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Sample records for extracellular matrix mediates

  1. Extracellular matrix mediates epithelial effects on chondrogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M; Jensen, K L; Zanetti, N C; Linsenmayer, T F; Reiter, R S

    1984-10-01

    It has been previously observed that single chick embryonic limb mesenchymal cells can differentiate into chondrocytes without cell-cell interactions when cultured in collagen or agarose gels. In the present study, limb ectoderm, but not dermis, inhibits chondrogenesis when placed on such collagen gel cultures. The inhibitory influence can be transmitted extensive distances in the gel, even when the ectoderm is placed on a porous filter. Collagen gels, preconditioned with limb ectoderms, are also inhibitory to chondrogenesis. On the other hand, chondrogenesis is less inhibited by ectoderm when the mesenchymal cells are placed in agarose. These results suggest that the antichondrogenic effect of limb ectoderm is mediated through alterations of the collagenous extracellular matrix and support the idea that the extracellular matrix must be considered as an organized, functional unit capable of regulating cell differentiation.

  2. Role of Extracellular Matrix-Mediated Interactions in Thymocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Sérgio Ranto; Dealmeida, Vinícius Cotta

    2000-01-01

    Cell adhesion, migration, differentiation and survival or death is amongst a large spectrum of biological responses that can be elicited by ligation of extracellular matrix components to their corresponding receptors. As regards the physiology of the thymus, cell migration is a crucial event in the general process of T cell differentiation. Studies on the intrathymic distribution of ECM components revealed that fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen, are not restrictedly located at typical basement membrane sites, also forming a thick network in the medullary region of the thymic lobules, whereas very thin ECM fibers are found within the cortex. These ECM components are essentially produced by thymic microenvironmental cells, which also drive thymocyte differentiation. Signals triggered by ECM are conveyed into thymocytes or microenvironmental cells through specific membrane receptors, and most of them belong to the integrin type, such as the VLA-3, VLA-4, VLA-5 and VLA-6. In vitro studies revealed that adhesion of thymocytes to thymic microenvironmental cells is mediated by extracellular matrix. Such an adhesion is preferentially done by immature thymocytes. Importantly, ECM-mediated interactions also govern the entrance and exit of thymocytes in the lymphoepithelial complexes named thymic nurse cells. Lastly, pathological conditions, including infectious and autoimmune diseases, in which changes of ECM ligands and receptors are observed, course with alterations in thymocyte migration and death. In conclusion, the fact that ECM can modulate traffic, differentiation, death and survival of normal thymocytes adds clues for understanding how ECM-mediated interactions behave in the thymus, not only in normal, but also in pathological conditions. PMID:11097218

  3. Extracellular Matrix-Mediated Differentiation of Periodontal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dangaria, Smit J.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Walker, Cameron; Druzinsky, Robert; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.

    2009-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) is a specialized connective tissue that connects the surface of the tooth root with the bony tooth socket. The healthy PDL harbors stem cell niches and extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironments that facilitate periodontal regeneration. During periodontal disease, the PDL is often compromised or destroyed, reducing the life-span of the tooth. In order to explore new approaches toward the regeneration of diseased periodontal tissues, we have tested the effect of periodontal ECM signals, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and the cell adhesion peptide Arg-Gly- Asp (RGD) on the differentiation of two types of periodontal progenitor cells, PDL progenitor cells (PDLPs) and dental follicle progenitor cells (DFCs). Our studies documented that CTGF and FGF2 significantly enhanced the expression of collagens I & III, biglycan and periostin in tissue engineered regenerates after 4 weeks compared to untreated controls. Specifically, CTGF promoted mature PDL-like tissue regeneration as demonstrated by dense periostin localization in collagen fiber bundles. CTGF and FGF2 displayed synergistic effects on collagen III and biglycan gene expression, while effects on mineralization were antagonistic to each other: CTGF promoted while FGF2 inhibited mineralization in PDL cell cultures. Incorporation of RGD peptides in hydrogel matrices significantly enhanced attachment, spreading, survival and mineralization of the encapsulated DFCs, suggesting that RGD additives might promote the use of hydrogels for periodontal mineralized tissue engineering. Together, our studies have documented the effect of three key components of the periodontal ECM on the differentiation of periodontal progenitor populations. PMID:19433344

  4. Extracellular matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  5. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  6. Episialin (MUC1) overexpression inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Episialin (MUC1) is a transmembrane molecule with a large mucin-like extracellular domain protruding high above the cell surface. The molecule is located at the apical side of most glandular epithelial cells, whereas in carcinoma cells it is often present at the entire surface and it is frequently expressed in abnormally large quantities. We have previously shown that overexpression of episialin reduces cell- cell interactions. Here we show that the integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix of transfectants of a melanoma cell line (A375), a transformed epithelial cell line (MDCK-ras-e) and a human breast epithelial cell line (HBL-100) is reduced by high levels of episialin. This reduction can be reversed by inducing high avidity of the beta 1 integrins by mAb TS2/16 (at least for beta 1-mediated adhesion). The adhesion can also be restored by redistribution of episialin on the cell surface by monoclonal antibodies into patches or caps. Similarly, capping of episialin on ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells, growing in suspension, caused adherence and spreading of these cells. We propose that there is a delicate balance between adhesion and anti-adhesion forces in episialin expressing cells, which can be shifted towards adhesion by strengthening the integrin-mediated adhesion, or towards anti-adhesion by increasing the level of expression of episialin. PMID:7698991

  7. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  8. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  9. Neutrophil elastase processing of Gelatinase A is mediated by extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, A.; Banda, M.J.

    1995-07-18

    Gelatinase A (72-kDa type IV collagenase) is a metalloproteinase that is expressed by many cells in culture and is overexpressed by some tumor cells. It has been suggested that the serine proteinase neutrophil elastase might play a role iii the posttranslational processing of gelatinase A and that noncatalytic interactions between gelatinase A and components of the extracellular matrix might alter potential processing pathways. These questions were addressed with the use of gelatin substrate zymography, gelatinolytic activity assays, and amino acid sequence analysis. We found that neutrophil elastase does proteolytically modify gelatinase A by cleaving at a number of sites within gelatinase A. Sequential treatment of gelatinase A with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA) and neutrophil elastase yielded an active gelatinase with a 4-fold increase in gelatinolytic activity. The increased gelatinolytic activity correlated with that of a 40-kDa fragment of gelatinase A. Matrix components altered the proteolytic modifications in gelatinase A that were mediated by neutrophil elastase. In the absence of gelatin, neutrophil elastase destructively degraded gelatinase A by hydrolyzing at least two bonds within the fibronectin-like gelatin-binding domain of gelatinase A. In the presence of gelatin, these two inactivating cleavage sites were protected, and cleavage at a site within the hemopexin-like carboxyl-terminal domain resulted in a truncated yet active gelatinase. The results suggest a regulatory role for extracellular matrix molecules in stabilizing gelatinase A fragments and in altering the availability of sites susceptible to destructive proteolysis by neutrophil elastase. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Monocytes increase human cardiac myofibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling through TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Lipon, Brodie D; Svystonyuk, Daniyil A; Teng, Guoqi; Guzzardi, David G; Silva, Claudia; Yong, V Wee; Fedak, Paul W M

    2016-03-15

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myofibroblasts remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM), preventing mechanical complications. However, prolonged myofibroblast activity leads to dysregulation of the ECM, maladaptive remodeling, fibrosis, and heart failure (HF). Chronic inflammation is believed to drive persistent myofibroblast activity; however, the mechanisms are unclear. We assessed the influence of peripheral blood monocytes on human cardiac myofibroblast activity in a three-dimensional (3D) ECM microenvironment. Human cardiac myofibroblasts isolated from surgical biopsies of the right atrium and left ventricle were seeded into 3D collagen matrices. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human donors and cocultured with myofibroblasts. Monocytes increased myofibroblast activity measured by collagen gel contraction (baseline: 57.6 ± 5.9% vs. coculture: 65.2 ± 7.1% contraction; P < 0.01) and increased local ECM remodeling quantified by confocal microscopy. Under coculture conditions that allow indirect cellular interaction via paracrine factors but prevent direct cell-cell contact, monocytes had minimal effects on myofibroblast activity (17.9 ± 11.1% vs. 6.4 ± 7.0% increase, respectively; P < 0.01). When cells were cultured under direct contact conditions, multiplex analysis of the coculture media revealed an increase in the paracrine factors TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 compared with baseline (122.9 ± 10.1 pg/ml and 3,496.0 ± 190.4 pg/ml, respectively, vs. 21.5 ± 16.3 pg/ml and 183.3 ± 43.9 pg/ml; P < 0.001). TGF-β blockade abolished the monocyte-induced increase in cardiac myofibroblast activity. These data suggest that direct cell-cell interaction between monocytes and cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast activity and increases remodeling of local matrix. Peripheral blood monocyte interaction with human cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates myofibroblast activity through release of TGF-β1

  11. Adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 promotes the extracellular matrix expression in degenerative nucleus pulposus cells*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xu-wei; Liu, Kang; Chen, Zhu; Zhao, Ming; Han, Xiao-wei; Bai, Yi-guang; Feng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector-carrying human growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) gene, investigate the biological effects of adenovirus-mediated GDF-5 (Ad-GDF-5) on extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in human degenerative disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, and explore a candidate gene therapy method for intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Methods: Human NP cells of a degenerative disc were isolated, cultured, and infected with Ad-GDF-5 using the AdEasy-1 adenovirus vector system. On Days 3, 7, 14, and 21, the contents of the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and hydroxyproline (Hyp), synthesis of proteoglycan and collagen II, gene expression of collagen II and aggrecan, and NP cell proliferation were assessed. Results: The adenovirus was an effective vehicle for gene delivery with prolonged expression of GDF-5. Biochemical analysis revealed increased sGAG and Hyp contents in human NP cells infected by Ad-GDF-5 whereas there was no conspicuous change in basal medium (BM) or Ad-green fluorescent protein (GFP) groups. Only cells in the Ad-GDF-5 group promoted the production of ECM, as demonstrated by the secretion of proteoglycan and up-regulation of collagen II and aggrecan at both protein and mRNA levels. The NP cell proliferation was significantly promoted. Conclusions: The data suggest that Ad-GDF-5 gene therapy is a potential treatment for IDD, which restores the functions of degenerative intervertebral disc through enhancing the ECM production of human NP cells. PMID:26739524

  12. Induction of Tenogenic Differentiation Mediated by Extracellular Tendon Matrix and Short-Term Cyclic Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Plenge, Amelie; Heller, Sandra; Pfeiffer, Bastian; Kasper, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Tendon and ligament pathologies are still a therapeutic challenge, due to the difficulty in restoring the complex extracellular matrix architecture and biomechanical strength. While progress is being made in cell-based therapies and tissue engineering approaches, comprehensive understanding of the fate of progenitor cells in tendon healing is still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of decellularized tendon matrix and moderate cyclic stretching as natural stimuli which could potentially direct tenogenic fate. Equine adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were seeded on decellularized tendon matrix scaffolds. Mechanical stimulation was applied in a custom-made cyclic strain bioreactor. Assessment was performed 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h following mechanical stimulation. Scaffold culture induced cell alignment and changes in expression of tendon-related genes, although cell viability was decreased compared to monolayer culture. Short mechanical stimulation periods enhanced most of the scaffold-induced effects. Collagen 1A2 expression levels were decreased, while collagen 3A1 and decorin levels were increased. Tenascin-C and scleraxis expression showed an initial decrease but had increased 24 h after stimulation. The results obtained suggest that decellularized tendon matrix, supported by cyclic stretching, can induce tenogenic differentiation and the synthesis of tendon components important for matrix remodeling. PMID:27630718

  13. A Biosynthetic Scaffold that Facilitates Chondrocyte-Mediated Degradation and Promotes Articular Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar., Balaji V.; Dailing, Eric A.; Brock, J. Logan; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Randolph, Mark A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage remains a significant clinical challenge to repair because of its limited self-healing capacity. Interest has grown in the delivery of autologous chondrocytes to cartilage defects, and combining cell-based therapies with scaffolds that capture aspects of native tissue and allow cell-mediated remodeling could improve outcomes. Currently, scaffold-based therapies with encapsulated chondrocytes permit matrix production; however, resorption of the scaffold often does not match the rate of matrix production by chondrocytes, which can limit functional tissue regeneration. Here, we designed a hybrid biosynthetic system consisting of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) endcapped with thiols and crosslinked by norbornene-functionalized gelatin via a thiol-ene photopolymerization. The protein crosslinker was selected to facilitate chondrocyte-mediated scaffold remodeling and matrix deposition. Gelatin was functionalized with norbornene to varying degrees (~4–17 norbornenes/gelatin), and the shear modulus of the resulting hydrogels was characterized (<0.1–0.5 kPa). Degradation of the crosslinked PEG-gelatin hydrogels by chondrocyte-secreted enzymes was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. Finally, chondrocytes encapsulated in these biosynthetic scaffolds showed significantly increased glycosaminoglycan deposition over just 14 days of culture, while maintaining high levels of viability and producing a distributed matrix. These results indicate the potential of a hybrid PEG-gelatin hydrogel to permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling and promote articular cartilage matrix production. Tunable scaffolds that can easily permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling may be useful in designing treatment options for cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:26900597

  14. Evidence of Innervation following Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Mediated Remodeling of Muscular Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vineet; Brown, Bryan N.; Beattie, Allison J.; Gilbert, Thomas W.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring porcine derived extracellular matrix (ECM) has successfully been used as a biologic scaffold material for site-specific reconstruction of a wide variety of tissues. The site-specific remodeling process includes rapid degradation of the scaffold with concomitant recruitment of mononuclear cells, endothelial cells, and bone marrow derived cells, and can lead to formation of functional skeletal and smooth muscle tissue. However, the temporal and spatial patterns of innervation of the remodeling scaffold material in muscular tissues are not well understood. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the presence of nervous tissue in a rat model of abdominal wall reconstruction and a canine model of esophageal reconstruction in which ECM scaffolds were used as inductive scaffolds. Evidence of mature nerve, immature nerve, and Schwann cells was found within the remodeled ECM at 28 days in the rat body wall model, and at 91 days post surgery in a canine model of esophageal repair. Additionally, a microscopic and morphologic study that investigated the response of primary cultured neurons seeded upon an ECM scaffold showed that neuronal survival and outgrowth was supported by the ECM substrate. Finally, matricryptic peptides resulting from rapid degradation of the ECM scaffold induced migration of terminal Schwann cells in a concentration dependent fashion in vitro. The findings of this study suggest that the reconstruction of tissues in which innervation is an important functional component is possible with use of biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix. PMID:19701935

  15. Extracellular matrix composition and interstitial pH modulate NHE1-mediated melanoma cell motility.

    PubMed

    Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Domikowsky, Britta; Schwöppe, Christian; Krähling, Hermann; Mally, Sabine; Schäfers, Michael; Hermann, Sven; Shahin, Victor; Haier, Jörg; Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is required for human melanoma cell adhesion and migration. The goal of the present study was to suppress mouse melanoma (B16V) cell invasion in vivo by inhibiting NHE1. Intravital observations in mobilized left liver lobes of laparotomized male Sprague-Dawley rats disclosed that five minutes after intra-arterial administration of the B16V cell suspension, cells adhered to the endothelia of liver sinusoidal capillaries and started to migrate into the surrounding liver tissue. In the presence of the NHE1-specific inhibitor cariporide, migration/invasion was reduced by about 50% while adhesion was not lowered. Time-lapse video microscopy and adhesion/invasion assays revealed that in vitro, blockade of NHE1 by cariporide i) significantly decreased the migratory speed of the cells and ii) completely inhibited the invasive behavior of both an artificial, basement membrane-like and a dermis-like matrix. Cells were more motile on the basement membrane and more invasive on the dermis-like matrix. Small-animal PET (positron-emission tomography) analyses of B16V metastasis in female C57BL/6 mice showed that, although NHE1 inhibition hardly affected the percentage of animals developing metastases or relapses, metastases seem to get directed to the lungs in cariporide-treated animals while animals feeding on the standard diet show metastases spread all over the body. We conclude that i) B16V cells prefer to invade a dermis-like rather than a basement membrane-like matrix; ii) the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition strongly impacts on NHE1-dependent in vitro cell motility and invasion; and iii) the lungs are metastasis‑prone and impair the efficiency of cariporide due to their ECM composition and the pulmonary interstitial (extravascular) pH.

  16. Disorganized collagen scaffold interferes with fibroblast mediated deposition of organized extracellular matrix in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E. K.; Sander, Edward A.; Bale, Shyam Sundar; Melotti, Suzanna A.; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Many tissue engineering applications require the remodeling of a degradable scaffold either in vitro or in situ. Although inefficient remodeling or failure to fully remodel the temporary matrix can result in a poor clinical outcome, very few investigations have examined in detail, the interaction of regenerative cells with temporary scaffoldings. In a recent series of investigations, randomly oriented collagen gels were directly implanted into human corneal pockets and followed for 24 months. The resulting remodeling response exhibited a high degree of variability which likely reflects differing regenerative/synthetic capacity across patients. Given this variability, we hypothesize that a disorganized, degradable provisional scaffold could be disruptive to a uniform, organized reconstruction of stromal matrix. In this investigation, two established corneal stroma tissue engineering culture systems (collagen scaffold-based and scaffold-free) were compared to determine if the presence of the disorganized collagen gel influenced matrix production and organizational control exerted by primary human corneal fibroblast cells (PHCFCs). PHCFCs were cultured on thin disorganized reconstituted collagen substrate (RCS - 5 donors: average age 34.4) or on a bare polycarbonate membrane (5 donors: average age 32.4-controls). The organization and morphology of the two culture systems were compared over the long-term at 4, 8 and 11/12 weeks. Construct thickness and extracellular matrix organization/alignment was tracked optically with bright field and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The details of cell/matrix morphology and cell/matrix interaction were examined with standard transmission, cuprolinic blue and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Both the scaffold-free and the collagen-based scaffold cultures produced organized arrays of collagen fibrils. However, at all time points, the amount of organized cell-derived matrix in the scaffold

  17. A fibronectin receptor on Candida albicans mediates adherence of the fungus to extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, S.A.; Smith, R.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Binding of fibronectin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, to Candida albicans was measured, and adherence of the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins, fibronectin, laminin, types I and IV collagen, and subendothelial ECM was studied. 125I-labeled fibronectin was inhibited from binding to the fungus by unlabeled human plasma fibronectin and by Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser-Pro (GRGESP), and Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro (GRGDTP), but binding was not inhibited by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. Soluble fibronectin, RGD, GRGESP, and GRGDTP also inhibited fungal adherence to the individual immobilized ECM proteins in a complex pattern, but only soluble fibronectin (10(-7) M) inhibited fungal adherence to subendothelial ECM. Thus, C. albicans possesses at least one type of cell surface receptor for binding soluble fibronectin that can be inhibited with peptides. This receptor apparently is used to bind the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins and to subendothelial ECM and may play a role in the initiation of disseminated disease by bloodborne fungi by providing for adherence of the microorganisms to ECM proteins.

  18. Alterations in junctional proteins, inflammatory mediators and extracellular matrix molecules in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Gyftopoulos, Alex A; Brown, Karen L; Hansen, Molly; Butcher, Kathy F; Eidelwein, Alexandra P; Noel, Robert A; Rabon, Edd; Posta, Allison; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2013-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory atopic disease of the esophagus, causes massive eosinophil infiltration, basal cell hyperplasia, and sub-epithelial fibrosis. To elucidate cellular and molecular factors involved in esophageal tissue damage and remodeling, we examined pinch biopsies from EoE and normal pediatric patients. An inflammation gene array confirmed that eotaxin-3, its receptor CCR3 and interleukins IL-13 and IL-5 were upregulated. An extracellular matrix (ECM) gene array revealed upregulation of CD44 & CD54, and of ECM proteases (ADAMTS1 & MMP14). A cytokine antibody array showed a marked decrease in IL-1α and IL-1 receptor antagonist and an increase in eotaxin-2 and epidermal growth factor. Western analysis indicated reduced expression of intercellular junction proteins, E-cadherin and claudin-1 and increased expression of occludin and vimentin. We have identified a number of novel genes and proteins whose expression is altered in EoE. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease.

  19. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  20. Extracellular Matrix Mediated Maturation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Cardiac Monolayer Structure and Electrophysiological Function

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Rocha, Andre Monteiro Da; Campbell, Katherine; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Willis, B. Cicero; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Liu, Qinghua; Klos, Matt; Musa, Hassan; Zarzoso, Manuel; Bizy, Alexandra; Furness, Jamie; Anumonwo, Justus; Mironov, Sergey; Jalife, José

    2016-01-01

    Background Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) monolayers generated to date display an immature embryonic-like functional and structural phenotype that limits their utility for research and cardiac regeneration. In particular, the electrophysiological function of hPSC-CM monolayers and bioengineered constructs used to date are characterized by slow electrical impulse propagation velocity and immature action potential profiles. Methods and Results Here we have identified an optimal extracellular matrix (ECM) for significant electrophysiological and structural maturation of hPSC-CM monolayers. hPSC-CM plated in the optimal ECM combination have impulse propagation velocities ~2X faster than previously reported (43.6±7.0 cm·s−1 n=9) and have mature cardiomyocyte action potential profiles including hyperpolarized diastolic potential and rapid action potential upstroke velocity (146.5±17.7 V/s, N=5 monolayers). In addition the optimal ECM promoted hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes and the expression of key mature sarcolemmal (SCN5A, Kir2.1 and Connexin43) and myofilament markers (cTroponin I). The maturation process reported here relies on activation of integrin signaling pathways: neutralization of β1 integrin receptors via blocking antibodies and pharmacological blockade of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation prevented structural maturation. Conclusions Maturation of human stem cell derived cardiomyocyte monolayers is achieved in a one week period by plating cardiomyocytes on PDMS coverslips rather than on conventional 2D cell culture formats such as glass coverslips or plastic dishes. Activation of integrin signaling and FAK are essential for significant maturation of human cardiac monolayers. PMID:27069088

  1. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects.

  2. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  3. Extracellular matrix protein mediated regulation of the osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Smitha; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Totey, Satish

    2012-09-01

    The biomimetic approach of tissue engineering exploits the favorable properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), to achieve better scaffold performance and tissue regeneration. ECM proteins regulate cell adhesion and differentiation through integrin mediated signal transduction. In the present study, we have examined the role of ECM proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin in regulating the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown on selected ECM protein treated tissue culture plates. The growth kinetics was assessed by calculating the doubling time of the cells on different ECM treated plates. The cells were directed to osteoblast lineage by growing them in osteogenic induction media for 21 day. Differentiation was evaluated at different time points by osteoblast differentiation associated gene expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, histochemical staining for mineralized matrix and calcium quantification. The doubling time of hMSCs cultured on collagen type I was significantly low, which was followed by laminin and fibronectin treated plates. However, doubling time of hMSCs cultured on vitronectin treated plate was not significantly different than that of the untreated control. High ALP gene (ALPL) expression and associated enhancement of mineralization were observed on collagen type I, fibronectin and vitronectin treated plates. Collagen type I showed early onset of mineralization with high ALP activity and up-regulation of osteopontin, ALPL, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin genes. Vitronectin also up-regulated these genes and showed the highest amount of calcium in the secreted mineral matrix. Therefore, we conclude that, ECM proteins indeed modified the growth patterns and induced the osteoblast differentiation of hMSCs. Our findings have significant implication for bone tissue engineering applications.

  4. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  5. The role of cardiac fibroblasts in extracellular matrix-mediated signaling during normal and pathological cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly Elizabeth; Black, Lauren Deems

    2013-07-01

    The extracellular matrix is no longer considered a static support structure for cells but a dynamic signaling network with the power to influence cell, tissue, and whole organ physiology. In the myocardium, cardiac fibroblasts are the primary cell type responsible for the synthesis, deposition, and degradation of matrix proteins, and they therefore play a critical role in the development and maintenance of functional heart tissue. This review will summarize the extensive research conducted in vivo and in vitro, demonstrating the influence of both physical and chemical stimuli on cardiac fibroblasts and how these interactions impact both the extracellular matrix and, by extension, cardiomyocytes. This work is of considerable significance, given that cardiovascular diseases are marked by extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix, which ultimately impairs the functional capacity of the heart. We seek to summarize the unique role of cardiac fibroblasts in normal cardiac development and the most prevalent cardiac pathologies, including congenital heart defects, hypertension, hypertrophy, and the remodeled heart following myocardial infarction. We will conclude by identifying existing holes in the research that, if answered, have the potential to dramatically improve current therapeutic strategies for the repair and regeneration of damaged myocardium via mechanotransductive signaling.

  6. Endothelin-1 mediated induction of extracellular matrix genes in strial marginal cells underlies strial pathology in Alport mice.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Daniel T; Delimont, Duane; Dufek, Brianna; Zallocchi, Marisa; Phillips, Grady; Gratton, Michael Anne; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2016-11-01

    Alport syndrome, a type IV collagen disorder, manifests as glomerular disease associated with hearing loss with thickening of the glomerular and strial capillary basement membranes (SCBMs). We have identified a role for endothelin-1 (ET-1) activation of endothelin A receptors (ETARs) in glomerular pathogenesis. Here we explore whether ET-1 plays a role in strial pathology. Wild type (WT) and Alport mice were treated with the ETAR antagonist, sitaxentan. The stria vascularis was analyzed for SCBM thickness and for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Additional WT and Alport mice were exposed to noise or hypoxia and the stria analyzed for hypoxia-related and ECM genes. A strial marginal cell line cultured under hypoxic conditions, or stimulated with ET-1 was analyzed for expression of hypoxia-related and ECM transcripts. Noise exposure resulted in significantly elevated ABR thresholds in Alport mice relative to wild type littermates. Alport stria showed elevated expression of collagen α1(IV), laminin α2, and laminin α5 proteins relative to WT. SCBM thickening and elevated ECM protein expression was ameliorated by ETAR blockade. Stria from normoxic Alport mice and hypoxic WT mice showed upregulation of hypoxia-related, ECM, and ET-1 transcripts. Both ET-1 stimulation and hypoxia up-regulated ECM transcripts in cultured marginal cells. We conclude that ET-1 mediated activation of ETARs on strial marginal cells results in elevated expression of ECM genes and thickening of the SCBMs in Alport mice. SCBM thickening results in hypoxic stress further elevating ECM and ET-1 gene expression, exacerbating strial pathology.

  7. The function of multiple extracellular matrix receptors in mediating cell adhesion to extracellular matrix: preparation of monoclonal antibodies to the fibronectin receptor that specifically inhibit cell adhesion to fibronectin and react with platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have identified monoclonal antibodies that inhibit human cell adhesion to collagen (P1H5), fibronectin (P1F8 or P1D6), and collagen and fibronectin (P1B5) that react with a family of structurally similar glycoproteins referred to as extracellular matrix receptors (ECMRs) II, VI, and I, respectively. Each member of this family contains a unique alpha subunit, recognized by the antibodies, and a common beta subunit, each of approximately 140 kD. We show here that ECMR VI is identical to the fibronectin receptor (FNR), very late antigen (VLA) 5, and platelet glycoproteins Ic-IIa and shall be referred to as FNR. Monoclonal antibodies to FNR inhibit lymphocyte, fibroblast, and platelet adhesion to fibronectin-coated surfaces. ECMRs I, II, and FNR were differentially expressed in platelets, resting or activated lymphocytes, and myeloid, epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblast cell populations, suggesting a functional role for the receptors in vascular emigration and selective tissue localization. Tissue staining of human fetal skin localized ECMRs I and II to the basal epidermis primarily, while monoclonal antibodies to the FNR stained both the dermis and epidermis. Experiments carried out to investigate the functional roles of these receptors in mediating cell adhesion to complex extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cells in culture revealed that complete inhibition of cell adhesion to ECM required antibodies to both the FNR and ECMR II, the collagen adhesion receptor. These results show that multiple ECMRs function in combination to mediate cell adhesion to complex EMC templates and predicts that variation in ECM composition and ECMR expression may direct cell localization to specific tissue domains. PMID:2846588

  8. The evolution of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P; Adams, Josephine C

    2010-12-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or "adhesome" also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology.

  9. Extracellular matrix mediators of metastatic cell colonization characterized using scaffold mimics of the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Caffe, Jordan R.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Azarin, Samira M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells colonize the pre-metastatic niche, which is a complex microenvironment consisting partially of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We sought to identify and validate novel contributors to tumor cell colonization using ECM coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as mimics of the pre-metastatic niche. Utilizing orthotopic breast cancer mouse models, fibronectin and collagen IV-coated scaffolds implanted in the subcutaneous space captured colonizing tumor cells, showing a greater than 2-fold increase in tumor cell accumulation at the implant site compared to uncoated scaffolds. As a strategy to identify additional ECM colonization contributors, decellularized matrix (DCM) from lungs and livers containing metastatic tumors were characterized. In vitro, metastatic cell adhesion was increased on DCM coatings from diseased organs relative to healthy DCM. Furthermore, in vivo implantations of diseased DCM-coated scaffolds had increased tumor cell colonization relative to healthy DCM coatings. Mass-spectrometry proteomics was performed on healthy and diseased DCM to identify candidates associated with colonization. Myeloperoxidase was identified as abundantly present in diseased organs and validated as a contributor to colonization using myeloperoxidase-coated scaffold implants. This work identified novel ECM proteins associated with colonization using decellularization and proteomics techniques and validated candidates using a scaffold to mimic the pre-metastatic niche. PMID:26844426

  10. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  11. Electrical stimulation of neural stem cells mediated by humanized carbon nanotube composite made with extracellular matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Kam, Nadine Wong Shi; Jan, Edward; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges to engineering neural interfaces is to minimize their immune response toward implanted electrodes. One potential approach is to manufacture materials that bear greater structural resemblance to living tissues and by utilizing neural stem cells. The unique electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes make them excellent candidates for neural interfaces, but their adoption hinges on finding approaches for "humanizing" their composites. Here we demonstrated the fabrication of layer-by-layer assembled composites from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and laminin, which is an essential part of human extracellular matrix. Laminin-SWNT thin films were found to be conducive to neural stem cells (NSC) differentiation and suitable for their successful excitation. We observed extensive formation of functional neural network as indicated by the presence of synaptic connections. Calcium imaging of the NSCs revealed generation of action potentials upon the application of a lateral current through the SWNT substrate. These results indicate that the protein-SWNT composite can serve as materials foundation of neural electrodes with chemical structure better adapted with long-term integration with the neural tissue.

  12. Granzyme B mediates both direct and indirect cleavage of extracellular matrix in skin after chronic low-dose ultraviolet light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Leigh G; Toro, Ana; Zhao, Hongyan; Brown, Keddie; Tebbutt, Scott J; Granville, David J

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation is a hallmark of many chronic inflammatory diseases that can lead to a loss of function, aging, and disease progression. Ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation from the sun is widely considered as the major cause of visible human skin aging, causing increased inflammation and enhanced ECM degradation. Granzyme B (GzmB), a serine protease that is expressed by a variety of cells, accumulates in the extracellular milieu during chronic inflammation and cleaves a number of ECM proteins. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to ECM degradation in the skin after UV irradiation through both direct cleavage of ECM proteins and indirectly through the induction of other proteinases. Wild-type and GzmB-knockout mice were repeatedly exposed to minimal erythemal doses of solar-simulated UV irradiation for 20 weeks. GzmB expression was significantly increased in wild-type treated skin compared to nonirradiated controls, colocalizing to keratinocytes and to an increased mast cell population. GzmB deficiency significantly protected against the formation of wrinkles and the loss of dermal collagen density, which was related to the cleavage of decorin, an abundant proteoglycan involved in collagen fibrillogenesis and integrity. GzmB also cleaved fibronectin, and GzmB-mediated fibronectin fragments increased the expression of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings indicate a significant role for GzmB in ECM degradation that may have implications in many age-related chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25495009

  13. Extracellular matrix proteins of dentine.

    PubMed

    Butler, W T; Ritchie, H H; Bronckers, A L

    1997-01-01

    Bone and dentine extracellular matrix proteins are similar, consisting primarily of type I collagen, acidic proteins and proteoglycans. Although collagen forms the lattice for deposition of calcium and phosphate for formation of carbonate apatite, the non-collagenous proteins are believed to control initiation and growth of the crystals. Despite this similarity, dentine contains three unique proteins apparently absent from bone and other tissue: dentine phosphophoryn (DPP), dentine matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentine sialoprotein (DSP). DPP and DMP1 are acidic phosphoproteins probably involved in the control of mineralization processes. DPP may localize in gap regions of collagen and initiate apatite crystal formation by binding large quantities of calcium in a conformation that promotes this process. Extensive studies have been conducted in our laboratory on the nature, biosynthesis, localization and gene structure of DSP. Immunolocalization studies showed that rat DSP, a 53 kDa sialic acid-rich glycoprotein, was synthesized by young and mature odontoblasts, and by dental pulp cells and pre-ameloblasts, but not by ameloblasts, osteoblasts, chondrocytes or other cell types. The cDNA sequence indicated that DSP was a 366-residue protein with several potential N-glycosylation sites, as well as phosphorylation sites, but that the amino acid sequence was dissimilar to that of other known proteins. Northern blot analysis detected several mRNA species near 4.6 and 1.5 kb, indicative of alternative splicing events. Evidence for two DSP genes was obtained, further complicating this picture. Recent in situ hybridization studies utilizing rat and mouse molars and incisors indicated that DSP mRNA was expressed by young odontoblasts and odontoblasts in animals of all ages. Transcripts were also observed in pre-ameloblasts. The expression of DSP mRNA ceased when these cells matured to become secretory ameloblasts. DSP transcripts were not detected in osteoblasts or other cell

  14. Long noncoding RNA TUG1 alleviates extracellular matrix accumulation via mediating microRNA-377 targeting of PPARγ in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li-Jun; Ding, Min; Hou, Li-Jun; Cui, Yuan-Tao; Li, Chun-Jun; Yu, De-Min

    2017-03-11

    Long noncoding RNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 (lncRNA TUG1) has been reported to play a key role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, the role of lncRNA TUG1 in the regulation of diabetic nephropathy remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study is to identify the regulation of lncRNA TUG1 on extracellular matrix accumulation via mediating microRNA-377 targeting of PPARγ, and investigate the underlying mechanisms in progression of DN. Microarray was performed to screen differentially expressed miRNAs in db/db DN mice. Afterwards, computational prediction programs (TargetScan, miRanda, PicTar and miRGen) was applied to predict the target gene of miRNAs. The complementary binding of miRNA and lncRNA was assessed by luciferase assays. Protein and mRNA expression were detected by western blot and real time quantitate PCR. MiRNA-377 was screened by miRNA microarray and differentially up-regulated in db/db DN mice. PPARγ was predicted to be the target of miR-377 and the prediction was verified by luciferase assays. Expression of miR-377 was up-regulated in mesangial cell treated with high glucose (25 mM), and overexpression of miR-377 inhibited PPARγ expression and promoted PAI-1 and TGF-β1 expression. The expression of TUG1 antagonized the effect of miR-377 on the downregulation of its target PPARγ and inhibited extracellular matrix accumulation, including PAI-1, TGF-β1, fibronectin (FN) and collagen IV (Col IV), induced by high glucose. LncRNA TUG1 acts as an endogenous sponge of miR-377 and downregulates miR-377 expression levels, and thereby relieving the inhibition of its target gene PPARγ and alleviates extracellular matrix accumulation of mesangial cells, which provides a novel insight of diabetic nephropathy pathogenesis.

  15. A two parameter family of travelling waves with a singular barrier arising from the modelling of extracellular matrix mediated cellular invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumpanani, Abbey J.; Sherratt, Jonathan A.; Norbury, John; Byrne, Helen M.

    1999-02-01

    Invasive cells variously show changes in adhesion, protease production and motility. In this paper the authors develop and analyse a model for malignant invasion, brought about by a combination of proteolysis and haptotaxis. A common feature of these two mechanisms is that they can be produced by contact with the extracellular matrix through the mediation of a class of surface receptors called integrins. An unusual feature of the model is the absence of cell diffusion. By seeking travelling wave solutions the model is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations which can be studied using phase plane analysis. The authors demonstrate the presence of a singular barrier in the phase plane and a “hole” in this singular barrier which admits a phase trajectory. The model admits a family of travelling waves which depend on two parameters, i.e. the tissue concentration of connective tissue and the rate of decay of the initial spatial profile of the invading cells. The slowest member of this family corresponds to the phase trajectory which goes through the “hole” in the singular barrier. Using a power series method the authors derive an expression relating the minimum wavespeed to the tissue concentration of the extracellular matrix which is arbitrary. The model is applicable in a wide variety of biological settings which combine haptotaxis with proteolysis. By considering various functional forms the authors show that the key mathematical features of the particular model studied in the early parts of the paper are exhibited by a wider class of models which characterise the behaviour of invading cells.

  16. Caveolin 3-mediated integrin β1 signaling is required for the proliferation of folliculostellate cells in rat anterior pituitary gland under the influence of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Ilmiawati, Cimi; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Tsukada, Takehiro; Kouki, Tom; Yashiro, Takashi

    2011-07-01

    Folliculostellate (FS) cells in the anterior pituitary gland are believed to have multifunctional properties. Using transgenic rats that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) specifically in FS cells in the anterior pituitary gland (S100b-GFP rats), we recently revealed that FS cells in primary culture exhibited marked proliferation in the presence of laminin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) component of the basement membrane. In a process referred to as matricrine action, FS cells receive ECM as a signal through their receptors, which results in morphological and functional changes. In this study, we investigated matricrine signaling in FS cells and observed that the proliferation of FS cells is mediated by integrin β1, which is involved in various signaling pathways for cell migration and proliferation in response to ECM. Then, we analyzed downstream events of the integrin β1 signaling pathway in the proliferation of FS cells and identified caveolin 3 as a potential candidate molecule. Caveolin 3 is a membrane protein that binds cholesterol and a number of signaling molecules that interact with integrin β1. Using specific small interfering RNA of caveolin 3, the proliferation of FS cells was inhibited. Furthermore, caveolin 3 drove activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades, which resulted in upregulation of cyclin D1 in FS cells. These findings suggest that matricrine signaling in the proliferation of FS cells was transduced by a caveolin 3-mediated integrin β1 signaling pathway and subsequent activation of the MAPK pathway.

  17. Genomic and Surface Proteomic Analysis of the Canine Pathogen Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Reveals Proteins That Mediate Adherence to the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bannoehr, Jeanette; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Reglinski, Mark; Inglis, Neil F.; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Fossum, Even; Smith, David G.; Wilson, Gillian J.; Cartwright, Robyn A.; Haas, Juergen; Hook, Magnus; van den Broek, Adri H. M.; Thoday, Keith L.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2011-01-01

    Cell wall-associated (CWA) proteins made by Gram-positive pathogens play a fundamental role in pathogenesis. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a major animal pathogen responsible for the canine skin disease bacterial pyoderma. Here, we describe the bioinformatic analysis of the family of 18 predicted CWA proteins encoded in the genome of S. pseudintermedius strain ED99 and determine their distribution among a phylogenetically diverse panel of S. pseudintermedius clinical isolates and closely related species of the Staphylococcus intermedius group. In parallel, we employed a proteomic approach to identify proteins presented on the surface of strain ED99 in vitro, revealing a total of 60 surface-localized proteins in one or more phases of growth, including 6 of the 18 genome-predicted CWA proteins. Based on these analyses, we selected two CWA proteins (SpsD and SpsL) encoded by all strains examined and investigated their capacity to mediate adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. We discovered that SpsD and SpsL mediated binding of a heterologous host, Lactococcus lactis, to fibrinogen and fibronectin and that SpsD mediated binding to cytokeratin 10, a major constituent of mammalian skin. Of note, the interaction with fibrinogen was host-species dependent, suggestive of a role for SpsD and SpsL in the host tropism of S. pseudintermedius. Finally, we identified IgG specific for SpsD and SpsL in sera from dogs with bacterial pyoderma, implying that both proteins are expressed during infection. The combined genomic and proteomic approach employed in the current study has revealed novel host-pathogen interactions which represent candidate therapeutic targets for the control of bacterial pyoderma. PMID:21576333

  18. Extracellular matrix signaling in morphogenesis and repair.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Barker, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is critically important for many cellular processes including growth, differentiation, survival, and morphogenesis. Cells remodel and reshape the ECM by degrading and reassembling it, playing an active role in sculpting their surrounding environment and directing their own phenotypes. Both mechanical and biochemical molecules influence ECM dynamics in multiple ways; by releasing small bioactive signaling molecules, releasing growth factors stored within the ECM, eliciting structural changes to matrix proteins which expose cryptic sites and by degrading matrix proteins directly. The dynamic reciprocal communication between cells and the ECM plays a fundamental roll in tissue development, homeostasis, and wound healing.

  19. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  20. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  1. Pneumococcal MSCRAMM targeting of the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Gavin K.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2010-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to host cells and tissues and their subsequent invasion and dissemination are key processes during disease pathogenesis. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Jensch and co-workers provide further molecular insight into these events during infection with the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Their characterization of PavB, a bacterial surface protein with orthologues in other streptococci, shows it to bind the extracellar matrix components fibronection and plasminogen by virtue of repetitive sequences designated Streptococcal Surface Repeats (SSURE). In mice, a pavB mutant showed reduced nasopharyngeal colonisation and was attenuated in a lung infection model. As discussed here in the context of the pneumococcus, the study of PavB highlights the central role during microbal pathogenesis of targetting the extracellular matrix by so-called MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules). PMID:20444102

  2. Achondrogenesis type II, abnormalities of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Chou, J W; Campbell, D

    1987-09-01

    Immune and lectin histochemical and microchemical methods were employed to study growth cartilage from seven cases of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino). The normal architecture of the epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage was replaced by a morphologically heterogeneous tissue. Some areas were comprised of vascular canals surrounded by extensive fibrous tissue and enlarged cells that had the appearance and histochemical characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Other areas contained a mixture of cells ranging from small to the enlarged chondrocytes. The extracellular matrix in the latter areas was more abundant and had characteristics of both precartilage mesenchymal matrix and typical cartilage matrix; it contained types I and II collagen, cartilage proteoglycan, fibronectin, and peanut agglutinin binding glycoconjugate(s). Peptide mapping of cyanogen bromide cartilage collagen peptides revealed the presence of types I and II collagen. These observations could be explained by a defect in the biosynthesis of type II collagen or in chondrocyte differentiation.

  3. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  4. The evolution of metazoan extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The modular domain structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and their genes has allowed extensive exon/domain shuffling during evolution to generate hundreds of ECM proteins. Many of these arose early during metazoan evolution and have been highly conserved ever since. Others have undergone duplication and divergence during evolution, and novel combinations of domains have evolved to generate new ECM proteins, particularly in the vertebrate lineage. The recent sequencing of several genomes has revealed many details of this conservation and evolution of ECM proteins to serve diverse functions in metazoa. PMID:22431747

  5. The tetrapartite synapse: extracellular matrix remodeling contributes to corticoaccumbens plasticity underlying drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander C.W.; Scofield, Michael D.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity has long been known to involve three key elements of neuropil, the presynapse, the postsynapse and adjacent glia. Here we review the role of the extracellular matrix in synaptic plasticity as a necessary component forming the tetrapartite synapse. We describe the role of matrix metalloproteinases as enzymes sculpting extracellular proteins and thereby creating an extracellular signaling domain required for synaptic plasticity. Specifically we focus on the role of the tetrapartite synapse in mediating the effects of addictive drugs at corticostriatal synapses, and conclude that the extracellular signaling domain and its regulation by matrix metalloproteinases is critical for developing and expressing drug seeking behaviors. PMID:25838241

  6. Protective effect of fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus on liver fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smad pathway-mediated inhibition of extracellular matrix and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Chen, Kan; Li, Sainan; Feng, Jiao; Liu, Tong; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Shizan; Zhou, Yuqing; Zhou, Shunfeng; Xia, Yujing; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a dynamic reversible pathological process in the development of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis. However, the current treatments are not administered for a long term due to their various side effects. Autophagy is initiated to decompose damaged or excess organelles, which had been found to alter the progression of liver fibrosis. In this article, we hypothesized that fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus may attenuate liver fibrosis in mice by inhibition of the extracellular matrix and autophagy in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced animal models of liver fibrosis. The results were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. Fucoidan from F. vesiculosus could inhibit the activation of hepatic stellate cells and the formation of extracellular matrix and autophagosomes, and its effect may be associated with the downregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1/Smads pathways. Fucoidan, as an autophagy and transforming growth factor beta 1 inhibitor, could be a promising potential therapeutic agent for liver fibrosis. PMID:26929597

  7. Protective effect of fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus on liver fibrosis via the TGF-β1/Smad pathway-mediated inhibition of extracellular matrix and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Chen, Kan; Li, Sainan; Feng, Jiao; Liu, Tong; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Shizan; Zhou, Yuqing; Zhou, Shunfeng; Xia, Yujing; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a dynamic reversible pathological process in the development of chronic liver disease to cirrhosis. However, the current treatments are not administered for a long term due to their various side effects. Autophagy is initiated to decompose damaged or excess organelles, which had been found to alter the progression of liver fibrosis. In this article, we hypothesized that fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus may attenuate liver fibrosis in mice by inhibition of the extracellular matrix and autophagy in carbon tetrachloride- and bile duct ligation-induced animal models of liver fibrosis. The results were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. Fucoidan from F. vesiculosus could inhibit the activation of hepatic stellate cells and the formation of extracellular matrix and autophagosomes, and its effect may be associated with the downregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1/Smads pathways. Fucoidan, as an autophagy and transforming growth factor beta 1 inhibitor, could be a promising potential therapeutic agent for liver fibrosis.

  8. Extracellular matrix structure governs invasion resistance in bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-08-01

    Many bacteria are highly adapted for life in communities, or biofilms. A defining feature of biofilms is the production of extracellular matrix that binds cells together. The biofilm matrix provides numerous fitness benefits, including protection from environmental stresses and enhanced nutrient availability. Here we investigate defense against biofilm invasion using the model bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We demonstrate that immotile cells, including those identical to the biofilm resident strain, are completely excluded from entry into resident biofilms. Motile cells can colonize and grow on the biofilm exterior, but are readily removed by shear forces. Protection from invasion into the biofilm interior is mediated by the secreted protein RbmA, which binds mother-daughter cell pairs to each other and to polysaccharide components of the matrix. RbmA, and the invasion protection it confers, strongly localize to the cell lineages that produce it.

  9. Extracellular matrix structure governs invasion resistance in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria are highly adapted for life in communities, or biofilms. A defining feature of biofilms is the production of extracellular matrix that binds cells together. The biofilm matrix provides numerous fitness benefits, including protection from environmental stresses and enhanced nutrient availability. Here we investigate defense against biofilm invasion using the model bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We demonstrate that immotile cells, including those identical to the biofilm resident strain, are completely excluded from entry into resident biofilms. Motile cells can colonize and grow on the biofilm exterior, but are readily removed by shear forces. Protection from invasion into the biofilm interior is mediated by the secreted protein RbmA, which binds mother–daughter cell pairs to each other and to polysaccharide components of the matrix. RbmA, and the invasion protection it confers, strongly localize to the cell lineages that produce it. PMID:25603396

  10. Extracellular Matrix, a Hard Player in Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mongiat, Maurizio; Andreuzzi, Eva; Tarticchio, Giulia; Paulitti, Alice

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex network of proteins, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and polysaccharides. Through multiple interactions with each other and the cell surface receptors, not only the ECM determines the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues, but also profoundly influences cell behavior and many physiological and pathological processes. One of the functions that have been extensively explored is its impingement on angiogenesis. The strong impact of the ECM in this context is both direct and indirect by virtue of its ability to interact and/or store several growth factors and cytokines. The aim of this review is to provide some examples of the complex molecular mechanisms that are elicited by these molecules in promoting or weakening the angiogenic processes. The scenario is intricate, since matrix remodeling often generates fragments displaying opposite effects compared to those exerted by the whole molecules. Thus, the balance will tilt towards angiogenesis or angiostasis depending on the relative expression of pro- or anti-angiogenetic molecules/fragments composing the matrix of a given tissue. One of the vital aspects of this field of research is that, for its endogenous nature, the ECM can be viewed as a reservoir to draw from for the development of new more efficacious therapies to treat angiogenesis-dependent pathologies. PMID:27809279

  11. Why regenerative medicine needs an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, Glenn D; Healy, Kevin E

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is now coming of age. Many attempts at cell therapy have failed to show significant efficacy, and the umbrella term 'stem cell therapy' is perceived in some quarters as hype or just expensive and unnecessary medical tourism. Here we present a short editorial in three parts. First, we examine the importance of using a semisynthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) mimetic, or sECM, to deliver and retain therapeutic cells at the site of administration. Second, we describe one approach in which biophysical and biochemical properties are tailored to each tissue type, which we call "design for optimal functionality." Third, we describe an alternative approach to sECM design and implementation, called "design for simplicity," in which a deconstructed, minimalist sECM is employed and biology is allowed to perform the customization in situ. We opine that an sECM, whether minimal or instructive, is an essential contributor to improve the outcomes of cell-based therapies.

  12. Extracellular Matrix Revisited: Roles in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a heterogeneous, connective network composed of fibrous glycoproteins that coordinate in vivo to provide the physical scaffolding, mechanical stability, and biochemical cues necessary for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. This review highlights some of the recently raised aspects of the roles of the ECM as related to the fields of biophysics and biomedical engineering. Fundamental aspects of focus include the role of the ECM as a basic cellular structure, for novel spontaneous network formation, as an ideal scaffold in tissue engineering, and its essential contribution to cell sheet technology. As these technologies move from the laboratory to clinical practice, they are bound to shape the vast field of tissue engineering for medical transplantations. PMID:27230457

  13. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  14. Crosstalk between glia, extracellular matrix and neurons.

    PubMed

    Song, Inseon; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-03-08

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in the central nervous system form highly organized ECM structures around cell somata, axon initial segments, and synapses and play prominent roles in early development by guiding cell migration, neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, and by regulating closure of the critical period of development, synaptic plasticity and stability, cognitive flexibility, and axonal regeneration in adults. Major components of neural ECM, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), tenascin-R and hyaluronic acid, are synthesized by both neurons and glial cells. The expression of these molecules is dynamically regulated during brain development in physiological conditions, shaping both neuronal and glial functions through multitude of molecular mechanisms. Upregulation of particular CSPGs and other ECM molecules, in particular by reactive astrocytes, after CNS injuries, during aging, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration on the one hand results in formation of growth-impermissive environment and impaired synaptic plasticity. On the other hand, ECM appeared to have a neuroprotective effect, at least in the form of perineuronal nets. CSPGs-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and several members of the disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family of proteases are secreted by neurons and glia and may drive neural ECM remodeling in physiological conditions as well as after brain injury and other brain disorders. Thus, targeting expression of specific ECM molecules, associated glycans and degrading enzymes may lead to development of new therapeutic strategies promoting regeneration and synaptic plasticity.

