA sequence indicated that DSP was a 366-residue protein with several potential N-glycosylation sites, as well as phosphorylation sites, but that the amino acid sequence was dissimilar to that of other known proteins. Northern blot analysis detected several mRNA species near 4.6 and 1.5 kb, indicative of alternative splicing events. Evidence for two DSP genes was obtained, further complicating this picture. Recent in situ hybridization studies utilizing rat and mouse molars and incisors indicated that DSP mRNA was expressed by young odontoblasts and odontoblasts in animals of all ages. Transcripts were also observed in pre-ameloblasts. The expression of DSP mRNA ceased when these cells matured to become secretory ameloblasts. DSP transcripts were not detected in osteoblasts or other cell

  2. Characterization of Extracellular Chitinolytic Activity in Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Ace M.; Diwu, Zhenjun; Dunham, Glen C.; Eastburn, Callie; Geesey, Gill G.; Goodman, Amanda; Suci, Peter; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet

    2001-05-01

    It is common for bacteria to produce extracellular enzymes having some form of degradative activity. In some cases these enzymes serve to protect cells from antagonistic substances, or to convert a large and/or insoluble biopolymer to an assimilable nutrient source. In some cases the physiological benefit to the bacterium is not entirely evident. Extracellular enzymes may be membrane bound, but in many cases they are released into the surrounding medium. It has been shown that these relatively large molecules become immobilized in the extracellular polymeric matrix in which cells in flocs and biofilms are embedded. Most proteins adsorb irreversibly to substrata having a variety of surface chemistries, and transport by convection is reduced near any solid surface, regardless of the flow regimen in the bulk liquid. Thus, extracellular enzymes have a tendency to become an integral and significant component of the biofilm/substratum microenvironment, influencing cell physiology and biofilm ecology.

  3. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  4. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  5. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Chimileski, Scott; Dolas, Kunal; Naor, Adit; Gophna, Uri; Papke, R Thane

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the microbial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA concentrations measured in nature-a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration, and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent, and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy showed that labeled DNA co-localized with H. volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created a strain deficient in the ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  6. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Huber, Robert J; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca(2+)/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chromatography: concepts and contrasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    As the author states in the Preface, this text attempts to provide a unified approach to chromatography (hence the title) by way of contrasting similarities and differences between gas chromatography (GC), column liquid chromatography (LC), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). This book is also said to be pitched at an elementary level, suitable for most newcomers to the field (e.g., advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the academic world, as well as bench-level chemists in industry).

  8. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  9. The extracellular matrix of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Eble, Johannes A; Niland, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Blood vessels are highly organized and complex structure, which are far more than simple tubes conducting the blood to almost any tissue of the body. They are able to autonomously regulate the blood flow, thus providing the tissues an optimal support of oxygen and nutrients and an efficient removal of waste products. In higher organisms, the blood vessel forms a closed circuit system, which additionally has the ability to seal itself in case of leakage as a result of injury. The blood vessel system does not only transport soluble substances, but also serves as "highway" system for leukocytes to patrol the body during the immunological surveillance and to reach the inflammation site quickly. In a complex interplay with the vascular wall, leukocytes are able to penetrate the blood vessel without any obvious leakage. Pathologically, tumor cells subvert the blood vessel system to disseminate from the primary tumor and colonize distant organs during metastasis. The extracellular matrix (ECM) of a blood vessel contributes substantially to the diverse functions of the blood vessel. First, the ECM constitutes the scaffold which keeps the histological structure of the vessel wall in shape but also bears the enormous and permanent mechanical forces levied on the vessel by the pulsatile blood flow in the arteries and by vasoconstriction, which regulates blood flow and pressure. The complex network of elastic fibers and tensile forces-bearing networks are well adapted to accomplish these mechanical tasks. Second, the ECM provides informational cues to the vascular cells, thus regulating their proliferation and differentiation. Third, ECM molecules can store, mask, present or sequester growth factors, thereby modulating their effects remarkably. Furthermore, several ECM molecules serve additional functions within the blood vessel. Their expression is altered in a spatial and temporal pattern during blood vessel formation and remodeling. In contrast to vasculogenesis during

  10. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  11. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  12. High Contrast CRT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    form brown sulfides or sulfates. By con- trast, No. 1720 glass does not acquire a brown coloration . How- ever, preliminary tests with 1723 glass show...TR-77-2639-F NL -mmo mhhmhul IIII,. BwII ---- i 11111--- IIIIIN III i 8’ II.I25 .11111 I .6 MCROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of...High Contrast Displays Two- Color CRT Laminar Flow Electron Gun Thin Film Phosphor Color Penetration Tube 2% AS~iTACT (ConIlm. a" Pove.. 0fdo if

  13. Extracellular histones in tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Kumar, Santhosh V R; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophil NETosis is an important element of host defense as it catapults chromatin out of the cell to trap bacteria, which then are killed, e.g., by the chromatin's histone component. Also, during sterile inflammation TNF-alpha and other mediators trigger NETosis, which elicits cytotoxic effects on host cells. The same mechanism should apply to other forms of regulated necrosis including pyroptosis, necroptosis, ferroptosis, and cyclophilin D-mediated regulated necrosis. Beyond these toxic effects, extracellular histones also trigger thrombus formation and innate immunity by activating Toll-like receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Thereby, extracellular histones contribute to the microvascular complications of sepsis, major trauma, small vessel vasculitis as well as acute liver, kidney, brain, and lung injury. Finally, histones prevent the degradation of extracellular DNA, which promotes autoimmunization, anti-nuclear antibody formation, and autoimmunity in susceptible individuals. Here, we review the current evidence on the pathogenic role of extracellular histones in disease and discuss how to target extracellular histones to improve disease outcomes.

  14. Extracellular purines, purinergic receptors and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Di Virgilio, F; Adinolfi, E

    2017-01-01

    Virtually, all tumor cells as well as all immune cells express plasma membrane receptors for extracellular nucleosides (adenosine) and nucleotides (ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP and sugar UDP). The tumor microenvironment is characterized by an unusually high concentration of ATP and adenosine. Adenosine is a major determinant of the immunosuppressive tumor milieu. Sequential hydrolysis of extracellular ATP catalyzed by CD39 and CD73 is the main pathway for the generation of adenosine in the tumor interstitium. Extracellular ATP and adenosine mold both host and tumor responses. Depending on the specific receptor activated, extracellular purines mediate immunosuppression or immunostimulation on the host side, and growth stimulation or cytotoxicity on the tumor side. Recent progress in this field is providing the key to decode this complex scenario and to lay the basis to harness the potential benefits for therapy. Preclinical data show that targeting the adenosine-generating pathway (that is, CD73) or adenosinergic receptors (that is, A2A) relieves immunosuppresion and potently inhibits tumor growth. On the other hand, growth of experimental tumors is strongly inhibited by targeting the P2X7 ATP-selective receptor of cancer and immune cells. This review summarizes the recent data on the role played by extracellular purines (purinergic signaling) in host–tumor interaction and highlights novel therapeutic options stemming from recent advances in this field. PMID:27321181

  15. Endothelial Extracellular Vesicles-Promises and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Hromada, Carina; Mühleder, Severin; Grillari, Johannes; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microparticles, and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles that have once been considered as cell debris lacking biological functions. However, they have recently gained immense interest in the scientific community due to their role in intercellular communication, immunity, tissue regeneration as well as in the onset, and progression of various pathologic conditions. Extracellular vesicles of endothelial origin have been found to play a versatile role in the human body, since they are on the one hand known to contribute to cardiovascular diseases, but on the other hand have also been reported to promote endothelial cell survival. Hence, endothelial extracellular vesicles hold promising therapeutic potential to be used as a new tool to detect as well as treat a great number of diseases. This calls for clinically approved, standardized, and efficient isolation and characterization protocols to harvest and purify endothelial extracellular vesicles. However, such methods and techniques to fulfill stringent requirements for clinical trials have yet to be developed or are not harmonized internationally. In this review, recent advances and challenges in the field of endothelial extracellular vesicle research are discussed and current problems and limitations regarding isolation and characterization are pointed out.

  16. Vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory egg coats.

    PubMed

    Menkhorst, Ellen; Selwood, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular egg coats deposited by maternal or embryonic tissues surround all vertebrate conceptuses during early development. In oviparous species, the time of hatching from extracellular coats can be considered equivalent to the time of birth in viviparous species. Extracellular coats must be lost during gestation for implantation and placentation to occur in some viviparous species. In the most recent classification of vertebrate extracellular coats, Boyd and Hamilton (Cleavage, early development and implantation of the egg. In: Parkes AS (ed.), Marshall's Physiology of Reproduction, vol. 2, 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green & Co; 1961:1-126) defined the coat synthesized by the oocyte during oogenesis as primary and the coat deposited by follicle cells surrounding the oocyte as secondary. Tertiary egg coats are those synthesized and deposited around the primary or secondary coat by the maternal reproductive tract. This classification is difficult to reconcile with recent data collected using modern molecular biological techniques that can accurately establish the site of coat precursor synthesis and secretion. We propose that a modification to the classification by Boyd and Hamilton is required. Vertebrate egg coats should be classed as belonging to the following two broad groups: the preovulatory coat, which is deposited during oogenesis by the oocyte or follicle cells, and the postovulatory coats, which are deposited after fertilization by the reproductive tract or conceptus. This review discusses the origin and classification of vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory coats and illustrates what is known about coat homology between the vertebrate groups.

  17. The complex extracellular biology of Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Chater, Keith F; Biró, Sandor; Lee, Kye Joon; Palmer, Tracy; Schrempf, Hildgund

    2010-03-01

    Streptomycetes, soil-dwelling mycelial bacteria that form sporulating aerial branches, have an exceptionally large number of predicted secreted proteins, including many exported via the twin-arginine transport system. Their use of noncatalytic substrate-binding proteins and hydrolytic enzymes to obtain soluble nutrients from carbohydrates such as chitin and cellulose enables them to interact with other organisms. Some of their numerous secreted proteases participate in developmentally significant extracellular cascades, regulated by inhibitors, which lead to cannibalization of the substrate mycelium biomass to support aerial growth and sporulation. They excrete many secondary metabolites, including important antibiotics. Some of these play roles in interactions with eukaryotes. Surprisingly, some antibiotic biosynthetic enzymes are extracellular. Antibiotic production is often regulated by extracellular signalling molecules, some of which also control morphological differentiation. Amphipathic proteins, assembled with the help of cellulose-like material, are required for both hyphal attachment to surfaces and aerial reproductive growth. Comparative genomic analysis suggests that the acquisition of genes for extracellular processes has played a huge part in speciation. The rare codon TTA, which is present in the key pleiotropic regulatory gene adpA and many pathway-specific regulatory genes for antibiotic production, has a particular influence on extracellular biology.

  18. Contrast and depth perception: effects of texture contrast and area contrast.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Shigeru; Kitagawa, Norimichi; Akutsu, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    Many objects in natural scenes have textures on their surfaces. Contrast of the texture surfaces (the texture contrast) reduces when the viewing distance increases. Similarly, contrast between the surfaces of the objects and the background (the area contrast) reduces when the viewing distance increases. The texture contrast and the area contrast were defined by the contrast between random dots, and by the contrast between the average luminance of the dot pattern and the luminance of the background, respectively. To examine how these two types of contrast influence depth perception, we ran two experiments. In both experiments two areas of random-dot patterns were presented against a uniform background, and participants rated relative depth between the two areas. We found that the rated depth of the patterned areas increased with increases in texture contrast. Furthermore, the effect of the texture contrast on depth judgment increased when the area contrast became low.

  19. Extracellular nucleotide and nucleoside signaling in vascular and blood disease

    PubMed Central

    Idzko, Marco; Ferrari, Davide; Riegel, Ann-Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotides and nucleosides—such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine—are famous for their intracellular roles as building blocks for the genetic code or cellular energy currencies. In contrast, their function in the extracellular space is different. Here, they are primarily known as signaling molecules via activation of purinergic receptors, classified as P1 receptors for adenosine or P2 receptors for ATP. Because extracellular ATP is rapidly converted to adenosine by ectonucleotidase, nucleotide-phosphohydrolysis is important for controlling the balance between P2 and P1 signaling. Gene-targeted mice for P1, P2 receptors, or ectonucleotidase exhibit only very mild phenotypic manifestations at baseline. However, they demonstrate alterations in disease susceptibilities when exposed to a variety of vascular or blood diseases. Examples of phenotypic manifestations include vascular barrier dysfunction, graft-vs-host disease, platelet activation, ischemia, and reperfusion injury or sickle cell disease. Many of these studies highlight that purinergic signaling events can be targeted therapeutically. PMID:25001468

  20. Extracellular cleavage of E-cadherin promotes epithelial cell extrusion.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Adam G; Rabouille, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Epithelial cell extrusion and subsequent apoptosis is a key mechanism to prevent the accumulation of excess cells. By contrast, when driven by oncogene expression, apical cell extrusion is followed by proliferation and represents an initial step of tumorigenesis. E-cadherin (E-cad), the main component of adherens junctions, has been shown to be essential for epithelial cell extrusion, but its mechanistic contribution remains unclear. Here, we provide clear evidence that cell extrusion can be driven by the cleavage of E-cad, both in a wild-type and an oncogenic environment. We first show that CDC42 activation in a single epithelial cell results in its efficient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-sensitive extrusion through MEK signalling activation and this is supported by E-cad cleavage. Second, using an engineered cleavable form of E-cad, we demonstrate that, by itself, truncation of extracellular E-cad at the plasma membrane promotes apical extrusion. We propose that extracellular cleavage of E-cad generates a rapid change in cell-cell adhesion that is sufficient to drive apical cell extrusion. Whereas in normal epithelia, extrusion is followed by apoptosis, when combined with active oncogenic signalling, it is coupled to cell proliferation.

  1. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  2. On Establishing Underlying Tonal Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Phonological field work is largely about establishing contrast in comparable environments. The notion of phonological contrast, however, can be confusing, particularly in its application to tone analysis. Does it mean phonemic contrast in the structuralist sense, or does it mean underlying contrast in the generative sense? Many linguists, in…

  3. On Establishing Underlying Tonal Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Phonological field work is largely about establishing contrast in comparable environments. The notion of phonological contrast, however, can be confusing, particularly in its application to tone analysis. Does it mean phonemic contrast in the structuralist sense, or does it mean underlying contrast in the generative sense? Many linguists, in…

  4. Using extracellular action potential recordings to constrain compartmental models.

    PubMed

    Gold, Carl; Henze, Darrell A; Koch, Christof

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the use of extracellular action potential (EAP) recordings for biophysically faithful compartmental models. We ask whether constraining a model to fit the EAP is superior to matching the intracellular action potential (IAP). In agreement with previous studies, we find that the IAP method under-constrains the parameters. As a result, significantly different sets of parameters can have virtually identical IAP's. In contrast, the EAP method results in a much tighter constraint. We find that the distinguishing characteristics of the waveform--but not its amplitude-resulting from the distribution of active conductances are fairly invariant to changes of electrode position and detailed cellular morphology. Based on these results, we conclude that EAP recordings are an excellent source of data for the purpose of constraining compartmental models.

  5. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    PubMed Central

    Stoorvogel, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNA. Deficiencies in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for EV formation and lack of methods to interfere with the packaging of cargo or with vesicle release, however, still hamper identification of their physiological relevance in vivo. In this review, we focus on the characterization of EVs and on currently proposed mechanisms for their formation, targeting, and function. PMID:23420871

  6. Contrasting Martian Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this interesting view of martian topography just below the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills' on sol 208 (Aug. 2, 2004). The view is looking southwest. The rover's wheel tracks show the contrast between soft martian soil and the harder 'Clovis' rock outcrop, which scientists are now studying.

    The angle of the horizon indicates the tilt of the rover to be about 20 degrees. On the horizon is a small peak informally named 'Grissom Hill,' about 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) away. To the right of the peak is the edge of a 2-kilometer-wide (1.2-mile-wide) crater. A few weeks ago, Spirit stopped to conduct scientific studies of rocks in 'Hank's Hollow,' located on the right side of the image approximately one-third of the way down from the top. This photo was taken with Spirit's right rear hazard-avoidance camera.

  7. Receptor-like activity evoked by extracellular ADP in Arabidopsis root epidermal plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Demidchik, Vadim; Shang, Zhonglin; Shin, Ryoung; Colaço, Renato; Laohavisit, Anuphon; Shabala, Sergey; Davies, Julia M

    2011-07-01

    Extracellular purine nucleotides are implicated in the control of plant development and stress responses. While extracellular ATP is known to activate transcriptional pathways via plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase and calcium channel activation, very little is known about signal transduction by extracellular ADP. Here, extracellular ADP was found to activate net Ca(2+) influx in roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and transiently elevate cytosolic free Ca(2+) in root epidermal protoplasts. An inward Ca(2+)-permeable conductance in root epidermal PM was activated within 1 s of ADP application and repeated application evoked a smaller current. Such response speed and densitization are consistent with operation of equivalents to animal ionotropic purine receptors, although to date no equivalent genes for such receptors have been identified in higher plants. In contrast to ATP, extracellular ADP did not evoke accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. While high concentrations of ATP caused net Ca(2+) efflux from roots, equivalent concentrations of ADP caused net influx. Overall the results point to a discrete ADP signaling pathway, reliant on receptor-like activity at the PM.

  8. Receptor-Like Activity Evoked by Extracellular ADP in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Plasma Membrane1

    PubMed Central

    Demidchik, Vadim; Shang, Zhonglin; Shin, Ryoung; Colaço, Renato; Laohavisit, Anuphon; Shabala, Sergey; Davies, Julia M.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular purine nucleotides are implicated in the control of plant development and stress responses. While extracellular ATP is known to activate transcriptional pathways via plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase and calcium channel activation, very little is known about signal transduction by extracellular ADP. Here, extracellular ADP was found to activate net Ca2+ influx in roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and transiently elevate cytosolic free Ca2+ in root epidermal protoplasts. An inward Ca2+-permeable conductance in root epidermal PM was activated within 1 s of ADP application and repeated application evoked a smaller current. Such response speed and densitization are consistent with operation of equivalents to animal ionotropic purine receptors, although to date no equivalent genes for such receptors have been identified in higher plants. In contrast to ATP, extracellular ADP did not evoke accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. While high concentrations of ATP caused net Ca2+ efflux from roots, equivalent concentrations of ADP caused net influx. Overall the results point to a discrete ADP signaling pathway, reliant on receptor-like activity at the PM. PMID:21562328

  9. Different danger signals differently impact on microglial proliferation through alterations of ATP release and extracellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    George, Jimmy; Gonçalves, Francisco Q; Cristóvão, Gonçalo; Rodrigues, Lisa; Meyer Fernandes, José Roberto; Gonçalves, Teresa; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gomes, Catarina A

    2015-09-01

    Microglia rely on their ability to proliferate in the brain parenchyma to sustain brain innate immunity and participate in the reaction to brain damage. We now studied the influence of different danger signals activating microglia, both internal (typified by glutamate, associated with brain damage) and external (using a bacterial lipopolysaccharide, LPS), on the proliferation of microglia cells. We found that LPS (100 ng/mL) increased, whereas glutamate (0.5 mM) decreased proliferation. Notably, LPS decreased whereas glutamate increased the extracellular levels of ATP. In contrast, LPS increased whereas glutamate decreased the extracellular catabolism of ATP into adenosine through ecto-nucleotidases and ecto-5'-nucleotidase. Finally, apyrase (degrades extracellular ATP) abrogated glutamate-induced inhibition of microglia proliferation; conversely, inhibitors of ecto-nucleotidases (ARL67156 or α,β-methylene ADP) and adenosine deaminase (degrades extracellular adenosine) abrogated the LPS-induced increase of microglia proliferation, which was blocked by a selective A2A receptor antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM). Overall, these results highlight the importance of the extracellular purinergic metabolism to format microglia proliferation and influence the spatio-temporal profile of neuroinflammation in different conditions of brain damage.

  10. Leishmania donovani promastigotes evade the antimicrobial activity of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Christelle; McMaster, W Robert; Girard, Denis; Descoteaux, Albert

    2010-10-01

    Upon their recruitment to a site of infection and their subsequent activation, neutrophils release DNA and a subset of their granule content to form filamentous structures, known as neutrophil extracellular traps, which capture and kill microorganisms. In this study, we show that Leishmania promastigotes induced the rapid release of neutrophil extracellular traps from human neutrophils and were trapped by these structures. The use of Leishmania mutants defective in the biosynthesis of either lipophosphoglycan or GP63 revealed that these two major surface promastigote virulence determinants were not responsible for inducing the release of the surface protease neutrophil extracellular traps. We also demonstrate that this induction was independent of superoxide production by neutrophils. Finally, in contrast to wild-type Leishmania donovani promastigotes, mutants defective in lipophosphoglycan biosynthesis were highly susceptible to the antimicrobial activity of neutrophil extracellular traps. Altogether, our data suggest that neutrophil extracellular traps may contribute to the containment of L. donovani promastigotes at the site of inoculation, thereby facilitating their uptake by mononuclear phagocytes.

  11. Influence of AMPA/kainate receptors on extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat midbrain raphe and forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Ma, Zhiyuan; Auerbach, Sidney B

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release by excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors was examined by use of microdialysis in the CNS of freely behaving rats. Extracellular 5-HT was measured in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), median raphe nucleus (MRN), nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, frontal cortex, dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Local infusion of kainate produced increases in extracellular 5-HT in the DRN and MRN. Kainate infusion into forebrain sites had a less potent effect. In further studies of the DRN and nucleus accumbens, kainate-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT were blocked by the EAA receptor antagonists, kynurenate and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX). The effect of infusing kainate into the DRN or nucleus accumbens was attenuated or abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that the increase in extracellular 5-HT is dependent on 5-HT neuronal activity. In contrast, ibotenate-induced lesion of intrinsic neurones did not attenuate the effect of infusing kainate into the nucleus accumbens. Thus, the effect of kainate in the nucleus accumbens does not depend on intrinsic neurones. Infusion of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolaproprionate (AMPA) into the DRN and nucleus accumbens induced nonsignificant changes in extracellular 5-HT. Cyclothiazide and diazoxide, which attenuate receptor desensitization, greatly enhanced the effect of AMPA on 5-HT in the DRN, but not in the nucleus accumbens. In conclusion, AMPA/kainate receptors regulate 5-HT in the raphe and in forebrain sites. PMID:9283707

  12. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Norsworthy, Allison N.; Sun, Tung-Tien

    2016-01-01

    The catheter-associated uropathogen Proteus mirabilis frequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found that P. mirabilis rapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistant Proteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation by P. mirabilis stands in direct contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism of P. mirabilis survival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  13. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Norsworthy, Allison N; Sun, Tung-Tien; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-04-19

    The catheter-associated uropathogenProteus mirabilisfrequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found thatP. mirabilisrapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistantProteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation byP. mirabilisstands in direct contrast to uropathogenicEscherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism ofP. mirabilissurvival and virulence in the bladder.

  14. Extracellular recombinant protein production from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Chen, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering. Extracellular production of enzymes and proteins is advantageous as it could greatly reduce the complexity of a bioprocess and improve product quality. Extracellular production of proteins is necessary for metabolic engineering applications in which substrates are polymers such as lignocelluloses or xenobiotics since adequate uptake of these substrates is often an issue. The dogma that E. coli secretes no protein has been challenged by the recognition of both its natural ability to secrete protein in common laboratory strains and increased ability to secrete proteins in engineered cells. The very existence of this review dedicated to extracellular production is a testimony for outstanding achievements made collectively by the community in this regard. Four strategies have emerged to engineer E. coli cells to secrete recombinant proteins. In some cases, impressive secretion levels, several grams per liter, were reached. This secretion level is on par with other eukaryotic expression systems. Amid the optimism, it is important to recognize that significant challenges remain, especially when considering the success cannot be predicted a priori and involves much trials and errors. This review provides an overview of recent developments in engineering E. coli for extracellular production of recombinant proteins and an analysis of pros and cons of each strategy.

  15. A Moon Contrasts

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-22

    Dione reveals its past via contrasts in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The features visible here are a mixture of tectonics -- the bright, linear features -- and impact cratering -- the round features, which are spread across the entire surface. Tectonic features tell the story of how Dione (698 miles or 1,123 kilometers across) has been heated and cooled since its formation, and scientists use those clues to piece together the moon's past. Impact craters are evidence of external debris striking the surface, and thus they tell about the environment in which the moon has existed over its history. This view looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Dione. North on Dione is up. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini narrow-angle camera on April 11, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 68,000 miles (110,000 kilometers) from Dione and at a Sun-Dione-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 28 degrees. Image scale is 2,165 feet (660 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20492

  16. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  17. Oxidative and other posttranslational modifications in extracellular vesicle biology.

    PubMed

    Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Ryan, Brent; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó, Tamás G; Sódar, Barbara; Holub, Marcsilla; Németh, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Pállinger, Éva; Winyard, Paul; Buzás, Edit I

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles, are phospholipid bilayer surrounded structures secreted by cells universally, in an evolutionarily conserved fashion. Posttranslational modifications such as oxidation, citrullination, phosphorylation and glycosylation play diverse roles in extracellular vesicle biology. Posttranslational modifications orchestrate the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles. The signals extracellular vesicles transmit between cells also often function via modulating posttranslational modifications of target molecules, given that extracellular vesicles are carriers of several active enzymes catalysing posttranslational modifications. Posttranslational modifications of extracellular vesicles can also contribute to disease pathology by e.g. amplifying inflammation, generating neoepitopes or carrying neoepitopes themselves.

  18. Morphological Characterization of Organized Extracellular Matrix Deposition by Ascorbic Acid-Stimulated Human Corneal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E. K.; Melotti, Suzanna A.; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the structure and morphology of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesized by untransformed, cultured human corneal fibroblasts in long-term cultures. Methods Human corneal stromal keratocytes were expanded in transwell culture in the presence of fetal bovine serum and a stable derivative of Vitamin C. The cells were allowed to synthesize a fibrillar ECM for up to five weeks. Constructs were assessed via light (phase contrast and differential interference contrast) and transmission (standard and quick freeze/deep etch) microscopy. Results Electron micrographs revealed stratified constructs with multiple parallel layers of cells and an extracellular matrix comprising parallel arrays of small, polydisperse fibrils (27–51 nm) which often alternate in direction. Differential interference contrast images demonstrated oriented ECM fibril arrays parallel to the plane of the construct while quick-freeze deep etch micrographs showed the details of the matrix interaction with fibroblasts via arrays of membrane surface structures. Conclusions Human keratocytes, cultured in a stable Vitamin C derivative, are capable of assembling extracellular matrix which comprise parallel arrays of ECM fibrils. The resulting constructs, which are highly cellular, exhibit morphology similar to the developing mammalian stroma where organized matrix is derived. The appearance of arrays of structures on the cell membranes suggest a role in the local organization of synthesized ECM. This model could provide critical insight into the fundamental processes which govern the genesis of organized connective tissues such as the cornea and may provide a scaffolding suitable for tissue-engineering a biomimetic stroma. PMID:17724187

  19. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  20. CT and MR Imaging Diagnosis and Staging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Part II. Extracellular Agents, Hepatobiliary Agents, and Ancillary Imaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Jeong-Min

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging play critical roles in the diagnosis and staging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The second article of this two-part review discusses basic concepts of diagnosis and staging, reviews the diagnostic performance of CT and MR imaging with extracellular contrast agents and of MR imaging with hepatobiliary contrast agents, and examines in depth the major and ancillary imaging features used in the diagnosis and characterization of HCC. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:25247563

  1. Recognition memory reveals just how CONTRASTIVE contrastive accenting really is

    PubMed Central

    Fraundorf, Scott H.; Watson, Duane G.; Benjamin, Aaron S.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of pitch accenting on memory were investigated in three experiments. Participants listened to short recorded discourses that contained contrast sets with two items (e.g. British scientists and French scientists); a continuation specified one item from the set. Pitch accenting on the critical word in the continuation was manipulated between non-contrastive (H* in the ToBI system) and contrastive (L+H*). On subsequent recognition memory tests, the L+H* accent increased hits to correct statements and correct rejections of the contrast item (Experiments 1–3), but did not impair memory for other parts of the discourse (Experiment 2). L+H* also did not facilitate correct rejections of lures not in the contrast set (Experiment 3), indicating that contrastive accents do not simply strengthen the representation of the target item. These results suggest comprehenders use pitch accenting to encode and update information about multiple elements in a contrast set. PMID:20835405

  2. MR-angiography: the role of contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Goyen, M; Ruehm, S G; Debatin, J F

    2000-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced 3D MR angiography (MRA) permits comprehensive assessment of the supraaortic arteries as well as the arterial system in the chest, abdomen and lower extremities. 3D MRA combines intravenous injection of a non-nephrotoxic, paramagnetic, extracellular contrast agent that increases the signal intensity of blood by shortening its T1 value with the acquisition of a fast 3D data set. High contrast between the vascular lumen and surrounding tissues, inherent three-dimensionality and the ability to collect image data in the chest and abdomen under apnea conditions all contribute to excellent image quality. This review provides clinical applications of 3D MRA in the chest, abdomen and lower extremities based upon the available literature and several clinical examples.

  3. An intrinsic agonist mechanism for activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor by its extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yanting; Zhou, X Edward; Hou, Li; Zhao, Li-Hua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Gaihong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is a class B G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays key roles in glucose metabolism and is a major therapeutic target for diabetes. The classic two-domain model for class B GPCR activation proposes that the apo-state receptor is auto-inhibited by its extracellular domain, which physically interacts with the transmembrane domain. The binding of the C-terminus of the peptide hormone to the extracellular domain allows the N-terminus of the hormone to insert into the transmembrane domain to induce receptor activation. In contrast to this model, here we demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can be activated by N-terminally truncated glucagon-like peptide-1 or exendin-4 when fused to the receptor, raising the question regarding the role of N-terminal residues of peptide hormone in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation. Mutations of cysteine 347 to lysine or arginine in intracellular loop 3 transform the receptor into a G protein-biased receptor and allow it to be activated by a nonspecific five-residue linker that is completely devoid of exendin-4 or glucagon-like peptide-1 sequence but still requires the presence of an intact extracellular domain. Moreover, the extracellular domain can activate the receptor in trans in the presence of an intact peptide hormone, and specific mutations in three extracellular loops abolished this extracellular domain trans-activation. Together, our data reveal a dominant role of the extracellular domain in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation and support an intrinsic agonist model of the extracellular domain, in which peptide binding switches the receptor from the auto-inhibited state to the auto-activated state by releasing the intrinsic agonist activity of the extracellular domain. PMID:27917297

  4. An intrinsic agonist mechanism for activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor by its extracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanting; Zhou, X Edward; Hou, Li; Zhao, Li-Hua; Liu, Bo; Wang, Gaihong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is a class B G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays key roles in glucose metabolism and is a major therapeutic target for diabetes. The classic two-domain model for class B GPCR activation proposes that the apo-state receptor is auto-inhibited by its extracellular domain, which physically interacts with the transmembrane domain. The binding of the C-terminus of the peptide hormone to the extracellular domain allows the N-terminus of the hormone to insert into the transmembrane domain to induce receptor activation. In contrast to this model, here we demonstrate that glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can be activated by N-terminally truncated glucagon-like peptide-1 or exendin-4 when fused to the receptor, raising the question regarding the role of N-terminal residues of peptide hormone in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation. Mutations of cysteine 347 to lysine or arginine in intracellular loop 3 transform the receptor into a G protein-biased receptor and allow it to be activated by a nonspecific five-residue linker that is completely devoid of exendin-4 or glucagon-like peptide-1 sequence but still requires the presence of an intact extracellular domain. Moreover, the extracellular domain can activate the receptor in trans in the presence of an intact peptide hormone, and specific mutations in three extracellular loops abolished this extracellular domain trans-activation. Together, our data reveal a dominant role of the extracellular domain in glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation and support an intrinsic agonist model of the extracellular domain, in which peptide binding switches the receptor from the auto-inhibited state to the auto-activated state by releasing the intrinsic agonist activity of the extracellular domain.

  5. Contrastive Analysis and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Charles A.

    Contrastive analysis is basic to all linguistics since only by this approach can a general theory of language (language universals) be constructed and only with at least implicit contrastive analysis can a particular language be fully characterized. Two kinds of contrastive analysis have been basic to diachronic linguistics: the comparison of…

  6. Extracellularly Identifying Motor Neurons for a Muscle Motor Pool in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M.; Chiel, Hillel J.

    2013-01-01

    In animals with large identified neurons (e.g. mollusks), analysis of motor pools is done using intracellular techniques1,2,3,4. Recently, we developed a technique to extracellularly stimulate and record individual neurons in Aplysia californica5. We now describe a protocol for using this technique to uniquely identify and characterize motor neurons within a motor pool. This extracellular technique has advantages. First, extracellular electrodes can stimulate and record neurons through the sheath5, so it does not need to be removed. Thus, neurons will be healthier in extracellular experiments than in intracellular ones. Second, if ganglia are rotated by appropriate pinning of the sheath, extracellular electrodes can access neurons on both sides of the ganglion, which makes it easier and more efficient to identify multiple neurons in the same preparation. Third, extracellular electrodes do not need to penetrate cells, and thus can be easily moved back and forth among neurons, causing less damage to them. This is especially useful when one tries to record multiple neurons during repeating motor patterns that may only persist for minutes. Fourth, extracellular electrodes are more flexible than intracellular ones during muscle movements. Intracellular electrodes may pull out and damage neurons during muscle contractions. In contrast, since extracellular electrodes are gently pressed onto the sheath above neurons, they usually stay above the same neuron during muscle contractions, and thus can be used in more intact preparations. To uniquely identify motor neurons for a motor pool (in particular, the I1/I3 muscle in Aplysia) using extracellular electrodes, one can use features that do not require intracellular measurements as criteria: soma size and location, axonal projection, and muscle innervation4,6,7. For the particular motor pool used to illustrate the technique, we recorded from buccal nerves 2 and 3 to measure axonal projections, and measured the contraction

  7. Extracellularly identifying motor neurons for a muscle motor pool in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; McManus, Jeffrey M; Chiel, Hillel J

    2013-03-25

    In animals with large identified neurons (e.g. mollusks), analysis of motor pools is done using intracellular techniques. Recently, we developed a technique to extracellularly stimulate and record individual neurons in Aplysia californica. We now describe a protocol for using this technique to uniquely identify and characterize motor neurons within a motor pool. This extracellular technique has advantages. First, extracellular electrodes can stimulate and record neurons through the sheath, so it does not need to be removed. Thus, neurons will be healthier in extracellular experiments than in intracellular ones. Second, if ganglia are rotated by appropriate pinning of the sheath, extracellular electrodes can access neurons on both sides of the ganglion, which makes it easier and more efficient to identify multiple neurons in the same preparation. Third, extracellular electrodes do not need to penetrate cells, and thus can be easily moved back and forth among neurons, causing less damage to them. This is especially useful when one tries to record multiple neurons during repeating motor patterns that may only persist for minutes. Fourth, extracellular electrodes are more flexible than intracellular ones during muscle movements. Intracellular electrodes may pull out and damage neurons during muscle contractions. In contrast, since extracellular electrodes are gently pressed onto the sheath above neurons, they usually stay above the same neuron during muscle contractions, and thus can be used in more intact preparations. To uniquely identify motor neurons for a motor pool (in particular, the I1/I3 muscle in Aplysia) using extracellular electrodes, one can use features that do not require intracellular measurements as criteria: soma size and location, axonal projection, and muscle innervation. For the particular motor pool used to illustrate the technique, we recorded from buccal nerves 2 and 3 to measure axonal projections, and measured the contraction forces of the I1

  8. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  9. Endoscopy imaging intelligent contrast improvement.

    PubMed

    Sheraizin, S; Sheraizin, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a medical endoscopy video contrast improvement method that provides intelligent automatic adaptive contrast control. The method fundamentals are video data clustering and video data histogram modification. The video data clustering allows an effective use the low noise two channel contrast enhancement processing. The histogram analysis permitted to determine the video exposure type for simple and complicated contrast distribution. We determined the needed gamma value for automatic local area contrast improvement for the following exposure types: dark, normal, light, dark light, dark normal etc. The experimental results of medical endoscopy video processing allow defining the automatic gamma control range from 0.5 to 2.0.

  10. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  11. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  12. High Presence of Extracellular Hemoglobin in the Periventricular White Matter Following Preterm Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ley, David; Romantsik, Olga; Vallius, Suvi; Sveinsdóttir, Kristbjörg; Sveinsdóttir, Snjolaug; Agyemang, Alex A.; Baumgarten, Maria; Mörgelin, Matthias; Lutay, Nataliya; Bruschettini, Matteo; Holmqvist, Bo; Gram, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Severe cerebral intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in preterm infants continues to be a major clinical problem, occurring in about 15–20% of very preterm infants. In contrast to other brain lesions the incidence of IVH has not been reduced over the last decade, but actually slightly increased. Currently over 50% of surviving infants develop post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation and about 35% develop severe neurological impairment, mainly cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. To date there is no therapy available to prevent infants from developing either hydrocephalus or serious neurological disability. It is known that blood rapidly accumulates within the ventricles following IVH and this leads to disruption of normal anatomy and increased local pressure. However, the molecular mechanisms causing brain injury following IVH are incompletely understood. We propose that extracellular hemoglobin is central in the pathophysiology of periventricular white matter damage following IVH. Using a preterm rabbit pup model of IVH the distribution of extracellular hemoglobin was characterized at 72 h following hemorrhage. Evaluation of histology, histochemistry, hemoglobin immunolabeling and scanning electron microscopy revealed presence of extensive amounts of extracellular hemoglobin, i.e., not retained within erythrocytes, in the periventricular white matter, widely distributed throughout the brain. Furthermore, double immunolabeling together with the migration and differentiation markers polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) demonstrates that a significant proportion of the extracellular hemoglobin is distributed in areas of the periventricular white matter with high extracellular plasticity. In conclusion, these findings support that extracellular hemoglobin may contribute to the pathophysiological processes that cause irreversible damage to the immature brain following IVH. PMID:27536248

  13. Extracellular cyclophilins in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular cyclophilins (eCyPs) are pro-inflammatory factors implicated in pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases. Most pathogenic activities of eCyPs are related to their chemotactic action towards leukocytes, which is mediated by eCyP receptor on target cells, CD147, and involves peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilins. This activity is inhibited by cyclosporine A (CsA) and non-immunosuppressive derivatives of this drug. Accumulating evidence for the role of eCyPs in disease pathogenesis stimulated research on the mechanisms of eCyP-initiated events, resulting in identification of multiple signaling pathways, characterization of a variety of effector molecules released from eCyP-treated cells, and synthesis of CsA derivatives specifically blocking eCyPs. However, a number of important questions related to the mode of action of eCyPs remain unanswered. In this article, we integrate available information on release and function of extracellular cyclophilins into a unified model, focusing on outstanding issues that need to be clarified. Extracellular cyclophilins are critical players in pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases. Their mechanism of action involves interaction with the receptor, CD147, and initiation of a poorly characterized signal transduction process culminating in chemotaxis and production of pro-inflammatory factors. Extracellular cyclophilins present an attractive target for therapeutic interventions that can be used to alleviate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Proline-directed Foldases: Cell Signaling Catalysts and Drug Targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Circulating Extracellular RNA Markers of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Xue; Asmann, Yan W.; Haga, Hiroaki; Patel, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Although a key determinant of hepatic recovery after injury is active liver regeneration, the ability to detect ongoing regeneration is lacking. The restoration of liver mass after hepatectomy involves systemic changes with coordinated changes in gene expression guiding regenerative responses, activation of progenitor cells, and proliferation of quiescent hepatocytes. We postulated that these responses involve intercellular communication involving extracellular RNA and that these could represent biomarkers of active regenerative responses. Methods RNA sequencing was performed to identify temporal changes in serum extracellular non-coding RNA after partial hepatectomy in C57BL/6 male mice. Tissue expression of selected RNA was performed by microarray analysis and validated using qRT-PCR. Digital PCR was used to detect and quantify serum expression of selected RNA. Results A peak increase in extracellular RNA content occurred six hours after hepatectomy. RNA sequencing identified alterations in several small non-coding RNA including known and novel microRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNA, antisense and repeat elements after partial hepatectomy. Combinatorial effects and network analyses identified signal regulation, protein complex assembly, and signal transduction as the most common biological processes targeted by miRNA that altered. miR-1A and miR-181 were most significantly altered microRNA in both serum and in hepatic tissues, and their presence in serum was quantitated using digital PCR. Conclusions Extracellular RNA selectively enriched during acute regeneration can be detected within serum and represent biomarkers of ongoing liver regeneration in mice. The ability to detect ongoing active regeneration would improve the assessment of hepatic recovery from liver injury. PMID:27415797

  15. Extracellular cyclophilins in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracellular cyclophilins (eCyPs) are pro-inflammatory factors implicated in pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases. Most pathogenic activities of eCyPs are related to their chemotactic activity towards leukocytes, which is mediated by eCyP receptor on target cells, CD147, and involves peptydil-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilins. This activity is inhibited by cyclosporine A (CsA) and non-immunosuppressive derivatives of this drug. Accumulating evidence for the role of eCyPs in disease pathogenesis stimulated research on the mechanisms of eCyP-initiated events, resulting in identification of multiple signaling pathways, characterization of a variety of effector molecules released from eCyP-treated cells, and synthesis of CsA derivatives specifically blocking eCyPs. However, a number of important questions related to the mode of action of eCyPs remain unanswered. Scope of review In this article, we integrate available information on release and function of extracellular cyclophilins into a unified model, focusing on outstanding issues that need to be clarified. Major conclusions Extracellular cyclophilins are critical players in pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases. Their mechanism of action involves interaction with the receptor, CD147, and initiation of a poorly characterized signal transduction process culminating in chemotaxis and production of pro-inflammatory factors. General significance Extracellular cyclophilins present an attractive target for therapeutic interventions that can be used to alleviate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:25445705

  16. [Pharmacology of the extracellular calcium ion receptor].