  15. Extracellular matrix and its receptors in Drosophila neural development

    PubMed Central

    Broadie, Kendal; Baumgartner, Stefan; Prokop, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) and matrix receptors are intimately involved in most biological processes. The ECM plays fundamental developmental and physiological roles in health and disease, including processes underlying the development, maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system. To understand the principles of ECM-mediated functions in the nervous system, genetic model organisms like Drosophila provide simple, malleable and powerful experimental platforms. This article provides an overview of ECM proteins and receptors in Drosophila. It then focuses on their roles during three progressive phases of neural development: 1) neural progenitor proliferation, 2) axonal growth and pathfinding and 3) synapse formation and function. Each section highlights known ECM and ECM-receptor components and recent studies done in mutant conditions to reveal their in vivo functions, all illustrating the enormous opportunities provided when merging work on the nervous system with systematic research into ECM-related gene functions. PMID:21688401

  16. Positional information in axolotl and mouse limb extracellular matrix is mediated via heparan sulfate and fibroblast growth factor during limb regeneration in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum)

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Anne Q.; Lee, Jangwoo; Oei, Michelle; Flath, Craig; Hwe, Caitlyn; Mariano, Rachele; Vu, Tiffany; Shu, Cynthia; Dinh, Andrew; Simkin, Jennifer; Muneoka, Ken; Bryant, Susan V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Urodele amphibians are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate complex body structures after traumatic injury. In salamander regeneration, the cells maintain a memory of their original position and use this positional information to recreate the missing pattern. We used an in vivo gain‐of‐function assay to determine whether components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have positional information required to induce formation of new limb pattern during regeneration. We discovered that salamander limb ECM has a position‐specific ability to either inhibit regeneration or induce de novo limb structure, and that this difference is dependent on heparan sulfates that are associated with differential expression of heparan sulfate sulfotransferases. We also discovered that an artificial ECM containing only heparan sulfate was sufficient to induce de novo limb pattern in salamander limb regeneration. Finally, ECM from mouse limbs is capable of inducing limb pattern in axolotl blastemas in a position‐specific, developmental‐stage‐specific, and heparan sulfate‐dependent manner. This study demonstrates a mechanism for positional information in regeneration and establishes a crucial functional link between salamander regeneration and mammals. PMID:27499874

  17. Positional information in axolotl and mouse limb extracellular matrix is mediated via heparan sulfate and fibroblast growth factor during limb regeneration in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    Phan, Anne Q; Lee, Jangwoo; Oei, Michelle; Flath, Craig; Hwe, Caitlyn; Mariano, Rachele; Vu, Tiffany; Shu, Cynthia; Dinh, Andrew; Simkin, Jennifer; Muneoka, Ken; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2015-08-01

    Urodele amphibians are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate complex body structures after traumatic injury. In salamander regeneration, the cells maintain a memory of their original position and use this positional information to recreate the missing pattern. We used an in vivo gain-of-function assay to determine whether components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have positional information required to induce formation of new limb pattern during regeneration. We discovered that salamander limb ECM has a position-specific ability to either inhibit regeneration or induce de novo limb structure, and that this difference is dependent on heparan sulfates that are associated with differential expression of heparan sulfate sulfotransferases. We also discovered that an artificial ECM containing only heparan sulfate was sufficient to induce de novo limb pattern in salamander limb regeneration. Finally, ECM from mouse limbs is capable of inducing limb pattern in axolotl blastemas in a position-specific, developmental-stage-specific, and heparan sulfate-dependent manner. This study demonstrates a mechanism for positional information in regeneration and establishes a crucial functional link between salamander regeneration and mammals.

  18. Extracellular matrix components in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Injured axons of the peripheral nerve are able to regenerate and, eventually, reinnervate target organs. However, functional recovery is usually poor after severe nerve injuries. The switch of Schwann cells to a proliferative state, secretion of trophic factors, and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (such as collagen, laminin, or fibronectin) in the distal stump are key elements to create a permissive environment for axons to grow. In this review, we focus attention on the ECM components and their tropic role in axonal regeneration. These components can also be used as molecular cues to guide the axons through artificial nerve guides in attempts to better mimic the natural environment found in a degenerating nerve. Most used scaffolds tested are based on natural molecules that form the ECM, but use of synthetic polymers and functionalization of hydrogels are bringing new options. Progress in tissue engineering will eventually lead to the design of composite artificial nerve grafts that may replace the use of autologous nerve grafts to sustain regeneration over long gaps.

  19. Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Arterial Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    WAGENSEIL, JESSICA E.; MECHAM, ROBERT P.

    2009-01-01

    An important factor in the transition from an open to a closed circulatory system was a change in vessel wall structure and composition that enabled the large arteries to store and release energy during the cardiac cycle. The component of the arterial wall in vertebrates that accounts for these properties is the elastic fiber network organized by medial smooth muscle. Beginning with the onset of pulsatile blood flow in the developing aorta, smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that will ultimately define the mechanical properties that are critical for proper function of the adult vascular system. This review discusses the structural ECM proteins in the vertebrate aortic wall and will explore how the choice of ECM components has changed through evolution as the cardiovascular system became more advanced and pulse pressure increased. By correlating vessel mechanics with physiological blood pressure across animal species and in mice with altered vessel compliance, we show that cardiac and vascular development are physiologically coupled, and we provide evidence for a universal elastic modulus that controls the parameters of ECM deposition in vessel wall development. We also discuss mechanical models that can be used to design better tissue-engineered vessels and to test the efficacy of clinical treatments. PMID:19584318

  20. Extracellular matrix, supramolecular organisation and shape.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J E

    1995-01-01

    Connective tissue function is defined as the formation and maintenance of shape, without which centralised physiologies (circulatory, digestive or nervous) could not have evolved. Two elements, inextensible (collagenous) fibrils and compression-resistant interfibrillar soluble polymers (proteoglycans), cope with all usual stresses. Relationships between the two are highly specific, as demonstrated by electron histochemistry based on Cupromeronic blue and critical electrolyte concentration (CEC) methodologies. Recent ideas on (1) the protofibrillar or modular structure of collagen fibrils, (2) the nature of specific binding sites for proteoglycans on fibrils, and (3) fundamental similarities in secondary and tertiary structures of the glycosaminoglycans (hyaluronan, chondroitin, keratan and dermatan sulphates) are described. They have greatly illuminated the study of extracellular matrix structure and function in normal, pathological (osteogenesis imperfecta) and ageing tissues. The small proteoglycans are proposed to be tissue organisers, orienting and ordering the collagen fibrils--thus shaping the tissue at a molecular and ultimately macro level. These interfibrillar structures are based on their bifunctional character, the protein parts binding to collagen fibrils at specific sites and the glycosaminoglycans duplexing and aggregating to hold the proteins and hence the collagen fibrils at defined distances from each other, rather like yardsticks. Examples of the way these functions work in specific tissues are drawn from the cornea and vitreous humour of the eye and developing tendon. Images Fig. 3 (cont.) Fig. 3 PMID:7591990

  1. Micro- and macrorheology of jellyfish extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J M

    2012-01-04

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish.

  2. Extracellular matrix mechanics in lung parenchymal diseases.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Bates, Jason H T

    2008-11-30

    In this review, we examine how the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the lung contributes to the overall mechanical properties of the parenchyma, and how these properties change in disease. The connective tissues of the lung are composed of cells and ECM, which includes a variety of biological macromolecules and water. The macromolecules that are most important in determining the mechanical properties of the ECM are collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans. We first discuss the various components of the ECM and how their architectural organization gives rise to the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. Next, we examine how mechanical forces can affect the physiological functioning of the lung parenchyma. Collagen plays an especially important role in determining the homeostasis and cellular responses to injury because it is the most important load-bearing component of the parenchyma. We then demonstrate how the concept of percolation can be used to link microscopic pathologic alterations in the parenchyma to clinically measurable lung function during the progression of emphysema and fibrosis. Finally, we speculate about the possibility of using targeted tissue engineering to optimize treatment of these two major lung diseases.

  3. C/EBP β Mediates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulated Inflammatory Response and Extracellular Matrix Degradation in LPS-Stimulated Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yudi; Wei, Yi; Wu, Lian; Wei, Jianhua; Wang, Xiaojing; Bai, Yuxiang

    2016-03-22

    Periodontitis is an oral inflammatory disease that not only affects the integrity of local tooth-supporting tissues but also impacts systemic health. A compositional shift in oral microbiota has been considered as the main cause of periodontitis; however, the potential mechanism has not been fully defined. Herein, we investigated the role of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP β), a member of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis showed that the expression of C/EBP β was significantly increased in hPDLCs stimulated with LPS stimuli. Overexpression of C/EBP β by the recombinant adenoviral vector pAd/C/EBP β markedly increased the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-8 and -9 in hPDLCs in response to LPS. Furthermore, the activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was confirmed in LPS-stimulated hPDLCs by measuring the expression of the ER stress marker molecules protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK), eIF2α, GRP78/Bip, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). The ER stress inhibitor salubrinal repressed, but inducer tunicamycin enhanced, the production of IL-6, IL-8, MMP-8, and MMP-9 in hPDLCs. Additionally, ER stress inducer tunicamycin significantly increased the expression level of C/EBP β in hPDLCs. Blocking of C/EBP β by siRNA resulted in a significant decrease in the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 and expression of MMP-8 and MMP-9 induced by tunicamycin treatment in hPDLCs. Taken together, ER stress appears to play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in hPDLCs in response to LPS stimuli by activating C/EBP β expression. This enhances our understanding of human periodontitis pathology.

  4. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0751 (Pallilysin) Reveals a Non-canonical Lipocalin Fold That Mediates Adhesion to Extracellular Matrix Components and Interactions with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Lithgow, Karen V.; Hof, Rebecca; Wetherell, Charmaine; Kao, Wei-Chien; Lin, Yi-Pin; Ebady, Rhodaba; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Treponema pallidum disseminates widely throughout the host and extravasates from the vasculature, a process that is at least partially dependent upon the ability of T. pallidum to interact with host extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Defining the molecular basis for the interaction between T. pallidum and the host is complicated by the intractability of T. pallidum to in vitro culturing and genetic manipulation. Correspondingly, few T. pallidum proteins have been identified that interact directly with host components. Of these, Tp0751 (also known as pallilysin) displays a propensity to interact with the ECM, although the underlying mechanism of these interactions remains unknown. Towards establishing the molecular mechanism of Tp0751-host ECM attachment, we first determined the crystal structure of Tp0751 to a resolution of 2.15 Å using selenomethionine phasing. Structural analysis revealed an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a profile of short conserved regions consistent with a non-canonical lipocalin fold. Using a library of native and scrambled peptides representing the full Tp0751 sequence, we next identified a subset of peptides that showed statistically significant and dose-dependent interactions with the ECM components fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen IV. Intriguingly, each ECM-interacting peptide mapped to the lipocalin domain. To assess the potential of these ECM-coordinating peptides to inhibit adhesion of bacteria to host cells, we engineered an adherence-deficient strain of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to heterologously express Tp0751. This engineered strain displayed Tp0751 on its surface and exhibited a Tp0751-dependent gain-of-function in adhering to human umbilical vein endothelial cells that was inhibited in the presence of one of the ECM-interacting peptides (p10). Overall, these data provide the first structural insight into the

  5. ZEB1 Induces LOXL2-Mediated Collagen Stabilization and Deposition in the Extracellular Matrix to Drive Lung Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, David H.; Ungewiss, Christin; Tong, Pan; Byers, Lauren A.; Wang, Jing; Canales, Jaime Rodriguez; Villalobos, Pamela A.; Uraoka, Naohiro; Mino, Barbara; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Han, Richard I; Wanna, Charles A.; Fahrenholtz, Monica; Grande-Allen, Kathryn Jane; Creighton, Chad J.; Gibbons, Don L.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death, primarily due to distant metastatic disease. Metastatic lung cancer cells can undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulated by many transcription factors, including double-negative feedback loop between the microRNA-200 (miR-200) family and ZEB1, but the precise mechanisms by which ZEB1-dependent EMT promotes malignancy remain largely undefined. While the cell-intrinsic effects of EMT are important for tumor progression, the reciprocal dynamic crosstalk between mesenchymal cancer cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is equally critical in regulating invasion and metastasis. Investigating the collaborative effect of EMT and ECM in the metastatic process reveals increased collagen deposition in metastatic tumor tissues as a direct consequence of amplified collagen gene expression in ZEB1-activated mesenchymal lung cancer cells. Additionally, collagen fibers in metastatic lung tumors exhibit greater linearity and organization as a result of collagen crosslinking by the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of enzymes. Expression of the LOX and LOXL2 isoforms is directly regulated by miR-200 and ZEB1, respectively, and their upregulation in metastatic tumors and mesenchymal cell lines is coordinated to that of collagen. Functionally, LOXL2, as opposed to LOX, is the principle isoform that crosslinks and stabilizes insoluble collagen deposition in tumor tissues. In turn, focal adhesion formation and FAK/SRC signaling is activated in mesenchymal tumor cells by crosslinked collagen in the ECM. Our study is the first to validate direct regulation of LOX and LOXL2 by the miR-200/ZEB1 axis, defines a novel mechanism driving tumor metastasis, delineates collagen as a prognostic marker, and identifies LOXL2 as a potential therapeutic target against tumor progression. PMID:27694892

  6. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  7. The Extracellular Matrix In Development and Morphogenesis: A Dynamic View

    PubMed Central

    Rozario, Tania; DeSimone, Douglas W.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is synthesized and secreted by embryonic cells beginning at the earliest stages of development. Our understanding of ECM composition, structure and function has grown considerably in the last several decades and this knowledge has revealed that the extracellular microenvironment is critically important for cell growth, survival, differentiation and morphogenesis. ECM and the cellular receptors that interact with it mediate both physical linkages with the cytoskeleton and the bidirectional flow of information between the extracellular and intracellular compartments. This review considers the range of cell and tissue functions attributed to ECM molecules and summarizes recent findings specific to key developmental processes. The importance of ECM as a dynamic repository for growth factors is highlighted along with more recent studies implicating the 3-dimensional organization and physical properties of the ECM as it relates to cell signaling and the regulation of morphogenetic cell behaviors. Embryonic cell and tissue generated forces and mechanical signals arising from ECM adhesion represent emerging areas of interest in this field. PMID:19854168

  8. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Walter H.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  9. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  10. The RhoA-Rok-Myosin II Pathway is Involved in Extracellular Matrix-Mediated Regulation of Prolactin Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jyun-Yi; Chen, Meng-Chi; Hsu, Tsai-Ching; Wang, Jen-Hsing; Brackenbury, Lisa; Lin, Ting-Hui; Wu, Yi-Ying; Yang, Zhihong; Streuli, Charles H; Lee, Yi-Ju

    2012-01-01

    In mammary epithelial cells (MECs), prolactin-induced signaling and gene expression requires integrin-mediated cell adhesion to basement membrane (BM). In the absence of proper cell–BM interactions, for example, culturing cells on collagen-coated plastic dishes, signal propagation is substantially impaired. Here we demonstrate that the RhoA-Rok-myosin II pathway accounts for the ineffectiveness of prolactin signaling in MECs cultured on collagen I. Under these culture conditions, the RhoA pathway is activated, leading to downregulation of prolactin receptor expression and reduced prolactin signaling. Enforced activation of RhoA in MECs cultured on BM suppresses prolactin receptor levels, and prevents prolactin-induced Stat5 tyrosine phosphorylation and β-casein expression. Overexpression of dominant negative RhoA in MECs cultured on collagen I, or inhibiting Rok activity, increases prolactin receptor expression, and enhances prolactin signaling. In addition, inhibition of myosin II ATPase activity by blebbistatin also exerts a beneficial effect on prolactin receptor expression and prolactin signaling, suggesting that tension exerted by the collagen substratum, in collaboration with the RhoA-Rok-myosin II pathway, contributes to the failure of prolactin signaling. Furthermore, MECs cultured on laminin-coated plastic have similar morphology and response to prolactin as those cultured on collagen I. They display high levels of RhoA activity and are inefficient in prolactin signaling, stressing the importance of matrix stiffness in signal transduction. Our results reveal that RhoA has a central role in determining the fate decisions of MECs in response to cell–matrix interactions. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 1553–1560, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21678418

  11. Using self-assembled monolayers to model the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Mrksich, Milan

    2009-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is an insoluble aggregate of large proteins and glycosoaminoglycans that comprises the microenvironment of cells in tissue. The matrix displays a host of ligands that interact with cell-surface receptors to mediate the attachment and spreading of cells and regulate signaling processes. Studies of cell-matrix interactions and downstream signaling processes commonly employ substrates having an adsorbed layer of protein and are challenged by the difficulty in controlling the structure and activity of the immobilized protein. Significant effort has been directed towards the development of model substrates that present adhesion ligands in defined densities, orientations and environments. Among these approaches, self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on gold offer a high level of control over the molecular structure of the surface and are well-suited to studies of cell adhesion. This review describes the design and use of monolayers for applications in cell biology, including the use of monolayers to evaluate the roles of peptide and protein ligands in cell-matrix interactions, the development of methods to pattern ligands on monolayers and applications to cell biology, the development of dynamic monolayers that can switch the activities of ligands presented to an adherent cell, and the rewiring of interactions between a cell and its substrate. These examples illustrate the flexibility inherent to monolayers for applications in cell biology.

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, F.; Bradley, D. A.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve (⩽20% strain), from 23±18 kPa for controls to 57±22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy ( p=0.01, α=0.05). At larger strain (⩾20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92±0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31±0.56 MPa ( p=0.01, α=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626±65 kPa, irradiated 474±121 kPa ( p=0.02, α=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400±194 cP for controls to 1500±88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s -1 and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  13. Extracellular Matrix and Fibroblast Communication Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yonggang; Halade, Ganesh V.; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support by serving as a scaffold for cells, and as such the ECM maintains normal tissue homeostasis and mediates the repair response following injury. In response to myocardial infarction (MI), ECM expression is generally upregulated in the left ventricle (LV), which regulates LV remodeling by modulating scar formation. The ECM directly affects scar formation by regulating growth factor release and cell adhesion, and indirectly affects scar formation by regulating the inflammatory, angiogenic, and fibroblast responses. This review summarizes the current literature on ECM expression patterns and fibroblast mechanisms in the myocardium, focusing on the ECM response to MI. In addition, we discuss future research areas that are needed to better understand the molecular mechanisms of ECM action, both in general and as a means to optimize infarct healing. PMID:22926488

  14. Extracellular matrix as a driver for lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Balestrini, Jenna L; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular matrix has manifold roles in tissue mechanics, guidance of cellular behavior, developmental biology, and regenerative medicine. Over the past several decades, various pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that many connective tissues may be replaced and/or regenerated using suitable extracellular matrix scaffolds. More recently, decellularization of lung tissue has shown that gentle removal of cells can leave behind a "footprint" within the matrix that may guide cellular adhesion, differentiation and homing following cellular repopulation. Fundamental issues like understanding matrix composition and micro-mechanics remain difficult to tackle, largely because of a lack of available assays and tools for systematically characterizing intact matrix from tissues and organs. This review will critically examine the role of engineered and native extracellular matrix in tissue and lung regeneration, and provide insights into directions for future research and translation.

  15. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  16. Response of zonal chondrocytes to extracellular matrix-hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Nathaniel S; Varghese, Shyni; Lee, H Janice; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam; Sharma, Blanka; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2007-09-04

    We investigated the biological response of chondrocytes isolated from different zones of articular cartilage and their cellular behaviors in poly (ethylene glycol)-based (PEG) hydrogels containing exogenous type I collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), or chondroitin sulfate (CS). The cellular morphology was strongly dependent on the extracellular matrix component of hydrogels. Additionally, the exogenous extracellular microenvironment affected matrix production and cartilage specific gene expression of chondrocytes from different zones. CS-based hydrogels showed the strongest response in terms of gene expression and matrix accumulation for both superficial and deep zone chondrocytes, but HA and type I collagen-based hydrogels demonstrated zonal-dependent cellular responses.

  17. RESPONSE OF ZONAL CHONDROCYTES TO EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX-HYDROGELS

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Nathaniel S.; Varghese, Shyni; Lee, H. Janice; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam; Sharma, Blanka; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the biological response of chondrocytes isolated from different zones of articular cartilage and their cellular behaviors in poly (ethylene glycol)-based (PEG) hydrogels containing exogenous type I collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), or chondroitin sulfate (CS). The cellular morphology was strongly dependent on the extracellular matrix component of hydrogels. Additionally, the exogenous extracellular microenvironment affected matrix production and cartilage specific gene expression of chondrocytes from different zones. CS-based hydrogels showed the strongest response in terms of gene expression and matrix accumulation for both superficial and deep zone chondrocytes, but HA and type I collagen-based hydrogels demonstrated zonal-dependent cellular responses. PMID:17692846

  18. Extracellular matrix: A dynamic microenvironment for stem cell niche☆

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Francesca; Urciuolo, Anna; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and complex environment characterized by biophysical, mechanical and biochemical properties specific for each tissue and able to regulate cell behavior. Stem cells have a key role in the maintenance and regeneration of tissues and they are located in a specific microenvironment, defined as niche. Scope of review We overview the progresses that have been made in elucidating stem cell niches and discuss the mechanisms by which ECM affects stem cell behavior. We also summarize the current tools and experimental models for studying ECM–stem cell interactions. Major conclusions ECM represents an essential player in stem cell niche, since it can directly or indirectly modulate the maintenance, proliferation, self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Several ECM molecules play regulatory functions for different types of stem cells, and based on its molecular composition the ECM can be deposited and finely tuned for providing the most appropriate niche for stem cells in the various tissues. Engineered biomaterials able to mimic the in vivo characteristics of stem cell niche provide suitable in vitro tools for dissecting the different roles exerted by the ECM and its molecular components on stem cell behavior. General significance ECM is a key component of stem cell niches and is involved in various aspects of stem cell behavior, thus having a major impact on tissue homeostasis and regeneration under physiological and pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. PMID:24418517

  19. First demonstration of decorin, an extracellular matrix molecule, in bovine mammary tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the mammary gland, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is secreted by and surrounds cells located in both mammary parenchyma (PAR) and stroma. Decorin is an ECM proteoglycan with cell growth regulatory effects mediated by its ability to interact with growth factors or up-regulation of cyclin-dependent...

  20. Extracellular matrix protein CCN1 limits oncolytic efficacy in glioma.

    PubMed

    Haseley, Amy; Boone, Sean; Wojton, Jeffrey; Yu, Lianbo; Yoo, Ji Young; Yu, Jianhua; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Glorioso, Joseph C; Caligiuri, Michael A; Kaur, Balveen

    2012-03-15

    Oncolytic viral therapy has been explored widely as an option for glioma treatment but its effectiveness has remained limited. Cysteine rich 61 (CCN1) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein elevated in cancer cells that modulates their adhesion and migration by binding cell surface receptors. In this study, we examined a hypothesized role for CCN1 in limiting the efficacy of oncolytic viral therapy for glioma, based on evidence of CCN1 induction that occurs in this setting. Strikingly, we found that exogenous CCN1 in glioma ECM orchestrated a cellular antiviral response that reduced viral replication and limited cytolytic efficacy. Gene expression profiling and real-time PCR analysis revealed a significant induction of type-I interferon responsive genes in response to CCN1 exposure. This induction was accompanied by activation of the Jak/Stat signaling pathway, consistent with induction of an innate antiviral cellular response. Both effects were mediated by the binding of CCN1 to the cell surface integrin α6β1, activating its signaling and leading to rapid secretion of interferon-α, which was essential for the innate antiviral effect. Together, our findings reveal how an integrin signaling pathway mediates activation of a type-I antiviral interferon response that can limit the efficacy of oncolytic viral therapy. Furthermore, they suggest therapeutic interventions to inhibit CCN1-integrin α6 interactions to sensitize gliomas to viral oncolysis.

  1. The extracellular matrix modulates the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Michael W; Mouw, Janna K; Weaver, Valerie M

    2014-12-01

    The extracellular matrix regulates tissue development and homeostasis, and its dysregulation contributes to neoplastic progression. The extracellular matrix serves not only as the scaffold upon which tissues are organized but provides critical biochemical and biomechanical cues that direct cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation and modulate vascular development and immune function. Thus, while genetic modifications in tumor cells undoubtedly initiate and drive malignancy, cancer progresses within a dynamically evolving extracellular matrix that modulates virtually every behavioral facet of the tumor cells and cancer-associated stromal cells. Hanahan and Weinberg defined the hallmarks of cancer to encompass key biological capabilities that are acquired and essential for the development, growth and dissemination of all human cancers. These capabilities include sustained proliferation, evasion of growth suppression, death resistance, replicative immortality, induced angiogenesis, initiation of invasion, dysregulation of cellular energetics, avoidance of immune destruction and chronic inflammation. Here, we argue that biophysical and biochemical cues from the tumor-associated extracellular matrix influence each of these cancer hallmarks and are therefore critical for malignancy. We suggest that the success of cancer prevention and therapy programs requires an intimate understanding of the reciprocal feedback between the evolving extracellular matrix, the tumor cells and its cancer-associated cellular stroma.

  2. Monitoring of Extracellular Matrix Formation using Nanosecond Pulsed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Masato; Mitani, Genya; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Mochida, Joji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    There is a new demand in the field of tissue engineering for evaluation technology of extracellular matrix because the extracellular matrix plays an important role in the function of skeletal tissue such as articular cartilage. We previously proposed a noninvasive method of viscoelastic characterization of tissue phantom, based on the photoacoustic measurement. The purpose of this study was to verify the applicability of the photoacoustic measurement method for monitoring of the development of extracellular matrix using tissue engineering technology. The decay times measured by the photoacoustic method were varied with culture periods when tissue-engineered articular cartilages with various culture periods (-12 weeks) were used as samples. Tissue-engineered cartilage cultured for a long period showed shorter decay times, indicating that the samples approached an elastic solid from a rheological viewpoint. By comparison between biochemical analyses and biomechanical studies, we proved that the photoacoustic signal was a good indicator for evaluating extracellular matrix formation because the change of the photoacoustic decay times would reflect the production of an extracellular matrix.

  3. Vitamin A Deficiency and Alterations in the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Teresa; Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo; Marín, María Pilar; Timoneda, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A or retinol which is the natural precursor of several biologically active metabolites can be considered the most multifunctional vitamin in mammals. Its deficiency is currently, along with protein malnutrition, the most serious and common nutritional disorder worldwide. It is necessary for normal embryonic development and postnatal tissue homeostasis, and exerts important effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These actions are produced mainly by regulating the expression of a variety of proteins through transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Extracellular matrix proteins are among those whose synthesis is known to be modulated by vitamin A. Retinoic acid, the main biologically active form of vitamin A, influences the expression of collagens, laminins, entactin, fibronectin, elastin and proteoglycans, which are the major components of the extracellular matrix. Consequently, the structure and macromolecular composition of this extracellular compartment is profoundly altered as a result of vitamin A deficiency. As cell behavior, differentiation and apoptosis, and tissue mechanics are influenced by the extracellular matrix, its modifications potentially compromise organ function and may lead to disease. This review focuses on the effects of lack of vitamin A in the extracellular matrix of several organs and discusses possible molecular mechanisms and pathologic implications. PMID:25389900

  4. The assembly of integrin adhesion complexes requires both extracellular matrix and intracellular rho/rac GTPases

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix via integrin adhesion receptors plays an important role in a wide range of cellular: functions, for example cell growth, movement, and differentiation. Upon interaction with substrate, integrins cluster and associate with a variety of cytoplasmic proteins to form focal complexes and with the actin cytoskeleton. Although the intracellular signals induced by integrins are at present undefined, it is thought that they are mediated by proteins recruited to the focal complexes. It has been suggested, for example, that after recruitment to focal adhesions p125FAK can activate the ERK1/2 MAP kinase cascade. We have previously reported that members of the rho family of small GTPases can trigger the assembly of focal complexes when activated in cells. Using microinjection techniques, we have now examined the role of the extracellular matrix and of the two GTP-binding proteins, rac and rho, in the assembly of integrin complexes in both mouse and human fibroblasts. We find that the interaction of integrins with extracellular matrix alone is not sufficient to induce integrin clustering and focal complex formation. Similarly, activation of rho or rac by extracellular growth factors does not lead to focal complex formation in the absence of matrix. Focal complexes are only assembled in the presence of both matrix and functionally active members of the rho family. In agreement with this, the interaction of integrins with matrix in the absence of rho/rac activity is unable to activate the ERK1/2 kinases in Swiss 3T3 cells. In fact, ERK1/2 can be activated fully by growth factors in the absence of matrix and it seems unlikely, therefore, that the adhesion dependence of fibroblast growth is mediated through the ras/MAP kinase pathway. We conclude that extracellular matrix is not sufficient to trigger focal complex assembly and subsequent integrin-dependent signal transduction in the absence of functionally active members of the rho

  5. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Wustman, Brandon A.; Lind, Jan; Wetherbee, Richard; Gretz, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1–AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, ≥ 20,000,000 Mr; F2, ≅100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The ≅100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility. PMID:9536061

  6. Extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin-mediated myogenic satellite cell responsiveness to transforming growth factor-beta1 during cell proliferation and differentiation Decorin and transforming growth factor-beta1 in satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuehui; McFarland, Douglas C; Velleman, Sandra G

    2008-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent inhibitor of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. Decorin, a small proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix, binds to TGF-beta1 and modulates the activity of TGF-beta1 during muscle cell growth and development. However, its interaction with TGF-beta1 and involvement in myogenesis is not well characterized. In the present study, chicken myogenic satellite cells, myogenic precursors for muscle growth and repair, were isolated from the pectoralis major muscle and used to investigate the biological function of TGF-beta1 and decorin during myogenesis. The over-expression of decorin in satellite cells significantly increased cell proliferation, compared to the control cells. Consistent with this result, reducing decorin expression decreased cell proliferation, which suggests a decorin-mediated mechanism is involved in the regulation of myogenic satellite cell proliferation. Satellite cells over-expressing decorin were less sensitive to TGF-beta1 during proliferation, which indicates that decorin may sequester TGF-beta1 leading to increased proliferation. During satellite cell differentiation, the over-expression of decorin induced differentiation by increasing the muscle specific creatine kinase concentration. However, the addition of TGF-beta1 diminished decorin-mediated cell responsiveness to TGF-beta1 during differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that decorin induces myogenic satellite cell proliferation and differentiation by regulating cellular responsiveness to TGF-beta1. An alternative TGF-beta1-independent pathway may be involved in the regulation of satellite cells by decorin.

  7. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Colagiorgi, Angelo; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi; Zanardi, Emanuela; Ghidini, Sergio; Ianieri, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s). In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM) of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments. PMID:27681916

  8. Regulation of Osteoblast Survival by the Extracellular Matrix and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus. Ruth K.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight adversely affects the skeleton, posing a substantial risk to astronaut's health during long duration missions. The reduced bone mass observed in growing animals following spaceflight is due at least in part to inadequate bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, it is of central importance to identify basic cellular mechanisms underlying normal bone formation. The fundamental ideas underlying our research are that interactions between extracellular matrix proteins, integrin adhesion receptors, cytoplasmic signaling and cytoskeletal proteins are key ingredients for the proper functioning of osteoblasts, and that gravity impacts these interactions. As an in vitro model system we used primary fetal rat calvarial cells which faithfully recapitulate osteoblast differentiation characteristically observed in vivo. We showed that specific integrin receptors ((alpha)3(beta)1), ((alpha)5(beta)1), ((alpha)8(betal)1) and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, laminin) were needed for the differentiation of immature osteoblasts. In the course of maturation, cultured osteoblasts switched from depending on fibronectin and laminin for differentiation to depending on these proteins for their very survival. Furthermore, we found that manipulating the gravity vector using ground-based models resulted in activation of key intracellular survival signals generated by integrin/extracellular matrix interactions. We are currently testing the in vivo relevance of some of these observations using targeted transgenic technology. In conclusion, mechanical factors including gravity may participate in regulating survival via cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. This leads us to speculate that microgravity adversely affects the survival of osteoblasts and contributes to spaceflight-induced osteoporosis.

  9. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments.

    PubMed

    Birch, Helen L; Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Rumian, Adam P

    2013-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures.

  10. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Wang, Steven X.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  11. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  12. Scatter factor binds to thrombospondin and other extracellular matrix components.

    PubMed Central

    Lamszus, K.; Joseph, A.; Jin, L.; Yao, Y.; Chowdhury, S.; Fuchs, A.; Polverini, P. J.; Goldberg, I. D.; Rosen, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    Scatter factor (SF) is an angiogenic growth factor that stimulates motility and invasion of carcinoma cells. SF is present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of breast cancers, where it might act to promote tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis. To investigate how SF is incorporated into the ECM, we studied the binding of SF to various ECM components using a solid-phase binding assay based on the SF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that SF binds to a variety of ECM molecules, with different binding capacities. The highest SF binding capacities were observed for thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), fibronectin (Fn), and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, although SF did not bind to albumin. Mature two-chain SF and precursor single-chain SF bound approximately equally well to TSP-1 and Fn. Moreover, two SF alpha-chain peptides (NK1 and NK2) both bound to TSP-1 and Fn, suggesting that the whole SF molecule is not required for binding. Based on binding competition assays, TSP-1 exhibited higher affinity for SF than did nine other ECM molecules, including Fn and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Although heparin in solution potently inhibited the binding of SF to TSP-1-coated surfaces, even very high concentrations of heparin could not elute SF already bound to TSP-1. SF binding was modulated by binding interactions among ECM molecules (TSP-1-Fn, TSP-1-collagen I, and Fn-collagen I), suggesting that the matrix capacity to bind SF depends upon its exact composition. SF bound in a dose-dependent fashion to ECMs secreted by three human breast carcinoma cell lines. Binding of SF to matrices from all three cell lines was significantly inhibited by preincubation of the matrices with antibodies against TSP-1, whereas antibodies against several other ECM components were less effective or ineffective in inhibiting SF binding. In addition, TSP-1 markedly inhibited chemotaxis of microvascular endothelial cells toward SF and SF-induced angiogenesis in the rat cornea neovascularization assay

  13. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction.

  14. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  15. Decellularized zebrafish cardiac extracellular matrix induces mammalian heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William C. W.; Wang, Zhouguang; Missinato, Maria Azzurra; Park, Dae Woo; Long, Daniel Ward; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Kim, Kang; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Heart attack is a global health problem that leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and health care burden. Adult human hearts have very limited regenerative capability after injury. However, evolutionarily primitive species generally have higher regenerative capacity than mammals. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to this difference. Mammalian cardiac ECM may not be optimally inductive for cardiac regeneration because of the fibrotic, instead of regenerative, responses in injured adult mammalian hearts. Given the high regenerative capacity of adult zebrafish hearts, we hypothesize that decellularized zebrafish cardiac ECM (zECM) made from normal or healing hearts can induce mammalian heart regeneration. Using zebrafish and mice as representative species of lower vertebrates and mammals, we show that a single administration of zECM, particularly the healing variety, enables cardiac functional recovery and regeneration of adult mouse heart tissues after acute myocardial infarction. zECM-treated groups exhibit proliferation of the remaining cardiomyocytes and multiple cardiac precursor cell populations and reactivation of ErbB2 expression in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, zECM exhibits pro-proliferative and chemotactic effects on human cardiac precursor cell populations in vitro. These contribute to the structural preservation and correlate with significantly higher cardiac contractile function, notably less left ventricular dilatation, and substantially more elastic myocardium in zECM-treated hearts than control animals treated with saline or decellularized adult mouse cardiac ECM. Inhibition of ErbB2 activity abrogates beneficial effects of zECM administration, indicating the possible involvement of ErbB2 signaling in zECM-mediated regeneration. This study departs from conventional focuses on mammalian ECM and introduces a new approach for cardiac tissue regeneration. PMID:28138518

  16. Effects of extracellular matrix on the malignant phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Luikart, S. D.

    1988-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules, including collagen, glycosaminoglycans (usually linked to a protein core as proteoglycan), elastin, and glycoproteins, influence the initiation and maintenance of differentiation of a variety of cell types. These molecules bind to the cell surface at specific sites and nonspecifically by electrostatic forces. Such interactions may alter the cell's response to growth and differentiation factors. After neoplastic transformation, most cells retain some dependence on these factors. This paper reviews the influence of matrix components on the phenotype of a variety of malignant cells and concludes that in vitro studies of malignant cell behavior require the utilization of an appropriate microenvironment. PMID:3284211

  17. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient’s tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient’s tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient’s tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  18. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient's tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient's tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient's tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies.

  19. Targeting the extracellular matrix: matricellular proteins regulate cell-extracellular matrix communication within distinct niches of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Bedore, Jake; Leask, Andrew; Séguin, Cheryle A

    2014-07-01

    The so-called "matricellular" proteins have recently emerged as important regulators of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. These proteins modulate a variety of cell functions through a range of interactions with cell-surface receptors, hormones, proteases and structural components of the ECM. As such, matricellular proteins are crucial regulators of cell phenotype, and consequently tissue function. The distinct cell types and microenvironments that together form the IVD provide an excellent paradigm to study how matricellular proteins mediate communication within and between adjacent tissue types. In recent years, the role of several matricellular proteins in the intervertebral disc has been explored in vivo using mutant mouse models in which the expression of target matricellular proteins was deleted from either one or all compartments of the intervertebral disc. The current review outlines what is presently known about the roles of the matricellular proteins belonging to the CCN family, SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, and Rich in Cysteine), and thrombospondin (TSP) 2 in regulating intervertebral disc cell-ECM interactions, ECM synthesis and disc tissue homeostasis using genetically modified mouse models. Furthermore, we provide a brief overview of recent preliminary studies of other matricellular proteins including, periostin (POSTN) and tenascin (TN). Each specific tissue type of the IVD contains a different matricellular protein signature, which varies based on the specific stage of development, maturity or disease. A growing body of direct genetic evidence links IVD development, maintenance and repair to the coordinate interaction of matricellular proteins within their respective niches and suggests that several of these signaling modulators hold promise in the development of diagnostics and/or therapeutics targeting intervertebral disc aging and/or degeneration.

  20. Fibronectin Deposition Participates in Extracellular Matrix Assembly and Vascular Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Abigail; Ellis, Kim; Qiu, Connie; Porterfield, Josh; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has been demonstrated to facilitate angiogenesis. In particular, fibronectin has been documented to activate endothelial cells, resulting in their transition from a quiescent state to an active state in which the cells exhibit enhanced migration and proliferation. The goal of this study is to examine the role of polymerized fibronectin during vascular tubulogenesis using a 3 dimensional (3D) cell-derived de-cellularized matrix. A fibronectin-rich 3D de-cellularized ECM was used as a scaffold to study vascular morphogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs). Confocal analyses of several matrix proteins reveal high intra- and extra-cellular deposition of fibronectin in formed vascular structures. Using a small peptide inhibitor of fibronectin polymerization, we demonstrate that inhibition of fibronectin fibrillogenesis in ECs cultured atop de-cellularized ECM resulted in decreased vascular morphogenesis. Further, immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses reveal decreased expression of stromal matrix proteins in the absence of polymerized fibronectin with high co-localization of matrix proteins found in association with polymerized fibronectin. Evaluating vascular kinetics, live cell imaging showed that migration, migration velocity, and mean square displacement, are disrupted in structures grown in the absence of polymerized fibronectin. Additionally, vascular organization failed to occur in the absence of a polymerized fibronectin matrix. Consistent with these observations, we tested vascular morphogenesis following the disruption of EC adhesion to polymerized fibronectin, demonstrating that block of integrins α5β1 and αvβ3, abrogated vascular morphogenesis. Overall, fibronectin deposition in a 3D cell-derived de-cellularized ECM appears to be imperative for matrix assembly and vascular morphogenesis.

  1. Starved epithelial cells uptake extracellular matrix for survival

    PubMed Central

    Muranen, Taru; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Curry, Natasha L.; Hwang, Julie; DuBois, Cory D.; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Clish, Clary B.; Brugge, Joan S.; Kalaany, Nada Y.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix adhesion is required for normal epithelial cell survival, nutrient uptake and metabolism. This requirement can be overcome by oncogene activation. Interestingly, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR leads to apoptosis of matrix-detached, but not matrix-attached cancer cells, suggesting that matrix-attached cells use alternate mechanisms to maintain nutrient supplies. Here we demonstrate that under conditions of dietary restriction or growth factor starvation, where PI3K/mTOR signalling is decreased, matrix-attached human mammary epithelial cells upregulate and internalize β4-integrin along with its matrix substrate, laminin. Endocytosed laminin localizes to lysosomes, results in increased intracellular levels of essential amino acids and enhanced mTORC1 signalling, preventing cell death. Moreover, we show that starved human fibroblasts secrete matrix proteins that maintain the growth of starved mammary epithelial cells contingent upon epithelial cell β4-integrin expression. Our study identifies a crosstalk between stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells under starvation that could be exploited therapeutically to target tumours resistant to PI3K/mTOR inhibition. PMID:28071763

  2. The role of extracellular matrix in spinal cord development.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Stefan; Faissner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The development of the spinal cord represents one of the most complex structure developments of the central nervous system (CNS) as it has to unfold along the longitudinal axis and within segmental cues. There it has to cope with on the one hand connection to the periphery (skeletal muscle, dermomyotome, smooth muscles) and connect it to the higher midbrain and cortical regions of the CNS. Major studies have been performed to analyze the specific subset of transcription factors of the different types of cells within the different segments of the spinal cord. But transcription factor expression is always a result of cellular positioning as the environment defines the intracellular changes during differentiation and in adulthood. The surrounding composed of mainly extracellular matrix does not only provide a "glue" to attach cells to each other but also provides signals with special domains docking to cell surface receptors and presents soluble molecules such as basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGFs) or Wnt-proteins. The availability of these molecules depends on the matrix composition and influences the transcription factor code of each cell. Recent research has also provided strong evidence that depletion of single matrix molecules like Tenascin C (TnC) can lead to developmental changes within the progenitor pools. Therefore beyond the transcription factor code that defines cellular properties we want to focus on the role of the extracellular matrix in the development of the spinal cord.

  3. Applying Proteomics to Investigate Extracellular Matrix in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Randles, Michael; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of basement membranes (BMs) has traditionally been investigated by candidate-based approaches leading to the identification of key structural components as described in previous chapters. Laminins, collagen IV, nidogens, perlecan, and type XV/XVIII collagen are integral to BMs with isoforms showing tissue specificity. More recently the application of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has led to the discovery of many more structural and regulatory components of BMs and more broadly, extracellular matrix (ECM). These investigations have revealed tissue-specific signatures of between 100 and 150 ECM components, demonstrating the complexity of the extracellular niche. In addition to providing a structural scaffold for cells, ECM is a dynamic extracellular environment capable of regulating the physical properties of tissues. Global investigations of ECM with proteomics in turn enable systems level analyses and when applied to health and disease states these investigations provide insights into pathways regulating matrix dysregulation. This chapter focuses on the methods used to extract ECM and on the analysis of its composition using MS-based proteomics, and it provides examples of how these approaches have been used to investigate health and disease states.

  4. An extracellular matrix-based mechanism of rapid neutrophil extracellular trap formation in response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Angel S; O'Brien, Xian M; Johnson, Courtney M; Lavigne, Liz M; Reichner, Jonathan S

    2013-04-15

    The armament of neutrophil-mediated host defense against pathogens includes the extrusion of a lattice of DNA and microbicidal enzymes known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The receptor/ligand interactions and intracellular signaling mechanisms responsible for elaborating NETs were determined for the response to Candida albicans. Because the host response of extravasated neutrophils to mycotic infections within tissues necessitates contact with extracellular matrix, this study also identified a novel and significant regulatory role for the ubiquitous matrix component fibronectin (Fn) in NET release. We report that recognition of purified fungal pathogen-associated molecular pattern β-glucan by human neutrophils causes rapid (≤ 30 min) homotypic aggregation and NET release by a mechanism that requires Fn. Alone, immobilized β-glucan induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production but not NET release, whereas in the context of Fn, ROS production is suppressed and NETs are extruded. NET release to Fn with β-glucan is robust, accounting for 17.2 ± 3.4% of total DNA in the cell population. Release is dependent on β-glucan recognition by complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18), but not Dectin-1, or ROS. The process of NET release included filling of intracellular vesicles with nuclear material that was eventually extruded. We identify a role for ERK in homotypic aggregation and NET release. NET formation to C. albicans hyphae was also found to depend on β-glucan recognition by complement receptor 3, require Fn and ERK but not ROS, and result in hyphal destruction. We report a new regulatory mechanism of NETosis in which the extracellular matrix is a key component of the rapid antifungal response.

  5. Role of oligomerization domains in thrombospondins and other extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jürgen

    2004-06-01

    Coiled coils, collagen triple helices and globular oligomerization domains mediate the subunit assembly of many proteins in vertebrates and invertebrates. Oligomerization offers functional advantages including multivalency, increased binding strength and the combined function of different domains. These features are seen in natural proteins and may be introduced by protein engineering. The special focus of this review is on oligomerization domain of extracellular matrix proteins. For thrombospondins, initial interesting results on the functional role of oligomerization have been published. Other features remain to be explored. For example, it is not clear why thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are trimers whereas thrombospondins-3 to -5 are pentamers. To stimulate this type of research, this review makes a survey of oligomerization domains and their functional role in extracellular matrix proteins.

  6. Structure and function of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Allison R; Lieber, Richard L

    2011-09-01

    The skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in muscle fiber force transmission, maintenance, and repair. In both injured and diseased states, ECM adapts dramatically, a property that has clinical manifestations and alters muscle function. Here we review the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of skeletal muscle ECM; describe the cells that contribute to the maintenance of the ECM; and, finally, overview changes that occur with pathology. New scanning electron micrographs of ECM structure are also presented with hypotheses about ECM structure–function relationships. Detailed structure–function relationships of the ECM have yet to be defined and, as a result, we propose areas for future study.

  7. A fast and mild decellularization protocol for obtaining extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Mirzarafie, Ariana; Grainger, Rhian K; Thomas, Ben; Bains, William; Ustok, Fatma I; Lowe, Chris R

    2014-04-01

    Degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) function with age is a major cause of loss of tissue function with age that we would wish to reverse. Tissue engineering to provide replacement tissue requires an ECM-mimicking scaffold for cell organization. The standard protocols for achieving this take 10 days and include steps that may change the protein structure of the ECM. Here we describe a much shorter protocol for decellularizing chicken muscle, skin, and tendon samples that achieves the same efficiency as the original protocol without protein cross-link interference. Our protocol can be completed in 72 hr.

  8. Structure and Function of the Skeletal Muscle Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Allison R.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in muscle fiber force transmission, maintenance, and repair. In both injured and diseased states, ECM adapts dramatically, a property thathas clinical manifestations and alters muscle function. Here, we review the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of skeletal muscle ECM, describe the cells that contribute to the maintenance of the ECM and, finally, overview changes that occur with pathology. New scanning electron micrographs of ECM structure are also presented with hypotheses about ECM structure-function relationships. Detailed structure-function relationships of the ECM have yet to be defined and, as a result, we propose areas for future studies. PMID:21949456

  9. The design of reversible hydrogels to capture extracellular matrix dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, Adrianne M.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic environment that constantly provides physical and chemical cues to embedded cells. Much progress has been made in engineering hydrogels that can mimic the ECM, but hydrogel properties are, in general, static. To recapitulate the dynamic nature of the ECM, many reversible chemistries have been incorporated into hydrogels to regulate cell spreading, biochemical ligand presentation and matrix mechanics. For example, emerging trends include the use of molecular photoswitches or biomolecule hybridization to control polymer chain conformation, thereby enabling the modulation of the hydrogel between two states on demand. In addition, many non-covalent, dynamic chemical bonds have found increasing use as hydrogel crosslinkers or tethers for cell signalling molecules. These reversible chemistries will provide greater temporal control of adhered cell behaviour, and they allow for more advanced in vitro models and tissue-engineering scaffolds to direct cell fate.

  10. Streptococcus pyogenes degrades extracellular matrix in chondrocytes via MMP-13

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2008-08-29

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of human diseases, including bacterial arthritis. The pathogenesis of arthritis is characterized by synovial proliferation and the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone in joints. We report here that GAS strain JRS4 invaded a chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 and induced the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas an isogenic mutant of JRS4 lacking a fibronectin-binding protein, SAM1, failed to invade the chondrocytes or degrade the ECM. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was strongly elevated during the infection with GAS. A reporter assay revealed that the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and the phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinase participated in MMP-13 expression. These results suggest that MMP-13 plays an important role in the destruction of infected joints during the development of septic arthritis.

  11. Specific Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Signature of Colon Hepatic Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Vezzio-Vie, Nadia; Bibeau, Frédéric; Ychou, Marc; Martineau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    To identify genes implicated in metastatic colonization of the liver in colorectal cancer, we collected pairs of primary tumors and hepatic metastases before chemotherapy in 13 patients. We compared mRNA expression in the pairs of patients to identify genes deregulated during metastatic evolution. We then validated the identified genes using data obtained by different groups. The 33-gene signature was able to classify 87% of hepatic metastases, 98% of primary tumors, 97% of normal colon mucosa, and 95% of normal liver tissues in six datasets obtained using five different microarray platforms. The identified genes are specific to colon cancer and hepatic metastases since other metastatic locations and hepatic metastases originating from breast cancer were not classified by the signature. Gene Ontology term analysis showed that 50% of the genes are implicated in extracellular matrix remodeling, and more precisely in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix organization and angiogenesis. Because of the high efficiency of the signature to classify colon hepatic metastases, the identified genes represent promising targets to develop new therapies that will specifically affect hepatic metastasis microenvironment. PMID:24023955

  12. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Protein Fibers for Brillouin Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Edginton, Ryan S; Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Fioretto, Daniele; Green, Ellen; Winlove, C Peter; Palombo, Francesca

    2016-09-15

    Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging technique in the biomedical field. It probes the mechanical properties of a sample through the interaction of visible light with thermally induced acoustic waves or phonons propagating at a speed of a few km/sec. Information on the elasticity and structure of the material is obtained in a nondestructive contactless manner, hence opening the way to in vivo applications and potential diagnosis of pathology. This work describes the application of Brillouin spectroscopy to the study of biomechanics in elastin and trypsin-digested type I collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix. Fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix are the building blocks of biological tissues and investigating their mechanical and physical behavior is key to establishing structure-function relationships in normal tissues and the changes which occur in disease. The procedures of sample preparation followed by measurement of Brillouin spectra using a reflective substrate are presented together with details of the optical system and methods of spectral data analysis.

  13. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Protein Fibers for Brillouin Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Edginton, Ryan S.; Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Fioretto, Daniele; Green, Ellen; Winlove, C. Peter; Palombo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging technique in the biomedical field. It probes the mechanical properties of a sample through the interaction of visible light with thermally induced acoustic waves or phonons propagating at a speed of a few km/sec. Information on the elasticity and structure of the material is obtained in a nondestructive contactless manner, hence opening the way to in vivo applications and potential diagnosis of pathology. This work describes the application of Brillouin spectroscopy to the study of biomechanics in elastin and trypsin-digested type I collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix. Fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix are the building blocks of biological tissues and investigating their mechanical and physical behavior is key to establishing structure-function relationships in normal tissues and the changes which occur in disease. The procedures of sample preparation followed by measurement of Brillouin spectra using a reflective substrate are presented together with details of the optical system and methods of spectral data analysis. PMID:27684584

  14. Mechanical model for a collagen fibril pair in extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yue; Cox, Grant M; Haverkamp, Richard G; Hill, James M

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we model the mechanics of a collagen pair in the connective tissue extracellular matrix that exists in abundance throughout animals, including the human body. This connective tissue comprises repeated units of two main structures, namely collagens as well as axial, parallel and regular anionic glycosaminoglycan between collagens. The collagen fibril can be modeled by Hooke's law whereas anionic glycosaminoglycan behaves more like a rubber-band rod and as such can be better modeled by the worm-like chain model. While both computer simulations and continuum mechanics models have been investigated for the behavior of this connective tissue typically, authors either assume a simple form of the molecular potential energy or entirely ignore the microscopic structure of the connective tissue. Here, we apply basic physical methodologies and simple applied mathematical modeling techniques to describe the collagen pair quantitatively. We found that the growth of fibrils was intimately related to the maximum length of the anionic glycosaminoglycan and the relative displacement of two adjacent fibrils, which in return was closely related to the effectiveness of anionic glycosaminoglycan in transmitting forces between fibrils. These reveal the importance of the anionic glycosaminoglycan in maintaining the structural shape of the connective tissue extracellular matrix and eventually the shape modulus of human tissues. We also found that some macroscopic properties, like the maximum molecular energy and the breaking fraction of the collagen, were also related to the microscopic characteristics of the anionic glycosaminoglycan.