    PubMed

    Ruat, Martial

    2003-01-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to family 3 of G-protein coupled receptors. The CaSR, expressed at the surface of the parathyroid cells, controls parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion and is the main regulator of calcium homeostasis. Its activity is regulated by small changes in the physiological concentrations of calcium and magnesium ions present in the serum and extracellular fluids, leading to the stimulation of the phospholipases C and A2. Molecules that potentiate the effect of extracellular calcium are called calcimimetics. They reduce the PTH level in vivo and have been proposed to be of therapeutic benefit for the treatment of both primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The blocking of CaSR by a calcilytic molecule results in the increase in serum PTH and might be of interest in the treatment of osteoporosis. The CaSR is also expressed in the thyroid, kidney, bone and in neuronal and glial cell populations, where it should be involved in the complex responses associated with calcium and magnesium ions present in the extracellular fluids.

  17. Effective extracellular trehalose production by Cellulosimicrobium cellulans.

    PubMed

    Seto, A; Yoshijima, H; Toyomasu, K; Ogawa, H-O; Kakuta, H; Hosono, K; Ueda, K; Beppu, T

    2004-06-01

    A bacterium isolated from a petal of Casa Blanca Lily (ST26 strain) produced a marked amount of extracellular trehalose (alpha- d-glucopyranosyl-[1,1]-alpha- d-glucopyranose) in culture medium containing glucose. 16S rDNA-based phylogeny showed that ST26 belongs to, or is related to, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans, a close relative of Cellulomonas spp. Various Cellulomonas strains obtained from culture collections also showed extracellular trehalose productivity, suggesting that trehalose production is a common property of this bacterial genus. ST26 accumulated trehalose in medium supplied with glucose but not with sucrose, glycerol or maltose. Effective extracellular trehalose production by ST26 was achieved by supplying 0.5-1% ammonium sulfate and 0.5-1% CaCO(3). The addition of CaCO(3) adjusted the pH of the culture to around 5.0. The optimized culture conditions yielded trehalose from glucose at a conversion rate of 61%. The addition of ammonium sulfate greatly reduced the dry cell weight of ST26 and intracellular content of trehalose, which suggests that the addition of ammonium sulfate makes ST26 cells leak trehalose into the medium. ST26 effectively propagated in minimal medium containing trehalose as a sole carbon source, which suggests that trehalose serves as a carbohydrate reserve of this organism.

  18. Extracellular DNA: A Bridge to Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Martha C; Wen, Fushi; Elquza, Emad

    2015-10-15

    DNase I is a secreted enzyme whose function has been presumed to control "waste management" in the human system, by degrading DNA that leaks from dead and dying cells. Emerging studies have instead yielded evidence that DNase I plays a central role in newly defined dynamics of immune and autoimmune diseases, as well as cancer and vascular disorders, including thrombosis. Cancer cells have been reported to be associated with distinctive extracellular structures that facilitate aggregation and implantation. The fact that DNA is a component of such structures and that it plays a role in cancer development is illustrated by direct evidence: DNase I added to tumor cells eliminates the structures and inhibits tumorigenicity of some cancer cell lines. DNase I injected into experimental animals, moreover, results in significant inhibition of metastasis. Despite independent observations of such phenomena in diverse cancers for over 50 years, the potential for using DNase I as a clinical tool to prevent or treat cancer remains unexplored. The discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps has yielded a conceptual framework for interpreting how extracellular DNA may function in cancer development and why it may prove to be an important clinical target in stopping cancer outside the cell.

  19. Intracellular Biopotentials During Static Extracellular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Two properties of the intracellular potentials and electric fields resulting from static extracellular stimulation are obtained for arbitrarily shaped cells. First, the values of intracellular potential are shown to be bounded by the maximum and minimum values of extracellular potential on the surface of the cell. Second, the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field is shown to have an upper bound given by the ratio of the magnitude of the largest extracellular potential difference on the surface of the cell to a generalized length constant λ = [σintraVcell/(σmemb Acell)]1/2, where Vcell and Acell are the volume and surface area of the cell, σintra is the intracellular conductivity (reciprocal ohms per centimeter), and σmemb is the membrane conductivity (reciprocal ohms per square centimeter). The use of the upper bound on the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field as an estimate for intracellular isopotentiality is discussed and the use of the generalized length constant for electrically describing arbitrary cells is illustrated for cylindrical- and spheroidal-shaped cells. PMID:4726882

  20. Extracellular conversion of adiponectin hexamers into trimers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-a; Nuñez, Martha; Briggs, David B.; Laskowski, Bethany L.; Chhun, Jimmy J.; Eleid, Joseph K.; Quon, Michael J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that exists as trimers, hexamers and larger species collectively referred to as HMW (high-molecular-weight) adiponectin. Whether hexamers or HMW adiponectin serve as precursors for trimers outside the circulation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that adiponectin trimers can be generated from larger oligomers secreted from primary rat adipose cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Purified hexameric, but not HMW, adiponectin converted into trimers in conditioned media separated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes or, more efficiently, when enclosed in the dialysis membrane in the presence of adipocytes. Several lines of evidence indicate that the conversion is mediated by an extracellular redox system. First, N-terminal epitope-tagged hexamers converted into trimers without proteolytic removal of the tag. Secondly, appearance of trimers was associated with conversion of disulfide-bonded dimers into monomers. Thirdly, thiol-reactive agents inhibited conversion into trimers. Consistent with a redox-based mechanism, purified hexamers reductively converted into trimers in defined glutathione redox buffer with reduction potential typically found in the extracellular environment while the HMW adiponectin remained stable. In addition, conversion of hexamers into trimers was enhanced by NADPH, but not by NADP+. Collectively, these data strongly suggest the presence of an extracellular redox system capable of converting adiponectin oligomers. PMID:22973892

  1. Extracellular space diffusion and extrasynaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Vargová, L; Syková, E

    2008-01-01

    The diffusion of neuroactive substances in the extracellular space (ECS) plays an important role in short- and long-distance communication between nerve cells and is the underlying mechanism of extrasynaptic (volume) transmission. The diffusion properties of the ECS are described by three parameters: 1. ECS volume fraction alpha (alpha=ECS volume/total tissue volume), 2. tortuosity lambda (lambda2=free/apparent diffusion coefficient), reflecting the presence of diffusion barriers represented by, e.g., fine neuronal and glial processes or extracellular matrix molecules and 3. nonspecific uptake k'. These diffusion parameters differ in various brain regions, and diffusion in the CNS is therefore inhomogeneous. Moreover, diffusion barriers may channel the migration of molecules in the ECS, so that diffusion is facilitated in a certain direction, i.e. diffusion in certain brain regions is anisotropic. Changes in the diffusion parameters have been found in many physiological and pathological states in which cell swelling, glial remodeling and extracellular matrix changes are key factors influencing diffusion. Changes in ECS volume, tortuosity and anisotropy significantly affect the accumulation and diffusion of neuroactive substances in the CNS and thus extrasynaptic transmission, neuron-glia communication, transmitter "spillover" and synaptic cross-talk as well as cell migration, drug delivery and treatment.

  2. Differential detergent sensitivity of extracellular vesicle subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Sódar, Barbara; Németh, Andrea; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Vukman, Krisztina V; Tamási, Viola; Balogh, Andrea; Kittel, Ágnes; Pállinger, Éva; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2015-10-14

    Extracellular vesicles (including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies) are currently attracting rapidly increasing attention from various fields of biology due to their ability to carry complex information and act as autocrine, paracrine and even endocrine intercellular messengers. In the present study we investigated the sensitivity of size-based subpopulations of extracellular vesicles to different concentrations of detergents including sodium dodecyl sulphate, Triton X-100, Tween 20 and deoxycholate. We determined the required detergent concentration that lysed each of the vesicle subpopulations secreted by Jurkat, THP-1, MiaPaCa and U937 human cell lines. We characterized the vesicles by tunable resistive pulse sensing, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. Microvesicles and apoptotic bodies were found to be more sensitive to detergent lysis than exosomes. Furthermore, we found evidence that sodium dodecyl sulphate and Triton X-100 were more effective in vesicle lysis at low concentrations than deoxycholate or Tween 20. Taken together, our data suggest that a combination of differential detergent lysis with tunable resistive pulse sensing or flow cytometry may prove useful for simple and fast differentiation between exosomes and other extracellular vesicle subpopulations as well as between vesicular and non-vesicular structures.

  3. Extracellular Aldonolactonase from Myceliophthora thermophila▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, William T.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Hausmann, Corinne D.; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Fungi secrete many different enzymes to deconstruct lignocellulosic biomass, including several families of hydrolases, oxidative enzymes, and many uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the isolation, characterization, and primary sequence analysis of an extracellular aldonolactonase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila (synonym Sporotrichum thermophile). The lactonase is a 48-kDa glycoprotein with a broad pH optimum. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucono-δ-lactone and cellobiono-δ-lactone with an apparent second-order rate constant, kcat/Km, of ∼1 × 106 M−1 s−1 at pH 5.0 and 25°C but is unable to hydrolyze xylono-γ-lactone or arabino-γ-lactone. Sequence analyses of the lactonase show that it has distant homology to cis-carboxy-muconate lactonizing enzymes (CMLE) as well as 6-phosphogluconolactonases present in some bacteria. The M. thermophila genome contains two predicted extracellular lactonase genes, and expression of both genes is induced by the presence of pure cellulose. Homologues of the M. thermophila lactonase, which are also predicted to be extracellular, are present in nearly all known cellulolytic ascomycetes. PMID:21075873

  4. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  5. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  6. Listeria monocytogenes induces mast cell extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Leyva-Paredes, Kahiry; Donis-Maturano, Luis; González-Jiménez, Marco; Paredes-Vivas, Yuriria; Cerbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Serafín-López, Jeanet; García-Pérez, Blanca; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2017-02-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in different immunological phenomena including allergy and infectious diseases. Several bacteria induce mast cell activation leading to degranulation and the production of several cytokines and chemokines. However, mast cells also have different microbicidal activities such as phagocytosis and the release of DNA with embedded granular proteins known as Mast Cell Extracellular Traps (MCETs). Although previous reports indicate that extracellular bacteria are able to induce MCETs little is known if intracellular bacteria can induce these structures. In this work, we evaluated MCETs induction by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. We found that mast cells released DNA after stimulation with L. monocytogenes, and this DNA was complexed to histone and tryptase. Before extracellular DNA release, L. monocytogenes induced modifications to the mast cell nuclear envelope and DNA was detected outside the nucleus. L. monocytogenes stimulated mast cells to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking NADPH oxidase diminished DNA release by mast cells. Finally, MCETs showed antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes that was partially blocked when β-hexosaminidase activity was inhibited. These results show that L. monocytogenes induces mast cells to produce microbicidal MCETs, suggesting a role for mast cells in containing infection beyond the induction of inflammation.

  7. TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) induces necrosis-like cell death in tumor cells at acidic extracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Meurette, Olivier; Huc, Laurence; Rebillard, Amelie; Le Moigne, Gwenaelle; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Therese

    2005-11-01

    How tumor microenvironment, more specifically low extracellular pH (6.5), alters cell response to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-based cancer therapy has yet to be determined. The aim of the current work was to test the effect of acidic extracellular pH on TRAIL-induced cell death in human HT29 colon carcinoma and HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cell lines as well as in human primary hepatocytes. We found an increase in TRAIL sensitivity at low extracellular pH, which is partially inhibited by Bcl-2 expression in HT29 cells. At low extracellular pH, TRAIL induced a new form of cell death, sharing necrotic and apoptotic features in tumor cells. By contrast, human primary hepatocytes were resistant to TRAIL-induced cell death even at acidic extracellular pH.

  8. Nematicidal Bacteria Associated to Pinewood Nematode Produce Extracellular Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S.; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M. O.; Morais, Paula V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  9. Dipole characterization of single neurons from their extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial variation of the extracellular action potentials (EAP) of a single neuron contains information about the size and location of the dominant current source of its action potential generator, which is typically in the vicinity of the soma. Using this dependence in reverse in a three-component realistic probe + brain + source model, we solved the inverse problem of characterizing the equivalent current source of an isolated neuron from the EAP data sampled by an extracellular probe at multiple independent recording locations. We used a dipole for the model source because there is extensive evidence it accurately captures the spatial roll-off of the EAP amplitude, and because, as we show, dipole localization, beyond a minimum cell-probe distance, is a more accurate alternative to approaches based on monopole source models. Dipole characterization is separable into a linear dipole moment optimization where the dipole location is fixed, and a second, nonlinear, global optimization of the source location. We solved the linear optimization on a discrete grid via the lead fields of the probe, which can be calculated for any realistic probe + brain model by the finite element method. The global source location was optimized by means of Tikhonov regularization that jointly minimizes model error and dipole size. The particular strategy chosen reflects the fact that the dipole model is used in the near field, in contrast to the typical prior applications of dipole models to EKG and EEG source analysis. We applied dipole localization to data collected with stepped tetrodes whose detailed geometry was measured via scanning electron microscopy. The optimal dipole could account for 96% of the power in the spatial variation of the EAP amplitude. Among various model error contributions to the residual, we address especially the error in probe geometry, and the extent to which it biases estimates of dipole parameters. This dipole characterization method can be applied to

  10. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  11. Chromatic and contrast selectivity in color contrast adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Yoko; Paras, Carrie; Webster, Michael A

    2004-01-01

    We used color contrast adaptation to examine the chromatic and contrast selectivity of central color mechanisms. Adaptation to a field whose color varies along a single axis of color space induces a selective loss in sensitivity to the adapting axis. The resulting changes in color appearance are consistent with mechanisms formed by different linear combinations of the cone signals. We asked whether the visual system could also adjust to higher-order variations in the adapting stimulus, by adapting observers to interleaved variations along both the L versus M and the S versus LM cardinal axes. The perceived hue of test stimuli was then measured with an asymmetric matching task. Frequency analysis of the hue shifts revealed weak but systematic hue rotations away from each cardinal axis and toward the diagonal intermediate axes. Such shifts could arise if the adapted channels include mechanisms with narrow chromatic selectivity, as some physiological recordings suggest, but could also reflect how adaptation alters the contrast response function. In either case they imply the presence of more than two mechanisms within the chromatic plane. In a second set of measurements, we adapted to either the L versus M or the S versus LM axis alone and tested whether the changes in hue could be accounted for by changes in relative contrast along the two axes. For high contrasts the hue biases are larger than the contrast changes predict. This dissociation implies that the contrast and hue changes are not carried by a common underlying signal, and could arise if the contrast along a single color direction is encoded by more than one mechanism with different contrast sensitivities or if different subsets of channels encode contrast and hue. Such variations in contrast sensitivity are also consistent with physiological recordings of cortical neurons.

  12. Extracellular nucleases and extracellular DNA play important roles in Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Seper, Andrea; Fengler, Vera H I; Roier, Sandro; Wolinski, Heimo; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Biofilms are a preferred mode of survival for many microorganisms including Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe secretory diarrhoeal disease cholera. The ability of the facultative human pathogen V. cholerae to form biofilms is a key factor for persistence in aquatic ecosystems and biofilms act as a source for new outbreaks. Thus, a better understanding of biofilm formation and transmission of V. cholerae is an important target to control the disease. So far the Vibrio exopolysaccharide was the only known constituent of the biofilm matrix. In this study we identify and characterize extracellular DNA as a component of the Vibrio biofilm matrix. Furthermore, we show that extracellular DNA is modulated and controlled by the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. Our results indicate that extracellular DNA and the extracellular nucleases are involved in diverse processes including the development of a typical biofilm architecture, nutrient acquisition, detachment from biofilms and the colonization fitness of biofilm clumps after ingestion by the host. This study provides new insights into biofilm development and transmission of biofilm-derived V. cholerae. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Extracellular nucleases and extracellular DNA play important roles in Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Seper, Andrea; Fengler, Vera H I; Roier, Sandro; Wolinski, Heimo; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are a preferred mode of survival for many microorganisms including Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe secretory diarrhoeal disease cholera. The ability of the facultative human pathogen V. cholerae to form biofilms is a key factor for persistence in aquatic ecosystems and biofilms act as a source for new outbreaks. Thus, a better understanding of biofilm formation and transmission of V. cholerae is an important target to control the disease. So far the Vibrio exopolysaccharide was the only known constituent of the biofilm matrix. In this study we identify and characterize extracellular DNA as a component of the Vibrio biofilm matrix. Furthermore, we show that extracellular DNA is modulated and controlled by the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. Our results indicate that extracellular DNA and the extracellular nucleases are involved in diverse processes including the development of a typical biofilm architecture, nutrient acquisition, detachment from biofilms and the colonization fitness of biofilm clumps after ingestion by the host. This study provides new insights into biofilm development and transmission of biofilm-derived V. cholerae. PMID:22032623

  14. The modulation of TRPM7 currents by nafamostat mesilate depends directly upon extracellular concentrations of divalent cations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of extracellular divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) fall substantially during intensive synaptic transmission as well as during some pathophysiological conditions such as epilepsy and brain ischemia. Here we report that a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, nafamostat mesylate (NM), and several of its analogues, block recombinant TRPM7 currents expressed in HEK293T cells in inverse relationship to the concentration of extracellular divalent cations. Lowering extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ also evokes a divalent-sensitive non-selective cation current that is mediated by TRPM7 expression in hippocampal neurons. In cultured hippocampal neurons, NM blocked these TRPM7-mediated currents with an apparent affinity of 27 μM, as well as the paradoxical Ca2+ influx associated with lowering extracellular Ca2+. Unexpectedly, pre-exposure to NM strongly potentiated TRPM7 currents. In the presence of physiological concentrations of extracellular divalent cations, NM activates TRPM7. The stimulating effects of NM on TRPM7 currents are also inversely related to extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+. DAPI and HSB but not netropsin, blocked and stimulated TRPM7. In contrast, mono-cationic, the metabolites of NM, p-GBA and AN, as well as protease inhibitor leupeptin and gabexate failed to substantially modulate TRPM7. NM thus provides a molecular template for the design of putative modulators of TRPM7. PMID:21122141

  15. Faithful contrastive features in learning.

    PubMed

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-09-10

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2 distinct morphemes contrast on the surface in a particular environment, at least 1 of the underlying features on which the 2 differ must be realized faithfully on the surface. A learning procedure exploiting the faithful contrastive feature property, contrast analysis, can set the underlying values of some features, even where featural minimal pairs do not exist, but is nevertheless fundamentally limited in what it can set. This work suggests that observation of surface contrasts between pairs of words can contribute to the learning of underlying forms, while still supporting the view that interaction with the phonological mapping will be necessary to fully determine underlying forms.

  16. Extracellular Ca2+ Is Required for Fertilization in the African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Katherine L; Mayfield, Brianna L; Duray, Alexis M; Tembo, Maiwase; Beleny, David O; Napolitano, Marc A; Sauer, Monica L; Wisner, Bennett W; Carlson, Anne E

    2017-01-01

    The necessity of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization and early embryonic development in the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is controversial. Ca2+ entry into X. laevis sperm is reportedly required for the acrosome reaction, yet fertilization and embryonic development have been documented to occur in high concentrations of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Here we sought to resolve this controversy. Using the appearance of cleavage furrows as an indicator of embryonic development, we found that X. laevis eggs inseminated in a solution lacking added divalent cations developed normally. By contrast, eggs inseminated in millimolar concentrations of BAPTA or EGTA failed to develop. Transferring embryos to varying solutions after sperm addition, we found that extracellular Ca2+ is specifically required for events occurring within the first 30 minutes after sperm addition, but not after. We found that the fluorescently stained sperm were not able to penetrate the envelope of eggs inseminated in high BAPTA, whereas several had penetrated the vitelline envelope of eggs inseminated without a Ca2+ chelator, or with BAPTA and saturating CaCl2. Together these results indicate that fertilization does not occur in high concentrations of Ca2+ chelators. Finally, we found that the jelly coat includes >5 mM of readily diffusible Ca2+. Taken together, these data are consistent with requirement of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the jelly coat surrounding the egg acts as a reserve of readily available Ca2+ ions to foster fertilization in changing extracellular milieu.

  17. Extracellular calcium elicits a chemokinetic response from monocytes in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olszak, I. T.; Poznansky, M. C.; Evans, R. H.; Olson, D.; Kos, C.; Pollak, M. R.; Brown, E. M.; Scadden, D. T.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Recruitment of macrophages to sites of cell death is critical for induction of an immunologic response. Calcium concentrations in extracellular fluids vary markedly, and are particularly high at sites of injury or infection. We hypothesized that extracellular calcium participates in modulating the immune response, perhaps acting via the seven-transmembrane calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) on mature monocytes/macrophages. We observed a dose-dependent increase in monocyte chemotaxis in response to extracellular calcium or the selective allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467. In contrast, monocytes derived from mice deficient in CaR lacked the normal chemotactic response to a calcium gradient. Notably, CaR activation of monocytes bearing the receptor synergistically augmented the transmigration response of monocytes to the chemokine MCP-1 in association with increased cell-surface expression of its cognate receptor, CCR2. Conversely, stimulation of monocytes with MCP-1 or SDF-1alpha reciprocally increased CaR expression, suggesting a dual-enhancing interaction of Ca(2+) with chemokines in recruiting inflammatory cells. Subcutaneous administration in mice of Ca(2+), MCP-1, or (more potently) the combination of Ca(2+) and MCP-1, elicited an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of monocytes/macrophages. Thus extracellular calcium functions as an ionic chemokinetic agent capable of modulating the innate immune response in vivo and in vitro by direct and indirect actions on monocytic cells. Calcium deposition may be both consequence and cause of chronic inflammatory changes at sites of injury, infection, and atherosclerosis.

  18. Extracellular calcium elicits a chemokinetic response from monocytes in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olszak, I. T.; Poznansky, M. C.; Evans, R. H.; Olson, D.; Kos, C.; Pollak, M. R.; Brown, E. M.; Scadden, D. T.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Recruitment of macrophages to sites of cell death is critical for induction of an immunologic response. Calcium concentrations in extracellular fluids vary markedly, and are particularly high at sites of injury or infection. We hypothesized that extracellular calcium participates in modulating the immune response, perhaps acting via the seven-transmembrane calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) on mature monocytes/macrophages. We observed a dose-dependent increase in monocyte chemotaxis in response to extracellular calcium or the selective allosteric CaR activator NPS R-467. In contrast, monocytes derived from mice deficient in CaR lacked the normal chemotactic response to a calcium gradient. Notably, CaR activation of monocytes bearing the receptor synergistically augmented the transmigration response of monocytes to the chemokine MCP-1 in association with increased cell-surface expression of its cognate receptor, CCR2. Conversely, stimulation of monocytes with MCP-1 or SDF-1alpha reciprocally increased CaR expression, suggesting a dual-enhancing interaction of Ca(2+) with chemokines in recruiting inflammatory cells. Subcutaneous administration in mice of Ca(2+), MCP-1, or (more potently) the combination of Ca(2+) and MCP-1, elicited an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of monocytes/macrophages. Thus extracellular calcium functions as an ionic chemokinetic agent capable of modulating the innate immune response in vivo and in vitro by direct and indirect actions on monocytic cells. Calcium deposition may be both consequence and cause of chronic inflammatory changes at sites of injury, infection, and atherosclerosis.

  19. Polymeric gastrointestinal MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Tilcock, C; Unger, E C; Ahkong, Q F; Fritz, T; Koenig, S H; Brown, R D

    1991-01-01

    Combining either paramagnetic (gadolinium chelates) or superparamagnetic (ferrite) contrast agents with polymers such as polyethylene glycol or cellulose, or with simple sugars such as dextrose, results in mixtures that exhibit improved T1 and/or T2 relaxivity compared with that of the contrast agent alone. It is suggested that the addition of such inexpensive and nontoxic polymers or saccharides may improve the effectiveness and decrease the cost of enteric contrast agents.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  2. Discourse Theory and "Contrastive Rhetoric."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Lev, Zev

    1986-01-01

    Appraises R. Kaplan's "contrastic rhetoric" in the light of a multilanguage research project on discourse structure. Concludes that Kaplan's specific analyses are in need of substantive revision. (FL)

  3. Phase contrast MR angiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, C L

    1995-08-01

    Phase contrast MR methods encode information from macroscopic motion into the phase of the MR signal. Phase contrast methods can be applied with small and large fields-of-view, can give quantitative measures of velocity, and provide excellent suppression of signals from stationary tissue. Unlike time-of-flight methods, phase contrast methods directly measure flow and thus are not hindered by the artifactual appearance of tissue having short T1. Phase contrast angiograms can be two-dimensional (thin slice or projectile), three-dimensional, and/or time resolved and have applications throughout the body.

  4. Fuzzy-Contextual Contrast Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Anil; Verma, Om; Khanna, Chintan

    2017-02-08

    This paper presents contrast enhancement algorithms based on fuzzy contextual information of the images. We introduce fuzzy similarity index and fuzzy contrast factor to capture the neighborhood characteristics of a pixel. A new histogram, using fuzzy contrast factor of each pixel is developed, and termed as the fuzzy dissimilarity histogram (FDH). A cumulative distribution function (CDF) is formed with normalized values of FDH and used as a transfer function to obtain the contrast enhanced image. The algorithm gives good contrast enhancement and preserves the natural characteristic of the image. In order to develop a contextual intensity transfer function, we introduce a fuzzy membership function based on fuzzy similarity index and coefficient of variation of the image. The contextual intensity transfer function is designed using the fuzzy membership function to achieve final contrast enhanced image. The overall algorithm is referred as the fuzzy contextual contrast-enhancement (FCCE) algorithm. The proposed algorithms are compared with conventional and state-of-art contrast enhancement algorithms. The quantitative and visual assessment of the results is performed. The results of quantitative measures are statistically analyzed using t-test. The exhaustive experimentation and analysis show the proposed algorithm efficiently enhances contrast and yields in natural visual quality images.

  5. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-05

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  6. Anomalous Extracellular Diffusion in Rat Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  7. Microbial extracellular polysaccharides and plagioclase dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, S. A.; Barker, W. W.; Banfield, J. F.

    1999-05-01

    Bytownite feldspar was dissolved in batch reactors in solutions of starch (glucose polymer), gum xanthan (glucose, mannose, glucuronic acid), pectin (poly-galacturonic acid), and four alginates (mannuronic and guluronic acid) with a range of molecular weights (low, medium, high and uncharacterized) to evaluate the effect of extracellular microbial polymers on mineral dissolution rates. Solutions were analyzed for dissolved Si and Al as an indicator of feldspar dissolution. At neutral pH, feldspar dissolution was inhibited by five of the acid polysaccharides, gum xanthan, pectin, alginate low, alginate medium, alginate high, compared to an organic-free control. An uncharacterized alginate substantially enhanced both Si and Al release from the feldspar. Starch, a neutral polysaccharide, had no apparent effect. Under mildly acidic conditions, initial pH ≈ 4, all of the polymers enhanced feldspar dissolution compared to the inorganic controls. Si release from feldspar in starch solution exceeded the control by a factor of three. Pectin and gum xanthan increased feldspar dissolution by a factor of 10, and the alginates enhanced feldspar dissolution by a factor of 50 to 100. Si and Al concentrations increased with time, even though solutions were supersaturated with respect to several possible secondary phases. Under acidic conditions, initial pH ≈ 3, below the pK a of the carboxylic acid groups, dissolution rates increased, but the relative increase due to the polysaccharides is lower, approximately a factor of two to ten. Microbial extracellular polymers play a complex role in mineral weathering. Polymers appear to inhibit dissolution under some conditions, possibly by irreversibly binding to the mineral surfaces. The extracellular polysaccharides can also enhance dissolution by providing protons and complexing with ions in solution.

  8. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  9. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF AZOTOBACTER VINELANDII1

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gary H.; Johnstone, Donald B.

    1964-01-01

    Cohen, Gary H. (University of Vermont, Burlington), and Donald B. Johnstone. Extracellular polysaccharides of Azotobacter vinelandii. J. Bacteriol. 88:329–338. 1964.—Extracellular polysaccharides synthetized by Azotobacter vinelandii strains 155, 102, and 3A were shown to be carboxylic acid heteropolysaccharides of apparent high molecular weight. Cells were grown in a nitrogen-free, mineral broth medium with 2% sucrose. Extracellular slime was recovered by centrifugation and purified by repeated alcohol precipitation and Sevag deproteinization. Capsular polysaccharide was recovered from washed cells by mild alkaline digestion. Methods of isolation and purification appeared to provide polysaccharide showing no evidence of heterogeneity when examined by chemical and physical methods. Infrared analysis of purified slime from the three strains suggested fundamental structural similarities. Colorimetric, paper chromatographic, and enzymatic analyses on both intact and acid-hydrolyzed slime polysaccharide indicated that the polymers contained in common galacturonic acid, [α] d-glucose, and rhamnose at a ratio of approximately 43:2:1, as well as a hexuronic acid lactone, probably mannurono-lactone. However, as shown by chemical and infrared analysis, minor differences did exist; namely, slime from strain 155 and 102 contained o-acetyl groups, whereas slime from strain 3A contained none. A sialic acid-like component (1.5% of dry weight of the polysaccharide, calculated as N-acetyl neuraminic acid), was found only in the slime of strain 155. Capsular polysaccharide composition closely resembled that for slime. It is of interest that the major slime components were identical whether the energy source provided for the cells was sucrose, glucose, fructose, or ethanol. PMID:14203348

  10. Extracellular killing of inhaled pneumococci in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coonrod, J.D.; Marple, S.; Holmes, G.P.; Rehm, S.R.

    1987-12-01

    Early clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus is believed to be caused by phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. In murine models inhaled pneumococci are cleared even more rapidly than S. aureus. Conventional opsonins appear to play no role in this clearance, and recently it has been shown that murine alveolar lining material contains free fatty acids and other soluble factors that are directly bactericidal for pneumococci. To determine whether non-phagocytic factors are involved in pneumococcal clearance, we compared the site of killing of inhaled pneumococci and S. aureus in rats using histologic methods and bronchoalveolar lavage. Spontaneous lysis of pneumococci was prevented by use of autolysin-defective pneumococci or by substitution of ethanolamine for choline in the cell wall. Histologic studies showed that the percent of inhaled staphylococci associated with alveolar macrophages always exceeded the percent of staphylococci cleared, whereas there was little association of pneumococci with macrophages during clearance. Analysis of the intracellular or extracellular location of iron 59 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats that had inhaled aerosols of /sup 59/Fe-labeled bacteria suggested that staphylococci were killed predominantly in macrophages and pneumococci in the extracellular space. When /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci or staphylococci were ingested and killed by macrophages in vitro, the /sup 59/Fe remained with the macrophages, suggesting that the extracellular location of /sup 59/Fe during pneumococcal killing in vivo was not caused by rapid turnover of /sup 59/Fe in macrophages. Studies of the site of killing of inhaled type 25 pneumococci labeled exclusively in the cell wall with carbon 14-ethanolamine confirmed the results obtained with /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci. Thus, early killing of inhaled pneumococci, unlike staphylococci, appears to take place outside of macrophages.

  11. Mechanism of cryoprotection by extracellular polymeric solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Hirsh, A; Erbe, E; Williams, R J

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the means by which polymer solutions protect cells from freezing injury, we cooled human monocytes to -80 degrees C or below in the presence of various polymers. Differential scanning calorimetric studies showed that those polymers which protect cells best have a limiting glass transition temperature (T'g) of approximately -20 degrees C; those with a T'g significantly higher or lower did not protect. Freeze-etch electron micrographs indicated that intracellular ice crystals had formed during this freezing procedure, but remained smaller than approximately 300 nm in the same proportion of cells as survived rapid thawing. We propose that cryoprotection of slowly frozen monocytes by polymers is a consequence of a T'g of -20 degrees C in the extracellular solution. In our hypothesis, the initial concentration and viscosity of protective polymer solutions reduce the extent and rate of cell water loss to extracellular ice and limit the injurious osmotic stress, which cells face during freezing at moderate rates to -20 degrees C. Below -20 degrees C, glass formation prevents further osmotic stress by isolating cells from extracellular ice crystals, virtually eliminating cell water loss at lower temperatures. On the other hand, the protective polymer solutions will allow some diffusion of water away from cells at temperatures above T'g. If conditions are correct, cells will concentrate the cytoplasm sufficiently during the initial cooling to T'g to avoid lethal intracellular freezing between T'g and the intracellular Tg, which has been depressed to low temperatures by that concentration. Thus, when polymers are used as cryoprotective agents, cell survival is contingent upon maintenance of osmotic stress within narrow limits. Images FIGURE 9 FIGURE 9 PMID:2462928

  12. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase), released by activated monocytes (and possibly macrophages), in oxidative events within the artery wall. As MPO is released extracellularly, and is highly basic, it might be expected to associate with poly-anionic matrix components thereby localizing damage to these materials. In this study the reaction of the MPO-derived oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with extracellular matrix from vascular smooth muscle cells and healthy pig arteries has been examined. HOCl is rapidly consumed by such matrix samples, with the formation of matrix-derived chloramines or chloramides. The yield of these intermediates increases with HOCl dose. These materials undergo a time- and temperature-dependent decay, which parallels the release of sugar and protein components from the treated matrix, consistent with these species being important intermediates. Matrix damage is enhanced by species that increase chloramine/chloramide decomposition, with copper and iron ions being effective catalysts, and decreased by compounds which scavenge chloramines/chloramides, or species derived from them. The effect of such matrix modifications on cellular behaviour is poorly understood, though it is known that changes in matrix materials can have profound effects on cell adhesion, proliferation, growth and phenotype. The observed matrix modifications reported here may therefore modulate cellular behaviour in diseases such as atherosclerosis where MPO-derived oxidants are generated. PMID:12911330

  13. The evolution of metazoan extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The modular domain structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and their genes has allowed extensive exon/domain shuffling during evolution to generate hundreds of ECM proteins. Many of these arose early during metazoan evolution and have been highly conserved ever since. Others have undergone duplication and divergence during evolution, and novel combinations of domains have evolved to generate new ECM proteins, particularly in the vertebrate lineage. The recent sequencing of several genomes has revealed many details of this conservation and evolution of ECM proteins to serve diverse functions in metazoa. PMID:22431747

  14. Extracellular matrix signaling in morphogenesis and repair.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Barker, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is critically important for many cellular processes including growth, differentiation, survival, and morphogenesis. Cells remodel and reshape the ECM by degrading and reassembling it, playing an active role in sculpting their surrounding environment and directing their own phenotypes. Both mechanical and biochemical molecules influence ECM dynamics in multiple ways; by releasing small bioactive signaling molecules, releasing growth factors stored within the ECM, eliciting structural changes to matrix proteins which expose cryptic sites and by degrading matrix proteins directly. The dynamic reciprocal communication between cells and the ECM plays a fundamental roll in tissue development, homeostasis, and wound healing.

  15. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent advances in extracellular biopolymer flocculants.

    PubMed

    Salehizadeh, Hossein; Yan, Ning

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular biopolymer flocculants (EBFs) are flocculating substances, consisting of polysaccharides, proteins, and lipids, which are secreted in the culture broth by many microorganisms. Some of EBFs have attracted much attention as biodegradable and nontoxic substitutes for conventional chemical flocculants. This paper reviews the recent development of EBFs. Aspects discussed include an introduction to conventional chemical flocculants and EBFs, isolation of novel bioflocculant-producing microorganisms, culture conditions, chemical structure and molecular weight of EBFs, the physico-chemical factors affecting flocculating activity, fermentation process design and recent and emerging application fields of EBFs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Image Contrast in Holographic Reconstructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, B. R.

    1969-01-01

    The fundamental concepts of holography are explained using elementary wave ideas. Discusses wavefront reconstruction and contrast in hemigraphic images. The consequence of recording only the intensity at a given surface and using an oblique reference wave is shown to be an incomplete reconstruction resulting in image of low contrast. (LC)

  18. Faithful Contrastive Features in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2…

  19. Nephrotoxicity related to contrast media.

    PubMed

    Berg, K J

    2000-10-01

    The numbers of contrast media (CM)-enhanced examinations are increasing. The annual sale of iodine for CM now represents 60 million CM doses a year world-wide. In spite of improvements in chemical structure, CM are still the third leading cause of hospital-acquired acute renal failure. The definition of contrast nephropathy (CN) is discussed, as well as the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. Low osmolar contrast media (LOCM) are less nephrotoxic than high osomolar contrast media (HOCM) and cause fewer osmotoxic side-effects such as pain and heat sensations. The non-ionic dimeric contrast media which are iso-osmolar to plasma (IOCM) cause even fewer haemodynamic side-effects and result in better opacification of the urinary tract than LOCM. The nephrotoxicity of IOCM is low. The risk factors for CN and methods for prevention of CN are discussed.

  20. Measurement of visual contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Marko, A. R.

    1985-04-01

    This invention involves measurement of the visual contrast sensitivity (modulation transfer) function of a human subject by means of linear or circular spatial frequency pattern on a cathode ray tube whose contrast is automatically decreasing or increasing depending on the subject pressing or releasing a hand-switch button. The threshold of detection of the pattern modulation is found by the subject by adjusting the contrast to values which vary about the subject's threshold thereby determining the threshold and also providing by the magnitude of the contrast fluctuations between reversals some estimate of the variability of the subject's absolute threshold. The invention also involves the slow automatic sweeping of the spatial frequency of the pattern over the spatial frequencies after preset time intervals or after threshold has been defined at each frequency by a selected number of subject-determined threshold crossings; i.e., contrast reversals.

  1. Extracellular superoxide dismutase of boar seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kowalowka, M; Wysocki, P; Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2008-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzymatic component of the antioxidant defense system that protects spermatozoa by catalysing the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Age and season effects on SOD activity in the seminal plasma were measured in boars at the onset of 8 months through a 35-month period. It was found that age-related changes in SOD activity in the seminal plasma were markedly higher in boars less than 2 years of age. However, it appeared that SOD activity was established at the early sexual maturity age (8-12 months). There were variations in SOD activity throughout the season, being significantly higher in spring and autumn than in summer. A secretory extracellular form of SOD (EC-SOD) was purified to homogeneity (350-fold) from boar seminal plasma, using a three-step purification protocol (affinity chromatography followed by ion exchange and ceramic hydroxyapatite chromatography). The molecular properties and specificity of SOD (molecular mass, isoelectric point, optimum pH, thermostability and susceptibility to inhibitors) confirmed that the purified enzyme is an extracellular form of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase occurring in boar seminal plasma. The results of this study indicate that EC-SOD is an important antioxidant enzyme of boar seminal plasma, which plays an important physiological role in counteracting oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

  2. How Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Become Visible

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been identified as a fundamental innate immune defense mechanism against different pathogens. NETs are characterized as released nuclear DNA associated with histones and granule proteins, which form an extracellular web-like structure that is able to entrap and occasionally kill certain microbes. Furthermore, NETs have been shown to contribute to several noninfectious disease conditions when released by activated neutrophils during inflammation. The identification of NETs has mainly been succeeded by various microscopy techniques, for example, immunofluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Since the last years the development and improvement of new immunofluorescence-based techniques enabled optimized visualization and quantification of NETs. On the one hand in vitro live-cell imaging led to profound new ideas about the mechanisms involved in the formation and functionality of NETs. On the other hand different intravital, in vivo, and in situ microscopy techniques led to deeper insights into the role of NET formation during health and disease. This paper presents an overview of the main used microscopy techniques to visualize NETs and describes their advantages as well as disadvantages. PMID:27294157

  3. Upper threshold of extracellular neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Boinagrov, David; Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Suh, Bongsoo; Mathieson, Keith; Naik, Natasha; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that spiking neurons can produce action potentials in response to extracellular stimulation above certain threshold. It is widely assumed that there is no upper limit to somatic stimulation, except for cellular or electrode damage. Here we demonstrate that there is an upper stimulation threshold, above which no action potential can be elicited, and it is below the threshold of cellular damage. Existence of this upper stimulation threshold was confirmed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at pulse durations ranging from 5 to 500 μs. The ratio of the upper to lower stimulation thresholds varied typically from 1.7 to 7.6, depending on pulse duration. Computational modeling of extracellular RGC stimulation explained the upper limit by sodium current reversal on the depolarized side of the cell membrane. This was further confirmed by experiments in the medium with a low concentration of sodium. The limited width of the stimulation window may have important implications in design of the electro-neural interfaces, including neural prosthetics.

  4. Upper threshold of extracellular neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pangratz-Fuehrer, Susanne; Suh, Bongsoo; Mathieson, Keith; Naik, Natasha; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that spiking neurons can produce action potentials in response to extracellular stimulation above certain threshold. It is widely assumed that there is no upper limit to somatic stimulation, except for cellular or electrode damage. Here we demonstrate that there is an upper stimulation threshold, above which no action potential can be elicited, and it is below the threshold of cellular damage. Existence of this upper stimulation threshold was confirmed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) at pulse durations ranging from 5 to 500 μs. The ratio of the upper to lower stimulation thresholds varied typically from 1.7 to 7.6, depending on pulse duration. Computational modeling of extracellular RGC stimulation explained the upper limit by sodium current reversal on the depolarized side of the cell membrane. This was further confirmed by experiments in the medium with a low concentration of sodium. The limited width of the stimulation window may have important implications in design of the electro-neural interfaces, including neural prosthetics. PMID:22993266

  5. Extracellular matrix alterations in the Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Marcelo Silva; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachel; Coelho, Natália Lima; Mendes, Aline; Leonel, Monica Luzia Pereira; Mader, Ana Maria; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Glina, Sidney; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva

    2017-07-01

    Peyronie's disease is characterized by fibrous plaque formation of the tunica albuginea, causing penile deformity and fertility problems. The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in the extracellular matrix in Peyronie's disease. The study used tissues collected by surgical procedure from individuals that presented a well-established disease, while control samples were obtained by biopsies of fresh cadavers. Immunohistochemistry analysis followed by digital quantification was performed to evaluate TGF-β, heparanases and metalloproteinases (MMPs). The profile of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis, while hyaluronic acid quantification was obtained by an ELISA-like assay. The expression of mRNA was investigated for syndecan-1 proteoglycan (Syn-1), interleukine-6 (IL-6), hyaluronic acid synthases, and hyaluronidases. Pathologic features showed decreased apoptosis and blood vessel number in Peyronie's tissues. TGF-β and IL-6 were significantly enhanced in Peyronie's disease. There was an increased expression of heparanases, though no alteration was observed for MMPs. Hyaluronic acid as well as hyaluronic acid synthases, hyaluronidases, and dermatan sulfate were not changed, while the level of chondroitin sulfate was significantly (P = 0.008, Mann-Whitney test) increased in Peyronie's samples. Heparanases and sulfated glycosaminoglycans seem to be involved in extracellular matrix alterations in Peyronie's disease.

  6. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% < 1,000 Da (low MW), 30% from 1,000 to 10,000 Da (medium MW), and 31% > 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  7. Targeting extracellular ROS signaling of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2014-04-01

    Expression of membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX1) represents a characteristic feature of malignant cells. NOX1-derived extracellular superoxide anions are the basis for autocrine stimulation of proliferation, but also drive the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathways. This may cause the elimination of transformed cells. Tumor cells express membrane-associated catalase that efficiently protects the cells against apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Membrane-associated superoxide dismutase (SOD) plays a co-modulatory protective role that is functionally interrelated with the protective effect mediated by catalase. Due to the co-localization of NOX1, catalase and SOD on the outer membrane of tumor cells, specific inhibition of membrane-associated SOD causes superoxide anion-dependent inhibition of catalase. This establishes a strong apoptotic signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite pathway. In parallel, it causes a drastic decrease in the concentration of proliferation-stimulating H2O2. Knowledge of the biochemical network on the surface of tumor cells should, therefore, allow development of specific novel strategies for tumor therapy, based on the specific features of tumor cell-specific extracellular ROS interactions.

  8. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  9. Probing extracellular Sonic hedgehog in neurons.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Erez; Petralia, Ronald S; Wang, Ya-Xian; Indig, Fred E; Mattson, Mark P; Yao, Pamela J

    2016-08-15

    The bioactivity of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) depends on specific lipid modifications; a palmitate at its N-terminus and a cholesterol at its C-terminus. This dual-lipid modification makes Shh molecules lipophilic, which prevents them from diffusing freely in extracellular space. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Shh proteins are carried by various forms of extracellular vesicles (EVs). It also has been shown, for instance, that in some tissues Shh proteins are transported to neighboring cells directly via filopodia. We have previously reported that Shh proteins are expressed in hippocampal neurons. In this study we show that, in the hippocampus and cerebellum of postnatal day (P)2 rats, Shh is mostly found near or on the membrane surface of small neurites or filopodia. We also examined cultured hippocampal neurons where we observed noticeable and widespread Shh-immunolabeled vesicles located outside neurons. Through immunoelectron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we find Shh-containing EVs with a wide range of sizes. Unlike robust Shh activity in EVs isolated from cells overexpressing an N-terminal Shh fragment construct, we did not detect measurable Shh activity in EVs purified from the medium of cultured hippocampal neurons. These results suggest the complexity of the transcellular Shh signaling mechanisms in neurons.

  10. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  11. Solute partitioning and filtration by extracellular matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Christina L.; Ferrell, Nicholas; Schnell, Lisa; Dubnisheva, Anna; Zydney, Andrew L.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    The physiology of glomerular filtration remains mechanistically obscure despite its importance in disease. The correspondence between proteinuria and foot process effacement suggests podocytes as the locus of the filtration barrier. If so, retained macromolecules ought to accumulate at the filtration barrier, an effect called concentration polarization. Literature data indicate macromolecule concentrations decrease from subendothelial to subepithelial glomerular basement membrane (GBM), as would be expected if the GBM were itself the filter. The objective of this study was to obtain insights into the possible role of the GBM in protein retention by performing fundamental experimental and theoretical studies on the properties of three model gels. Solute partitioning and filtration through thin gels of a commercially available laminin-rich extracellular matrix, Matrigel, were measured using a polydisperse polysaccharide tracer molecule, Ficoll 70. Solute partitioning into laminin gels and lens basement membrane (LBM) were measured using Ficoll 70. A novel model of a laminin gel was numerically simulated, as well as a mixed structure-random-fiber model for LBM. Experimental partitioning was predicted by numerical simulations. Sieving coefficients through thin gels of Matrigel were size dependent and strongly flux dependent. The observed flux dependence arose from compression of the gel in response to the applied pressure. Gel compression may alter solute partitioning into extracellular matrix at physiologic pressures present in the glomerular capillary. This suggests a physical mechanism coupling podocyte structure to permeability characteristics of the GBM. PMID:19587146

  12. Decellularized musculofascial extracellular matrix for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A; Chang, David W.; Zhang, Qixu

    2016-01-01

    Ideal scaffolds that represent native extracellular matrix (ECM) properties of musculofascial tissues have great importance in musculofascial tissue engineering. However, detailed characterization of musculofascial tissues’ ECM (particularly, of fascia) from large animals is still lacking. In this study, we developed a decellularization protocol for processing pig composite musculofascial tissues. Decellularized muscle (D-muscle) and decellularized fascia (D-fascia), which are two important components of decellularized musculofascial extracellular matrix (DMM), were comprehensively characterized. D-muscle and D-fascia retained intact three-dimensional architecture, strong mechanical properties, and bioactivity of compositions such as collagen, laminin, glycosaminoglycan, and vascular endothelial growth factor. D-muscle and D-fascia provided a compatible niche for human adipose-derived stem cell integration and proliferation. Heterotopic and orthotopic implantation of D-muscle and D-fascia in a rodent model further proved their biocompatibility and myogenic properties during the remodeling process. The differing characteristics of D-muscle from D-fascia (e.g., D-muscle’s strong pro-angiogenic and pro-myogenic properties vs. D-fascia’s strong mechanical properties) indicate different clinical application opportunities of D-muscle vs. D-fascia scaffolds. DMM comprising muscle and fascia ECM as a whole unit can thus provide not only a clinically translatable platform for musculofascial tissue repair and regeneration but also a useful standard for scaffold design in musculofascial tissue engineering. PMID:23347834

  13. Contrast agents in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yuling; Sun, Xilin; Shen, Baozhong

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a noninvasive method to assess angiogenesis, which is widely used in clinical applications including diagnosis, monitoring therapy response and prognosis estimation in cancer patients. Contrast agents play a crucial role in DCE-MRI and should be carefully selected in order to improve accuracy in DCE-MRI examination. Over the past decades, there was much progress in the development of optimal contrast agents in DCE-MRI. In this review, we describe the recent research advances in this field and discuss properties of contrast agents, as well as their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we discuss the research perspectives for improving this promising imaging method. PMID:28415647

  14. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lässer, Cecilia; Théry, Clotilde; Buzás, Edit I.; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Weian; Gho, Yong Song; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC) on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge. PMID:27989272

  15. A Method for Isolation of Extracellular Vesicles and Characterization of Exosomes from Brain Extracellular Space.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Rocío; Gauthier, Sebastien A; Kumar, Asok; Saito, Mitsuo; Saito, Mariko; Levy, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV), including exosomes, secreted vesicles of endocytic origin, and microvesicles derived from the plasma membrane, have been widely isolated and characterized from conditioned culture media and bodily fluids. The difficulty in isolating EV from tissues, however, has hindered their study in vivo. Here, we describe a novel method designed to isolate EV and characterize exosomes from the extracellular space of brain tissues. The purification of EV is achieved by gentle dissociation of the tissue to free the brain extracellular space, followed by sequential low-speed centrifugations, filtration, and ultracentrifugations. To further purify EV from other extracellular components, they are separated on a sucrose step gradient. Characterization of the sucrose step gradient fractions by electron microscopy demonstrates that this method yields pure EV preparations free of large vesicles, subcellular organelles, or debris. The level of EV secretion and content are determined by assays for acetylcholinesterase activity and total protein estimation, and exosomal identification and protein content are analyzed by Western blot and immuno-electron microscopy. Additionally, we present here a method to delipidate EV in order to improve the resolution of downstream electrophoretic analysis of EV proteins.

  16. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lässer, Cecilia; Théry, Clotilde; Buzás, Edit I; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Weian; Gho, Yong Song; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This course, "Basics of Extracellular Vesicles," uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC) on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform "Coursera" and is free of charge.

  17. Multimodal nanoparticulate bioimaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parvesh; Singh, Amit; Brown, Scott C; Bengtsson, Niclas; Walter, Glenn A; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Iwakuma, Nobutaka; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Scott, Edward W; Moudgil, Brij M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of bioimaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed X-ray tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography) are commonly employed for clinical diagnostics and scientific research. While all of these methods use a characteristic "energy-matter" interaction to provide specific details about biological processes, each modality differs from another in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, anatomical and molecular details, imaging depth, as well as the desirable material properties of contrast agents needed for augmented imaging. On many occasions, it is advantageous to apply multiple complimentary imaging modalities for faster and more accurate prognosis. Since most imaging modalities employ exogenous contrast agents to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, the development and use of multimodal contrast agents is considered to be highly advantageous for obtaining improved imagery from sought-after imaging modalities. Multimodal contrast agents offer improvements in patient care, and at the same time can reduce costs and enhance safety by limiting the number of contrast agent administrations required for imaging purposes. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanoparticulate-based multimodal contrast agent for noninvasive bioimaging using MRI, optical, and photoacoustic tomography (PAT)-imaging modalities. The synthesis of these agents is described using microemulsions, which enable facile integration of the desired diversity of contrast agents and material components into a single entity.

  18. Light Regimes Shape Utilization of Extracellular Organic C and N in a Cyanobacterial Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Rhona K.; Mayali, Xavier; Boaro, Amy A.; Zemla, Adam; Everroad, R. Craig; Nilson, Daniel; Weber, Peter K.; Lipton, Mary; Bebout, Brad M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although it is becoming clear that many microbial primary producers can also play a role as organic consumers, we know very little about the metabolic regulation of photoautotroph organic matter consumption. Cyanobacteria in phototrophic biofilms can reuse extracellular organic carbon, but the metabolic drivers of extracellular processes are surprisingly complex. We investigated the metabolic foundations of organic matter reuse by comparing exoproteome composition and incorporation of 13C-labeled and 15N-labeled cyanobacterial extracellular organic matter (EOM) in a unicyanobacterial biofilm incubated using different light regimes. In the light and the dark, cyanobacterial direct organic C assimilation accounted for 32% and 43%, respectively, of all organic C assimilation in the community. Under photosynthesis conditions, we measured increased excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and proteins involved in micronutrient transport, suggesting that requirements for micronutrients may drive EOM assimilation during daylight hours. This interpretation was supported by photosynthesis inhibition experiments, in which cyanobacteria incorporated N-rich EOM-derived material. In contrast, under dark, C-starved conditions, cyanobacteria incorporated C-rich EOM-derived organic matter, decreased excretion of EPS, and showed an increased abundance of degradative exoproteins, demonstrating the use of the extracellular domain for C storage. Sequence-structure modeling of one of these exoproteins predicted a specific hydrolytic activity that was subsequently detected, confirming increased EOM degradation in the dark. Associated heterotrophic bacteria increased in abundance and upregulated transport proteins under dark relative to light conditions. Taken together, our results indicate that biofilm cyanobacteria are successful competitors for organic C and N and that cyanobacterial nutrient and energy requirements control the use of EOM. PMID:27353754

  19. The new numbers contrast sensitivity chart for contrast sensitivity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Khambhiphant, Bharkbhum; Tulvatana, Wasee; Busayarat, Mathu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and assess the agreement between the 3 newly made numbers contrast sensitivity charts and the MARS contrast sensitivity chart (MARS) in contrast sensitivity measurement. Methods We developed 3 numbers contrast sensitivity charts for right, left and both eyes. Two hundred subjects were assigned to read numbers 0-9 for determining the degree of difficulty. Selected seven numbers were randomly arranged and the contrast of each number was decreased by the constant factor of 0.04 log units in the units as in the MARS. We assigned 112 subjects with visual acuity range from 20/480 to 20/20 to test once with the new chart and then with MARS Chart monocularly and binocularly by random order. Bland-Altman analysis for comparing two charts was performed. Results Bland-Altman analysis between 2 charts showed the mean differences were 0.04, 0.03, 0.04 log CS and the 95% limit of agreement (LOA) of the bias were (+0.26, −0.19), (+0.26, −0.20), (+0.25, −0.17) log CS for right, left and binocular. The Bland-Altman plot indicates a good concordance in 3 charts. Conclusions These charts show reasonable agreement and can be used interchangeably with the MARS. It is helpful for Thai people who can only read numbers in doing the test. We can use them in routinely contrast sensitivity measurement.

  20. Contrasting Rhetorics/Contrasting Cultures: Why Contrastive Rhetoric Needs a Better Conceptualization of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with an underdeveloped notion in the EAP sub-discipline of contrastive rhetoric: culture. It argues that a better conceptualization of contrastive rhetoric needs to include a better conceptualization of culture. After engaging with the complex question "What is culture?" the paper moves on to consider four sets of current issues…

  1. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  2. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  3. Three-dimensional reconstituted extracellular matrix scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Leck, Kwong-Joo; Gao, Shujun; Wan, Andrew C A

    2009-09-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a rich meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans. Besides assuming a cell adhesive and structural support role, the ECM also helps to sequester and present growth factors to cells. ECM derived from tissues has been used as biological scaffolds for tissue engineering. In contrast, it has been difficult to employ ECM derived from cell lines as scaffolds due to its lack of form and structure. We have developed a mild, aqueous-based method for incorporating cell line derived ECM into biological scaffolds based on polyelectrolyte complexation, using the example of ECM from MC-3T3, a mouse preosteoblast cell line. A DNase step was incorporated in the ECM isolation procedure to further purify it of genetic material. Immunohistochemistry of fibers incorporated with MC-3T3 ECM reveal the presence of the ECM components, collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin and heparan sulfate, on their surface. Reconstituted ECM scaffolds retained the cell-adhesion characteristics of the ECM, as demonstrated by 'reseeding' the ECM-secreting cell on the scaffolds. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were seeded onto the fibrous scaffolds incorporated with MC-3T3 ECM, and implanted subcutaneously into SCID mice. After 4 weeks of implantation, histological evidence showed that the hMSC seeded ECM scaffolds had induced bone formation at the ectopic site.

  4. The role for neutrophil extracellular traps in cystic fibrosis autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Skopelja, Sladjana; Hamilton, B. JoNell; Jones, Jonathan D.; Yang, Mei-Ling; Mamula, Mark; Ashare, Alix; Gifford, Alex H.; Rigby, William F.C.

    2016-01-01

    While respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis (CF) frequently associates with chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, no single factor predicts the extent of lung damage in CF. To elucidate other causes, we studied the autoantibody profile in CF and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, given the similar association of airway inflammation and autoimmunity in RA. Even though we observed that bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI), carbamylated proteins, and citrullinated proteins all localized to the neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are implicated in the development of autoimmunity, our study demonstrates striking autoantibody specificity in CF. Particularly, CF patients developed anti-BPI autoantibodies but hardly any anti-citrullinated protein autoantibodies (ACPA). In contrast, ACPA-positive RA patients exhibited no reactivity with BPI. Interestingly, anti-carbamylated protein autoantibodies (ACarPA) were found in both cohorts but did not cross-react with BPI. Contrary to ACPA and ACarPA, anti-BPI autoantibodies recognized the BPI C-terminus in the absence of posttranslational modifications. In fact, we discovered that P. aeruginosa–mediated NET formation results in BPI cleavage by P. aeruginosa elastase, which suggests a novel mechanism in the development of autoimmunity to BPI. In accordance with this model, autoantibodies associated with presence of P. aeruginosa on sputum culture. Finally, our results provide a role for autoimmunity in CF disease severity, as autoantibody levels associate with diminished lung function. PMID:27777975

  5. On the pragmatics of contrast.

    PubMed

    Clark, E V

    1990-06-01

    In this paper, I review properties and consequences of the PRINCIPLE OF CONTRAST. This principle, which I have argued from the beginning has a pragmatic basis, captures facts about the inferences speakers and addresses make for both conventional and novel words. Along with a PRINCIPLE OF CONVENTIONALITY, it accounts for the pre-emption of novel words by well-established ones. And it holds just as much for morphology as it does for words and larger expressions. In short, Contrast has the major properties Gathercole (1989) proposed as characteristic of her alternative to Contrast.

  6. Nonrenal Complications of Contrast Media.

    PubMed

    Marycz, Damien; Ziada, Khaled M

    2014-07-01

    Nonrenal complications of contrast media are caused by chemotoxic or anaphylactoid reactions related to the contrast agent used. Chemotoxicity is mainly attributed to ionic concentration and osmolality. Anaphylactoid reactions are typically caused by direct activation of basophils, mast cells, and complement rather than an observable antigen-antibody interaction, and may be acute or delayed. History of an adverse reaction following prior exposure is the strongest predictor of a subsequent adverse reaction to contrast. Premedication regimens of corticosteroids or antihistamines can lower the risk of repeat adverse reactions. Treatment of anaphylactoid reactions depends on the severity of symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  8. Automated segmentation of middle hepatic vein in non-contrast x-ray CT images based on an atlas-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Teruhiko; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kondo, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    In order to support the diagnosis of hepatic diseases, understanding the anatomical structures of hepatic lobes and hepatic vessels is necessary. Although viewing and understanding the hepatic vessels in contrast media-enhanced CT images is easy, the observation of the hepatic vessels in non-contrast X-ray CT images that are widely used for the screening purpose is difficult. We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to support the liver diagnosis based on non-contrast X-ray CT images. This paper proposes a new approach to segment the middle hepatic vein (MHV), a key structure (landmark) for separating the liver region into left and right lobes. Extraction and classification of hepatic vessels are difficult in non-contrast X-ray CT images because the contrast between hepatic vessels and other liver tissues is low. Our approach uses an atlas-driven method by the following three stages. (1) Construction of liver atlases of left and right hepatic lobes using a learning datasets. (2) Fully-automated enhancement and extraction of hepatic vessels in liver regions. (3) Extraction of MHV based on the results of (1) and (2). The proposed approach was applied to 22 normal liver cases of non-contrast X-ray CT images. The preliminary results show that the proposed approach achieves the success in 14 cases for MHV extraction.

  9. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  10. Light Regimes Shape Utilization of Extracellular Organic C and N in a Cyanobacterial Biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, Rhona K.; Mayali, Xavier; Boaro, Amy A.; Zemla, Adam; Everroad, R. Craig; Nilson, Daniel; Weber, Peter K.; Lipton, Mary; Bebout, Brad M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P.

    2016-06-28

    ABSTRACT

    Although it is becoming clear that many microbial primary producers can also play a role as organic consumers, we know very little about the metabolic regulation of photoautotroph organic matter consumption. Cyanobacteria in phototrophic biofilms can reuse extracellular organic carbon, but the metabolic drivers of extracellular processes are surprisingly complex. We investigated the metabolic foundations of organic matter reuse by comparing exoproteome composition and incorporation of13C-labeled and15N-labeled cyanobacterial extracellular organic matter (EOM) in a unicyanobacterial biofilm incubated using different light regimes. In the light and the dark, cyanobacterial direct organic C assimilation accounted for 32% and 43%, respectively, of all organic C assimilation in the community. Under photosynthesis conditions, we measured increased excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and proteins involved in micronutrient transport, suggesting that requirements for micronutrients may drive EOM assimilation during daylight hours. This interpretation was supported by photosynthesis inhibition experiments, in which cyanobacteria incorporated N-rich EOM-derived material. In contrast, under dark, C-starved conditions, cyanobacteria incorporated C-rich EOM-derived organic matter, decreased excretion of EPS, and showed an increased abundance of degradative exoproteins, demonstrating the use of the extracellular domain for C storage. Sequence-structure modeling of one of these exoproteins predicted a specific hydrolytic activity that was subsequently detected, confirming increased EOM degradation in the dark. Associated heterotrophic bacteria increased in abundance and upregulated transport proteins under dark relative to light conditions. Taken together, our results indicate that biofilm cyanobacteria are successful competitors for organic C and N and that cyanobacterial nutrient and energy requirements control

  11. Light Regimes Shape Utilization of Extracellular Organic C and N in a Cyanobacterial Biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, Rhona K.; Mayali, Xavier; Boaro, Amy A.; Zemla, Adam; Everroad, R. Craig; Nilson, Daniel; Weber, Peter K.; Lipton, Mary; Bebout, Brad M.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P.

    2016-06-28

    Although it is becoming clear that many microbial primary producers can also play a role as organic consumers, we know very little about the metabolic regulation of photoautotroph organic matter consumption. Cyanobacteria in phototrophic biofilms can reuse extracellular organic carbon, but the metabolic drivers of extracellular processes are surprisingly complex. We investigated the metabolic foundations of organic matter reuse by comparing exoproteome composition and incorporation of13C-labeled and15N-labeled cyanobacterial extracellular organic matter (EOM) in a unicyanobacterial biofilm incubated using different light regimes. In the light and the dark, cyanobacterial direct organic C assimilation accounted for 32% and 43%, respectively, of all organic C assimilation in the community. Under photosynthesis conditions, we measured increased excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and proteins involved in micronutrient transport, suggesting that requirements for micronutrients may drive EOM assimilation during daylight hours. This interpretation was supported by photosynthesis inhibition experiments, in which cyanobacteria incorporated N-rich EOM-derived material. In contrast, under dark, C-starved conditions, cyanobacteria incorporated C-rich EOM-derived organic matter, decreased excretion of EPS, and showed an increased abundance of degradative exoproteins, demonstrating the use of the extracellular domain for C storage. Sequence-structure modeling of one of these exoproteins predicted a specific hydrolytic activity that was subsequently detected, confirming increased EOM degradation in the dark. Associated heterotrophic bacteria increased in abundance and upregulated transport proteins under dark relative to light conditions. Taken together, our results indicate that biofilm cyanobacteria are successful competitors for organic C and N and that cyanobacterial nutrient and energy requirements control the use of EOM.

  12. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Joseph F.; Patel, Tushar; Wong, David; Das, Saumya; Freedman, Jane E.; Laurent, Louise C.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred; Keuren-Jensen, Kendall Van; Huentelman, Matt; Spetzler, Robert; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Arango, Jorge; Adelson, P. David; Weiner, Howard L.; Gandhi, Roopali; Goilav, Beatrice; Putterman, Chaim; Saugstad, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined. PMID:26320940

  13. A theory of behavioral contrast.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R

    2014-11-01

    The reinforcers that maintain target instrumental responses also reinforce other responses that compete with them for expression. This competition, and its imbalance at points of transition between different schedules of reinforcement, causes behavioral contrast. The imbalance is caused by differences in the rates at which different responses come under the control of component stimuli. A model for this theory of behavioral contrast is constructed by expanding the coupling coefficient of MPR (Killeen, 1994). The coupling coefficient gives the degree of association of a reinforcer with the target response (as opposed to other competing responses). Competing responses, often identified as interim or adjunctive or superstitious behavior, are intrinsic to reinforcement schedules, especially interval schedules. In addition to that base-rate of competition, additional competing responses may spill over from the prior component, causing initial contrast; and they may be modulated by conditioned reinforcement or punishment from stimuli associated with subsequent component change, causing terminal contrast. A formalization of these hypotheses employed (a) a hysteresis model of off-target responses giving rise to initial contrast, and (b) a competing traces model of the suppression or enhancement of ongoing competitive responses by signals of following-schedule transition. The theory was applied to transient contrast, the following schedule effect, and the component duration effect.

  14. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope.

  15. Dipolar extracellular potentials generated by axonal projections

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ji; Kuokkanen, Paula Tuulia; Carr, Catherine Emily; Wagner, Hermann

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular field potentials (EFPs) are an important source of information in neuroscience, but their physiological basis is in many cases still a matter of debate. Axonal sources are typically discounted in modeling and data analysis because their contributions are assumed to be negligible. Here, we established experimentally and theoretically that contributions of axons to EFPs can be significant. Modeling action potentials propagating along axons, we showed that EFPs were prominent in the presence of terminal zones where axons branch and terminate in close succession, as found in many brain regions. Our models predicted a dipolar far field and a polarity reversal at the center of the terminal zone. We confirmed these predictions using EFPs from the barn owl auditory brainstem where we recorded in nucleus laminaris using a multielectrode array. These results demonstrate that axonal terminal zones can produce EFPs with considerable amplitude and spatial reach. PMID:28871959

  16. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine

    PubMed Central

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre‐B cell colony‐enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro‐environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro‐environment. PMID:27128025

  17. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Tsukasa; Fujita, Yu; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD. PMID:27801806

  18. Pneumococcal MSCRAMM targeting of the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Gavin K.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2010-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to host cells and tissues and their subsequent invasion and dissemination are key processes during disease pathogenesis. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Jensch and co-workers provide further molecular insight into these events during infection with the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Their characterization of PavB, a bacterial surface protein with orthologues in other streptococci, shows it to bind the extracellar matrix components fibronection and plasminogen by virtue of repetitive sequences designated Streptococcal Surface Repeats (SSURE). In mice, a pavB mutant showed reduced nasopharyngeal colonisation and was attenuated in a lung infection model. As discussed here in the context of the pneumococcus, the study of PavB highlights the central role during microbal pathogenesis of targetting the extracellular matrix by so-called MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules). PMID:20444102

  19. Extracellular matrix motion and early morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Rongish, Brenda J; Smith, Christopher M; Filla, Michael B; Czirok, Andras; Bénazéraf, Bertrand; Little, Charles D

    2016-06-15

    For over a century, embryologists who studied cellular motion in early amniotes generally assumed that morphogenetic movement reflected migration relative to a static extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold. However, as we discuss in this Review, recent investigations reveal that the ECM is also moving during morphogenesis. Time-lapse studies show how convective tissue displacement patterns, as visualized by ECM markers, contribute to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Computational image analysis distinguishes between cell-autonomous (active) displacements and convection caused by large-scale (composite) tissue movements. Modern quantification of large-scale 'total' cellular motion and the accompanying ECM motion in the embryo demonstrates that a dynamic ECM is required for generation of the emergent motion patterns that drive amniote morphogenesis. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Extracellular Matrix Revisited: Roles in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a heterogeneous, connective network composed of fibrous glycoproteins that coordinate in vivo to provide the physical scaffolding, mechanical stability, and biochemical cues necessary for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. This review highlights some of the recently raised aspects of the roles of the ECM as related to the fields of biophysics and biomedical engineering. Fundamental aspects of focus include the role of the ECM as a basic cellular structure, for novel spontaneous network formation, as an ideal scaffold in tissue engineering, and its essential contribution to cell sheet technology. As these technologies move from the laboratory to clinical practice, they are bound to shape the vast field of tissue engineering for medical transplantations. PMID:27230457

  1. Neutrophil extracellular traps in tissue pathology.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Kumar, Santosh; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are innate immune systems against invading pathogens. NETs are characterized as released DNA mixed with cytoplasmic antimicrobial proteins such as myeloperoxidase, proteinase3 and neutrophil elastase. While NETs are thought to have an important role in host defense, recent work has suggested that NETs contribute to tissue injury in non-infectious disease states. Uncontrolled NET formation in autoimmune diseases, metabolic disorders, cancers and thrombotic diseases can exacerbate a disease or even be a major initiator of tissue injury. But spotting NETs in tissues is not easy. Here we review the available histopathological evidence on the presence of NETs in a variety of diseases. We discuss technical difficulties and potential sources of misinterpretation while trying to detect NETs in tissue samples.

  2. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Ericsson, Maria; Distel, Robert J; Ivanov, Alexander R; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize ECVs. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some ECVs-specific evidence. Characterization of ECVs has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, flow cytometry, cryo-electron microscopy instruments, and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  3. Alternative Methods for Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Balaj, Leonora; Alian, Sara; Tigges, John; Toxavidis, Vasilis; Ericsson, Maria; Distel, Robert J.; Ivanov, Alexander R.; Skog, Johan; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (ECVs) are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell–cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize ECVs. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some ECVs-specific evidence. Characterization of ECVs has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, flow cytometry, cryo-electron microscopy instruments, and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face. PMID:22973237

  4. Achondrogenesis type II, abnormalities of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Chou, J W; Campbell, D

    1987-09-01

    Immune and lectin histochemical and microchemical methods were employed to study growth cartilage from seven cases of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino). The normal architecture of the epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage was replaced by a morphologically heterogeneous tissue. Some areas were comprised of vascular canals surrounded by extensive fibrous tissue and enlarged cells that had the appearance and histochemical characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Other areas contained a mixture of cells ranging from small to the enlarged chondrocytes. The extracellular matrix in the latter areas was more abundant and had characteristics of both precartilage mesenchymal matrix and typical cartilage matrix; it contained types I and II collagen, cartilage proteoglycan, fibronectin, and peanut agglutinin binding glycoconjugate(s). Peptide mapping of cyanogen bromide cartilage collagen peptides revealed the presence of types I and II collagen. These observations could be explained by a defect in the biosynthesis of type II collagen or in chondrocyte differentiation.

  5. Extracellular Matrices (ECM) for Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Thais O; Xylas, Joanna; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    Persistence of skin wounds due to underlying disease, bacterial contamination, and/or repeated trauma, causes a chronic condition where a functional extracellular matrix (ECM) cannot be established and the normal wound-healing cascade is unable to progress. These open chronic wounds leave the body susceptible to infection and present a major healthcare problem. To this end, a broad range of biologic ECM scaffolds have been developed that can provide other therapeutic options aside from traditional wound care approaches. These tissue engineered ECM scaffolds aim to facilitate the restoration of functional skin-like tissue by altering the chronic wound environment and facilitating cellular attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. This discussion will center on reviewing current ECM scaffolds and highlighting their properties and mechanism of action with respect to the clinical application in chronic, non-healing wounds.

  6. The (dys)functional extracellular matrix☆

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Bade, Nathan D.; Riggin, Corinne N.; Zhang, Sijia; Haines, Philip G.; Ong, Katy L.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major component of the biomechanical environment with which cells interact, and it plays important roles in both normal development and disease progression. Mechanical and biochemical factors alter the biomechanical properties of tissues by driving cellular remodeling of the ECM. This review provides an overview of the structural, compositional, and mechanical properties of the ECM that instruct cell behaviors. Case studies are reviewed that highlight mechanotransduction in the context of two distinct tissues: tendons and the heart. Although these two tissues demonstrate differences in relative cell–ECM composition and mechanical environment, they share similar mechanisms underlying ECM dysfunction and cell mechanotransduction. Together, these topics provide a framework for a fundamental understanding of the ECM and how it may vary across normal and diseased tissues in response to mechanical and biochemical cues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:25930943

  7. Why regenerative medicine needs an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, Glenn D; Healy, Kevin E

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is now coming of age. Many attempts at cell therapy have failed to show significant efficacy, and the umbrella term 'stem cell therapy' is perceived in some quarters as hype or just expensive and unnecessary medical tourism. Here we present a short editorial in three parts. First, we examine the importance of using a semisynthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) mimetic, or sECM, to deliver and retain therapeutic cells at the site of administration. Second, we describe one approach in which biophysical and biochemical properties are tailored to each tissue type, which we call "design for optimal functionality." Third, we describe an alternative approach to sECM design and implementation, called "design for simplicity," in which a deconstructed, minimalist sECM is employed and biology is allowed to perform the customization in situ. We opine that an sECM, whether minimal or instructive, is an essential contributor to improve the outcomes of cell-based therapies.

  8. The Colorful World of Extracellular Electron Shuttles.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Nathaniel R; Saunders, Scott H; Newman, Dianne K

    2017-09-08

    Descriptions of the changeable, striking colors associated with secreted natural products date back well over a century. These molecules can serve as extracellular electron shuttles (EESs) that permit microbes to access substrates at a distance. In this review, we argue that the colorful world of EESs has been too long neglected. Rather than simply serving as a diagnostic attribute of a particular microbial strain, redox-active natural products likely play fundamental, underappreciated roles in the biology of their producers, particularly those that inhabit biofilms. Here, we describe the chemical diversity and potential distribution of EES producers and users, discuss the costs associated with their biosynthesis, and critically evaluate strategies for their economical usage. We hope this review will inspire efforts to identify and explore the importance of EES cycling by a wide range of microorganisms so that their contributions to shaping microbial communities can be better assessed and exploited.

  9. Neutrophil extracellular traps in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Spicer, Jonathan; Najmeh, Sara; Ferri, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    Neutrophils are being increasingly recognized as an important element in tumor progression. They have been shown to exert important effects at nearly every stage of tumor progression with a number of studies demonstrating that their presence is critical to tumor development. Novel aspects of neutrophil biology have recently been elucidated and its contribution to tumorigenesis is only beginning to be appreciated. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are neutrophil-derived structures composed of DNA decorated with antimicrobial peptides. They have been shown to trap and kill microorganisms, playing a critical role in host defense. However, their contribution to tumor development and metastasis has recently been demonstrated in a number of studies highlighting NETs as a potentially important therapeutic target. Here, studies implicating NETs as facilitators of tumor progression and metastasis are reviewed. In addition, potential mechanisms by which NETs may exert these effects are explored. Finally, the ability to target NETs therapeutically in human neoplastic disease is highlighted.

  10. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular disease: are they Jedi or Sith?

    PubMed

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Németh, Andrea; Sódar, Barbara W; Vukman, Krisztina V; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-06-01

    In the recent past, extracellular vesicles have become recognized as important players in cell biology and biomedicine. Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed structures found to be secreted by most if not all cells. Extracellular vesicle secretion represents a universal and highly conserved active cellular function. Importantly, increasing evidence supports that extracellular vesicles may serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets or tools in human diseases. Cardiovascular disease undoubtedly represents one of the most intensely studied and rapidly growing areas of the extracellular vesicle field. However, in different studies related to cardiovascular disease, extracellular vesicles have been shown to exert diverse and sometimes discordant biological effects. Therefore, it might seem a puzzle whether these vesicles are in fact beneficial or detrimental to cardiovascular health. In this review we provide a general introduction to extracellular vesicles and an overview of their biological roles in cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, we aim to untangle the various reasons for the observed discrepancy in biological effects of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular diseases. To this end, we provide several examples that demonstrate that the observed functional diversity is in fact due to inherent differences among various types of extracellular vesicles. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  11. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  12. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes.