  15. Modeling Extracellular Matrix Reorganization in 3D Environments

    PubMed Central

    Harjanto, Dewi; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is a key physiological process that occurs in a number of contexts, including cell migration, and is especially important for cellular form and function in three-dimensional (3D) matrices. However, there have been few attempts to computationally model how cells modify their environment in a manner that accounts for both cellular properties and the architecture of the surrounding ECM. To this end, we have developed and validated a novel model to simulate matrix remodeling that explicitly defines cells in a 3D collagenous matrix. In our simulation, cells can degrade, deposit, or pull on local fibers, depending on the fiber density around each cell. The cells can also move within the 3D matrix. Different cell phenotypes can be modeled by varying key cellular parameters. Using the model we have studied how two model cancer cell lines, of differing invasiveness, modify matrices with varying fiber density in their vicinity by tracking the metric of fraction of matrix occupied by fibers. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that in low density environments, cells deposit more collagen to uniformly increase fibril fraction. On the other hand, in higher density environments, the less invasive model cell line reduced the fibril fraction as compared to the highly invasive phenotype. These results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with existing experimental literature. Our simulation is therefore able to function as a novel platform to provide new insights into the clinically relevant and physiologically critical process of matrix remodeling by helping identify critical parameters that dictate cellular behavior in complex native-like environments. PMID:23341900

  16. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  17. The Extracellular Matrix in Photosynthetic Mats: A Cyanobacterial Gingerbread House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, R.; Stannard, W.; Bebout, B.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Mayali, X.; Weber, P. K.; Lipton, M. S.; Lee, J.; Everroad, R. C.; Thelen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Hypersaline laminated cyanobacterial mats are excellent model systems for investigating photoautotrophic contributions to biogeochemical cycling on a millimeter scale. These self-sustaining ecosystems are characterized by steep physiochemical gradients that fluctuate dramatically on hour timescales, providing a dynamic environment to study microbial response. However, elucidating the distribution of energy from light absorption into biomass requires a complete understanding of the various constituents of the mat. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which can be composed of proteins, polysaccharides, lipids and DNA are a major component of these mats and may function in the redistribution of nutrients and metabolites within the community. To test this notion, we established a model mat-building culture for comparison with the phylogenetically diverse natural mat communities. In these two systems we determined how proteins and glycans in the matrix changed as a function of light and tracked nutrient flow from the matrix. Using mass spectrometry metaproteomics analysis, we found homologous proteins in both field and culture extracellular matrix that point to cyanobacterial turnover of amino acids, inorganic nutrients, carbohydrates and nucleic acids from the EPS. Other abundant functions identified included oxidative stress response from both the cyanobacteria and heterotrophs and cyanobacterial structural proteins that may play a role in mat cohesion. Several degradative enzymes also varied in abundance in the EPS in response to light availability, suggesting active secretion. To further test cyanobacterial EPS turnover, we generated isotopically-labeled EPS and used NanoSIMS to trace uptake of this labeled EPS. Our findings suggest Cyanobacteria may facilitate nutrient transfer to other groups, as well as uptake of their own products through degradation of EPS components. This work provides evidence for the essential roles of EPS for storage, structural

  18. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  19. Extracellular Matrix and Integrins in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Leighton, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells with great therapeutic potentials. The in vitro differentiation of ESC was designed by recapitulating embryogenesis. Significant progress has been made to improve the in vitro differentiation protocols by toning soluble maintenance factors. However, more robust methods for lineage-specific differentiation and maturation are still under development. Considering the complexity of in vivo embryogenesis environment, extracellular matrix (ECM) cues should be considered besides growth factor cues. ECM proteins bind to cells and act as ligands of integrin receptors on cell surfaces. Here, we summarize the role of the ECM and integrins in the formation of three germ layer progenies. Various ECM–integrin interactions were found, facilitating differentiation toward definitive endoderm, hepatocyte-like cells, pancreatic beta cells, early mesodermal progenitors, cardiomyocytes, neuroectoderm lineages, and epidermal cells, such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. In the future, ECM combinations for the optimal ESC differentiation environment will require substantial study. PMID:26462244

  20. Extracellular matrix bioscaffolds in tissue remodeling and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Swinehart, Ilea T.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    During normal morphogenesis the extracellular matrix (ECM) influences cell motility, proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Tissue engineers have attempted to harness the cell signaling potential of ECM to promote the functional reconstruction, if not regeneration, of injured or missing adult tissues that otherwise heal by the formation of scar tissue. ECM bioscaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues, have been used to promote the formation of site appropriate, functional tissues in many clinical applications including skeletal muscle, fibrocartilage, lower urinary tract, and esophageal reconstruction, among others. These scaffolds function by the release or exposure of growth factors and cryptic peptides, modulation of the immune response, and recruitment of progenitor cells. Herein, we describe this process of ECM induced constructive remodeling and examine similarities to normal tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26699796

  1. Extracellular matrix production in vitro in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Lin; Duan, Li; Zhu, Weimin; Xiong, Jianyi; Wang, Daping

    2014-04-05

    Cartilage tissue engineering is arising as a technique for the repair of cartilage lesions in clinical applications. However, fibrocartilage formation weakened the mechanical functions of the articular, which compromises the clinical outcomes. Due to the low proliferation ability, dedifferentiation property and low production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) of the chondrocytes, the cartilage synthesis in vitro has been one of the major limitations for obtaining high-quality engineered cartilage constructs. This review discusses cells, biomaterial scaffolds and stimulating factors that can facilitate the cartilage-specific ECM production and accumulation in the in vitro culture system. Special emphasis has been put on the factors that affect the production of ECM macromolecules such as collagen type II and proteoglycans in the review, aiming at providing new strategies to improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  2. The extracellular matrix: A dynamic niche in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pengfei; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2012-01-01

    The local microenvironment, or niche, of a cancer cell plays important roles in cancer development. A major component of the niche is the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network of macromolecules with distinctive physical, biochemical, and biomechanical properties. Although tightly controlled during embryonic development and organ homeostasis, the ECM is commonly deregulated and becomes disorganized in diseases such as cancer. Abnormal ECM affects cancer progression by directly promoting cellular transformation and metastasis. Importantly, however, ECM anomalies also deregulate behavior of stromal cells, facilitate tumor-associated angiogenesis and inflammation, and thus lead to generation of a tumorigenic microenvironment. Understanding how ECM composition and topography are maintained and how their deregulation influences cancer progression may help develop new therapeutic interventions by targeting the tumor niche. PMID:22351925

  3. Extracellular matrix hydrogels from decellularized tissues: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Saldin, Lindsey T; Cramer, Madeline C; Velankar, Sachin S; White, Lisa J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) bioscaffolds prepared from decellularized tissues have been used to facilitate constructive and functional tissue remodeling in a variety of clinical applications. The discovery that these ECM materials could be solubilized and subsequently manipulated to form hydrogels expanded their potential in vitro and in vivo utility; i.e. as culture substrates comparable to collagen or Matrigel, and as injectable materials that fill irregularly-shaped defects. The mechanisms by which ECM hydrogels direct cell behavior and influence remodeling outcomes are only partially understood, but likely include structural and biological signals retained from the native source tissue. The present review describes the utility, formation, and physical and biological characterization of ECM hydrogels. Two examples of clinical application are presented to demonstrate in vivo utility of ECM hydrogels in different organ systems. Finally, new research directions and clinical translation of ECM hydrogels are discussed.

  4. Insight On Colorectal Carcinoma Infiltration by Studying Perilesional Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Albarello, Luca; Andolfo, Annapaola; Magagnotti, Cinzia; Genovese, Luca; Locatelli, Irene; Tonon, Giovanni; Longhi, Erika; Zerbi, Pietro; Allevi, Raffaele; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; Milani, Paolo; Soldarini, Armando; Salonia, Andrea; Alfano, Massimo

    2016-03-04

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) from perilesional and colorectal carcinoma (CRC), but not healthy colon, sustains proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. We investigated the biochemical and physical diversity of ECM in pair-wised comparisons of healthy, perilesional and CRC specimens. Progressive linearization and degree of organization of fibrils was observed from healthy to perilesional and CRC ECM, and was associated with a steady increase of stiffness and collagen crosslinking. In the perilesional ECM these modifications coincided with increased vascularization, whereas in the neoplastic ECM they were associated with altered modulation of matrisome proteins, increased content of hydroxylated lysine and lysyl oxidase. This study identifies the increased stiffness and crosslinking of the perilesional ECM predisposing an environment suitable for CRC invasion as a phenomenon associated with vascularization. The increased stiffness of colon areas may represent a new predictive marker of desmoplastic region predisposing to invasion, thus offering new potential application for monitoring adenoma with invasive potential.

  5. Insight On Colorectal Carcinoma Infiltration by Studying Perilesional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Albarello, Luca; Andolfo, Annapaola; Magagnotti, Cinzia; Genovese, Luca; Locatelli, Irene; Tonon, Giovanni; Longhi, Erika; Zerbi, Pietro; Allevi, Raffaele; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; Milani, Paolo; Soldarini, Armando; Salonia, Andrea; Alfano, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) from perilesional and colorectal carcinoma (CRC), but not healthy colon, sustains proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. We investigated the biochemical and physical diversity of ECM in pair-wised comparisons of healthy, perilesional and CRC specimens. Progressive linearization and degree of organization of fibrils was observed from healthy to perilesional and CRC ECM, and was associated with a steady increase of stiffness and collagen crosslinking. In the perilesional ECM these modifications coincided with increased vascularization, whereas in the neoplastic ECM they were associated with altered modulation of matrisome proteins, increased content of hydroxylated lysine and lysyl oxidase. This study identifies the increased stiffness and crosslinking of the perilesional ECM predisposing an environment suitable for CRC invasion as a phenomenon associated with vascularization. The increased stiffness of colon areas may represent a new predictive marker of desmoplastic region predisposing to invasion, thus offering new potential application for monitoring adenoma with invasive potential. PMID:26940881

  6. Preparation of Cardiac Extracellular Matrix from an Intact Porcine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, John M.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Patel, Urvi B.; Freytes, Donald O.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications. PMID:19702513

  7. Preparation of cardiac extracellular matrix from an intact porcine heart.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, John M; Czajka, Caitlin A; Patel, Urvi B; Freytes, Donald O; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    Whole organ engineering would benefit from a three-dimensional scaffold produced from intact organ-specific extracellular matrix (ECM). The microenvironment and architecture provided by such a scaffold would likely support site-appropriate cell differentiation and spatial organization. The methods to produce such scaffolds from intact organs require customized decellularization protocols. In the present study, intact adult porcine hearts were successfully decellularized in less than 10 h using pulsatile retrograde aortic perfusion. Serial perfusion of an enzymatic, nonionic detergent, ionic detergent, and acid solution with hypotonic and hypertonic rinses was used to systematically remove cellular content. The resultant cardiac ECM retained collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycans, and mechanical integrity. Cardiac ECM supported the formation of organized chicken cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure in vitro. The intact decellularized porcine heart provides a tissue engineering template that may be beneficial for future preclinical studies and eventual clinical applications.

  8. Decellularization of Rat Kidneys to Produce Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mei; Yaling, Yu; Zhibin, Wang; Jianse, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) retains three-dimensional structures for the stimulation of cell growth, with components of the ECM relatively conserved between species. Interest in the use of decellularized scaffold-based strategies for organ regeneration is increasing rapidly. Decellularized scaffolds derived from animal organs are a promising material for organ engineering, with a number of prominent advances having been reported in the past few years.In this article we describe a simple and robust methodology for generating decellularized rat kidneys. To obtain these scaffolds, we perfuse rat kidneys with detergents through the abdominal aorta. After decellularization, kidney scaffolds are harvested for evaluation of vascular structure and histology. Qualitative evaluation involves vascular corrosion casting, transmission electron microscopy, and several different histological and immunofluorescent methods. SDS residue levels are assessed by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer (UV-VIS).

  9. Hypoxia and the extracellular matrix: drivers of tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, Daniele M.; Semenza, Gregg L.; Wirtz, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Of the deaths attributed to cancer, 90% are due to metastasis, and treatments that prevent or cure metastasis remain elusive. Emerging data indicate that hypoxia and the extracellular matrix (ECM) might have crucial roles in metastasis. During tumour evolution, changes in the composition and the overall content of the ECM reflect both its biophysical and biological properties and these strongly influence tumour and stromal cell properties, such as proliferation and motility. Originally thought of as independent contributors to metastatic spread, recent studies have established a direct link between hypoxia and the composition and the organization of the ECM, which suggests a new model in which multiple microenvironmental signals might converge to synergistically influence metastatic outcome. PMID:24827502

  10. Aging-associated changes in renal extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Abrass, C. K.; Adcox, M. J.; Raugi, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The composition of renal extracellular matrices was examined in 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old rats by immunofluorescence microscopy. No change in composition of tubular basement membrane was detected. Increased immunostaining for laminin chains B1 and s-laminin and thrombospondin characterized the thickened glomerular basement membrane. Interstitial collagens I and III were not detected in globally sclerotic glomeruli. The major change noted in the aged rat kidney at 24 months was generalized expansion of the interstitium by thrombospondin and fibronectin. In areas of tubular atrophy there was new expression of extra domain A (EDA)+ fibronectin. Collagens I and III were detected focally in the interstitium adjacent to areas of tubular atrophy, but otherwise collagens I, III, and IV and laminin did not contribute to the interstitial fibrosis. Interstitial fibrosis was detectable at 18 months of age and preceded the development of sclerotic glomeruli, tubular atrophy, or accumulations of interstitial collagen. These changes in extracellular matrix composition distinguish the aging kidney from other sclerotic forms of renal disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7887455

  11. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz; Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar; Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effects of VEGF165 gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Methods Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF165 treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. Results There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF165. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF165, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. Conclusion The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF165 seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct. PMID:25993074

  12. Extracellular Matrix Fibronectin Stimulates the Self-Assembly of Microtissues on Native Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Sevilla, Carlos A.; Dalecki, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin is an adhesive glycoprotein that is polymerized into extracellular matrices via a tightly regulated, cell-dependent process. Here, we demonstrate that fibronectin matrix polymerization induces the self-assembly of multicellular structures in vitro, termed tissue bodies. Fibronectin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts adherent to compliant gels of polymerized type I collagen failed to spread or proliferate. In contrast, addition of fibronectin to collagen-adherent fibronectin-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in a dose-dependent increase in cell number, and induced the formation of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures that remained adherent and well-spread on the native collagen substrate. An extensive fibrillar fibronectin matrix formed throughout the microtissue. Blocking fibronectin matrix polymerization inhibited both cell proliferation and microtissue formation, demonstrating the importance of fibronectin fibrillogenesis in triggering cellular self-organization. Cell proliferation, tissue body formation, and tissue body shape were dependent on both fibronectin and collagen concentrations, suggesting that the relative proportion of collagen and fibronectin fibrils polymerized into the extracellular matrix influences the extent of cell proliferation and the final shape of microtissues. These data demonstrate a novel role for cell-mediated fibronectin fibrillogenesis in the formation and vertical assembly of microtissues, and provide a novel approach for engineering complex tissue architecture. PMID:20673131

  13. Casting a Net on Dendritic Spines: The Extracellular Matrix and its Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, Lorraine E.; Ethell, Iryna M.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that accommodate the majority of excitatory synapses in the brain and are influenced by extracellular signals from presynaptic neurons, glial cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM surrounds dendritic spines and extends into the synaptic cleft, maintaining synapse integrity as well as mediating trans-synaptic communications between neurons. Several scaffolding proteins and glycans that compose the ECM form a lattice-like network, which serves as an attractive ground for various secreted glycoproteins, lectins, growth factors and enzymes. ECM components can control dendritic spines through the interactions with their specific receptors or by influencing the functions of other synaptic proteins. In this review, we focus on ECM components and their receptors that regulate dendritic spine development and plasticity in the normal and diseased brain. PMID:21834084

  14. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  15. Incorporation of tenascin-C into the extracellular matrix by periostin underlies an extracellular meshwork architecture.

    PubMed

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2010-01-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C null mice exhibited a similar phenotype, confined tibial periostitis, which possibly corresponds to medial tibial stress syndrome in human sports injuries. Periostin possessed adjacent domains that bind to tenascin-C and the other ECM protein: fibronectin and type I collagen, respectively. These adjacent domains functioned as a bridge between tenascin-C and the ECM, which increased deposition of tenascin-C on the ECM. The deposition of hexabrachions of tenascin-C may stabilize bifurcations of the ECM fibrils, which is integrated into the extracellular meshwork architecture. This study suggests a role for periostin in adaptation of the ECM architecture in the mechanical environment.

  16. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Reyes-López, Magda; Ortíz-Estrada, Guillermo; de la Garza, Mireya; Serrano-Luna, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina). The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa. PMID:22792442

  17. [Single mechanism of remodelling extracellular matrix in thymus and pineal gland at aging].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Kvetnoĭ, I M

    2011-01-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 in thymus and pineal gland has been verified. These data demonstrate single mechanism of remodelling extracellular matrix in thymus and pineal gland at aging.

  18. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    PubMed Central

    Stanic, Karen; Saldivia, Natalia; Förstera, Benjamín; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are pivotal for central nervous system (CNS) development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axon guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during CNS development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn toward the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons. PMID:27733818

  19. [Theodor Huzella and the initiation of research on the interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix].

    PubMed

    Robert, Ladislas; Labat-Robert, Jacqueline; Michel Robert, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between cells and the surrounding "biomatrix", mediated by receptors as integrins or the elastin receptor is the most important topic in up to date research on connective tissues. Looking for the origin of this concept, one finds the pioneering work of Theodor Huzella, professor of histology-embryology at the Medical University of Budapest during pre-world war II decades. Using time-laps micro-cinematography in reflected light, he visualized the important role of connective tissue fibers, prepared in his laboratory, for the oriented migration of normal and malignant cells. His theoretical explanations, attributing an "active" role to the elasticity of the argyrophilic fibrous network in the coordination of cell societies, can now be reinterpreted in the light of recent work on the mechanotransduction of "messages" from the extracellular matrix to the cell inside. We propose a succinct review of Huzella's work and theories reinterpreted in the light of up-to-date knowledge on cell-matrix interactions.

  20. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  1. Extracellular matrix protein expression is brain region dependent.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Grevesse, Thomas; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Campbell, Patrick H; Maoz, Ben M; Berretta, Sabina; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, extracellular matrix (ECM) components form networks that contribute to structural and functional diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of ECM networks has been reported in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that the brain microenvironment is a dynamic structure. A lack of quantitative information about ECM distribution in the brain hinders an understanding of region-specific ECM functions and the role of ECM in health and disease. We hypothesized that each ECM protein as well as specific ECM structures, such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) and interstitial matrix, are differentially distributed throughout the brain, contributing to the unique structure and function in the various regions of the brain. To test our hypothesis, we quantitatively analyzed the distribution, colocalization, and protein expression of aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R throughout the rat brain utilizing immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis and assessed the effect of aggrecan, brevican, and/or tenascin-R on neurite outgrowth in vitro. We focused on aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R as they are especially expressed in the mature brain, and have established roles in brain development, plasticity, and neurite outgrowth. The results revealed a differentiated distribution of all three proteins throughout the brain and indicated that their presence significantly reduces neurite outgrowth in a 3D in vitro environment. These results underline the importance of a unique and complex ECM distribution for brain physiology and suggest that encoding the distribution of distinct ECM proteins throughout the brain will aid in understanding their function in physiology and in turn assist in identifying their role in disease. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1309-1336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Conditional switches for extracellular matrix patterning in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Arvinder; Chen, Nan; Yuan, Ji-Ping; Li, Yishi; Landis, Gary N; Beaulieu, Gregory; Kaur, Harminder; Tower, John

    2008-03-01

    An F(1) mutagenesis strategy was developed to identify conditional mutations affecting extracellular matrix (ECM) patterning. Tubulogenesis requires coordinated movement of epithelial cells and deposition of a multilayered ECM. In the Drosophila ovary, an epithelium of follicle cells creates the eggshells, including the paired tubular dorsal appendages (DAs) that act as breathing tubes for the embryo. A P-element mutagenesis strategy allowed for conditional overexpression of hundreds of genes in follicle cells. Conditional phenotypes were scored at the level of individual mutant (F(1)) female flies. ECM pattern regulators were readily identified including MAPK signaling gene ets domain lacking (fused DAs), Wnt pathway genes frizzled 3 and osa (long DAs), Hh pathway gene debra (branched DAs), and transcription factor genes sima/HIF-1alpha, ush, lilli, Tfb1, broad, and foxo. In moving cells the [Ca(2+)]/calcineurin pathway can regulate adhesion to ECM while adherens junctions link cells together. Accordingly, thin eggshell and DA phenotypes were identified for the calcineurin regulator calreticulin and the adherens junction component arc. Finally a tubulogenesis defect phenotype was identified for the gene pterodactyl, homologous to the mammalian serine/threonine receptor-associated protein (STRAP) that integrates the TGF-beta and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Because phenotypes can be scored in each mutant fly before and after gene induction, this F(1) conditional mutagenesis strategy should allow for increased scale in screens for mutations affecting repeated (reiterated) events in adult animals, including gametogenesis, movement, behavior, and learning.

  3. Tissue-Specific Effects of Esophageal Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Timothy J.; DeWard, Aaron; Londono, Ricardo; Saldin, Lindsey T.; Castleton, Arthur A.; Carey, Lisa; Nieponice, Alejandro; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been used to facilitate repair or remodeling of numerous tissues, including the esophagus. The theoretically ideal scaffold for tissue repair is the ECM derived from the particular tissue to be treated, that is, site-specific or homologous ECM. The preference or potential advantage for the use of site-specific ECM remains unknown in the esophageal location. The objective of the present study was to characterize the in vitro cellular response and in vivo host response to a homologous esophageal ECM (eECM) versus nonhomologous ECMs derived from small intestinal submucosa and urinary bladder. The in vitro response of esophageal stem cells was characterized by migration, proliferation, and three-dimensional (3D) organoid formation assays. The in vivo remodeling response was evaluated in a rat model of esophageal mucosal resection. Results of the study showed that the eECM retains favorable tissue-specific characteristics that enhance the migration of esophageal stem cells and supports the formation of 3D organoids to a greater extent than heterologous ECMs. Implantation of eECM facilitates the remodeling of esophageal mucosa following mucosal resection, but no distinct advantage versus heterologous ECM could be identified. PMID:26192009

  4. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M; Kerwin, James; Guerrero, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen, can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24-h biofilms, two were found only in 96-h biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation.

  5. Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sean P.; Billings, Kate S.; Ohashi, Tomoo; Allen, Mark D.; Best, Robert B.; Randles, Lucy G.; Erickson, Harold P.; Clarke, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix proteins tenascin and fibronectin experience significant mechanical forces in vivo. Both contain a number of tandem repeating homologous fibronectin type III (fnIII) domains, and atomic force microscopy experiments have demonstrated that the mechanical strength of these domains can vary significantly. Previous work has shown that mutations in the core of an fnIII domain from human tenascin (TNfn3) reduce the unfolding force of that domain significantly: The composition of the core is apparently crucial to the mechanical stability of these proteins. Based on these results, we have used rational redesign to increase the mechanical stability of the 10th fnIII domain of human fibronectin, FNfn10, which is directly involved in integrin binding. The hydrophobic core of FNfn10 was replaced with that of the homologous, mechanically stronger TNfn3 domain. Despite the extensive substitution, FNoTNc retains both the three-dimensional structure and the cell adhesion activity of FNfn10. Atomic force microscopy experiments reveal that the unfolding forces of the engineered protein FNoTNc increase by ≈20% to match those of TNfn3. Thus, we have specifically designed a protein with increased mechanical stability. Our results demonstrate that core engineering can be used to change the mechanical strength of proteins while retaining functional surface interactions. PMID:17535921

  6. Mixed Extracellular Matrix Ligands Synergistically Modulate Integrin Adhesion and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Catherine D.; Petrie, Timothy A.; García, Andrés J

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components through cell-surface integrin receptors is essential to the formation, maintenance and repair of numerous tissues, and therefore represents a central theme in the design of bioactive materials that successfully interface with the body. While the adhesive responses associated with a single ligand have been extensively analyzed, the effects of multiple integrin subtypes binding to multivalent ECM signals remain poorly understood. In the present study, we generated a high throughput platform of non-adhesive surfaces presenting well-defined, independent densities of two integrin-specific engineered ligands for the type I collagen (COL-I) receptor α2β1 and the fibronectin (FN) receptor α5β1 to evaluate the effects of integrin cross-talk on adhesive responses. Engineered surfaces displayed ligand density-dependent adhesive effects, and mixed ligand surfaces significantly enhanced cell adhesion strength and focal adhesion assembly compared to single FN and COL-I ligand surfaces. Moreover, surfaces presenting mixed COL-I/FN ligands synergistically enhanced FAK activation compared to the single ligand substrates. The enhanced adhesive activities of the mixed ligand surfaces also promoted elevated proliferation rates. Our results demonstrate interplay between multivalent ECM ligands in adhesive responses and downstream cellular signaling. PMID:18613064

  7. The Extracellular Matrix in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Target and Source

    PubMed Central

    Mižíková, Ivana; Morty, Rory E.

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common complication of preterm birth that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. BPD results from life-saving interventions, such as mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation used to manage preterm infants with acute respiratory failure, which may be complicated by pulmonary infection. The pathogenic pathways driving BPD are not well-delineated but include disturbances to the coordinated action of gene expression, cell–cell communication, physical forces, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), which together guide normal lung development. Efforts to further delineate these pathways have been assisted by the use of animal models of BPD, which rely on infection, injurious mechanical ventilation, or oxygen supplementation, where histopathological features of BPD can be mimicked. Notable among these are perturbations to ECM structures, namely, the organization of the elastin and collagen networks in the developing lung. Dysregulated collagen deposition and disturbed elastin fiber organization are pathological hallmarks of clinical and experimental BPD. Strides have been made in understanding the disturbances to ECM production in the developing lung, but much still remains to be discovered about how ECM maturation and turnover are dysregulated in aberrantly developing lungs. This review aims to inform the reader about the state-of-the-art concerning the ECM in BPD, to highlight the gaps in our knowledge and current controversies, and to suggest directions for future work in this exciting and complex area of lung development (patho)biology. PMID:26779482

  8. Lung protection by inhalation of exogenous solubilized extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinglei; Ravikumar, Priya; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hsia, Connie C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) contains complex tissue-specific components that work in concert to promote tissue repair and constructive remodeling and has been used experimentally and clinically to accelerate epithelial wound repair, leading us to hypothesize that lung-derived ECM could mitigate acute lung injury. To explore the therapeutic potential of ECM for noninvasive delivery to the lung, we decellularized and solubilized porcine lung ECM, then characterized the composition, concentration, particle size and stability of the preparation. The ECM preparation at 3.2 mg/mL with average particle size <3 μm was tested in vitro on human A549 lung epithelial cells exposed to 95% O2 for 24 hours, and in vivo by tracheal instillation or nebulization into the lungs of rats exposed intermittently or continuously to 90% O2 for a cumulative 72 hours. Our results showed that the preparation was enriched in collagen, reduced in glycosaminoglycans, and contained various bioactive molecules. Particle size was concentration-dependent. Compared to the respective controls treated with cell culture medium in vitro or saline in vivo, ECM inhalation normalized cell survival and alveolar morphology, and reduced hyperoxia-induced apoptosis and oxidative damage. This proof-of-concept study established the methodology, feasibility and therapeutic potential of exogenous solubilized ECM for pulmonary cytoprotection, possibly as an adjunct or potentiator of conventional therapy. PMID:28151947

  9. Extracellular matrix content of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Samiric, Tom; Feller, Julian; Cook, Jill

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can rupture with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between ruptured and non-ruptured ACLs. We also compared changes in ruptured tissue over time. During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 ruptured ACLs were collected from participants (10 females; 14 males; mean age 24 years). Four non-ruptured ACLs were obtained from participants undergoing total knee replacement surgery (one female, three males; mean age 66 years). Western blot analysis was used to characterise core proteins of aggrecan, versican, decorin and biglycan and glycosaminoglycan assays were also conducted. Collagen levels were measured by hydroxyproline (OHPr) assays. Significantly lower levels of collagen, were found in ruptured ACL compared to non-ruptured ACL (p=0.004). Lower levels of both small and large proteoglycans were found in ruptured than non-ruptured ACLs. No correlation was found between time since rupture and proteoglycan or collagen levels. Ruptured ACLs had less collagen and proteoglycans than non-ruptured ACLs. These changes indicate either extracellular matrix protein levels were reduced prior to rupture or levels decreased immediately after rupture. It is possible that the composition and structure of ACLs that rupture are different to normal ACLs, potentially reducing the tissue's ability to withstand loading. An enhanced understanding of the aetiology of ACL injury could help identify individuals who may be predisposed to rupture.

  10. LRP1 regulates remodeling of the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Hollister, Margaret; Reynolds, Irene; Hsieh, En-hui; Gonias, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor for diverse proteases, protease inhibitors, and other plasma membrane proteins, including the urokinase receptor (uPAR). LRP1 also functions in cell-signaling and regulates gene expression. The goal of this study was to determine whether LRP1 regulates remodeling of provisional extracellular matrix (ECM) by fibroblasts. To address this problem, we utilized an in vitro model in which type I collagen was reconstituted and overlaid with fibronectin. Either the collagen or fibronectin was fluorescently-labeled. ECM remodeling by fibroblasts deficient in LRP1, uPAR, or MT1-MMP was studied. MT1-MMP was required for efficient remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not involved in fibronectin remodeling. Instead, fibronectin was remodeled by a system that required urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPAR, and exogenously-added plasminogen. LRP1 markedly inhibited fibronectin remodeling by regulating cell-surface uPAR and plasminogen activation. LRP1 also regulated remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not by controlling MT1-MMP. Instead, LRP1 deficiency or inhibition de-repressed a secondary pathway for collagen remodeling, which was active in MT1-MMP-deficient cells but not in uPAR-deficient cells. These results demonstrate that LRP1 regulates ECM remodeling principally by repressing pathways that require plasminogen activation by uPA in association with uPAR. PMID:19699300

  11. Actin dynamics at sites of extracellular matrix degradation.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Massimiliano; Ayala, Inmaculada; Beznoussenko, Galina; Giacchetti, Giada; Machesky, Laura M; Luini, Alberto; Buccione, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    The degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) by proteases is crucial in physiological and pathological cell invasion alike. In vitro, degradation occurs at specific sites where invasive cells make contact with the ECM via specialized plasma membrane protrusions termed invadopodia. Here we present an extensive morpho-functional analysis of invadopodia actively engaged in ECM degradation and show that they are actin comet-based structures, not unlike the well-known bacteria-propelling actin tails. The relative mapping of the basic molecular components of invadopodia to actin tails is also provided. Finally, a live-imaging analysis of invadopodia highlights the intrinsic long-term stability of the structures coupled to a highly dynamic actin turnover. The results offer new insight into the tight coordination between signalling, actin remodelling and trafficking activities occurring at sites of focalized ECM degradation by invadopodia. In conclusion, invadopodia-associated actin comets are a striking example of consistently arising, spontaneous expression of actin-driven propulsion events that also represent a valuable experimental paradigm.

  12. Quercetin Attenuates Lactate Production and Extracellular Matrix Secretion in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    McKay, T. B.; Lyon, D.; Sarker-Nag, A.; Priyadarsini, S.; Asara, J. M.; Karamichos, D.

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus(KC) is an ecstatic corneal disease leading to corneal-thinning and the formation of a cone-like cornea. Elevated lactate levels, increased oxidative stress, and myofibroblast formation have all been previously reported. In the current study, we assess the role of Quercetin on collagen secretion and myofibroblast formation in KC in vitro. Human corneal fibroblasts(HCFs) and human keratoconus cells(HKCs) were treated with a stable Vitamin C derivative and cultured for 4 weeks, stimulating formation of a self-assembled extracellular matrix. All samples were analyzed using Western blots and targeted tandem mass spectrometry. Our data showed that Quercetin significantly down regulates myofibroblast differentiation and fibrotic markers, such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen III (Col III), in both HCFs and HKCs. Collagen III secretion was reduced 80% in both HCFs and HKCs following Quercetin treatment. Furthermore, Quercetin reduced lactate production by HKCs to normal HCF levels. Quercetin down regulated TGF-βR2 and TGF-β2 expression in HKCs suggesting a significant link to the TGF-β pathway. These results assert that Quercetin is a key regulator of fibrotic markers and ECM assembly by modulating cellular metabolism and TGF-β signaling. Our study suggests that Quercetin is a potential therapeutic for treatment of corneal dystrophies, such as KC. PMID:25758533

  13. Human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete the extracellular matrix protein, thrombospondin.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Dixit, V M; Frazier, W A; Clark, R A

    1987-02-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) a glycoprotein originally identified as the endogenous lectin of platelets, is also synthesized by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, pneumocytes, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Thrombospondin is subdivided into functional domains which bind specifically to heparin, fibronectin, collagen, and to specific cellular receptors. It is found within the basement membranes of kidney, lung, smooth muscle, and skin. Thus TSP may serve as an important link between cells and matrices. Thrombospondin also has been reported at the epidermal-dermal junction. We wished to determine whether human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete TSP. Pure human keratinocytes were grown in defined medium without fibroblast feeder layers. Immunofluorescent staining with either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies to human platelet TSP yielded specific granular staining within the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. Culture media and cellular lysates were harvested from cultures metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine. Trichloroacetic acid precipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and autoradiography revealed a major labeled band comigrating with purified platelet TSP in both the media and the cellular lysates. Immunoprecipitation with either the polyclonal or the monoclonal anti-TSP antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography identified this band as TSP. Thus keratinocytes in culture synthesize and secrete TSP. Thrombospondin may play an important role in epidermal interactions with extracellular matrix.

  14. EVALUATION OF THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX OF INJURED SUPRASPINATUS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luiz Henrique Oliveira; Ikemoto, Roberto; Mader, Ana Maria; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Munhoz, Bruna; Murachovsky, Joel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the evolution of injuries of the supraspinatus muscle by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and anatomopathological analysis in animal model (Wistar rats). Methods: Twenty-five Wistar rats were submitted to complete injury of the supraspinatus tendon, then subsequently sacrificed in groups of five animals at the following periods: immediately after the injury, 24h after the injury, 48h after, 30 days after and three months after the injury. All groups underwent histological and IHC analysis. Results: Regarding vascular proliferation and inflammatory infiltrate, we found a statistically significant difference between groups 1(control group) and 2 (24h after injury). IHC analysis showed that expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) showed a statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2, and collagen type 1 (Col-1) evaluation presented a statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 4. Conclusion: We observed changes in the extracellular matrix components compatible with remodeling and healing. Remodeling is more intense 24h after injury. However, VEGF and Col-1 are substantially increased at 24h and 30 days after the injury, respectively. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:26997907

  15. Micromechanical anisotropy and heterogeneity of the meniscus extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Qu, Feini; Han, Biao; Wang, Chao; Li, Hao; Mauck, Robert L; Han, Lin

    2017-02-27

    To understand how the complex biomechanical functions of the meniscus are endowed by the nanostructure of its extracellular matrix (ECM), we studied the anisotropy and heterogeneity in the micromechanical properties of the meniscus ECM. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the time-dependent mechanical properties of juvenile bovine meniscus at deformation length scales corresponding to the diameters of collagen fibrils. At this scale, anisotropy in the elastic modulus of the circumferential fibers, the major ECM structural unit, can be attributed to differences in fibril deformation modes: uncrimping when normal to the fiber axis, and laterally constrained compression when parallel to the fiber axis. Heterogeneity among different structural units is mainly associated with their variations in microscale fiber orientation, while heterogeneity across anatomical zones is due to alterations in collagen fibril diameter and alignment at the nanoscale. Unlike the elastic modulus, the time-dependent properties are more homogeneous and isotropic throughout the ECM. These results enable a detailed understanding of the meniscus structure-mechanics at the nanoscale, and can serve as a benchmark for understanding meniscus biomechanical functions, documenting disease progression and designing tissue repair strategies.

  16. Extracellular matrix, mechanotransduction and structural hierarchies in heart tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E

    2007-08-29

    The spatial and temporal scales of cardiac organogenesis and pathogenesis make engineering of artificial heart tissue a daunting challenge. The temporal scales range from nanosecond conformational changes responsible for ion channel opening to fibrillation which occurs over seconds and can lead to death. Spatial scales range from nanometre pore sizes in membrane channels and gap junctions to the metre length scale of the whole cardiovascular system in a living patient. Synchrony over these scales requires a hierarchy of control mechanisms that are governed by a single common principle: integration of structure and function. To ensure that the function of ion channels and contraction of muscle cells lead to changes in heart chamber volume, an elegant choreography of metabolic, electrical and mechanical events are executed by protein networks composed of extracellular matrix, transmembrane integrin receptors and cytoskeleton which are functionally connected across all size scales. These structural control networks are mechanoresponsive, and they process mechanical and chemical signals in a massively parallel fashion, while also serving as a bidirectional circuit for information flow. This review explores how these hierarchical structural networks regulate the form and function of living cells and tissues, as well as how microfabrication techniques can be used to probe this structural control mechanism that maintains metabolic supply, electrical activation and mechanical pumping of heart muscle. Through this process, we delineate various design principles that may be useful for engineering artificial heart tissue in the future.

  17. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  18. Brain extracellular matrix retains connectivity in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Bikbaev, Arthur; Frischknecht, Renato; Heine, Martin

    2015-09-29

    The formation and maintenance of connectivity are critically important for the processing and storage of information in neuronal networks. The brain extracellular matrix (ECM) appears during postnatal development and surrounds most neurons in the adult mammalian brain. Importantly, the removal of the ECM was shown to improve plasticity and post-traumatic recovery in the CNS, but little is known about the mechanisms. Here, we investigated the role of the ECM in the regulation of the network activity in dissociated hippocampal cultures grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). We found that enzymatic removal of the ECM in mature cultures led to transient enhancement of neuronal activity, but prevented disinhibition-induced hyperexcitability that was evident in age-matched control cultures with intact ECM. Furthermore, the ECM degradation followed by disinhibition strongly affected the network interaction so that it strongly resembled the juvenile pattern seen in naïve developing cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the ECM plays an important role in retention of existing connectivity in mature neuronal networks that can be exerted through synaptic confinement of glutamate. On the other hand, removal of the ECM can play a permissive role in modification of connectivity and adaptive exploration of novel network architecture.

  19. Fibroblast extracellular matrix and adhesion on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Morgan M; Parrillo, Allegra; Thomas, Gawain M; McGimpsey, W Grant; Wen, Qi; Bellin, Robert M; Lambert, Christopher R

    2015-05-01

    The immediate physical and chemical surroundings of cells provide important biochemical cues for their behavior. Designing and tailoring biomaterials for controlled cell signaling and extracellular matrix (ECM) can be difficult due to the complexity of the cell-surface relationship. To address this issue, our research has led to the development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold with defined microtopography and chemistry for surface driven ECM assembly. When human fibroblasts were cultured on this microtextured PDMS with 2-6 µm wide vertical features, significant changes in morphology, adhesion, actin cytoskeleton, and fibronectin generation were noted when compared with cells cultured on unmodified PDMS. Investigation of cellular response and behavior was performed with atomic force microscopy in conjunction with fluorescent labeling of focal adhesion cites and fibronectin in the ECM. Changes in the surface topography induced lower adhesion, an altered actin cytoskeleton, and compacted units of fibronectin similar to that observed in vivo. Overall, these findings provide critical information of cell-surface interactions with a microtextured, polymer substrate that can be used in the field of tissue engineering for controlling cellular ECM interactions.

  20. Extracellular matrix proteomics identifies molecular signature of symptomatic carotid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Sarah R.; Willeit, Karin; Didangelos, Athanasios; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Skroblin, Philipp; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Lengquist, Mariette; Rungger, Gregor; Kapustin, Alexander; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Molenaar, Chris; Lu, Ruifang; Barwari, Temo; Suna, Gonca; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Willeit, Peter; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Davies, Alun H.; Monaco, Claudia; Hedin, Ulf; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification of patients with high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to the manifestation of clinical events remains challenging. Recent findings question histology- and imaging-based definitions of the “vulnerable plaque,” necessitating an improved approach for predicting onset of symptoms. METHODS. We performed a proteomics comparison of the vascular extracellular matrix and associated molecules in human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 6 symptomatic versus 6 asymptomatic patients to identify a protein signature for high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Proteomics data were integrated with gene expression profiling of 121 carotid endarterectomies and an analysis of protein secretion by lipid-loaded human vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, epidemiological validation of candidate biomarkers was performed in two community-based studies. RESULTS. Proteomics and at least one of the other two approaches identified a molecular signature of plaques from symptomatic patients that comprised matrix metalloproteinase 9, chitinase 3-like-1, S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), S100A9, cathepsin B, fibronectin, and galectin-3-binding protein. Biomarker candidates measured in 685 subjects in the Bruneck study were associated with progression to advanced atherosclerosis and incidence of cardiovascular disease over a 10-year follow-up period. A 4-biomarker signature (matrix metalloproteinase 9, S100A8/S100A9, cathepsin D, and galectin-3-binding protein) improved risk prediction and was successfully replicated in an independent cohort, the SAPHIR study. CONCLUSION. The identified 4-biomarker signature may improve risk prediction and diagnostics for the management of cardiovascular disease. Further, our study highlights the strength of tissue-based proteomics for biomarker discovery. FUNDING. UK: British Heart Foundation (BHF); King’s BHF Center; and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Center based at Guy’s and St

  1. Brain extracellular matrix meets COST--matrix for European research networks.

    PubMed

    Gajović, Srećko; Pochet, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Today's researchers are faced with a change from curiosity-driven to mandate-driven research. These two approaches are well combined within scientific networks (Actions) supported by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program. The functioning of COST Actions, although directed only to networking, has a substantial impact on European science and can be compared to the functioning of the extracellular matrix in the brain, which although scarce plays a key role in initiation, maintenance, and plasticity of intercellular interactions in the nervous system. COST networks enable interdisciplinary approach and support early-stage researchers, which is a vital asset for the advancement of science.

  2. Extracellular citrullination inhibits the function of matrix associated TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Kalle H; Ranga, Vipin; Rappu, Pekka; Torittu, Annamari; Pirilä, Laura; Käpylä, Jarmo; Johnson, Mark S; Larjava, Hannu; Heino, Jyrki

    2016-09-01

    In inflammatory arthritis peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) enzymes can citrullinate arginine residues in extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as collagens and fibronectin. This may lead to the generation of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, important diagnostic markers in rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the citrullination may directly affect protein function. Based on structural analysis, we found that most ECM-associated growth factors (GFs) have arginine residues in their receptor recognition sites. Thus, they are potential functional targets of extracellular citrullination. To examine this further, we focused on the citrullination of transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-β), well-known ECM-associated GFs. PAD-treatment of CHO-LTBP1 cell derived matrix, rich with TGF-β, decreased the level of TGF-β activity as detected by HaCaT and MLEC-PAI-1/Lu reporter cells. Additional experiments indicated that PAD-treatment inhibits the integrin-mediated TGF-β activation since PAD-treatment decreased the binding of integrin αVβ6 ectodomain as well as integrin-mediated spreading of MG-63 and HaCaT cells to β1-latency associated peptide (TGF-β1 LAP). The citrullination of the RGD site, an important integrin recognition motif, was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the citrullination of active TGF-β1 inhibited its binding to recombinant TGF-β receptor II, and prevented its ability to activate TGF-β signaling. Thus, extracellular PAD activity can affect the function of ECM-associated growth factors by different mechanisms. Importantly, the citrullination of both latent and active TGF-β has the potency to regulate the inflammatory process.

  3. Role of microRNA 1207-5P and its host gene, the long non-coding RNA Pvt1, as mediators of extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidney: implications for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Eddy, Elena; Kiefer, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney failure and end-stage renal disease in the Western World. One of the major characteristics of this disease is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney glomeruli. While both environmental and genetic determinants are recognized for their role in the development of diabetic nephropathy, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, long non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs, have also recently been found to underlie some of the biological mechanisms, including ECM accumulation, leading to the disease. We previously found that a long non-coding RNA, the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 (PVT1), increases plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) in mesangial cells, the two main contributors to ECM accumulation in the glomeruli under hyperglycemic conditions, as well as fibronectin 1 (FN1), a major ECM component. Here, we report that miR-1207-5p, a PVT1-derived microRNA, is abundantly expressed in kidney cells, and is upregulated by glucose and TGF-β1. We also found that like PVT1, miR-1207-5p increases expression of TGF-β1, PAI-1, and FN1 but in a manner that is independent of its host gene. In addition, regulation of miR-1207-5p expression by glucose and TGFβ1 is independent of PVT1. These results provide evidence supporting important roles for miR-1207-5p and its host gene in the complex pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of

  5. Extracellular matrix and sex-inducing pheromone in Volvox.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Armin

    2003-01-01

    During evolution of multicellularity it was imperative to create a complex, multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM) out of the simple cell wall of a unicellular ancestor. The green alga Volvox represents one of the simplest multicellular organisms, but even so, it already has a highly developed ECM. This ECM is mainly composed of an assortment of glycoproteins, many of which are hydroxyproline rich and extensively sulfated. Several ECM proteins are cross-linked and might have only structural functions. However, the ECM does not represent a static but rather a dynamic and multifunctional interface between a cell and its neighboring cells or its environment. It not only provides protection and structural support for the shape of each cell and the organism as a whole, but also plays a broad range of biological roles in growth, development, reproduction, and responses to environmental stress or wounding. The variety of functions of the ECM requires many glycoproteins to do the work. To attain a high flexibility and adaptability, almost all ECM glycoproteins from Volvox consist of modules, defined as functional subunits that form modular mosaic proteins with an outstanding combinatorial potential. The ECM's functions are not only extensive but also change under developmental control or by environmental incidents. The changing scope of duties necessitates a permanent ECM turnover and remodeling. In Volvox carteri one particularly challenging trigger of such ECM modifications is a sex-inducing pheromone, which is one of the most potent biological effector molecules known: the glycoprotein pheromone is fully effective for inducing sexual development in males and females at concentrations as low as 10(-16) M. The earliest detectable response to the pheromone is the synthesis of ECM glycoproteins.

  6. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism. Recent Advances: Advances in tissue culture, tissue engineering, and ex vivo models have made the examination and precise measurements of ECM components in wound healing possible. Likewise, the development of specific transgenic animal models has created the opportunity to characterize the role of various ECM molecules in healing wounds. In addition, the recent characterization of new ECM molecules, including matricellular proteins, dermatopontin, and FACIT collagens (Fibril-Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple helices), further demonstrates our cursory knowledge of the ECM in coordinated wound healing. Critical Issues: The manipulation and augmentation of ECM components in the healing wound is emerging in patient care, as demonstrated by the use of acellular dermal matrices, tissue scaffolds, and wound dressings or topical products bearing ECM proteins such as collagen, hyaluronan (HA), or elastin. Once thought of as neutral structural proteins, these molecules are now known to directly influence many aspects of cellular wound healing. Future Directions: The role that ECM molecules, such as CCN2, osteopontin, and secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine, play in signaling homing of fibroblast progenitor cells to sites of injury invites future research as we continue investigating the heterotopic origin of certain populations of fibroblasts in a healing wound. Likewise, research into differently sized fragments of the same polymeric ECM molecule is warranted as we learn that fragments of molecules such as HA and tenascin-C can have opposing effects on dermal fibroblasts. PMID:26989578

  7. An innovative protocol for schwann cells extracellular matrix proteins extraction.

    PubMed

    Parisi, L; Zomer Volpato, F; Cagol, N; Siciliano, M; Migliaresi, C; Motta, A; Sala, R

    2016-12-01

    The evidence that extracellular matrix (ECM) components could represent new targets for drugs designed to approach degenerative disease, requires their analysis. Before the analysis, proteins should be extracted from ECM and solubilized. Currently, few protocols for ECM proteins extraction and solubilization are available in literature, and most of them are based mainly on the use of proteolytic enzymes, such as trypsin, which often lead to proteins damage. Moreover, no methods have been so far proposed to solubilize Schwann Cell ECM, which may represent an important target for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. In our study, we propose to solubilize SC ECM through the use of surfactants and urea. We compared our method of solubilization, with one of that proposed in literature for a general ECM, mainly based on the use of enzymes. We want to highlight the benefit of solubilizing SC ECM, avoiding the use of proteolytic enzymes. To compare the amount of proteins extracted with both methods, MicroBCA assay was used, while the quality of the proteins extracted was observed through the SDS-PAGE. The results obtained confirm a better solubilization of SC ECM proteins with the proposed protocol, both quantitatively and qualitatively, showing a higher concentration of proteins extracted and a better enrichment of protein fractions, if compared to the enzyme-based protocol. Our results show that SC ECM could be efficiently solubilized through the use of surfactant and urea, avoiding the use of enzyme-base methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3175-3180, 2016.

  8. Putative chitin synthases from Branchiostoma floridae show extracellular matrix-related domains and mosaic structures.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gea

    2012-08-01

    The transition from unicellular to multicellular life forms requires the development of a specialized structural component, the extracellular matrix (ECM). In Metazoans, there are two main supportive systems, which are based on chitin and collagen/hyaluronan, respectively. Chitin is the major constituent of fungal cell walls and arthropod exoskeleton. However, presence of chitin/chitooligosaccharides has been reported in lower chordates and during specific stages of vertebrate development. In this study, the occurrence of chitin synthases (CHSs) was investigated with a bioinformatics approach in the cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae, in which the presence of chitin was initially reported in the skeletal rods of the pharyngeal gill basket. Twelve genes coding for proteins containing conserved amino acid residues of processive glycosyltransferases from GT2 family were found and 10 of them display mosaic structures with novel domains never reported previously in a chitin synthase. In particular, the presence of a discoidin (DS) and a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain was found in nine identified proteins. Sequence analyses and homology modelling suggest that these domains might interact with the extracellular matrix and mediate protein-protein interaction. The multi-domain putative chitin synthases from B. floridae constitute an emblematic example of the explosion of domain innovation and shuffling which predate Metazoans.

  9. Skeletal muscle extracellular matrix remodelling after aestivation in the green striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Nicholas J; Harper, Gregory S; Allingham, Peter G; Franklin, Craig E; Barris, W; Lehnert, Sigrid A

    2007-03-01

    Connective tissue has recently been found to play a role in mediating mammalian skeletal muscle atrophy. We investigated connective tissue remodelling in the skeletal muscle of a species of the Australian burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata. Despite being inactive whilst aestivating, the frog shows an inhibition of muscle atrophy. Connective tissue size and distribution was measured in histological sections of the cruralis muscle of control and aestivating C. alboguttata. Using a custom written software application we could detect no significant difference in any connective tissue morphological parameter between the two treatment groups. Biochemical measurements of gelatinase activity showed 2-fold higher activity in aestivating gastrocnemius muscle than in controls (p<0.001). We measured the messenger RNA transcript levels for C. alboguttata metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP2) in cruralis skeletal muscle using quantitative real-time PCR. The trend of reduced expression of the two genes in the aestivators did not meet statistical significance. This work indicates that aestivation in C. alboguttata leads to subtle and specific changes in some extracellular matrix remodelling factors. Their main impact is to maintain proportional representation of extracellular matrix components of skeletal muscle and therefore preserve the active frog phenotype.

  10. Transitional Remodeling of the Hepatic Extracellular Matrix in Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Lauren G.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a common custom worldwide, and the toxic effects of alcohol on several target organs are well understood. The liver is the primary site of alcohol metabolism and is therefore the major target of alcohol toxicity. Alcoholic liver disease is a spectrum of disease states, ranging from simple steatosis (fat accumulation), to inflammation, and eventually to fibrosis and cirrhosis if untreated. The fibrotic stage of ALD is primarily characterized by robust accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (collagens) which ultimately impairs the function of the organ. The role of the ECM in early stages of ALD is poorly understood, but recent research has demonstrated that a number of changes in the hepatic ECM in prefibrotic ALD not only are present, but may also contribute to disease progression. The purpose of this review is to summarize the established and proposed changes to the hepatic extracellular matrix (ECM) that may contribute to earlier stages of ALD development and to discuss potential mechanisms by which these changes may mediate the progression of the disease. PMID:27843941

  11. Dendritic cell podosomes are protrusive and invade the extracellular matrix using metalloproteinase MMP-14

    PubMed Central

    Gawden-Bone, Christian; Zhou, Zhongjun; King, Emma; Prescott, Alan; Watts, Colin; Lucocq, John

    2010-01-01

    Podosomes are spot-like actin-rich structures formed at the ventral surface of monocytic and haematopoietic cells. Podosomes degrade extracellular matrix and are proposed to be involved in cell migration. A key question is whether podosomes form protrusions similar to the invadopodia of cancer cells. We characterised podosomes of immature dendritic cells using electron microscopy combined with both conventional and novel high-resolution structured illumination light microscopy. Dendritic cell podosomes are composed of actin foci surrounded by a specialised ring region that is rich in material containing paxillin. We found that podosomes were preferential sites for protrusion into polycarbonate filters impregnated with crosslinked gelatin, degrading up to 2 μm of matrix in 24 hours. Podosome-associated uptake of colloidal gold-labelled gelatin matrix appeared to occur via large phagosome-like structures or narrow tubular invaginations. The motor protein myosin-II was excluded from ring or core regions but was concentrated around them and the myosin-II inhibitor Blebbistatin reduced the length of podosome protrusions. Finally, we found that degradation, protrusion and endocytosis in this system are dependent on the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-14. We propose that podosomes mediate migration of dendritic cells through tissues by means of myosin-II-dependent protrusion coupled to MMP-14-dependent degradation and endocytosis. PMID:20356925

  12. Ubiquitylation functions in the calcium carbonate biomineralization in the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes.

  13. The Extracellular Matrix Component Psl Provides Fast-Acting Antibiotic Defense in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Nicole; Ramirez Millan, Maria; Caldara, Marina; Rusconi, Roberto; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Stocker, Roman; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria within biofilms secrete and surround themselves with an extracellular matrix, which serves as a first line of defense against antibiotic attack. Polysaccharides constitute major elements of the biofilm matrix and are implied in surface adhesion and biofilm organization, but their contributions to the resistance properties of biofilms remain largely elusive. Using a combination of static and continuous-flow biofilm experiments we show that Psl, one major polysaccharide in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix, provides a generic first line of defense toward antibiotics with diverse biochemical properties during the initial stages of biofilm development. Furthermore, we show with mixed-strain experiments that antibiotic-sensitive “non-producing” cells lacking Psl can gain tolerance by integrating into Psl-containing biofilms. However, non-producers dilute the protective capacity of the matrix and hence, excessive incorporation can result in the collapse of resistance of the entire community. Our data also reveal that Psl mediated protection is extendible to E. coli and S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Together, our study shows that Psl represents a critical first bottleneck to the antibiotic attack of a biofilm community early in biofilm development. PMID:23950711

  14. Ubiquitylation Functions in the Calcium Carbonate Biomineralization in the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Pan, Cong; Lin, Huijuan; Lin, Ya; Xu, Guangrui; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2012-01-01

    Mollusks shell formation is mediated by matrix proteins and many of these proteins have been identified and characterized. However, the mechanisms of protein control remain unknown. Here, we report the ubiquitylation of matrix proteins in the prismatic layer of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata. The presence of ubiquitylated proteins in the prismatic layer of the shell was detected with a combination of western blot and immunogold assays. The coupled ubiquitins were separated and identified by Edman degradation and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Antibody injection in vivo resulted in large amounts of calcium carbonate randomly accumulating on the surface of the nacreous layer. These ubiquitylated proteins could bind to specific faces of calcite and aragonite, which are the two main mineral components of the shell. In the in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization assay, they could reduce the rate of calcium carbonate precipitation and induce the calcite formation. Furthermore, when the attached ubiquitins were removed, the functions of the EDTA-soluble matrix of the prismatic layer were changed. Their potency to inhibit precipitation of calcium carbonate was decreased and their influence on the morphology of calcium carbonate crystals was changed. Taken together, ubiquitylation is involved in shell formation. Although the ubiquitylation is supposed to be involved in every aspect of biophysical processes, our work connected the biomineralization-related proteins and the ubiquitylation mechanism in the extracellular matrix for the first time. This would promote our understanding of the shell biomineralization and the ubiquitylation processes. PMID:22558208

  15. Expression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and matrix metalloproteinases during mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Nakai, Masaaki; Belton, Robert J; Nowak, Romana A

    2007-02-01

    Mouse embryo implantation is a highly invasive and controlled process that involves remodeling and degradation of the extracellular matrix of the uterus. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the main proteinases facilitating this process. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) can stimulate the production of MMPs and is required for successful implantation in the mouse. The aims of the present study were to examine the expression profiles of mRNA and proteins for EMMPRIN and MMPs in the developing mouse embryo in vitro, and to study whether EMMPRIN protein induces the production of MMPs by mouse blastocysts. EMMPRIN mRNA, detected by RT-PCR, was present at all stages of embryo development from the one-cell to the blastocyst outgrowth. EMMPRIN protein, observed by confocal microscopy, was present on the cell surface at the same stages of development as was the mRNA. Of seven MMPs studied, murine collagenase-like A (Mcol-A), murine collagenase-like B (Mcol-B) and gelatinase A (MMP-2) mRNAs were detected only in blastocyst outgrowths by RT-PCR. Gelatinase B (MMP-9) mRNA was detected both in expanded blastocysts and blastocyst outgrowths. MMP-2 and -9 proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of outgrowing trophoblast cells. Collagenase-2 (MMP-8), collagenase-3 (MMP-13), or stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) mRNAs were not present at any stage of pre- or peri-implantation mouse embryo development. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that recombinant EMMPRIN protein did not stimulate MMP-2 or -9 expression by mouse blastocyst outgrowths. These data suggest that EMMPRIN may regulate physiological functions other than MMP production by mouse embryos during implantation.

  16. Changes in extracellular matrix composition regulate cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Alique, Matilde; Calleros, Laura; Luengo, Alicia; Griera, Mercedes; Iñiguez, Miguel Ángel; Punzón, Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2011-04-01

    Glomerular diseases are characterized by a sustained synthesis and accumulation of abnormal extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen type I. The extracellular matrix transmits information to cells through interactions with membrane components, which directly activate many intracellular signaling events. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that eicosanoids derived from cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 participate in a number of pathological processes in immune-mediated renal diseases, and it is known that protein kinase B (AKT) may act through different transcription factors in the regulation of the COX-2 promoter. The present results show that progressive accumulation of collagen I in the extracellular medium induces a significant increase of COX-2 expression in human mesangial cells, resulting in an enhancement in PGE(2) production. COX-2 overexpression is due to increased COX-2 mRNA levels. The study of the mechanism implicated in COX-2 upregulation by collagen I showed focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation. Furthermore, we observed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway by collagen I and collagen I-induced COX-2 overexpression was abolished by PI3K and AKT inhibitors. Additionally, we showed that the cAMP response element (CRE) transcription factor is implicated. Finally, we studied COX-2 expression in an animal model, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hypertensive rats. In renal tissue and vascular walls, COX-2 and collagen type I content were upregulated. In summary, our results provide evidence that collagen type I increases COX-2 expression via the FAK/PI3K/AKT/cAMP response element binding protein signaling pathway.

  17. A Hydrogel Derived From Decellularized Dermal Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthew T.; Daly, Kerry A.; Brennan-Pierce, Ellen P.; Johnson, Scott A.; Carruthers, Christopher; D’Amore, Antonio; Nagarkar, Shailesh P.; Velankar, Sachin S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    The ECM of mammalian tissues has been used as a scaffold to facilitate the repair and reconstruction of numerous tissues. Such scaffolds are prepared in many forms including sheets, powders, and hydrogels. ECM hydrogels provide advantages such as injectability, the ability to fill an irregularly shaped space, and the inherent bioactivity of native matrix. However, material properties of ECM hydrogels and the effect of these properties upon cell behavior are neither well understood nor controlled. The objective of this study was to prepare and determine the structure, mechanics, and the cell response in vitro and in vivo of ECM hydrogels prepared from decellularized porcine dermis and urinary bladder tissues. Dermal ECM hydrogels were characterized by a more dense fiber architecture and greater mechanical integrity than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels, and showed a dose dependent increase in mechanical properties with ECM concentration. In vitro, dermal ECM hydrogels supported greater C2C12 myoblast fusion, and less fibroblast infiltration and less fibroblast mediated hydrogel contraction than urinary bladder ECM hydrogels. Both hydrogels were rapidly infiltrated by host cells, primarily macrophages, when implanted in a rat abdominal wall defect. Both ECM hydrogels degraded by 35 days in vivo, but UBM hydrogels degraded more quickly, and with greater amounts of myogenesis than dermal ECM. These results show that ECM hydrogel properties can be varied and partially controlled by the scaffold tissue source, and that these properties can markedly affect cell behavior. PMID:22789723

  18. Adapted Boolean network models for extracellular matrix formation

    PubMed Central

    Wollbold, Johannes; Huber, René; Pohlers, Dirk; Koczan, Dirk; Guthke, Reinhard; Kinne, Raimund W; Gausmann, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Background Due to the rapid data accumulation on pathogenesis and progression of chronic inflammation, there is an increasing demand for approaches to analyse the underlying regulatory networks. For example, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterised by joint destruction and perpetuated by activated synovial fibroblasts (SFB). These abnormally express and/or secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, collagens causing joint fibrosis, or tissue-degrading enzymes resulting in destruction of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We applied three methods to analyse ECM regulation: data discretisation to filter out noise and to reduce complexity, Boolean network construction to implement logic relationships, and formal concept analysis (FCA) for the formation of minimal, but complete rule sets from the data. Results First, we extracted literature information to develop an interaction network containing 18 genes representing ECM formation and destruction. Subsequently, we constructed an asynchronous Boolean network with biologically plausible time intervals for mRNA and protein production, secretion, and inactivation. Experimental gene expression data was obtained from SFB stimulated by TGFβ1 or by TNFα and discretised thereafter. The Boolean functions of the initial network were improved iteratively by the comparison of the simulation runs to the experimental data and by exploitation of expert knowledge. This resulted in adapted networks for both cytokine stimulation conditions. The simulations were further analysed by the attribute exploration algorithm of FCA, integrating the observed time series in a fine-tuned and automated manner. The resulting temporal rules yielded new contributions to controversially discussed aspects of fibroblast biology (e.g., considerable expression of TNF and MMP9 by fibroblasts stimulation) and corroborated previously known facts (e.g., co-expression of collagens and MMPs after TNFα stimulation), but also revealed

  19. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M.; McDonnell, Lisa P.; Nourse, Jamison L.; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation. PMID:25686615

  20. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer.

  1. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M.; McDonnell, Lisa P.; Nourse, Jamison L.; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2015-02-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation.

  2. Aberrant alternative splicing and extracellular matrix gene expression in mouse models of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongqing; Cline, Melissa S.; Osborne, Robert J.; Tuttle, Daniel L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Donohue, John Paul; Hall, Megan P.; Shiue, Lily; Swanson, Maurice S.; Thornton, Charles A.; Ares, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is associated with expression of expanded CTG DNA repeats as RNA (CUGexp RNA). To test whether CUGexp RNA creates a global splicing defect, we compared skeletal muscle of two mouse DM1 models, one expressing a CTGexp transgene, and another homozygous for a defective Mbnl1 gene. Strong correlation in splicing changes for ~100 new Mbnl1-regulated exons indicates loss of Mbnl1 explains >80% of the splicing pathology due to CUGexp RNA. In contrast, only about half of mRNA level changes can be attributed to loss of Mbnl1, indicating CUGexp RNA has Mbnl1-independent effects, particularly on mRNAs for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We propose that CUGexp RNA causes two separate effects: loss of Mbnl1 function, disrupting splicing, and loss of another function that disrupts ECM mRNA regulation, possibly mediated by MBNL2. These findings reveal unanticipated similarities between DM1 and other muscular dystrophies. PMID:20098426

  3. Extracellular matrix of secondary lymphoid organs impacts on B-cell fate and survival

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nathalie; Ruegg, Markus A.; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Winkler, Thomas H.; Kearney, John F.; Cardell, Susanna; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We describe a unique extracellular matrix (ECM) niche in the spleen, the marginal zone (MZ), characterized by the basement membrane glycoproteins, laminin α5 and agrin, that promotes formation of a specialized population of MZ B lymphocytes that respond rapidly to blood-borne antigens. Mice with reduced laminin α5 expression show reduced MZ B cells and increased numbers of newly formed (NF) transitional B cells that migrate from the bone marrow, without changes in other immune or stromal cell compartments. Transient integrin α6β1-mediated interaction of NF B cells with laminin α5 in the MZ supports the MZ B-cell population, their long-term survival, and antibody response. Data suggest that the unique 3D structure and biochemical composition of the ECM of lymphoid organs impacts on immune cell fate. PMID:23847204

  4. Extracellular matrix remodelling in response to venous hypertension: proteomics of human varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Oklu, Rahmi; Lynch, Marc; Fava, Marika; Baig, Ferheen; Yin, Xiaoke; Barwari, Temo; Potier, David N.; Albadawi, Hassan; Jahangiri, Marjan; Porter, Karen E.; Watkins, Michael T.; Misra, Sanjay; Stoughton, Julianne; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling has been implicated in a number of vascular conditions, including venous hypertension and varicose veins. However, to date, no systematic analysis of matrix remodelling in human veins has been performed. Methods and results To understand the consequences of venous hypertension, normal and varicose veins were evaluated using proteomics approaches targeting the extracellular matrix. Varicose saphenous veins removed during phlebectomy and normal saphenous veins obtained during coronary artery bypass surgery were collected for proteomics analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were enriched from venous tissues. The proteomics analysis revealed the presence of >150 extracellular matrix proteins, of which 48 had not been previously detected in venous tissue. Extracellular matrix remodelling in varicose veins was characterized by a loss of aggrecan and several small leucine-rich proteoglycans and a compensatory increase in collagen I and laminins. Gene expression analysis of the same tissues suggested that the remodelling process associated with venous hypertension predominantly occurs at the protein rather than the transcript level. The loss of aggrecan in varicose veins was paralleled by a reduced expression of aggrecanases. Chymase and tryptase β1 were among the up-regulated proteases. The effect of these serine proteases on the venous extracellular matrix was further explored by incubating normal saphenous veins with recombinant enzymes. Proteomics analysis revealed extensive extracellular matrix degradation after digestion with tryptase β1. In comparison, chymase was less potent and degraded predominantly basement membrane-associated proteins. Conclusion The present proteomics study provides unprecedented insights into the expression and degradation of structural and regulatory components of the vascular extracellular matrix in varicosis. PMID:27068509

  5. Obstructor-A is required for epithelial extracellular matrix dynamics, exoskeleton function, and tubulogenesis.

    PubMed

    Petkau, Georg; Wingen, Christian; Jussen, Laura C A; Radtke, Tina; Behr, Matthias

    2012-06-15

    The epidermis and internal tubular organs, such as gut and lungs, are exposed to a hostile environment. They form an extracellular matrix to provide epithelial integrity and to prevent contact with pathogens and toxins. In arthropods, the cuticle protects, shapes, and enables the functioning of organs. During development, cuticle matrix is shielded from premature degradation; however, underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously, we identified the conserved obstructor multigene-family, which encodes chitin-binding proteins. Here we show that Obstructor-A is required for extracellular matrix dynamics in cuticle forming organs. Loss of obstructor-A causes severe defects during cuticle molting, wound protection, tube expansion and larval growth control. We found that Obstructor-A interacts and forms a core complex with the polysaccharide chitin, the cuticle modifier Knickkopf and the chitin deacetylase Serpentine. Knickkopf protects chitin from chitinase-dependent degradation and deacetylase enzymes ensure extracellular matrix maturation. We provide evidence that Obstructor-A is required to control the presence of Knickkopf and Serpentine in the extracellular matrix. We propose a model suggesting that Obstructor-A coordinates the core complex for extracellular matrix protection from premature degradation. This mechanism enables exoskeletal molting, tube expansion, and epithelial integrity. The evolutionary conservation suggests a common role of Obstructor-A and homologs in coordinating extracellular matrix protection in epithelial tissues of chitinous invertebrates.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses a cyclic-di-GMP-regulated adhesin to reinforce the biofilm extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Borlee, Bradley R; Goldman, Aaron D; Murakami, Keiji; Samudrala, Ram; Wozniak, Daniel J; Parsek, Matthew R

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the principal pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients, forms antibiotic-resistant biofilms promoting chronic colonization of the airways. The extracellular (EPS) matrix is a crucial component of biofilms that provides the community multiple benefits. Recent work suggests that the secondary messenger, cyclic-di-GMP, promotes biofilm formation. An analysis of factors specifically expressed in P. aeruginosa under conditions of elevated c-di-GMP, revealed functions involved in the production and maintenance of the biofilm extracellular matrix. We have characterized one of these components, encoded by the PA4625 gene, as a putative adhesin and designated it cdrA. CdrA shares structural similarities to extracellular adhesins that belong to two-partner secretion systems. The cdrA gene is in a two gene operon that also encodes a putative outer membrane transporter, CdrB. The cdrA gene encodes a 220 KDa protein that is predicted to be rod-shaped protein harbouring a beta-helix structural motif. Western analysis indicates that the CdrA is produced as a 220 kDa proprotein and processed to 150 kDa before secretion into the extracellular medium. We demonstrated that cdrAB expression is minimal in liquid culture, but is elevated in biofilm cultures. CdrAB expression was found to promote biofilm formation and auto-aggregation in liquid culture. Aggregation mediated by CdrA is dependent on the Psl polysaccharide and can be disrupted by adding mannose, a key structural component of Psl. Immunoprecipitation of Psl present in culture supernatants resulted in co-immunoprecipitation of CdrA, providing additional evidence that CdrA directly binds to Psl. A mutation in cdrA caused a decrease in biofilm biomass and resulted in the formation of biofilms exhibiting decreased structural integrity. Psl-specific lectin staining suggests that CdrA either cross-links Psl polysaccharide polymers and/or tethers Psl to the cells, resulting in increased biofilm structural

  7. Extracellular matrix biomimicry for the creation of investigational and therapeutic devices.

    PubMed

    Pellowe, Amanda S; Gonzalez, Anjelica L

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a web of fibrous proteins that serves as a scaffold for tissues and organs, and is important for maintaining homeostasis and facilitating cellular adhesion. Integrin transmembrane receptors are the primary adhesion molecules that anchor cells to the ECM, thus integrating cells with their microenvironments. Integrins play a critical role in facilitating cell-matrix interactions and promoting signal transduction, both from the cell to the ECM and vice versa, ultimately mediating cell behavior. For this reason, many advanced biomaterials employ biomimicry by replicating the form and function of fibrous ECM proteins. The ECM also acts as a reservoir for small molecules and growth factors, wherein fibrous proteins directly bind and present these bioactive moieties that facilitate cell activity. Therefore biomimicry can be enhanced by incorporating small molecules into ECM-like substrates. Biomimetic ECM materials have served as invaluable research tools for studying interactions between cells and the surrounding ECM, revealing that cell-matrix signaling is driven by mechanical forces, integrin engagement, and small molecules. Mimicking pathological ECMs has also elucidated disease specific cell behaviors. For example, biomimetic tumor microenvironments have been used to induce metastatic cell behaviors, and have thereby shown promise for in vitro cancer drug testing and targeting. Further, ECM-like substrates have been successfully employed for autologous cell recolonization for tissue engineering and wound healing. As we continue to learn more about the mechanical and biochemical characteristics of the ECM, these properties can be harnessed to develop new biomaterials, biomedical devices, and therapeutics.

  8. Altered protein levels in the isolated extracellular matrix of failing human hearts with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DeAguero, Joshua L; McKown, Elizabeth N; Zhang, Liwen; Keirsey, Jeremy; Fischer, Edgar G; Samedi, Von G; Canan, Benjamin D; Kilic, Ahmet; Janssen, Paul M L; Delfín, Dawn A

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is associated with extensive pathological cardiac remodeling and involves numerous changes in the protein expression profile of the extracellular matrix of the heart. We obtained seven human, end-stage, failing hearts with DCM (DCM-failing) and nine human, nonfailing donor hearts and compared their extracellular matrix protein profiles. We first showed that the DCM-failing hearts had indeed undergone extensive remodeling of the left ventricle myocardium relative to nonfailing hearts. We then isolated the extracellular matrix from a subset of these hearts and performed a proteomic analysis on the isolated matrices. We found that the levels of 26 structural proteins were altered in the DCM-failing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix compared to nonfailing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix. Overall, most of the extracellular matrix proteins showed reduced levels in the DCM-failing hearts, while all of the contractile proteins showed increased levels. There was a mixture of increased and decreased levels of cytoskeletal and nuclear transport proteins. Using immunoprobing, we verified that collagen IV (α2 and α6 isoforms), zyxin, and myomesin protein levels were reduced in the DCM-failing hearts. We expect that these data will add to the understanding of the pathology associated with heart failure with DCM.

  9. Modifications in stromal extracellular matrix of aged corneas can be induced by ultraviolet A irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Sébastien P; Rochette, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    With age, structural and functional changes can be observed in human cornea. Some studies have shown a loss of corneal transparency and an increase in turbidity associated with aging. These changes are caused by modifications in the composition and arrangement of extracellular matrix in the corneal stroma. In human skin, it is well documented that exposure to solar radiation, and mainly to the UVA wavelengths, leads to phenotypes of photoaging characterized by alteration in extracellular matrix of the dermis. Although the cornea is also exposed to solar radiation, the extracellular matrix modifications observed in aging corneas have been mainly attributed to chronological aging and not to solar exposure. To ascertain the real implication of UVA exposure in extracellular matrix changes observed with age in human cornea, we have developed a model of photoaging by chronically exposing corneal stroma keratocytes with a precise UVA irradiation protocol. Using this model, we have analyzed UVA-induced transcriptomic and proteomic changes in corneal stroma. Our results show that cumulative UVA exposure causes changes in extracellular matrix that are found in corneal stromas of aged individuals, suggesting that solar exposure catalyzes corneal aging. Indeed, we observe a downregulation of collagen and proteoglycan gene expression and a reduction in proteoglycan production and secretion in response to cumulative UVA exposure. This study provides the first evidence that chronic ocular exposure to sunlight affects extracellular matrix composition and thus plays a role in corneal changes observed with age. PMID:25728164

  10. Spatiotemporal segregation of endothelial cell integrin and nonintegrin extracellular matrix-binding proteins during adhesion events

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) attachments to laminin, fibronectin, and fibrinogen are inhibited by soluble arginine-glycine- aspartate (RGD)-containing peptides, and YGRGDSP activity is responsive to titration of either soluble peptide or matrix protein. To assess the presence of RGD-dependent receptors, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting studies were conducted and demonstrated integrin beta 1, beta 3, and associated alpha subunits as well as a beta 1 precursor. Immunofluorescence of BAECs plated on laminin, fibronectin, and fibrinogen reveals different matrix-binding specificities of each of these integrin subclasses. By 1 h after plating, organization of beta 1 integrin into fibrillar streaks is influenced by laminin and fibronectin, whereas beta 3 integrin punctate organization is influenced by fibrinogen and the integrin spatial distribution changes with time in culture. In contrast, the nonintegrin laminin-binding protein LB69 only organizes after cell-substrate contact is well established several hours after plating. Migration of BAECs is also mediated by both integrin and nonintegrin matrix-binding proteins. Specifically, BAEC migration on laminin is remarkably sensitive to RGD peptide inhibition, and, in its presence, beta 1 integrin organization dissipates and reorganizes into perinuclear vesicles. However, RGD peptides do not alter LB69 linear organization during migration. Similarly, agents that block LB69--e.g., antibodies to LB69 as well as YIGSR-NH2 peptide--do not inhibit attachment of nonmotile BAECs to laminin. However, both anti-LB69 and YIGSR-NH2 inhibit late adhesive events such as spreading. Accordingly, we propose that integrin and nonintegrin extracellular matrix-binding protein organizations in BAECs are both temporally and spatially segregated during attachment processes. High affinity nonintegrin interaction with matrix may create necessary stable contacts for longterm attachment, while lower affinity integrins may be important

  11. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process.

  12. Impaired extracellular matrix structure resulting from malnutrition in ovariectomized mature rats.

    PubMed

    El Khassawna, Thaqif; Böcker, Wolfgang; Brodsky, Katharina; Weisweiler, David; Govindarajan, Parameswari; Kampschulte, Marian; Thormann, Ulrich; Henss, Anja; Rohnke, Marcus; Bauer, Natali; Müller, Robert; Deutsch, Andreas; Ignatius, Anita; Dürselen, Lutz; Langheinrich, Alexander; Lips, Katrin S; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiss, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Bone loss is a symptom related to disease and age, which reflects on bone cells and ECM. Discrepant regulation affects cell proliferation and ECM localization. Rat model of osteoporosis (OVX) was investigated against control rats (Sham) at young and old ages. Biophysical, histological and molecular techniques were implemented to examine the underlying cellular and extracellular matrix changes and to assess the mechanisms contributing to bone loss in the context of aging and the widely used osteoporotic models in rats. Bone loss exhibited a compromised function of bone cells and infiltration of adipocytes into bone marrow. However, the expression of genes regulating collagen catabolic process and adipogenesis was chronologically shifted in diseased bone in comparison with aged bone. The data showed the involvement of Wnt signaling inhibition in adipogenesis and bone loss due to over-expression of SOST in both diseased and aged bone. Further, in the OVX animals, an integrin-mediated ERK activation indicated the role of MAPK in osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis. The increased PTH levels due to calcium and estrogen deficiency activated osteoblastogenesis. Thusly, RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis was initiated. Interestingly, the data show the role of MEPE regulating osteoclast-mediated resorption at late stages in osteoporotic bone. The interplay between ECM and bone cells change tissue microstructure and properties. The involvement of Wnt and MAPK pathways in activating cell proliferation has intriguing similarities to oncogenesis and myeloma. The study indicates the importance of targeting both pathways simultaneously to remedy metabolic bone diseases and age-related bone loss.

  13. The extracellular matrix: Structure, composition, age-related differences, tools for analysis and applications for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kular, Jaspreet K; Basu, Shouvik; Sharma, Ram I

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a structural support network made up of diverse proteins, sugars and other components. It influences a wide number of cellular processes including migration, wound healing and differentiation, all of which is of particular interest to researchers in the field of tissue engineering. Understanding the composition and structure of the extracellular matrix will aid in exploring the ways the extracellular matrix can be utilised in tissue engineering applications especially as a scaffold. This review summarises the current knowledge of the composition, structure and functions of the extracellular matrix and introduces the effect of ageing on extracellular matrix remodelling and its contribution to cellular functions. Additionally, the current analytical technologies to study the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-related cellular processes are also reviewed.

  14. The bioactivity of cartilage extracellular matrix in articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Amanda J; Converse, Gabriel L; Hopkins, Richard A; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-01-07

    Cartilage matrix is a promising material for cartilage regeneration given the evidence supporting its chondroinductive character. The "raw materials" of cartilage matrix can serve as building blocks and signals for tissue regeneration. These matrices can be created by chemical or physical processing: physical methods disrupt cellular membranes and nuclei but may not fully remove all cell components and DNA, whereas chemical methods combined with physical methods are effective in fully decellularizing such materials. It is important to delineate between the sources of the cartilage matrix, that is, derived from matrix in vitro or from native tissue, and then to further characterize the cartilage matrix based on the processing method, decellularization or devitalization. With these distinctions, four types of cartilage matrices exist: decellularized native cartilage (DCC), devitalized native cartilage (DVC), decellularized cell-derived matrix (DCCM), and devitalized cell-derived matrix (DVCM). One currently marketed cartilage matrix device is decellularized, although trends in patents suggest additional decellularized products may be available in the future. To identify the most relevant source and processing for cartilage matrix, testing needs to include targeting the desired application, optimizing delivery of the material, identify relevant FDA regulations, assess availability of materials, and immunogenic properties of the product.

  15. Impaired astrocytic extracellular matrix distribution under congenital hypothyroidism affects neuronal development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Alchini, Ricardo; Zucco, Juliana Klein; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Decker, Helena; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Tasca, Carla Inês; Trentin, Andréa Gonçalves

    2010-11-15

    Astrocytes clearly play a role in neuronal development. An indirect mechanism of thyroid hormone (T3) in the regulation of neuronal development mediated by astrocytes has been proposed. T3 alters the production and organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and proteoglycans, producing a high-quality substrate for neuronal differentiation. The present study investigated the effect of hypothyroidism on the astrocyte production of fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN) as well as their involvement in neuronal growth and neuritogenesis. Our results demonstrated that the amount of both FN and LN were significantly reduced in cultures of hypothyroid astrocytes from rat cerebellum compared with normal cells. This effect was accompanied by reduced numbers of neurons and neuritogenesis. Similarly, the proportions of neurons and neurons with neurites were reduced in cultures on ECM prepared from hypothyroid astrocytes in comparison with normal cells. The proportion of both normal and hypothyroid neurons is strongly reduced in astrocyte ECM compared with cocultures on astrocyte monolayers, suggesting that extracellular factors other than ECM proteins are involved in this process. Moreover, treatment of hypothyroid astrocytic cultures with T3 restored the area of both FN and LN immunostaining to normal levels and partially reestablished neuronal survival and neuritogenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrated that hypothyroidism involves impairment of the astrocytic microenvironment and affects the production of ECM proteins. Thus, hypothyroidism is implicated in impaired neuronal development.

  16. Extracellular matrix regenerative graft attenuates the negative impact of polypropylene prolapse mesh on vagina in rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Knight, Katrina; Barone, William; Powers, Robert W.; Nolfi, Alexis; Palcsey, Stacy; Abramowitch, Steven; Moalli, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of wide pore lightweight polypropylene mesh to improve anatomical outcomes in the surgical repair of prolapse has been hampered by mesh complications. One of the prototype prolapse meshes has been found to negatively impact the vagina by inducing a decrease in smooth muscle volume and contractility and the degradation of key structural proteins (collagen and elastin), resulting in vaginal degeneration. Recently, bioscaffolds derived from extracellular matrix have been used to mediate tissue regeneration and have been widely adopted in tissue engineering applications. OBJECTIVE Here we aimed to: (1) define whether augmentation of a polypropylene prolapse mesh with an extracellular matrix regenerative graft in a primate sacrocolpopexy model could mitigate the degenerative changes; and (2) determine the impact of the extracellular matrix graft on vagina when implanted alone. STUDY DESIGN A polypropylene-extracellular matrix composite graft (n = 9) and a 6-layered extracellular matrix graft alone (n = 8) were implanted in 17 middle-aged parous rhesus macaques via sacrocolpopexy and compared to historical data obtained from sham (n = 12) and the polypropylene mesh (n = 12) implanted by the same method. Vaginal function was measured in passive (ball-burst test) and active (smooth muscle contractility) mechanical tests. Vaginal histomorphologic/ biochemical assessments included hematoxylin-eosin and trichrome staining, immunofluorescent labeling of α-smooth muscle actin and apoptotic cells, measurement of total collagen, collagen subtypes (ratio III/ I), mature elastin, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Statistical analyses included 1-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and appropriate posthoc tests. RESULTS The host inflammatory response in the composite mesh-implanted vagina was reduced compared to that following implantation with the polypropylene mesh alone. The increase in apoptotic cells observed with the polypropylene mesh was blunted in

  17. The Bioactivity of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix in Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Amanda J.; Converse, Gabriel L.; Hopkins, Richard A.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage matrix is a particularly promising acellular material for cartilage regeneration given the evidence supporting its chondroinductive character. The ‘raw materials’ of cartilage matrix can serve as building blocks and signals for enhanced tissue regeneration. These matrices can be created by chemical or physical methods: physical methods disrupt cellular membranes and nuclei but may not fully remove all cell components and DNA, whereas chemical methods when combined with physical methods are particularly effective in fully decellularizing such materials. Critical endpoints include no detectable residual DNA or immunogenic antigens. It is important to first delineate between the sources of the cartilage matrix, i.e., derived from matrix produced by cells in vitro or from native tissue, and then to further characterize the cartilage matrix based on the processing method, i.e., decellularization or devitalization. With these distinctions, four types of cartilage matrices exist: decellularized native cartilage (DCC), devitalized native cartilage (DVC), decellularized cell derived matrix (DCCM), and devitalized cell derived matrix (DVCM). Delivery of cartilage matrix may be a straightforward approach without the need for additional cells or growth factors. Without additional biological additives, cartilage matrix may be attractive from a regulatory and commercialization standpoint. Source and delivery method are important considerations for clinical translation. Only one currently marketed cartilage matrix medical device is decellularized, although trends in filed patents suggest additional decellularized products may be available in the future. To choose the most relevant source and processing for cartilage matrix, qualifying testing needs to include targeting the desired application, optimizing delivery of the material, identify relevant FDA regulations, assess availability of raw materials, and immunogenic properties of the product. PMID:25044502

  18. The extracellular matrix and blood vessel formation: not just a scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, John M; Simons, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The extracellular matrix plays a number of important roles, among them providing structural support and information to cellular structures such as blood vessels imbedded within it. As more complex organisms have evolved, the matrix ability to direct signalling towards the vasculature and remodel in response to signalling from the vasculature has assumed progressively greater importance. This review will focus on the molecules of the extracellular matrix, specifically relating to vessel formation and their ability to signal to the surrounding cells to initiate or terminate processes involved in blood vessel formation. PMID:17488472

  19. Molecular Control of Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Stabilization: Regulation by Extracellular Matrix, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Endothelial Cell-Pericyte Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, George E.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia

    Recent studies have revealed a critical role for both extracellular matrices and matrix metalloproteinases in the molecular control of vascular morphogenesis and stabilization in three-dimensional (3D) tissue environments. Key interactions involve endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes, which coassemble to affect vessel formation, remodeling, and stabilization events during development and postnatal life. EC-pericyte interactions control extracellular matrix remodeling events including vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a necessary step for endothelial tube maturation and stabilization. ECs form tube networks in 3D extracellular matrices in a manner dependent on integrins, membrane-type metalloproteinases, and the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1. Recent work has defined an EC lumen signaling complex of proteins composed of these proteins that controls 3D matrix-specific signaling events required for these processes. The EC tube formation process results in the creation of a network of proteolytically generated vascular guidance tunnels. These tunnels are physical matrix spaces that regulate vascular tube remodeling and represent matrix conduits into which pericytes are recruited to allow dynamic cell-cell interactions with ECs. These dynamic EC-pericyte interactions induce vascular basement membrane matrix deposition, leading to vessel maturation and stabilization.

  20. Hypoxic stellate cells of pancreatic cancer stroma regulate extracellular matrix fiber organization and cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Sada, Masafumi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Horioka, Kohei; Okumura, Takashi; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-03-28

    Desmoplasia and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer mutually affect each other and create a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Here, we show that microenvironment remodeling by hypoxic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promotes cancer cell motility through alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) fiber architecture. Three-dimensional (3-D) matrices derived from PSCs under hypoxia exhibited highly organized parallel-patterned matrix fibers compared with 3-D matrices derived from PSCs under normoxia, and promoted cancer cell motility by inducing directional migration of cancer cells due to the parallel fiber architecture. Microarray analysis revealed that procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) in PSCs was the gene that potentially regulates ECM fiber architecture under hypoxia. Stromal PLOD2 expression in surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PLOD2 in PSCs blocked parallel fiber architecture of 3-D matrices, leading to decreased directional migration of cancer cells within the matrices. In conclusion, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced PLOD2 expression in PSCs creates a permissive microenvironment for migration of cancer cells through architectural regulation of stromal ECM in pancreatic cancer.

  1. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix.

  2. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  3. The transcriptional signature of human ovarian carcinoma macrophages is associated with extracellular matrix reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Till; Wortmann, Annika; Hoffmann, Nathalie; Bieringer, Tim; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Jansen, Julia M.; Wagner, Uwe; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages occur as resident cells of fetal origin or as infiltrating blood monocyte-derived cells. Despite the critical role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in tumor progression, the contribution of these developmentally and functionally distinct macrophage subsets and their alteration by the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. We have addressed this question by comparing TAMs from human ovarian carcinoma ascites, resident peritoneal macrophages (pMPHs) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Our study revealed striking a similarity between TAMs and pMPHs, which was considerably greater that the resemblance of TAMs and MDMs, including their transcriptomes, their inflammation-related activation state, the presence of receptors mediating immune functions and the expression of tumor-promoting mediators. Consistent with these results, TAMs phagocytized bacteria, presented peptide antigens and activated cytotoxic T cells within their pathophysiological environment. These observations support the notion that tumor-promoting properties of TAMs may reflect, at least to some extent, normal features of resident macrophages rather than functions induced by the tumor microenvironment. In spite of these surprising similarities between TAMs and pMPHs, bioinformatic analyses identified a TAM-selective signature of 30 genes that are upregulated relative to both pMPHs and MDMs. The majority of these genes is linked to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, supporting a role for TAMs in cancer cell invasion and ovarian cancer progression. PMID:27659538

  4. On-demand dissolution of modular, synthetic extracellular matrix reveals local epithelial-stromal communication networks.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Jorge; Cook, Christi D; Ahrens, Caroline Chopko; Wang, Alex J; Brown, Alexander; Kumar, Manu; Stockdale, Linda; Rothenberg, Daniel; Renggli, Kasper; Gordon, Elizabeth; Lauffenburger, Douglas; White, Forest; Griffith, Linda

    2017-06-01

    Methods to parse paracrine epithelial-stromal communication networks are a vital need in drug development, as disruption of these networks underlies diseases ranging from cancer to endometriosis. Here, we describe a modular, synthetic, and dissolvable extracellular matrix (MSD-ECM) hydrogel that fosters functional 3D epithelial-stromal co-culture, and that can be dissolved on-demand to recover cells and paracrine signaling proteins intact for subsequent analysis. Specifically, synthetic polymer hydrogels, modified with cell-interacting adhesion motifs and crosslinked with peptides that include a substrate for cell-mediated proteolytic remodeling, can be rapidly dissolved by an engineered version of the microbial transpeptidase Sortase A (SrtA) if the crosslinking peptide includes a SrtA substrate motif and a soluble second substrate. SrtA-mediated dissolution affected only 1 of 31 cytokines and growth factors assayed, whereas standard protease degradation methods destroyed about half of these same molecules. Using co-encapsulated endometrial epithelial and stromal cells as one model system, we show that the dynamic cytokine and growth factor response of co-cultures to an inflammatory cue is richer and more nuanced when measured from SrtA-dissolved gel microenvironments than from the culture supernate. This system employs accessible, reproducible reagents and facile protocols; hence, has potential as a tool in identifying and validating therapeutic targets in complex diseases.

  5. Absence of K-Ras Reduces Proliferation and Migration But Increases Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Cuesta, Cristina; Eleno, Nélida; Crespo, Piero; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of Ras-GTPases in the development of renal fibrosis has been addressed in the last decade. We have previously shown that H- and N-Ras isoforms participate in the regulation of fibrosis. Herein, we assessed the role of K-Ras in cellular processes involved in the development of fibrosis: proliferation, migration, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins synthesis. K-Ras knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (K-ras(-/-) ) stimulated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) exhibited reduced proliferation and impaired mobility than wild-type fibroblasts. Moreover, an increase on ECM production was observed in K-Ras KO fibroblasts in basal conditions. The absence of K-Ras was accompanied by reduced Ras activation and ERK phosphorylation, and increased AKT phosphorylation, but no differences were observed in TGF-β1-induced Smad signaling. The MEK inhibitor U0126 decreased cell proliferation independently of the presence of K-ras but reduced migration and ECM proteins expression only in wild-type fibroblasts, while the PI3K-AKT inhibitor LY294002 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and ECM synthesis in both types of fibroblasts. Thus, our data unveil that K-Ras and its downstream effector pathways distinctively regulate key biological processes in the development of fibrosis. Moreover, we show that K-Ras may be a crucial mediator in TGF-β1-mediated effects in this cell type. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2224-2235, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Histochemical evidence of osteoclastic degradation of extracellular matrix in osteolytic metastasis originating from human lung small carcinoma (SBC-5) cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio; Takeuchi, Kiichi; Freitas, Paulo H L; Kawano, Yoshiro; Hoshino, Masaaki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of osteoclast migration and the degradation of unmineralized extracellular matrix in an osteolytic metastasis by examining a well-standardized lung cancer metastasis model of nude mice. SBC-5 human lung small carcinoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of 6-week-old BALB/c nu/nu mice under anesthesia. At 25-30 days after injection, the animals were sacrificed and their femora and/or tibiae were removed for histochemical analyses. Metastatic lesions were shown to occupy a considerable area extending from the metaphyses to the bone marrow region. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive osteoclasts were found in association with an alkaline phosphatase (ALPase)-positive osteoblastic layer lining the bone surface, but could also be localized in the ALPase-negative stromal tissues that border the tumor nodules. These stromal tissues were markedly positive for osteopontin, and contained a significant number of TRAPase-positive osteoclasts expressing immunoreactivity for CD44. We thus speculated that, mediating its affinity for CD44, osteopontin may serve to facilitate osteoclastic migration after their formation associated with ALPase-positive osteoblasts. We next examined the localization of cathepsin K and matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) in osteoclasts. Osteoclasts adjacent to the bone surfaces were positive for both proteins, whereas those in the stromal tissues in the tumor nests showed only MMP-9 immunoreactivity. Immunoelectron microscopy disclosed the presence of MMP-9 in the Golgi apparatus and in vesicular structures at the baso-lateral cytoplasmic region of the osteoclasts found in the stromal tissue. MMP-9-positive vesicular structures also contained fragmented extracellular materials. Thus, osteoclasts appear to either select an optimized function, namely secreting proteolytic enzymes from ruffled borders during bone resorption, or recognize the surrounding extracellular

  7. Conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to basal lamina analogs enhances keratinocyte attachment.

    PubMed

    Bush, Katie A; Downing, Brett R; Walsh, Sarah E; Pins, George D

    2007-02-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of skin contains extracellular matrix proteins that are involved in initiating and controlling keratinocyte signaling events such as attachment, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. To characterize the relationship between extracellular matrix proteins and keratinocyte attachment, a biomimetic design approach was used to precisely tailor the surface of basal lamina analogs with biochemistries that emulate the native biochemical composition found at the dermal-epidermal junction. A high-throughput screening device was developed by our laboratory that allows for the simultaneous investigation of the conjugation of individual extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. collagen type I, collagen type IV, laminin, or fibronectin) as well as their effect on keratinocyte attachment, on the surface of an implantable collagen membrane. Fluorescence microscopy coupled with quantitative digital image analyses indicated that the extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to the collagen-GAG membranes in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the relationship between extracellular matrix protein signaling cues and keratinocyte attachment, cells were seeded on protein-conjugated collagen-GAG membranes and a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay was used to quantify viable keratinocyte attachment. Our results indicate that keratinocyte attachment was significantly enhanced on the surfaces of collagen membranes that were conjugated with fibronectin and type IV collagen. These findings define a set of design parameters that will enhance keratinocyte binding efficiency on the surface of collagen membranes and ultimately improve the rate of epithelialization for dermal equivalents.

  8. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix and Developmental Dysregulation in the Pancreas by Transgenic Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Shik; Gu, Danling; Feng, Lili; Curriden, Scott; Arnush, Marc; Krahl, Troy; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Wilson, Curtis; Loskutoff, David L.; Fox, Howard; Sarvetnick, Nora

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the pancreatic β-islet cells directed by human insulin promoter were produced to study in vivo effects of TGF-β1. Fibroblast proliferation and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix were observed from birth onward, finally replacing almost all the exocrine pancreas. Cellular infiltrates comprising macrophages and neutrophils were also observed. Plasminogen activator inhibitor was induced in the transgenic pancreas as well as fibronectin and laminin, partly explaining accumulation of extracellular matrix. TGF-β1 inhibited proliferation of acinar cells in vivo as evidenced by decreased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Development of pancreatic islets was dysregulated, resulting in small islet cell clusters without formation of normal adult islets; however, the overall islet cell mass was not signfifcantly diminished. Additional transgenic lines with less pronounced phenotypes had less expression of TGF-β1 transgene. These findings suggest that TGF-β1 might be a mediator of diseases associated with extracellular matrix deposition such as chronic pancreatitis, and this mouse model will be useful for further analysis of the in vivo effects of TGF-β1, including its potential for immunosuppression. Imagesp43-aFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7604884

  9. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the “selfish” immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  10. Detection of extracellular matrix modification in cancer models with inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Graham L. C.; Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Young, Scott T.; Ellis, Ronald; Bauer, Greta M.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-10-01

    In cancer biology, there has been a recent effort to understand tumor formation in the context of the tissue microenvironment. In particular, recent progress has explored the mechanisms behind how changes in the cell-extracellular matrix ensemble influence progression of the disease. The extensive use of in vitro tissue culture models in simulant matrix has proven effective at studying such interactions, but modalities for non-invasively quantifying aspects of these systems are scant. We present the novel application of an imaging technique, Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography, for the non-destructive measurement of in vitro biological samples during matrix remodeling. Our findings indicate that the nanoscale-sensitive mass density correlation shape factor D of cancer cells increases in response to a more crosslinked matrix. We present a facile technique for the non-invasive, quantitative study of the micro- and nano-scale structure of the extracellular matrix and its host cells.

  11. Tissue architecture and breast cancer: the role of extracellular matrix and steroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R K; Bissell, M J

    2000-06-01

    The changes in tissue architecture that accompany the development of breast cancer have been the focus of investigations aimed at developing new cancer therapeutics. As we learn more about the normal mammary gland, we have begun to understand the complex signaling pathways underlying the dramatic shifts in the structure and function of breast tissue. Integrin-, growth factor-, and steroid hormone-signaling pathways all play an important part in maintaining tissue architecture; disruption of the delicate balance of signaling results in dramatic changes in the way cells interact with each other and with the extracellular matrix, leading to breast cancer. The extracellular matrix itself plays a central role in coordinating these signaling processes. In this review, we consider the interrelationships between the extracellular matrix, integrins, growth factors, and steroid hormones in mammary gland development and function.

  12. The second extracellular loop dictates Occludin-mediated HCV entry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Kuo, Wayne; Yang, Wei; Liu, Weiqun; Gibson, Gregory A; Dorko, Kenneth; Watkins, Simon C; Strom, Stephen C; Wang, Tianyi

    2010-11-10

    Recent findings have implicated tight junction (TJ) protein Occludin (OCLN) as an essential factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV) to enter human hepatocytes. To gain insights into OCLN-mediated HCV entry, we created a panel of OCLN deletion mutants and found that without impairing OCLN's cell surface localization, removal of the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) from OCLN abolished both its ability to mediate HIV-HCV pseudotypes' (HCVpp) entry as well as its ability to coprecipitate HCV glycoprotein E2. Recombinant OCLN EL2, however, failed to robustly bind soluble E2 (sE2) in pull-down assays. Subsequent studies revealed that OCLN formed complex with Dynamin II, an important GTPase for endocytosis, in an EL2-dependent fashion. HCVpp, as well as cell culture grown HCV (HCVcc), was sensitive to Dynamin knockdown or inhibition. We conclude that OCLN EL2 dictates the Dynamin-dependent HCV entry. Furthermore, OCLN could function to bridge virions to Dynamin-dependent endocytic machineries.

  13. Mammary epithelial cell: Influence of extracellular matrix composition and organization during development and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Laura; Erler, Janine T.; Dembo, Micah; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2009-01-01

    Stromal–epithelial interactions regulate mammary gland development and are critical for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. The extracellular matrix, which is a proteinaceous component of the stroma, regulates mammary epithelial growth, survival, migration and differentiation through a repertoire of transmembrane receptors, of which integrins are the best characterized. Integrins modulate cell fate by reciprocally transducing biochemical and biophysical cues between the cell and the extracellular matrix, facilitating processes such as embryonic branching morphogenesis and lactation in the mammary gland. During breast development and cancer progression, the extracellular matrix is dynamically altered such that its composition, turnover, processing and orientation change dramatically. These modifications influence mammary epithelial cell shape, and modulate growth factor and hormonal responses to regulate processes including branching morphogenesis and alveolar differentiation. Malignant transformation of the breast is also associated with significant matrix remodeling and a progressive stiffening of the stroma that can enhance mammary epithelial cell growth, perturb breast tissue organization, and promote cell invasion and survival. In this review, we discuss the role of stromal–epithelial interactions in normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell behavior. We specifically focus on how dynamic modulation of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix elicit a dialogue with the mammary epithelium through transmembrane integrin receptors to influence tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and malignant transformation. PMID:17719831

  14. Topological Control of Extracellular Matrix Growth: A Native-Like Model for Cell Morphodynamics Studies.

    PubMed

    Caballero, David; Samitier, Josep

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of cells with their natural environment influences a large variety of cellular phenomena, including cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The complex extracellular matrix network has challenged the attempts to replicate in vitro the heterogeneity of the cell environment and has threatened, in general, the relevance of in vitro studies. In this work, we describe a new and extremely versatile approach to generate native-like extracellular matrices with controlled morphologies for the in vitro study of cellular processes. This general approach combines the confluent culture of fibroblasts with microfabricated guiding templates to direct the three-dimensional growth of well-defined extracellular networks which recapitulate the structural and biomolecular complexity of features typically found in vivo. To evaluate its performance, we studied fundamental cellular processes, including cell cytoskeleton organization, cell-matrix adhesion, proliferation, and protrusions morphodynamics. In all cases, we found striking differences depending on matrix architecture and, in particular, when compared to standard two-dimensional environments. We also assessed whether the engineered matrix networks influenced cell migration dynamics and locomotion strategy, finding enhanced migration efficiency for cells seeded on aligned matrices. Altogether, our methodology paves the way to the development of high-performance models of the extracellular matrix for potential applications in tissue engineering, diagnosis, or stem-cell biology.

  15. Alterations in the biosynthesis of extracellular matrix molecules in connective tissues by electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ciombor, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) of certain configurations have been shown to be effective clinically in promoting the healing of fracture non-unions and are believed to enhance calcification of extracellular matrix. In vitro studies have suggested that PEMFs may also have the effect of modifying the extracellular matrix by promoting the synthesis of matrix molecules. This study examines the effect of one particular type of PEMF and a sinusoidal continuous wave upon the extracellular matrix and calcification of endochondral ossification in vivo. The pulsed magnetic field (SS-22) utilized in these studies is being used clinically for the treatment of fracture non-unions, a condition in which the bone is not restored to form or function. The sinusoidal continuous wave was designed to provide a 5 Gauss amplitude at a 15 Hz. rate. The synthesis of cartilage molecules is enhanced by this type of PEMF and since wave and subsequent endochondral calcification is stimulated. Histomorphometric studies indicate that the maturation of bone trabeculae is also promoted by this type of PEMF stimulation. These results indicate that a specific PEMF or continuous waveform can change the composition of cartilage extracellular matrix in vivo and raises the possibility that the effects on other processes of endochondral ossification (e.g., fracture healing and growth plates) may occur through a similar mechanism.

  16. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein attenuated extracellular matrix deposit by inhibiting phospho-Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in kidneys of diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Hao, Jun; Li, Lisha; Li, Fan; Liu, Shuxia; Duan, Huijun

    2016-06-10

    Glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial extracellular matrix deposit and fibrosis are the main features of diabetic nephropathy, which are mediated by activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) is known as a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt pathway. Whether CTMP regulates renal extracellular matrix metabolism of diabetic nephropathy is still not known. Here, renal decreased CTMP, enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1, α-SMA and extracellular matrix deposit are found in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high glucose decreases CTMP expression accompanied by enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA in cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HKC), which are effectively prevented by transfection of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Moreover, delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector into kidneys via tail vein of diabetic mice increases CTMP expression by 8.84 times followed by 60.00%, 76.50% and 24.37% decreases of phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA compared with diabetic mice receiving pYr-adshuttle-4 vector. Again, increased renal extracellular matrix accumulation of diabetic mice is also inhibited with delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Our results indicate that CTMP attenuates renal extracellular matrix deposit by regulating the phosphorylation of Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA expression in diabetic mice.