    PubMed

    Yael, Dorin; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results.

  13. Estimation of extracellular fluid volume in children.

    PubMed

    Peters, A Michael

    2012-07-01

    Many equations have been developed to estimate various body fluid volumes from height and weight, but few have been developed for children. The aim of this study was to compare four height/weight formulae for estimating extracellular fluid volume (eECV) in children against measured extracellular fluid volume (mECV). The mECV was obtained from plasma Cr-51-EDTA clearance data used for routine measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in two groups of children (n=182 and 69, respectively). eECV obtained using the formulae of Abraham et al. (Clin J Am Assoc Nephrol 6:741-747, 2011) and Friis-Hansen (Pediatrics 28:169-181, 1961) were compared with mECV in both patient groups. The formulae of Bird et al. (J Nucl Med 44:1037-1043, 2003) and of Peters (Nucl Med Commun 32:375-380, 2011) were originally based on groups 1 and 2, respectively, so the eECV from them was compared with the mECV in groups 2 and 1, respectively. The eECV from the Friis-Hansen formula underestimated the mECV in larger children. Biases (mean differences between eECV and mECV) from the Bird (0.146 l) and Peters (0.029 l) formulae were not significantly different from zero, but those from the Abraham formula was higher than zero (0.694 and 0.588 l in groups 1 and 2; p<0.001). Precisions (standard deviations of the biases) of these three formulae were similar, ranging from 0.731 l (Peters) to 0.878 l (Abraham, group 2; p>0.1). The formulae of Bird, Peters and Abraham have similar precisions. The higher bias of the Abraham formula is probably due to the higher values of mECV on which their formula was based. The Friis-Hansen formula no longer has a place.

  14. Ciliary Extracellular Vesicles: Txt Msg Organelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M

    2016-04-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and Caenorhabditis elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport-dependent manner. Caenorhabditis elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions. Until the 21st century, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies.

  15. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and C. elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. C. elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent manner. C. elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions, suggest the cilium may be an important organelle as an EV donor or as an EV target. Until the past few decades, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  16. Homeostasis of Extracellular ATP in Human Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Montalbetti, Nicolas; Leal Denis, Maria F.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Kobatake, Eiry; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the intra- and extracellular processes governing the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in human erythrocytes stimulated with agents that increase cAMP. Using the luciferin-luciferase reaction in off-line luminometry we found both direct adenylyl cyclase activation by forskolin and indirect activation through β-adrenergic stimulation with isoproterenol-enhanced [ATP]e in a concentration-dependent manner. A mixture (3V) containing a combination of these agents and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor papaverine activated ATP release, leading to a 3-fold increase in [ATP]e, and caused increases in cAMP concentration (3-fold for forskolin + papaverine, and 10-fold for 3V). The pannexin 1 inhibitor carbenoxolone and a pannexin 1 blocking peptide (10Panx1) decreased [ATP]e by 75–84%. The residual efflux of ATP resulted from unavoidable mechanical perturbations stimulating a novel, carbenoxolone-insensitive pathway. In real-time luminometry experiments using soluble luciferase, addition of 3V led to an acute increase in [ATP]e to a constant value of ∼1 pmol × (106 cells)−1. A similar treatment using a surface attached luciferase (proA-luc) triggered a rapid accumulation of surface ATP levels to a peak concentration of 2.4 pmol × (106 cells)−1, followed by a slower exponential decay (t½ = 3.7 min) to a constant value of 1.3 pmol × (106 cells)−1. Both for soluble luciferase and proA-luc, ATP efflux was fully blocked by carbenoxolone, pointing to a 3V-induced mechanism of ATP release mediated by pannexin 1. Ecto-ATPase activity was extremely low (∼28 fmol × (106 cells min)−1), but nevertheless physiologically relevant considering the high density of erythrocytes in human blood. PMID:21921036

  17. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes

    PubMed Central

    Yael, Dorin

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results. PMID:28358895

  18. Identification of a Receptor for Extracellular Renalase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Velazquez, Heino; Chang, John; Safirstein, Robert; Desir, Gary V.

    2015-01-01

    Background An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI) and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI) in wild type (WT) mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase. Methods and Results RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase. Conclusions PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling. PMID:25906147

  19. Extracellular Acidification Inhibits the ROS-Dependent Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Behnen, Martina; Möller, Sonja; Brozek, Antonia; Klinger, Matthias; Laskay, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory microenvironment is commonly characterized by extracellular acidosis (pH < 7.35). Sensitivity to pH, CO2 or bicarbonate concentrations allows neutrophils to react to changes in their environment and to detect inflamed areas in the tissue. One important antimicrobial effector mechanism is the production of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are released during a programmed reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death, the so-called NETosis. Although several functions of neutrophils have been analyzed under acidic conditions, the effect of extracellular acidosis on NETosis remains mainly unexplored and the available experimental results are contradictory. We performed a comprehensive study with the aim to elucidate the effect of extracellular acidosis on ROS-dependent NETosis of primary human neutrophils and to identify the underlying mechanisms. The study was performed in parallel in a CO2–bicabonate-buffered culture medium, which mimics in vivo conditions, and under HEPES-buffered conditions to verify the effect of pH independent of CO2 or bicarbonate. We could clearly show that extracellular acidosis (pH 6.5, 6.0, and 5.5) and intracellular acidification inhibit the release of ROS-dependent NETs upon stimulation of neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate and immobilized immune complexes. Moreover, our findings suggest that the diminished NET release is a consequence of reduced ROS production and diminished glycolysis of neutrophils under acidic conditions. It was suggested previously that neutrophils can sense the border of inflamed tissue by the pH gradient and that a drop in pH serves as an indicator for the progress of inflammation. Following this hypothesis, our data indicate that an acidic inflammatory environment results in inhibition of extracellular operating effector mechanisms of neutrophils such as release of ROS and NETs. This way the release of toxic components and tissue damage can be avoided. However, we

  20. Extracellular chloride regulation of Kv2.1, contributor to the major outward Kv current in mammalian outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiantao; Surguchev, Alexei; Bian, Shumin; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar

    2012-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) function as both receptors and effectors in providing a boost to auditory reception. Amplification is driven by the motor protein prestin, which is under anionic control. Interestingly, we now find that the major, 4-AP-sensitive, outward K+ current of the OHC (IK) is also sensitive to Cl−, although, in contrast to prestin, extracellularly. IK is inhibited by reducing extracellular Cl− levels, with a linear dependence of 0.4%/mM. Other voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channel conductances in supporting cells, such as Hensen and Deiters' cells, are not affected by reduced extracellular Cl−. To elucidate the molecular basis of this Cl−-sensitive IK, we looked at potential molecular candidates based on Cl− sensitivity and/or similarities in kinetics. For IK, we identified three different Ca2+-independent components of IK based on the time constant of inactivation: a fast, transient outward current, a rapidly activating, slowly inactivating current (Ik1), and a slowly inactivating current (Ik2). Extracellular Cl− differentially affects these components. Because the inactivation time constants of Ik1 and Ik2 are similar to those of Kv1.5 and Kv2.1, we transiently transfected these constructs into CHO cells and found that low extracellular Cl− inhibited both channels with linear current reductions of 0.38%/mM and 0.49%/mM, respectively. We also tested heterologously expressed Slick and Slack conductances, two intracellularly Cl−-sensitive K+ channels, but found no extracellular Cl− sensitivity. The Cl− sensitivity of Kv2.1 and its robust expression within OHCs verified by single-cell RT-PCR indicate that these channels underlie the OHC's extracellular Cl− sensitivity. PMID:21940671

  1. Contrast Media: Are There Differences in Nephrotoxicity among Contrast Media?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iodinated contrast agents are usually classified based upon their osmolality—high, low, and isosmolar. Iodinated contrast agents are also nephrotoxic in some but not all patients resulting in loss of glomerular filtration rate. Over the past 30 years, nephrotoxicity has been linked to osmolality although the precise mechanism underlying such a link has been elusive. Improvements in our understanding of the pathogenesis of nephrotoxicity and prospective randomized clinical trials have attempted to further explore the relationship between osmolality and nephrotoxicity. In this review, the basis for our current understanding that there are little if any differences in nephrotoxic potential between low and isosmolar contrast media will be detailed using data from clinical studies. PMID:24587997

  2. Evidence for the fusion of extracellular vesicles with/without DNA to form specific structures in fertilized chicken eggs, mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheon; Lee, Ho-Sung; Yun, Ju Eun; Kim, Hyun A

    2013-01-01

    With a combination of cultivation and phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopic observation, we first found that fusion of extracellular vesicles with or without membranes occurred in fertilized chicken eggs. In order to find solid evidence for fusion, we collected many fusion data from various tissues; primo vessels and pancreases of mice and pancreases and omentums of rats. Especially, by using acridine orange vital staining to demonstrate DNA and phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy for long real-time observation, we found that many of the extracellular vesicles involved in the fusion process contained DNAs. The fusions fall into two main patterns: pattern A characterizes a fusion of less agitated extracellular vesicles without membranes. Pattern B is a fusion of vigorously vibrating extracellular vesicles in a certain membrane. Considering all data, tables, pictures and movies, we were able to show fusions of DNA extracellular vesicles without or with membranes in several tissues of three species. Interestingly, some of the fused structures share the same morphology as normal cell's in terms of overall shape, size and DNA signals in the center. Thus, in this article we first report the evidence for the fusion of extracellular vesicles with/without DNA toward a specific structure and discuss our findings by comparing with those of other pioneer's works in search for a mitosis-free alternative pathway for generating new cells.

  3. Human contrast-detail performance with declining contrast

    PubMed Central

    Walz-Flannigan, Alisa; Babcock, Ben; Kagadis, George C.; Wang, Jihong; Langer, Steve G

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: How do display settings and ambient lighting affect contrast detection thresholds for human observers? Can recalibrating a display for high ambient lighting improve object detection? Methods: Contrast/detail (CD) threshold detection performance was measured for observers using four color displays with varying overall contrast (e.g., differing maximum luminance and ambient lighting conditions). Detailed mapping of contrast detection performance (for fixed object size) was tracked as a function of: display maximum luminance, ambient lighting changes (with and without recalibrating for the higher ambience), and the performance of radiologists vs. nonradiologists. Results: The initial phase was analyzed with a hierarchical linear model of observer performance using: background gray level, maximum display luminance, and radiologist vs. nonradiologist. The only statistically significant finding was a maximum luminance of 100 cd/m2 display performing worse than a baseline peak of 400 cd/m2. The second phase examined ambient lighting effects on detection thresholds. Background gray level and maximum display luminance were examined coupled with ambient lighting for: baseline at 30, 435 uncorrected, and 435 lx with display recalibration for the ambient conditions. Results showed ambient correction improved sensitivity for small background digital driving level, but not at higher luminance backgrounds. Conclusions: For CD study, nonradiologist observers can be used without loss of applicability. Contrast detection thresholds improved significantly between displays with peak luminance from 100 cd/m2 to 200 cd/m2, but improvement beyond that was not statistically significant for contrast detection thresholds in a reading room environment. Applying a calibration correction at high ambience (435 lx) improved detection tasks primarily in the darker background regions. PMID:22957612

  4. The effects of systemically administered taurine and N-pivaloyltaurine on striatal extracellular dopamine and taurine in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Salimäki, J; Scriba, G; Piepponen, T P; Rautolahti, N; Ahtee, L

    2003-08-01

    The second most abundant cerebral amino acid, taurine, is widely consumed in the so-called "energy drinks". Therefore, its possible actions on the brain are of great interest. In the present experiments taurine was given intraperitoneally to rats in order to study if it can be administered systemically in large enough amounts to alter cerebral dopaminergic transmission or to induce hypothermia. In addition, the effects of subcutaneously administered lipophilic taurine analogue, N-pivaloyltaurine, were studied. The extracellular striatal taurine and dopamine concentrations were estimated using in vivo microdialysis in awake and freely moving rats, and the rectal temperatures were measured. Taurine at the total dose of 45 mmol/kg i.p. led to a maximally 8-fold increased striatal extracellular taurine concentration, induced a long-lasting hypothermia, and significantly reduced the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration. The latter effect was strengthened by co-treatment with reuptake inhibitor nomifensine. N-pivaloyltaurine (15 mmol/kg in total, s.c.) only slightly elevated the striatal extracellular taurine concentration, failed to alter the rectal temperature, and in contrast to taurine somewhat elevated the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration suggesting a different mechanism or locus of action from that of taurine. Finally, our experiments using brain microdialysis confirmed the earlier findings that taurine is slowly eliminated from the brain. The results clearly indicate that systemically given taurine enters the brain in concentrations that induce pharmacological effects.

  5. Adaptation of cat motoneurons to sustained and intermittent extracellular activation.

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, J M; Laouris, Y; Nordstrom, M A; Robinson, G A; Reinking, R M; Stuart, D G

    1993-01-01

    1. The main purpose of this study was to quantify the adaptation of spinal motoneurons to sustained and intermittent activation, using an extracellular route of stimulating current application to single test cells, in contrast to an intracellular route, as has been used previously. In addition, associations were tested between firing rate properties of the tested cells and other type (size)-related properties of these cells and their motor units. 2. Motoneurons supplying the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the deeply anaesthetized cat were stimulated for 240 s with microelectrodes which passed sustained extracellular current at 1.25 times the threshold for repetitive firing. Many cells were also tested following a rest period with intermittent 1 s current pulses (duration 600 ms) at the same relative stimulus strength. Cell discharge was assessed from the EMG of the motor unit innervated by the test neuron. The motoneurons and their motor units were assigned to four categories (i.e. types FF, FR, S and F; where F = FF + FR) based on conventional criteria. In all, twenty F (16 FF, 4 FR) and fourteen S cells were studied with sustained stimulation. Thirty of these cells (17 F, 13 S) and an additional two cells (1 F, 1 S) were studied with intermittent stimulation. 3. The mean threshold current required for sustained firing for a period of > or = 2 s was not significantly different for F and S cells. However, most of the other measured parameters of motoneuron firing differed significantly for these two cell groups. For example, at 1.25 times the threshold current for repetitive firing, the mean firing duration in response to 240 s of sustained activation was 123 +/- 88 s (+/- S.D.) for F cells vs. 233 +/- 19 s for S cells. These values were significantly longer than those from a comparable, previously reported study that employed intracellular stimulation. With intermittent stimulation, the firing durations of F and S cells were not significantly different from each

  6. Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps under Low Oxygen Level

    PubMed Central

    Branitzki-Heinemann, Katja; Möllerherm, Helene; Völlger, Lena; Husein, Diab M.; de Buhr, Nicole; Blodkamp, Stefanie; Reuner, Friederike; Brogden, Graham; Naim, Hassan Y.; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been characterized as a fundamental host innate immune defense mechanism. Conversely, excessive NET-release may have a variety of detrimental consequences for the host. A fine balance between NET formation and elimination is necessary to sustain a protective effect during an infectious challenge. Our own recently published data revealed that stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) by the iron chelating HIF-1α-agonist desferoxamine or AKB-4924 enhanced the release of phagocyte extracellular traps. Since HIF-1α is a global regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen, we hypothesized that NET formation may be similarly increased under low oxygen conditions. Hypoxia occurs in tissues during infection or inflammation, mostly due to overconsumption of oxygen by pathogens and recruited immune cells. Therefore, experiments were performed to characterize the formation of NETs under hypoxic oxygen conditions compared to normoxia. Human blood-derived neutrophils were isolated and incubated under normoxic (21%) oxygen level and compared to hypoxic (1%) conditions. Dissolved oxygen levels were monitored in the primary cell culture using a Fibox4-PSt3 measurement system. The formation of NETs was quantified by fluorescence microscopy in response to the known NET-inducer phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or Staphylococcus (S.) aureus wild-type and a nuclease-deficient mutant. In contrast to our hypothesis, spontaneous NET formation of neutrophils incubated under hypoxia was distinctly reduced compared to control neutrophils incubated under normoxia. Furthermore, neutrophils incubated under hypoxia showed significantly reduced formation of NETs in response to PMA. Gene expression analysis revealed that mRNA level of hif-1α as well as hif-1α target genes was not altered. However, in good correlation to the decreased NET formation under hypoxia, the cholesterol content of the neutrophils

  7. Monosodium urate crystals induce extracellular DNA traps in neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils but not in mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Schorn, Christine; Janko, Christina; Latzko, Melanie; Chaurio, Ricardo; Schett, Georg; Herrmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are fibers of extracellular DNA released from neutrophils due to overwhelming phagocytic stimuli. The function of NETs is to trap and kill microbes to avoid spreading of potential pathogens. NETs are formed after encounter with various gram-positive and -negative bacteria but also in response to mediators causing sterile inflammation like interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Here we show the formation of NETs (NETting) in response to monosodium urate (MSU) crystals as further model for sterile inflammation. We identified monocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils as MSU phagocytosing cells. Basophils did not take up the crystals, instead they upregulated their activation marker CD203c after contact with MSU. Nevertheless, MSU crystals induced extracellular trap formation also in basophils, like in eosinophils and neutrophils, which phagocytose the crystals. In contrast, monocytes do not form NETs despite uptake of the MSU crystals. In contrast to the canonical stimuli like bacteria and PMA, MSU-induced NETosis was not abrogated by plasma. Our data show that MSU crystals induce extracellular DNA trap formation in all three granulocytes lineages (NETs, EETs, and BETs) but not in monocytes, and DNA externalization does not necessitate the uptake of the crystals.

  8. Acute Kidney Injury Network definition of contrast-induced nephropathy in the critically ill: incidence and outcome.

    PubMed

    Lakhal, Karim; Ehrmann, Stephan; Chaari, Anis; Laissy, Jean-Pierre; Régnier, Bernard; Wolff, Michel; Pajot, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) has been extensively studied in the ward but only scarcely in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, even if they may be particularly prone to develop or to worsen acute kidney insufficiency. We aimed to measure the incidence of CIN in a large ICU population using the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) definition and to investigate its impact on patients' outcome. In this 3-year retrospective study, we included all patients undergoing, during their stay in our medical ICU, a contrast media-enhanced computed tomographic scan. Change in serum creatinine between baseline (24 hours before to 12 hours after contrast media injection) and its maximum value over the 96 hours after contrast media injection was recorded. Contrast-induced nephropathy was defined as a 44.2-μmol/L absolute or a 25% relative minimal increase in serum creatinine over 48, 72, or 96 hours and according to the stage 1 of the AKIN classification (at least 26.4 μmol/L or 50% increase over 48 hours). A total of 398 contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scans performed among 299 patients were analyzed. Incidence of CIN was 14% according to the AKIN definition and ranged from 8% (48-hour absolute definition) to 23% (96-hour relative definition). The need for renal replacement therapy and ICU mortality were significantly higher in case of CIN. After adjusting for other variables associated with ICU mortality, the occurrence of at least 1 CIN episode during the ICU stay (AKIN criteria) was independently associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio, 3.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.85-8.00). Even if incidence varied greatly depending on the definition, CIN appeared frequent in our critically ill patients. The AKIN definition, independently associated with ICU mortality, may allow unifying diagnostic criteria to further evaluate this condition that impacts morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Contrastive Rhetoric, Contrastive Poetics, or Perhaps Something Else?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scollon, Ron

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the discussion of the contemporary state of contrastive rhetoric that took place at the 1996 convention of the Teachers of English to the Speakers of Other Languages. The position taken at the convention states that no language or culture can be reduced to one or two diagrammatic structures and that stylistically preferred compositional…

  10. Contrasting coloration in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Here I survey, collate and synthesize contrasting coloration in 5000 species of terrestrial mammals focusing on black and white pelage. After briefly reviewing alternative functional hypotheses for coloration in mammals, I examine nine colour patterns and combinations on different areas of the body and for each mammalian taxon to try to identify the most likely evolutionary drivers of contrasting coloration. Aposematism and perhaps conspecific signalling are the most consistent explanations for black and white pelage in mammals; background matching may explain white pelage. Evidence for contrasting coloration is being involved in crypsis through pattern blending, disruptive coloration or serving other functions, such as signalling dominance, lures, reducing eye glare or in temperature regulation has barely moved beyond anecdotal stages of investigation. Sexual dichromatism is limited in this taxon and its basis is unclear. Astonishingly, the functional significance of pelage coloration in most large charismatic black and white mammals that were new to science 150 years ago still remains a mystery. PMID:18990666

  11. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  12. Extracellular Matrix Biomarkers for Diagnosis, Prognosis, Imaging, and Targeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    use in diagnosis, prognosis, early detection, in situ imaging and, eventually, targeting of breast cancer metastases, which are the major cause of...the management and treatment of metastatic breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer , Metastasis, Extracellular Matrix, Tumor Microenvironment...KEYWORDS: Breast Cancer , Metastasis, Extracellular Matrix, Tumor Microenvironment, Tumor Heterogeneity 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS: HYNES lab: Major Task 1

  13. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thu H.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. PMID:26251351

  14. Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Cell Membrane Resealing during Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun; Cui, Jianmin; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Sonoporation has been exploited as a novel strategy for intracellular drug and gene delivery. In sonoporation, ultrasound application generates transient pores or openings in the cell membrane that allow entry of extracellular agents normally not permeable to the cell membrane. In order to improve the sonoporation outcome, we seek to obtain improved understanding of the sonoporation mechanism and investigate the factors affecting sonoporation process. We established a voltage clamp technique for real time measurement of sonoporation at single cell level using Xenopus oocytes as a model system. As both cell survival and intracellular delivery efficiency of drug or genes depend on the sonoporation dynamic process, and Calcium plays important roles in cellular processes, we focus on studying of the effect of extracellular Calcium concentration on the formation, extension, and resealing of membrane pores in sonoporation. We obtained experimental results demonstrating that the cell membrane reseals in the order of seconds in the presence of physiological level of extracellular [Ca]. We measured the resealing as function of extracellular [Ca] (0-1.8mM) and observed that the resealing rate decreases as extracellular [Ca] decreases from normal physiological level. No resealing was demonstrated when 1mM EGTA was added in the extracellular medium to chelate the [Ca] extracellularly. Our experimental findings suggest that extracellular Calcium plays an important role in controlling membrane resealing in sonoporation and thus the sonoporation outcome such as cell survival and delivery efficiency.

  15. Extracellular matrix components mark the territories of circumventricular organs.

    PubMed

    Pócsai, Károly; Kálmán, Mihály

    2014-04-30

    In the central nervous system the extracellular matrix has important roles, e.g. supporting the extracellular space, controlling the tissue hydration, binding soluble factors and influencing their diffusion. The distribution of the extracellular matrix components in the brain has been mapped but data on the circumventricular organs (CVOs) is not available yet. The CVOs lack the blood-brain barrier and have relatively large perivascular spaces. The present study investigates tenascin-R and the lecticans: aggrecan, brevican, neurocan, and versican in the median eminence, the area postrema, the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis, the subfornical organ, the pineal body and the subcommissural organ of the rat applying immunohistochemical methods, and lectin histochemistry, using Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). The extracellular matrix components were found intensely expressed in the CVOs with two exceptions: aggrecan immunoreactivity visualized only neurons in the arcuate nucleus, and the subcommissural organ was not labeled with either WFA, or lecticans, or tenascin-R. The different labelings usually overlapped each other. The distribution of the extracellular matrix components marked the territories of the CVOs. Considering these we suppose that the extracellular matrix is essential in the maintenance of CVO functions providing the large extracellular space which is required for diffusion and other processes important in their chemosensitive and neurosecretory activities. The decrease of extracellular matrix beyond the border of the organs may contribute to the control of the diffusion of molecules from the CVOs into the surrounding brain substance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    PubMed

    Erdbrügger, Uta; Le, Thu H

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Irradiation Enhances Hippocampus-Dependent Cognition in Mice Deficient in Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Raber, Jacob; Villasana, Laura; Rosenberg, Jenna; Zou, Yani; Huang, Ting Ting; Fike, John R.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ionizing irradiation on the brain are associated with oxidative stress. While oxidative stress following irradiation is generally viewed as detrimental for hippocampal function, it might have beneficial effects as part of an adaptive or preconditioning response to a subsequent challenge. Here we show that in contrast to what is seen in wild-type mice, irradiation enhances hippocampus-dependent cognitive measures in mice lacking extracellular superoxide dismutase. These outcomes were associated with genotype-dependent effects on measures of oxidative stress. When cortices and hippocampi were analyzed for nitrotyrosine formation as an index of oxidative stress, the levels were chronically elevated in mice lacking extracellular superoxide dismutase. However, irradiation caused a greater increase in nitrotyrosine levels in wild-type mice than mice lacking extracellular superoxide dismutase. These paradoxical genotype-dependent effects of irradiation on measures of oxidative stress and cognitive function underscore potential beneficial effects associated with chronic oxidative stress if it exists prior to a secondary insult such as irradiation. PMID:20020436

  18. Extracellular IL-33 cytokine, but not endogenous nuclear IL-33, regulates protein expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Violette; Cayrol, Corinne; Farache, Dorian; Roga, Stéphane; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-03

    IL-33 is a nuclear cytokine from the IL-1 family that plays important roles in health and disease. Extracellular IL-33 activates a growing number of target cells, including group 2 innate lymphoid cells, mast cells and regulatory T cells, but it remains unclear whether intracellular nuclear IL-33 has additional functions in the nucleus. Here, we used a global proteomic approach based on high-resolution mass spectrometry to compare the extracellular and intracellular roles of IL-33 in primary human endothelial cells, a major source of IL-33 protein in human tissues. We found that exogenous extracellular IL-33 cytokine induced expression of a distinct set of proteins associated with inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous nuclear IL-33 expression using two independent RNA silencing strategies had no reproducible effect on the endothelial cell proteome. These results suggest that IL-33 acts as a cytokine but not as a nuclear factor regulating gene expression in endothelial cells.

  19. Responses in the expression of extracellular proteins in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus treated with rhodomyrtone.

    PubMed

    Visutthi, Monton; Srimanote, Potjanee; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2011-12-01

    Rhodomyrtone from a medicinal plant species, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, is a challenged effective agent against Gram-positive bacteria, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The present study was undertaken to provide insight into MRSA extracellular protein expression following rhodomyrtone treatment. Secreteomic approach was performed on a representative clinical MRSA isolate exposing to subinhibitory concentration rhodomyrtone (0.174 μg/ml). The identified extracellular proteins of a response of MRSA to rhodomyrtone treated condition were both suppressed and overexpressed. Staphylococcal antigenic proteins, immunodominant antigen A (IsaA) and staphylococcal secretory antigen (SsaA) involved in cell wall hydrolysis were downregulated after the treatment. The results suggested that rhodomyrtone may interfere with WalK/WalR (YycG/YycF) system. Other enzymes such as lipase precursor and another lipase, glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase, were absent. In contrast, cytoplasmic proteins such as SpoVG and glycerol phosphate lipoteichoic acid synthase, and ribosomal proteins were found in the treated sample. Appearance of several cytoplasmic proteins in the treated culture supernatant revealed that the bacterial cell wall biosynthesis was disturbed. This finding provides a proteomic mapping of extracellular proteins after rhodomytone treatment. Extensive investigation is required for this natural compound as it has a great potency as an alternative anti-MRSA drug.

  20. Effect of spaceflight on the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle after a crush injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaia, T. E.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1992-01-01

    The organization and composition of the extracellular matrix were studied in the crush-injured gastrocnemius muscle of rats subjected to 0 G. After 14 days of flight on Cosmos 2044, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed and evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques from the five injured flight rodents and various earth-based treatment groups. In general, the repair process was similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to the organization of the extracellular matrix and myofibers. Small and large myofibers were present within an expanded extracellular matrix, indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with nonenlarged area of nonmuscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well organized and contained more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region, indicative of a delayed repair process, but did not demonstrate any chronic inflammation. Myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, being slowest in the flight animals and most complete in the tail-suspended ones.

  1. Effect of spaceflight on the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle after a crush injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaia, T. E.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1992-01-01

    The organization and composition of the extracellular matrix were studied in the crush-injured gastrocnemius muscle of rats subjected to 0 G. After 14 days of flight on Cosmos 2044, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed and evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques from the five injured flight rodents and various earth-based treatment groups. In general, the repair process was similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to the organization of the extracellular matrix and myofibers. Small and large myofibers were present within an expanded extracellular matrix, indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with nonenlarged area of nonmuscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well organized and contained more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region, indicative of a delayed repair process, but did not demonstrate any chronic inflammation. Myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, being slowest in the flight animals and most complete in the tail-suspended ones.

  2. Extracellular IL-33 cytokine, but not endogenous nuclear IL-33, regulates protein expression in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Violette; Cayrol, Corinne; Farache, Dorian; Roga, Stéphane; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    IL-33 is a nuclear cytokine from the IL-1 family that plays important roles in health and disease. Extracellular IL-33 activates a growing number of target cells, including group 2 innate lymphoid cells, mast cells and regulatory T cells, but it remains unclear whether intracellular nuclear IL-33 has additional functions in the nucleus. Here, we used a global proteomic approach based on high-resolution mass spectrometry to compare the extracellular and intracellular roles of IL-33 in primary human endothelial cells, a major source of IL-33 protein in human tissues. We found that exogenous extracellular IL-33 cytokine induced expression of a distinct set of proteins associated with inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous nuclear IL-33 expression using two independent RNA silencing strategies had no reproducible effect on the endothelial cell proteome. These results suggest that IL-33 acts as a cytokine but not as a nuclear factor regulating gene expression in endothelial cells. PMID:27694941

  3. A combination of mirtazapine and milnacipran augments the extracellular levels of monoamines in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Miki; Imanishi, Taiichiro; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2012-06-01

    Mirtazapine, an antidepressant, antagonizes α(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, which leads to enhanced noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission without inhibiting monoamine transporters. Using a microdialysis technique, we investigated whether co-administration of mirtazapine and a serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), milnacipran, augments the effects of each drug on the extracellular levels of monoamines by pharmacological synergy. Mirtazapine increased the extracellular levels of noradrenaline and serotonin in the dorsal hippocampus. In contrast, it increased the levels of noradrenaline and dopamine without changing serotonin levels in the prefrontal cortex. Milnacipran increased the levels of all monoamines evaluated in both areas, and the combined treatment with mirtazapine augmented these changes. The combined treatment with idazoxan, an α(2) adrenoceptor antagonist, and milnacipran also increased all monoamine levels in the prefrontal cortex. Ketanserin, a serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist, showed no effect in combination with milnacipran, while SB242084, a 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, augmented the effects of milnacipran on the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that combined treatment with mirtazapine and milnacipran augments the extracellular levels of noradrenaline, serotonin and dopamine through the blockade of α(2) adrenoceptors without regional specificity, whereas mirtazapine enhances serotonergic transmission in a region-specific manner. 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonism may also partly contribute to the amplification effects of mirtazapine on serotonin and dopamine levels. These neurochemical changes could play a role in reported advantageous clinical effects in patients treated with an SNRI and mirtazapine.

  4. Cat exposure induces both intra- and extracellular Hsp72: the role of adrenal hormones.

    PubMed

    Fleshner, Monika; Campisi, Jay; Amiri, Leila; Diamond, David M

    2004-10-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsp) play an important role in stress physiology. Exposure to a variety of stressors will induce intracellular Hsp72, and this induction is believed to be beneficial for cell survival. In contrast, Hsp72 released during stress (extracellular Hsp72; eHsp72) activates pro-inflammatory responses. Clearly, physical stressors such as heat, cold, H(2)O(2), intense exercise and tail shock will induce both intra- and extracellular Hsp72. The current study tested whether a psychological stressor, cat exposure, would also trigger this response. In addition, the potential role of adrenal hormones in the Hsp72 response was examined. Adult, male Sprague Dawley rats were either adrenalectomized (ADX) or sham operated. Ten days post-recovery, rats were exposed to either a cat with no physical contact or control procedures (n = 5-6/group) for 2 h. Levels of intracellular Hsp72 were measured in the brain (frontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, dorsal vagal complex) and pituitary (ELISA). Levels of eHsp72 (ELISA) and corticosterone (RIA) were measured from serum obtained at the end of the 2-h stress period. Rats that were exposed to a cat had elevated intracellular Hsp72 in hypothalamus and dorsal vagal complex, and elevated eHsp72 and corticosterone in serum. Both the intra- and extracellular Hsp72 responses were blocked or attenuated by ADX. This study demonstrates that cat exposure can stimulate the Hsp72 response and that adrenal hormones contribute to this response.

  5. Primary cerebral and cerebellar astrocytes display differential sensitivity to extracellular sodium with significant effects on apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomohiko; Makinodan, Manabu; Fukami, Shin-ichi; Toritsuka, Michihiro; Ikawa, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasunori; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis is one of the idiopathic or iatrogenic brain dysfunction, and the most common cause is excessively rapid correction of chronic hyponatraemia. While myelin disruption is the main pathology, as the diagnostic name indicates, a previous study has reported that astrocyte death precedes the destruction of the myelin sheath after the rapid correction of chronic low Na(+) levels, and interestingly, certain brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, etc.) are specifically damaged but not cerebellum. Here, using primary astrocyte cultures derived from rat cerebral cortex and cerebellum, we examined how extracellular Na(+) alterations affect astrocyte death and whether the response is different between the two populations of astrocytes. Twice the amount of extracellular [Na(+) ] and voltage-gated Na(+) channel opening induced substantial apoptosis in both populations of astrocytes, while, in contrast, one half [Na(+) ] prevented apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes, in which the Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger, NCX2, was highly expressed but not in cerebral astrocytes. Strikingly, the rapid correction of chronic one half [Na(+) ] exposure significantly increased apoptosis in cerebellar astrocytes but not in cerebral astrocytes. These results indicate that extracellular [Na(+) ] affects astrocyte apoptosis, and the response to alterations in [Na(+) ] is dependent on the brain region from which the astrocyte is derived.

  6. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  7. Formation of extracellular matrix by cultured rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ishimura, E.; Sterzel, R. B.; Budde, K.; Kashgarian, M.

    1989-01-01

    Formation of extracellular matrix (ECM) by mesangial cells (MCs) contributes to progressive glomerulosclerosis. The authors investigated the production and distribution of ECM constituents by cultured rat MCs, using immunocytochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. Staining for all ECM constituents increased after serum feeding. Localization was strictly intracellular until confluency, when extracellular deposition of collagen IV and laminin appeared, followed by fibronectin and collagen III. In parallel, the intracellular staining for these proteins diminished markedly. Neither extracellular deposition nor intracellular loss was observed for collagen I and thrombospondin. On surfaces coated with collagen IV or laminin, extracellular deposition of ECM constituents clearly preceded confluency. These results indicate that synthesis of ECM constituents parallels MC growth, and that extracellular deposition of ECM occurs at cell-cell contact. Collagen IV or laminin secreted by MCs in the substratum accelerates production and facilitates secretion of other ECM constituents in an autocrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:2650558

  8. Extracellular vesicles as new pharmacological targets to treat atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Min; Loyer, Xavier; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular vesicles released by most cell types, include apoptotic bodies (ABs), microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. They play a crucial role in physiology and pathology, contributing to "cell-to-cell" communication by modifying the phenotype and the function of target cells. Thus, extracellular vesicles participate in the key processes of atherosclerosis from endothelial dysfunction, vascular wall inflammation to vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on extracellular vesicle formation, structure, release and clearance. We focus on the deleterious and beneficial effects of extracellular vesicles in the development of atherosclerosis. The potential role of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and pharmacological targets, their innate therapeutic capacity, or their use for novel drug delivery devices in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Extracellular taurine in the substantia nigra: taurine-glutamate interaction.

    PubMed

    García Dopico, José; Perdomo Díaz, Juan; Alonso, Teofilo Jorge; González Hernández, Tomás; Castro Fuentes, Rafael; Rodríguez Díaz, Manuel

    2004-05-15

    Taurine has been proposed as an inhibitory transmitter in the substantia nigra (SN), but the mechanisms involved in its release and uptake remain practically unexplored. We studied the extracellular pool of taurine in the rat's SN by using microdialysis methods, paying particular attention to the taurine-glutamate (GLU) interaction. Extracellular taurine increased after cell depolarization with high-K(+) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, being modified by the local perfusion of GLU, GLU receptor agonists, and zinc. Nigral administration of taurine increased the extracellular concentration of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GLU, the transmitters of the two main inputs of the SN. The modification of the glial metabolism with fluocitrate and L-methionine sulfoximine also changed the extracellular concentration of taurine. The complex regulation of the extracellular pool of taurine, its interaction with GABA and GLU, and the involvement of glial cells in its regulation suggest a volume transmission role for taurine in the SN.

  10. Simultaneous density contrast is bidirectional.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Chun; Baker, Curtis L; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous density contrast, or SDC, is the phenomenon in which the perceived density of a textured region is altered by a surround of different density (Mackay, 1973). SDC provides an experimental tool to investigate mechanisms of density coding, yet has not been systematically examined. We measured SDC with a 2AFC staircase procedure in which human observers judged which of two patterns, one with and one without a surround, appeared more dense. We used a range of surround densities varying from very sparse to very dense (0-76.8 dots/deg2), and two center test densities (6.4 and 12.8 dots/deg2). Psychometric functions were used to estimate both the points of subjective equality (PSE) and their precision. Unexpectedly we find a bidirectional SDC effect across the five observers: Not only does a denser surround reduce perceived density of the center, but a sparser surround enhances its perceived density. We also show that SDC is not mediated by either contrast-contrast or spatial-frequency contrast. Our results suggest the presence of multiple channels selective for texture density, with lateral inhibitory interactions between them.

  11. A Bibliography of Contrastive Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, John H.; Rice, Frank A.

    This 484-item bibliography is a revised and expanded version of William W. Gage's "Contrastive Studies in Linguistics: A Bibliographical Checklist" (CAL, 1961). Following a general section, the entries are arranged alphabetically by foreign language. The language headings are: Afrikaans, Arabic, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Bantu, Batak, Bengali,…

  12. Contrast-specific ultrasound techniques.

    PubMed

    Quaia, E

    2007-06-01

    The advent of microbubble contrast agents has determined an important evolution of ultrasound (US) technology due to the introduction of contrast-specific US techniques. This was due to the fact that neither colour or power Doppler are suitable for correct management of the signals produced by microbubble insonation, as they are limited by the heavy presence of artefacts. Microbubbles may be insonated by a characteristic frequency named resonance or fundamental frequency (f (0)) by using a high or low transmit power. If insonated by a high transmit power, microbubbles produce a wideband harmonic signal due to microbubble destruction. If insonated by a low transmit power, microbubbles produce harmonic frequencies (2f, 3f, 4f) due to their nonlinear physical behaviour. Contrast-specific US techniques have recently undergone an important technical development with the introduction of innovative algorithms able to register selectively the harmonic signals produced by microbubbles and to suppress the signal produced by stationary tissues. The different contrast-specific US techniques may be distinguished by their basic principle into pseudo-Doppler, harmonic, phase-modulation, amplitude-modulation and phase-and amplitude-modulation techniques.