  17. Extracellular-matrix tethering regulates stem-cell fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappmann, Britta; Gautrot, Julien E.; Connelly, John T.; Strange, Daniel G. T.; Li, Yuan; Oyen, Michelle L.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Boehm, Heike; Li, Bojun; Vogel, Viola; Spatz, Joachim P.; Watt, Fiona M.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2012-07-01

    To investigate how substrate properties influence stem-cell fate, we cultured single human epidermal stem cells on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel surfaces, 0.1 kPa-2.3 MPa in stiffness, with a covalently attached collagen coating. Cell spreading and differentiation were unaffected by polydimethylsiloxane stiffness. However, cells on polyacrylamide of low elastic modulus (0.5 kPa) could not form stable focal adhesions and differentiated as a result of decreased activation of the extracellular-signal-related kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. The differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells was also unaffected by PDMS stiffness but regulated by the elastic modulus of PAAm. Dextran penetration measurements indicated that polyacrylamide substrates of low elastic modulus were more porous than stiff substrates, suggesting that the collagen anchoring points would be further apart. We then changed collagen crosslink concentration and used hydrogel-nanoparticle substrates to vary anchoring distance at constant substrate stiffness. Lower collagen anchoring density resulted in increased differentiation. We conclude that stem cells exert a mechanical force on collagen fibres and gauge the feedback to make cell-fate decisions.

  18. A finite dissipative theory of temporary interfibrillar bridges in the extracellular matrix of ligaments and tendons

    PubMed Central

    Ciarletta, P.; Ben Amar, M.

    2009-01-01

    The structural integrity and the biomechanical characteristics of ligaments and tendons result from the interactions between collagenous and non-collagenous proteins (e.g. proteoglycans, PGs) in the extracellular matrix. In this paper, a dissipative theory of temporary interfibrillar bridges in the anisotropic network of collagen type I, embedded in a ground substance, is derived. The glycosaminoglycan chains of decorin are assumed to mediate interactions between fibrils, behaving as viscous structures that transmit deformations outside the collagen molecules. This approach takes into account the dissipative effects of the unfolding preceding fibrillar elongation, together with the slippage of entire fibrils and the strain-rate-dependent damage evolution of the interfibrillar bridges. Thermodynamic consistency is used to derive the constitutive equations, and the transition state theory is applied to model the rearranging properties of the interfibrillar bridges. The constitutive theory is applied to reproduce the hysteretic spectrum of the tissues, demonstrating how PGs determine damage evolution, softening and non-recoverable strains in their cyclic mechanical response. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental response of ligaments and tendons from referenced studies. The relevance of the proposed model in mechanobiology research is discussed, together with several applications from medical practice to bioengineering science. PMID:19106068

  19. Polo-like Kinase I is involved in Invasion through Extracellular Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-04-02

    Polo-like kinase 1, PLK1, has important functions in maintaining genome stability and is involved in regulation of mitosis. PLK1 is up regulated in many invasive carcinomas. We asked whether it may also play a role in acquisition of invasiveness, a crucial step in transition to malignancy. In a model of metaplastic basal-like breast carcinoma progression, we found that PLK1 expression is necessary but not sufficient to induce invasiveness through laminin-rich extracellular matrix. PLK1 mediates invasion via Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin, both of which are necessary. We observed that PLK1 phosphorylates Vimentin on serine 82, which in turn regulates cell surface levels of {beta}1 integrin. We found PLK1 to be also highly expressed in pre-invasive in situ carcinomas of the breast. These results support a role for the involvement of PLK1 in the invasion process and point to this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for pre-invasive and invasive breast carcinoma treatment.

  20. Mechanical signaling and the cellular response to extracellular matrix in angiogenesis and cardiovascular physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Great advances have been made in the identification of the soluble angiogenic factors, insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, and receptor signaling pathways that mediate control of angiogenesis--the growth of blood capillaries. This review focuses on work that explores how endothelial cells integrate these chemical signals with mechanical cues from their local tissue microenvironment so as to produce functional capillary networks that exhibit specialized form as well as function. These studies have revealed that ECM governs whether an endothelial cell will switch between growth, differentiation, motility, or apoptosis programs in response to a soluble stimulus based on its ability to mechanically resist cell tractional forces and thereby produce cell and cytoskeletal distortion. Transmembrane integrin receptors play a key role in this mechanochemical transduction process because they both organize a cytoskeletal signaling complex within the focal adhesion and preferentially focus mechanical forces on this site. Molecular filaments within the internal cytoskeleton--microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments--also contribute to the cell's structural and functional response to mechanical stress through their role as discrete support elements within a tensegrity-stabilized cytoskeletal array. Importantly, a similar form of mechanical control also has been shown to be involved in the regulation of contractility in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiac myocytes. Thus, the mechanism by which cells perform mechanochemical transduction and the implications of these findings for morphogenetic control are discussed in the wider context of vascular development and cardiovascular physiology.

  1. Interactions of promonocytic U937 cells with proteins of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Pucillo, C E; Colombatti, A; Vitale, M; Salzano, S; Rossi, G; Formisano, S

    1993-01-01

    Monocyte interaction with proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is regulated by expression of specific cell-surface receptors. 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) has been shown to induce the promonocytic cell line U937 to a more differentiated monocyte-like state. In this study we have analysed the attachment of U937 cells to ECM proteins and the effects of treatment with TPA on this process. Non-induced U937 cells attach to fibronectin- and Matrigel-coated surfaces without TPA stimulation, but TPA further increases adherence to these substrates as measured by an enhanced binding and by the lower concentration of proteins needed in the substrate to achieve 50% of maximal cell adhesion. Attachment to type I collagen was seen only with activated U937 cells, whereas no measurable attachment to bovine serum albumin, vitronectin, and type IV collagen was detected. TPA-activated U937 cells showed a two-fold increase in the expression of the RGD-dependent integrin receptors alpha 3 and alpha 5, and a reduction in the expression of alpha 4, another fibronectin-specific receptor, whereas the common beta 1 chain was unchanged. Attachment of U937 cells to fibronectin was primarily mediated by the alpha 3 and alpha 5 integrins, as revealed by the ability of GRGDS peptides to inhibit attachment, whereas the CS-1 peptide, containing the alpha 4 binding site, was largely ineffective in blocking attachment. PMID:8262552

  2. Neuron-Glia Interactions in Neural Plasticity: Contributions of Neural Extracellular Matrix and Perineuronal Nets

    PubMed Central

    Dzyubenko, Egor; Gottschling, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Synapses are specialized structures that mediate rapid and efficient signal transmission between neurons and are surrounded by glial cells. Astrocytes develop an intimate association with synapses in the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to the regulation of ion and neurotransmitter concentrations. Together with neurons, they shape intercellular space to provide a stable milieu for neuronal activity. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components are synthesized by both neurons and astrocytes and play an important role in the formation, maintenance, and function of synapses in the CNS. The components of the ECM have been detected near glial processes, which abut onto the CNS synaptic unit, where they are part of the specialized macromolecular assemblies, termed perineuronal nets (PNNs). PNNs have originally been discovered by Golgi and represent a molecular scaffold deposited in the interface between the astrocyte and subsets of neurons in the vicinity of the synapse. Recent reports strongly suggest that PNNs are tightly involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity. Moreover, several studies have implicated PNNs and the neural ECM in neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we highlight current concepts relating to neural ECM and PNNs and describe an in vitro approach that allows for the investigation of ECM functions for synaptogenesis. PMID:26881114

  3. Tumor cell-driven extracellular matrix remodeling drives haptotaxis during metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Madeleine J.; Jonas, Oliver; Kosciuk, Tatsiana; Broye, Liliane C.; Guido, Bruna C.; Wyckoff, Jeff; Riquelme, Daisy; Lamar, John M.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Whittaker, Charlie; Ma, Duanduan; Langer, Robert; Cima, Michael J.; Wisinski, Kari B.; Hynes, Richard O.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Keely, Patricia J.; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2016-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the tumor microenvironment, but its role in promoting metastasis is incompletely understood. Here we show that FN gradients elicit directional movement of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Haptotaxis on FN gradients requires direct interaction between α5β1 integrin and Mena, an actin regulator, and involves increases in focal complex signaling and tumor-cell-mediated extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Compared to Mena, higher levels of the pro-metastatic MenaINV isoform associate with α5, which enables 3D haptotaxis of tumor cells towards the high FN concentrations typically present in perivascular space and in the periphery of breast tumor tissue. MenaINV and FN levels were correlated in two breast cancer cohorts, and high levels of MenaINV were significantly associated with increased tumor recurrence as well as decreased patient survival. Our results identify a novel tumor-cell-intrinsic mechanism that promotes metastasis through ECM remodeling and ECM guided directional migration. PMID:26811325

  4. Enhanced cognitive flexibility in reversal learning induced by removal of the extracellular matrix in auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Happel, Max F K; Niekisch, Hartmut; Castiblanco Rivera, Laura L; Ohl, Frank W; Deliano, Matthias; Frischknecht, Renato

    2014-02-18

    During brain maturation, the occurrence of the extracellular matrix (ECM) terminates juvenile plasticity by mediating structural stability. Interestingly, enzymatic removal of the ECM restores juvenile forms of plasticity, as for instance demonstrated by topographical reconnectivity in sensory pathways. However, to which degree the mature ECM is a compromise between stability and flexibility in the adult brain impacting synaptic plasticity as a fundamental basis for learning, lifelong memory formation, and higher cognitive functions is largely unknown. In this study, we removed the ECM in the auditory cortex of adult Mongolian gerbils during specific phases of cortex-dependent auditory relearning, which was induced by the contingency reversal of a frequency-modulated tone discrimination, a task requiring high behavioral flexibility. We found that ECM removal promoted a significant increase in relearning performance, without erasing already established-that is, learned-capacities when continuing discrimination training. The cognitive flexibility required for reversal learning of previously acquired behavioral habits, commonly understood to mainly rely on frontostriatal circuits, was enhanced by promoting synaptic plasticity via ECM removal within the sensory cortex. Our findings further suggest experimental modulation of the cortical ECM as a tool to open short-term windows of enhanced activity-dependent reorganization allowing for guided neuroplasticity.

  5. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  6. Heart extracellular matrix supports cardiomyocyte differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Sayaka; Lin, Qingsong; Wang, Jigang; Lim, Teck Kwang; Joshi, Shashikant B.; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan; Chung, Maxey C.M.; Sheetz, Michael P.; Fujita, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    We have evaluated the effect of heart extracellular matrix (ECM) on the cardiomyocyte differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells) using de-cellularized heart tissue. Several lines of evidence indicate that ECM plays significant roles in cell proliferation, cell death and differentiation, but role of ECM possessing a 3D structure in differentiation has not been studied in detail. We found that there are substantial differences in the quantitative protein profiles of ECM in SDS-treated heart tissue compared to that of liver tissue, as assessed by iTRAQ™ quantitative proteomics analysis. When mouse ES cells were cultured on thin (60 μm) sections of de-cellularized tissue, the expression of cardiac myosin heavy chain (cMHC) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) was high in ES cells cultured on heart ECM compared with those cultured on liver ECM. In addition, the protein expression of cMHC and cTnI was detected in cells on heart ECM after 2 weeks, which was not detectable in cells on liver ECM. These results indicate that heart ECM plays a critical role in the cardiomyocyte differentiation of ES cells. We propose that tissue-specific ECM induced cell lineage specification through mechano-transduction mediated by the structure, elasticity and components of ECM. PMID:23168383

  7. A finite dissipative theory of temporary interfibrillar bridges in the extracellular matrix of ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, P; Ben Amar, M

    2009-10-06

    The structural integrity and the biomechanical characteristics of ligaments and tendons result from the interactions between collagenous and non-collagenous proteins (e.g. proteoglycans, PGs) in the extracellular matrix. In this paper, a dissipative theory of temporary interfibrillar bridges in the anisotropic network of collagen type I, embedded in a ground substance, is derived. The glycosaminoglycan chains of decorin are assumed to mediate interactions between fibrils, behaving as viscous structures that transmit deformations outside the collagen molecules. This approach takes into account the dissipative effects of the unfolding preceding fibrillar elongation, together with the slippage of entire fibrils and the strain-rate-dependent damage evolution of the interfibrillar bridges. Thermodynamic consistency is used to derive the constitutive equations, and the transition state theory is applied to model the rearranging properties of the interfibrillar bridges. The constitutive theory is applied to reproduce the hysteretic spectrum of the tissues, demonstrating how PGs determine damage evolution, softening and non-recoverable strains in their cyclic mechanical response. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental response of ligaments and tendons from referenced studies. The relevance of the proposed model in mechanobiology research is discussed, together with several applications from medical practice to bioengineering science.

  8. Oncogenic Ras differentially regulates metabolism and anoikis in extracellular matrix-detached cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, J A; Davison-Versagli, C A; Leliaert, A K; Pape, D J; McCallister, C; Zuo, J; Durbin, S M; Buchheit, C L; Zhang, S; Schafer, Z T

    2016-08-01

    In order for cancer cells to survive during metastasis, they must overcome anoikis, a caspase-dependent cell death process triggered by extracellular matrix (ECM) detachment, and rectify detachment-induced metabolic defects that compromise cell survival. However, the precise signals used by cancer cells to facilitate their survival during metastasis remain poorly understood. We have discovered that oncogenic Ras facilitates the survival of ECM-detached cancer cells by using distinct effector pathways to regulate metabolism and block anoikis. Surprisingly, we find that while Ras-mediated phosphatidylinositol (3)-kinase signaling is critical for rectifying ECM-detachment-induced metabolic deficiencies, the critical downstream effector is serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1 (SGK-1) rather than Akt. Our data also indicate that oncogenic Ras blocks anoikis by diminishing expression of the phosphatase PHLPP1 (PH Domain and Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein Phosphatase 1), which promotes anoikis through the activation of p38 MAPK. Thus, our study represents a novel paradigm whereby oncogene-initiated signal transduction can promote the survival of ECM-detached cells through divergent downstream effectors.

  9. Shell Extracts from the Marine Bivalve Pecten maximus Regulate the Synthesis of Extracellular Matrix in Primary Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Latire, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Bigot, Nicolas; Carduner, Ludovic; Kellouche, Sabrina; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Carreiras, Franck; Marin, Frédéric; Lebel, Jean-Marc; Galéra, Philippe; Serpentini, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Mollusc shells are composed of more than 95% calcium carbonate and less than 5% of an organic matrix consisting mostly of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides. Previous studies have elucidated the biological activities of the shell matrices from bivalve molluscs on skin, especially on the expression of the extracellular matrix components of fibroblasts. In this work, we have investigated the potential biological activities of shell matrix components extracted from the shell of the scallop Pecten maximus on human fibroblasts in primary culture. Firstly, we demonstrated that shell matrix components had different effects on general cellular activities. Secondly, we have shown that the shell matrix components stimulate the synthesis of type I and III collagens, as well as that of sulphated GAGs. The increased expression of type I collagen is likely mediated by the recruitment of transactivating factors (Sp1, Sp3 and human c-Krox) in the −112/−61 bp COL1A1 promoter region. Finally, contrarily to what was obtained in previous works, we demonstrated that the scallop shell extracts have only a small effect on cell migration during in vitro wound tests and have no effect on cell proliferation. Thus, our research emphasizes the potential use of shell matrix of Pecten maximus for dermo-cosmetic applications. PMID:24949635

  10. Multiphase modelling of tumour growth and extracellular matrix interaction: mathematical tools and applications.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, Luigi; Tosin, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Resorting to a multiphase modelling framework, tumours are described here as a mixture of tumour and host cells within a porous structure constituted by a remodelling extracellular matrix (ECM), which is wet by a physiological extracellular fluid. The model presented in this article focuses mainly on the description of mechanical interactions of the growing tumour with the host tissue, their influence on tumour growth, and the attachment/detachment mechanisms between cells and ECM. Starting from some recent experimental evidences, we propose to describe the interaction forces involving the extracellular matrix via some concepts coming from viscoplasticity. We then apply the model to the description of the growth of tumour cords and the formation of fibrosis.

  11. Novel extracellular matrix and microtubule cables associated with pseudopodia of Astrammina rara, a carnivorous Antarctic foraminifer.

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; DeLaca, T E; Rieder, C L

    1986-02-01

    Astrammina rara is a benthic foraminiferan protozoan which uses an extensive network of fine, branching, and anastomosing pseudopodia to capture and digest metazoans up to 12 mm long. During such predation the pseudopodia appear remarkably elastic and tensile. Electron microscopy has revealed a novel extracellular matrix of thin branching fibers associated with A. rara's pseudopodia, which are otherwise typical in appearance. These fibers are structurally associated with the pseudopodial glycocalyx. Cytoplasmic microtubules are often found in close juxtaposition to the plasma membrane and overlying extracellular fibers. In the main pseudopodial trunks bundles of 30-300 microtubules are surrounded by a lightly staining matrix and linked by occasional bridges. The microtubules follow straight trajectories in distal filopodia, but in pseudopodial trunks they appear to coil around one another to form cables. These microtubular cables and extracellular fibers are novel features of A. rara's pseudopodia and may provide the structural basis for their tensile strength.

  12. Macromolecular crowding directs extracellular matrix organization and mesenchymal stem cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Adam S; Loe, Felicia C; Li, Ran; Raghunath, Michael; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2012-01-01

    Microenvironments of biological cells are dominated in vivo by macromolecular crowding and resultant excluded volume effects. This feature is absent in dilute in vitro cell culture. Here, we induced macromolecular crowding in vitro by using synthetic macromolecular globules of nm-scale radius at physiological levels of fractional volume occupancy. We quantified the impact of induced crowding on the extracellular and intracellular protein organization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via immunocytochemistry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and AFM-enabled nanoindentation. Macromolecular crowding in extracellular culture media directly induced supramolecular assembly and alignment of extracellular matrix proteins deposited by cells, which in turn increased alignment of the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. The resulting cell-matrix reciprocity further affected adhesion, proliferation, and migration behavior of MSCs. Macromolecular crowding can thus aid the design of more physiologically relevant in vitro studies and devices for MSCs and other cells, by increasing the fidelity between materials synthesized by cells in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Collin, Estelle; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Gorelov, Alexander; Dillon, Simon; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulates intra- and extra-cellular activities in multicellular organisms, in human corneal fibroblast culture. In the presence of macromolecules, abundant extracellular matrix deposition was evidenced as fast as 48 h in culture, even at low serum concentration. Temperature responsive copolymers allowed the detachment of dense and cohesive supramolecularly assembled living substitutes within 6 days in culture. Morphological, histological, gene and protein analysis assays demonstrated maintenance of tissue-specific function. Macromolecular crowding opens new avenues for a more rational design in engineering of clinically relevant tissue modules in vitro. PMID:25736020

  14. Macromolecular Crowding Directs Extracellular Matrix Organization and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Adam S.; Loe, Felicia C.; Li, Ran; Raghunath, Michael; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Microenvironments of biological cells are dominated in vivo by macromolecular crowding and resultant excluded volume effects. This feature is absent in dilute in vitro cell culture. Here, we induced macromolecular crowding in vitro by using synthetic macromolecular globules of nm-scale radius at physiological levels of fractional volume occupancy. We quantified the impact of induced crowding on the extracellular and intracellular protein organization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via immunocytochemistry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and AFM-enabled nanoindentation. Macromolecular crowding in extracellular culture media directly induced supramolecular assembly and alignment of extracellular matrix proteins deposited by cells, which in turn increased alignment of the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. The resulting cell-matrix reciprocity further affected adhesion, proliferation, and migration behavior of MSCs. Macromolecular crowding can thus aid the design of more physiologically relevant in vitro studies and devices for MSCs and other cells, by increasing the fidelity between materials synthesized by cells in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22649562

  15. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cell cultivation in vitro on decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Timothy F; French, Samuel W

    2010-02-01

    The in vitro biocompatibility of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix was evaluated. Following a freeze-thaw cycle, sectioned discs of fresh frozen rat metaphyseal bone were sequentially incubated in solutions of hypertonic, then hypotonic Ringer's solution, followed by deoxycholic acid, then DNAase I. The adequacy of decellularization of marrow stroma was examined by light microscopy. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cells were harvested by dispersion of rat long bone marrow, followed by concentration by discontinuous Ficoll-Paque gradient centrifugation. The fibroblastic cells were expanded by in vitro cultivation, and second passage cells were cryopreserved until needed. Cryopreserved marrow stromal cells were applied dropwise to sections of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix, and cultured in BJGb medium with 20% fetal bovine serum for ten days. Mature cultures were formalin fixed, decalcified, and embedded in paraffin. Light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections showed individual spindle cells invading the upper portion of the decellularized extracellular matrix, and also a monolayer of spindle cells on the upper surfaces of exposed trabecular and cortical bone. This experiment showed that decellularized marrow extracellular matrix is a biocompatible three dimensional in vitro substrate for marrow stromal fibroblastic cells.

  16. Aging of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix drives a stem cell fibrogenic conversion.

    PubMed

    Stearns-Reider, Kristen M; D'Amore, Antonio; Beezhold, Kevin; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Cavalli, Loredana; Wagner, William R; Vorp, David A; Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Shinde, Sunita; Zhang, Changqing; Barchowsky, Aaron; Rando, Thomas A; Tuan, Rocky S; Ambrosio, Fabrisia

    2017-03-30

    Age-related declines in skeletal muscle regeneration have been attributed to muscle stem cell (MuSC) dysfunction. Aged MuSCs display a fibrogenic conversion, leading to fibrosis and impaired recovery after injury. Although studies have demonstrated the influence of in vitro substrate characteristics on stem cell fate, whether and how aging of the extracellular matrix (ECM) affects stem cell behavior has not been investigated. Here, we investigated the direct effect of the aged muscle ECM on MuSC lineage specification. Quantification of ECM topology and muscle mechanical properties reveals decreased collagen tortuosity and muscle stiffening with increasing age. Age-related ECM alterations directly disrupt MuSC responses, and MuSCs seeded ex vivo onto decellularized ECM constructs derived from aged muscle display increased expression of fibrogenic markers and decreased myogenicity, compared to MuSCs seeded onto young ECM. This fibrogenic conversion is recapitulated in vitro when MuSCs are seeded directly onto matrices elaborated by aged fibroblasts. When compared to young fibroblasts, fibroblasts isolated from aged muscle display increased nuclear levels of the mechanosensors, Yes-associated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), consistent with exposure to a stiff microenvironment in vivo. Accordingly, preconditioning of young fibroblasts by seeding them onto a substrate engineered to mimic the stiffness of aged muscle increases YAP/TAZ nuclear translocation and promotes secretion of a matrix that favors MuSC fibrogenesis. The findings here suggest that an age-related increase in muscle stiffness drives YAP/TAZ-mediated pathogenic expression of matricellular proteins by fibroblasts, ultimately disrupting MuSC fate.

  17. Monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation: synthesis and secretion of a complex extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mary Y; Chan, Christina K; Braun, Kathleen R; Green, Pattie S; O'Brien, Kevin D; Chait, Alan; Day, Anthony J; Wight, Thomas N

    2012-04-20

    Although monocyte- and macrophage-derived molecules are known to promote extracellular matrix (ECM) disruption and destabilization, it is less appreciated that they also synthesize molecules contributing to ECM formation, stabilization, and function. We have identified and characterized the synthesis of proteoglycans and related proteins, some not previously known to be associated with macrophages. Proteoglycan extracts of [(35)S]sulfate- and (35)S-trans amino acid-radiolabeled culture media from THP-1 monocytes induced to differentiate by treatment with phorbol myristate acetate revealed three major proteins of ~25, 90, and 100 kDa following chondroitin ABC lyase digestion. The 25-kDa protein was predominant for monocytes, whereas the 90- and 100-kDa proteins were predominant for macrophages. Tandem mass spectrometry identified (i) the 25-kDa core protein as serglycin, (ii) the 90-kDa core protein as inter-α-inhibitor heavy chain 2 (IαIHC2), and (iii) the 100-kDa core as amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2). Differentiation was also associated with (i) a >500-fold increase in mRNA for TNF-stimulated gene-6, an essential cofactor for heavy chain-mediated matrix stabilization; (ii) a >800-fold increase in mRNA for HAS2, which is responsible for hyaluronan synthesis; and (iii) a 3-fold increase in mRNA for versican, which interacts with hyaluronan. Biochemical evidence is also presented for an IαIHC2-APLP2 complex, and immunohistochemical staining of human atherosclerotic lesions demonstrates similar staining patterns for APLP2 and IαIHC2 with macrophages, whereas serglycin localizes to the underlying glycosaminoglycan-rich region. These findings indicate that macrophages synthesize many of the molecules participating in ECM formation and function, suggesting a novel role for these molecules in the differentiation of macrophages in the development of atherosclerosis.

  18. Physicomechanical properties of the extracellular matrix of a demineralized bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Nikolaev, S. V.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Uvarkin, P. V.; Ratushnyak, A. S.; Chebodaeva, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The article describes the results of a study of physicomechanical properties of a demineralized bone matrix of human cancellous and compact bones. A demineralized cancellous bone was shown to have the best characteristics of a porous system for colonization of matrices by cells. The ultimate stress and elasticity modulus of samples of demineralized femoral heads isolated in primary hip replacement was demonstrated to vary in wide ranges. The elasticity modulus ranged from 50 to 250 MPa, and the tensile strength varied from 1.1 to 5.5 MPa. Microhardness measurements by the recovered indentation method were not possible because of the viscoelastic properties of a bone material. To study the piezoelectric properties of samples, a measuring system was developed that comprised a measuring chamber with contact electrodes, a system for controlled sample loading, an amplifier-converter unit, and signal recording and processing software. The measurement results were used to determine the dependence of the signal amplitude on the dynamic deformation characteristics. The findings are discussed in terms of the relationship between the mechanical and electrical properties and the structure of the organic bone component.

  19. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  20. Novel alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways: secreted factors and interactions with the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Papay, Robert; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Gaivin, Robert J; de la Motte, Carol A; Plow, Edward F; Perez, Dianne M

    2006-07-01

    alpha1-Adrenergic receptor (alpha1-ARs) subtypes (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D) regulate multiple signal pathways, such as phospholipase C, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases. We employed oligonucleotide microarray technology to explore the effects of both short- (1 h) and long-term (18 h) activation of the alpha1A-AR to enable RNA changes to occur downstream of earlier well characterized signaling pathways, promoting novel couplings. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies confirmed that PKC was a critical regulator of alpha1A-AR-mediated gene expression, and secreted interleukin (IL)-6 also contributed to gene expression alterations. We next focused on two novel signaling pathways that might be mediated through alpha1A-AR stimulation because of the clustering of gene expression changes for cell adhesion/motility (syndecan-4 and tenascin-C) and hyaluronan (HA) signaling. We confirmed that alpha1-ARs induced adhesion in three cell types to vitronectin, an interaction that was also integrin-, FGF7-, and PKC-dependent. alpha1-AR activation also inhibited cell migration, which was integrin- and PKC-independent but still required secretion of FGF7. alpha1-AR activation also increased the expression and deposition of HA, a glycosaminoglycan, which displayed two distinct structures: pericellular coats and long cable structures, as well as increasing expression of the HA receptor, CD44. Long cable structures of HA can bind leukocytes, which this suggests that alpha1-ARs may be involved in proinflammatory responses. Our results indicate alpha1-ARs induce the secretion of factors that interact with the extracellular matrix to regulate cell adhesion, motility and proinflammatory responses through novel signaling pathways.

  1. Yersinia enterocolitica-mediated degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Möllerherm, Helene; Neumann, Ariane; Schilcher, Katrin; Blodkamp, Stefanie; Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Dersch, Petra; Lüthje, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is described as a tool of the innate host defence to fight against invading pathogens. Fibre-like DNA structures associated with proteins such as histones, cell-specific enzymes and antimicrobial peptides are released, thereby entrapping invading pathogens. It has been reported that several bacteria are able to degrade NETs by nucleases and thus evade the NET-mediated entrapment. Here we studied the ability of three different Yersinia serotypes to induce and degrade NETs. We found that the common Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8 and O:9 were able to induce NETs in human blood-derived neutrophils during the first hour of co-incubation. At later time points, the NET amount was reduced, suggesting that degradation of NETs has occurred. This was confirmed by NET degradation assays with phorbol-myristate-acetate-pre-stimulated neutrophils. In addition, we found that the Yersinia supernatants were able to degrade purified plasmid DNA. The absence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions, but not that of a protease inhibitor cocktail, completely abolished NET degradation. We therefore postulate that Y. enterocolitica produces Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-dependent NET-degrading nucleases as shown for some Gram-positive pathogens.

  2. Basic components of connective tissues and extracellular matrix: elastin, fibrillin, fibulins, fibrinogen, fibronectin, laminin, tenascins and thrombospondins.

    PubMed

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    -elastic extracellular matrixes, and interact closely with tropoelastin and integrins. Not only do microfibrils provide structural integrity of specific organ systems, but they also provide a scaffold for elastogenesis in elastic tissues. Fibrillin is important for the assembly of elastin into elastic fibers. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene are closely associated with Marfan syndrome. Fibulins are tightly connected with basement membranes, elastic fibers and other components of extracellular matrix and participate in formation of elastic fibers. Tenascins are ECM polymorphic glycoproteins found in many connective tissues in the body. Their expression is regulated by mechanical stress both during development and in adulthood. Tenascins mediate both inflammatory and fibrotic processes to enable effective tissue repair and play roles in pathogenesis of Ehlers-Danlos, heart disease, and regeneration and recovery of musculo-tendinous tissue. One of the roles of thrombospondin 1 is activation of TGFβ. Increased expression of thrombospondin and TGFβ activity was observed in fibrotic skin disorders such as keloids and scleroderma. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) or thrombospondin-5 is primarily present in the cartilage. High levels of COMP are present in fibrotic scars and systemic sclerosis of the skin, and in tendon, especially with physical activity, loading and post-injury. It plays a role in vascular wall remodeling and has been found in atherosclerotic plaques as well.

  3. Morphological Characterization of Organized Extracellular Matrix Deposition by Ascorbic Acid-Stimulated Human Corneal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E. K.; Melotti, Suzanna A.; Zieske, James D.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the structure and morphology of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesized by untransformed, cultured human corneal fibroblasts in long-term cultures. Methods Human corneal stromal keratocytes were expanded in transwell culture in the presence of fetal bovine serum and a stable derivative of Vitamin C. The cells were allowed to synthesize a fibrillar ECM for up to five weeks. Constructs were assessed via light (phase contrast and differential interference contrast) and transmission (standard and quick freeze/deep etch) microscopy. Results Electron micrographs revealed stratified constructs with multiple parallel layers of cells and an extracellular matrix comprising parallel arrays of small, polydisperse fibrils (27–51 nm) which often alternate in direction. Differential interference contrast images demonstrated oriented ECM fibril arrays parallel to the plane of the construct while quick-freeze deep etch micrographs showed the details of the matrix interaction with fibroblasts via arrays of membrane surface structures. Conclusions Human keratocytes, cultured in a stable Vitamin C derivative, are capable of assembling extracellular matrix which comprise parallel arrays of ECM fibrils. The resulting constructs, which are highly cellular, exhibit morphology similar to the developing mammalian stroma where organized matrix is derived. The appearance of arrays of structures on the cell membranes suggest a role in the local organization of synthesized ECM. This model could provide critical insight into the fundamental processes which govern the genesis of organized connective tissues such as the cornea and may provide a scaffolding suitable for tissue-engineering a biomimetic stroma. PMID:17724187

  4. Sternal reconstruction by extracellular matrix: a rare case of phaces syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Molinaro, Francesco; Cerchia, Elisa; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo Giuseppe; Luzzi, Luca; Bulotta, Anna Lavinia; Gotti, Giuseppe; Messina, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Congenital defects of the sternum are rare and due to a failure of midline development and fusion of the sternal bones. Surgical correction of a sternal cleft should be preferred during infancy for functional reasons. Chest wall reconstruction represented a complex problem in the last decades. We report our successful outcome of sternal reconstruction in a rare case of PHACES syndrome, in which the patient was submitted to reconstruction of the sternum and complete closure of the thoracic defect by the employ of an extracellular matrix XCM Biologic tissue matrix. We promote the use of extracellular matrix in surgical reconstruction of chest defects for its maneuverability, plasticity, tolerability and the possibility of growing with the children’s chest getting a good compliance and optimal cosmetic results.

  5. Impact of changes in extracellular matrix in the lumbar degenerative disc

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, AV; Mitrica, M; Mohan, A

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the clinical, biochemical, hystochemical and immunologic aspects of the intervertebral disk, along with its molecular biology, justifies the object of our study on the extracellular matrix modifications in lumbar disk hernias and their impact on patient quality of life. Material and method: the research lot was composed of 50 patients, aged between 18 and 73, who have undergone lumbar disk hernia surgery. MMP–9 (metalloproteinase–9) and TIMP–1 (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloprotease 1) have been dosed in order to study the modifications on extracellular disk matrix, and quality of life assessment was carried out both in pre–operatory and post–operatory periods. Conclusions: patients may prevent the appearance of degenerative processes of the intervertebral disk with care and responsibility by controlling their weight, avoiding intense physical activities and ceasing to smoke. PMID:22567050

  6. Alteration of the extracellular matrix of smooth muscle cells by ascorbate treatment.

    PubMed

    Barone, L M; Faris, B; Chipman, S D; Toselli, P; Oakes, B W; Franzblau, C

    1985-06-18

    The protein composition in the extracellular matrix of cultured neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cells has been monitored over time in culture. The influence of ascorbate on insoluble elastin and collagen has been described. In the absence of ascorbate, the cells accumulate an insoluble elastin component which can account for as much as 50% of the total protein in the extracellular matrix. In the presence of ascorbate, the amount of insoluble collagen increases, while the insoluble elastin content is significantly less. When ascorbate conditions are varied at different times during the culture, the extracellular matrices are altered with respect to collagen and elastin ratios. The decrease in elastin accumulation in the presence of ascorbate may be explained by an overhydroxylation of tropoelastin. Approximately 1/3 of the prolyl residues in the soluble elastin fractions isolated from cultures grown in the presence of ascorbate are hydroxylated. Since the insoluble elastin accumulated in these cultures contain the unique lysine-derived cross-links in amounts comparable to aortic tissue, this culture system proves ideal for studying the influence of extracellular matrix elastin on cell growth and metabolism.

  7. Controlling the spatial organization of cells and extracellular matrix proteins in engineered tissues using ultrasound standing wave fields

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great potential for saving the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. However, to successfully fabricate tissues and organs in vitro, methodologies that recreate appropriate extracellular microenvironments to promote tissue regeneration are needed. In this study, we have developed an application of ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) technology to the field of tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with USWF were used to non-invasively control the spatial distribution of mammalian cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within three-dimensional collagen-based engineered tissues. Cells were suspended in unpolymerized collagen solutions and were exposed to a continuous wave USWF, generated using a 1 MHz source, for 15 min at room temperature. Collagen polymerization occurred during USWF exposure resulting in the formation of three-dimensional collagen gels with distinct bands of aggregated cells. The density of cell bands was dependent on both the initial cell concentration and the pressure amplitude of the USWF. Importantly, USWF exposure did not decrease cell viability, but rather enhanced cell function. Alignment of cells into loosely clustered, planar cell bands significantly increased levels of cell-mediated collagen gel contraction and collagen fiber reorganization as compared to sham-exposed samples with a homogeneous cell distribution. Additionally, the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, was localized to cell banded areas by binding the protein to the cell surface prior to USWF exposure. By controlling cell and extracellular organization, this application of USWF technology is a promising approach for engineering tissues in vitro. PMID:20870341

  8. Activin A suppresses osteoblast mineralization capacity by altering extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and impairing matrix vesicle (MV) production.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rodrigo D A M; Eijken, Marco; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A A; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2013-10-01

    During bone formation, osteoblasts deposit an extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized via a process involving production and secretion of highly specialized matrix vesicles (MVs). Activin A, a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily member, was previously shown to have inhibitory effects in human bone formation models through unclear mechanisms. We investigated these mechanisms elicited by activin A during in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Activin A inhibition of ECM mineralization coincided with a strong decline in alkaline phosphatase (ALP(1)) activity in extracellular compartments, ECM and matrix vesicles. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics disclosed intricate protein composition alterations in the activin A ECM, including changed expression of collagen XII, osteonectin and several cytoskeleton-binding proteins. Moreover, in activin A osteoblasts matrix vesicle production was deficient containing very low expression of annexin proteins. ECM enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic development and mineralization. This osteogenic enhancement was significantly decreased when human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on ECM produced under activin A treatment. These findings demonstrate that activin A targets the ECM maturation phase of osteoblast differentiation resulting ultimately in the inhibition of mineralization. ECM proteins modulated by activin A are not only determinant for bone mineralization but also possess osteoinductive properties that are relevant for bone tissue regeneration.

  9. Hypergravity Stimulates the Extracellular Matrix/Integrin-Signaling Axis and Proliferation in Primary Osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, M.; Vercoutere, W.; Roden, C.; Banerjee, I.; Krauser, W.; Holton, E.; Searby, N.; Globus, R.; Almeida, E.

    2003-01-01

    We set out to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferative response of primary rat osteoblasts to mechanical stimulation using cell culture centrifugation as a model for hypergravity. We hypothesized that this proliferative response is mediated by specific integrin/Extracellular Matrix (ECM) interactions. To investigate this question we developed a cell culture centrifuge and an automated system that performs cell fixation during hypergravity loading. We generated expression vectors for various focal adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins fused to GFP or dsRed and visualized these structures in transfected (or infected) osteoblasts. The actin cytoskeleton was also visualized using rhodamine-phalloidin staining and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) levels were assessed biochemically. We observed that a 24 hour exposure to 50-g stimulated proliferation compared to the 1-g control when cells were plated on fibronectin, collagen Type I , and collagen Type IV, but not on uncoated tissue culture plastic surfaces. This proliferative response was greatest for osteoblasts grown on fibronectin (2-fold increase over 1-g control) and collagen Type I (1.4 fold increase over 1-g control), suggesting that specific matrices and integrins are involved in the signaling pathways required for proliferation. Exposing osteoblasts grown on different matrices to 10-g or 25-g showed that effects on proliferation depended on both matrix type and loading level. We found that osteoblasts exposed to a short pulse of hypergravity during adhesion spread further and had more GFP-FAK containing focal adhesions compared to their 1-g controls. While overall levels of FAK did not change, more FAK was in the active (phosphorylated) form under hypergravity than in the 1-g controls. Cytoskeletal F-actin organization into filaments was also more prominent after brief exposures to hypergravity during the first five minutes of adhesion. These results suggest that specific integrins sense

  10. Extracellular vesicles as mediators of vascular inflammation in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Alexandra; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a common cause of renal impairment and a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with kidney disease. Current studies consistently show an increase of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in acute vasculitis and in patients with atherosclerosis. Recent research has elucidated mechanisms that mediate vascular wall leukocyte accumulation and differentiation. This review addresses the role of EVs in this process. Part one of this review addresses functional roles of EVs in renal vasculitis. Most published data address anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis and indicate that the number of EVs, mostly of platelet origin, is increased in active disease. EVs generated from neutrophils by activation by ANCA can contribute to vessel damage. While EVs are also elevated in other types of autoimmune vasculitis with renal involvement such as systemic lupus erythematodes, functional consequences beyond intravascular thrombosis remain to be established. In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome secondary to infection with shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, EV numbers are elevated and contribute to toxin distribution into the vascular wall. Part two addresses mechanisms how EVs modulate vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, a process that is aggravated in uremia. Elevated numbers of circulating endothelial EVs were associated with atherosclerotic complications in a number of studies in patients with and without kidney disease. Uremic endothelial EVs are defective in induction of vascular relaxation. Neutrophil adhesion and transmigration and intravascular thrombus formation are critically modulated by EVs, a process that is amenable to therapeutic interventions. EVs can enhance monocyte adhesion to the endothelium and modulate macrophage differentiation and cytokine production with major influence on the local inflammatory milieu in the plaque. They significantly influence lipid phagocytosis and antigen presentation by

  11. Differential expression of extracellular matrix components in the Fallopian tubes throughout the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the unique characteristics of the female genital tract is the extensive tissue remodeling observed throughout the menstrual cycle. Multiple components of the extracellular matrix take part in this tissue rebuilding; however, the individual components involved have not been identified. Methods In the present study, the expression of extracellular matrix proteins and selected matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities in Fallopian tubes (FT) throughout the menstrual cycle were examined by PCR array, immunocytochemistry, zymography and bioinformatics. Results Of the eighty-four genes analyzed, eighty-three were expressed in the FT during at least one stage of the menstrual cycle. We observed a significant increase (>/=2-fold) in ADAMTS1, ADAMTS13, COL7A1, MMP3, MMP9, PECAM1, and THBS3 in the periovulatory phase compared to the follicular phase. Meanwhile, we observed a significant decrease (>/= 2-fold) in COL7A1, ICAM1, ITGA8, MMP16, MMP9, CLEC3B, SELE and TIMP2 in the lutheal phase compared to the periovulatory phase. Immunocytochemistry showed that MMP-3 and MMP-9 were localized in the endosalpinx during all phases of the menstrual cycle. Gelatin zymograms detected non-cycle-dependent protease activity. Conclusions Several extracellular matrix components were regulated throughout the menstrual cycle in a cyclic pattern, suggesting a possible steroid regulation and a role in tissue remodeling and FT functions. PMID:22897899

  12. Effect of spaceflight on the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle after a crush injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaia, T. E.; Il'ina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1992-01-01

    The organization and composition of the extracellular matrix were studied in the crush-injured gastrocnemius muscle of rats subjected to 0 G. After 14 days of flight on Cosmos 2044, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed and evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques from the five injured flight rodents and various earth-based treatment groups. In general, the repair process was similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to the organization of the extracellular matrix and myofibers. Small and large myofibers were present within an expanded extracellular matrix, indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with nonenlarged area of nonmuscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well organized and contained more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region, indicative of a delayed repair process, but did not demonstrate any chronic inflammation. Myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, being slowest in the flight animals and most complete in the tail-suspended ones.

  13. Interactions between Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and their Extracellular Matrix Revealed by a Serum Free Culture System.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Vishal; Dye, Danielle E; Kinnear, Beverley F; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Grounds, Miranda D; Coombe, Deirdre R

    2015-01-01

    Decellularisation of skeletal muscle provides a system to study the interactions of myoblasts with muscle extracellular matrix (ECM). This study describes the efficient decellularisation of quadriceps muscle with the retention of matrix components and the use of this matrix for myoblast proliferation and differentiation under serum free culture conditions. Three decellularisation approaches were examined; the most effective was phospholipase A2 treatment, which removed cellular material while maximizing the retention of ECM components. Decellularised muscle matrices were then solubilized and used as substrates for C2C12 mouse myoblast serum free cultures. The muscle matrix supported myoblast proliferation and differentiation equally as well as collagen and fibronectin. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that myoblasts seeded on muscle matrix and fibronectin differentiated to form long, well-aligned myotubes, while myoblasts seeded on collagen were less organized. qPCR analyses showed a time dependent increase in genes involved in skeletal muscle differentiation and suggested that muscle-derived matrix may stimulate an increased rate of differentiation compared to collagen and fibronectin. Decellularized whole muscle three-dimensional scaffolds also supported cell adhesion and spreading, with myoblasts aligning along specific tracts of matrix proteins within the scaffolds. Thus, under serum free conditions, intact acellular muscle matrices provided cues to direct myoblast adhesion and migration. In addition, myoblasts were shown to rapidly secrete and organise their own matrix glycoproteins to create a localized ECM microenvironment. This serum free culture system has revealed that the correct muscle ECM facilitates more rapid cell organisation and differentiation than single matrix glycoprotein substrates.

  14. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  15. Design of fibrin matrix composition to enhance endothelial cell growth and extracellular matrix deposition for in vitro tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pankajakshan, Divya; Krishnan, Lissy K

    2009-01-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessel substitutes should closely resemble native vessels in terms of structure, composition, mechanical properties, and function. Successful cardiovascular tissue engineering requires optimization of in vitro culture environment that would produce functional constructs. The extracellular matrix (ECM) protein elastin plays an essential role in the cardiovascular system to render elasticity to blood vessel wall, whereas collagen is responsible for providing mechanical strength. The objective of this study was to understand the significance of various ECM components on endothelial cell (EC) growth and tissue generation. We demonstrate that, even though fibrin is a good matrix for EC growth, fibronectin is the crucial component of the fibrin matrix that enhances EC adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Vascular EC growth factor is known to influence in vitro growth of EC, but, so far, ECM deposition in in vitro culture has not been reported. In this study, it is shown that incorporation of a mixture of hypothalamus-derived angiogenic growth factors with fibrin matrix enhances synthesis and deposition of insoluble elastin and collagen in the matrix, within 10 days of in vitro culture. The results suggest that a carefully engineered fibrin composite matrix may support EC growth, survival, and remodeling of ECM in vitro and impart optimum properties to the construct for resisting the shear stress at the time of implantation.

  16. Preliminary Experience in the Use of an Extracellular Matrix (CorMatrix) as a Tube Graft: Word of Caution.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Narutoshi; McConnell, Patrick; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Malik, Mahim; Galantowicz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A number of materials have been used for the repair of congenital heart disease. However, an ideal material is yet to be discovered. Decellularized extracellular matrix from porcine small intestinal submucosa (CorMatrix) has been developed and commercialized as a biological tissue substitute. This has been used for valvuloplasty, sepal defect repair, or angioplasty as a patch. In this study, we demonstrate our preliminary experience using CorMatrix as a tube graft. A retrospective review of 13 patients who underwent cardiac surgery using CorMatrix as an interposition graft was performed (10 patients for central pulmonary artery reconstruction in comprehensive stage II surgery for hypoplastic left-sided heart syndrome and 3 patients for aortic arch reconstruction in interrupted aortic arch). At a mean follow-up of 9.7 months, 8 of 10 patients who underwent central pulmonary artery reconstruction using CorMatrix tube showed progressive significant stenosis. One patient underwent replacement of the CorMatrix tube with a homograft because of severe stenosis after the placement of a stent. All 3 patients who had aortic arch reconstruction with the CorMatrix tube demonstrated no stenosis, no dilatation, and no aneurysm formation. Although angioplasty using CorMatrix as an interposition tube vascular graft demonstrated no adverse event in the aortic position in short term, a high rate of intimal hyperplasia formation with significant stenosis was found in the low-pressure small-diameter system. Longer follow-up is required to assess the growth potential of the arterial conduit. CorMatrix may not be the ideal material as conduit in the low-pressure small-diameter system to provide long-term durable outcomes.

  17. Bartonella henselae Pap31, an Extracellular Matrix Adhesin, Binds the Fibronectin Repeat III13 Module

    PubMed Central

    Dabo, S. M.; Confer, A. W.; Anderson, B. E.; Gupta, Snehalata

    2006-01-01

    Bartonella henselae wound-associated infections suggest involvement of extracellular matrix molecules in adhesion and invasion. Pap31 was previously identified as a hemin-binding protein. Our recent studies suggest the protein is an adhesin that is recognized by the host's immune systems. In this study we examined the interactions of B. henselae Pap31 with fibronectin (Fn), heparin (Hep), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The cloned gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified Pap31 protein elicited strong antibody responses in mice and was reactive with rabbit anti-live B. henselae and mouse anti-Pap31 antibodies by Western blotting. Pap31 bound to immobilized Fn and to HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner and to Hep. Fn fragment-binding assays identified the Hep-1 and Hep-2 binding domains of human Fn and in particular the 12-13FnIII repeat module as primary binding sites for this adhesin. Furthermore, Pap31 binding to the above Fn fragments could be inhibited by Hep, suggesting a common binding site involving the 13FnIII repeat module on the Hep-2 domain of Fn. Adherence of intact B. henselae to HUVECs was inhibited by increasing concentrations of anti-Pap31 antibodies. In addition, purified Pap31 coprecipitated effectively with Fn and anti-Fn antibodies. Taken together, these data suggest that Pap31 is an Fn-binding protein mediating the B. henselae-host interaction(s), and they implicate the 13FnIII repeat module as an important binding site for this adhesin on the Fn molecule. These interactions may be important initial steps leading to bacterial attachment and colonization that promote the establishment of B. henselae infections in vivo. PMID:16622186

  18. OmpL1 Is an Extracellular Matrix- and Plasminogen-Interacting Protein of Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luis G. V.; Vieira, Monica L.; Kirchgatter, Karin; Alves, Ivy J.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Romero, Eliete C.

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with multisystem involvement caused by pathogenic strains of the genus Leptospira. OmpL1 is an outer membrane protein of Leptospira spp. that is expressed during infection. In this work, we investigated novel features of this protein. We describe that OmpL1 is a novel leptospiral extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding protein and a plasminogen (PLG) receptor. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Star/pLysS as inclusion bodies, refolded, and purified by metal-chelating chromatography. The protein presented a typical β-strand secondary structure, as evaluated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The recombinant protein reacted with antibodies in serum samples from convalescent leptospirosis patients with a high specificity compared to serum samples from individuals with unrelated diseases. These data strengthen the usefulness of OmpL1 as a diagnostic marker of leptospirosis. The characterization of the immunogenicity of recombinant OmpL1 in inoculated BALB/c mice showed that the protein has the capacity to elicit humoral and cellular immune responses, as denoted by high antibody titers and the proliferation of lymphocytes. We demonstrate that OmpL1 has the ability to mediate attachment to laminin and plasma fibronectin, with KD (equilibrium dissociation constant) values of 2,099.93 ± 871.03 nM and 1,239.23 ± 506.85 nM, respectively. OmpL1 is also a PLG receptor, with a KD of 368.63 ± 121.23 nM, capable of generating enzymatically active plasmin. This is the first report that shows and characterizes OmpL1 as an ECM-interacting and a PLG-binding protein of Leptospira spp. that may play a role in bacterial pathogenesis when expressed during infection. PMID:22802342

  19. Extracellular matrix-specific focal adhesions in vascular smooth muscle produce mechanically active adhesion sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhe; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Hill, Michael A.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2008-01-01

    Integrin-mediated mechanotransduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the physiological control of tissue blood flow and vascular resistance. To test whether force applied to specific extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin interactions could induce myogenic-like mechanical activity at focal adhesion sites, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to apply controlled forces to specific ECM adhesion sites on arteriolar VSMCs. The tip of AFM probes were fused with a borosilicate bead (2∼5 μm) coated with fibronectin (FN), collagen type I (CNI), laminin (LN), or vitronectin (VN). ECM-coated beads induced clustering of α5- and β3-integrins and actin filaments at sites of bead-cell contact indicative of focal adhesion formation. Step increases of an upward (z-axis) pulling force (800∼1,600 pN) applied to the bead-cell contact site for FN-specific focal adhesions induced a myogenic-like, force-generating response from the VSMC, resulting in a counteracting downward pull by the cell. This micromechanical event was blocked by cytochalasin D but was enhanced by jasplakinolide. Function-blocking antibodies to α5β1- and αvβ3-integrins also blocked the micromechanical cell event in a concentration-dependent manner. Similar pulling experiments with CNI, VN, or LN failed to induce myogenic-like micromechanical events. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mechanical force applied to integrin-FN adhesion sites induces an actin-dependent, myogenic-like, micromechanical event. Focal adhesions formed by different ECM proteins exhibit different mechanical characteristics, and FN appears of particular relevance in its ability to strongly attach to VSMCs and to induce myogenic-like, force-generating reactions from sites of focal adhesion in response to externally applied forces. PMID:18495809

  20. Integrin-dependent force transmission to the extracellular matrix by α-actinin triggers adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Cusachs, Pere; del Rio, Armando; Puklin-Faucher, Eileen; Gauthier, Nils C.; Biais, Nicolas; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Focal adhesions are mechanosensitive elements that enable mechanical communication between cells and the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate a major mechanosensitive pathway in which α-actinin triggers adhesion maturation by linking integrins to actin in nascent adhesions. We show that depletion of the focal adhesion protein α-actinin enhances force generation in initial adhesions on fibronectin, but impairs mechanotransduction in a subsequent step, preventing adhesion maturation. Expression of an α-actinin fragment containing the integrin binding domain, however, dramatically reduces force generation in depleted cells. This behavior can be explained by a competition between talin (which mediates initial adhesion and force generation) and α-actinin for integrin binding. Indeed, we show in an in vitro assay that talin and α-actinin compete for binding to β3 integrins, but cooperate in binding to β1 integrins. Consistently, we find opposite effects of α-actinin depletion and expression of mutants on substrates that bind β3 integrins (fibronectin and vitronectin) versus substrates that only bind β1 integrins (collagen). We thus suggest that nascent adhesions composed of β3 integrins are initially linked to the actin cytoskeleton by talin, and then α-actinin competes with talin to bind β3 integrins. Force transmitted through α-actinin then triggers adhesion maturation. Once adhesions have matured, α-actinin recruitment correlates with force generation, suggesting that α-actinin is the main link transmitting force between integrins and the cytoskeleton in mature adhesions. Such a multistep process enables cells to adjust forces on matrices, unveiling a role of α-actinin that is different from its well-studied function as an actin cross-linker. PMID:23515331

  1. Soil organic matter and the extracellular microbial matrix show contrasting responses to C and N availability

    PubMed Central

    Redmile-Gordon, M.A.; Evershed, R.P.; Hirsch, P.R.; White, R.P.; Goulding, K.W.T.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging paradigm in soil science suggests microbes can perform ‘N mining’ from recalcitrant soil organic matter (SOM) in conditions of low N availability. However, this requires the production of extracellular structures rich in N (including enzymes and structural components) and thus defies stoichiometric expectation. We set out to extract newly synthesised peptides from the extracellular matrix in soil and compare the amino acid (AA) profiles, N incorporation and AA dynamics in response to labile inputs of contrasting C/N ratio. Glycerol was added both with and without an inorganic source of N (10% 15N labelled NH4NO3) to a soil already containing a large pool of refractory SOM and incubated for 10 days. The resulting total soil peptide (TSP) and extracellular pools were compared using colorimetric methods, gas chromatography, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. N isotope compositions showed that the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) contained a greater proportion of products formed de novo than did TSP, with hydrophobic EPS-AAs (leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, hydroxyproline and tyrosine) deriving substantially more N from the inorganic source provided. Quantitative comparison between extracts showed that the EPS contained greater relative proportions of alanine, glycine, proline, phenylalanine and tyrosine. The greatest increases in EPS-peptide and EPS-polysaccharide concentrations occurred at the highest C/N ratios. All EPS-AAs responded similarly to treatment whereas the responses of TSP were more complex. The results suggest that extracellular investment of N (as EPS peptides) is a microbial survival mechanism in conditions of low N/high C which, from an evolutionary perspective, must ultimately lead to the tendency for increased N returns to the microbial biomass. A conceptual model is proposed that describes the dynamics of the extracellular matrix in response to the C/N ratio of labile inputs. PMID:26339106

  2. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  3. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones.