  13. A Bibliography of Contrastive Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, John H.; Rice, Frank A.

    This 484-item bibliography is a revised and expanded version of William W. Gage's "Contrastive Studies in Linguistics: A Bibliographical Checklist" (CAL, 1961). Following a general section, the entries are arranged alphabetically by foreign language. The language headings are: Afrikaans, Arabic, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Bantu, Batak, Bengali,…

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles attenuate kidney inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eirin, Alfonso; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Tang, Hui; McGurren, Kelly A; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have distinct capability for renal repair, but may have safety concerns. MSC-derived extracellular vesicles emerged as a novel noncellular alternative. Using a porcine model of metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis we tested whether extracellular vesicles attenuate renal inflammation, and if this capacity is mediated by their cargo of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10. Pigs with metabolic syndrome were studied after 16 weeks of renal artery stenosis untreated or treated four weeks earlier with a single intrarenal delivery of extracellular vesicles harvested from adipose tissue-derived autologous MSCs. Lean and sham metabolic syndrome animals served as controls (seven each). Five additional pigs with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis received extracellular vesicles with pre-silenced IL10 (IL10 knock-down). Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and oxygenation were studied in vivo and renal injury pathways ex vivo. Retention of extracellular vesicles in the stenotic kidney peaked two days after delivery and decreased thereafter. Four weeks after injection, extracellular vesicle fragments colocalized with stenotic-kidney tubular cells and macrophages, indicating internalization or fusion. Extracellular vesicle delivery attenuated renal inflammation, and improved medullary oxygenation and fibrosis. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate fell in metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis compared to metabolic syndrome, but was restored in pigs treated with extracellular vesicles. These renoprotective effects were blunted in pigs treated with IL10-depleted extracellular vesicles. Thus, extracellular vesicle-based regenerative strategies might be useful for patients with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface characteristics and adhesion behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7: role of extracellular macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjung N; Hong, Yongsuk; Lee, Ilkeun; Bradford, Scott A; Walker, Sharon L

    2009-09-14

    Experiments were conducted using enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells to investigate the influence of extracellular macromolecules on cell surface properties and adhesion behavior to quartz sand. Partial removal of the extracellular macromolecules on cells by a proteolytic enzyme (proteinase K) was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. The proteinase K treated cells exhibited more negative electrophoretic mobility (EPM) at an ionic strength (IS) < or = 1 mM, a slightly lower isoelectric point, and were less hydrophobic as compared to the untreated cells. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the total site concentration (i.e., the total amount of exposed functional groups per cell) on the treated cells was approximately 22% smaller than the untreated cells, while the dissociation constants were almost identical. Analysis of the EPM data using soft particle theory showed that the removal of extracellular macromolecules resulted in polymeric layers outside the cell surface that were less electrophoretically soft. The more negative mobility for the treated cells was likely due to the combined effects of a change in the distribution of functional groups and an increase in the charges per unit volume after enzyme treatment and not just removal of extracellular macromolecules. The proteolytic digestion of extracellular macromolecules led to a significant difference in the cell adhesion to quartz sand. The adhesion behavior for treated cells was consistent with DLVO theory and increased with IS due to less negativity in the EPM. In contrast, the adhesion behavior of untreated cells was much more complex and exhibited a maximum at IS = 1 mM. The treated cells exhibited less adhesion than the untreated cells when the IS < or = 1 mM due to their more negative EPM. However, when the IS > or = 10 mM, a sudden decrease in the removal efficiency was observed only for the untreated cells even through EPM values were similar for

  16. Sparsity constrained contrast source inversion.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Ana B; van Dongen, Koen W A

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used for detecting and characterizing breast lesions. A state of the art imaging method is the contrast source inversion (CSI), which solves the full wave nonlinear inverse problem. However, when the measurements are acquired in noisy environments, CSI can diverge from the correct solution after several iterations. Problems associated with noisy data were originally solved by including total variation (TV) regularization. Unfortunately, for very noisy data, TV regularization alone is not sufficient. In this work, compressed sensing ideas are used to regularize the inversion process by restricting the solution of the CSI method to be sparse in a transformation domain. The proposed method estimates the contrast source and contrast function by minimizing the mean squared error between the measured and modeled data. An extra penalty term is added to measure sparsity in the transformation domain. A second method that combines sparsity of the contrast source and minimal TV in the contrast function is also presented. The proposed methods are tested on noise-free and noisy synthetic data sets representing a scan of a cancerous breast. Numerical experiments show that, for measurements contaminated with 1% noise, the sparsity constrained CSI improves the normalized mean squared error of the reconstructed speed-of-sound profiles up to 36% in comparison with traditional CSI. Also, for measurements contaminated with 5% noise, the proposed methods improve the quality of the reconstruction up to 70% in comparison with the traditional CSI method. Experimental results also show that the methods remain convergent to the correct speed-of-sound profile as the number of iterations increases.

  17. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    PubMed

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  18. Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Arterial Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    WAGENSEIL, JESSICA E.; MECHAM, ROBERT P.

    2009-01-01

    An important factor in the transition from an open to a closed circulatory system was a change in vessel wall structure and composition that enabled the large arteries to store and release energy during the cardiac cycle. The component of the arterial wall in vertebrates that accounts for these properties is the elastic fiber network organized by medial smooth muscle. Beginning with the onset of pulsatile blood flow in the developing aorta, smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that will ultimately define the mechanical properties that are critical for proper function of the adult vascular system. This review discusses the structural ECM proteins in the vertebrate aortic wall and will explore how the choice of ECM components has changed through evolution as the cardiovascular system became more advanced and pulse pressure increased. By correlating vessel mechanics with physiological blood pressure across animal species and in mice with altered vessel compliance, we show that cardiac and vascular development are physiologically coupled, and we provide evidence for a universal elastic modulus that controls the parameters of ECM deposition in vessel wall development. We also discuss mechanical models that can be used to design better tissue-engineered vessels and to test the efficacy of clinical treatments. PMID:19584318

  19. Crosstalk between glia, extracellular matrix and neurons.

    PubMed

    Song, Inseon; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-03-08

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in the central nervous system form highly organized ECM structures around cell somata, axon initial segments, and synapses and play prominent roles in early development by guiding cell migration, neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, and by regulating closure of the critical period of development, synaptic plasticity and stability, cognitive flexibility, and axonal regeneration in adults. Major components of neural ECM, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), tenascin-R and hyaluronic acid, are synthesized by both neurons and glial cells. The expression of these molecules is dynamically regulated during brain development in physiological conditions, shaping both neuronal and glial functions through multitude of molecular mechanisms. Upregulation of particular CSPGs and other ECM molecules, in particular by reactive astrocytes, after CNS injuries, during aging, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration on the one hand results in formation of growth-impermissive environment and impaired synaptic plasticity. On the other hand, ECM appeared to have a neuroprotective effect, at least in the form of perineuronal nets. CSPGs-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and several members of the disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family of proteases are secreted by neurons and glia and may drive neural ECM remodeling in physiological conditions as well as after brain injury and other brain disorders. Thus, targeting expression of specific ECM molecules, associated glycans and degrading enzymes may lead to development of new therapeutic strategies promoting regeneration and synaptic plasticity.

  20. Protein Dynamics in the Plant Extracellular Space.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Barros, Danielle R; Ricardo, Cândido P

    2016-07-13

    The extracellular space (ECS or apoplast) is the plant cell compartment external to the plasma membrane, which includes the cell walls, the intercellular space and the apoplastic fluid (APF). The present review is focused on APF proteomics papers and intends to draw information on the metabolic processes occurring in the ECS under abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as under non-challenged conditions. The large majority of the proteins detected are involved in "cell wall organization and biogenesis", "response to stimulus" and "protein metabolism". It becomes apparent that some proteins are always detected, irrespective of the experimental conditions, although with different relative contribution. This fact suggests that non-challenged plants have intrinsic constitutive metabolic processes of stress/defense in the ECS. In addition to the multiple functions ascribed to the ECS proteins, should be considered the interactions established between themselves and with the plasma membrane and its components. These interactions are crucial in connecting exterior and interior of the cell, and even simple protein actions in the ECS can have profound effects on plant performance. The proteins of the ECS are permanently contributing to the high dynamic nature of this plant compartment, which seems fundamental to plant development and adaptation to the environmental conditions.

  1. Relevance of extracellular DNA in rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietramellara, Giacomo; Ascher, Judith; Baraniya, Divyashri; Arfaioli, Paola; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Hawes, Martha

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for future development is the manipulation of the rhizosphere to produce sustainable and efficient agriculture production systems. Using Omics approaches, to define the distinctive features of eDNA systems and structures, will facilitate progress in rhizo-enforcement and biocontrol studies. The relevance of these studies results clear when we consider the plethora of ecological functions in which eDNA is involved. This fraction can be actively extruded by living cells or discharged during cellular lysis and may exert a key role in the stability and variability of the soil bacterial genome, resulting also a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for plants due to the root's capacity to directly uptake short DNA fragments. The adhesive properties of the DNA molecule confer to eDNA the capacity to inhibit or kill pathogenic bacteria by cation limitation induction, and to facilitate formation of biofilm and extracellular traps (ETs), that may protect microorganisms inhabiting biofilm and plant roots against pathogens and allelopathic substances. The ETs are actively extruded by root border cells when they are dispersed in the rhizosphere, conferring to plants the capacity to extend an endogenous pathogen defence system outside the organism. Moreover, eDNA could be involved in rhizoremediation in heavy metal polluted soil acting as a bioflotation reagent.

  2. Characterization of Alternaria infectoria extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Branca M.A.; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Espadas-Moreno, Javier; Wolf, Julie M.; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Gonçalves, Teresa; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Many fungi use membrane vesicles to transport complex molecules across their cell walls. Like mammalian exosomes, fungal vesicles contain lipids, proteins, and polysaccharides, many of which are associated with virulence. Here we identify and characterize extracellular vesicles (EVs) in Alternaria infectoria, a ubiquitous, environmental filamentous fungus that is also an opportunistic human pathogen. Examination of the A. infectoria EVs revealed a morphology similar to that of vesicles described in other fungal species. Of note, proteomic analysis detected a reduced number of vesicle-associated proteins. There were two prevalent categories among the 20 identified proteins, including the polysaccharide metabolism group, probably related to plant host invasion or biosynthesis/degradation of cell wall components, and the nuclear proteins, especially DNA repair enzymes. We also found enzymes related to pigment synthesis, adhesion to the host cell, and trafficking of vesicles/organelles/molecules. This is the first time EV secretions have been identified in a filamentous fungus. We believe that these vesicles might have a role in virulence. PMID:24576997

  3. Overview of Extracellular Microvesicles in Drug Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Vancells, Javier; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Liver is the major body reservoir for enzymes involved in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Recently, it has been shown that hepatocytes release exosome-like vesicles to the extracellular medium, and the proteomic characterization of these hepatocyte-secreted exosomes has revealed the presence of several of these enzymes on them. Areas covered in this review A systematic bibliographic search focus on two related aspects: 1) xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that have been detected in microvesicles, and 2) microvesicles which are in the blood stream or secreted by cell-types with clear interactions with this fluid. What the reader will gain A discussion of these hepatocyte-secreted vesicles along with others microvesicles as enzymatic carriers in the context of extrahepatic drug-metabolizing systems. Take home message The contribution of many tissues including the liver to the microvesicles plasma population is supported by several reports. On the other hand, many enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs have been detected in microvesicles. Together, these observations argue positively through a role of hepatic-microvesicles in spreading the liver metabolizing activities through the body contributing in this manner to extrahepatic drug metabolism systems what could be relevant for body homeostasis and pharmaceutical interests. PMID:20192903

  4. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    PubMed Central

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable. Recent studies have shown the potential of hydrogels to mimic native ECM. Such an engineered native-like ECM is more likely to provide cells with rational cues for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. The research for novel biomaterials has led to an extension of the scope and techniques used to fabricate biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this article, we detail the progress of the current state-of-the-art engineering methods to create cell-encapsulating hydrogel tissue constructs as well as their applications in in vitro models in biomedicine. PMID:20394538

  5. Extracellular proton release by stimulated neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    van Zwieten, R.; Wever, R.; Hamers, M.N.; Weening, R.S.; Roos, D.

    1981-07-01

    We have tried to elucidate the mechanism of phagosome acidification in human neutrophils. Assuming that phenomena occurring at the plasma membrane reflect reactions in the phagocytic vacuoles, we have stimulated human neutrophils with agents that induce a ''respiratory burst,'' and we have measured the release of protons into the extracellular medium. Phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and serum-opsonized zymosan particles each caused a rapid release of protons, concomitant with the increase in oxygen consumption. The stimulated release of protons was strictly coupled to the increase respiration of the cells, because inhibition of the respiration of either anaerobiosis, chlorpromazine, or glycolytic inhibitors also inhibited the release of protons. Also, in the presence of the above-mentioned stimulating agents, neutrophils from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease enhanced neither respiration not proton release. In normal cells, the ratio of deltaH+/-deltaO2 was 1.04 +/- 0.19 (mean +/ SD, n . 13). The mechanism of this proton release is not clear. The amount of lactic and carbonic acid produced by stimulated neutrophils was inadequate to explain the amount of protons released. Perhydroxyl radicals were also ruled out as the source of the protons. Because the cells did not release measurable amounts of phosphate ions, a phosphate-hydroxyl-ion antiport was also excluded. Finally, the lack of any effect of uncouplers renders it unlikely that a respiration-driven proton gradient is built up across the plasma membrane.

  6. Extracellular matrix components in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Injured axons of the peripheral nerve are able to regenerate and, eventually, reinnervate target organs. However, functional recovery is usually poor after severe nerve injuries. The switch of Schwann cells to a proliferative state, secretion of trophic factors, and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (such as collagen, laminin, or fibronectin) in the distal stump are key elements to create a permissive environment for axons to grow. In this review, we focus attention on the ECM components and their tropic role in axonal regeneration. These components can also be used as molecular cues to guide the axons through artificial nerve guides in attempts to better mimic the natural environment found in a degenerating nerve. Most used scaffolds tested are based on natural molecules that form the ECM, but use of synthetic polymers and functionalization of hydrogels are bringing new options. Progress in tissue engineering will eventually lead to the design of composite artificial nerve grafts that may replace the use of autologous nerve grafts to sustain regeneration over long gaps.

  7. Mechanics of composite cytoskeletal and extracellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Living cells sense and respond to mechanical forces in their surroundings. This mechanical response is mainly due to the cell cytoskeleton, and its interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cell cytoskeleton is a composite polymeric scaffold made of many different types of protein filaments and crosslinking proteins. Two major filament systems in the cytoskeleton are actin filaments (F-actin) and microtubules (MTs). Actin filaments are semiflexible, while the much stiffer MTs behave as rigid rods. I shall discuss theories that help understand how the direct coupling to the surrounding F-actin matrix allows intracellular MTs to bear large compressive forces and controls the range of force transmission along the MTs, and how the MTs not only enhance the stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton, but can also dramatically endow an initially nearly incompressible F-actin matrix with enhanced compressibility relative to its shear compliance. A second source of compositeness in the cytoskeleton is the presences of different types of crosslinkers that can interact cooperatively leading to enhanced mechanical rigidity and tunable response. Like the cytoskeleton, the ECM is also a polymeric composite. It is primarily composed of a mesh of fibrous proteins, mainly stiff collagen filaments, and a comparatively flexible gel of proteoglycans and hyaluronan. I shall discuss a model that shows how the interplay between the collagen network and the background elastic gel leads to a mechanically robust ECM.

  8. Extracellular enzymatic activity of Microsporum canis isolates.

    PubMed

    Papini, R; Mancianti, F

    The enzymatic activity of 70 feline and canine Microsporum canis isolates was determined by the Api-Zym test. The liquid phase of cultures, inoculated into Tryptic Soy Broth, was used to examine 19 enzymes. Considerable differences were observed among the extracellular enzymatic patterns. All the isolates produced alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucosidase, while lipase (C14), trypsin, chymotrypsin, beta-glucuronidase, and alpha-fucosidase activity was never revealed. Esterase (C4) activity was present in 57 samples (81%), esterase lipase (C8) in 31 (44%), leucine arylamidase in 35 (50%), valine arylamidase and cystine arylamidase in 7 (10%), acid phosphatase in 64 (91%), naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase in 60 (86%), alpha-galactosidase in 5 (7%), beta-galactosidase in 6 (8%), alpha-glucosidase in 25 (36%), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in 41 (58%), and alpha-mannosidase in 51 (73%). The beta-galactosidase activity of M. canis has not been reported previously. Remarkable variations of intensity for each enzymatic activity were also detected. It is believed that these results could provide basic data for further investigations on the pathogenic role of enzymes secreted by M. canis.

  9. Extracellular proteases from eight psychrotolerant Antarctic strains.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Susana C; Coria, Silvia H; MacCormack, Walter P

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular proteases from 8 Antarctic psychrotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strains were purified and characterised. All of them are neutral metalloproteases, have an apparent molecular mass of 45kDa, optimal activity at 40 degrees C and pH 7-9, retaining significant activity at pH 5-11. With the exception of P96-18, which is less stable, all retain more than 50% activity after 3 h of incubation at pH 5-9 and show low thermal stability (their half-life times range from 20 to 60 min at 40 degrees C and less than 5 min at 50 degrees C). These proteases can be used in commercial processes carried out at neutral pH and moderate temperatures, and are of special interest for their application in mixtures of enzymes where final thermal selective inactivation is needed. Results also highlight the relevance of Antarctic biotopes for the isolation of protease-producing enzymes active at low temperatures.

  10. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weimin; Chen, Mingxue; Huang, Jingxiang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Mingjie; Li, Penghao; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Zhang, Li; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies. PMID:28078284

  11. Extracellular matrix, supramolecular organisation and shape.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J E

    1995-01-01

    Connective tissue function is defined as the formation and maintenance of shape, without which centralised physiologies (circulatory, digestive or nervous) could not have evolved. Two elements, inextensible (collagenous) fibrils and compression-resistant interfibrillar soluble polymers (proteoglycans), cope with all usual stresses. Relationships between the two are highly specific, as demonstrated by electron histochemistry based on Cupromeronic blue and critical electrolyte concentration (CEC) methodologies. Recent ideas on (1) the protofibrillar or modular structure of collagen fibrils, (2) the nature of specific binding sites for proteoglycans on fibrils, and (3) fundamental similarities in secondary and tertiary structures of the glycosaminoglycans (hyaluronan, chondroitin, keratan and dermatan sulphates) are described. They have greatly illuminated the study of extracellular matrix structure and function in normal, pathological (osteogenesis imperfecta) and ageing tissues. The small proteoglycans are proposed to be tissue organisers, orienting and ordering the collagen fibrils--thus shaping the tissue at a molecular and ultimately macro level. These interfibrillar structures are based on their bifunctional character, the protein parts binding to collagen fibrils at specific sites and the glycosaminoglycans duplexing and aggregating to hold the proteins and hence the collagen fibrils at defined distances from each other, rather like yardsticks. Examples of the way these functions work in specific tissues are drawn from the cornea and vitreous humour of the eye and developing tendon. Images Fig. 3 (cont.) Fig. 3 PMID:7591990

  12. Extracellular alkaline proteinase of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Dunaevsky, Ya E; Matveeva, A R; Beliakova, G A; Domash, V I; Belozersky, M A

    2007-03-01

    The main proteinase of the filamentous fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing anthracnoses and serious problems for production and storage of agricultural products has molecular mass of 57 kD and was purified more than 200-fold to homogeneity with the yield of 5%. Maximal activity of the proteinase is at pH 9.0-10.0, and the enzyme is stable at pH 6.0-11.5 (residual activity not less than 70%). The studied enzyme completely kept its activity to 55 degrees C, with a temperature optimum of 45 degrees C. The purified C. gloeosporioides proteinase is stable at alkaline pH values, but rapidly loses its activity at pH values lower than 5.0. Addition of bovine serum albumin stabilizes the enzyme under acidic conditions. Data on inhibitor analysis and substrate specificity of the enzyme allow its classification as a serine proteinase of subtilisin family. It is demonstrated that the extracellular proteinase of C. gloeosporioides specifically effects plant cell wall proteins. It is proposed that the studied proteinase--via hydrolysis of cell wall--provides for penetration of the fungus into the tissues of the host plant.

  13. Extracellular Matrix, a Hard Player in Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mongiat, Maurizio; Andreuzzi, Eva; Tarticchio, Giulia; Paulitti, Alice

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex network of proteins, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and polysaccharides. Through multiple interactions with each other and the cell surface receptors, not only the ECM determines the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues, but also profoundly influences cell behavior and many physiological and pathological processes. One of the functions that have been extensively explored is its impingement on angiogenesis. The strong impact of the ECM in this context is both direct and indirect by virtue of its ability to interact and/or store several growth factors and cytokines. The aim of this review is to provide some examples of the complex molecular mechanisms that are elicited by these molecules in promoting or weakening the angiogenic processes. The scenario is intricate, since matrix remodeling often generates fragments displaying opposite effects compared to those exerted by the whole molecules. Thus, the balance will tilt towards angiogenesis or angiostasis depending on the relative expression of pro- or anti-angiogenetic molecules/fragments composing the matrix of a given tissue. One of the vital aspects of this field of research is that, for its endogenous nature, the ECM can be viewed as a reservoir to draw from for the development of new more efficacious therapies to treat angiogenesis-dependent pathologies. PMID:27809279

  14. Tetraspanins in extracellular vesicle formation and function.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Zoraida; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles, and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size, and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different physiological and/or pathological processes. Depending on their origin, they can alter the fate of recipient cells according to the information transferred. In the last two decades, EVs have become the focus of many studies because of their putative use as non-invasive biomarkers and their potential in bioengineering and clinical applications. In order to exploit this ability of EVs many aspects of their biology should be deciphered. Here, we review the mechanisms involved in EV biogenesis, assembly, recruitment of selected proteins, and genetic material as well as the uptake mechanisms by target cells in an effort to understand EV functions and their utility in clinical applications. In these contexts, the role of proteins from the tetraspanin superfamily, which are among the most abundant membrane proteins of EVs, will be highlighted.

  15. Protein Dynamics in the Plant Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Barros, Danielle R.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular space (ECS or apoplast) is the plant cell compartment external to the plasma membrane, which includes the cell walls, the intercellular space and the apoplastic fluid (APF). The present review is focused on APF proteomics papers and intends to draw information on the metabolic processes occurring in the ECS under abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as under non-challenged conditions. The large majority of the proteins detected are involved in “cell wall organization and biogenesis”, “response to stimulus” and “protein metabolism”. It becomes apparent that some proteins are always detected, irrespective of the experimental conditions, although with different relative contribution. This fact suggests that non-challenged plants have intrinsic constitutive metabolic processes of stress/defense in the ECS. In addition to the multiple functions ascribed to the ECS proteins, should be considered the interactions established between themselves and with the plasma membrane and its components. These interactions are crucial in connecting exterior and interior of the cell, and even simple protein actions in the ECS can have profound effects on plant performance. The proteins of the ECS are permanently contributing to the high dynamic nature of this plant compartment, which seems fundamental to plant development and adaptation to the environmental conditions. PMID:28248232

  16. The extracellular matrix in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Insua-Rodríguez, Jacob; Oskarsson, Thordur

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is increasingly recognized as an important regulator in breast cancer. ECM in breast cancer development features numerous changes in composition and organization when compared to the mammary gland under homeostasis. Matrix proteins that are induced in breast cancer include fibrillar collagens, fibronectin, specific laminins and proteoglycans as well as matricellular proteins. Growing evidence suggests that many of these induced ECM proteins play a major functional role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. A number of the induced ECM proteins have moreover been shown to be essential components of metastatic niches, promoting stem/progenitor signaling pathways and metastatic growth. ECM remodeling enzymes are also markedly increased, leading to major changes in the matrix structure and biomechanical properties. Importantly, several ECM components and ECM remodeling enzymes are specifically induced in breast cancer or during tissue regeneration while healthy tissues under homeostasis express exceedingly low levels. This may indicate that ECM and ECM-associated functions may represent promising drug targets against breast cancer, providing important specificity that could be utilized when developing therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracellular matrix mechanics in lung parenchymal diseases.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Bates, Jason H T

    2008-11-30

    In this review, we examine how the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the lung contributes to the overall mechanical properties of the parenchyma, and how these properties change in disease. The connective tissues of the lung are composed of cells and ECM, which includes a variety of biological macromolecules and water. The macromolecules that are most important in determining the mechanical properties of the ECM are collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans. We first discuss the various components of the ECM and how their architectural organization gives rise to the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. Next, we examine how mechanical forces can affect the physiological functioning of the lung parenchyma. Collagen plays an especially important role in determining the homeostasis and cellular responses to injury because it is the most important load-bearing component of the parenchyma. We then demonstrate how the concept of percolation can be used to link microscopic pathologic alterations in the parenchyma to clinically measurable lung function during the progression of emphysema and fibrosis. Finally, we speculate about the possibility of using targeted tissue engineering to optimize treatment of these two major lung diseases.

  18. Analysis of extracellular RNA in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Saugstad, Julie A.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R.; Phillips, Jay I.; Lind, Babett; Harrington, Christina A.; McFarland, Trevor J.; Courtright, Amanda L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Yeri, Ashish S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Messer, Karen; Akers, Johnny C.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the extracellular vesicle (EV) and RNA composition of pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and CSF from five major neurological disorders: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), low-grade glioma (LGG), glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), representing neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and severe acute brain injury. We evaluated: (I) size and quantity of EVs by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), (II) RNA yield and purity using four RNA isolation kits, (III) replication of RNA yields within and between laboratories, and (IV) composition of total and EV RNAs by reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and RNA sequencing (RNASeq). The CSF contained ~106 EVs/μL by NTA and VFC. Brain tumour and SAH CSF contained more EVs and RNA relative to normal, AD, and PD. RT-qPCR and RNASeq identified disease-related populations of microRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) relative to normal CSF, in both total and EV fractions. This work presents relevant measures selected to inform the design of subsequent replicative CSF studies. The range of neurological diseases highlights variations in total and EV RNA content due to disease or collection site, revealing critical considerations guiding the selection of appropriate approaches and controls for CSF studies. PMID:28717417

  19. Molecular adhesion between cartilage extracellular matrix macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Fredrick P; Batista, Michael A; Lindburg, C Alexander; Dean, Delphine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine; Han, Lin

    2014-03-10

    In this study, we investigated the molecular adhesion between the major constituents of cartilage extracellular matrix, namely, the highly negatively charged proteoglycan aggrecan and the type II/IX/XI fibrillar collagen network, in simulated physiological conditions. Colloidal force spectroscopy was applied to measure the maximum adhesion force and total adhesion energy between aggrecan end-attached spherical tips (end radius R ≈ 2.5 μm) and trypsin-treated cartilage disks with undamaged collagen networks. Studies were carried out in various aqueous solutions to reveal the physical factors that govern aggrecan-collagen adhesion. Increasing both ionic strength and [Ca(2+)] significantly increased adhesion, highlighting the importance of electrostatic repulsion and Ca(2+)-mediated ion bridging effects. In addition, we probed how partial enzymatic degradation of the collagen network, which simulates osteoarthritic conditions, affects the aggrecan-collagen interactions. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in aggrecan-collagen adhesion even when there were no detectable changes at the macro- or microscales. It is hypothesized that the aggrecan-collagen adhesion, together with aggrecan-aggrecan self-adhesion, works synergistically to determine the local molecular deformability and energy dissipation of the cartilage matrix, in turn, affecting its macroscopic tissue properties.

  20. Inflammatory Stroke Extracellular Vesicles Induce Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Davis, Simon; Fischer, Roman; Dickens, Alex M; Neuhaus, Ain A; Burgess, Annette I; Rothwell, Peter M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are protein-lipid complexes released from cells, as well as actively exocytosed, as part of normal physiology, but also during pathological processes such as those occurring during a stroke. Our aim was to determine the inflammatory potential of stroke EVs. EVs were quantified and analyzed in the sera of patients after an acute stroke (<24 hours; OXVASC [Oxford Vascular Study]). Isolated EV fractions were subjected to untargeted proteomic analysis by liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry/mass-spectrometry and then applied to macrophages in culture to investigate inflammatory gene expression. EV number, but not size, is significantly increased in stroke patients when compared to age-matched controls. Proteomic analysis reveals an overall increase in acute phase proteins, including C-reactive protein. EV fractions applied to monocyte-differentiated macrophage cultures induced inflammatory gene expression. Together these data show that EVs from stroke patients are proinflammatory in nature and are capable of inducing inflammation in immune cells. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Getting to know the extracellular vesicle glycome.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jared Q; Griffin, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a diverse population of complex biological particles with diameters ranging from approximately 20 to 1000 nm. Tremendous interest in EVs has been generated following a number of recent, high-profile reports describing their potential utility in diagnostic, prognostic, drug delivery, and therapeutic roles. Subpopulations, such as exosomes, are now known to directly participate in cell-cell communication and direct material transfer. Glycomics, the 'omic' portion of the glycobiology field, has only begun to catalog the surface oligosaccharide and polysaccharide structures and also the carbohydrate-binding proteins found on and inside EVs. The EV glycome undoubtedly contains vital clues essential to better understanding the function, biogenesis, release and transfer of vesicles, however getting at this information is technically challenging and made even more so because of the small physical size of the vesicles and the typically minute yield from physiological-scale biological samples. Vesicle micro-heterogeneity which may be related to specific vesicle origins and functions presents a further challenge. A number of primary studies carried out over the past decade have turned up specific and valuable clues regarding the composition and roles of glycan structures and also glycan binding proteins involved EV biogenesis and transfer. This review explores some of the major EV glycobiological research carried out to date and discusses the potential implications of these findings across the life sciences.

  2. Characterization of the extracellular haemoglobins of Artemia salina.

    PubMed Central

    Moens, L; Kondo, M

    1977-01-01

    The following factors were measured for extracellular haemoglobins of Artemia salina: a minimal molecular weight of globin chain per haem group (based on the iron and haem contents), the absorption coefficients, the absorption spectra of various derivatives and the amino acid compositions. These were compared with those of the haemoglobins of other invertebrates. Three Artemia haemoglobins (I, II and III) had similar molecular structures, constructed from two-globin subunits of 122000-130000mol.wt. Since the minimal mol.wt. was determined to be 18000, this suggests that one globin subunit was bound by seven haem groups, and hence one haemoglobin molecule (240000-260000mol.wt.) should contain 14 haem groups. A successful identification of this high-molecular-weight subunit required first the denaturation of haemoglobin in 1% sodium dodecyl sulphate before sodium dodecyl sulphate gel electrophoresis. Denaturation by prolonged incubation (12-36 h) at room temperature in the presence of 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulphate [Bowen, Moise, Waring & Poon (1976) Comp. Biochem. Physiol. B55, 99-103] was accompanied by extensive proteolysis, resulting in low recovery of the stainable protein and heterogeneous gel patterns. Regardless of which electrophoretic system was used, the high-molecular-weight subunit was always present provided that 1% sodium dodecyl sulphate was present during denaturation. These results contrast with those obtained by Bowen et al. (1976). However, preferential cleavage of the globin subunit (alpha) seemed to occur in vitro when standard conditions were used, producing two specific fragments having mol.wts. of 80000 (beta) and 50000 (gamma). Images Fig. 3. PMID:889567

  3. Impact of ionic aluminium on extracellular phosphatases in acidified lakes.

    PubMed

    Bittl, T; Vrba, J; Nedoma, J; Kopácek, J

    2001-09-01

    We studied direct inhibiting effects of aluminium (Al) on extracellular phosphatases produced by the plankton of acidified lakes in the Bohemian Forest. In laboratory experiments we tested the effect of different Al concentrations (0-1000 microg l(-1)) on kinetic parameters of acid phosphatases (pH optimum approximately 5.0) at pH between 4.5 and 5.2. We observed a significant reduction of an apparent substrate affinity at Al concentrations between 300 and 1000 microg l(-1) at pH 4.5 and 4.8 (but not at 5.2). In contrast, maximum acid phosphatase activity (AcPA) remained unchanged. Such behaviour of saturation kinetics is compatible with the assumption that ionic Al acts as a competitive inhibitor of acid phosphatases. To decide whether the observed Al effects could be explained alternatively by complexation of Al with substrate, we tested statistically the best fits of data with both possible models (competitive versus complexation). Experimental results supported the competitive hypothesis rather than the complexation model suggested originally by some authors. Furthermore, we tested the Al effect within a wide range of pH from 4.0 to 6.0. For pH values < 5.2, the results of an Al-pH matrix experiment gave a more detailed picture: the higher the Al concentration, the wider the pH range in which Al could negatively affect AcPA. The ecological ramifications of this effect were evaluated in the context of field AcPA data on three strongly acidified lakes.

  4. Extracellular Enzyme Production and Synthetic Lignin Mineralization by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann-Johnson, Carmen; Salas, Loreto; Vicuña, Rafael; Kirk, T. Kent

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora to mineralize 14C-synthetic lignin was studied under different culture conditions, and the levels of two extracellular enzymes were monitored. The highest mineralization rates (28% after 28 days) were obtained in cultures containing a growth-limiting amount of nitrogen source (1.0 mM ammonium tartrate); under this condition, the levels of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase present in the culture supernatant solutions were very low compared with cultures containing 10 mM of the nitrogen source. In contrast, cultures containing a limiting concentration of the carbon source (0.1% glucose) showed low levels of both enzymes and also very low mineralization rates compared with cultures containing 1% glucose. Cultures containing 11 ppm of Mn(II) showed a higher rate of mineralization than those containing 0.3 or 40 ppm of this cation. Levels of MnP and laccase were higher when 40 ppm of Mn(II) was used. Mineralization rates were slightly higher in cultures flushed daily with oxygen, whereas laccase levels were lower and MnP levels were approximately the same as in cultures maintained under an air atmosphere. The presence of 0.4 mM veratryl alcohol reduced both mineralization rates and MnP levels, without affecting laccase levels. Lignin peroxidase activity was not detected under any condition. Addition of purified lignin peroxidase to the cultures in the presence or absence of veratryl alcohol did not enhance mineralization rates significantly. PMID:16348955

  5. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Extracellular Ca2+ Is Required for Fertilization in the African Clawed Frog, Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Duray, Alexis M.; Tembo, Maiwase; Beleny, David O.; Napolitano, Marc A.; Sauer, Monica L.; Wisner, Bennett W.

    2017-01-01

    Background The necessity of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization and early embryonic development in the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is controversial. Ca2+ entry into X. laevis sperm is reportedly required for the acrosome reaction, yet fertilization and embryonic development have been documented to occur in high concentrations of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Here we sought to resolve this controversy. Methodology/principal finding Using the appearance of cleavage furrows as an indicator of embryonic development, we found that X. laevis eggs inseminated in a solution lacking added divalent cations developed normally. By contrast, eggs inseminated in millimolar concentrations of BAPTA or EGTA failed to develop. Transferring embryos to varying solutions after sperm addition, we found that extracellular Ca2+ is specifically required for events occurring within the first 30 minutes after sperm addition, but not after. We found that the fluorescently stained sperm were not able to penetrate the envelope of eggs inseminated in high BAPTA, whereas several had penetrated the vitelline envelope of eggs inseminated without a Ca2+ chelator, or with BAPTA and saturating CaCl2. Together these results indicate that fertilization does not occur in high concentrations of Ca2+ chelators. Finally, we found that the jelly coat includes >5 mM of readily diffusible Ca2+. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these data are consistent with requirement of extracellular Ca2+ for fertilization. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the jelly coat surrounding the egg acts as a reserve of readily available Ca2+ ions to foster fertilization in changing extracellular milieu. PMID:28114360

  7. Diffusion characteristics and extracellular volume fraction during normoxia and hypoxia in slices of rat neostriatum.

    PubMed

    Rice, M E; Nicholson, C

    1991-02-01

    1. Diffusion properties of submerged, superfused slices from the rat neostriatum were measured by quantitative analysis of concentration-time profiles of tetramethylammonium (TMA+) introduced by iontophoresis. TMA+ was sensed at an ion-selective microelectrode (ISM) positioned 100-150 microns from the source pipette. Slice viability was assessed from the extracellular field potentials evoked by intrastriatal electrical stimulation. 2. Under normoxic conditions the extracellular volume fraction (alpha) was 0.21 (range 0.18-0.24), and the tortuosity (lambda) was 1.54, in slices with good field potentials. In slices with poor field potentials, alpha was 0.09-0.16. Extraction of correct alpha and lambda in the slice required evaluation of nonspecific uptake, k', which was 1 x 10(-2) s-1. 3. Slices were made hypoxic by superfusing physiological saline equilibrated with 95% N2-5% CO2 for 10-30 min. Synaptic components of field potentials were inhibited after 3-4 min in hypoxic media. In some experiments extracellular K+ concentration [( K+]o) was monitored with ISMs. During hypoxia, [K+]o rose from an average baseline of 5.1 mM to 7-10 mM. After reoxygenation, [K+]o transiently fell below the original level. 4. The average value for alpha during hypoxia was 0.13 (a 38% decrease), which was significantly different from control (P less than 0.001) and increased progressively during hypoxic exposure. In contrast, tortuosity and k' were unchanged by this treatment. 5. These data represent the first characterization of the diffusion properties of the rat striatal slice and of changes in extracellular volume fraction during hypoxia in a brain slice preparation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, E.J.; Gillette, E.L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1996-02-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by {gamma} irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin inummoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  10. Calcium diffusion enhanced after cleavage of negatively charged components of brain extracellular matrix by chondroitinase ABC

    PubMed Central

    Hrabětová, Sabina; Masri, Daniel; Tao, Lian; Xiao, Fanrong; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The concentration of extracellular calcium plays a critical role in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability as well as other physiological processes. The time course and extent of local fluctuations in the concentration of this ion largely depend on its effective diffusion coefficient (D*) and it has been speculated that fixed negative charges on chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and other components of the extracellular matrix may influence calcium diffusion because it is a divalent cation. In this study we used ion-selective microelectrodes combined with pressure ejection or iontophoresis of ions from a micropipette to quantify diffusion characteristics of neocortex and hippocampus in rat brain slices. We show that D* for calcium is less than the value predicted from the behaviour of the monovalent cation tetramethylammonium (TMA), a commonly used diffusion probe, but D* for calcium increases in both brain regions after the slices are treated with chondroitinase ABC, an enzyme that predominantly cleaves chondroitin sulphate glycans. These results suggest that CSPGs do play a role in determining the local diffusion properties of calcium in brain tissue, most likely through electrostatic interactions mediating rapid equilibrium binding. In contrast, chondroitinase ABC does not affect either the TMA diffusion or the extracellular volume fraction, indicating that the enzyme does not alter the structure of the extracellular space and that the diffusion of small monovalent cations is not affected by CSPGs in the normal brain ionic milieu. Both calcium and CSPGs are known to have many distinct roles in brain physiology, including brain repair, and our study suggests they may be functionally coupled through calcium diffusion properties. PMID:19546165

  11. Alginate-coated magnetic nanoparticles for noninvasive MRI of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Avram, Liat; Yariv-Shoushan, Shani; Anaby, Debbie; Cohen, Smadar; Segev-Amzaleg, Niva; Frenkel, Dan; Sadan, Ofer; Offen, Daniel; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential to increase the diagnostic capacity of many imaging modalities. MRI is currently regarded as the method of choice for the imaging of deep tissues, and metal ions, such as calcium ions (Ca(2+)), are essential ingredients for life. Despite the tremendous importance of Ca(2+) for the well-being of living systems, the noninvasive determination of the changes in Ca(2+) levels in general, and extracellular Ca(2+) levels in particular, in deep tissues remains a challenge. Here, we describe the preparation and contrast mechanism of a flexible easy to prepare and selective superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) NPs for the noninvasive determination of changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels using conventional MRI. We show that SPIO NPs coated with monodisperse and purified alginate, having a specific molecular weight, provide a tool to selectively determine Ca(2+) concentrations in the range of 250 µm to 2.5 mm, even in the presence of competitive ions. The alginate-coated magnetic NPs (MNPs) aggregate in the presence of Ca(2+) , which, in turn, affects the T2 relaxation of the water protons in their vicinity. The new alginate-coated SPIO NP formulations, which have no effect on cell viability for 24 h, allow the detection of Ca(2+) levels secreted from ischemic cell cultures and the qualitative examination of the change in extracellular Ca(2+) levels in vivo. These results demonstrate that alginate-coated MNPs can be used, at least qualitatively, as a platform for the noninvasive MRI determination of extracellular Ca(2+) levels in myriad in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  12. Putative functions of extracellular matrix glycoproteins in secondary palate morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    d'Amaro, Rocca; Scheidegger, Rolf; Blumer, Susan; Pazera, Pawel; Katsaros, Christos; Graf, Daniel; Chiquet, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect in humans. Elevation and fusion of paired palatal shelves are coordinated by growth and transcription factors, and mutations in these can cause malformations. Among the effector genes for growth factor signaling are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. These provide substrates for cell adhesion (e.g., fibronectin, tenascins), but also regulate growth factor availability (e.g., fibrillins). Cleft palate in Bmp7 null mouse embryos is caused by a delay in palatal shelf elevation. In contrast, palatal shelves of Tgf-β3 knockout mice elevate normally, but a cleft develops due to their failure to fuse. However, nothing is known about a possible functional interaction between specific ECM proteins and Tgf-β/Bmp family members in palatogenesis. To start addressing this question, we studied the mRNA and protein distribution of relevant ECM components during secondary palate development, and compared it to growth factor expression in wildtypewild type and mutant mice. We found that fibrillin-2 (but not fibrillin-1) mRNA appeared in the mesenchyme of elevated palatal shelves adjacent to the midline epithelial cells, which were positive for Tgf-β3 mRNA. Moreover, midline epithelial cells started expressing fibronectin upon contact of the two palatal shelves. These findings support the hypothesis that fibrillin-2 and fibronectin are involved in regulating the activity of Tgf-β3 at the fusing midline. In addition, we observed that tenascin-W (but not tenascin-C) was misexpressed in palatal shelves of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. In contrast to tenascin-C, tenascin-W secretion was strongly induced by Bmp7 in embryonic cranial fibroblasts in vitro. These results are consistent with a putative function for tenascin-W as a target of Bmp7 signaling during palate elevation. Our results indicate that distinct ECM proteins are important for morphogenesis of the secondary palate, both as downstream effectors and as regulators of Tgf

  13. [Two-photon microscopy of the cornea using intrinsic contrast].