  4. How Osteoblasts Sense their Environment: Integrin-Extracellular Matrix Interactions and Mechanical Loading of Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth K.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts are the cells responsible for forming and replacing bone throughout life. We know that mechanical stimulation through weight-bearing at I gravity on Earth is needed to maintain healthy bone, and that osteoblasts play a critical role in that process. Over the last 9 years in my laboratory at NASA ARC, we have studied the regulation of osteoblast function by interactions between the extracellular matrix and die cell. Using a cell culture approach, we defined the repertoire of adhesion receptors, called integrins, which are expressed on the osteoblast surface, as well as specific extracellular matrix proteins, which are needed for cellular differentiation and survival. We are now extending these observations to determine if integrin signaling is involved in the skeletal responses to disuse and recovery from disuse using the rodent model of hindlimb unloading by tail suspension. Together, our cell culture and animal studies are providing new insight into the regulation of osteoblast function in bone.

  5. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling During the Progression of Volume Overload-Induced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Kirk R.; Stewart, James A.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2009-01-01

    Volume overload-induced heart failure results in progressive left ventricular remodeling characterized by chamber dilation, eccentric cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling changes. The ECM matrix scaffold is an important determinant of the structural integrity of the myocardium and actively participates in force transmission across the LV wall. In response to this hemodynamic overload, the ECM undergoes a distinct pattern of remodeling that differs from pressure overload. Once thought to be a static entity, the ECM is now regarded to be a highly adaptive structure that is dynamically regulated by mechanical stress, neurohormonal activation, inflammation and oxidative stress, that result in alterations in collagen and other matrix components and a net change in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activation. These changes dictate overall ECM turnover during volume overload hear failure progression. This review will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that dictate the temporal patterns of ECM remodeling during heart disease progression. PMID:19524591

  6. Monocyte Migration Driven by Galectin-3 Occurs through Distinct Mechanisms Involving Selective Interactions with the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Danella Polli, Cláudia; Alves Toledo, Karina; Franco, Luís Henrique; Sammartino Mariano, Vânia; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Soares Bernardes, Emerson; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte migration into tissues, an important event in inflammation, requires an intricate interplay between determinants on cell surfaces and extracellular matrix (ECM). Galectin-3 is able to modulate cell-ECM interactions and is an important mediator of inflammation. In this study, we sought to investigate whether interactions established between galectin-3 and ECM glycoproteins are involved in monocyte migration, given that the mechanisms by which monocytes move across the endothelium and through the extravascular tissue are poorly understood. Using the in vitro transwell system, we demonstrated that monocyte migration was potentiated in the presence of galectin-3 plus laminin or fibronectin, but not vitronectin, and was dependent on the carbohydrate recognition domain of the lectin. Only galectin-3-fibronectin combinations potentiated the migration of monocyte-derived macrophages. In binding assays, galectin-3 did not bind to fibronectin, whereas both the full-length and the truncated forms of the lectin, which retains carbohydrate binding ability, were able to bind to laminin. Our results show that monocytes migrate through distinct mechanisms and selective interactions with the extracellular matrix driven by galectin-3. We suggest that the lectin may bridge monocytes to laminin and may also activate these cells, resulting in the positive regulation of other adhesion molecules and cell adhesion to fibronectin. PMID:24049657

  7. The extracellular matrix of muscle--implications for manipulation of the craniofacial musculature.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M P; Machell, J R; Hunt, N P; Sinanan, A C; Tippett, H L

    2001-08-01

    Successful adaptation of craniofacial skeletal muscle is dependent upon the connective tissue component of the muscle. This is exemplified by procedures such as distraction histo/osteogenesis. The mechanisms underlying remodelling of intramuscular connective tissue are complex and multifactorial and involve extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, receptors for the ECM (integrins) and enzymes that remodel the ECM (MMPs). This review discusses the current state of knowledge and clinical implications of connective tissue biology as applied to craniofacial skeletal muscle.

  8. Tumors perturbing extracellular matrix biosynthesis. The case of von Recklinghausen's disease.

    PubMed

    Robert, L

    2014-04-01

    This is a short review of neurofibromatosis-1 or von Recklinghausen's disease, due to a loss of function mutation of the gene neurofibromin-1, which normally inhibits the Ras MAPK-pathways. Among its symptoms, the strong oversynthesis of several collagen types designates this disease as producing a deregulation of extracellular matrix biosynthesis involved in tumor formation. Up to about 40% of the skin tumors consist of collagens. A short summary of the clinical manifestations and pathological and genetic mechanisms are also described.

  9. Repair of a penetrating ascending aortic ulcer with localized resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig R; Stamou, Sotiris C; Boeve, Theodore J; Hooker, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Penetrating ascending aortic ulcers are rarely encountered, yet they present significant risk of hemorrhage and aortic dissection. Expedient recognition and repair is of vital importance. The current management of penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta includes replacement of the ascending aorta with a prosthetic graft. We describe our technique of repairing a penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta with localized ulcer resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

  10. The extracellular matrix in breast cancer predicts prognosis through composition, splicing, and crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Claire

    2016-04-10

    The extracellular matrix in the healthy breast has an important tumor suppressive role, whereas the abnormal ECM in tumors can promote aggressiveness, and has been linked to breast cancer relapse, survival and resistance to chemotherapy. This review article gives an overview of the elements of the ECM which have been linked to prognosis of breast cancers, including changes in ECM protein composition, splicing, and microstructure.

  11. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  12. Extracellular matrix remodeling in wound healing of critical size defects in the mitral valve leaflet.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Nguyen, Tom C; Blazejewski, Jack G; Vekilov, Dragoslava P; Connell, Jennifer P; Itoh, Akinobu; Ingels, Neil B; Miller, D Craig; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2016-07-01

    The details of valvular leaflet healing following valvuloplasty and leaflet perforation from endocarditis are poorly understood. In this study, the synthesis and turnover of valvular extracellular matrix due to healing of a critical sized wound was investigated. Twenty-nine sheep were randomized to either CTRL (n = 11) or HOLE (n = 18), in which a 2.8-4.8 mm diameter hole was punched in the posterior mitral leaflet. After 12 weeks, posterior leaflets were harvested and histologically stained to localize extracellular matrix components. Immunohistochemistry was also performed to assess matrix components and markers of matrix turnover. A semi-quantitative grading scale was used to quantify differences between HOLE and CTRL. After 12 weeks, the hole diameter was reduced by 71.3 ± 1.4 % (p < 0.001). Areas of remodeling surrounding the hole contained more activated cells, greater expression of proteoglycans, and markers of matrix turnover (prolyl 4-hydroxylase, metalloproteases, and lysyl oxidase, each p ≤ 0.025), along with fibrin accumulation. Two distinct remodeling regions were evident surrounding the hole, one directly bordering the hole rich in versican and hyaluronan and a second adjacent region with abundant collagen and elastic fiber turnover. The remodeling also caused reduced delineation between valve layers (p = 0.002), more diffuse staining of matrix components and markers of matrix turnover (p < 0.001), and disruption of the collagenous fibrosa. In conclusion, acute valve injury elicited distinct, heterogeneous alterations in valvular matrix composition and structure, resulting in partial wound closure. Because these changes could also affect leaflet mechanics and valve function, it will be important to determine their impact on healing wounds.

  13. Nitric Oxide Induces Cardiac Protection by Preventing Extracellular Matrix Degradation through the Complex Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Irene; Castejon, Borja; Martin, Ana M; Saura, Marta; Reventun-Torralba, Paula; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Zaragoza, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Extracellular Matrix degradation by nitric oxide (NO) induces cardiac protection against coronary ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Glycosylation of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) stimulates enzymatic activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the heart, although the mechanisms leading to EMMPRIN glycosylation are poorly understood. We sought to determine if NO may induce cardiac protection by preventing glycosylation of EMMPRIN in a mouse model of IR. Here we found that Caveolin-3 binds to low glycosylated EMMPRIN (LG-EMMPRIN) in cardiac cells and in the hearts of healthy mice, whereas IR disrupted the complex in nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) knockout (KO) mice. By contrast, the binding was partially restored when mice were fed with an NO donor (DEA-NO) in the drinking water, showing a significant reduction on infarct size (NOS2KO: 34.6±5 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 20.7±9), in expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and cardiac performance was improved (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). NOS2KO: 31±4 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 46±6). The role of Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in NO-mediated cardiac protection was further assayed in Caveolin-3 KO mice, showing no significant improvement on infarct size (Caveolin-3 KO: 34.8±3 vs Caveolin-3 KO+DEA-NO:33.7±5), or in the expression of MMPs, suggesting that stabilization of the complex Caveolin-3/LG-EMMPRIN may play a significant role in the cardioprotective effect of NO against IR.

  14. Nitric Oxide Induces Cardiac Protection by Preventing Extracellular Matrix Degradation through the Complex Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado, Irene; Castejon, Borja; Martin, Ana M.; Saura, Marta; Reventun-Torralba, Paula; Zamorano, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of Extracellular Matrix degradation by nitric oxide (NO) induces cardiac protection against coronary ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Glycosylation of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) stimulates enzymatic activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the heart, although the mechanisms leading to EMMPRIN glycosylation are poorly understood. We sought to determine if NO may induce cardiac protection by preventing glycosylation of EMMPRIN in a mouse model of IR. Here we found that Caveolin-3 binds to low glycosylated EMMPRIN (LG-EMMPRIN) in cardiac cells and in the hearts of healthy mice, whereas IR disrupted the complex in nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) knockout (KO) mice. By contrast, the binding was partially restored when mice were fed with an NO donor (DEA-NO) in the drinking water, showing a significant reduction on infarct size (NOS2KO: 34.6±5 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 20.7±9), in expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and cardiac performance was improved (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). NOS2KO: 31±4 vs NOS2KO+DEA-NO: 46±6). The role of Caveolin-3/EMMPRIN in NO-mediated cardiac protection was further assayed in Caveolin-3 KO mice, showing no significant improvement on infarct size (Caveolin-3 KO: 34.8±3 vs Caveolin-3 KO+DEA-NO:33.7±5), or in the expression of MMPs, suggesting that stabilization of the complex Caveolin-3/LG-EMMPRIN may play a significant role in the cardioprotective effect of NO against IR. PMID:27649573

  15. Cell-Derived Polymer/Extracellular Matrix Composite Scaffolds for Cartilage Regeneration, Part 1: Investigation of Cocultures and Seeding Densities for Improved Extracellular Matrix Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Levorson, Erica J.; Mountziaris, Paschalia M.; Hu, Olivia; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the coculture of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on electrospun fibrous polymer scaffolds to produce polymer/extracellular matrix (ECM) hybrid constructs with the objective of reducing the number of chondrocytes necessary to produce ample cartilage-like ECM within the scaffolds. To generate these hybrid constructs, electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) fibrous scaffolds were seeded at both high and low initial densities with five different ratios of chondrocytes to MSCs: 1:0, 1:1, 1:3, 1:5, and 0:1, and cultured for 7, 14, and 21 days. Glycosaminoglycan production and distribution within the three coculture groups was similar to quantities generated by chondrocyte-only controls. Conversely, as the concentration of chondrocytes was increased, the collagen content of the constructs also increased at each time point, with a 1:1 chondrocyte to MSC ratio approximating the collagen production of chondrocytes alone. Histological staining suggested that cocultured constructs mimicked the well-distributed ECM patterns of chondrocyte generated constructs, while improving greatly over the restricted distribution of matrix within MSC-only constructs. These results support the capacity of cocultures of chondrocytes and MSCs to generate cartilaginous matrix within a polymeric scaffold. Further, the inclusion of MSCs in these cocultures enables the reduction of chondrocytes needed to produce cell-generated ECM. PMID:24007559

  16. Coming into focus: the role of extracellular matrix in vertebrate optic cup morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Kristen M

    2014-10-01

    The vertebrate eye acquires its basic form during the process of optic cup morphogenesis, during which the optic vesicle emerges from the brain neuroepithelium and, through a series of cell and tissue movements, transforms itself into the multilayered optic cup, containing neural retina (comprised of retinal progenitors), retinal pigmented epithelium, and the lens, which is derived from the overlying ectoderm. While great strides have been made to understand the developmental signals controlling specification, patterning, and differentiation of the optic cup, only in recent years have the cellular and molecular bases of optic cup morphogenesis begun to be unraveled. One critical component of the morphogenetic process is the extracellular matrix: the complex, glycoprotein-rich layer that surrounds the optic vesicle and lens. Though the extracellular matrix has long been visualized by classical histological techniques and postulated to play various roles in optic cup development, its functional role was uncertain. This is now beginning to change, as live imaging techniques, quantitative image analyses, molecular genetics and in vitro models yield new insights into the process of optic cup morphogenesis and the specific influences of particular extracellular matrix components and their associated signaling pathways.

  17. Quantitation and relative distribution of extracellular matrix in Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pett, K.; Schurman, D.J.; Smith, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The relationship between adherence of bacteria to foreign bodies and their deposition of extracellular matrix was examined on glass and suture material. To quantitate bacterial adherence, uptake of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into bacterial DNA was analyzed. Corresponding amounts of extracellular matrix were measured by a new technique using ({sup 14}C)glucose incorporation. This study shows that ({sup 14}C)glucose preferentially labeled bacterial strains in proportion to biofilm production. The ratio of {sup 3}H{sup 14}C in high biofilm producers was 0.9 and in low producers it was 3.7. Radioactive identification of organisms as high and low producers was confirmed by electron microscopy. The results presented here show that production and accumulation of biofilm over time is a stable characteristic in different strains of S. epidermidis. The use of ratios reflecting radiolabeling of bacteria and biofilm by ({sup 3}H)thymidine and ({sup 14}C)glucose, respectively, is a quantitative yet simple technique to assess extracellular matrix of different strains of S. epidermidis.

  18. Relationships between melanocytes, mechanical properties and extracellular matrix composition in mouse heart valves.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Flavia; Kruithof, Boudewijn Pt; Balani, Kanthesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Gaussin, Vinciane; Kos, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Heart valves are complex structures composed of organized layers of extracellular matrix, and interstitial and overlying endothelial cells. In this article, we present the specific localization of a population of melanocytes within the murine heart valves at ages important for their post-natal development. In all stages analyzed in our study, melanocytes were found in high numbers populating the atrial aspect of the tricuspid and mitral leaflets. The pulmonary valve did not present melanocytes. To characterize a putative role for the valve melanocytes, the dynamic nanomechanical properties of tricuspid leaftets containing large numbers or no melanocytes were measured. The stiffness coefficient of hyperpigmented leaflets was higher (11.5 GPa) than the ones from wild-type (7.5 GPa) and hypopigmented (5.5 GPa) leaflets. These results suggest that melanocytes may contribute to the mechanical properties of the heart valves. The arrangement of extracellular matrix molecules such as Collagen I and Versican B is responsible for the mechanical characteristics of the leaflets. Melanocytes were found to reside primarily in areas of Versican B expression. The patterns of expression of Collagen I and Versican B were not, however, disrupted in hyper or hypopigmented leaflets. Melanocytes may affect other extracellular matrix molecules to alter the valves' microenvironment.

  19. Platelets and plasma stimulate sheep rotator cuff tendon tenocytes when cultured in an extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian A; Proffen, Benedikt L; Haslauer, Carla M; Murray, Martha M

    2016-04-01

    The addition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to rotator cuff repair has not translated into improved outcomes after surgery. However, recent work stimulating ligament healing has demonstrated improved outcomes when PRP or whole blood is combined with an extracellular matrix carrier. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three components of blood (plasma, platelets, and macrophages) on the in vitro activity of ovine rotator cuff cells cultured in an extracellular matrix environment. Tenocytes were obtained from six ovine infraspinatus tendons and cultured over 14 days in an extracellular matrix scaffold with the following additives: (1) plasma (PPP), (2) plasma and platelets (PAP), (3) plasma and macrophages (PPPM), (4) plasma, platelets and macrophages (PAPM), (5) phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and (6) PBS with macrophages (PBSM). Assays measuring cellular metabolism (AlamarBlue), proliferation (Quantitative DNA assay), synthesis of collagen and cytokines (SIRCOL, TNF-α and IL-10 ELISA, and MMP assay), and collagen gene expression (qPCR) were performed over the duration of the experiment, as well as histology at the conclusion. Plasma was found to stimulate cell attachment and spreading on the scaffold, as well as cellular proliferation. Platelets also stimulated cell proliferation, cellular metabolism, transition of cells to a myofibroblast phenotype, and contraction of the scaffolds. The addition of macrophages did not have any significant effect on the sheep rotator cuff cells in vitro. In vivo studies are needed to determine whether these changes in cellular function will translate into improved tendon healing.

  20. Interaction between the extracellular matrix and lymphatics - consequences for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic function

    PubMed Central

    Wiig, Helge; Keskin, Doruk; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system is important for body fluid balance as well as immunological surveillance. Due to the identification of new molecular markers during the last decade, there has been a recent dramatic increase in our knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) and lymphatic function. Here we review data showing that although it is often overlooked, the extracellular matrix plays an important role in the generation of new lymphatic vessels as a response to physiological and pathological stimuli. Extracellular matrix-lymphatic interactions as well as biophysical characteristics of the stroma have consequences for tumor formation, growth and metastasis. During the recent years, anti-lymphangiogenesis has emerged as an additional therapeutic modality to the clinically applied anti-angiogenesis strategy. Oppositely, enhancement of lymphangiogenesis in situations of lymph accumulation is seen as a promising strategy to a set of conditions where few therapeutic avenues are available. Knowledge on the interaction between the extracellular matrix and the lymphatics may enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and may ultimately lead to better therapies for conditions where reduced or increased lymphatic function is the therapeutic target PMID:20727409

  1. Aggrecan-based extracellular matrix is an integral part of the human basal ganglia circuit.

    PubMed

    Brückner, G; Morawski, M; Arendt, T

    2008-01-24

    The extracellular matrix is known to be involved in neuronal communication and the regulation of plastic changes, and also considered to protect neurons and synapses against damage. The goal of this study was to investigate how major extracellular matrix components (aggrecan, link protein, hyaluronan) constitute the pathways of the nigral system in the human basal ganglia circuit affected by neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Here we show that aggrecan- and link protein-related components form clear regional distribution patterns, whereas hyaluronan is widely distributed in gray and white matter. Two predominant phenotypes of the aggrecan-based matrix can be discriminated: (1) perineuronal nets (PNs) and (2) axonal coats (ACs) encapsulating preterminal fibers and synaptic boutons. Clearly contoured PNs are associated with GABAergic projection neurons in the external and internal division of the globus pallidus, the lateral and reticular part of the substantia nigra, as well as subpopulations of striatal and thalamic inhibitory interneurons. Dopaminergic nigral neurons are devoid of PNs but are contacted to a different extent by matrix-coated boutons forming subnucleus-specific patterns. A very dense network of ACs is characteristic especially of the posterior lateral cell groups of the compact substantia nigra (nigrosome 1). In the subthalamic nucleus and the lateral thalamic nuclei numerous AC-associated axons were attached to principal neurons devoid of PNs. We conclude from the region-specific patterns that the aggrecan-based extracellular matrix is adapted to the fast processing of sensorimotor activities which are the therapeutic target of surgery and deep brain stimulation in the treatment of advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 activation and serum amyloid A regulate smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christopher A.; Best, Michael; Rich, Celeste B.; Stone, Phillip J.

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells contribute to extracellular matrix remodeling during atherogenesis. De-differentiated, synthetic smooth muscle cells are involved in processes of migration, proliferation and changes in expression of extracellular matrix components, all of which contribute to loss of homeostasis accompanying atherogenesis. Elevated levels of acute phase proteins, including serum amyloid A (SAA), are associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis. Although infection with periodontal and respiratory pathogens via activation of inflammatory cell Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 has been linked to vascular disease, little is known about smooth muscle cell TLR2 in atherosclerosis. This study addresses the role of SAA and TLR2 activation on smooth muscle cell matrix gene expression and insoluble elastin accumulation. Cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were treated with SAA or TLR2 agonists and the effect on expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and tropoelastin studied. SAA up-regulated MMP9 expression. Tropoelastin is an MMP9 substrate and decreased tropoelastin levels in SAA-treated cells supported the concept of extracellular matrix remodeling. Interestingly, SAA-induced down-regulation of tropoelastin was not only evident at the protein level but at the level of gene transcription as well. Contributions of proteasomes, nuclear factor κ B and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β on regulation of MMP9 vs. tropoleastin expression were revealed. Effects on Mmp9 and Eln mRNA expression persisted with long-term SAA treatment, resulting in decreased insoluble elastin accumulation. Interestingly, the SAA effects were TLR2-dependent and TLR2 activation by bacterial ligands also induced MMP9 expression and decreased tropoelastin expression. These data reveal a novel mechanism whereby SAA and/or infection induce changes in vascular elastin consistent with atherosclerosis. PMID:28257481

  3. Functional Ultrasound Imaging for Assessment of Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds Used for Liver Organoid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan C.; Hanson, Ariel D.; Feingold, Steven; Cashion, Avery T.; Corcimaru, Ana; Wu, Bryant T.; Mullins, Christopher R.; Aylward, Stephen R.; Reid, Lola M.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    A method of 3D functional ultrasound imaging has been developed to enable non-destructive assessment of extracellular matrix scaffolds that have been prepared by decellularization protocols and are intended for recellularization to create organoids. A major challenge in organ decellularization is retaining patent micro-vascular structures crucial for nutrient access and functionality of organoids. The imaging method described here provides statistical distributions of flow rates throughout the tissue volumes, 3D vessel network architecture visualization, characterization of microvessel volumes and sizes, and delineation of matrix from vascular circuits. The imaging protocol was tested on matrix scaffolds that are tissue-specific, but not species-specific, matrix extracts, prepared by a process that preserved >98% of the collagens, collagen-associated matrix components, and matrix-bound growth factors and cytokines. Image-derived data are discussed with respect to assessment of scaffolds followed by proof-of-concept studies in organoid establishment using Hep3B, human hepatoblast-like cells. Histology showed that the cells attached to scaffolds with patent vasculature within minutes, achieved engraftment at near 100%, expressed liver-specific functions within 24h, and yielded evidence of proliferation and increasing differentiation of cells throughout the two weeks of culture studies. This imaging method should prove valuable in analyses of such matrix scaffolds. PMID:24011714

  4. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and its binding partners in the cartilage extracellular matrix: interaction, regulation and role in chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chitrangada; Yik, Jasper H N; Kishore, Ashleen; Van Dinh, Victoria; Di Cesare, Paul E; Haudenschild, Dominik R

    2014-07-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are widely known as a family of five calcium-binding matricellular proteins. While these proteins belong to the same family, they are encoded by different genes, regulate different cellular functions and are localized to specific regions of the body. TSP-5 or Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) is the only TSP that has been associated with skeletal disorders in humans, including pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). The pentameric structure of COMP, the evidence that it interacts with multiple cellular proteins, and the recent reports of COMP acting as a 'lattice' to present growth factors to cells, inspired this review of COMP and its interacting partners. In our review, we have compiled the interactions of COMP with other proteins in the cartilage extracellular matrix and summarized their importance in maintaining the structural integrity of cartilage as well as in regulating cellular functions.

  5. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the main extracellular matrix (ECM) enzymes in collagen degradation, as a target for anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Matejczyk, Marzena; Rosochacki, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    The main group of enzymes responsible for the collagen and other protein degradation in extracellular matrix (ECM) are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collagen is the main structural component of connective tissue and its degradation is a very important process in the development, morphogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. Typical structure of MMPs consists of several distinct domains. MMP family can be divided into six groups: collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs, and other non-classified MMPs. MMPs and their inhibitors have multiple biological functions in all stages of cancer development: from initiation to outgrowth of clinically relevant metastases and likewise in apoptosis and angiogenesis. MMPs and their inhibitors are extensively examined as potential anticancer drugs. MMP inhibitors can be divided into two main groups: synthetic and natural inhibitors. Selected synthetic inhibitors are in clinical trials on humans, e.g. synthetic peptides, non-peptidic molecules, chemically modified tetracyclines, and bisphosphonates. Natural MMP inhibitors are mainly isoflavonoids and shark cartilage.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Tendon Extracellular Matrix Reveals Disease Stage-specific Fragmentation and Differential Cleavage of COMP (Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein)*

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Khabut, Areej; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2014-01-01

    During inflammatory processes the extracellular matrix (ECM) is extensively remodeled, and many of the constituent components are released as proteolytically cleaved fragments. These degradative processes are better documented for inflammatory joint diseases than tendinopathy even though the pathogenesis has many similarities. The aims of this study were to investigate the proteomic composition of injured tendons during early and late disease stages to identify disease-specific cleavage patterns of the ECM protein cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). In addition to characterizing fragments released in naturally occurring disease, we hypothesized that stimulation of tendon explants with proinflammatory mediators in vitro would induce fragments of COMP analogous to natural disease. Therefore, normal tendon explants were stimulated with IL-1β and prostaglandin E2, and their effects on the release of COMP and its cleavage patterns were characterized. Analyses of injured tendons identified an altered proteomic composition of the ECM at all stages post injury, showing protein fragments that were specific to disease stage. IL-1β enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and release of COMP from tendon explants, whereas PGE2 had no catabolic effect. Of the cleavage fragments identified in early stage tendon disease, two fragments were generated by an IL-1-mediated mechanism. These fragments provide a platform for the development of neo-epitope assays specific to injury stage for tendon disease. PMID:24398684

  7. Analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm Extracellular Matrix by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Ferreira, Jose A. G.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly responsible for lethal fungal infections among immunosuppressed individuals. A. fumigatus forms biofilm communities that are of increasing biomedical interest due to the association of biofilms with chronic infections and their increased resistance to antifungal agents and host immune factors. Understanding the composition of microbial biofilms and the extracellular matrix is important to understanding function and, ultimately, to developing strategies to inhibit biofilm formation. We implemented a solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to define compositional parameters of the A. fumigatus extracellular matrix (ECM) when biofilms are formed in RPMI 1640 nutrient medium. Whole biofilm and isolated matrix networks were also characterized by electron microscopy, and matrix proteins were identified through protein gel analysis. The 13C NMR results defined and quantified the carbon contributions in the insoluble ECM, including carbonyls, aromatic carbons, polysaccharide carbons (anomeric and nonanomerics), aliphatics, etc. Additional 15N and 31P NMR spectra permitted more specific annotation of the carbon pools according to C-N and C-P couplings. Together these data show that the A. fumigatus ECM produced under these growth conditions contains approximately 40% protein, 43% polysaccharide, 3% aromatic-containing components, and up to 14% lipid. These fundamental chemical parameters are needed to consider the relationships between composition and function in the A. fumigatus ECM and will enable future comparisons with other organisms and with A. fumigatus grown under alternate conditions. PMID:26163318

  8. Electrospinning adipose tissue-derived extracellular matrix for adipose stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    Francis, Michael P; Sachs, Patrick C; Madurantakam, Parthasarathy A; Sell, Scott A; Elmore, Lynne W; Bowlin, Gary L; Holt, Shawn E

    2012-07-01

    Basement membrane-rich extracellular matrices, particularly murine sarcoma-derived Matrigel, play important roles in regenerative medicine research, exhibiting marked cellular responses in vitro and in vivo, although with limited clinical applications. We find that a human-derived matrix from lipoaspirate fat, a tissue rich in basement membrane components, can be fabricated by electrospinning and used to support cell culture. We describe practical applications and purification of extracellular matrix (ECM) from adipose tissue (At-ECM) and its use in electrospinning scaffolds and adipose stem cell (ASC) culture. The matrix composition of this purified and electrospun At-ECM was assessed histochemically for basement membrane, connective tissue, collagen, elastic fibers/elastin, glycoprotein, and proteoglycans. Each histochemical stain was positive in fat tissue, purified At-ECM, and electrospun At-ECM, and to some extent positive in a 10:90 blend with polydioxanone (PDO). We also show that electrospun At-ECM, alone and blended with PDO, supports ASC attachment and growth, suggesting that electrospun At-ECM scaffolds support ASC cultivation. These studies show that At-ECM can be isolated and electrospun as a basement membrane-rich tissue engineering matrix capable of supporting stem cells, providing the groundwork for an array of future regenerative medicine advances.

  9. Subepithelial fibrosis and degradation of the bronchial extracellular matrix in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Peyrol, S; Gindre, D; Bellon, G; Durand, D V; Pacheco, Y

    1998-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. Chronic inflammation and proteolysis lead to progressive damage of the bronchial wall. Extracellular matrix determines the structural organization and the mechanical properties of lung airways. It was thus examined in nine patients with cystic fibrosis (six bronchial biopsies and three lobectomies) in order to assess its level of alteration. The submucosal changes in matrix protein distribution were analyzed by immunochemistry and electron microscopy: the subepithelial basal lamina was thinned; an acellular collagen fiber layer composed of interstitial collagens (types I and III) subtended by tenascin and devoid of elastin-associated microfibrils was deposited beneath the basal lamina; this dense fibrous deposit generally formed a thick layer and could extend into the bronchial wall; the bronchial elastic framework lost arborescent distribution and appeared slender, packed, or lacunar; ultrastructural observation gave evidence for elastic and collagenic fiber lysis. Proteolytic activity is probably the major cause of matrix degradation. Fibrosis appears as a repair process rather than as an active fibrogenesis. The reversibility of extracellular matrix alterations is an important challenge and various interventions such as anti-inflammatory treatments can be targeted to halt or reverse this degradation process.

  10. Phenotypic diversity of neoplastic chondrocytes and extracellular matrix gene expression in cartilaginous neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, T.; Dertinger, S.; Vornehm, S. I.; Dudhia, J.; von der Mark, K.; Kirchner, T.

    1997-01-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation is characterized by distinct cellular phenotypes, which can be identified by specific extracellular matrix gene expression profiles. By applying in situ analysis on the mRNA and protein level in a series of benign and malignant human chondrogenic neoplasms, we were able to identify for the first time different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes in vivo: 1) mature chondrocytes, which synthesized the characteristic cartilaginous extracellular tumor matrix, 2) cells resembling hypertrophic chondrocytes of the fetal growth plate, 3) cells resembling so-called dedifferentiated chondrocytes, and 4) well differentiated chondrocytic cells, which expressed type I collagen, indicating the presence of post-hypertrophic differentiated neoplastic chondrocytes. Chondrocytes exhibiting a range of phenotypes were found to be present in the same neoplasm. The different observed phenotypes, including the dedifferentiated phenotype, were in contrast to the anaplastic cells of high-grade chondrosarcomas. Comparison of expression data with tumor morphology revealed a relationship between the cellular phenotypes, the tumor matrix composition, and the matrix and cell morphology within the neoplasms. The distinctly different phenotypes of neoplastic chondrocytes are the basis of the characteristic high biochemical and morphological heterogeneity of chondroid neoplasms and shed light on their biological and clinical behavior. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9176404

  11. Analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm Extracellular Matrix by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Ferreira, Jose A G; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly responsible for lethal fungal infections among immunosuppressed individuals. A. fumigatus forms biofilm communities that are of increasing biomedical interest due to the association of biofilms with chronic infections and their increased resistance to antifungal agents and host immune factors. Understanding the composition of microbial biofilms and the extracellular matrix is important to understanding function and, ultimately, to developing strategies to inhibit biofilm formation. We implemented a solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to define compositional parameters of the A. fumigatus extracellular matrix (ECM) when biofilms are formed in RPMI 1640 nutrient medium. Whole biofilm and isolated matrix networks were also characterized by electron microscopy, and matrix proteins were identified through protein gel analysis. The (13)C NMR results defined and quantified the carbon contributions in the insoluble ECM, including carbonyls, aromatic carbons, polysaccharide carbons (anomeric and nonanomerics), aliphatics, etc. Additional (15)N and (31)P NMR spectra permitted more specific annotation of the carbon pools according to C-N and C-P couplings. Together these data show that the A. fumigatus ECM produced under these growth conditions contains approximately 40% protein, 43% polysaccharide, 3% aromatic-containing components, and up to 14% lipid. These fundamental chemical parameters are needed to consider the relationships between composition and function in the A. fumigatus ECM and will enable future comparisons with other organisms and with A. fumigatus grown under alternate conditions.

  12. Age-related macular degeneration and changes in the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Nita, Małgorzata; Strzałka-Mrozik, Barbara; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Mazurek, Urszula; Romaniuk, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of permanent, irreversible, central blindness (scotoma in the central visual field that makes reading and writing impossible, stereoscopic vision, recognition of colors and details) in patients over the age of 50 years in European and North America countries, and an important role is attributed to disorders in the regulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The main aim of this article is to present the crucial processes that occur on the level of Bruch’s membrane, with special consideration of the metalloproteinase substrates, metalloproteinase, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). A comprehensive review of the literature was performed through MEDLINE and PubMed searches, covering the years 2005–2012, using the following keywords: AMD, extracellular matrix, metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, Bruch’s membrane, collagen, elastin. In the pathogenesis of AMD, a significant role is played by collagen type I and type IV; elastin; fibulin-3, -5, and -6; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, MMP-14, and MMP-1; and TIMP-3. Other important mechanisms include: ARMS2 and HTR1 proteins, the complement system, the urokinase plasminogen activator system, and pro-renin receptor activation. Continuous rebuilding of the extracellular matrix occurs in both early and advanced AMD, simultaneously with the dysfunction of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and endothelial cells. The pathological degradation or accumulation of ECM structural components are caused by impairment or hyperactivity of specific MMPs/TIMPs complexes, and is also endangered by the influence of other mechanisms connected with both genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24938626

  13. Sortilin mediates vascular calcification via its recruitment into extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutcheson, Joshua D.; Aikawa, Masanori; Iwata, Hiroshi; Pham, Tan; Nykjaer, Anders; Kjolby, Mads; Rogers, Maximillian; Michel, Thomas; Shibasaki, Manabu; Hagita, Sumihiko; Kramann, Rafael; Singh, Sasha A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of major cardiovascular diseases. Extracellular vesicles participate in the formation of microcalcifications that are implicated in atherosclerotic plaque rupture; however, the mechanisms that regulate formation of calcifying extracellular vesicles remain obscure. Here, we have demonstrated that sortilin is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) calcification via its recruitment to extracellular vesicles. Sortilin localized to calcifying vessels in human and mouse atheromata and participated in formation of microcalcifications in SMC culture. Sortilin regulated the loading of the calcification protein tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) into extracellular vesicles, thereby conferring its calcification potential. Furthermore, SMC calcification required Rab11-dependent trafficking and FAM20C/casein kinase 2–dependent C-terminal phosphorylation of sortilin. In a murine model, Sort1-deficiency reduced arterial calcification but did not affect bone mineralization. Additionally, transfer of sortilin-deficient BM cells to irradiated atherosclerotic mice did not affect vascular calcification, indicating a primary role of SMC-derived sortilin. Together, the results of this study identify sortilin phosphorylation as a potential therapeutic target for ectopic calcification/microcalcification and may clarify the mechanism that underlies the genetic association between the SORT1 gene locus and coronary artery calcification. PMID:26950419

  14. Abnormal recruitment of extracellular matrix proteins by excess Notch3 ECD: a new pathomechanism in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Haddad, Iman; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Fouillot-Panchal, Maï; Riani, Meriem; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Dussaule, Claire; Cognat, Emmanuel; Vinh, Joelle; Joutel, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, one of the most common inherited small vessel diseases of the brain, is characterized by a progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix accumulation. The disease is caused by highly stereotyped mutations within the extracellular domain of the NOTCH3 receptor (Notch3(ECD)) that result in an odd number of cysteine residues. While CADASIL-associated NOTCH3 mutations differentially affect NOTCH3 receptor function and activity, they all are associated with early accumulation of Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates in small vessels. We still lack mechanistic explanation to link NOTCH3 mutations with small vessel pathology. Herein, we hypothesized that excess Notch3(ECD) could recruit and sequester functionally important proteins within small vessels of the brain. We performed biochemical, nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunohistochemical analyses, using cerebral and arterial tissue derived from patients with CADASIL and mouse models of CADASIL that exhibit vascular lesions in the end- and early-stage of the disease, respectively. Biochemical fractionation of brain and artery samples demonstrated that mutant Notch3(ECD) accumulates in disulphide cross-linked detergent-insoluble aggregates in mice and patients with CADASIL. Further proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses identified two functionally important extracellular matrix proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) and vitronectin (VTN) that are sequestered into Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates. Using cultured cells, we show that increased levels or aggregation of Notch3 enhances the formation of Notch3(ECD)-TIMP3 complex, promoting TIMP3 recruitment and accumulation. In turn, TIMP3 promotes complex formation including NOTCH3 and VTN. In vivo, brain vessels from mice and patients with CADASIL exhibit elevated levels of both insoluble cross

  15. Role of Extracellular Matrix Proteins and Their Receptors in the Development of the Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Martin, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate neuromuscular junction remains the best-studied model for understanding the mechanisms involved in synaptogenesis, due to its relatively large size, its simplicity of patterning and its unparalleled experimental accessibility. During neuromuscular development, each skeletal myofiber secretes and deposits around its extracellular surface an assemblage of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that ultimately form a basal lamina. This is also the case at the neuromuscular junction, where the motor nerve contributes additional factors. Before most of the current molecular components were known, it was clear that the synaptic ECM of adult skeletal muscles was unique in composition and contained factors sufficient to induce the differentiation of both pre- and postsynaptic membranes. Biochemical, genetic and microscopy studies have confirmed that agrin, laminin (221, 421, and 521), collagen IV (α3-α6), collagen XIII, perlecan and the ColQ-bound form of acetylcholinesterase are all synaptic ECM proteins with important roles in neuromuscular development. The roles of their many potential receptors and/or binding proteins has been more difficult to assess at the genetic level due to the complexity of membrane interactions with these large proteins, but roles for MuSK-LRP4 in agrin signaling and for integrins, dystroglycan, and voltage-gated calcium channels in laminin-dependent phenotypes have been identified. Synaptic extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors are involved in almost all aspects of synaptic development, including synaptic initiation, topography, ultrastructure, maturation, stability and transmission. PMID:21766463

  16. Extracellular matrix gene expression profiling using microfluidics for colorectal carcinoma stratification

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Christopher J.; Dowling, Catriona M.; Dwane, Susan; McCumiskey, Mary E.; Tormey, Shona M.; Anne Merrigan, B.; Coffey, John C.; Kiely, Patrick A.; Dalton, Tara M.

    2016-01-01

    In cancer, biomarkers have many potential applications including generation of a differential diagnosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring disease progression. Many molecular biomarkers have been put forward for different diseases but most of them do not possess the required specificity and sensitivity. A biomarker with a high sensitivity has a low specificity and vice versa. The inaccuracy of the biomarkers currently in use has led to a compelling need to identify more accurate markers with diagnostic and prognostic significance. The aim of the present study was to use a novel, droplet-based, microfluidic platform to evaluate the prognostic value of a panel of thirty-four genes that regulate the composition of extracellular matrices in colorectal carcinoma. Our method is a novel approach as it uses using continuous-flowing Polymerase Chain Reaction for the sensitive detection and accurate quantitation of gene expression. We identified a panel of relevant extracellular matrix genes whose expression levels were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using Taqman® reagents in twenty-four pairs of matched colorectal cancer tumour and associated normal tissue. Differential expression patterns occurred between the normal and malignant tissue and correlated with histopathological parameters and overall surgical staging. The findings demonstrate that a droplet-based microfluidic quantitative PCR system enables biomarker classification. It was further possible to sub-classify colorectal cancer based on extracellular matrix protein expressing groups which in turn correlated with prognosis. PMID:27822332

  17. Decellularization of porcine skeletal muscle extracellular matrix for the formulation of a matrix hydrogel: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuehe; Fan, Xuejiao; Tian, Chunxiang; Luo, Jingcong; Zhang, Yi; Deng, Li; Qin, Tingwu; Lv, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels are used as scaffolds to facilitate the repair and reconstruction of tissues. This study aimed to optimize the decellularization process of porcine skeletal muscle ECM and to formulate a matrix hydrogel scaffold. Five multi-step methods (methods A-E) were used to generate acellular ECM from porcine skeletal muscle [rinsing in SDS, trypsin, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Triton X-100 and/or sodium deoxycholate at 4-37°C]. The resulting ECM was evaluated using haematoxylin and eosin, 4-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, and DNA quantification. Acellular matrix was dissolved in pepsin and gelled at 37°C. Hydrogel response to temperature was observed in vivo and in vitro. ECM components were assessed by Masson, Sirius red, and alcian blue staining, and total protein content. Acellular porcine skeletal muscle exhibited a uniform translucent white appearance. No intact nuclear residue was detected by haematoxylin and eosin staining, while DAPI staining showed a few nuclei in the matrixes produced by methods B, C, and D. Method A generated a gel that was too thin for gelation. However, the matrix obtained by rinsing in 0.2% trypsin/0.1% EDTA, 0.5% Triton X-100, and 1% Triton X-100/0.2% sodium deoxycholate was nuclei-free and produced a viscous solution that formed a structurally stable white jelly-like hydrogel. The residual DNA content of this solution was 49.37 ± 0.72 ng/mg, significantly less than in fresh skeletal muscle, and decreased to 19.22 ± 0.85 ng/mg after gelation (P < 0.05). The acellular matrix was rich in collagen and glycosaminoglycan, with a total protein concentration of 64.8 ± 6.9%. An acellular ECM hydrogel from porcine skeletal muscle was efficiently produced.

  18. Extracellular matrix contains insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5: potentiation of the effects of IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been shown to serve as carrier proteins for the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and to modulate their biologic effects. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to be a reservoir for IGF-I and IGF-II, we examined the ECM of cultured human fetal fibroblasts and found that IGFBP-5 was incorporated intact into ECM, while mostly inert proteolytic fragments were found in the medium. In contrast, two other forms of IGFBP that are secreted by these cells were either present in ECM in minimal amounts (IGFBP-3) or not detected (IGFBP-4). Likewise, when purified IGFBPs were incubated with ECM, IGFBP-5 bound preferentially. IGFBP-5 was found to bind to types III and IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin. Increasing salt concentrations inhibited the binding of IGFBP-5 to ECM and accelerated the release of IGFBP-5 from ECM, suggesting an ionic basis for this interaction. ECM-associated IGFBP-5 had a sevenfold decrease in affinity for IGF-I compared to IGFBP-5 in solution. Furthermore, when IGFBP-5 was present in cell culture substrata, it potentiated the growth stimulatory effects of IGF- I on fibroblasts. When IGFBP-5 was present only in the medium, it was degraded to a 22-kD fragment and had no effect on IGF-I-stimulated growth. We conclude that IGFBP-5 is present in fibroblast ECM, where it is protected from degradation and can potentiate the biologic actions of IGF-I. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the association of the IGF's with the extracellular matrix, and suggest that the binding of the IGF's to matrix, via IGFBP-5, may be important in mediating the cellular growth response to these growth factors. PMID:7683690

  19. Tendon extracellular matrix damage, degradation and inflammation in response to in vitro overload exercise.

    PubMed

    Spiesz, Ewa M; Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Chaudhry, Saira; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-06-01

    The role of inflammation in tendon injury is uncertain and a topic of current interest. In vitro studies of tendon accelerated overload damage can serve as a valuable source of information on the early stages of tendinopathy. Viable fascicle bundles from bovine flexor tendons were subjected to cyclic uniaxial loading from 1-10% strain. Immuno-staining for inflammatory markers and matrix degradation markers was performed on the samples after mechanical testing. Loaded samples exhibited visible extracellular matrix damage, with disrupted collagen fibers and fiber kinks, and notable damage to the interfascicular matrix. Inflammatory markers COX-2 and IL-6 were only expressed in the cyclically loaded samples. Collagen degradation markers MMP-1 and C1,2C were colocalized in many areas, with staining occurring in the interfascicular matrix or the fascicular tenocytes. These markers were present in control samples, but staining became increasingly intense with loading. Little MMP-3 or MMP-13 was evident in control sections. In loaded samples, some sections showed intense staining of these markers, again localized to interfascicular regions. This study suggests that inflammatory markers may be expressed rapidly after tendon overload exercise. Interestingly, both inflammation and damage-induced matrix remodeling seem to be concentrated in, or in the vicinity of, the highly cellular interfascicular matrix.

  20. Interactions between Skeletal Muscle Myoblasts and their Extracellular Matrix Revealed by a Serum Free Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Vishal; Dye, Danielle E.; Kinnear, Beverley F.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Coombe, Deirdre R.

    2015-01-01

    Decellularisation of skeletal muscle provides a system to study the interactions of myoblasts with muscle extracellular matrix (ECM). This study describes the efficient decellularisation of quadriceps muscle with the retention of matrix components and the use of this matrix for myoblast proliferation and differentiation under serum free culture conditions. Three decellularisation approaches were examined; the most effective was phospholipase A2 treatment, which removed cellular material while maximizing the retention of ECM components. Decellularised muscle matrices were then solubilized and used as substrates for C2C12 mouse myoblast serum free cultures. The muscle matrix supported myoblast proliferation and differentiation equally as well as collagen and fibronectin. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that myoblasts seeded on muscle matrix and fibronectin differentiated to form long, well-aligned myotubes, while myoblasts seeded on collagen were less organized. qPCR analyses showed a time dependent increase in genes involved in skeletal muscle differentiation and suggested that muscle-derived matrix may stimulate an increased rate of differentiation compared to collagen and fibronectin. Decellularized whole muscle three-dimensional scaffolds also supported cell adhesion and spreading, with myoblasts aligning along specific tracts of matrix proteins within the scaffolds. Thus, under serum free conditions, intact acellular muscle matrices provided cues to direct myoblast adhesion and migration. In addition, myoblasts were shown to rapidly secrete and organise their own matrix glycoproteins to create a localized ECM microenvironment. This serum free culture system has revealed that the correct muscle ECM facilitates more rapid cell organisation and differentiation than single matrix glycoprotein substrates. PMID:26030912

  1. In Silico Investigation of Angiogenesis with Growth and Stress Generation Coupled to Local Extracellular Matrix Density

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lowell T.; Hoying, James B.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical interactions during angiogenesis, i.e., traction applied by neovessels to the extracellular matrix and the corresponding deformation, are important regulators of growth and neovascularization. We have previously designed, implemented, and validated a coupled model of angiogenesis in which a discrete microvessel growth model interacts with a continuous finite element mesh through the application of local remodeling sprout stresses (Edgar et al. in Biomech Model Mechanobiol, 2014). However, the initial implementation of this framework does not take matrix density into account when determined these remodeling stresses and is therefore insufficient for the study of angiogenesis within heterogeneous matrix environments such as those found in vivo. The objective of this study was to implement sensitivity to matrix density in the active stress generation within AngioFE in order to allow the study of angiogenic growth within a heterogeneous density environment. We accomplished this by scaling active sprout stresses relative to local matrix density using a scaling factor previously determined from experimental data. We then exercised the new functionality of the model by simulating angiogenesis within four different scenarios: homogeneous density, a narrow gap model, and matrix density gradient, and a construct subjected to repeated loading/unloading and preconditioning. These numerical experiments predicted heterogeneous matrix density in the initially homogeneous case, the closure and alignment of microvessels along a low-density gap, the formation of a unique cap-like structure during angiogenesis within a density gradient, and the alignment of microvessels in the absence of applied load due to preconditioning. The result of these in silico investigations demonstrate how matrix heterogeneity affects neovascularization and matrix deformation and provides a platform for studying angiogenesis in complicated and multi-faceted mechanical environments that

  2. Extracellular matrix profiles in the progression to heart failure. European Young Physiologists Symposium Keynote Lecture-Bratislava 2007.

    PubMed

    Graham, H K; Horn, M; Trafford, A W

    2008-09-01

    The myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM), which preserves the geometry and integrity of the myocardium, is a dynamic structure whose component proteins are maintained by a finely controlled homeostatic balance between deposition and degradation. One of the key targets in cardiology is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms which mediate pathological remodelling of this matrix causing the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to congestive decompensated heart failure. In response to injury or increased workload, cardiac remodelling including myocyte hypertrophy, develops as the heart attempts to compensate for increased wall stresses. Persistence of these stresses over extended time periods leads to disruption of ECM homeostasis resulting in irreversible maladaptive cardiac remodelling, ventricular dilatation and finally heart failure. ECM remodelling is regulated by the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs). Clinical studies and experimental models of cardiac disease states have reported alterations in the balance between the MMPs and TIMPs in the failing heart and crucially at intermediate time points in the progression to failure. This article reviews the recent clinical, genetic and experimental approaches employed to compare ECM, MMP and TIMP profiles in healthy, compensated and failing hearts and identifies common themes in the perturbation of ECM homeostasis in the transition to heart failure.

  3. Cytoskeletal filament assembly and the control of cell spreading and function by extracellular matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, D. J.; Langer, R.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze how cell binding to extracellular matrix produces changes in cell shape. We focused on the initial process of cell spreading that follows cell attachment to matrix and, thus, cell 'shape' changes are defined here in terms of alterations in projected cell areas, as determined by computerized image analysis. Cell spreading kinetics and changes in microtubule and actin microfilament mass were simultaneously quantitated in hepatocytes plated on different extracellular matrix substrata. The initial rate of cell spreading was highly dependent on the matrix coating density and decreased from 740 microns 2/h to 50 microns 2/h as the coating density was lowered from 1000 to 1 ng/cm2. At approximately 4 to 6 hours after plating, this initial rapid spreading rate slowed and became independent of the matrix density regardless of whether laminin, fibronectin, type I collagen or type IV collagen was used for cell attachment. Analysis of F-actin mass revealed that cell adhesion to extracellular matrix resulted in a 20-fold increase in polymerized actin within 30 minutes after plating, before any significant change in cell shape was observed. This was followed by a phase of actin microfilament disassembly which correlated with the most rapid phase of cell extension and ended at about 6 hours; F-actin mass remained relatively constant during the slow matrix-independent spreading phase. Microtubule mass increased more slowly in spreading cells, peaking at 4 hours, the time at which the transition between rapid and slow spreading rates was observed. However, inhibition of this early rise in microtubule mass using either nocodazole or cycloheximide did not prevent this transition. Use of cytochalasin D revealed that microfilament integrity was absolutely required for hepatocyte spreading whereas interference with microtubule assembly (using nocodazole or taxol) or protein synthesis (using cycloheximide) only partially suppressed cell extension. In

  4. Pilot Study of the Efficacy of Extracellular Matrix Arterial Interposition Grafts in a Sheep (Ovis aries) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    extracellular matrix arterial interposition grafts in a sheep (Ovis aries) model." 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...carotid arteries in sheep . Methods: Three crossbred sheep were anesthetized, instrumented, and had 10 cm interposition grafts placed in both carotid...was present by four weeks. Conclusion: In this pilot study, the Cormatrix extracellular matrix performed well in a sheep carotid interposition graft

  5. Extracellular matrix mineralization in periodontal tissues: Noncollagenous matrix proteins, enzymes, and relationship to hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Marc D.; Hoac, Betty; Addison, William N.; Barros, Nilana M.T.; Millán, José Luis; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    As broadly demonstrated for the formation of a functional skeleton, proper mineralization of periodontal alveolar bone and teeth – where calcium phosphate crystals are deposited and grow within an extracellular matrix – is essential to dental function. Mineralization defects in tooth dentin and cementum of the periodontium invariably lead to a weak (soft or brittle) dentition such that teeth become loose and prone to infection and are lost prematurely. Mineralization of the extremities of periodontal ligament fibres (Sharpey's fibres) where they insert into tooth cementum and alveolar bone is also essential for the function of the tooth suspensory apparatus in occlusion and mastication. Molecular determinants of mineralization in these tissues include mineral ion concentrations (phosphate and calcium), pyrophosphate, small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs), and matrix vesicles. Amongst the enzymes important in regulating these mineralization determinants, two are discussed at length here with clinical examples given, namely tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX). Inactivating mutations in these enzymes in humans and in mouse models lead to the soft bones and teeth characteristic of hypophosphatasia (HPP) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), respectively, where levels of local and systemic circulating mineralization determinants are perturbed. In XLH, in addition to renal phosphate wasting causing low circulating phosphate levels, phosphorylated mineralization-regulating SIBLING proteins such as matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and osteopontin (OPN), and the phosphorylated peptides proteolytically released from them such as the acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) peptide, may accumulate locally to impair mineralization in this disease. PMID:23931057

  6. Insider trading: Extracellular matrix proteins and their non-canonical intracellular roles.

    PubMed

    Hellewell, Andrew L; Adams, Josephine C

    2016-01-01

    In metazoans, the extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a dynamic, heterogeneous microenvironment that has important supportive and instructive roles. Although the primary site of action of ECM proteins is extracellular, evidence is emerging for non-canonical intracellular roles. Examples include osteopontin, thrombospondins, IGF-binding protein 3 and biglycan, and relate to roles in transcription, cell-stress responses, autophagy and cancer. These findings pose conceptual problems on how proteins signalled for secretion can be routed to the cytosol or nucleus, or can function in environments with diverse redox, pH and ionic conditions. We review evidence for intracellular locations and functions of ECM proteins, and current knowledge of the mechanisms by which they may enter intracellular compartments. We evaluate the experimental methods that are appropriate to obtain rigorous evidence for intracellular localisation and function. Better insight into this under-researched topic is needed to decipher the complete spectrum of physiological and pathological roles of ECM proteins.

  7. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  8. Localization of the domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter DsrA involved in serum resistance and binding to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi.

  9. Localization of the Domains of the Haemophilus ducreyi Trimeric Autotransporter DsrA Involved in Serum Resistance and Binding to the Extracellular Matrix Proteins Fibronectin and Vitronectin▿

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Resisting the bactericidal activity of naturally occurring antibodies and complement of normal human serum is an important element in the evasion of innate immunity by bacteria. In the gram-negative mucosal pathogen Haemophilus ducreyi, serum resistance is mediated primarily by the trimeric autotransporter DsrA. DsrA also functions as an adhesin for the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and vitronectin and mediates attachment of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. We sought to determine the domain(s) of the 236-residue DsrA protein required for serum resistance and extracellular matrix protein binding. A 140-amino-acid truncated protein containing only the C-terminal portion of the passenger domain and the entire translocator domain of DsrA exhibited binding to fibronectin and vitronectin and conferred serum resistance to an H. ducreyi serum-sensitive strain. A shorter DsrA construct consisting of only 128 amino acids was unable to bind to extracellular matrix proteins but was serum resistant. We concluded that neither fibronectin binding nor vitronectin binding is required for high-level serum resistance in H. ducreyi. PMID:19015257

  10. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Danton H.; Huber, Robert J.; Suarez, Andres

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  11. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and extracellular matrix deposition by smooth-muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Shannon D.; Trent, Margaret B.; Boor, Paul J.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently reported in vivo disruption of collagen and elastin architecture within blood vessel walls resulting from the selective inhibition of the enzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). This study further investigates the effects of SSAO inhibition on extracellular matrix deposition by smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) cultured from neonatal rat hearts. SMCs were characterized, SSAO activity was measured, and soluble and insoluble collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix (ECM) were quantified. Cultured neonatal rat heart SMC exhibited a monotypic synthetic phenotype that likely represents a myofibroblast. Detectable levels of SSAO activity present throughout 30-d culture peaked at 7-14 d, coinciding with the production of ECM. The addition of enzyme inhibitors and alternate SSAO substrates (benzylamine) produced varied and, in some cases, marked changes in SSAO activity as well as in the composition of mature and soluble matrix components. Similar to our previous in vivo findings, in vitro SSAO inhibition produced aberrations in collagen and elastin deposition by heart SMC. Because changes in SSAO activity are associated with cardiovascular pathologic states, this enzyme may play a protective or modulating role by regulating ECM production during pathologic insult.

  12. The extracellular matrix protein WARP is a novel component of a distinct subset of basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Justin M; Brachvogel, Bent; Farlie, Peter G; Fitzgerald, Jamie; Bateman, John F

    2008-05-01

    WARP is a recently described member of the von Willebrand factor A domain superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins, and is encoded by the Vwa1 gene. We have previously shown that WARP is a multimeric component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix in articular cartilage and intervertebral disc, where it interacts with the basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan. However, the tissue-specific expression of WARP in non-cartilaginous tissues and its localization in the extracellular matrix of other perlecan-containing tissues have not been analyzed in detail. To visualize WARP-expressing cells, we generated a reporter gene knock-in mouse by targeted replacement of the Vwa1 gene with beta-galactosidase. Analysis of reporter gene expression and WARP protein localization by immunostaining demonstrates that WARP is a component of a limited number of distinct basement membranes. WARP is expressed in the vasculature of neural tissues and in basement membrane structures of the peripheral nervous system. Furthermore, WARP is also expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge of developing limb buds, and in skeletal and cardiac muscle. These findings are the first evidence for WARP expression in non-cartilaginous tissues, and the identification of WARP as a component of a limited range of specialized basement membranes provides further evidence for the heterogeneous composition of basement membranes between different tissues.

  13. Lib, transcriptionally induced in senile plaque-associated astrocytes, promotes glial migration through extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kazuki; Hata, Mitsumi; Shimizu, Tomoko; Yokota, Hiroshi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Kosaka, Kenji; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2005-09-23

    In an effort to identify astrocyte-derived molecules that may be intimately associated with progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lib, a type I transmembrane protein belonging to leucine-rich repeat superfamily, has been identified as a distinctly inducible gene, responsive to beta-amyloid as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. To evaluate the roles of Lib in AD, we investigated Lib expression in AD brain. In non-AD brain, Lib mRNA has been detected in neurons but not in quiescent astrocytes. On the contrary, in AD brain, Lib mRNA is expressed in activated astrocytes associated with senile plaques, but not expressed in neurons around lesions. Lib-expressing glioma cells displayed promotion of migration ability through reconstituted extracellular matrix and recombinant Lib protein bound to constituents of extracellular matrix. These observations suggest that Lib may contribute to regulation of cell-matrix adhesion interactions with respect to astrocyte recruitment around senile plaques in AD brain.

  14. Pseudomonas deceptionensis DC5-mediated synthesis of extracellular silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jae H; Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yeon J; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Jin, Chi-Gyu; Yang, Deok C

    2016-09-01

    The biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles is of great interest in the field of nanotechnology. The present work highlights the extracellular biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Pseudomonas deceptionensis DC5. The particles were synthesized in the culture supernatant within 48 h of incubation. Extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the culture supernatant was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, which showed the absorption peak at 428 nm, and also under field emission transmission electron microscopy which displayed the spherical shape. In addition, the particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, which corresponds to the crystalline nature of nanoparticles, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis which exhibited the intense peak at 3 keV, resembling the silver nanoparticles. Further, the synthesized nanoparticles were examined by elemental mapping which displayed the dominance of the silver element in the synthesized product, and dynamic light scattering which showed the distribution of silver nanoparticles with respect to intensity, volume, and number of particles. Moreover, the silver nanoparticles have been found to be quite active in antimicrobial activity and biofilm inhibition activity against pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, the present work emphasized the prospect of using the P. deceptionensis DC5 to achieve the extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles in a facile and environmental manner.

  15. Extracellular matrix assembly in extreme acidic eukaryotic biofilms and their possible implications in heavy metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Angeles; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Martín-Uriz, Patxi San; Amils, Ricardo

    2008-07-30

    To evaluate the importance of the extracellular matrix in relation to heavy metal binding capacity in extreme acidic environments, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) composition of 12 biofilms isolated from Río Tinto (SW, Spain) was analyzed. Each biofilm was composed mainly by one or two species of eukaryotes, although other microorganisms were present. EPS ranged from 130 to 439 mg g(-1) biofilm dry weight, representing between 15% and the 40% of the total biofilm dry weight (DW). Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found in the amount of total EPS extracted from biofilms dominated by the same organism at different sampling points. The amount of EPS varied among different biofilms collected from the same sampling location. Colloidal EPS ranged from 42 to 313 mg g(-1) dry weight; 10% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Capsular EPS ranged from 50 to 318 mg g(-1) dry weight; 5% to 30% of the total biofilm dry weight. Seven of the 12 biofilms showed higher amounts of capsular than colloidal EPS (p<0.05). Total amount of EPS decreased when total cell numbers and pH increased. There was a positive correlation between EPS concentration and heavy metal concentration in the water. Observations by low temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) revealed the mineral adsorption in the matrix of EPS and onto the cell walls. EPS in all biofilms were primarily composed of carbohydrates, heavy metals and humic acid, plus small quantities of proteins and DNA. After carbohydrates, heavy metals were the second main constituents of the extracellular matrix. Their total concentrations ranged from 3 to 32 mg g(-1) biofilm dry weight, reaching up to 16% of the total composition. In general, the heavy metal composition of the EPS extracted from the biofilms closely resembled the metal composition of the water from which the biofilms were collected.

  16. The contribution of the extracellular matrix to gravisensing in characean cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-extracellular matrix junction, which includes the cell wall and the outer surface of the plasma membrane, may be an essential region for the perception of gravity by the internodal cells of Chara corallina. Typically, when an internodal cell is oriented vertically, the downwardly directed cytoplasmic stream travels at a velocity that is 10% faster than that of the upwardly directed stream. However when the cells are treated with impermeant hydrolytic enzymes that partially digest cellulose or hemicellulose, the cells lose their ability to respond to gravity even though streaming continues. By contrast, enzymes that digest pectins have no effect on the gravity-induced polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, gravisensing is sensitive to protease treatment; Proteinase K, thermolysin and collagenase but not trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin or carboxypeptidase B, inhibit gravisensing. These findings indicate that proteins in the cell-extracellular matrix junction may be required for gravisensing. Moreover, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibits gravisensing in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that the gravireceptor may be an integrin-like protein. The macromolecules necessary for gravisensing have been localized to the cell ends. As a consequence of the exoplasmic site of action of the enzymes and the tetrapeptides, we interpret the results to mean that they are acting on the gravireceptor, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that they are acting on the signal transduction chain. On the whole, our observations indicate that the cell-extracellular matrix junction is a sine qua non for graviperception in statolith-free Chara internodal cells and we suggest that the gravireceptor is located in this region.

  17. Local extracellular matrix alignment directs cellular protrusion dynamics and migration through Rac1 and FAK.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Goldblatt, Zachary E; Martin, Karen E; Romero, Bethsabe; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-08-08

    Cell migration within 3D interstitial microenvironments is sensitive to extracellular matrix (ECM) properties, but the mechanisms that regulate migration guidance by 3D matrix features remain unclear. To examine the mechanisms underlying the cell migration response to aligned ECM, which is prevalent at the tumor-stroma interface, we utilized time-lapse microscopy to compare the behavior of MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells within randomly organized and well-aligned 3D collagen ECM. We developed a novel experimental system in which cellular morphodynamics during initial 3D cell spreading served as a reductionist model for the complex process of matrix-directed 3D cell migration. Using this approach, we found that ECM alignment induced spatial anisotropy of cells' matrix probing by promoting protrusion frequency, persistence, and lengthening along the alignment axis and suppressing protrusion dynamics orthogonal to alignment. Preference for on-axis behaviors was dependent upon FAK and Rac1 signaling and translated across length and time scales such that cells within aligned ECM exhibited accelerated elongation, front-rear polarization, and migration relative to cells in random ECM. Together, these findings indicate that adhesive and protrusive signaling allow cells to respond to coordinated physical cues in the ECM, promoting migration efficiency and cell migration guidance by 3D matrix structure.

  18. Extracellular matrix molecules and synaptic plasticity: immunomapping of intracellular and secreted Reelin in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Moreno, Tania; Galazo, Maria J; Porrero, Cesar; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Clascá, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Reelin, a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is secreted by several neuron populations in the developing and adult rodent brain. Secreted Reelin triggers a complex signaling pathway by binding lipoprotein and integrin membrane receptors in target cells. Reelin signaling regulates migration and dendritic growth in developing neurons, while it can modulate synaptic plasticity in adult neurons. To identify which adult neural circuits can be modulated by Reelin-mediated signaling, we systematically mapped the distribution of Reelin in adult rat brain using sensitive immunolabeling techniques. Results show that the distribution of intracellular and secreted Reelin is both very widespread and specific. Some interneuron and projection neuron populations in the cerebral cortex contain Reelin. Numerous striatal neurons are weakly immunoreactive for Reelin and these cells are preferentially located in striosomes. Some thalamic nuclei contain Reelin-immunoreactive cells. Double-immunolabeling for GABA and Reelin reveals that the Reelin-immunoreactive cells in the visual thalamus are the intrinsic thalamic interneurons. High local concentrations of extracellular Reelin selectively outline several dendrite spine-rich neuropils. Together with previous mRNA data, our observations suggest abundant axoplasmic transport and secretion in pathways such as the retino-collicular tract, the entorhino-hippocampal ('perforant') path, the lateral olfactory tract or the parallel fiber system of the cerebellum. A preferential secretion of Reelin in these neuropils is consistent with reports of rapid, activity-induced structural changes in adult brain circuits.

  19. SIGMAR1 Regulates Membrane Electrical Activity in Response to Extracellular Matrix Stimulation to Drive Cancer Cell Invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Rapetti-Mauss, Raphael; Alcaraz-Perez, Francisca; Tichet, Mélanie; Gariano, Giuseppina; Martial, Sonia; Guizouarn, Hélène; Pellissier, Bernard; Loubat, Agnès; Popa, Alexandra; Paquet, Agnès; Presta, Marco; Tartare-Deckert, Sophie; Cayuela, Maria Luisa; Martin, Patrick; Borgese, Franck; Soriani, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    The sigma 1 receptor (Sig1R) is a stress-activated chaperone that regulates ion channels and is associated with pathologic conditions, such as stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, and addiction. Aberrant expression levels of ion channels and Sig1R have been detected in tumors and cancer cells, such as myeloid leukemia and colorectal cancer, but the link between ion channel regulation and Sig1R overexpression during malignancy has not been established. In this study, we found that Sig1R dynamically controls the membrane expression of the human voltage-dependent K(+) channel human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) in myeloid leukemia and colorectal cancer cell lines. Sig1R promoted the formation of hERG/β1-integrin signaling complexes upon extracellular matrix stimulation, triggering the activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Consequently, the presence of Sig1R in cancer cells increased motility and VEGF secretion. In vivo, Sig1R expression enhanced the aggressiveness of tumor cells by potentiating invasion and angiogenesis, leading to poor survival. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel function for Sig1R in mediating cross-talk between cancer cells and their microenvironment, thus driving oncogenesis by shaping cellular electrical activity in response to extracellular signals. Given the involvement of ion channels in promoting several hallmarks of cancer, our study also offers a potential strategy to therapeutically target ion channel function through Sig1R inhibition.

  20. Back to basics--how the evolution of the extracellular matrix underpinned vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Huxley-Jones, Julie; Pinney, John W; Archer, John; Robertson, David L; Boot-Handford, Raymond P

    2009-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex substrate that is involved in and influences a spectrum of behaviours such as growth and differentiation and is the basis for the structure of tissues. Although a characteristic of all metazoans, the ECM has elaborated into a variety of tissues unique to vertebrates, such as bone, tendon and cartilage. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular evolution of the ECM. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ECM genes represent a pivotal family of proteins the evolution of which appears to have played an important role in the evolution of vertebrates.

  1. The Extracellular Matrix in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer – A Piece of a Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Angela; Howell, Viive M.; Colvin, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is an integral component of both the normal and tumor microenvironment. ECM composition varies between tissues and is crucial for maintaining normal function and homeostasis. Dysregulation and aberrant deposition or loss of ECM components is implicated in ovarian cancer progression. The mechanisms by which tumor cells induce ECM remodeling to promote a malignant phenotype are yet to be elucidated. A thorough understanding of the role of the ECM in ovarian cancer is needed for the development of effective biomarkers and new therapies. PMID:26579497

  2. Adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix as drug targets for glioma.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshihiko; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Ishida, Joji; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Date, Isao

    2016-04-01

    The formation of tumor vasculature and cell invasion along white matter tracts have pivotal roles in the development and progression of glioma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of angiogenesis and invasion in glioma will aid the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The processes of angiogenesis and invasion cause the production of an array of adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. This review focuses on the role of adhesion molecules and the ECM in malignant glioma. The results of clinical trials using drugs targeted against adhesion molecules and the ECM for glioma are also discussed.

  3. "Click" immobilization of a VEGF-mimetic peptide on decellularized endothelial extracellular matrix to enhance angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Zhao, Meirong; Li, Siheng; Erasquin, Uriel J; Wang, Hao; Ren, Li; Chen, Changyi; Wang, Yingjun; Cai, Chengzhi

    2014-06-11

    We show that coating of decellularized extracellular matrix (DC-ECM) on substrate surfaces is an efficient way to generate a platform mimicking the native ECM environment. Moreover, the DC-ECM can be modified with a peptide (QK) mimicking vascular endothelial growth factor without apparently compromising its integrity. The modification was achieved through metabolic incorporation of a "clickable" handle to DC-ECM followed by rapid attachment of the QK peptide with an azido tag using copper-catalyzed click reaction. The attachment of the QK peptide on to DC-ECM in this way further enhanced the angiogenic responses (formation of branched tubular networks) of endothelial cells.

  4. Emerging Implications for Extracellular Matrix-Based Technologies in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo; Gorantla, Vijay S.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent progress in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA), limitations including complex, high dose immunosuppression regimens, lifelong risk of toxicity from immunosuppressants, acute and most critically chronic graft rejection, and suboptimal nerve regeneration remain particularly challenging obstacles restricting clinical progress. When properly configured, customized, and implemented, biomaterials derived from the extracellular matrix (ECM) retain bioactive molecules and immunomodulatory properties that can promote stem cell migration, proliferation and differentiation, and constructive functional tissue remodeling. The present paper reviews the emerging implications of ECM-based technologies in VCA, including local immunomodulation, tissue repair, nerve regeneration, minimally invasive graft targeted drug delivery, stem cell transplantation, and other donor graft manipulation. PMID:26839554

  5. Of extracellular matrix, scaffolds, and signaling: Tissuearchitectureregulates development, homeostasis, and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-03-09

    The microenvironment surrounding cells influences gene expression, such that a cell's behavior is largely determined by its interactions with the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells, and soluble cues released locally or by distant tissues. We describe the essential role of context and organ structure in directing mammary gland development and differentiated function, and in determining response to oncogenic insults including mutations. We expand on the concept of 'dynamic reciprocity' to present an integrated view of development, cancer, and aging, and posit that genes are like piano keys: while essential, it is the context that makes the music.

  6. In vitro enhancement of extracellular matrix formation as natural bioscaffold for stem cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naroeni, Aroem; Shalihah, Qonitha; Meilany, Sofy

    2017-02-01

    Growing cells in plastic with liquid media for in vitro study is very common but far from physiological. The use of scaffold materials is more biocompatible. Extracellular matrix provides tissue integrity which acts as a native scaffold for cell attachment and interaction, as well as it serves as a reservoir for growth factors. For this reason, we have developed natural scaffold from mice fibroblast to form a natural scaffold for stem cell culture. Fibroblasts were cultured under crowded condition and lysed to form natural scaffold. The natural scaffold formation was observed using immunofluorescence which then will be used and tested for stem cell propagation and differentiation.

  7. Suppression of ICE and Apoptosis in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Extracellular Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, Nancy; Sympson, C. J.; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J.

    1994-12-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) plays a major role in development and tissue regeneration. Basement membrane extracellular matrix (ECM), but not fibronectin or collagen, was shown to suppress apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells in tissue culture and in vivo. Apoptosis was induced by antibodies to beta 1 integrins or by overexpression of stromelysin-1, which degrades ECM. Expression of interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) correlated with the loss of ECM, and inhibitors of ICE activity prevented apoptosis. These results suggest that ECM regulates apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells through an integrin-dependent negative regulation of ICE expression.

  8. Teaching the Extracellular Matrix and Introducing Online Databases within a Multidisciplinary Course with i-Cell-MATRIX: A Student-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Joao Carlos; Costa, Manuel Joao; Palha, Joana Almeida

    2010-01-01

    The biochemistry and molecular biology of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is difficult to convey to students in a classroom setting in ways that capture their interest. The understanding of the matrix's roles in physiological and pathological conditions study will presumably be hampered by insufficient knowledge of its molecular structure.…

  9. Enzymes in the extracellular matrix of Volvox: an inducible, calcium-dependent phosphatase with a modular composition.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, A

    1999-01-15

    The volvocine algae provide the unique opportunity for exploring development of an extracellular matrix. Volvox is the most advanced member of this family and represents the simplest multicellular organism, with differentiated cells, a complete division of labor, and a complex extracellular matrix, which serves structural and enzymatic functions. In Volvox carteri a glycosylated extracellular phosphatase was identified, which is partially released from the extracellular matrix into the growth medium. The phosphatase is synthesized in response to inorganic phosphate starvation and is strictly calcium-dependent. The metalloenzyme has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. Its gene and cDNA have been cloned. Comparisons of genomic and cDNA sequences revealed an extremely intron-rich gene (32 introns). With an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa the Volvox extracellular phosphatase is the largest phosphatase cloned, with no sequence similarity to any other phosphatase. This enzyme exhibits a modular composition. There are two large domains and a small one. The large domains are highly homologous to each other and therefore most likely originated from gene duplication and fusion. At least one EF-hand motif for calcium binding was identified in this extracellular protein. Volvox extracellular phosphatase is the first calcium-dependent extracellular phosphatase to be cloned.

  10. Evidence for export of a muscle lectin from cytosol to extracellular matrix and for a novel secretory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A soluble lactose-binding lectin with subunit Mr of 14,500 is believed to function by interacting with extracellular glycoconjugates, because it has been detected extracellularly by immunohistochemistry. This localization has been questioned, however, since the lectin lacks a secretion signal sequence, which challenges the contention that it is secreted. We have demonstrated externalization of this lectin from C2 mouse muscle cells by both immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled protein and immunohistochemical localization. We further show that externalization of the lectin is a developmentally regulated process that accompanies myoblast differentiation and that the lectin codistributes with laminin in myotube extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemical localization during intermediate stages of externalization suggests that the lectin becomes concentrated in evaginations of plasma membrane, which pinch off to form labile lectin- rich extracellular vesicles. This suggests a possible mechanism for lectin export from the cytosol to the extracellular matrix. PMID:2335567

  11. FAP-overexpressing fibroblasts produce an extracellular matrix that enhances invasive velocity and directionality of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Alterations towards a permissive stromal microenvironment provide important cues for tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this study, Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a serine protease selectively produced by tumor-associated fibroblasts in over 90% of epithelial tumors, was used as a platform for studying tumor-stromal interactions. We tested the hypothesis that FAP enzymatic activity locally modifies stromal ECM (extracellular matrix) components thus facilitating the formation of a permissive microenvironment promoting tumor invasion in human pancreatic cancer. Methods We generated a tetracycline-inducible FAP overexpressing fibroblastic cell line to synthesize an in vivo-like 3-dimensional (3D) matrix system which was utilized as a stromal landscape for studying matrix-induced cancer cell behaviors. A FAP-dependent topographical and compositional alteration of the ECM was characterized by measuring the relative orientation angles of fibronectin fibers and by Western blot analyses. The role of FAP in the matrix-induced permissive tumor behavior was assessed in Panc-1 cells in assorted matrices by time-lapse acquisition assays. Also, FAP+ matrix-induced regulatory molecules in cancer cells were determined by Western blot analyses. Results We observed that FAP remodels the ECM through modulating protein levels, as well as through increasing levels of fibronectin and collagen fiber organization. FAP-dependent architectural/compositional alterations of the ECM promote tumor invasion along characteristic parallel fiber orientations, as demonstrated by enhanced directionality and velocity of pancreatic cancer cells on FAP+ matrices. This phenotype can be reversed by inhibition of FAP enzymatic activity during matrix production resulting in the disorganization of the ECM and impeded tumor invasion. We also report that the FAP+ matrix-induced tumor invasion phenotype is β1-integrin/FAK mediated. Conclusion Cancer cell invasiveness can be affected by

  12. Extracellular Matrix Properties Regulate the Migratory Response of Glioblastoma Stem Cells in Three-Dimensional Culture

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Perez, Marisol; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse infiltration across brain tissue is a hallmark of glioblastoma and the main cause of unsuccessful total resection that leads to tumor reappearance. A subpopulation termed glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) has been directly related to aggressive invasion; nonetheless, their migratory characteristics and regulation by the microenvironment are still unknown. In this study, we developed a composite matrix of hyaluronan (HA) structurally supported by a collagen-oligomer fibril network to simulate the brain tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Matrigel-coated microfibers were embedded within the matrix to create a tunable dual niche microenvironment that resembles the vascular network of the brain. This model was compared with the most commonly used in vitro three-dimensional (3D) culture formats, Matrigel and collagen type-I monomer matrices, to study how the mechanical and compositional properties of the ECM alter the migration characteristics of GSC neurospheres. The migration mode, distance, velocity, and morphology of the GSCs were monitored over a 72-h period. The cells altered their migration mode depending on the matrix composition, showing migration by expansive growth in Matrigel matrices, multicellular extension along rigid interfaces (as Matrigel glass and coated microfibers), and mesenchymal single-cell migration in collagen matrices. Velocity and distance of migration within each composition varied according to matrix mechanical properties. In the dual niche system, the presence of HA reduced velocity and number of migratory cells; however, cells that came in contact with the pseudovessels exhibited collective migration by an extensive strand and reached higher velocities than cells migrating individually across the 3D matrix. Our results show that GSCs adopt varied migration mechanisms to invade multiple ECM microenvironments, and the migration characteristics exhibited are highly influenced by the matrix physical properties. Moreover, GSC

  13. Systems biology—opportunities and challenges: the application of proteomics to study the cardiovascular extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Lynch, Marc; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Systems biology approaches including proteomics are becoming more widely used in cardiovascular research. In this review article, we focus on the application of proteomics to the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM remodelling is a hallmark of many cardiovascular diseases. Proteomic techniques using mass spectrometry (MS) provide a platform for the comprehensive analysis of ECM proteins without a priori assumptions. Proteomics overcomes various constraints inherent to conventional antibody detection. On the other hand, studies that use whole tissue lysates for proteomic analysis mask the identification of the less abundant ECM constituents. In this review, we first discuss decellularization-based methods that enrich for ECM proteins in cardiac tissue, and how targeted MS allows for accurate protein quantification. The second part of the review will focus on post-translational modifications including hydroxylation and glycosylation and on the release of matrix fragments with biological activity (matrikines), all of which can be interrogated by proteomic techniques. PMID:27635058

  14. Probing Micromechanical Properties of the Extracellular Matrix of Soft Tissues by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Ignasi; Uriarte, Juan J; Campillo, Noelia; Farré, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) determines 3D tissue architecture and provides structural support and chemical and mechanical cues to the cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has unique capabilities to measure ECM mechanics at the scale at which cells probe the mechanical features of their microenvironment. Moreover, AFM measurements can be readily combined with bright field and fluorescence microscopy. Performing reliable mechanical measurements with AFM requires accurate calibration of the device and correct computation of the mechanical parameters. A suitable approach to isolate ECM mechanics from cell contribution is removing the cells by means of an effective decellularization process that preserves the composition, structure and mechanical properties of the ECM. AFM measurement of ECM micromechanics provides important insights into organ biofabrication, cell-matrix mechanical crosstalk and disease-induced tissue stiffness alterations. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 19-26, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Tendon development and musculoskeletal assembly: emerging roles for the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Arul; Schilling, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich structures that interconnect muscles and bones. Recent work has shown how tendon fibroblasts (tenocytes) interact with muscles via the ECM to establish connectivity and strengthen attachments under tension. Similarly, ECM-dependent interactions between tenocytes and cartilage/bone ensure that tendon-bone attachments form with the appropriate strength for the force required. Recent studies have also established a close lineal relationship between tenocytes and skeletal progenitors, highlighting the fact that defects in signals modulated by the ECM can alter the balance between these fates, as occurs in calcifying tendinopathies associated with aging. The dynamic fine-tuning of tendon ECM composition and assembly thus gives rise to the remarkable characteristics of this unique tissue type. Here, we provide an overview of the functions of the ECM in tendon formation and maturation that attempts to integrate findings from developmental genetics with those of matrix biology. PMID:26672092

  16. Development of biomimetic nanocomposites as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Arundhati; Mitra, Tapas; Gnanamani, Arumugam; Das, Manas; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2016-05-05

    Here, we have developed biomimetic nanocomposites containing chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) and nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed interconnected macroporous structures. Moreover, in this study, the problem related to fabricating a porous composite with good mechanical strength has been resolved by incorporating 5wt% of nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide into chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix; the present composite showed high tensile strength (20.25MPa) while maintaining appreciable porosity (65.25%). These values are similar to human cancellous bone. These nanocomposites also showed superior water uptake, antimicrobial and biodegradable properties than the previously reported results. Compatibility with human blood and pH was observed, indicating nontoxicity of these materials to the human body. Moreover, proliferation of osteoblastic MG-63 cells onto the nanocomposites was also observed without having any negative effect.

  17. Embryonic lung morphogenesis in organ culture: experimental evidence for a proteoglycan function in the extracellular matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Bassett, K. E.; Spooner, B. S. Jr

    1993-01-01

    The lung rudiment, isolated from mid-gestation (11 day) mouse embryos, can undergo morphogenesis in organ culture. Observation of living rudiments, in culture, reveals both growth and ongoing bronchiolar branching activity. To detect proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis, and deposition in the extracellular matrix, rudiments were metabolically labeled with radioactive sulfate, then fixed, embedded, sectioned and processed for autoradiography. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) types, composing the carbohydrate component of the proteoglycans, were evaluated by selective GAG degradative approaches that showed chondroitin sulfate PG principally associated with the interstitial matrix, and heparan sulfate PG principally associated with the basement membrane. Experiments using the proteoglycan biosynthesis disrupter, beta-xyloside, suggest that when chondroitin sulfate PG deposition into the ECM is perturbed, branching morphogenesis is compromised.

  18. Synthetic Mimics of the Extracellular Matrix: How Simple is Complex Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Cells reside in a complex and dynamic extracellular matrix where they interact with a myriad of biophysical and biochemical cues that direct their function and regulate tissue homeostasis, wound repair, and even pathophysiological events. There is a desire in the biomaterials community to develop synthetic hydrogels to recapitulate facets of the ECM for in vitro culture platforms and tissue engineering applications. Advances in synthetic hydrogel design and chemistries, including user-tunable platforms, have broadened the field’s understanding of the role of matrix cues in directing cellular processes and enabled the design of improved tissue engineering scaffolds. This review focuses on recent advances in the development and fabrication of hydrogels and discusses what aspects of ECM signals can be incorporated to direct cell function in different contexts. PMID:25753017

  19. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  20. Nonlinear mechanical response of the extracellular matrix: learning from articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Sarah; Das, Moumita

    2015-03-01

    We study the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on nonlinear shear and compression response. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage tissue which has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen that acts as a stiff, reinforcing matrix, and a flexible aggrecan network that facilitates deformability. We model this system as a double network hydrogel made of interpenetrating networks of stiff and flexible biopolymers respectively. We study the linear and nonlinear mechanical response of the model ECM to shear and compression forces using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings.

  1. Extracellular matrix stiffness and composition jointly regulate the induction of malignant phenotypes in mammary epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Koshy, Sandeep T.; Branco da Cunha, Cristiana; Shin, Jae-Won; Verbeke, Catia S.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Mooney, David J.

    2014-10-01

    In vitro models of normal mammary epithelium have correlated increased extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness with malignant phenotypes. However, the role of increased stiffness in this transformation remains unclear because of difficulties in controlling ECM stiffness, composition and architecture independently. Here we demonstrate that interpenetrating networks of reconstituted basement membrane matrix and alginate can be used to modulate ECM stiffness independently of composition and architecture. We find that, in normal mammary epithelial cells, increasing ECM stiffness alone induces malignant phenotypes but that the effect is completely abrogated when accompanied by an increase in basement-membrane ligands. We also find that the combination of stiffness and composition is sensed through β4 integrin, Rac1, and the PI3K pathway, and suggest a mechanism in which an increase in ECM stiffness, without an increase in basement membrane ligands, prevents normal α6β4 integrin clustering into hemidesmosomes.

  2. Dynamics of extracellular matrix production and turnover in tissue engineered cardiovascular structures.

    PubMed

    Stock, U A; Wiederschain, D; Kilroy, S M; Shum-Tim, D; Khalil, P N; Vacanti, J P; Mayer, J E; Moses, M A

    2001-03-26

    Appropriate matrix formation, turnover and remodeling in tissue-engineered small diameter vascular conduits are crucial requirements for their long-term patency and function. This complex process requires the deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix molecules as well as the remodeling of this extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs). In this study, we have investigated the dynamics of ECM production and the activity of MMPs and TIMPs in long-term tissue-engineered vascular conduits using quantitative ECM analysis, substrate gel electrophoresis, radiometric enzyme assays and Western blot analyses. Over a time period of 169 days in vivo, levels of elastin and proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans in tissue-engineered constructs came to approximate those of their native tissue counter parts. The kinetics of collagen deposition and remodeling, however, apparently require a much longer time period. Through the use of substrate gel electrophoresis, proteolytic bands whose molecular weight was consistent with their identification as the active form of MMP-2 (approximately 64--66 kDa) were detected in all native and tissue-engineered samples. Additional proteolytic bands migrating at approximately 72 kDa representing the latent form of MMP-2 were detected in tissue-engineered samples at time points from 5 throughout 55 days. Radiometric assays of MMP-1 activity demonstrated no significant differences between the native and tissue-engineered samples. This study determines the dynamics of ECM production and turnover in a long-term tissue-engineered vascular tissue and highlights the importance of ECM remodeling in the development of successful tissue-engineered vascular structures.

  3. Dilation and degradation of the brain extracellular matrix enhances penetration of infused polymer nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Neeves, Keith B.; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Foley, Conor P.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Olbricht, William L.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates methods of manipulating the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) to enhance the penetration of nanoparticle drug carriers in convection-enhanced delivery (CED). A probe was fabricated with two independent microfluidic channels to infuse, either simultaneously or sequentially, nanoparticles and ECM-modifying agents. Infusions were performed in the striatum of the normal rat brain. Monodisperse polystyrene particles with a diameter of 54 nm were used as a model nanoparticle system. Because the size of these particles is comparable to the effective pore size of the ECM, their transport may be significantly hindered compared with the transport of low molecular weight molecules. To enhance the transport of the infused nanoparticles, we attempted to increase the effective pore size of the ECM by two methods: dilating the extracellular space and degrading selected constituents of the ECM. Two methods of dilating the extracellular space were investigated: co-infusion of nanoparticles and a hyperosmolar solution of mannitol, and pre-infusion of an isotonic buffer solution followed by infusion of nanoparticles. These treatments resulted in an increase in the nanoparticle distribution volume of 50% and 123%, respectively. To degrade hyaluronan, a primary structural component of the brain ECM, a pre-infusion of hyaluronidase (20,000 U/mL) was followed after 30 min by infusion of nanoparticles. This treatment resulted in an increase in the nanoparticle distribution of 64%. Our results suggest that both dilation and enzymatic digestion can be incorporated into CED protocols to enhance nanoparticle penetration. PMID:17920047

  4. Stem cell and extracellular matrix-related molecules increase following melatonin treatment in the skin of postmenopausal rats.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Serap; Oktem, Gulperi; Uysal, Aysegul; Soner, Burak Cem; Arbak, Serap; Ince, Umit

    2014-08-01

    The menopause has a negative effect in the skin. Melatonin affects skin functions and structures through actions mediated by cell-surface and putative-nuclear receptors expressed in skin cell. We have therefore determined the effects of melatonin treatment on stem cell in the epidermis and extracellular matrix related molecules in the dermis the skin of postmenopausal rats. A total of 45 female rats were divided into 5 groups: control group, group A [ovariectomy (OVX)], group B (OVX +10 mg/kg/day melatonin), group C (OVX +30 mg/kg/day melatonin), group S (sham operated + 10 mg/kg/day melatonin). Ventral skin samples were excised at 12th week after ovariectomy. Hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid- methylamine silver, elastic van Gieson staining techniques were used to measure histomorphometrically the thickness of elastic fibers and basement membrane, depths of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous fat layer. Immunohistochemical staining methods were used for fibroblast growth factor β (FGF β), collagen type I, fibronectin, β-catenin, c-kit, c-Myc evaluation. Epidermal thickness, subcutaneous fat layer, and elastic fibers were significantly decreased in group C, and there was a significant increase after melatonin treatment. Although there was no difference in dermal thickness of group C, melatonin also significantly increased the dermal thickness. High FGF β, type I collagen, fibronectin, β-catenin, c-Myc immunoreactivity developed following melatonin in all groups. Thus melatonin treatment of postmenopausal rats was mostly due to the decrease of stem cell and extracellular matrix-related molecules in the skin.

  5. Conserved Ankyrin Repeat Proteins and Their NIMA Kinase Partners Regulate Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Intracellular Trafficking in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lažetić, Vladimir; Fay, David S

    2017-01-01

    Molting is an essential developmental process in nematodes during which the epidermal apical extracellular matrix, the cuticle, is remodeled to accommodate further growth. Using genetic approaches, we identified a requirement for three conserved ankyrin repeat-rich proteins, MLT-2/ANKS6, MLT-3/ANKS3, and MLT-4/INVS, in Caenorhabditis elegans molting. Loss of mlt function resulted in severe defects in the ability of larvae to shed old cuticle and led to developmental arrest. Genetic analyses demonstrated that MLT proteins functionally cooperate with the conserved NIMA kinase family members NEKL-2/NEK8 and NEKL-3/NEK6/NEK7 to promote cuticle shedding. MLT and NEKL proteins were specifically required within the hyp7 epidermal syncytium, and fluorescently tagged mlt and nekl alleles were expressed in puncta within this tissue. Expression studies further showed that NEKL-2-MLT-2-MLT-4 and NEKL-3-MLT-3 colocalize within largely distinct assemblies of apical foci. MLT-2 and MLT-4 were required for the normal accumulation of NEKL-2 at the hyp7-seam cell boundary, and loss of mlt-2 caused abnormal nuclear accumulation of NEKL-2 Correspondingly, MLT-3, which bound directly to NEKL-3, prevented NEKL-3 nuclear localization, supporting the model that MLT proteins may serve as molecular scaffolds for NEKL kinases. Our studies additionally showed that the NEKL-MLT network regulates early steps in clathrin-mediated endocytosis at the apical surface of hyp7, which may in part account for molting defects observed in nekl and mlt mutants. This study has thus identified a conserved NEKL-MLT protein network that regulates remodeling of the apical extracellular matrix and intracellular trafficking, functions that may be conserved across species.

  6. Aldosterone and myocardial extracellular matrix expansion in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ajay D; Shah, Ravi V; Garg, Rajesh; Abbasi, Siddique A; Neilan, Tomas G; Perlstein, Todd S; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y; Adler, Gail K

    2013-07-01

    Myocardial extracellular matrix expansion and reduced coronary flow reserve (CFR) occur in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without heart failure or coronary artery disease. Because aldosterone is implicated in the pathophysiology of cardiac fibrosis and vascular injury, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that aldosterone is associated with extracellular matrix expansion and reduced CFR in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without evidence of coronary artery disease were recruited. Blood pressure, lipid management, and glycemic control were optimized over 3 months. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with T1 mapping was used to measure myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Cardiac positron emission tomography was used to assess CFR. On a liberal, 250 mEq/day sodium diet, 24-hour urinary aldosterone and change in serum aldosterone with angiotensin II stimulation were measured. Fifty-three participants with type 2 diabetes (68% men, mean age 53 ± 7 years, mean body mass index 32.2 ± 4.3 kg/m², mean glycosylated hemoglobin 6.8 ± 0.7%, mean systolic blood pressure 126 ± 14 mm Hg) without infarction or ischemia by cardiac magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography were studied. Subjects had impaired CFR (2.51 ± 0.83) and elevated ECV (0.36 ± 0.05), despite normal echocardiographic diastolic function and normal left ventricular function. Myocardial ECV, but not CFR, was positively associated with 24-hour urinary aldosterone excretion (r = 0.37, p = 0.01) and angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone increase (r = 0.35, p = 0.02). In a best-overall multivariate model (including age, gender, body mass index, glycosylated hemoglobin, and blood pressure), 24-hour urinary aldosterone was the strongest predictor of myocardial ECV (p = 0.004). In conclusion, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without coronary artery disease, aldosterone is associated with myocardial extracellular matrix expansion. These

  7. Sesamin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism in rat intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Li, Yan; Xu, Bo; Mao, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration contributes to most spinal degenerative diseases, while treatment inhibiting IVD degeneration is still in the experimental stage. Sesamin, a bioactive component extracted from sesame, has been reported to exert chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we analyzed the anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic effects of sesamin on rat IVD in vitro and ex vivo. Results show that sesamin significantly inhibits the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of catabolic enzymes (MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, ADAMTS-5) and inflammation factors (IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, NO, COX-2, PGE2) in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. It is also proven that migration of macrophages induced by LPS can be inhibited by treatment with sesamin. Organ culture experiments demonstrate that sesamin protects the IVD from LPS-induced depletion of the extracellular matrix ex vivo. Moreover, sesamin suppresses LPS-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through inhibiting phosphorylation of JNK, the common downstream signaling pathway of LPS and IL-1β, which may be the potential mechanism of the effects of sesamin. In light of our results, sesamin protects the IVD from inflammation and extracellular matrix catabolism, presenting positive prospects in the treatment of IVD degenerative diseases.

  8. Trafficking Mechanisms of Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules: Insights from Vertebrate Development and Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Gokhan; Levic, Daniel S.; Melville, David B.; Knapik, Ela W.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular life depends on protein transport and membrane traffic. In multicellular organisms, membrane traffic is required for extracellular matrix deposition, cell adhesion, growth factor release, and receptor signaling, which are collectively required to integrate the development and physiology of tissues and organs. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms that govern cargo and membrane flow presents a prime challenge in cell biology. Extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion remains poorly understood, although given its essential roles in the regulation of cell migration, differentiation, and survival, ECM secretion mechanisms are likely to be tightly controlled. Recent studies in vertebrate model systems, from fishes to mammals and in human patients, have revealed complex and diverse loss-of-function phenotypes associated with mutations in components of the secretory machinery. A broad spectrum of diseases from skeletal and cardiovascular to neurological deficits have been linked to ECM trafficking. These discoveries have directly challenged the prevailing view of secretion as an essential but monolithic process. Here, we will discuss the latest findings on mechanisms of ECM trafficking in vertebrates. PMID:24333299

  9. Mesenchymal Remodeling during Palatal Shelf Elevation Revealed by Extracellular Matrix and F-Actin Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Blumer, Susan; Angelini, Manuela; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.; Katsaros, Christos

    2016-01-01

    During formation of the secondary palate in mammalian embryos, two vertically oriented palatal shelves rapidly elevate into a horizontal position above the tongue, meet at the midline, and fuse to form a single entity. Previous observations suggested that elevation occurs by a simple 90° rotation of the palatal shelves. More recent findings showed that the presumptive midline epithelial cells are not located at the tips of palatal shelves before elevation, but mostly toward their medial/lingual part. This implied extensive tissue remodeling during shelf elevation. Nevertheless, it is still not known how the shelf mesenchyme reorganizes during this process, and what mechanism drives it. To address this question, we mapped the distinct and restricted expression domains of certain extracellular matrix components within the developing palatal shelves. This procedure allowed to monitor movements of entire mesenchymal regions relative to each other during shelf elevation. Consistent with previous notions, our results confirm a flipping movement of the palatal shelves anteriorly, whereas extensive mesenchymal reorganization is observed more posteriorly. There, the entire lingual portion of the vertical shelves moves close to the midline after elevation, whereas the mesenchyme at the original tip of the shelves ends up ventrolaterally. Moreover, we observed that the mesenchymal cells of elevating palatal shelves substantially align their actin cytoskeleton, their extracellular matrix, and their nuclei in a ventral to medial direction. This indicates that, like in other morphogenetic processes, actin-dependent cell contractility is a major driving force for mesenchymal tissue remodeling during palatogenesis. PMID:27656150

  10. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P.; Cleary, Ian A.; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2014-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C.albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance. PMID:20012895

  11. Bubaline Cholecyst Derived Extracellular Matrix for Reconstruction of Full Thickness Skin Wounds in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Poonam; Sharma, A. K.; Kumar, Naveen; Vellachi, Remya; Mathew, Dayamon D.; Dubey, Prasoon; Singh, Kiranjeet; Shrivastava, Sonal; Shrivastava, Sameer; Maiti, S. K.; Hasan, Anwarul; Singh, K. P.

    2016-01-01

    An acellular cholecyst derived extracellular matrix (b-CEM) of bubaline origin was prepared using anionic biological detergent. Healing potential of b-CEM was compared with commercially available collagen sheet (b-CS) and open wound (C) in full thickness skin wounds in rats. Thirty-six clinically healthy adult Sprague Dawley rats of either sex were randomly divided into three equal groups. Under general anesthesia, a full thickness skin wound (20 × 20 mm2) was created on the dorsum of each rat. The defect in group I was kept as open wound and was taken as control. In group II, the defect was repaired with commercially available collagen sheet (b-CS). In group III, the defect was repaired with cholecyst derived extracellular matrix of bovine origin (b-CEM). Planimetry, wound contracture, and immunological and histological observations were carried out to evaluate healing process. Significantly (P < 0.05) increased wound contraction was observed in b-CEM (III) as compared to control (I) and b-CS (II) on day 21. Histologically, improved epithelization, neovascularization, fibroplasia, and best arranged collagen fibers were observed in b-CEM (III) as early as on postimplantation day 21. These findings indicate that b-CEM have potential for biomedical applications for full thickness skin wound repair in rats. PMID:27127678

  12. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L.; Grist, S. M.; Nasseri, S. S.; Ni, C.; Cheung, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  13. The extracellular matrix is a novel attribute of endothelial progenitors and of hypoxic mature endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Sravanti; Zhao, Stephen; Gerecht, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) production is critical to preserve the function and integrity of mature blood vessels. Toward the engineering of blood vessels, studies have centered on ECM production by supporting cells, whereas few studies implicate endothelial cells (ECs) with ECM synthesis. Here, we elucidate variations between cultured human arterial, venous, and progenitor ECs with respect to ECM deposition assembly, composition, and response to biomolecular and physiological factors. Our studies reveal that progenitor ECs, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), deposit collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin that assemble to an organized weblike structure, as confirmed by decellularized cultures. Mature ECs only express these ECM proteins intracellularly. ECFC-derived ECM is abrogated in response to TGFβ signaling inhibition and actin cytoskeleton disruption. Hypoxic (1%) and physiological (5%) O2 tension stimulate ECM deposition from mature ECs. Interestingly, deposition of collagen I is observed only under 5% O2 tension. ECM production from all ECs is found to be regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors 1α and 2α but differentially in the different cell lines. Collectively, we suggest that ECM deposition and assembly by ECs is dependent on maturation stage and oxygen supply and that these findings can be harnessed to advance engineered vascular therapeutics.—Kusuma, S., Zhao, S., Gerecht, S. The extracellular matrix is a novel attribute of endothelial progenitors and of hypoxic mature endothelial cells. PMID:22919069

  14. Diffusion of Particles in the Extracellular Matrix: The Effect of Repulsive Electrostatic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Poh, Ming-Zher; Insin, Numpon; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Fukumura, Dai; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusive transport of macromolecules and nanoparticles in charged fibrous media is of interest in many biological applications, including drug delivery and separation processes. Experimental findings have shown that diffusion can be significantly hindered by electrostatic interactions between the diffusing particle and charged components of the extracellular matrix. The implications, however, have not been analyzed rigorously. Here, we present a mathematical framework to study the effect of charge on the diffusive transport of macromolecules and nanoparticles in the extracellular matrix of biological tissues. The model takes into account steric, hydrodynamic, and electrostatic interactions. We show that when the fiber size is comparable to the Debye length, electrostatic forces between the fibers and the particles result in slowed diffusion. However, as the fiber diameter increases the repulsive forces become less important. Our results explain the experimental observations that neutral particles diffuse faster than charged particles. Taken together, we conclude that optimal particles for delivery to tumors should be initially cationic to target the tumor vessels and then change to neutral charge after exiting the blood vessels. PMID:20816045

  15. UV irradiation and desiccation modulate the three-dimensional extracellular matrix of Nostoc commune (Cyanobacteria).

    PubMed

    Wright, Deborah J; Smith, Sue C; Joardar, Vinita; Scherer, Siegfried; Jervis, Jody; Warren, Andrew; Helm, Richard F; Potts, Malcolm

    2005-12-02

    Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune can tolerate the simultaneous stresses of desiccation, UV irradiation, and oxidation. Acidic WspA, of approximately 33.6 kDa, is secreted to the three-dimensional extracellular matrix and accounts for greater than 70% of the total soluble protein. The wspA gene of N. commune strain DRH1 was cloned and found in a single genomic copy, in a monocistronic operon. Transcription of wspA and sodF (superoxide dismutase), and synthesis and secretion of WspA, were induced upon desiccation or UV-A/B irradiation of cells. Recombinant WspA binds the UV-A/B absorbing pigment scytonemin through non-covalent interactions. WspA peptide polymorphism, and heterogeneity of multiple wspA sequences within cells of a single colony, account for distinct WspA isoforms. WspA has no similarity to entries in the sequence databases and wspA, a possible xenolog, is restricted to a subset of strains in the "form species" N. commune characterized through group I intron phylogeny. We hypothesize that WspA plays a central role in the global stress response of N. commune through modulation of the structure and function of the three-dimensional extracellular matrix, particularly the transport, distribution, and/or macromolecular architecture of mycosporine and scytonemin UV-A/B absorbing pigment complexes.