    PubMed

    Krüger, A; Hovakimyan, M; Ramírez, D F; Stachs, O; Lubatschowski, H; Wree, A; Guthoff, R; Heisterkamp, A

    2009-12-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of the cornea under physiological conditions is best performed with intrinsic contrast mechanisms for the visualisation of cells and extracellular matrix. However, the unique transparency of the cornea goes along with a lack of contrast for the extracellular matrix (ECM) in reflective mode microscopy and optical coherence tomography. Femtosecond laser-based non-linear microscopy provides novel contrast mechanisms for the visualisation of ECM. The confinement of the non-linear contrast to the focus volume provides an intrinsic sectioning property for 3D imaging. Further advantages of the infrared light are lower phototoxicity and higher penetration depth into the tissue. For the visualisation of the cornea and its layered substructures two non-linear contrast mechanisms are of main interest: Two-photon excited autofluorescence of NAD(P)H in the cytoplasma and second harmonic generation (SHG) in the collagen-I fibres of the stroma. Ex-vivo corneas of the rabbit were imaged to demonstrate the abilities of non-linear microscopy. Using the autofluorescence of NAD(P)H the corneal epithelium with squamous cells, wing cells and basal cells is visualised in three dimensions without additional exogenoeus staining. Stromal keratocytes are also imaged using the NAD(P)H autofluoresecence. The layered structure of lamella in the stroma is visible after virtual resclicing of the 3D volume data. The en-face SHG images detected through the transparent cornea in forward direction show areas of parallel streaks, which increase in size and periodically alter in orientation (90 degrees , 45 degrees) with increasing depth from anterior to posterior. These streaks are not visible in the backward SHG signal. First results on rabbit corneas, which were cross-linked with Rivoflavin and UV application showed a signature of treatment five weeks post treatment. There were zones in the stroma totally lacking NAD(P)H autofluorescence and the abundance of keratocytes was

  14. Extracellular disulfide bridges serve different purposes in two homologous chemokine receptors, CCR1 and CCR5.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Hansen, Lærke S; Petersen, Trine P; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H; Ulven, Trond; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2013-09-01

    In addition to the 7 transmembrane receptor (7TM)-conserved disulfide bridge between transmembrane (TM) helix 3 and extracellular loop (ECL)-2, chemokine receptors (CCR) contain a disulfide bridge between the N terminus and what previously was believed to be ECL-3. Recent crystal and NMR structures of the CXC chemokine receptors (CXCR) CXCR4 and CXCR1, combined with structural analysis of all endogenous chemokine receptors indicate that this chemokine receptor-conserved bridge in fact connects the N terminus to the top of TM-7. By employing chemokine ligands that mainly target extracellular receptor regions and small-molecule ligands that predominantly interact with residues in the main binding crevice, we show that the 7TM-conserved bridge is essential for all types of ligand-mediated activation, whereas the chemokine-conserved bridge is dispensable for small-molecule activation in CCR1. However, in striking contrast to previous studies in other chemokine receptors, high-affinity CCL3 chemokine binding was maintained in the absence of either bridge. In the highly related CCR5, a completely different dependency was observed as neither activation nor binding of the same chemokines was retained in the absence of either bridge. In contrast, both bridges were dispensable for activation by the same small molecules. This indicates that CCR5 activity is independent of extracellular regions, whereas in CCR1 the preserved folding of ECL-2 is necessary for activation. These results indicate that conserved structural features in a receptor subgroup do not necessarily provide specific traits for the whole subgroup but rather provide unique traits to the single receptors.

  15. The Extracellular Nuclease Dns and Its Role in Natural Transformation of Vibrio cholerae▿

    PubMed Central

    Blokesch, Melanie; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2008-01-01

    Free extracellular DNA is abundant in many aquatic environments. While much of this DNA will be degraded by nucleases secreted by the surrounding microbial community, some is available as transforming material that can be taken up by naturally competent bacteria. One such species is Vibrio cholerae, an autochthonous member of estuarine, riverine, and marine habitats and the causative agent of cholera, whose competence program is induced after colonization of chitin surfaces. In this study, we investigate how Vibrio cholerae's two extracellular nucleases, Xds and Dns, influence its natural transformability. We show that in the absence of Dns, transformation frequencies are significantly higher than in its presence. During growth on a chitin surface, an increase in transformation efficiency was found to correspond in time with increasing cell density and the repression of dns expression by the quorum-sensing regulator HapR. In contrast, at low cell density, the absence of HapR relieves dns repression, leading to the degradation of free DNA and to the abrogation of the transformation phenotype. Thus, as cell density increases, Vibrio cholerae undergoes a switch from nuclease-mediated degradation of extracellular DNA to the uptake of DNA by bacteria induced to a state of competence by chitin. Taken together, these results suggest the following model: nuclease production by low-density populations of V. cholerae might foster rapid growth by providing a source of nucleotides for the repletion of nucleotide pools. In contrast, the termination of nuclease production by static, high-density populations allows the uptake of intact DNA and coincides with a phase of potential genome diversification. PMID:18757542

  16. The extracellular nuclease Dns and its role in natural transformation of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Blokesch, Melanie; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2008-11-01

    Free extracellular DNA is abundant in many aquatic environments. While much of this DNA will be degraded by nucleases secreted by the surrounding microbial community, some is available as transforming material that can be taken up by naturally competent bacteria. One such species is Vibrio cholerae, an autochthonous member of estuarine, riverine, and marine habitats and the causative agent of cholera, whose competence program is induced after colonization of chitin surfaces. In this study, we investigate how Vibrio cholerae's two extracellular nucleases, Xds and Dns, influence its natural transformability. We show that in the absence of Dns, transformation frequencies are significantly higher than in its presence. During growth on a chitin surface, an increase in transformation efficiency was found to correspond in time with increasing cell density and the repression of dns expression by the quorum-sensing regulator HapR. In contrast, at low cell density, the absence of HapR relieves dns repression, leading to the degradation of free DNA and to the abrogation of the transformation phenotype. Thus, as cell density increases, Vibrio cholerae undergoes a switch from nuclease-mediated degradation of extracellular DNA to the uptake of DNA by bacteria induced to a state of competence by chitin. Taken together, these results suggest the following model: nuclease production by low-density populations of V. cholerae might foster rapid growth by providing a source of nucleotides for the repletion of nucleotide pools. In contrast, the termination of nuclease production by static, high-density populations allows the uptake of intact DNA and coincides with a phase of potential genome diversification.

  17. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shin-ichiro; Drummen, Gregor P. C.; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs), like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems. PMID:26861303

  18. Saliency detection via textural contrast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonjun; Kim, Changick

    2012-05-01

    We present a new approach for visual saliency detection from various natural images. It is inspired by our careful observation that the human visual system (HVS) responds sensitively and quickly to high textural contrast, derived from the discriminative directional pattern from its surroundings as well as the noticeable luminance difference, for understanding a given scene. By formulating such textural contrast within a multiscale framework, we construct a more reliable saliency map even without color information when compared to most previous approaches still suffering from the complex and cluttered background. The proposed method has been extensively tested on a wide range of natural images, and experimental results show that the proposed scheme is effective in detecting visual saliency compared to various state-of-the-art methods.

  19. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  20. Adapted polarization state contrast image.

    PubMed

    Richert, Michael; Orlik, Xavier; De Martino, Antonello

    2009-08-03

    We propose a general method to maximize the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using a predetermined illumination polarization state. After a first estimation of the polarimetric properties of the scene by classical Mueller imaging, we evaluate the incident polarized field that induces scattered polarization states by the object and background, as opposite as possible on the Poincar e sphere. With a detection method optimized for a 2-channel imaging system, Monte Carlo simulations of low flux coherent imaging are performed with various objects and backgrounds having different properties of retardance, dichroism and depolarization. With respect to classical Mueller imaging, possibly associated to the polar decomposition, our results show a noticeable increase in the Bhattacharyya distance used as our contrast parameter.

  1. Monitoring stiffness contrast in elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos; Bharat, Shyam; Varghese, Tomy; Techavipoo, Udomchai; Liu, Wu

    2005-03-01

    Elastography is an imaging modality used to image tissue strains resulting from external quasi-static compression of tissue. Therefore, elastograms can be used to study variations in the stiffness of thermally coagulated regions of tissue. In this study, the variations in stiffness contrast of lesions formed by radio frequency (RF) ablation of canine liver tissue have been investigated. RF ablation was performed on in vitro canine liver tissue over a range of temperatures from 70 - 100 degrees C, and over a range of ablation times from 1 -- 8 minutes. Elastography was then performed on these samples and on normal tissue. It was expected that stiffness contrast would increase with increasing lesion temperature and ablation duration, on the basis that higher temperature and greater ablation durations lead to increased protein denaturation. This increase was seen with ablation duration, but is not obvious with ablation temperature. These and other results will be discussed.

  2. Extracellular recordings of field potentials from single cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey L; Cooper, Jon

    2006-10-01

    Open microfluidic channels were used to separate the extracellular space around a cardiomyocyte into three compartments: the cell ends and a central partition (insulating gap). The microchannels were filled with buffer solution and overlaid with paraffin oil, thus forming the cavities for the cell ends. The central part of the cardiomyocyte rested on the partition between two adjacent microchannels and was entirely surrounded by the paraffin oil. This arrangement increased the extracellular electrical resistance to > 20 MOmega and facilitated the recording of the time course of the change in extracellular voltage and current during subthreshold and suprathreshold stimuli. The waveform of the extracellular current and voltage in response to an extracellular depolarizing stimulus comprised an initial monophasic signal followed by a biphasic signal with a delay of 2-15 ms. The latter was associated with a transient contraction and therefore caused by an action potential. The biphasic signal became monophasic after the depolarization of one cell end by raised extracellular [K+]. This form of differential recording revealed the repolarization phase of the action potential. At rest, the sarcomere length within the gap was 12% +/- 4.8% longer than outside the gap, but intracellular Ca2+ transients occurred to the same extent as that observed in the outer pools. This data demonstrate the feasibility of the use of a microfluidic bath design to limit the extracellular resistance between two ends of an isolated cardiomyocyte.

  3. Extracellular Recordings of Field Potentials from Single Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey L.; Cooper, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Open microfluidic channels were used to separate the extracellular space around a cardiomyocyte into three compartments: the cell ends and a central partition (insulating gap). The microchannels were filled with buffer solution and overlaid with paraffin oil, thus forming the cavities for the cell ends. The central part of the cardiomyocyte rested on the partition between two adjacent microchannels and was entirely surrounded by the paraffin oil. This arrangement increased the extracellular electrical resistance to >20 MΩ and facilitated the recording of the time course of the change in extracellular voltage and current during subthreshold and suprathreshold stimuli. The waveform of the extracellular current and voltage in response to an extracellular depolarizing stimulus comprised an initial monophasic signal followed by a biphasic signal with a delay of 2–15 ms. The latter was associated with a transient contraction and therefore caused by an action potential. The biphasic signal became monophasic after the depolarization of one cell end by raised extracellular [K+]. This form of differential recording revealed the repolarization phase of the action potential. At rest, the sarcomere length within the gap was 12% ± 4.8% longer than outside the gap, but intracellular Ca2+ transients occurred to the same extent as that observed in the outer pools. This data demonstrate the feasibility of the use of a microfluidic bath design to limit the extracellular resistance between two ends of an isolated cardiomyocyte. PMID:16844752

  4. The dark side of extracellular ATP in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Solini, Anna; Usuelli, Vera; Fiorina, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Intracellular ATP is the most vital source of cellular energy for biologic systems, whereas extracellular ATP is a multifaceted mediator of several cell functions via its interaction, in an autocrine or paracrine manner, with P2 purinergic receptors expressed on the cell surface. These ionotropic and metabotropic P2 purinergic receptors modulate a variety of physiologic events upon the maintenance of a highly sensitive "set point," the derangement of which may lead to the development of key pathogenic mechanisms during acute and chronic diseases. Growing evidence suggests that extracellular ATP signaling via P2 purinergic receptors may be involved in different renal pathologic conditions. For these reasons, investigators and pharmaceutical companies are actively exploring novel strategies to antagonize or block these receptors with the goal of reducing extracellular ATP production or accelerating extracellular ATP clearance. Targeting extracellular ATP signaling, particularly through the P2X7 receptor, has considerable translational potential, given that novel P2X7-receptor inhibitors are already available for clinical use (e.g., CE224,535, AZD9056, and GSK1482160). This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the involvement of extracellular ATP and its P2 purinergic receptor-mediated signaling in physiologic and pathologic processes in the kidney; potential therapeutic options targeting extracellular ATP purinergic receptors are analyzed as well.

  5. Plutonium Interactions with Pseudomonas sp. and its Extracellular Polymeric Substances (Sorption and Reduction of Plutonium by Bacterial Extracellular Polymeric Substances)

    DOE PAGES

    Boggs, Mark A.; Jiao, Yongqin; Dai, Zurong; ...

    2016-09-30

    Safe and effective nuclear waste disposal, as well as accidental radionuclide releases, necessitates our understanding of the fate of radionuclides in the environment, including their interaction with microorganisms. We examined the sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) toPseudomonassp. strain EPS-1W, an aerobic bacterium isolated from plutonium (Pu) contaminated groundwater collected in the United States at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada. We compared Pu sorption to cells with and without bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Wild type cells with intact EPS sorbed Pu(V) more effectively than cells with EPS removed. In contrast, cells with and without EPS showed the samemore » sorption affinity for Pu(IV).In vitroexperiments with extracted EPS revealed rapid reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV). Transmission Electron Microscopy indicated that 2-3 nm nanocrystalline Pu(IV)O2formed on cells equilibrated with high concentrations of Pu(IV) but not Pu(V). Thus, EPS, while facilitating Pu(V) reduction, inhibit the formation of nanocrystalline Pu(IV) precipitates. ImportanceOur results indicate that EPS are an effective reductant for Pu(V) and sorbent for Pu(IV), and may impact Pu redox cycling and mobility in the environment. Additionally, the resulting Pu morphology associated with EPS will depend on the concentration and initial Pu oxidation state. While our results are not directly applicable to the Pu transport situation at the NNSS, the results suggest that, in general, stationary microorganisms and biofilms will tend to limit the migration of Pu and provide an important Pu retardation mechanism in the environment. In a broader sense, our results along with a growing body of literature highlight the important role of microorganisms as producers of redox-active organic ligands and therefore as modulators of radionuclide redox transformations and complexation in the subsurface.« less

  6. The role of the third extracellular loop of the Na+,K+-ATPase alpha subunit in a luminal gating mechanism.

    PubMed

    Capendeguy, Oihana; Horisberger, Jean-Daniel

    2005-05-15

    Na+,K+-ATPase is responsible for maintaining the cross-membrane Na+ and K+ gradients of animal cells. This P-type ATPase works via a complex transport cycle, during which it binds and occludes three intracellular Na+ ions and then two extracellular K+ ions, which it then releases on the other side of the membrane. The cation pathway through the protein, and the structures responsible for occluding cations inside the protein, have not yet been definitely identified. We used cysteine mutagenesis to explore the accessibility and the role of five conserved residues in the short third extracellular loop, between the fifth and the sixth transmembrane helices. The P801C and L802C mutants were not affected by extracellular sulfhydryl reagents. The presence of cysteine residues at three positions (G803C, T804C and V805C) conferred sensitivity to omeprazole, a known inhibitor of the gastric proton pump, and to [2-(trimethylammonium)-ethyl]methanethiosulphonate bromide (MTSET). The effects of omeprazole and MTSET were modulated by the presence of extracellular K+, indicating that the accessibility of these positions depended on the conformational state of the protein. MTSET binding to cysteine at position 803 partially inhibited the Na+,K+-pump function by decreasing its affinity towards extracellular K+, suggesting a restriction of the access of extracellular K+ ions to their binding sites. In contrast, MTSET binding to cysteine at position 805 partially inhibited the Na+,K+-pump function by reducing its maximum turnover rate, probably by slowing a rate-limiting conformational change. These residues occupy positions that are critical for either the cation pathway or the conformational modifications.

  7. Electrofluidic systems for contrast management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, Keith J.; Maranchi, Jeffrey P.; Tiffany, Jason E.; Brown, Christopher Y.; Maisano, Adam J.; Hagedon, Matthew A.; Heikenfeld, Jason C.

    2012-06-01

    Operating in dynamic lighting conditions and in greatly varying backgrounds is challenging. Current paints and state-ofthe- art passive adaptive coatings (e.g. photochromics) are not suitable for multi- environment situations. A semi-active, low power, skin is needed that can adapt its reflective properties based on the background environment to minimize contrast through the development and incorporation of suitable pigment materials. Electrofluidic skins are a reflective display technology for electronic ink and paper applications. The technology is similar to that in E Ink but makes use of MEMS based microfluidic structures, instead of simple black and white ink microcapsules dispersed in clear oil. Electrofluidic skin's low power operation and fast switching speeds (~20 ms) are an improvement over current state-ofthe- art contrast management technologies. We report on a microfluidic display which utilizes diffuse pigment dispersion inks to change the contrast of the underlying substrate from 5.8% to 100%. Voltage is applied and an electromechanical pressure is used to pull a pigment dispersion based ink from a hydrophobic coated reservoir into a hydrophobic coated surface channel. When no voltage is applied, the Young-Laplace pressure pushes the pigment dispersion ink back down into the reservoir. This allows the pixel to switch from the on and off state by balancing the two pressures. Taking a systems engineering approach from the beginning of development has enabled the technology to be integrated into larger systems.

  8. Biological reference materials for extracellular vesicle studies.

    PubMed

    Valkonen, S; van der Pol, E; Böing, A; Yuana, Y; Yliperttula, M; Nieuwland, R; Laitinen, S; Siljander, P R M

    2017-02-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate normal physiological homeostasis and pathological processes by facilitating intercellular communication. Research of EVs in basic science and clinical settings requires both methodological standardization and development of reference materials (RM). Here, we show insights and results of biological RM development for EV studies. We used a three-step approach to find and develop a biological RM. First, a literature search was done to find candidates for biological RMs. Second, a questionnaire was sent to EV researchers querying the preferences for RM and their use. Third, a biological RM was selected, developed, characterized, and evaluated. The responses to the survey demonstrated a clear and recognized need for RM optimized for the calibration of EV measurements. Based on the literature, naturally occurring and produced biological RM, such as virus particles and liposomes, were proposed as RM. However, none of these candidate RMs have properties completely matching those of EVs, such as size and refractive index distribution. Therefore, we evaluated the use of nanoerythrosomes (NanoE), vesicles produced from erythrocytes, as a potential biological RM. The strength of NanoE is their resemblance to EVs. Compared to the erythrocyte-derived EVs (eryEVs), NanoE have similar morphology, a similar refractive index (1.37), larger diameter (70% of the NanoE are over 200nm), and increased positive staining for CD235a and lipids (Di-8-ANEPPS) (58% and 67% in NanoE vs. 21% and 45% in eryEVs, respectively). Altogether, our results highlight the general need to develop and validate new RM with similar physical and biochemical properties as EVs to standardize EV measurements between instruments and laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  10. Extracellular matrix in obesity - cancer interactions.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Stephany C; Hopkins, Christina A; Bhowmick, Meghnad; Ray, Amitabha

    2015-05-01

    Obesity or overweight is a risk factor for several health disorders such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and certain cancers. Furthermore, obesity affects almost all body systems including the extracellular matrix (ECM) by generating a pro-inflammatory environment, which are associated with abnormal secretions of several cytokines or hormonal substances, for example, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), leptin, and sex hormones. These chemical mediators most likely have a great impact on the ECM. Accumulating evidence suggests that both obesity and ECM can influence tumor growth and progression through a number of chemical mediators. Conversely, cells in the connective tissue, namely fibroblasts and macrophages, support and aggravate the inflammatory situation in obesity by releasing several cytokines or growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β). A wide range of functions are performed by TGF-β in normal health and pathological conditions including tumorigenesis. Breast cancer in postmenopausal women is a classic example of obesity-related cancer wherein several of these conditions, for example, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, impairment in the regulation of estrogen and growth factors, and dysregulation of different ECM components may favor the neoplastic process. Aberrant expressions of ECM components such as matrix metalloproteinases or matricellular proteins in both obesity and cancer have been reported by many studies. Nonstructural matricellular proteins, viz., thrombospondins, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), and Cyr61-CTGF-Nov (CCN), which function as modulators of cell-ECM interactions, exhibit protean behavior in cancer. Precise understanding of ECM biology can provide potential therapeutic targets to combat obesity-related pathologies.

  11. Metabolic requirements for neutrophil extracellular traps formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, Oscar; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina Bertha; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    As part of the innate immune response, neutrophils are at the forefront of defence against infection, resolution of inflammation and wound healing. They are the most abundant leucocytes in the peripheral blood, have a short lifespan and an estimated turnover of 1010 to 1011 cells per day. Neutrophils efficiently clear microbial infections by phagocytosis and by oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms. In 2004, a new neutrophil anti-microbial mechanism was described, the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA, histones and anti-microbial peptides. Several microorganisms, bacterial products, as well as pharmacological stimuli such as PMA, were shown to induce NETs. Neutrophils contain relatively few mitochondria, and derive most of their energy from glycolysis. In this scenario we aimed to analyse some of the metabolic requirements for NET formation. Here it is shown that NETs formation is strictly dependent on glucose and to a lesser extent on glutamine, that Glut-1, glucose uptake, and glycolysis rate increase upon PMA stimulation, and that NET formation is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-glucose, and to a lesser extent by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin. Moreover, when neutrophils were exposed to PMA in glucose-free medium for 3 hr, they lost their characteristic polymorphic nuclei but did not release NETs. However, if glucose (but not pyruvate) was added at this time, NET release took place within minutes, suggesting that NET formation could be metabolically divided into two phases; the first, independent from exogenous glucose (chromatin decondensation) and, the second (NET release), strictly dependent on exogenous glucose and glycolysis. PMID:25545227

  12. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Walter H.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  13. Procoagulant extracellular vesicles in amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Hell, Lena; Wisgrill, Lukas; Ay, Cihan; Spittler, Andreas; Schwameis, Michael; Jilma, Bernd; Pabinger, Ingrid; Altevogt, Peter; Thaler, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    Embolization of amniotic fluid (AF) into the blood circulation leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Procoagulant phosphatidylserine (PS)- and tissue factor (TF)-exposing extracellular vesicles (EVs) might play an important role in AF embolism-induced DIC. It was the aim of the present study to perform analyses of the procoagulant properties of AF with a panel of functional coagulation assays and flow cytometry. We applied a prothrombinase assay (that quantifies PS exposure on EVs), an EV-associated TF activity assay, a fibrin generation assay, a thrombin generation assay, a whole blood clotting model, and flow cytometry in AF and control plasma. We found that PS exposure on EVs was 21-fold increased in AF compared with plasma. Also, EV-associated TF activity was highly increased in AF compared with plasma. AF-derived EVs activated the blood coagulation cascade via PS and TF in the fibrin and thrombin generation assays. In a whole blood clotting model, AF-derived EVs significantly shortened the clotting time from 734 ± 139 seconds in the presence to 232 ± 139 seconds in the absence of an anti-TF antibody. The contact activation pathway via factor XII (FXII) was not affected. Applying flow cytometry, a subpopulation of PS(+) and TF(+) EVs was identified in AF but not in control plasma. In conclusion, we investigated the effect of AF on blood coagulation and found that PS(+) and TF(+) EVs determine their procoagulant potential. Taken together, our data further delineate the pathomechanisms underlying AF-induced coagulopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Wustman, Brandon A.; Lind, Jan; Wetherbee, Richard; Gretz, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1–AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, ≥ 20,000,000 Mr; F2, ≅100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The ≅100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility. PMID:9536061

  15. Filtration recovery of extracellular DNA from environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    qPCR methods are able to analyze DNA from microbes within hours of collecting water samples, providing the promptest notification and public awareness possible when unsafe pathogenic levels are reached. Health risk, however, may be overestimated by the presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA) that is co-recovered by the filtration procedure which is the most commonly used method to concentrate target microbes from environmental waters. Using C. parvum 18S rRNA gene fragment as a representative of eDNA, we examined the impact of filters (types and pore sizes) and physiochemical properties of surface water samples on the recovery of spiked DNA. Our results indicated that binding affinities of various filter membranes were quantifiably different for eDNA fragments with the polycarbonate (PC) binding the least and mixed cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate (MCE) binding the most as evidenced by up to 16% recovery of the spiked plasmid DNA with a pore size of 0.2µm. Water quality parameters also had a distinct influence on the recovery of eDNA which was enhanced by the presence of high total suspended solid (TSS) concentrations and reduced pH. At pH 5.5, with 150mg/L of clay, DNA recovery was increased to as much as 18%. By shielding the negative charge, thus increasing the interaction of DNA and colloids, the increase of Na+ and Ca+2 concentrations resulted in more DNA binding and consequently more recovery from environmental water samples. Therefore, in addition

  16. Modular Extracellular Matrices: Solutions for the Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Monica A.; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2008-01-01

    The common technique of growing cells in two-dimensions (2-D) is gradually being replaced by culturing cells on matrices with more appropriate composition and stiffness, or by encapsulation of cells in three-dimensions (3-D). The universal acceptance of the new 3-D paradigm has been constrained by the absence of a commercially available, biocompatible material that offers ease of use, experimental flexibility, and a seamless transition from in vitro to in vivo applications. The challenge – the puzzle that needs a solution – is to replicate the complexity of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) environment with the minimum number of components necessary to allow cells to rebuild and replicate a given tissue. For use in drug discovery, toxicology, cell banking, and ultimately in reparative medicine, the ideal matrix would therefore need to be highly reproducible, manufacturable, approvable, and affordable. Herein we describe the development of a set of modular components that can be assembled into biomimetic materials that meet these requirements. These semi-synthetic ECMs, or sECMs, are based on hyaluronan derivatives that form covalently crosslinked, biodegradable hydrogels suitable for 3-D culture of primary and stem cells in vitro, and for tissue formation in vivo. The sECMs can be engineered to provide appropriate biological cues needed to recapitulate the complexity of a given ECM environment. Specific applications for different sECM compositions include stem cell expansion with control of differentiation, scar-free wound healing, growth factor delivery, cell delivery for osteochondral defect and liver repair, and development of vascularized tumor xenografts for personalized chemotherapy. PMID:18442709

  17. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Ung, Timothy H; Graner, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]), and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review the features of GBM EVs, in terms of EV content and activities that may lead to the use of EVs as serially accessible biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment response in neuro-oncology. PMID:24634586

  18. Assessment of MRI Contrast Agent Kinetics via Retro-Orbital Injection in Mice: Comparison with Tail Vein Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Nojima, Masanori; Inoue, Yusuke; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kiryu, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It is not known whether administration of contrast agent via retro-orbital injection or the tail vein route affects the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, we compared the effects of retro-orbital and tail vein injection on the kinetics of the contrast agent used for MRI in mice. The same group of nine healthy female mice received contrast agent via either route. An extracellular contrast agent was infused via the tail vein and retro-orbital vein, in random order. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after administering the contrast agent. The contrast effects in the liver, kidney, lung, and myocardium were assessed. The average total times of venous puncture and mounting of the injection system were about 10 and 4 min for the tail vein and retro-orbital route, respectively. For all organs assessed, the maximum contrast ratio occurred 30 s after administration and the time course of the contrast ratio was similar with either routes. For each organ, the contrast ratios correlated strongly; the contrast ratios were similar. The retro-orbital and tail vein routes afforded similar results in terms of the kinetics of the contrast agent. The retro-orbital route can be used as a simple efficient alternative to tail vein injection for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of mice. PMID:26060990

  19. The contributions of respiration and glycolysis to extracellular acid production.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Goncalves, Renata L S; Gerencser, Akos A; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2015-02-01

    The rate at which cells acidify the extracellular medium is frequently used to report glycolytic rate, with the implicit assumption that conversion of uncharged glucose or glycogen to lactate(-)+H(+) is the only significant source of acidification. However, another potential source of extracellular protons is the production of CO2 during substrate oxidation: CO2 is hydrated to H2CO3, which then dissociates to HCO3(-)+H(+). O2 consumption and pH were monitored in a popular platform for measuring extracellular acidification (the Seahorse XF Analyzer). We found that CO2 produced during respiration caused almost stoichiometric release of H(+) into the medium. With C2C12 myoblasts given glucose, respiration-derived CO2 contributed 34% of the total extracellular acidification. When glucose was omitted or replaced by palmitate or pyruvate, this value was 67-100%. Analysis of primary cells, cancer cell lines, stem cell lines, and isolated synaptosomes revealed contributions of CO2-produced acidification that were usually substantial, ranging from 3% to 100% of the total acidification rate. Measurement of glycolytic rate using extracellular acidification requires differentiation between respiratory and glycolytic acid production. The data presented here demonstrate the importance of this correction when extracellular acidification is used for quantitative measurement of glycolytic flux to lactate. We describe a simple way to correct the measured extracellular acidification rate for respiratory acid production, using simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption rate. Extracellular acidification is often assumed to result solely from glycolytic lactate production, but respiratory CO2 also contributes. We demonstrate that extracellular acidification by myoblasts given glucose is 66% glycolytic and 34% respiratory and describe a method to differentiate these sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Human pharmacokinetics of iohexol. A new nonionic contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, B.; Aulie, A.; Sveen, K.; Andrew, E.

    1983-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of iohexol, a new nonionic, water-soluble contrast medium, have been determined after intravenous injection in 20 healthy volunteers, at four different dose levels (125-500 mg I/kg). The apparent volume of distribution was 0.27 1/kg, indicating distribution in the extracellular water. The biologic half-life was 121 minutes, comparable with that of other intravascular contrast media. Iohexol was excreted completely unmetabolized in the urine, with a 100% recovery 24 hours after injection. A comparison of iohexol and chromium-51 (/sup 51/Cr)-EDTA clearances indicates that iohexol is mainly excreted by glomerular filtration. The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA clearance was the same when injected separately and concomitantly with iohexol, indicating that glomerular filtration rate is not affected by iohexol. No dose dependency was observed in the investigated parameters t1/2 alpha, t1/2 beta, Vd, ClT or ClR. Iohexol pharmacokinetics are in correspondence with previously reported data on intravascular contrast media.

  1. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  2. Soluble Lectins: A New Class of Extracellular Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barondes, Samuel H.

    1984-03-01

    Soluble lectins of cellular slime molds and vertebrates are present at extracellular sites in the developing or adult tissues that make them. Some lectins are concentrated around cell groups, as in extracellular matrix or elastic fibers. Others are at the interface between cells and the external environment, as in much or slime. Specific glycoproteins, proteoglycans, or polysaccharides that bind these endogenous lectins may also be present at these sites. Interactions between the lectins and glycoconjugates appear to play a role in shaping extracellular environments.

  3. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K

    2016-10-01

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  4. Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Related Extracellular Histones Cause Vascular Necrosis in Severe GN.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santhosh V R; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Mulay, Shrikant R; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Romoli, Simone; Thomasova, Dana; Scherbaum, Christina R; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Müller, Susanna; Liapis, Helen; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Severe GN involves local neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. We hypothesized a local cytotoxic effect of NET-related histone release in necrotizing GN. In vitro, histones from calf thymus or histones released by neutrophils undergoing NETosis killed glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and parietal epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Histone-neutralizing agents such as antihistone IgG, activated protein C, or heparin prevented this effect. Histone toxicity on glomeruli ex vivo was Toll-like receptor 2/4 dependent, and lack of TLR2/4 attenuated histone-induced renal thrombotic microangiopathy and glomerular necrosis in mice. Anti-glomerular basement membrane GN involved NET formation and vascular necrosis, whereas blocking NET formation by peptidylarginine inhibition or preemptive anti-histone IgG injection significantly reduced all aspects of GN (i.e., vascular necrosis, podocyte loss, albuminuria, cytokine induction, recruitment or activation of glomerular leukocytes, and glomerular crescent formation). To evaluate histones as a therapeutic target, mice with established GN were treated with three different histone-neutralizing agents. Anti-histone IgG, recombinant activated protein C, and heparin were equally effective in abrogating severe GN, whereas combination therapy had no additive effects. Together, these results indicate that NET-related histone release during GN elicits cytotoxic and immunostimulatory effects. Furthermore, neutralizing extracellular histones is still therapeutic when initiated in established GN.

  5. Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Related Extracellular Histones Cause Vascular Necrosis in Severe GN

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santhosh V.R.; Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Darisipudi, Murthy N.; Romoli, Simone; Thomasova, Dana; Scherbaum, Christina R.; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Müller, Susanna; Liapis, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Severe GN involves local neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. We hypothesized a local cytotoxic effect of NET-related histone release in necrotizing GN. In vitro, histones from calf thymus or histones released by neutrophils undergoing NETosis killed glomerular endothelial cells, podocytes, and parietal epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Histone-neutralizing agents such as antihistone IgG, activated protein C, or heparin prevented this effect. Histone toxicity on glomeruli ex vivo was Toll-like receptor 2/4 dependent, and lack of TLR2/4 attenuated histone-induced renal thrombotic microangiopathy and glomerular necrosis in mice. Anti–glomerular basement membrane GN involved NET formation and vascular necrosis, whereas blocking NET formation by peptidylarginine inhibition or preemptive anti-histone IgG injection significantly reduced all aspects of GN (i.e., vascular necrosis, podocyte loss, albuminuria, cytokine induction, recruitment or activation of glomerular leukocytes, and glomerular crescent formation). To evaluate histones as a therapeutic target, mice with established GN were treated with three different histone-neutralizing agents. Anti-histone IgG, recombinant activated protein C, and heparin were equally effective in abrogating severe GN, whereas combination therapy had no additive effects. Together, these results indicate that NET-related histone release during GN elicits cytotoxic and immunostimulatory effects. Furthermore, neutralizing extracellular histones is still therapeutic when initiated in established GN. PMID:25644111

  6. Incorporation of tenascin-C into the extracellular matrix by periostin underlies an extracellular meshwork architecture.

    PubMed

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2010-01-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C null mice exhibited a similar phenotype, confined tibial periostitis, which possibly corresponds to medial tibial stress syndrome in human sports injuries. Periostin possessed adjacent domains that bind to tenascin-C and the other ECM protein: fibronectin and type I collagen, respectively. These adjacent domains functioned as a bridge between tenascin-C and the ECM, which increased deposition of tenascin-C on the ECM. The deposition of hexabrachions of tenascin-C may stabilize bifurcations of the ECM fibrils, which is integrated into the extracellular meshwork architecture. This study suggests a role for periostin in adaptation of the ECM architecture in the mechanical environment.

  7. Mechanisms of contrast agent destruction.

    PubMed

    Chomas, J E; Dayton, P; Allen, J; Morgan, K; Ferrara, K W

    2001-01-01

    Various applications of contrast-assisted ultrasound, including blood vessel detection, perfusion estimation, and drug delivery, require controlled destruction of contrast agent microbubbles. The lifetime of a bubble depends on properties of the bubble shell, the gas core, and the acoustic waveform impinging on the bubble. Three mechanisms of microbubble destruction are considered: fragmentation, acoustically driven diffusion, and static diffusion. Fragmentation is responsible for rapid destruction of contrast agents on a time scale of microseconds. The primary characteristics of fragmentation are a very large expansion and subsequent contraction, resulting in instability of the bubble. Optical studies using a novel pulsed-laser optical system show the expansion and contraction of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles with the ratio of maximum diameter to minimum diameter greater than 10. Fragmentation is dependent on the transmission pressure, occurring in over 55% of bubbles insonified with a peak negative transmission pressure of 2.4 MPa and in less than 10% of bubbles insonified with a peak negative transmission pressure of 0.8 MPa. The echo received from a bubble decorrelates significantly within two pulses when the bubble is fragmented, creating an opportunity for rapid detection of bubbles via a decorrelation-based analysis. Preliminary findings with a mouse tumor model verify the occurrence of fragmentation in vivo. A much slower mechanism of bubble destruction is diffusion, which is driven by both a concentration gradient between the concentration of gas in the bubble compared with the concentration of gas in the liquid, as well as convective effects of motion of the gas-liquid interface. The rate of diffusion increases during insonation, because of acoustically driven diffusion, producing changes in diameter on the time scale of the acoustic pulse length, thus, on the order of microseconds. Gas bubbles diffuse while they are not being insonified, termed

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, F.; Bradley, D. A.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve (⩽20% strain), from 23±18 kPa for controls to 57±22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy ( p=0.01, α=0.05). At larger strain (⩾20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92±0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31±0.56 MPa ( p=0.01, α=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626±65 kPa, irradiated 474±121 kPa ( p=0.02, α=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400±194 cP for controls to 1500±88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s -1 and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  9. Contrasting strategic and Milan therapies.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, L

    1983-12-01

    Three related models of therapy are often grouped together as the strategic therapies. These are brief therapy model associated with the Mental Research Institute, approaches developed by Jay Haley and Cloë Madanes, and the model developed by the Milan associates. Controversy exists, however, as to whether the Milan model should be included as a strategic therapy. It appears that the similarities among the three models can mask deeper differences, thus confounding the confusion. This paper contrast the models in their development, theory, and practice.

  10. Improved Methods of Producing and Administering Extracellular Vesicles | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An efficient method of producing purified extracellular vesicles (EVs), in conjunction with a method that blocks liver macrophages from clearing EVs from the body, has produced promising results for the use of EVs in cancer therapy.

  11. Genome degeneration affects both extracellular and intracellular bacterial endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Feldhaar, Heike; Gross, Roy

    2009-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterial endosymbionts of insects are a paradigm for reductive genome evolution. A study published recently in BMC Biology demonstrates that similar evolutionary forces shaping genome structure may also apply to extracellular endosymbionts. PMID:19435469

  12. Improved Methods of Producing and Administering Extracellular Vesicles | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    An efficient method of producing purified extracellular vesicles (EVs), in conjunction with a method that blocks liver macrophages from clearing EVs from the body, has produced promising results for the use of EVs in cancer therapy.

  13. Apyrases, extracellular ATP and the regulation of growth.

    PubMed

    Clark, Greg; Roux, Stanley J

    2011-12-01

    Although no definitive receptor for extracellular ATP (eATP) has been identified in plants, there is now stronger physiological evidence that the effects of eATP on plant growth are mediated by a receptor, or, as in animals, by multiple receptors. Recent papers clarify how extracellular nucleotides induce changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt), and the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species. They document links between eATP signaling and the synthesis or transport of hormones, and they reveal that applied nucleotides can regulate the aperture of stomates, which release ATP when stimulated by light and hormones. Ectoapyrases (ecto-nucleoside triphosphate-diphosphohydrolase) help control both the diverse signaling changes and downstream growth changes induced by extracellular nucleotides by limiting their concentration in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Extracellular vesicles in human follicular fluid do not promote coagulation.

    PubMed

    Franz, Cordula; Böing, Anita N; Montag, Markus; Strowitzki, Thomas; Markert, Udo R; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Nieuwland, Rienk; Toth, Bettina

    2016-11-01

    Body fluids contain extracellular vesicles expressing tissue factor on their surface and serve as an additional trigger for coagulation. During the menstrual cycle ovarian tissue restoration is mandatory and it is unknown whether follicular fluid might provide procoagulant substances. Within an observational study, follicular fluid from women undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was analysed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), electron microscopy, resistive pulse sensing (RPS), nanoparticle-tracking analysis (NTA) and fibrin generation tests (FGT). The presence of extracellular vesicles, especially CD9-positive extracellular vesicles in follicular fluid, was proven. However, clotting tests revealed no procoagulant properties of the detected extracellular vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Si-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Sic; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Go, Gyeongyun; Park, Seon-Min; Kim, Si Hyun; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Chang, Chulhun L; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-10-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles, also known as outer membrane vesicles, membrane vesicles, exosomes, and microvesicles, is an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon from bacteria to eukaryotes. It has been reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases extracellular vesicles harboring immunologically active molecules, and these extracellular vesicles have been suggested to be applicable in vaccine development and biomarker discovery. However, the comprehensive proteomic analysis has not been performed for M. tuberculosis extracellular vesicles. In this study, we identified a total of 287 vesicular proteins by four LC-MS/MS analyses with high confidence. In addition, we identified several vesicular proteins associated with the virulence of M. tuberculosis. This comprehensive proteome profile will help elucidate the pathogenic mechanism of M. tuberculosis. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001160 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001160). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Placental extracellular vesicles and feto-maternal communication.

    PubMed

    Tong, M; Chamley, L W

    2015-01-29

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Placental Extracellular Vesicles and Feto-Maternal Communication

    PubMed Central

    Tong, M.; Chamley, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. PMID:25635060

  18. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  19. Commercialization of vein contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Deshmukh, Harshal; Vrancken, Carlos; Zhang, Yong; Zeman, Herbert D.; Weinberg, Devin

    2003-07-01

    An ongoing clinical study of an experimental infrared (IR) device, the Vein Contrast Enhancer (VCE) that visualizes surface veins for medical access, indicates that a commercial device with the performance of the existing VCE would have significant clinical utility for even a very skilled phlebotomist. A proof-of-principle prototype VCE device has now been designed and constructed that captures IR images of surface veins with a commercial CCD camera, transfers the images to a PC for real-time software image processing to enhance the vein contrast, and projects the enhanced images back onto the skin with a modified commercial LCD projector. The camera and projector are mounted on precision slides allowing for precise mechanical alignment of the two optical axes and for measuring the effects of axes misalignment. Precision alignment of the captured and projected images over the entire field-of-view is accomplished electronically by software adjustments of the translation, scaling, and rotation of the enhanced images before they are projected back onto the skin. This proof-of-principle prototype will be clinically tested and the experience gained will lead to the development of a commercial device, OnTarget!, that is compact, easy to use, and will visualize accessible veins in almost all subjects needing venipuncture.

  20. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  1. Extracellular Potassium Homeostasis: Insights from Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Kuo, Elizabeth; Huang, Chou-Long

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular potassium makes up only about 2% of the total body potassium store. The majority of the body potassium is distributed in the intracellular space, and of which about 80% is in skeletal muscle. Movement of potassium in and out of skeletal muscle thus plays a pivotal role in extracellular potassium homeostasis. The exchange of potassium between the extracellular space and skeletal muscle is mediated by specific membrane transporters. These include potassium uptake by Na+, K+-ATPase and release by inward rectifier K+ channels. These processes are regulated by circulating hormones, peptides, ions, and by physical activity of muscle as well as dietary potassium intake. Pharmaceutical agents, poisons and disease conditions also affect the exchange and alter extracellular potassium concentration. Here, we review extracellular potassium homeostasis focusing on factors and conditions that influence the balance of potassium movement in skeletal muscle. Recent findings that mutations of a skeletal muscle-specific inward rectifier K+ channel cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis provide interesting insights into the role of skeletal muscle in extracellular potassium homeostasis. These recent findings will be reviewed. PMID:23953801

  2. Extracellular potassium homeostasis: insights from hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Kuo, Elizabeth; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-05-01

    Extracellular potassium makes up only about 2% of the total body's potassium store. The majority of the body potassium is distributed in the intracellular space, of which about 80% is in skeletal muscle. Movement of potassium in and out of skeletal muscle thus plays a pivotal role in extracellular potassium homeostasis. The exchange of potassium between the extracellular space and skeletal muscle is mediated by specific membrane transporters. These include potassium uptake by Na(+), K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase and release by inward-rectifier K(+) channels. These processes are regulated by circulating hormones, peptides, ions, and by physical activity of muscle as well as dietary potassium intake. Pharmaceutical agents, poisons, and disease conditions also affect the exchange and alter extracellular potassium concentration. Here, we review extracellular potassium homeostasis, focusing on factors and conditions that influence the balance of potassium movement in skeletal muscle. Recent findings that mutations of a skeletal muscle-specific inward-rectifier K(+) channel cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis provide interesting insights into the role of skeletal muscle in extracellular potassium homeostasis. These recent findings are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cyanobacterial reuse of extracellular organic carbon in microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Rhona K; Mayali, Xavier; Lee, Jackson Z; Craig Everroad, R; Hwang, Mona; Bebout, Brad M; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Thelen, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacterial organic matter excretion is crucial to carbon cycling in many microbial communities, but the nature and bioavailability of this C depend on unknown physiological functions. Cyanobacteria-dominated hypersaline laminated mats are a useful model ecosystem for the study of C flow in complex communities, as they use photosynthesis to sustain a more or less closed system. Although such mats have a large C reservoir in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), the production and degradation of organic carbon is not well defined. To identify extracellular processes in cyanobacterial mats, we examined mats collected from Elkhorn Slough (ES) at Monterey Bay, California, for glycosyl and protein composition of the EPS. We found a prevalence of simple glucose polysaccharides containing either α or β (1,4) linkages, indicating distinct sources of glucose with differing enzymatic accessibility. Using proteomics, we identified cyanobacterial extracellular enzymes, and also detected activities that indicate a capacity for EPS degradation. In a less complex system, we characterized the EPS of a cyanobacterial isolate from ES, ESFC-1, and found the extracellular composition of biofilms produced by this unicyanobacterial culture were similar to that of natural mats. By tracing isotopically labeled EPS into single cells of ESFC-1, we demonstrated rapid incorporation of extracellular-derived carbon. Taken together, these results indicate cyanobacteria reuse excess organic carbon, constituting a dynamic pool of extracellular resources in these mats. PMID:26495994

  4. Economical evolution: microbes reduce the synthetic cost of extracellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel R; Chapman, Matthew R

    2010-08-24

    Protein evolution is not simply a race toward improved function. Because organisms compete for limited resources, fitness is also affected by the relative economy of an organism's proteome. Indeed, many abundant proteins contain relatively high percentages of amino acids that are metabolically less taxing for the cell to make, thus reducing cellular cost. However, not all abundant proteins are economical, and many economical proteins are not particularly abundant. Here we examined protein composition and found that the relative synthetic cost of amino acids constrains the composition of microbial extracellular proteins. In Escherichia coli, extracellular proteins contain, on average, fewer energetically expensive amino acids independent of their abundance, length, function, or structure. Economic pressures have strategically shaped the amino acid composition of multicomponent surface appendages, such as flagella, curli, and type I pili, and extracellular enzymes, including type III effector proteins and secreted serine proteases. Furthermore, in silico analysis of Pseudomonas syringae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and over 25 other microbes spanning a wide range of GC content revealed a broad bias toward more economical amino acids in extracellular proteins. The synthesis of any protein, especially those rich in expensive aromatic amino acids, represents a significant investment. Because extracellular proteins are lost to the environment and not recycled like other cellular proteins, they present a greater burden on the cell, as their amino acids cannot be reutilized during translation. We hypothesize that evolution has optimized extracellular proteins to reduce their synthetic burden on the cell.

  5. Conduction velocities in amphibian skeletal muscle fibres exposed to hyperosmotic extracellular solutions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbo; Hothi, Sandeep S; Xu, Wei; Huang, Christopher L-H

    2007-01-01

    Early quantitative analyses of conduction velocities in unmyelinated nerve studied in a constantly iso-osmotic volume conductor were extended to an analysis of the effects of varying extracellular osmolarities on conduction velocities of surface membrane action potentials in Rana esculenta skeletal muscle fibres. Previous papers had reported that skeletal muscle fibres exposed to a wide range of extracellular sucrose concentrations resemble perfect osmometers with increased extracellular osmolarity proportionally decreasing fibre volume and therefore diminishing fibre radius, a. However, classical electrolyte theory (Robinson and Stokes 1959, Electrolyte solutions 2nd edn. Butterworth & Co. pp 41-42) would then predict that the consequent increases in intracellular ionic strength would correspondingly decrease sarcoplasmic resistivity, R(i). An extension of the original cable analysis then demonstrated that the latter would precisely offset its expected effect of alterations in a on the fibre axial resistance, r(i), and leave action potential conduction velocity constant. In contrast, other reports (Hodgkin and Nakajima J Physiol 221:105-120, 1972) had suggested that R(i) increased with extracellular osmolarity, owing to alterations in cytosolic viscosity. This led to a prediction of a decreased conduction velocity. These opposing hypotheses were then tested in muscle fibres subject to just-suprathreshold stimulation at a Vaseline seal at one end and measuring action potentials and their first order derivatives, dV/dt, using 5-20 MOmega, 3 M KCl glass microelectrodes at defined distances away from the stimulus sites. Exposures to hyperosmotic, sucrose-containing, Ringer solutions then reversibly reduced both conduction velocity and maximum values of dV/dt. This was compatible with an increase in R(i) in the event that conduction depended upon a discharge of membrane capacitance by propagating local circuit currents through initially passive electrical elements

  6. Content and persistence of extracellular DNA in native soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The long-term persistence of soil extracellular DNA is questionable because of high potential activity of nucleases produced by soil microorganisms. By the other hand, the relative persistence of DNA-like biopolymers could be due to their adsorption on clay minerals and humus substances in soil. High-specific and ultra sensitive reagent PicoGreenTM (Molecular Probes) permits the quantitative assessment of microbial dsDNA in diluted soil extracts giving a good tool for tracing the DNA fate in soil. Our goal was to determine intracellular and extracellular DNA content in cambisol (loamy sand) and in chernozem (silty loam) soils and to investigate the possible adsorption and degradation of extracellular DNA in soil. Optimized procedure of mechanical and enzymatic destruction of cell walls was used for direct extraction of microbial DNA with Tris-EDTA buffer (Blagodatskaya et al., 2003). Extracellular dsDNA was determined in distilled water and in Tris-EDTA extracts without enzymatic or mechanical treatments. DNA content was determined after addition of PicoGreen to diluted soil extracts. Degradation of extracellular DNA was traced during 24 h incubation of 2 µg lambda-phage DNA in soil. Possible DNA adsorption to soil matrix was determined by recovery of lambda -phage DNA added to autoclaved soil. Extracellular dsDNA was absent in water extracts of both soils. The content of extracellular dsDNA extracted by Tris-EDTA buffer was 0.46 µg/g in chernozem and 1.59 µg/g in cambisol amounting 0.43 and 2.8% of total dsDNA content in these soils, respectively. 100% and 64.8% of added extracellular lambda -phage dsDNA was found in cambisol and chernozem soils, respectively, in 5 h after application. 39% and 73.5% of added DNA disappeared in cambisol and in chernozem, respectively, during 24 h incubation. Degradation rate of extracellular DNA depended on microbial biomass content, which was 2.5 times higher in chernozem as compared to cambisol. Maximum adsorption of DNA by

  7. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  8. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  9. Contrastive divergence in gaussian diffusions.

    PubMed

    Movellan, Javier R

    2008-09-01

    This letter presents an analysis of the contrastive divergence (CD) learning algorithm when applied to continuous-time linear stochastic neural networks. For this case, powerful techniques exist that allow a detailed analysis of the behavior of CD. The analysis shows that CD converges to maximum likelihood solutions only when the network structure is such that it can match the first moments of the desired distribution. Otherwise, CD can converge to solutions arbitrarily different from the log-likelihood solutions, or they can even diverge. This result suggests the need to improve our theoretical understanding of the conditions under which CD is expected to be well behaved and the conditions under which it may fail. In, addition the results point to practical ideas on how to improve the performance of CD.

  10. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  11. ABCG1-mediated generation of extracellular cholesterol microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Sebastian R.; Jin, Xueting; Anzinger, Joshua J.; Xu, Qing; Purushothaman, Sonya; Fessler, Michael B.; Addadi, Lia; Kruth, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC)A1 and ABCG1 function in many aspects of cholesterol efflux from macrophages. In this current study, we continued our investigation of extracellular cholesterol microdomains that form during enrichment of macrophages with cholesterol. Human monocyte-derived macrophages and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages, differentiated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulation factor (GM-CSF), were incubated with acetylated LDL (AcLDL) to allow for cholesterol enrichment and processing. We utilized an anti-cholesterol microdomain monoclonal antibody to reveal pools of unesterified cholesterol, which were found both in the extracellular matrix and associated with the cell surface, that we show function in reverse cholesterol transport. Coincubation of AcLDL with 50 μg/ml apoA-I eliminated all extracellular and cell surface-associated cholesterol microdomains, while coincubation with the same concentration of HDL only removed extracellular matrix-associated cholesterol microdomains. Only at an HDL concentration of 200 µg/ml did HDL eliminate the cholesterol microdomains that were cell-surface associated. The deposition of cholesterol microdomains was inhibited by probucol, but it was increased by the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist TO901317, which upregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1. Extracellular cholesterol microdomains did not develop when ABCG1-deficient mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages were enriched with cholesterol. Our findings show that generation of extracellular cholesterol microdomains is mediated by ABCG1 and that reverse cholesterol transport occurs not only at the cell surface but also within the extracellular space. PMID:24212237

  12. Extracellular and intracellular esterase processing of SCFA-hexosamine analogs: implications for metabolic glycoengineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit P; Tan, Elaine; Shah, Shivam; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Adam Meledeo, M; Huang, Jun; Espinoza, Freddy A; Yarema, Kevin J

    2012-11-15

    This report provides a synopsis of the esterase processing of short chain fatty acid (SCFA)-derivatized hexosamine analogs used in metabolic glycoengineering by demonstrating that the extracellular hydrolysis of these compounds is comparatively slow (e.g., with a t(1/2) of ∼4 h to several days) in normal cell culture as well as in high serum concentrations intended to mimic in vivo conditions. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of common sugar analogs revealed that O-acetylated and N-azido ManNAc derivatives were more refractory against extracellular inactivation by FBS than their butanoylated counterparts consistent with in silico docking simulations of Ac(4)ManNAc and Bu(4)ManNAc to human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). By contrast, all analogs tested supported increased intracellular sialic acid production within 2h establishing that esterase processing once the analogs are taken up by cells is not rate limiting.

  13. The role of the second and third extracellular loops of the adenosine A1 receptor in activation and allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Peeters, M C; Wisse, L E; Dinaj, A; Vroling, B; Vriend, G; Ijzerman, A P

    2012-07-01

    The adenosine A1 receptor is a member of the large membrane protein family that signals through G proteins, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPCRs consist of seven transmembrane domains connected by three intracellular and three extracellular loops. Their N-terminus is extracellular, the C-terminal tail is in the cytoplasm. The transmembrane domains in receptor subfamilies that bind the same endogenous ligand, such as dopamine or adenosine, tend to be highly similar. In contrast, the loop regions can vary greatly, both in sequence and in length, and the role these loops have in the activation mechanism of the receptors remains unclear. Here, we investigated the activating role of the second and third extracellular loop of the human adenosine A1 receptor. By means of an (Ala)3 mutagenic scan in which consecutive sets of three amino acids were mutated into alanine residues in EL2 and a classical alanine scan in EL3, we revealed a strong regulatory role for the second extracellular loop (EL2) of the human adenosine A1 receptor. Besides many residues in the second and the third extracellular loops important for adenosine A1 receptor activation, we also identified two residues in EL2, a tryptophan and a glutamate, that affect the influence of the allosteric modulator PD81,723. These results, combined with a comparison of the different receptor loop regions, provide insight in the activation mechanism of this typical class A GPCR and further emphasize the unique pharmacological profile the loops can provide to individual receptors, even within subfamilies of GPCRs.

  14. The contribution of the extracellular matrix to gravisensing in characean cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-extracellular matrix junction, which includes the cell wall and the outer surface of the plasma membrane, may be an essential region for the perception of gravity by the internodal cells of Chara corallina. Typically, when an internodal cell is oriented vertically, the downwardly directed cytoplasmic stream travels at a velocity that is 10% faster than that of the upwardly directed stream. However when the cells are treated with impermeant hydrolytic enzymes that partially digest cellulose or hemicellulose, the cells lose their ability to respond to gravity even though streaming continues. By contrast, enzymes that digest pectins have no effect on the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, gravisensing is sensitive to protease treatment; Proteinase K, thermolysin and collagenase but not trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin or carboxypeptidase B, inhibit gravisensing. These findings indicate that proteins in the cell-extracellular matrix junction may be required for gravisensing. Moreover, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibits gravisensing in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the gravireceptor may be an integrin-like protein. The macromolecules necessary for gravisensing have been localized to the cell ends. As a consequence of the exoplasmic site of action of the enzymes and the tetrapeptides, we interpret the results to mean that they are acting on the gravireceptor, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that they are acting on the signal transduction chain. On the whole, our observations indicate that the cell-extracellular matrix junction is a sine qua non for graviperception in statolith-free Chara internodal cells and we suggest that the gravireceptor is located in this region.

  15. Distinct RNA profiles in subpopulations of extracellular vesicles: apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes.

    PubMed

    Crescitelli, Rossella; Lässer, Cecilia; Szabó, Tamas G; Kittel, Agnes; Eldh, Maria; Dianzani, Irma; Buzás, Edit I; Lötvall, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the number of studies aiming to understand the biology of exosomes, as well as other extracellular vesicles. However, classification of membrane vesicles and the appropriate protocols for their isolation are still under intense discussion and investigation. When isolating vesicles, it is crucial to use systems that are able to separate them, to avoid cross-contamination. EVS RELEASED FROM THREE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CELL LINES: HMC-1, TF-1 and BV-2 were isolated using two centrifugation-based protocols. In protocol 1, apoptotic bodies were collected at 2,000×g, followed by filtering the supernatant through 0.8 µm pores and pelleting of microvesicles at 12,200×g. In protocol 2, apoptotic bodies and microvesicles were collected together at 16,500×g, followed by filtering of the supernatant through 0.2 µm pores and pelleting of exosomes at 120,000×g. Extracellular vesicles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry and the RNA profiles were investigated using a Bioanalyzer(®). RNA profiles showed that ribosomal RNA was primary detectable in apoptotic bodies and smaller RNAs without prominent ribosomal RNA peaks in exosomes. In contrast, microvesicles contained little or no RNA except for microvesicles collected from TF-1 cell cultures. The different vesicle pellets showed highly different distribution of size, shape and electron density with typical apoptotic body, microvesicle and exosome characteristics when analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry revealed the presence of CD63 and CD81 in all vesicles investigated, as well as CD9 except in the TF-1-derived vesicles, as these cells do not express CD9. Our results demonstrate that centrifugation-based protocols are simple and fast systems to distinguish subpopulations of extracellular vesicles. Different vesicles show different RNA profiles and morphological characteristics, but they are indistinguishable using

  16. Characterization of purple acid phosphatases involved in extracellular dNTP utilization in Stylosanthes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pan-Dao; Xue, Ying-Bin; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Guo-Dao; Tian, Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Stylo (Stylosanthes spp.) is a pasture legume predominant in tropical and subtropical areas, where low phosphorus (P) availability is a major constraint for plant growth. Therefore, stylo might exhibit superior utilization of the P pool on acid soils, particularly organic P. However, little is known about mechanisms of inorganic phosphate (Pi) acquisition employed by stylo. In this study, the utilization of extracellular deoxy-ribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) and the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms were examined for two stylo genotypes with contrasting P efficiency. Results showed that the P-efficient genotype, TPRC2001-1, was superior to the P-inefficient genotype, Fine-stem, when using dNTP as the sole P source. This was reflected by a higher dry weight and total P content for TPRC2001-1 than for Fine-stem, which was correlated with higher root-associated acid phosphatase (APase) activities in TPRC2001-1 under low P conditions. Subsequently, three PAP members were cloned from TPRC2001-1: SgPAP7, SgPAP10, and SgPAP26 Expression levels of these three SgPAPs were up-regulated by Pi starvation in stylo roots. Furthermore, there was a higher abundance of transcripts of SgPAP7 and SgPAP10 in TPRC2001-1 than in Fine-stem. Subcellular localization analysis demonstrated that these three SgPAPs were localized on the plasma membrane. Overexpression of these three SgPAPs could result in significantly increased root-associated APase activities, and thus extracellular dNTP utilization in bean hairy roots. Taken together, the results herein suggest that SgPAP7, SgPAP10, and SgPAP26 may differentially contribute to root-associated APase activities, and thus control extracellular dNTP utilization in stylo. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Characterization of purple acid phosphatases involved in extracellular dNTP utilization in Stylosanthes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan-Dao; Xue, Ying-Bin; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Guo-Dao; Tian, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Stylo (Stylosanthes spp.) is a pasture legume predominant in tropical and subtropical areas, where low phosphorus (P) availability is a major constraint for plant growth. Therefore, stylo might exhibit superior utilization of the P pool on acid soils, particularly organic P. However, little is known about mechanisms of inorganic phosphate (Pi) acquisition employed by stylo. In this study, the utilization of extracellular deoxy-ribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) and the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms were examined for two stylo genotypes with contrasting P efficiency. Results showed that the P-efficient genotype, TPRC2001-1, was superior to the P-inefficient genotype, Fine-stem, when using dNTP as the sole P source. This was reflected by a higher dry weight and total P content for TPRC2001-1 than for Fine-stem, which was correlated with higher root-associated acid phosphatase (APase) activities in TPRC2001-1 under low P conditions. Subsequently, three PAP members were cloned from TPRC2001-1: SgPAP7, SgPAP10, and SgPAP26. Expression levels of these three SgPAPs were up-regulated by Pi starvation in stylo roots. Furthermore, there was a higher abundance of transcripts of SgPAP7 and SgPAP10 in TPRC2001-1 than in Fine-stem. Subcellular localization analysis demonstrated that these three SgPAPs were localized on the plasma membrane. Overexpression of these three SgPAPs could result in significantly increased root-associated APase activities, and thus extracellular dNTP utilization in bean hairy roots. Taken together, the results herein suggest that SgPAP7, SgPAP10, and SgPAP26 may differentially contribute to root-associated APase activities, and thus control extracellular dNTP utilization in stylo. PMID:27194738

  18. Extracellular voltage threshold settings can be tuned for optimal encoding of movement and stimulus parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oby, Emily R.; Perel, Sagi; Sadtler, Patrick T.; Ruff, Douglas A.; Mischel, Jessica L.; Montez, David F.; Cohen, Marlene R.; Batista, Aaron P.; Chase, Steven M.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. A traditional goal of neural recording with extracellular electrodes is to isolate action potential waveforms of an individual neuron. Recently, in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), it has been recognized that threshold crossing events of the voltage waveform also convey rich information. To date, the threshold for detecting threshold crossings has been selected to preserve single-neuron isolation. However, the optimal threshold for single-neuron identification is not necessarily the optimal threshold for information extraction. Here we introduce a procedure to determine the best threshold for extracting information from extracellular recordings. We apply this procedure in two distinct contexts: the encoding of kinematic parameters from neural activity in primary motor cortex (M1), and visual stimulus parameters from neural activity in primary visual cortex (V1). Approach. We record extracellularly from multi-electrode arrays implanted in M1 or V1 in monkeys. Then, we systematically sweep the voltage detection threshold and quantify the information conveyed by the corresponding threshold crossings. Main Results. The optimal threshold depends on the desired information. In M1, velocity is optimally encoded at higher thresholds than speed; in both cases the optimal thresholds are lower than are typically used in BCI applications. In V1, information about the orientation of a visual stimulus is optimally encoded at higher thresholds than is visual contrast. A conceptual model explains these results as a consequence of cortical topography. Significance. How neural signals are processed impacts the information that can be extracted from them. Both the type and quality of information contained in threshold crossings depend on the threshold setting. There is more information available in these signals than is typically extracted. Adjusting the detection threshold to the parameter of interest in a BCI context should improve our ability to decode motor intent

  19. A microelectrochemical biosensor for real-time in vivo monitoring of brain extracellular choline.

    PubMed

    Baker, Keeley L; Bolger, Fiachra B; Lowry, John P

    2015-06-07

    A first generation Pt-based polymer enzyme composite biosensor developed for real-time neurochemical monitoring was characterised in vivo for sensitive and selective detection of choline. Confirmation that the sensor responds to changes in extracellular choline was achieved using local perfusion of choline which resulted in an increase in current, and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine which produced a decrease. Interference by electroactive species was tested using systemic administration of sodium ascorbate which produced a rapid increase in extracellular levels before gradually returning towards baseline over several hours. There was no overall change in the response of the biosensor during the same period of monitoring. Oxygen interference was examined using pharmacological agents known to change tissue oxygenation. Chloral hydrate produced an immediate increase in O2 before gradually returning to baseline levels over 3 h. The biosensor signal displayed an initial brief decrease before increasing to a maximum after 1 h and returning to baseline within 2 h. L-NAME caused a decrease in O2 before returning to baseline levels after ca. 1.5 h. In contrast, the biosensor current increased over the same time period before slowly returning to baseline levels over several hours. Such differences in time course and direction suggest that changes in tissue O2 levels do not affect the ability of the sensor to monitor choline reliably. Although it was found to rapidly respond to behavioural activation, examination of baseline in vivo data suggests a stable viable signal for at least 14 days after implantation. Using in vitro calibration data the basal extracellular concentration of choline was estimated to be 6.3 μM.

  20. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence.

    PubMed

    Condon, Bradford J; Oide, Shinichi; Gibson, Donna M; Krasnoff, Stuart B; Turgeon, B Gillian

    2014-08-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or reductive iron assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies with the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus identified two genes, NPS2 and NPS6, encoding different nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for biosynthesis of intra- and extracellular siderophores, respectively. Deletion of NPS6 results in loss of extracellular siderophore biosynthesis, attenuated virulence, hypersensitivity to oxidative and iron-depletion stress, and reduced asexual sporulation, while nps2 mutants are phenotypically wild type in all of these traits but defective in sexual spore development when NPS2 is missing from both mating partners. Here, it is reported that nps2nps6 mutants have more severe phenotypes than both nps2 and nps6 single mutants. In contrast, mutants lacking the FTR1 or FET3 genes encoding the permease and ferroxidase components, respectively, of the alternate RIA system, are like wild type in all of the above phenotypes. However, without supplemental iron, combinatorial nps6ftr1 and nps2nps6ftr1 mutants are less virulent, are reduced in growth, and are less able to combat oxidative stress and to sporulate asexually, compared with nps6 mutants alone. These findings demonstrate that, while the role of RIA in metabolism and virulence is overshadowed by that of extracellular siderophores as a high-affinity iron acquisition mechanism in C. heterostrophus, it functions as a critical backup for the fungus.

  1. Extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent enhancement of cytocidal potency of zoledronic acid in human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Sayaka; Arai, Naoya; Tomihara, Kei; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi; Noguchi, Makoto

    2015-08-15

    Direct antitumor effects of bisphosphonates (BPs) have been demonstrated in various cancer cells in vitro. However, the effective concentrations of BPs are typically much higher than their clinically relevant concentrations. Oral cancers frequently invade jawbone and may lead to the release of Ca(2+) in primary lesions. We investigated the effects of the combined application of zoledronic acid (ZA) and Ca(2+) on proliferation and apoptosis of oral cancer cells. Human oral cancer cells, breast cancer cells, and colon cancer cells were treated with ZA at a wide range of concentrations in different Ca(2+) concentration environments. Under a standard Ca(2+) concentration (0.6mM), micromolar concentrations of ZA were required to inhibit oral cancer cell proliferation. Increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations greatly enhanced the potency of the ZA cytocidal effect. The ability of Ca(2+) to enhance the cytocidal effects of ZA was negated by the Ca(2+)-selective chelator EGTA. In contrast, the cytocidal effect of ZA was less pronounced in breast and colon cancer cells regardless of whether extracellular Ca(2+) was elevated. In oral cancer cells incubated with 1.6mM Ca(2+), ZA up-regulated mitochondrial Bax expression and increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of cytochrome c. We suggest that ZA can specifically produce potent cytocidal activity in oral cancer cells in an extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent manner, implying that BPs may be useful for treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma with jawbone invasion leading to the hypercalcemic state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The contribution of the extracellular matrix to gravisensing in characean cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-extracellular matrix junction, which includes the cell wall and the outer surface of the plasma membrane, may be an essential region for the perception of gravity by the internodal cells of Chara corallina. Typically, when an internodal cell is oriented vertically, the downwardly directed cytoplasmic stream travels at a velocity that is 10% faster than that of the upwardly directed stream. However when the cells are treated with impermeant hydrolytic enzymes that partially digest cellulose or hemicellulose, the cells lose their ability to respond to gravity even though streaming continues. By contrast, enzymes that digest pectins have no effect on the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, gravisensing is sensitive to protease treatment; Proteinase K, thermolysin and collagenase but not trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin or carboxypeptidase B, inhibit gravisensing. These findings indicate that proteins in the cell-extracellular matrix junction may be required for gravisensing. Moreover, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibits gravisensing in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the gravireceptor may be an integrin-like protein. The macromolecules necessary for gravisensing have been localized to the cell ends. As a consequence of the exoplasmic site of action of the enzymes and the tetrapeptides, we interpret the results to mean that they are acting on the gravireceptor, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that they are acting on the signal transduction chain. On the whole, our observations indicate that the cell-extracellular matrix junction is a sine qua non for graviperception in statolith-free Chara internodal cells and we suggest that the gravireceptor is located in this region.

  3. The pherophorins: common, versatile building blocks in the evolution of extracellular matrix architecture in Volvocales.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Green algae of the order Volvocales provide an unrivalled opportunity for exploring the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity. They range from unicells, like Chlamydomonas, through homocytic colonial forms with increasing cooperation of individual cells, like Gonium or Pandorina, to heterocytic multicellular forms with different cell types and a complete division of labour, like Volvox. A fundamental requirement for the evolution of multicellularity is the development of a complex, multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM has many functions, which can change under developmental control or as a result of environmental factors. Here molecular data from 15 novel proteins are presented. These proteins have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Gonium pectorale, Pandorina morum and Volvox carteri, and all belong to a single protein family, the pherophorins. Pherophorin-V1 is shown to be a glycoprotein localized to the 'cellular zone' of the V. carteri ECM. Pherophorin-V1 and -V2 mRNAs are strongly induced not only by the sex inducer, which triggers sexual development at extremely low concentrations, but also by mechanical wounding. Like the extensins of higher plants, which are also developmentally controlled or sometimes inducible by wounding, the pherophorins contain a (hydroxy-)proline-rich (HR) rod-like domain and are abundant within the extracellular compartment. In contrast to most extensins, pherophorins have additional globular A and B domains on both ends of the HR domains. Therefore pherophorins most closely resemble a particular class of higher plant extensin, the solanaceous lectins (e.g. potato lectin), suggesting multivalent carbohydrate-binding functions are present within the A and B domains and are responsible for cross-linking. Our results suggest that pherophorins are used as the building blocks for the extracellular scaffold throughout the Volvocales, with the characteristic mesh sizes in different ECM structures being

  4. Fractal dimension analysis for spike detection in low SNR extracellular signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmasi, Mehrdad; Büttner, Ulrich; Glasauer, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Many algorithms have been suggested for detection and sorting of spikes in extracellular recording. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to detect spikes in low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We propose a spike detection algorithm that is based on the fractal properties of extracellular signals and can detect spikes in low SNR regimes. Semi-intact spikes are low-amplitude spikes whose shapes are almost preserved. The detection of these spikes can significantly enhance the performance of multi-electrode recording systems. Approach. Semi-intact spikes are simulated by adding three noise components to a spike train: thermal noise, inter-spike noise, and spike-level noise. We show that simulated signals have fractal properties which make them proper candidates for fractal analysis. Then we use fractal dimension as the main core of our spike detection algorithm and call it fractal detector. The performance of the fractal detector is compared with three frequently used spike detectors. Main results. We demonstrate that in low SNR, the fractal detector has the best performance and results in the highest detection probability. It is shown that, in contrast to the other three detectors, the performance of the fractal detector is independent of inter-spike noise power and that variations in spike shape do not alter its performance. Finally, we use the fractal detector for spike detection in experimental data and similar to simulations, it is shown that the fractal detector has the best performance in low SNR regimes. Significance. The detection of low-amplitude spikes provides more information about the neural activity in the vicinity of the recording electrodes. Our results suggest using the fractal detector as a reliable and robust method for detecting semi-intact spikes in low SNR extracellular signals.

  5. Optogenetic approaches addressing extracellular modulation of neural excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczi, Emily A.; Vierock, Johannes; Atsuta-Tsunoda, Kyoko; Tsunoda, Satoshi P.; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Gorini, Christopher; Thompson, Kimberly; Lee, Soo Yeun; Berndt, Andre; Perry, Chelsey; Minniberger, Sonja; Vogt, Arend; Mattis, Joanna; Prakash, Rohit; Delp, Scott; Deisseroth, Karl; Hegemann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular ionic environment in neural tissue has the capacity to influence, and be influenced by, natural bouts of neural activity. We employed optogenetic approaches to control and investigate these interactions within and between cells, and across spatial scales. We began by developing a temporally precise means to study microdomain-scale interactions between extracellular protons and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). By coupling single-component proton-transporting optogenetic tools to ASICs to create two-component optogenetic constructs (TCOs), we found that acidification of the local extracellular membrane surface by a light-activated proton pump recruited a slow inward ASIC current, which required molecular proximity of the two components on the membrane. To elicit more global effects of activity modulation on ‘bystander’ neurons not under direct control, we used densely-expressed depolarizing (ChR2) or hyperpolarizing (eArch3.0, eNpHR3.0) tools to create a slow non-synaptic membrane current in bystander neurons, which matched the current direction seen in the directly modulated neurons. Extracellular protons played contributory role but were insufficient to explain the entire bystander effect, suggesting the recruitment of other mechanisms. Together, these findings present a new approach to the engineering of multicomponent optogenetic tools to manipulate ionic microdomains, and probe the complex neuronal-extracellular space interactions that regulate neural excitability. PMID:27045897

  6. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Pohnert, Georg; Wei, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology. PMID:27775594

  7. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Pohnert, Georg; Wei, Dong

    2016-10-20

    Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology.

  8. Propagation of thrombosis by neutrophils and extracellular nucleosome networks

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Stark, Konstantin; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils, early mediators of the innate immune defense, are recruited to developing thrombi in different types of thrombosis. They amplify intravascular coagulation by stimulating the tissue factor-dependent extrinsic pathway via inactivation of endogenous anticoagulants, enhancing factor XII activation or decreasing plasmin generation. Neutrophil-dependent prothrombotic mechanisms are supported by the externalization of decondensed nucleosomes and granule proteins that together form neutrophil extracellular traps. These traps, either in intact or fragmented form, are causally involved in various forms of experimental thrombosis as first indicated by their role in the enhancement of both microvascular thrombosis during bacterial infection and carotid artery thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps can be induced by interactions of neutrophils with activated platelets; vice versa, these traps enhance adhesion of platelets via von Willebrand factor. Neutrophil-induced microvascular thrombus formation can restrict the dissemination and survival of blood-borne bacteria and thereby sustain intravascular immunity. Dysregulation of this innate immune pathway may support sepsis-associated coagulopathies. Notably, neutrophils and extracellular nucleosomes, together with platelets, critically promote fibrin formation during flow restriction-induced deep vein thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps/extracellular nucleosomes are increased in thrombi and in the blood of patients with different vaso-occlusive pathologies and could be therapeutically targeted for the prevention of thrombosis. Thus, during infections and in response to blood vessel damage, neutrophils and externalized nucleosomes are major promoters of intravascular blood coagulation and thrombosis. PMID:27927771

  9. The extracellular matrix modulates the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Mouw, Janna K; Weaver, Valerie M

    2014-12-01

    The extracellular matrix regulates tissue development and homeostasis, and its dysregulation contributes to neoplastic progression. The extracellular matrix serves not only as the scaffold upon which tissues are organized but provides critical biochemical and biomechanical cues that direct cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation and modulate vascular development and immune function. Thus, while genetic modifications in tumor cells undoubtedly initiate and drive malignancy, cancer progresses within a dynamically evolving extracellular matrix that modulates virtually every behavioral facet of the tumor cells and cancer-associated stromal cells. Hanahan and Weinberg defined the hallmarks of cancer to encompass key biological capabilities that are acquired and essential for the development, growth and dissemination of all human cancers. These capabilities include sustained proliferation, evasion of growth suppression, death resistance, replicative immortality, induced angiogenesis, initiation of invasion, dysregulation of cellular energetics, avoidance of immune destruction and chronic inflammation. Here, we argue that biophysical and biochemical cues from the tumor-associated extracellular matrix influence each of these cancer hallmarks and are therefore critical for malignancy. We suggest that the success of cancer prevention and therapy programs requires an intimate understanding of the reciprocal feedback between the evolving extracellular matrix, the tumor cells and its cancer-associated cellular stroma.

  10. Multistep hopping and extracellular charge transfer in microbial redox chains.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2012-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria are microorganisms that gain energy by transferring respiratory electrons to extracellular solid-phase electron acceptors. In addition to its importance for physiology and natural environmental processes, this form of metabolism is being investigated for energy conversion and fuel production in bioelectrochemical systems, where microbes are used as biocatalysts at electrodes. One proposed strategy to accomplish this extracellular charge transfer involves forming a conductive pathway to electrodes by incorporating redox components on outer cell membranes and along extracellular appendages known as microbial nanowires within biofilms. To describe extracellular charge transfer in microbial redox chains, we employed a model based on incoherent hopping between sites in the chain and an interfacial treatment of electrochemical interactions with the surrounding electrodes. Based on this model, we calculated the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and found the results to be in good agreement with I-V measurements across and along individual microbial nanowires produced by the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Based on our analysis, we propose that multistep hopping in redox chains constitutes a viable strategy for extracellular charge transfer in microbial biofilms.

  11. Extracellular Ca2+ regulates the respiratory burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bei, L; Hu, T; Qian, Z M; Shen, X

    1998-09-16

    The role of extracellular calcium in the activation of respiratory burst in human neutrophils was studied by using the receptor agonist, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), and the activator of protein kinase C phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The level of intracellular free calcium was measured by using both cell suspensions and single cells in the presence and absence of extracellular calcium. The Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, was used to activate higher Ca2+ influx, while a novel calcium channel blocker, panax notoginseng saponins (PNGS) was used to block the Ca2+ entry from extracellular space during the responding period of cells. It was found that about two-thirds of the activation of respiratory burst initiated by the receptor agonist were attributed to the Ca2+ influx under normal physiological conditions. The higher Ca2+ influx resulted in tremendous enhancement of the intensity of respiratory burst initiated by fMLP and marked acceleration of the onset of the respiratory burst stimulated by PMA. It is evident that both intra- and extracellular Ca2+ are required for full activation of the respiratory burst of human neutrophils, and the Ca2+ influx from extracellular space plays an important role either in generation of reactive oxygen metabolites or in activation of protein kinase C.

  12. Monitoring of Extracellular Matrix Formation using Nanosecond Pulsed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Masato; Mitani, Genya; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Mochida, Joji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    There is a new demand in the field of tissue engineering for evaluation technology of extracellular matrix because the extracellular matrix plays an important role in the function of skeletal tissue such as articular cartilage. We previously proposed a noninvasive method of viscoelastic characterization of tissue phantom, based on the photoacoustic measurement. The purpose of this study was to verify the applicability of the photoacoustic measurement method for monitoring of the development of extracellular matrix using tissue engineering technology. The decay times measured by the photoacoustic method were varied with culture periods when tissue-engineered articular cartilages with various culture periods (-12 weeks) were used as samples. Tissue-engineered cartilage cultured for a long period showed shorter decay times, indicating that the samples approached an elastic solid from a rheological viewpoint. By comparison between biochemical analyses and biomechanical studies, we proved that the photoacoustic signal was a good indicator for evaluating extracellular matrix formation because the change of the photoacoustic decay times would reflect the production of an extracellular matrix.

  13. In vitro Determination of Extracellular Proteins from Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Juliano S.; Santiago, André S.; Toledo, Marcelo A. S.; Horta, Maria A. C.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Anete P.

    2016-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes economic losses in important agricultural crops. Xylem vessel occlusion caused by biofilm formation is the major mechanism underlying the pathogenicity of distinct strains of X. fastidiosa. Here, we provide a detailed in vitro characterization of the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa. Based on the results, we performed a comparison with a strain J1a12, which cannot induce citrus variegated chlorosis symptoms when inoculated into citrus plants. We then extend this approach to analyze the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa in media supplemented with calcium. We verified increases in extracellular proteins concomitant with the days of growth and, consequently, biofilm development (3–30 days). Outer membrane vesicles carrying toxins were identified beginning at 10 days of growth in the 9a5c strain. In addition, a decrease in extracellular proteins in media supplemented with calcium was observed in both strains. Using mass spectrometry, 71 different proteins were identified during 30 days of X. fastidiosa biofilm development, including proteases, quorum-sensing proteins, biofilm formation proteins, hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, chaperones, toxins, antitoxins, and extracellular vesicle membrane components. PMID:28082960

  14. Vitamin A Deficiency and Alterations in the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Teresa; Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo; Marín, María Pilar; Timoneda, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A or retinol which is the natural precursor of several biologically active metabolites can be considered the most multifunctional vitamin in mammals. Its deficiency is currently, along with protein malnutrition, the most serious and common nutritional disorder worldwide. It is necessary for normal embryonic development and postnatal tissue homeostasis, and exerts important effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These actions are produced mainly by regulating the expression of a variety of proteins through transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Extracellular matrix proteins are among those whose synthesis is known to be modulated by vitamin A. Retinoic acid, the main biologically active form of vitamin A, influences the expression of collagens, laminins, entactin, fibronectin, elastin and proteoglycans, which are the major components of the extracellular matrix. Consequently, the structure and macromolecular composition of this extracellular compartment is profoundly altered as a result of vitamin A deficiency. As cell behavior, differentiation and apoptosis, and tissue mechanics are influenced by the extracellular matrix, its modifications potentially compromise organ function and may lead to disease. This review focuses on the effects of lack of vitamin A in the extracellular matrix of several organs and discusses possible molecular mechanisms and pathologic implications. PMID:25389900

  15. Laser Image Contrast Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Robert L. (Inventor); Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical image enhancement system provides improved image contrast in imaging of a target in high temperature surroundings such as a furnace. The optical system includes a source of vertically polarized light such as laser and a beam splitter for receiving the light and directing the light toward the target. A retardation plate is affixed to a target-facing surface of the beam splitter and a vertical polarizer is disposed along a common optical path with the beam splitter between the retardation plate and the target. A horizontal polarizer disposed in the common optical path, receives light passing through a surface of the beam splitter opposed to the target-facing surface. An image detector is disposed at one end of the optical path. A band pass filter having a band pass filter characteristic matching the frequency of the vertically polarized light source is disposed in the path between the horizontal polarizer and the image detector. The use of circular polarization, together with cross polarizers, enables the reflected light to be passed to the detector while blocking thermal radiation.

  16. Brute force absorption contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Graham R.; Mills, David

    2014-09-01

    In laboratory X-ray microtomography (XMT) systems, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically determined by the X-ray exposure due to the low flux associated with microfocus X-ray tubes. As the exposure time is increased, the SNR improves up to a point where other sources of variability dominate, such as differences in the sensitivities of adjacent X-ray detector elements. Linear time-delay integration (TDI) readout averages out detector sensitivities on the critical horizontal direction and equiangular TDI also averages out the X-ray field. This allows the SNR to be increased further with increasing exposure. This has been used in dentistry to great effect, allowing subtle variations in dentine mineralisation to be visualised in 3 dimensions. It has also been used to detect ink in ancient parchments that are too damaged to physically unroll. If sufficient contrast between the ink and parchment exists, it is possible to virtually unroll the tomographic image of the scroll in order that the text can be read. Following on from this work, a feasibility test was carried out to determine if it might be possible to recover images from decaying film reels. A successful attempt was made to re-create a short film sequence from a rolled length of 16mm film using XMT. However, the "brute force" method of scaling this up to allow an entire film reel to be imaged presents a significant challenge.

  17. Low resistivity, low contrast pays

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, R.M.; Kulha, J.T. |

    1996-08-01

    Major hydrocarbon accumulations have been produced over the past 40 years in low resistivity, low contrast (LRLC) sands in the Gulf of Mexico Basin (GOM). LRLC reservoirs were commonly considered wet, tight, misidentified as a shale or overlooked, but are being re-evaluated now in other world basins, including Latin America. Seismic response, drill cuttings, cores, log response, petrophysical models, and production testing provide an integrated LRLC evaluation. Causes of LRLC pay in the GOM include: laminated clean sands with shales; silts or shaly sands; clay-coated sands; glauconitic sands; sands with interstitial dispersed clay; sands with disseminated pyrite or other conductive minerals; clay-lined burrows; clay clasts; altered volcanic/feldspathic framework grains; and very fine-grained sand with very saline water. LRLC depositional systems include: deepwater fans, with levee-channel complexes; delta front and toe deposits; shingle turbidites; and alluvial and deltaic channel fills. Geological and petrophysical models developed in the GOM for evaluation of LRLC pay are applicable in Latin America. An Archie clean sand or Waxman-Smits shaly sand model are commonly used to evaluate LRLC anomalies. Often, shaly sand models are not necessarily suited for LRLC evaluation. The Archie lithology exponent (m) and saturation exponent (n) for many LRLC reservoirs range from 1.4 to 1.85, and 1.2 to 1.8, respectively. In thinly laminated LRLC reservoirs, net sand distribution is identified with high resolution logging tools, rock examination and interval testing.

  18. Laser Image Contrast Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Robert L. (Inventor); Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical image enhancement system provides improved image contrast in imaging of a target in high temperature surroundings such as a furnace. The optical system includes a source of vertically polarized light such as laser and a beam splitter for receiving the light and directing the light toward the target. A retardation plate is affixed to a target-facing surface of the beam splitter and a vertical polarizer is disposed along a common optical path with the beam splitter between the retardation plate and the target. A horizontal polarizer disposed in the common optical path, receives light passing through a surface of the beam splitter opposed to the target-facing surface. An image detector is disposed at one end of the optical path. A band pass filter having a band pass filter characteristic matching the frequency of the vertically polarized light source is disposed in the path between the horizontal polarizer and the image detector. The use of circular polarization, together with cross polarizers, enables the reflected light to be passed to the detector while blocking thermal radiation.

  19. Extracellular Adenosine: A Safety Signal That Dampens Hypoxia-Induced Inflammation During Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Grenz, Almut; Homann, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Traditionally, the single most unique feature of the immune system has been attributed to its capability to discriminate between self (e.g., host proteins) and nonself (e.g., pathogens). More recently, an emerging immunologic concept involves the notion that the immune system responds via a complex system for sensing signals of danger, such as pathogens or host-derived signals of cellular distress (e.g., ischemia), while remaining unresponsive to nondangerous motifs. Experimental studies have provided strong evidence that the production and signaling effects of extracellular adenosine are dramatically enhanced during conditions of limited oxygen availability as occurs during ischemia. As such, adenosine would fit the bill of signaling molecules that are enhanced during situations of cellular distress. In contrast to a danger signal, we propose here that extracellular adenosine operates as a countermeasure, in fact as a safety signal, to both restrain potentially harmful immune responses and to maintain and promote general tissue integrity during conditions of limited oxygen availability. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2221–2234. PMID:21126189

  20. On-chip, multisite extracellular and intracellular recordings from primary cultured skeletal myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Rabieh, Noha; Ojovan, Silviya M.; Shmoel, Nava; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Spira, Micha E.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the extensive use of microelectrode array (MEA) technology in electrophysiological studies of cultured neurons and cardiac muscles, the vast field of skeletal muscle research has yet to adopt the technology. Here we demonstrate an empowering MEA technology for high quality, multisite, long-term electrophysiological recordings from cultured skeletal myotubes. Individual rat skeletal myotubes cultured on micrometer sized gold mushroom-shaped microelectrode (gMμE) based MEA tightly engulf the gMμEs, forming a high seal resistance between the myotubes and the gMμEs. As a consequence, spontaneous action potentials generated by the contracting myotubes are recorded as extracellular field potentials with amplitudes of up to 10 mV for over 14 days. Application of a 10 ms, 0.5–0.9 V voltage pulse through the gMμEs electroporated the myotube membrane, and transiently converted the extracellular to intracellular recording mode for 10–30 min. In a fraction of the cultures stable attenuated intracellular recordings were spontaneously produced. In these cases or after electroporation, subthreshold spontaneous potentials were also recorded. The introduction of the gMμE-MEA as a simple-to-use, high-quality electrophysiological tool together with the progress made in the use of cultured human myotubes opens up new venues for basic and clinical skeletal muscle research, preclinical drug screening, and personalized medicine. PMID:27812002

  1. Sequestration of Reactive Blue 4 by free and immobilized Bacillus subtilis cells and its extracellular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Binupriya, Arthur Raj; Sathishkumar, Muthuswamy; Ku, Chang Sub; Yun, Soon-Il

    2010-03-01

    Bacillus subtilis a gram positive bacteria and its extracellular polysaccharide were used in free form as well as immobilized form as biosorbent for sequestration of an anionic dye, Reactive Blue 4 (RB) in aqueous phase. The dye uptake enhanced with decrease in pH. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and free cells were found to be better adsorbents when compared to alginate immobilized cells (IC) and EPS (IEPS). The presence of functional groups in free cells and EPS was confirmed by FT-IR analysis. Immobilization resulted in poor adsorption performance due to increase in mass transfer resistance by the polymeric matrix. High Q(max) and b values were noted in the case of free cells and free EPS in contrast to IC and IEPS. From the kinetic experiments, the adsorption system was found to be a pseudo-first-order reaction at low dye concentration. Desorption of RB was found to be 100% in 1N NaOH. However, the alginate beads were found to be unstable under high alkaline conditions of NaOH.

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps contain calprotectin, a cytosolic protein complex involved in host defense against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Urban, Constantin F; Ermert, David; Schmid, Monika; Abu-Abed, Ulrike; Goosmann, Christian; Nacken, Wolfgang; Brinkmann, Volker; Jungblut, Peter R; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2009-10-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense at the site of an infection. They encounter and kill microbes intracellularly upon phagocytosis or extracellularly by degranulation of antimicrobial proteins and the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs were shown to ensnare and kill microbes. However, their complete protein composition and the antimicrobial mechanism are not well understood. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 24 NET-associated proteins. Quantitative analysis of these proteins and high resolution electron microscopy showed that NETs consist of modified nucleosomes and a stringent selection of other proteins. In contrast to previous results, we found several NET proteins that are cytoplasmic in unstimulated neutrophils. We demonstrated that of those proteins, the antimicrobial heterodimer calprotectin is released in NETs as the major antifungal component. Absence of calprotectin in NETs resulted in complete loss of antifungal activity in vitro. Analysis of three different Candida albicans in vivo infection models indicated that NET formation is a hitherto unrecognized route of calprotectin release. By comparing wild-type and calprotectin-deficient animals we found that calprotectin is crucial for the clearance of infection. Taken together, the present investigations confirmed the antifungal activity of calprotectin in vitro and, moreover, demonstrated that it contributes to effective host defense against C. albicans in vivo. We showed for the first time that a proportion of calprotectin is bound to NETs in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Involvement of plasmin-mediated extracellular activation of progalanin in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Okada, Rina; Iguchi, Kazuaki; Ohno, Satoshi; Yokogawa, Takashi; Nishikawa, Kazuya; Unno, Keiko; Hoshino, Minoru; Takeda, Atsushi

    2013-01-18

    Progalanin is released from the small cell lung carcinoma line SBC-3A and converted to its active form by plasmin. To elucidate the role of progalanin activation in the extracellular compartment, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity was studied in SBC-3A cells treated with progalanin siRNA, and angiogenesis was measured in tumor tissue originating from SBC-3A cell transplantation into mice. Progalanin siRNA caused downregulation of progalanin expression for approximately 8 days. MMP activity and angiogenesis were reduced in tumors induced by transplantation of progalanin siRNA-treated SBC-3A cells. In contrast, MMP-9 and MMP-2 activity and angiogenesis increased in tumors originating from progalanin siRNA-treated SBC-3A cells in the presence of galanin and progalanin. Furthermore, injection of tranexamic acid, a plasmin inhibitor, more markedly reduced MMP-9 and MMP-2 activity and angiogenesis in tumors originating from progalanin siRNA-treated SBC-3A cells and in tumor tissue originating from progalanin siRNA-treated SBC-3A cells in the presence of progalanin. The reduction of MMP-9 and MMP-2 activity with tranexamic acid was restored by galanin, but not by progalanin. Moreover, tranexamic acid reduced angiogenesis in control siRNA-treated SBC-3A cells. These results suggest that the activation of progalanin by plasmin in the extracellular compartment was involved in MMP-9 and MMP-2 activation and in angiogenesis in tumor tissue.

  4. Extracellular Matrix Fibronectin Stimulates the Self-Assembly of Microtissues on Native Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Sevilla, Carlos A.; Dalecki, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin is an adhesive glycoprotein that is polymerized into extracellular matrices via a tightly regulated, cell-dependent process. Here, we demonstrate that fibronectin matrix polymerization induces the self-assembly of multicellular structures in vitro, termed tissue bodies. Fibronectin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts adherent to compliant gels of polymerized type I collagen failed to spread or proliferate. In contrast, addition of fibronectin to collagen-adherent fibronectin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in a dose-dependent increase in cell number, and induced the formation of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures that remained adherent and well-spread on the native collagen substrate. An extensive fibrillar fibronectin matrix formed throughout the microtissue. Blocking fibronectin matrix polymerization inhibited both cell proliferation and microtissue formation, demonstrating the importance of fibronectin fibrillogenesis in triggering cellular self-organization. Cell proliferation, tissue body formation, and tissue body shape were dependent on both fibronectin and collagen concentrations, suggesting that the relative proportion of collagen and fibronectin fibrils polymerized into the extracellular matrix influences the extent of cell proliferation and the final shape of microtissues. These data demonstrate a novel role for cell-mediated fibronectin fibrillogenesis in the formation and vertical assembly of microtissues, and provide a novel approach for engineering complex tissue architecture. PMID:20673131

  5. Mouse embryogenesis requires the tissue factor extracellular domain but not the cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Graham C.N.; Mackman, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that tissue factor (TF) acts in embryogenesis, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Three independent groups showed that targeted disruption of the murine TF (mTF) gene results in 90% lethality of mTF null embryos at embryonic days 9.5–10.5. We have demonstrated that expression of wild-type human TF (hTF) from a minigene rescues the embryonic lethality of mTF null embryos. To investigate the role of TF in embryogenesis, we made mutant hTF minigenes whose products either bound FVII/VIIa at a reduced level or lacked the cytoplasmic domain. Two independent transgenic lines expressing the hTF extracellular domain mutant failed to rescue the embryonic lethality of mTF null embryos, suggesting that FVII/VIIa binding by TF, proteolytic activity by the TF/FVIIa complex, or both were required for embryogenesis. In contrast, two transgenic lines expressing the hTF cytoplasmic domain mutant rescued the embryonic lethality of mTF null embryos, indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of TF was not required for embryogenesis. We propose that TF/FVIIa-dependent extracellular protease activity is required for embryogenesis. PMID:10841513

  6. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  7. Extracellular divalent cations modulate aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, Allison B.; Reinhart, Katherine E.; Owens, Kelly N.; Raible, David W.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics cause death of sensory hair cells. Research over the past decade has identified several key players in the intracellular cascade. However, the role of the extracellular environment in aminoglycoside ototoxicity has received comparatively little attention. The present study uses the zebrafish lateral line to demonstrate that extracellular calcium and magnesium ions modulate hair cell death from neomycin and gentamicin in vivo, with high levels of either divalent cation providing significant protection. Imaging experiments with fluorescently tagged gentamicin show that drug uptake is reduced under high calcium conditions. Treating fish with the hair cell transduction blocker amiloride also reduces aminoglycoside uptake, preventing the toxicity, and experiments with variable calcium and amiloride concentrations suggest complementary effects between the two protectants. Elevated magnesium, in contrast, does not appear to significantly attenuate drug uptake, suggesting that the two divalent cations may protect hair cells from aminoglycoside damage through different mechanisms. These results provide additional evidence for calcium- and transduction-dependent aminoglycoside uptake. Divalent cations provided differential protection from neomycin and gentamicin, with high cation concentrations almost completely protecting hair cells from neomycin and acute gentamicin toxicity, but offering reduced protection from continuous (6 hr) gentamicin exposure. These experiments lend further support to the hypothesis that aminoglycoside toxicity occurs via multiple pathways in a both a drug and time course-specific manner. PMID:19285547

  8. A refined technique for extraction of extracellular matrices from bacterial biofilms and its applicability

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Akio; Sugimoto, Shinya; Sato, Fumiya; Hori, Seiji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria embedded in polymeric extracellular matrices (ECMs) that consist of polysaccharides, proteins and/or extracellular DNAs (eDNAs) acquire high resistance to antimicrobial agents and host immune systems. To understand molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation and maintenance and to develop therapeutic countermeasures against chronic biofilm-associated infections, reliable methods to isolate ECMs are inevitable. In this study, we refined the ECM extraction method recently reported and evaluated its applicability. Using three Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in which proteins, polysaccharides or eDNAs are major contributors to their integrity, ECMs were extracted using salts and detergents. We found that extraction with 1.5 M sodium chloride (NaCl) could be optimum for not only ECM proteins but also polysaccharides and eDNAs. In addition, long-time incubation was not necessary for efficient ECM isolation. Lithium chloride (LiCl) was comparative to NaCl but is more expensive. In contrast to SDS, NaCl hardly caused leakage of intracellular proteins and did not affect viability of bacterial cells within biofilms. Furthermore, this method is applicable to other bacteria such as Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, this refined method is very simple, rapid, low cost and non-invasive and could be used for a broad range of applications. PMID:25154775

  9. A refined technique for extraction of extracellular matrices from bacterial biofilms and its applicability.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Akio; Sugimoto, Shinya; Sato, Fumiya; Hori, Seiji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2015-05-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria embedded in polymeric extracellular matrices (ECMs) that consist of polysaccharides, proteins and/or extracellular DNAs (eDNAs) acquire high resistance to antimicrobial agents and host immune systems. To understand molecular mechanisms of biofilm formation and maintenance and to develop therapeutic countermeasures against chronic biofilm-associated infections, reliable methods to isolate ECMs are inevitable. In this study, we refined the ECM extraction method recently reported and evaluated its applicability. Using three Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in which proteins, polysaccharides or eDNAs are major contributors to their integrity, ECMs were extracted using salts and detergents. We found that extraction with 1.5 M sodium chloride (NaCl) could be optimum for not only ECM proteins but also polysaccharides and eDNAs. In addition, long-time incubation was not necessary for efficient ECM isolation. Lithium chloride (LiCl) was comparative to NaCl but is more expensive. In contrast to SDS, NaCl hardly caused leakage of intracellular proteins and did not affect viability of bacterial cells within biofilms. Furthermore, this method is applicable to other bacteria such as Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, this refined method is very simple, rapid, low cost and non-invasive and could be used for a broad range of applications.

  10. Extracellular polysaccharides mediate pilus retraction during social motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinuo; Sun, Hong; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Ann; Lux, Renate; Zusman, David; Shi, Wenyuan

    2003-04-29

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative bacterium with a complex life cycle that includes vegetative swarming and fruiting-body formation. Social (S)-motility (coordinated movement of large cell groups) requires both type IV pili and fibrils (extracellular matrix material consisting of polysaccharides and protein). Little is known about the role of this extracellular matrix, or fibril material, in pilus-dependent motility. In this study, mutants lacking fibril material and, therefore, S-motility were found to be hyperpiliated. We demonstrated that addition of fibril material resulted in pilus retraction and rescued this phenotype. The fibril material was further examined to determine the component(s) that were responsible for triggering pilus retraction. Protein-free fibril material was found to be highly active in correcting hyperpiliation. However, the amine sugars present in hydrolyzed fibril material, e.g., glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) had no effect on fibril(-) mutants, but, interestingly, cause hyperpiliation in wild-type cells. In contrast, chitin, a natural GlcNAc polymer, was found to restore pilus retraction in hyperpiliated mutants, indicating that a polysaccharide containing amine sugars is likely required for pilus retraction. These data suggest that the interaction of type IV pili with amine-containing polysaccharides on cell and slime-trail surfaces may trigger pilus retraction, resulting in S-motility and slime-trailing behaviors.

  11. Phenotypic diversity of neoplastic chondrocytes and extracellular matrix gene expression in cartilaginous neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, T.; Dertinger, S.; Vornehm, S. I.; Dudhia, J.; von der Mark, K.; Kirchner, T.

    1997-01-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation is characterized by distinct cellular phenotypes, which can be identified by specific extracellular matrix gene expression profiles. By applying in situ analysis on the mRNA and protein level in a series of benign and malignant human chondrogenic neoplasms, we were able to identify for the first time different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes in vivo: 1) mature chondrocytes, which synthesized the characteristic cartilaginous extracellular tumor matrix, 2) cells resembling hypertrophic chondrocytes of the fetal growth plate, 3) cells resembling so-called dedifferentiated chondrocytes, and 4) well differentiated chondrocytic cells, which expressed type I collagen, indicating the presence of post-hypertrophic differentiated neoplastic chondrocytes. Chondrocytes exhibiting a range of phenotypes were found to be present in the same neoplasm. The different observed phenotypes, including the dedifferentiated phenotype, were in contrast to the anaplastic cells of high-grade chondrosarcomas. Comparison of expression data with tumor morphology revealed a relationship between the cellular phenotypes, the tumor matrix composition, and the matrix and cell morphology within the neoplasms. The distinctly different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes are the basis of the characteristic high biochemical and morphological heterogeneity of chondroid neoplasms and shed light on their biological and clinical behavior. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9176404

  12. Intravital Confocal and Two-photon Imaging of Dual-color Cells and Extracellular Matrix Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Ufuk; Andresen, Volker; Baggett, Brenda; Utzinger, Urs

    2013-01-01

    To optimize imaging of cells in three dimensional culture we studied confocal backscattering, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and autofluorescence as source of contrast in extracellular matrix (ECM) mimics and evaluated the attenuation as well as bleaching of endogenous cellular fluorescence signals. All common ECM mimics exhibit contrast observable with confocal reflectance microscopy. SHG imaging on collagen I based hydrogels provides high contrast and good optical penetration depth. Agarose is a useful embedding medium because it allows for large optical penetration and exhibits minimal autofluorescence while still providing good reflectance to detect voids in the embedding medium. We labeled breast cancer cells’ outline with DsRed2 and nucleus with eGFP. DsRed2 can be excited with confocal imaging at 568nm, and with two photon excitation (TPE) in the red and longer NIR. eGFP was excited at 488nm for confocal and in the NIR for TPE. While there is small difference in the bleaching rate for eGFP between confocal and TPE we observed significant difference for DsRed2 where bleaching is strongest during TPE in the red wavelengths and smallest during confocal imaging. After a few hundred microns depth in a collagen I hydrogel, TPE fluorescence becomes twice as strong compared to confocal imaging. PMID:23380006

  13. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  14. Only scratching the cell surface: extracellular signals in cerebrum development.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Jean M

    2013-08-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type's competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development.

  15. Modeling extracellular electrical stimulation: II. Computational validation and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Bahman; Meffin, Hamish; Dokos, Socrates; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2012-12-01

    The validity of approximate equations describing the membrane potential under extracellular electrical stimulation (Meffin et al 2012 J. Neural Eng. 9 065005) is investigated through finite element analysis in this paper. To this end, the finite element method is used to simulate a cylindrical neurite under extracellular stimulation. Laplace's equations with appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically in three dimensions and the results are compared to the approximate analytic solutions. Simulation results are in agreement with the approximate analytic expressions for longitudinal and transverse modes of stimulation. The range of validity of the equations describing the membrane potential for different values of stimulation and neurite parameters are presented as well. The results indicate that the analytic approach can be used to model extracellular electrical stimulation for realistic physiological parameters with a high level of accuracy.

  16. Unidirectional cell crawling model guided by extracellular cues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanjiang; Geng, Yuxu

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration is a highly regulated and complex cellular process to maintain proper homeostasis for various biological processes. Extracellular environment was identified as the main affecting factors determining the direction of cell crawling. It was observed experimentally that the cell prefers migrating to the area with denser or stiffer array of microposts. In this article, an integrated unidirectional cell crawling model was developed to investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of unidirectional cell migration, which incorporates the dominating intracellular biochemical processes, biomechanical processes and the properties of extracellular micropost arrays. The interpost spacing and the stiffness of microposts are taken into account, respectively, to study the mechanism of unidirectional cell locomotion and the guidance of extracellular influence cues on the direction of unidirectional cell crawling. The model can explain adequately the unidirectional crawling phenomena observed in experiments such as "spatiotaxis" and "durotaxis," which allows us to obtain further insights into cell migration.

  17. Extracellular matrix as a driver for lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Jenna L; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular matrix has manifold roles in tissue mechanics, guidance of cellular behavior, developmental biology, and regenerative medicine. Over the past several decades, various pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that many connective tissues may be replaced and/or regenerated using suitable extracellular matrix scaffolds. More recently, decellularization of lung tissue has shown that gentle removal of cells can leave behind a "footprint" within the matrix that may guide cellular adhesion, differentiation and homing following cellular repopulation. Fundamental issues like understanding matrix composition and micro-mechanics remain difficult to tackle, largely because of a lack of available assays and tools for systematically characterizing intact matrix from tissues and organs. This review will critically examine the role of engineered and native extracellular matrix in tissue and lung regeneration, and provide insights into directions for future research and translation.

  18. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  19. Functional Advantages Conferred by Extracellular Prokaryotic Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Andrew J.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials, and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. PMID:23615201

  20. Only scratching the cell surface; extracellular signals in cerebrum development

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Jean M.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous roles have been identified for extracellular signals such as Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs), Transforming Growth Factor-βs (TGFβs), Wingless-Int proteins (WNTs), and Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in assigning fates to cells during development of the cerebrum. However, several fundamental questions remain largely unexplored. First, how does the same extracellular signal instruct precursor cells in different locations or at different stages to adopt distinct fates? And second, how does a precursor cell integrate multiple signals to adopt a specific fate? Answers to these questions require knowing the mechanisms that underlie each cell type’s competence to respond to certain extracellular signals. This brief review provides illustrative examples of potential mechanisms that begin to bridge the gap between cell surface and cell fate during cerebrum development. PMID:23669550

  1. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Colagiorgi, Angelo; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi; Zanardi, Emanuela; Ghidini, Sergio; Ianieri, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s). In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM) of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments. PMID:27681916

  2. Intraperitoneal contrast agents for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, J.

    1985-08-01

    Intraperitoneal contrast agents have been used to diagnose mass lesions, adhesions, and hernias using conventional radiographic techniques. The use of intraperitoneal contrast agents in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) has been limited and is the subject of this report.

  3. Human speed perception is contrast dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Thompson, Peter

    1992-01-01

    When two parallel gratings moving at the same speed are presented simultaneously, the lower-contrast grating appears slower. This misperception is evident across a wide range of contrasts (2.5-50 percent) and does not appear to saturate (e.g. a 50 percent contrast grating appears slower than a 70 percent contrast grating moving at the same speed). On average, a 70 percent contrast grating must be slowed by 35 percent to match a 10 percent contrast grating moving at 2 deg/sec (N = 6). Furthermore, the effect is largely independent of the absolute contrast level and is a quasi-linear function of log contrast ratio. A preliminary parametric study shows that, although spatial frequency has little effect, relative orientation is important. Finally, the misperception of relative speed appears lessened when the stimuli to be matched are presented sequentially.

  4. Regulation of CFTR chloride channel macroscopic conductance by extracellular bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Song; Holstead, Ryan G; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR contributes to Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ transport across epithelial cell apical membranes. The extracellular face of CFTR is exposed to varying concentrations of Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ in epithelial tissues, and there is evidence that CFTR is sensitive to changes in extracellular anion concentrations. Here we present functional evidence that extracellular Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ regulate anion conduction in open CFTR channels. Using cell-attached and inside-out patch-clamp recordings from constitutively active mutant E1371Q-CFTR channels, we show that voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR currents in intact cells is significantly stronger when the extracellular solution contains HCO₃⁻ than when it contains Cl⁻. This difference appears to reflect differences in the ability of extracellular HCO₃⁻ and Cl⁻ to interact with and repel intracellular blocking anions from the pore. Strong block by endogenous cytosolic anions leading to reduced CFTR channel currents in intact cells occurs at physiologically relevant HCO₃⁻ concentrations and membrane potentials and can result in up to ∼50% inhibition of current amplitude. We propose that channel block by cytosolic anions is a previously unrecognized, physiologically relevant mechanism of channel regulation that confers on CFTR channels sensitivity to different anions in the extracellular fluid. We further suggest that this anion sensitivity represents a feedback mechanism by which CFTR-dependent anion secretion could be regulated by the composition of the secretions themselves. Implications for the mechanism and regulation of CFTR-dependent secretion in epithelial tissues are discussed.

  5. Brain Extracellular Space: The Final Frontier of Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Charles; Hrabětová, Sabina

    2017-07-26

    Brain extracellular space is the narrow microenvironment that surrounds every cell of the central nervous system. It contains a solution that closely resembles cerebrospinal fluid with the addition of extracellular matrix molecules. The space provides a reservoir for ions essential to the electrical activity of neurons and forms an intercellular chemical communication channel. Attempts to reveal the size and structure of the extracellular space using electron microscopy have had limited success; however, a biophysical approach based on diffusion of selected probe molecules has proved useful. A point-source paradigm, realized in the real-time iontophoresis method using tetramethylammonium, as well as earlier radiotracer methods, have shown that the extracellular space occupies ∼20% of brain tissue and small molecules have an effective diffusion coefficient that is two-fifths that in a free solution. Monte Carlo modeling indicates that geometrical constraints, including dead-space microdomains, contribute to the hindrance to diffusion. Imaging the spread of macromolecules shows them increasingly hindered as a function of size and suggests that the gaps between cells are predominantly ∼40 nm with wider local expansions that may represent dead-spaces. Diffusion measurements also characterize interactions of ions and proteins with the chondroitin and heparan sulfate components of the extracellular matrix; however, the many roles of the matrix are only starting to become apparent. The existence and magnitude of bulk flow and the so-called glymphatic system are topics of current interest and controversy. The extracellular space is an exciting area for research that will be propelled by emerging technologies. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to curcumin and its derivatives depends on the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Paul J; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy.

  7. Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongqing; Cline, Melissa S.; Osborne, Robert J.; Tuttle, Daniel L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Donohue, John Paul; Hall, Megan P.; Shiue, Lily; Swanson, Maurice S.; Thornton, Charles A.; Ares, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is associated with expression of expanded CTG DNA repeats as RNA (CUGexp RNA). To test whether CUGexp RNA creates a global splicing defect, we compared skeletal muscle of two mouse DM1 models, one expressing a CTGexp transgene, and another homozygous for a defective Mbnl1 gene. Strong correlation in splicing changes for ~100 new Mbnl1-regulated exons indicates loss of Mbnl1 explains >80% of the splicing pathology due to CUGexp RNA. In contrast, only about half of mRNA level changes can be attributed to loss of Mbnl1, indicating CUGexp RNA has Mbnl1-independent effects, particularly on mRNAs for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We propose that CUGexp RNA causes two separate effects: loss of Mbnl1 function, disrupting splicing, and loss of another function that disrupts ECM mRNA regulation, possibly mediated by MBNL2. These findings reveal unanticipated similarities between DM1 and other muscular dystrophies. PMID:20098426

  8. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  9. Measuring collective cell movement and extracellular matrix interactions using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Dodd, Stephen J.; Tangrea, Michael A.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell behaviors in migration and force generation were studied at the mesoscopic-level using cells grown in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) simulating tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied to investigate dynamic cell mechanics at this level. MDCK, NBT2, and MEF cells were embedded in 3D ECM, forming clusters that then migrated and generated forces affecting the ECM. The cells demonstrated MRI contrast due to iron accumulation in the clusters. Timelapse-MRI enabled the measurement of dynamic stress fields generated by the cells, as well as simultaneous monitoring of the cell distribution and ECM deformation/remodeling. We found cell clusters embedded in the 3D ECM can exert translational forces to pull and push, as well as torque, their surroundings. We also observed that the sum of forces generated by multiple cell clusters may result in macroscopic deformation. In summary, MRI can be used to image cell-ECM interactions mesoscopically. PMID:23698816

  10. Measuring collective cell movement and extracellular matrix interactions using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Dodd, Stephen J; Tangrea, Michael A; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Koretsky, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    Collective cell behaviors in migration and force generation were studied at the mesoscopic-level using cells grown in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) simulating tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied to investigate dynamic cell mechanics at this level. MDCK, NBT2, and MEF cells were embedded in 3D ECM, forming clusters that then migrated and generated forces affecting the ECM. The cells demonstrated MRI contrast due to iron accumulation in the clusters. Timelapse-MRI enabled the measurement of dynamic stress fields generated by the cells, as well as simultaneous monitoring of the cell distribution and ECM deformation/remodeling. We found cell clusters embedded in the 3D ECM can exert translational forces to pull and push, as well as torque, their surroundings. We also observed that the sum of forces generated by multiple cell clusters may result in macroscopic deformation. In summary, MRI can be used to image cell-ECM interactions mesoscopically.

  11. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  12. Binocular contrast discrimination needs monocular multiplicative noise

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Levi, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of signal and noise on contrast discrimination are difficult to separate because of a singularity in the signal-detection-theory model of two-alternative forced-choice contrast discrimination (Katkov, Tsodyks, & Sagi, 2006). In this article, we show that it is possible to eliminate the singularity by combining that model with a binocular combination model to fit monocular, dichoptic, and binocular contrast discrimination. We performed three experiments using identical stimuli to measure the perceived phase, perceived contrast, and contrast discrimination of a cyclopean sine wave. In the absence of a fixation point, we found a binocular advantage in contrast discrimination both at low contrasts (<4%), consistent with previous studies, and at high contrasts (≥34%), which has not been previously reported. However, control experiments showed no binocular advantage at high contrasts in the presence of a fixation point or for observers without accommodation. We evaluated two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms: a nonlinear contrast transducer and multiplicative noise (MN). A binocular combination model (the DSKL model; Ding, Klein, & Levi, 2013b) was first fitted to both the perceived-phase and the perceived-contrast data sets, then combined with either the nonlinear contrast transducer or the MN mechanism to fit the contrast-discrimination data. We found that the best model combined the DSKL model with early MN. Model simulations showed that, after going through interocular suppression, the uncorrelated noise in the two eyes became anticorrelated, resulting in less binocular noise and therefore a binocular advantage in the discrimination task. Combining a nonlinear contrast transducer or MN with a binocular combination model (DSKL) provides a powerful method for evaluating the two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms. PMID:26982370

  13. Binocular contrast discrimination needs monocular multiplicative noise.