  16. Extracellular matrix family proteins that are potential targets of Dd-STATa in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Nishio, Keiko; Maeda, Mineko; Urushihara, Hideko; Kawata, Takefumi

    2004-10-01

    Dd-STATa is a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins, which is activated by cAMP and is thereby translocated into the nuclei of anterior tip cells of the prestalk region of the slug. By using in situ hybridization analyses, we found that the SLF308 cDNA clone, which contains the ecmF gene that encodes a putative extracellular matrix protein and is expressed in the anterior tip cells, was greatly down-regulated in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. Disruption of the ecmF gene, however, resulted in almost no phenotypic change. The absence of any obvious mutant phenotype in the ecmF-null mutant could be due to a redundancy of similar genes. In fact, a search of the Dictyostelium whole genome database demonstrates the existence of an additional 16 homologues, all of which contain a cellulose-binding module. Among these homologues, four genes show Dd-STATa-dependent expression, while the others are Dd-STATa-independent. We discuss the potential role of Dd-STATa in morphogenesis via its effect on the interaction between cellulose and these extracellular matrix family proteins.

  17. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms.

    PubMed

    Martins, Margarida; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P; Cleary, Ian A; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-05-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans, there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm development. We were able to detect the accumulation of eDNA in biofilm ECM extracted from C. albicans biofilms formed under conditions of flow, although the quantity of eDNA detected differed according to growth conditions, in particular with regards to the medium used to grow the biofilms. Experiments with C. albicans biofilms formed statically using a microtiter plate model indicated that the addition of exogenous DNA (>160 ng/ml) increases biofilm biomass and, conversely, DNase treatment (>0.03 mg/ml) decreases biofilm biomass at later time points of biofilm development. We present evidence for the role of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm structure and formation, consistent with eDNA being a key element of the ECM in mature C. albicans biofilms and playing a predominant role in biofilm structural integrity and maintenance.

  18. Extracellular histones disarrange vasoactive mediators release through a COX-NOS interaction in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cremades, Daniel; Bueno-Betí, Carlos; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Pallardó, Federico V; Novella, Susana

    2017-02-28

    Extracellular histones are mediators of inflammation, tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Interactions between circulating histones and vascular endothelial cells are key events in histone-mediated pathologies. Our aim was to investigate the implication of extracellular histones in the production of the major vasoactive compounds released by human endothelial cells (HUVECs), prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). HUVEC exposed to increasing concentrations of histones (0.001 to 100 μg/ml) for 4 hrs induced prostacyclin (PGI2) production in a dose-dependent manner and decreased thromboxane A2 (TXA2) release at 100 μg/ml. Extracellular histones raised cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) mRNA and protein expression, decreased COX-1 mRNA levels and did not change thromboxane A2 synthase (TXAS) expression. Moreover, extracellular histones decreased both, eNOS expression and NO production in HUVEC. The impaired NO production was related to COX-2 activity and superoxide production since was reversed after celecoxib (10 μmol/l) and tempol (100 μmol/l) treatments, respectively. In conclusion, our findings suggest that extracellular histones stimulate the release of endothelial-dependent mediators through an up-regulation in COX-2-PGIS-PGI2 pathway which involves a COX-2-dependent superoxide production that decreases the activity of eNOS and the NO production. These effects may contribute to the endothelial cell dysfunction observed in histone-mediated pathologies.

  19. Adhesion of T and B lymphocytes to extracellular matrix and endothelial cells can be regulated through the beta subunit of VLA

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Investigating the regulation of very late antigen (VLA)-mediated functions, we found that TS2/16, a mAb directed against the beta chain of the VLA group of integrins, can induce binding of resting peripheral blood lymphocytes, cloned T lymphocytes, and Epstein Barr virus- transformed B cells to extracellular matrix components, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen, but not to fibrinogen. The antibody stimulates VLA-4-, VLA-5-, and VLA-6-mediated binding. Furthermore, it induces VLA- 4-mediated binding to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expressed by rTNF-alpha-stimulated endothelial cells, but it does not stimulate homotypic aggregation of cells as described for a number of anti-VLA-4 alpha antibodies (Bednarczyk, J.L., and B. W. McIntyre. 1990. J. Immunol. 144: 777-784; Campanero, M. R., R. Pulido, M. A. Ursa, M. Rodriguez-Moya, M. O. de Landazuri, and F. Sanchez-Madrid. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:2157-2165). Therefore, the stimulating activity of this anti-beta 1 antibody clearly contrasts with that of the anti-VLA-4 alpha antibodies, which induce homotypic cell aggregation, but not binding of cells to extracellular matrix components or endothelial cells, indicating that TS2/16 may generate different signals. The observation that also F(ab')2 or Fab fragments of this anti-beta 1 antibody stimulate binding to extracellular matrix components and endothelial cells excludes the possibility that binding requires receptor crosslinking, or is Fc receptor mediated. Induction of this adhesion is cation and energy dependent and requires an intact cytoskeleton. Although changes in the conformation of VLA integrins induced by this antibody may regulate their functional activity, the dependence on metabolic energy indicates that intracellular processes may also play a role. PMID:1560035

  20. Shrink Wrapping Cells in a Defined Extracellular Matrix to Modulate the Chemo-Mechanical Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Palchesko, Rachelle N; Szymanski, John M; Sahu, Amrita; Feinberg, Adam W

    2014-09-01

    Cell-matrix interactions are important for the physical integration of cells into tissues and the function of insoluble, mechanosensitive signaling networks. Studying these interactions in vitro can be difficult because the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that adsorb to in vitro cell culture surfaces do not fully recapitulate the ECM-dense basement membranes to which cells such as cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells adhere to in vivo. Towards addressing this limitation, we have developed a surface-initiated assembly process to engineer ECM proteins into nanostructured, microscale sheets that can be shrink wrapped around single cells and small cell ensembles to provide a functional and instructive matrix niche. Unlike current cell encapsulation technology using alginate, fibrin or other hydrogels, our engineered ECM is similar in density and thickness to native basal lamina and can be tailored in structure and composition using the proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and/or collagen type IV. A range of cells including C2C12 myoblasts, bovine corneal endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes survive the shrink wrapping process with high viability. Further, we demonstrate that, compared to non-encapsulated controls, the engineered ECM modulates cytoskeletal structure, stability of cell-matrix adhesions and cell behavior in 2D and 3D microenvironments.

  1. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  2. Breast tumour initiating cell fate is regulated by microenvironmental cues from an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmistha; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Duan, Xinrui; Chen, Hexin; Wang, Qian

    2012-08-01

    Cancer stem cells, also known as tumour-initiating cells (TICs), are identified as highly tumorigenic population within tumours and hypothesized to be main regulators in tumour growth, metastasis and relapse. Evidence also suggests that a tumour microenvironment plays a critical role in the development and progression of cancer, by constantly modulating cell-matrix interactions. Scientists have tried to characterize and identify the TIC population but the actual combination of extracellular components in deciphering the fate of TICs has not been explored. The basic unanswered question is the phenotypic stability of this TIC population in a tissue extracellular matrix setting. The in vivo complexity makes it difficult to identify parameters in a diverse milieu that affect TICs behaviour. Herein we studied how the TIC population would respond when subjected to a unique microenvironment composed of different extracellular proteins. The TIC-enriched population isolated from a Her2/neu-induced mouse mammary tumour was cultured on collagen, fibronectin and laminin coated substrates for one to two weeks. Our observations indicate that a laminin substrate can maintain the majority of the self-renewing and tumorigenic TIC population, whereas collagen induced a more differentiated phenotype of the cells. Also interestingly, fibronectin substrates dictated an invasive phenotype of TICs as evidenced from the EMT-related gene expression pattern. The results of this study signify that the microenvironmental cues play a considerable role in tumour relapse and progression by altering the cancer stem cell behaviour and thus this knowledge could be used to design novel cancer therapeutics.

  3. Modulation of endogenous Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (ICP) 1 expression in Entamoeba histolytica affects amoebic adhesion to Extracellular Matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2015-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an enteric tissue-invading protozoan parasite that causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans. During tissue invasion, amoebic adhesion to host components is an important event for host cell death leading to successful invasion and infection. Among amoebic virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin is known to be major adhesion factor to host cells. In this study, we investigated the role of amoebic secreted CP (Cysteine Proteases) in amoebic adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) protein using CP inhibitor and E. histolytica strains in which the endogenous inhibitor of cysteine protease (ICP) 1 gene was overexpressed (ICP1(+)) or repressed by antisense small RNA-mediated gene silencing (ICP1(-)). We found that pretreatment of wild-type amoebae with CP inhibitor E64, or thiol-group modifiers such as diamide and N-Ethylmaleimide resulted in a significant decrease in adhesion to laminin and collagen ECM proteins. Furthermore, ICP1(+) strain, with a reduction of secreted CP activity, exhibited reduced ability by 40% to adhere to laminin. In contrast, ICP1(-) strain, with a 1.9-fold increase of secreted CP activity, showed a two-fold increase in amoebic adherence to laminin compared to the control strain. In addition, total amount of secreted CP5 was decreased in ICP1(+) amoeba. Conversely, total amount of secreted CP1 and mature-form CP5 were increased in ICP1(-) amoeba. We also found that ICP1 was secreted into extracellular milieu. These results suggest that secreted CP activity by E. histolytica may be an important factor affecting adhesion to host proteins, and regulation of CP secretion by ICP plays a major role in pathogenesis. This study provides insight into the CP-mediated tissue pathogenesis in amoeba-invaded lesions during human amoebiasis.

  4. Molecular changes evoked by triethylenetetramine treatment in the extracellular matrix of the heart and aorta in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Deming; Lu, Jun; Chen, Xiuyin; Choong, Soon Y; Zhang, Shaoping; Chan, Yih-Kai; Glyn-Jones, Sarah; Gamble, Gregory D; Phillips, Anthony R J; Cooper, Garth J S

    2006-12-01

    Most patients with diabetes die from cardiac or arterial disease, for which there are limited therapeutic options. Free Cu(2+) ions are strongly pro-oxidant, and chelatable-Cu(II) is increased in the diabetic heart. We reported previously that treatment by Cu(II)-selective chelation with triethylenetetramine (TETA) evokes elevated urinary Cu(II) in diabetic rats and humans in whom it also improved hallmarks of established left ventricular (LV) disease. Here, we treated diabetic rats with TETA and evaluated its ability to ameliorate Cu(2+)-mediated LV and arterial damage by modifying the expression of molecular targets that included transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, Smad4, extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), and heparan sulfate (HS). Eight-weeks of TETA treatment significantly improved cardiac diastolic function but not [glucose](plasma) in diabetic animals. LV and aortic mRNAs corresponding to TGF-beta1, Smad4, collagen types I, III, and IV, and fibronectin-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, were elevated in untreated diabetic animals and normalized after TETA treatment. EC-SOD mRNA and protein, and [HS](tissue) were significantly decreased in diabetes and restored by drug treatment. Candidate molecular mechanisms by which TETA could ameliorate diabetic cardiac and arteriovascular disease include the suppression of an activated TGF-beta/Smad signaling pathway that mediates increased ECM gene expression and restoration of normal EC-SOD and HS regulation. These findings are relevant to the restoration toward normal by TETA treatment of cardiac and arterial structure and function in diabetes.

  5. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by TCDD Modulates Expression of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Genes during Experimental Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Cheri L.; Cholico, Giovan N.; Perkins, Daniel E.; Fewkes, Michael T.; Oxford, Julia Thom; Lujan, Trevor J.; Morrill, Erica E.

    2016-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a soluble, ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Increasing evidence implicates the AhR in regulating extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis. We recently reported that TCDD increased necroinflammation and myofibroblast activation during liver injury elicited by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). However, TCDD did not increase collagen deposition or exacerbate fibrosis in CCl4-treated mice, which raises the possibility that TCDD may enhance ECM turnover. The goal of this study was to determine how TCDD impacts ECM remodeling gene expression in the liver. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 8 weeks with 0.5 mL/kg CCl4, and TCDD (20 μg/kg) was administered during the last two weeks. Results indicate that TCDD increased mRNA levels of procollagen types I, III, IV, and VI and the collagen processing molecules HSP47 and lysyl oxidase. TCDD also increased gelatinase activity and mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 3, MMP-8, MMP-9, and MMP-13. Furthermore, TCDD modulated expression of genes in the plasminogen activator/plasmin system, which regulates MMP activation, and it also increased TIMP1 gene expression. These findings support the notion that AhR activation by TCDD dysregulates ECM remodeling gene expression and may facilitate ECM metabolism despite increased liver injury. PMID:27672655

  6. RhoA determines lineage fate of mesenchymal stem cells by modulating CTGF–VEGF complex in extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changjun; Zhen, Gehua; Chai, Yu; Xie, Liang; Crane, Janet L.; Farber, Emily; Farber, Charles R.; Luo, Xianghang; Gao, Peisong; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) participate in the repair/remodelling of many tissues, where MSCs commit to different lineages dependent on the cues in the local microenvironment. Here we show that TGFβ-activated RhoA/ROCK signalling functions as a molecular switch regarding the fate of MSCs in arterial repair/remodelling after injury. MSCs differentiate into myofibroblasts when RhoA/ROCK is turned on, endothelial cells when turned off. The former is pathophysiologic resulting in intimal hyperplasia, whereas the latter is physiological leading to endothelial repair. Further analysis revealed that MSC RhoA activation promotes formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) complex consisting of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Inactivation of RhoA/ROCK in MSCs induces matrix metalloproteinase-3-mediated CTGF cleavage, resulting in VEGF release and MSC endothelial differentiation. Our findings uncover a novel mechanism by which cell–ECM interactions determine stem cell lineage specificity and offer additional molecular targets to manipulate MSC-involved tissue repair/regeneration. PMID:27126736

  7. Collagen XII and XIV, new partners of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in the skin extracellular matrix suprastructure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-06-29

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone.

  8. An investigation of the influence of extracellular matrix anisotropy and cell-matrix interactions on tissue architecture.

    PubMed

    Dyson, R J; Green, J E F; Whiteley, J P; Byrne, H M

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) in which they reside play a key role in tissue development. Mechanical cues from the environment (such as stress, strain and fibre orientation) regulate a range of cell behaviours, including proliferation, differentiation and motility. In turn, the ECM structure is affected by cells exerting forces on the matrix which result in deformation and fibre realignment. In this paper we develop a mathematical model to investigate this mechanical feedback between cells and the ECM. We consider a three-phase mixture of collagen, culture medium and cells, and formulate a system of partial differential equations which represents conservation of mass and momentum for each phase. This modelling framework takes into account the anisotropic mechanical properties of the collagen gel arising from its fibrous microstructure. We also propose a cell-collagen interaction force which depends upon fibre orientation and collagen density. We use a combination of numerical and analytical techniques to study the influence of cell-ECM interactions on pattern formation in tissues. Our results illustrate the wide range of structures which may be formed, and how those that emerge depend upon the importance of cell-ECM interactions.

  9. Analysis of the interaction of extracellular matrix and phenotype of bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Kyker, Kimberly D; Saban, Ricardo; Knowlton, Nicholas; Dozmorov, Igor; Centola, Michael B; Hurst, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Background The extracellular matrix has a major effect upon the malignant properties of bladder cancer cells both in vitro in 3-dimensional culture and in vivo. Comparing gene expression of several bladder cancer cells lines grown under permissive and suppressive conditions in 3-dimensional growth on cancer-derived and normal-derived basement membrane gels respectively and on plastic in conventional tissue culture provides a model system for investigating the interaction of malignancy and extracellular matrix. Understanding how the extracellular matrix affects the phenotype of bladder cancer cells may provide important clues to identify new markers or targets for therapy. Methods Five bladder cancer cell lines and one immortalized, but non-tumorigenic, urothelial line were grown on Matrigel, a cancer-derived ECM, on SISgel, a normal-derived ECM, and on plastic, where the only ECM is derived from the cells themselves. The transcriptomes were analyzed on an array of 1186 well-annotated cancer derived cDNAs containing most of the major pathways for malignancy. Hypervariable genes expressing more variability across cell lines than a set expressing technical variability were analyzed further. Expression values were clustered, and to identify genes most likely to represent biological factors, statistically over-represented ontologies and transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. Results Approximately 400 of the 1186 total genes were expressed 2 SD above background. Approximately 100 genes were hypervariable in cells grown on each ECM, but the pattern was different in each case. A core of 20 were identified as hypervariable under all 3 growth conditions, and 33 were hypervariable on both SISgel and Matrigel, but not on plastic. Clustering of the hypervariable genes showed very different patterns for the same 6 cell types on the different ECM. Even when loss of cell cycle regulation was identified, different genes were involved, depending on the ECM. Under the

  10. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration

    SciTech Connect

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. •Deleting the CaM-binding site impairs cell attachment and migration. •CaM antagonists inhibit Grb7-mediated cell migration. •We conclude that CaM controls Grb7-mediated cell migration. -- Abstract: The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  11. A Disaccharide that Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor α is Formed from the Extracellular Matrix by the Enzyme Heparanase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lider, Ofer; Cahalon, Liora; Gilat, Dalia; Hershkoviz, Rami; Siegel, Daniel; Margalit, Raanan; Shoseyov, Oded; Cohen, Irun R.

    1995-05-01

    The activation of T cells by antigens or mitogens leads to the secretion of cytokines and enzymes that shape the inflammatory response. Among these molecular mediators of inflammation is a heparanase enzyme that degrades the heparan sulfate scaffold of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Activated T cells use heparanase to penetrate the ECM and gain access to the tissues. We now report that among the breakdown products of the ECM generated by heparanase is a trisulfated disaccharide that can inhibit delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in mice. This inhibition of T-cell mediated inflammation in vivo was associated with an inhibitory effect of the disaccharide on the production of biologically active tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by activated T cells in vitro; the trisulfated disaccharide did not affect T-cell viability or responsiveness generally. Both the in vivo and in vitro effects of the disaccharide manifested a bell-shaped dose-response curve. The inhibitory effects of the trisulfated disaccharide were lost if the sulfate groups were removed. Thus, the disaccharide, which may be a natural product of inflammation, can regulate the functional nature of the response by the T cell to activation. Such a feedback control mechanism could enable the T cell to assess the extent of tissue degradation and adjust its behavior accordingly.

  12. High fidelity visualization of cell-to-cell variation and temporal dynamics in nascent extracellular matrix formation

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Claire M.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix dynamics are key to tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis, injury, and repair. The spatiotemporal organization of this matrix has profound biological implications, but is challenging to monitor using standard techniques. Here, we address these challenges by using noncanonical amino acid tagging to fluorescently label extracellular matrix synthesized in the presence of bio-orthogonal methionine analogs. This strategy labels matrix proteins with high resolution, without compromising their distribution or mechanical function. We demonstrate that the organization and temporal dynamics of the proteinaceous matrix depend on the biophysical features of the microenvironment, including the biomaterial scaffold and the niche constructed by cells themselves. Pulse labeling experiments reveal that, in immature constructs, nascent matrix is highly fibrous and interdigitates with pre-existing matrix, while in more developed constructs, nascent matrix lacks fibrous organization and is retained in the immediate pericellular space. Inhibition of collagen crosslinking increases matrix synthesis, but compromises matrix organization. Finally, these data demonstrate marked cell-to-cell heterogeneity amongst both chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells undergoing chondrogenesis. Collectively, these results introduce fluorescent noncanonical amino acid tagging as a strategy to investigate spatiotemporal matrix organization, and demonstrate its ability to identify differences in phenotype, microenvironment, and matrix assembly at the single cell level. PMID:27941914

  13. T Cell Migration in Three-dimensional Extracellular Matrix: Guidance by Polarity and Sensations

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Eva-Bettina

    2000-01-01

    The locomotion of T lymphocytes within 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM) is a highly dynamic and flexible process following the principles of ameboid movement. Ameboid motility is characterized by a polarized yet simple cell shape allowing high speed, rapid directional oscillations, and low affinity interactions to the substrate that are coupled to a low degree of cytoskeletal organization lacking discrete focal contacts. At the onset of T cell migration, a default program, here described as migration-associated polarization, is initiated, resulting in the polar redistribution of cell surface receptors and cytoskeletal elements. Polarization involves protein cycling either to the leading edge (i.e. LFA-1, CD45RO, chemokine receptors, focal adhesion kinase), to a central polarizing compartment (MTOC, PKC, MARCKS), or into the uropod (CD44, CD43, ICAM- and –3, β1 integrins). The function of such compartment formation may be important in chemotactic response, scanning of encountered cells, and a flexible and adaptive interaction with the ECM itself. Due to the simple shape and a diffusely organized cytoskeleton, the interactions to the surrounding extracellular matrix are rapid and reversible and appear to allow a broad spectrum of molecular migration strategies. These range from (1) adhesive and haptokinetic following i.e. chemokine-induced motility across 2-D surfaces to (2) largely integrin-independent migration predominantly guided by shape change and morphological flexibility, as seen in 3-D type I collagen matrices. Their prominent capacity to rapidly adapt to a given structural environment coupled to contact guidance mechanisms set T cell locomotion apart from slow, focal contact-dependent and more adhesive migration strategies established by fibroblast-like cells and cell clusters. It is therefore likely that, within the tissues, besides chemotactic or haptotactic gradients, the preformed matrix structure has an important impact on T cell trafficking and

  14. Force-Induced Unfolding of Fibronectin in the Extracellular Matrix of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael L; Gourdon, Delphine; Little, William C; Kubow, Kristopher E; Eguiluz, R. Andresen; Luna-Morris, Sheila; Vogel, Viola

    2007-01-01

    Whether mechanically unfolded fibronectin (Fn) is present within native extracellular matrix fibrils is controversial. Fn extensibility under the influence of cell traction forces has been proposed to originate either from the force-induced lengthening of an initially compact, folded quaternary structure as is found in solution (quaternary structure model, where the dimeric arms of Fn cross each other), or from the force-induced unfolding of type III modules (unfolding model). Clarification of this issue is central to our understanding of the structural arrangement of Fn within fibrils, the mechanism of fibrillogenesis, and whether cryptic sites, which are exposed by partial protein unfolding, can be exposed by cell-derived force. In order to differentiate between these two models, two fluorescence resonance energy transfer schemes to label plasma Fn were applied, with sensitivity to either compact-to-extended conformation (arm separation) without loss of secondary structure or compact-to-unfolded conformation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies revealed that a significant fraction of fibrillar Fn within a three-dimensional human fibroblast matrix is partially unfolded. Complete relaxation of Fn fibrils led to a refolding of Fn. The compactly folded quaternary structure with crossed Fn arms, however, was never detected within extracellular matrix fibrils. We conclude that the resting state of Fn fibrils does not contain Fn molecules with crossed-over arms, and that the several-fold extensibility of Fn fibrils involves the unfolding of type III modules. This could imply that Fn might play a significant role in mechanotransduction processes. PMID:17914904

  15. The effect on the extracellular matrix of the deep fascia in response to leg lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Qiang; Li, Xin-Kui; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Wei, Yi-Yong; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2008-01-01

    Background Whereas the alterations of diverse tissues in cellular and molecular levels have been investigated during leg lengthening via microscopy and biochemical studies, little is known about the response of deep fascia. This study aims to investigate the changes of the extracellular matrix in deep fascia in response to leg lengthening. Methods Animal model of leg lengthening was established in New Zealand white rabbits. Distraction was initiated at a rate of 1 mm/day and 2 mm/day in two steps, and preceded until increases of 10% and 20% in the initial length of tibia had been achieved. Alcian blue stain and picrosirius-polarization method were used for the study of the extracellular matrix of deep fascia samples. Leica DM LA image analysis system was used to investigate the quantitative changes of collagen type I and III. Results Alcian blue stain showed that glycosaminoglycans of fascia of each group were composed of chondroitin sulphate and heparin sulphate, but not of keratan sulphate. Under the polarization microscopy, the fascia consisted mainly of collagen type I. After leg lengthening, the percentage of collagen type III increased. The most similar collagen composition of the fascia to that of the normal fascia was detected at a 20% increase in tibia length achieved via a distraction rate of 1 mm/d. Conclusion The changes in collagen distribution and composition occur in deep fascia during leg lengthening. Although different lengthening schemes resulted in varied matrix changes, the most comparable collagen composition to be demonstrated under the scheme of a distraction rate of 1 mm/day and 20% increase in tibia length. Efficient fascia regeneration is initiated only in certain combinations of the leg load parameters including appropriate intensity and duration time, e.g., either low density distraction that persist a relatively short time or high distraction rates. PMID:18611283

  16. Matrilin-3 switches from anti- to pro-anabolic upon integration to the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Etienne, Stéphanie; Grossin, Laurent; Cottet, Justine; Bantsimba-Malanda, Claudie; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Libante, Virginie; Gillet, Pierre; Magdalou, Jacques

    2012-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has long been viewed primarily as an organized network of solid-phase ligands for integrin receptors. During degenerative processes, such as osteoarthritis, the ECM undergoes deterioration, resulting in its remodeling and in the release of some of its components. Matrilin-3 (MATN3) is an almost cartilage specific, pericellular protein acting in the assembly of the ECM of chondrocytes. In the past, MATN3 was found required for cartilage homeostasis, but also involved in osteoarthritis-related pro-catabolic functions. Here, to better understand the pathological and physiological functions of MATN3, its concentration as a circulating protein in articular fluids of human osteoarthritic patients was determined and its functions as a recombinant protein produced in human cells were investigated with particular emphasis on the physical state under which it is presented to chondrocytes. MATN3 down-regulated cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and up-regulated catabolism when administered as a soluble protein. When artificially immobilized, however, MATN3 induced chondrocyte adhesion via a α5β1 integrin-dependent mechanism, AKT activation and favored survival and ECM synthesis. Furthermore, MATN3 bound directly to isolated α5β1 integrin in vitro. TGFβ1 stimulation of chondrocytes allowed integration of exogenous MATN3 into their ECM and ECM-integrated MATN3 induced AKT phosphorylation and improved ECM synthesis and accumulation. In conclusion, the integration of MATN3 to the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes critically determines the direction toward which MATN3 regulates cartilage metabolism. These data explain how MATN3 plays either beneficial or detrimental functions in cartilage and highlight the important role played by the physical state of ECM molecules.

  17. Effects of freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions on the cells and extracellular matrix of engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ka Yaw; DeHoyos, Tenok O; Dutton, J Craig; Grinnell, Frederick; Han, Bumsoo

    2011-08-01

    The two most significant challenges for successful cryopreservation of engineered tissues (ETs) are preserving tissue functionality and controlling highly tissue-type dependent preservation outcomes. In order to address these challenges, freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions should be understood, which determine the post-thaw cell viability and extracellular matrix (ECM) microstructure. However, the current understanding of this tissue-level biophysical interaction is still limited. In this study, freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions and their impact on the cells and ECM microstructure of ETs were investigated using dermal equivalents as a model ET. The dermal equivalents were constructed by seeding human dermal fibroblasts in type I collagen matrices with varying cell seeding density and collagen concentration. While these dermal equivalents underwent an identical freeze/thaw condition, their spatiotemporal deformation during freezing, post-thaw ECM microstructure, and cellular level cryoresponse were characterized. The results showed that the extent and characteristics of freezing-induced deformation were significantly different among the experimental groups, and the ETs with denser ECM microstructure experienced a larger deformation. The magnitude of the deformation was well correlated to the post-thaw ECM structure, suggesting that the freezing-induced deformation is a good indicator of post-thaw ECM structure. A significant difference in the extent of cellular injury was also noted among the experimental groups, and it depended on the extent of freezing-induced deformation of the ETs and the initial cytoskeleton organization. These results suggest that the cells have been subjected to mechanical insult due to the freezing-induced deformation as well as thermal insult. These findings provide insight on tissue-type dependent cryopreservation outcomes, and can help to design and modify cryopreservation protocols for new types of tissues from

  18. Extracellular matrix from human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Rao, Feng; Guo, Zhi-yuan; Sun, Xun; Wang, Yi-guo; Liu, Shu-yun; Wang, Ai-yuan; Guo, Quan-yi; Meng, Hao-ye; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi-bi

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix, which includes collagens, laminin, or fibronectin, plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Recently, a Schwann cell-derived extracellular matrix with classical biomaterial was used to mimic the neural niche. However, extensive clinical use of Schwann cells remains limited because of the limited origin, loss of an autologous nerve, and extended in vitro culture times. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), which are easily accessible and more proliferative than Schwann cells, were used to prepare an extracellular matrix. We identified the morphology and function of hUCMSCs and investigated their effect on peripheral nerve regeneration. Compared with a non-coated dish tissue culture, the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, upregulated gene and protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion neurons. These findings suggest that the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve repair and can be used as a basis for the rational design of engineered neural niches. PMID:27630705

  19. LIM mineralization protein-1 suppresses TNF-α induced intervertebral disc degeneration by maintaining nucleus pulposus extracellular matrix production and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Pan, Hehai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Jianru; Zhang, Kuibo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hua; Ding, Wenbin; Li, Bingxue; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2015-03-01

    Imbalanced metabolism of Nucleus pulposus (NP) extracellular matrix (ECM) is closely correlated to Intervertebral Disc Degenerative Disease. LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) has been proven to induce sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production in NP and have an anti-inflammatory effect in pre-osteoclast. However, whether it has any effect on the NP ECM production and degradation under inflammatory stimulation has not been studied. In the current study, a TNF-α induced cell model was established in vitro. Lentivirus encoding LMP-1 (LV-LMP-1) and short heparin LMP-1 (LV-shLMP-1) were constructed to overexpress and knockdown LMP-1 expression in NP cells. LMP-1 mRNA level was regulated in a dose-dependent manner after transfection. LV-LMP-1 increased whereas LV-shLMP-1 decreased collagen II, aggrecan, versican expression, and sGAG production. LV-LMP-1 abolished while LV-shLMP-1 aggravated TNF-α mediated down-regulation of the above matrix genes via ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, LV-LMP-1 abrogated TNF-α induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 expression via inhibiting p65 translocation and MMP-3 and MMP-13 promoter activity. These results indicated that LMP-1 had an ECM production maintenance effect under inflammatory stimulation. This effect was via up-regulation of matrix genes expression at least partially through ERK1/2 activation, and down-regulation of MMPs expression through NF-κB inhibition.

  20. α2 Integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, and matrix metalloproteinase-3 act sequentially to induce differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into odontoblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Kawai, Rie; Hase, Naoko; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that interleukin 1β acts via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 to regulate cell proliferation and suppress apoptosis in α2 integrin-positive odontoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we characterize the signal cascade underpinning odontoblastic differentiation in mouse ES cells. The expression of α2 integrin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (Emmprin), and MMP-3 mRNA and protein were all potently increased during odontoblastic differentiation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of the odontoblastic biomarkers dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein-1 and alkaline phosphatase, and blocked odontoblast calcification. Our siRNA, western blot and blocking antibody analyses revealed a unique sequential cascade involving α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 that drives ES cell differentiation into odontoblasts. This cascade requires the interaction between α2 integrin and Emmprin and is potentiated by exogenous MMP-3. Finally, although odontoblast-like cells potently express α2, α6, αV, β1, and β3, integrins, we confirmed that β1 integrin acts as the trigger for ES cell differentiation, apparently in complex with α2 integrin. These results demonstrate a unique and unanticipated role for an α2 integrin-, Emmprin-, and MMP-3-mediated signaling cascade in driving mouse ES cell differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Odontoblast differentiation requires activation of α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3. • α2 integrin, Emmprin and MMP-3 form a sequential signaling cascade. • β1 integrin acts a specific trigger for odontoblast differentiation. • The role of these effectors is highly novel and unanticipated.

  1. Development of a cellularly degradable PEG hydrogel to promote articular cartilage extracellular matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Balaji V.; Brock, J. Logan; Silver, Jason S.; Leight, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Healing articular cartilage remains a significant clinical challenge because of its limited self-healing capacity. While delivery of autologous chondrocytes to cartilage defects has received growing interest, combining cell-based therapies with scaffolds that capture aspects of native tissue and promote cell-mediated remodeling could improve outcomes. Currently, scaffold-based therapies with encapsulated chondrocytes permit matrix production; however, resorption of the scaffold does not match the rate of production by cells leading to generally low ECM outputs. Here, a PEG norbornene hydrogel was functionalized with thiolated TGF-β1 and crosslinked by an MMP-degradable peptide. Chondrocytes were co-encapsulated with a smaller population of MSCs, with the goal of stimulating matrix production and increasing bulk mechanical properties of the scaffold. Interestingly, the co-encapsulated cells cleaved the MMP-degradable target sequence more readily than either cell population alone. Relative to non-degradable gels, cellularly-degraded materials showed significantly increased GAG and collagen deposition over just 14 days of culture, while maintaining high levels of viability and producing a more diffuse matrix. These results indicate the potential of an enzymatically-degradable, peptide-functionalized PEG hydrogel to locally influence and promote cartilage matrix production over a short period. Scaffolds that permit cell-mediated remodeling may be useful in designing treatment options for cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:25607633

  2. Extracellular Matrix Density Regulates the Rate of Neovessel Growth and Branching in Sprouting Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lowell T.; Underwood, Clayton J.; Guilkey, James E.; Hoying, James B.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by the local microenvironment, including the mechanical interactions between neovessel sprouts and the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the mechanisms controlling the relationship of mechanical and biophysical properties of the ECM to neovessel growth during sprouting angiogenesis are just beginning to be understood. In this research, we characterized the relationship between matrix density and microvascular topology in an in vitro 3D organ culture model of sprouting angiogenesis. We used these results to design and calibrate a computational growth model to demonstrate how changes in individual neovessel behavior produce the changes in vascular topology that were observed experimentally. Vascularized gels with higher collagen densities produced neovasculatures with shorter vessel lengths, less branch points, and reduced network interconnectivity. The computational model was able to predict these experimental results by scaling the rates of neovessel growth and branching according to local matrix density. As a final demonstration of utility of the modeling framework, we used our growth model to predict several scenarios of practical interest that could not be investigated experimentally using the organ culture model. Increasing the density of the ECM significantly reduced angiogenesis and network formation within a 3D organ culture model of angiogenesis. Increasing the density of the matrix increases the stiffness of the ECM, changing how neovessels are able to deform and remodel their surroundings. The computational framework outlined in this study was capable of predicting this observed experimental behavior by adjusting neovessel growth rate and branching probability according to local ECM density, demonstrating that altering the stiffness of the ECM via increasing matrix density affects neovessel behavior, thereby regulated vascular topology during angiogenesis. PMID:24465500

  3. Elastic extracellular matrix of the embryonic chick heart: an immunohistological study using laser confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hurle, J M; Kitten, G T; Sakai, L Y; Volpin, D; Solursh, M

    1994-08-01

    The "elastic matrix" constitutes a specialized component of the extracellular matrix which confers resiliency to tissues and organs subjected to repeated deformations. The role of the elastic matrix in living organisms appears to be of key importance since diseases characterized by expression of defective inherited genes which encode components of the elastic matrix lead to premature death. While the elastic matrix of adult organs has received a great deal of attention, little is known about when it first appears in embryonic tissues or its possible role in developing organs. In the present study we have performed an immunohistochemical study of the distribution of elastin and three additional components often associated with elastic matrices in adult tissues (i.e., fibrillin, emilin, and type VI collagen) during the development of the chicken embryonic heart. The three-dimensional arrangement of these components was established through the observation of whole-amount specimens with scanning laser confocal microscopy. Our results revealed three different periods of heart development regarding the composition of the elastic matrix. Prior to stage 21 the embryonic heart lacks elastin but exhibits a matrix scaffold of fibrillin and emilin associated with the endocardium and the developing cardiac jelly. Between stages 22 and 29 the heart shows a transient elastic scaffold in the outflow tract which contains elastin, fibrillin, and emilin. Elastin-positive fibrillar material is also observed during these stages in the base of the atrioventricular cushion adjacent to the myocardial wall. In addition, emilin-positive material appears to be associated with the zones of formation of ventricular trabeculae. Collagen type VI was not detected during these early stages. From stage 30 to stage 40 a progressive modification of the pattern of distribution of elastin, fibrillin, emilin, and collagen type VI is observed in association with the formation of the definitive four

  4. Preferential Enhancement of Sensory and Motor Axon Regeneration by Combining Extracellular Matrix Components with Neurotrophic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Daniel; González-Pérez, Francisco; Giudetti, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Udina, Esther; Del Valle, Jaume; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, motor and sensory axons are able to regenerate but inaccuracy of target reinnervation leads to poor functional recovery. Extracellular matrix (ECM) components and neurotrophic factors (NTFs) exert their effect on different neuronal populations creating a suitable environment to promote axonal growth. Here, we assessed in vitro and in vivo the selective effects of combining different ECM components with NTFs on motor and sensory axons regeneration and target reinnervation. Organotypic cultures with collagen, laminin and nerve growth factor (NGF)/neurotrophin-3 (NT3) or collagen, fibronectin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) selectively enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons and motor neurite outgrowth from spinal cord slices respectively. For in vivo studies, the rat sciatic nerve was transected and repaired with a silicone tube filled with a collagen and laminin matrix with NGF/NT3 encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres (MP) (LM + MP.NGF/NT3), or a collagen and fibronectin matrix with BDNF in PLGA MPs (FN + MP.BDNF). Retrograde labeling and functional tests showed that LM + MP.NGF/NT3 increased the number of regenerated sensory neurons and improved sensory functional recovery, whereas FN + MP.BDNF preferentially increased regenerated motoneurons and enhanced motor functional recovery. Therefore, combination of ECM molecules with NTFs may be a good approach to selectively enhance motor and sensory axons regeneration and promote appropriate target reinnervation. PMID:28036084

  5. Preparation of cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds by decellularization of human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Oberwallner, Barbara; Brodarac, Andreja; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Saric, Tomo; Anić, Petra; Morawietz, Lars; Stamm, Christof

    2014-09-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived by tissue decellularization has applications as a tissue engineering scaffold and for support of cellular regeneration. Myocardial ECM from animals has been produced by whole-organ perfusion or immersion processes, but methods for preparation of human myocardial ECM for therapy and research have not been compared in detail, yet. We analyzed the impact of decellularization processes on human myocardial ECM, and tested its ability to serve as a scaffold for cell seeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-based decellularization, but not treatments based on Triton X-100, deoxycholate or hypo/hypertonic incubations, removed cells satisfactorily, and incubation with fetal bovine serum (FBS) eliminated residual DNA. ECM architecture was best preserved by a protocol consisting of 2 h lysis, 6 h SDS, and 3 h FBS, but age and pathology of the donor tissue are highly important for producing reproducible, high-quality scaffolds. We also studied ECM repopulation with mesenchymal stem cells (CB-MSC), cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM), and na€ıve neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. Cells attached to the matrix and proliferated and displayed higher viability than in standard culture. We conclude that human cardiac ECM sheets may be suitable scaffold for cell-matrix interaction studies and as a biomaterial for tissue regeneration and engineering.

  6. Shewanella secretes flavins that mediate extracellular electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Enrico; Baron, Daniel B.; Shikhare, Indraneel D.; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria able to transfer electrons to metals are key agents in biogeochemical metal cycling, subsurface bioremediation, and corrosion processes. More recently, these bacteria have gained attention as the transfer of electrons from the cell surface to conductive materials can be used in multiple applications. In this work, we adapted electrochemical techniques to probe intact biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Shewanella sp. MR-4 grown by using a poised electrode as an electron acceptor. This approach detected redox-active molecules within biofilms, which were involved in electron transfer to the electrode. A combination of methods identified a mixture of riboflavin and riboflavin-5′-phosphate in supernatants from biofilm reactors, with riboflavin representing the dominant component during sustained incubations (>72 h). Removal of riboflavin from biofilms reduced the rate of electron transfer to electrodes by >70%, consistent with a role as a soluble redox shuttle carrying electrons from the cell surface to external acceptors. Differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry revealed a layer of flavins adsorbed to electrodes, even after soluble components were removed, especially in older biofilms. Riboflavin adsorbed quickly to other surfaces of geochemical interest, such as Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy(hydr)oxides. This in situ demonstration of flavin production, and sequestration at surfaces, requires the paradigm of soluble redox shuttles in geochemistry to be adjusted to include binding and modification of surfaces. Moreover, the known ability of isoalloxazine rings to act as metal chelators, along with their electron shuttling capacity, suggests that extracellular respiration of minerals by Shewanella is more complex than originally conceived. PMID:18316736

  7. Identification of CD9 extracellular domains important in regulation of CHO cell adhesion to fibronectin and fibronectin pericellular matrix assembly.

    PubMed

    Cook, George A; Longhurst, Celia M; Grgurevich, Svetozar; Cholera, Shila; Crossno, Joseph T; Jennings, Lisa K

    2002-12-15

    CD9, a 24-kDa member of the tetraspanin family, influences cellular growth and development, activation, adhesion, and motility. Our investigation focuses on the hypothesis that the CD9 second extracellular loop (EC2) is important in modulating cell adhesive events. Using a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell expression system, we previously reported that CD9 expression inhibited cell adhesion to fibronectin and fibronectin matrix assembly. For the first time, a functional epitope on CD9 EC2 that regulates these processes is described. Binding of mAb7, an EC2-specific anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody, reversed the CD9 inhibitory activity on CHO cell adhesion and fibronectin matrix assembly. This reversal of cell phenotype also was observed in CHO cells expressing CD9 EC2 truncations. Furthermore, our data showed that the EC2 sequence (173)LETFTVKSCPDAIKEVFDNK(192) was largely responsible for the CD9-mediated CHO cell phenotype. Two peptides, (135)K-V(172) (peptide 5b) and (168)P-I(185) (peptide 6a), selectively blocked mAb7 binding to soluble CD9 and to CD9 on intact cells. These active peptides reversed the influence of CD9 expression on CHO cell adhesion to fibronectin. In addition, confocal microscopy revealed that CD9 colocalized with the integrin alpha(5)beta(1) and cytoskeletal F-actin in punctate clusters on the cell surface, particularly at the cell margins. Immunoprecipitation studies confirmed CD9 association with beta(1) integrin. The cellular distribution and colocalization of focal adhesion kinase and alpha-actinin with cytoskeletal actin was also influenced by CD9 expression. Thus, CD9 may exhibit its effect by modulating the composition of adhesive complexes important in facilitating cell adhesion and matrix assembly.

  8. The pherophorins: common, versatile building blocks in the evolution of extracellular matrix architecture in Volvocales.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Green algae of the order Volvocales provide an unrivalled opportunity for exploring the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity. They range from unicells, like Chlamydomonas, through homocytic colonial forms with increasing cooperation of individual cells, like Gonium or Pandorina, to heterocytic multicellular forms with different cell types and a complete division of labour, like Volvox. A fundamental requirement for the evolution of multicellularity is the development of a complex, multifunctional extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM has many functions, which can change under developmental control or as a result of environmental factors. Here molecular data from 15 novel proteins are presented. These proteins have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Gonium pectorale, Pandorina morum and Volvox carteri, and all belong to a single protein family, the pherophorins. Pherophorin-V1 is shown to be a glycoprotein localized to the 'cellular zone' of the V. carteri ECM. Pherophorin-V1 and -V2 mRNAs are strongly induced not only by the sex inducer, which triggers sexual development at extremely low concentrations, but also by mechanical wounding. Like the extensins of higher plants, which are also developmentally controlled or sometimes inducible by wounding, the pherophorins contain a (hydroxy-)proline-rich (HR) rod-like domain and are abundant within the extracellular compartment. In contrast to most extensins, pherophorins have additional globular A and B domains on both ends of the HR domains. Therefore pherophorins most closely resemble a particular class of higher plant extensin, the solanaceous lectins (e.g. potato lectin), suggesting multivalent carbohydrate-binding functions are present within the A and B domains and are responsible for cross-linking. Our results suggest that pherophorins are used as the building blocks for the extracellular scaffold throughout the Volvocales, with the characteristic mesh sizes in different ECM structures being

  9. Role of Extracellular Matrix Signaling Cues in Modulating Cell Fate Commitment for Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Karina H.; Hou, Luqia; Huang, Ngan F.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally agreed that engineered cardiovascular tissues require cellular interactions with the local milieu. Within the microenvironment, the extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important support structure that provides dynamic signaling cues in part through its chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. In response to ECM factors, cells activate biochemical and mechanotransduction pathways that modulate their survival, growth, migration, differentiation, and function. This review describes the role of ECM chemical composition, spatial patterning, and mechanical stimulation in the specification of cardiovascular lineages, with a focus on stem cell differentiation, direct transdifferentiation, and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The translational application of ECMs will be discussed in the context of cardiovascular tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:24443420

  10. Bromelain surface modification increases the diffusion of silica nanoparticles in the tumor extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Alessandro; Haddix, Seth G; Taghipour, Nima; Scaria, Shilpa; Taraballi, Francesca; Cevenini, Armando; Yazdi, Iman K; Corbo, Claudia; Palomba, Roberto; Khaled, Sm Z; Martinez, Jonathan O; Brown, Brandon S; Isenhart, Lucas; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-10-28

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br-MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br-MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Extracellular matrix-inspired growth factor delivery systems for bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Maruyama, Kenta; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-04-17

    Growth factors are very promising molecules to enhance bone regeneration. However, their translation to clinical use has been seriously limited, facing issues related to safety and cost-effectiveness. These problems derive from the vastly supra-physiological doses of growth factor used without optimized delivery systems. Therefore, these issues have motivated the development of new delivery systems allowing better control of the spatio-temporal release and signaling of growth factors. Because the extracellular matrix (ECM) naturally plays a fundamental role in coordinating growth factor activity in vivo, a number of novel delivery systems have been inspired by the growth factor regulatory function of the ECM. After introducing the role of growth factors during the bone regeneration process, this review exposes different issues that growth factor-based therapies have encountered in the clinic and highlights recent delivery approaches based on the natural interaction between growth factor and the ECM.

  12. Functional coupling between the extracellular matrix and nuclear lamina by Wnt signaling in progeria.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Lidia; Roux, Kyle J; Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Mounkes, Leslie C; Mutalif, Rafidah; Navasankari, Raju; Rai, Bina; Cool, Simon; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Wang, Honghe; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Kozlov, Serguei; Grunert, Martin; Keeble, Thomas; Jones, C Michael; Meta, Margarita D; Young, Stephen G; Daar, Ira O; Burke, Brian; Perantoni, Alan O; Stewart, Colin L

    2010-09-14

    The segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) is caused by a truncated and farnesylated form of Lamin A. In a mouse model for HGPS, a similar Lamin A variant causes the proliferative arrest and death of postnatal, but not embryonic, fibroblasts. Arrest is due to an inability to produce a functional extracellular matrix (ECM), because growth on normal ECM rescues proliferation. The defects are associated with inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling, due to reduced nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of Lef1, but not Tcf4, in both mouse and human progeric cells. Defective Wnt signaling, affecting ECM synthesis, may be critical to the etiology of HGPS because mice exhibit skeletal defects and apoptosis in major blood vessels proximal to the heart. These results establish a functional link between the nuclear envelope/lamina and the cell surface/ECM and may provide insights into the role of Wnt signaling and the ECM in aging.

  13. The extracellular matrix of Volvox carteri: molecular structure of the cellular compartment.

    PubMed

    Ertl, H; Mengele, R; Wenzl, S; Engel, J; Sumper, M

    1989-12-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of Volvox contains insoluble fibrous layers that surround individual cells at a distance to form contiguous cellular compartments. Using immunological techniques, we identified a sulfated surface glycoprotein (SSG 185) as the monomeric precursor of this substructure within the ECM. The primary structure of the SSG 185 poly-peptide chain has been derived from cDNA and genomic DNA. A central domain of the protein, 80 amino acid residues long, consists almost exclusively of hydroxyproline residues. The chemical structure of the highly sulfated polysaccharide covalently attached to SSG 185 has been determined by permethylation analysis. As revealed by EM, SSG 185 is a rod-shaped molecule with a 21-nm-long polysaccharide strand protruding from its central region. The chemical nature of the cross-links between SSG 185 monomers is discussed.

  14. Decellularized extracellular matrix microparticles as a vehicle for cellular delivery in a model of anastomosis healing.

    PubMed

    Hoganson, David M; Owens, Gwen E; Meppelink, Amanda M; Bassett, Erik K; Bowley, Chris M; Hinkel, Cameron J; Finkelstein, Eric B; Goldman, Scott M; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) materials from animal and human sources have become important materials for soft tissue repair. Microparticles of ECM materials have increased surface area and exposed binding sites compared to sheet materials. Decellularized porcine peritoneum was mechanically dissociated into 200 µm microparticles, seeded with fibroblasts and cultured in a low gravity rotating bioreactor. The cells avidly attached and maintained excellent viability on the microparticles. When the seeded microparticles were placed in a collagen gel, the cells quickly migrated off the microparticles and through the gel. Cells from seeded microparticles migrated to and across an in vitro anastomosis model, increasing the tensile strength of the model. Cell seeded microparticles of ECM material have potential for paracrine and cellular delivery therapies when delivered in a gel carrier. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1728-1735, 2016.

  15. Extracellular matrix proteins as temporary coating for thin-film neural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyssens, Frederik; Deprez, Marjolijn; Turner, Neill; Kil, Dries; van Kuyck, Kris; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Nuttin, Bart; Badylak, Stephen; Puers, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the suitability of a thin sheet of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins as a resorbable coating for temporarily reinforcing fragile or ultra-low stiffness thin-film neural implants to be placed on the brain, i.e. microelectrocorticographic (µECOG) implants. Approach. Thin-film polyimide-based electrode arrays were fabricated using lithographic methods. ECM was harvested from porcine tissue by a decellularization method and coated around the arrays. Mechanical tests and an in vivo experiment on rats were conducted, followed by a histological tissue study combined with a statistical equivalence test (confidence interval approach, 0.05 significance level) to compare the test group with an uncoated control group. Main results. After 3 months, no significant damage was found based on GFAP and NeuN staining of the relevant brain areas. Significance. The study shows that ECM sheets are a suitable temporary coating for thin µECOG neural implants.

  16. Are extracellular matrix surface network components involved in signalling and protective function?

    PubMed Central

    Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Świerczyńska, Joanna; Góralski, Grzegorz; Ślesak, Halina; Bohdanowicz, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Endosperm is an interesting model for in vitro experiments, because of its unique origin, development and ploidy level. Here we used Actinidia deliciosa endosperm-derived callus to investigate morphology, histology and chemistry of extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in morphogenically stable tissue from long-term culture. SEM and TEM analysis showed that ECM is a heterogenous layer which consists of amorphous, dark-staining material, osmiophilic granules and reticulated fibres outside the outer callus cell wall. This structure may serve as a structural marker of morphogenic competence in endosperm-derived callus, because of its presence on the surface of callus forming morphogenic domains and its disappearance during organ growth. Based on immunolabelling, histochemistry, solvent and enzyme treatments, we suggest that pectins and lipids are components of the ECM layer. These results might indicate protective, water retention and/or cell communication functions for this ECM layer. PMID:19704835

  17. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ray, Robert P; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J

    2015-08-10

    How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape.

  18. Bromelain Surface Modification Increases the Diffusion of Silica Nanoparticles in the Tumor Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tumor extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major obstacle to the diffusion of therapeutics and drug delivery systems in cancer parenchyma. This biological barrier limits the efficacy of promising therapeutic approaches including the delivery of siRNA or agents intended for thermoablation. After extravasation due to the enhanced penetration and retention effect of tumor vasculature, typical nanotherapeutics are unable to reach the nonvascularized and anoxic regions deep within cancer parenchyma. Here, we developed a simple method to provide mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with a proteolytic surface. To this extent, we chose to conjugate MSN to Bromelain (Br–MSN), a crude enzymatic complex, purified from pineapple stems, that belongs to the peptidase papain family. This surface modification increased particle uptake in endothelial, macrophage, and cancer cell lines with minimal impact on cellular viability. Most importantly Br–MSN showed an increased ability to digest and diffuse in tumor ECM in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25119793

  19. Crosslinking strategies for preparation of extracellular matrix-derived cardiovascular scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing; Wang, Xiaoya; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve and blood vessel replacement using artificial prostheses is an effective strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular disease at terminal stage. Natural extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived materials (decellularized allogeneic or xenogenic tissues) have received extensive attention as the cardiovascular scaffold. However, the bioprosthetic grafts usually far less durable and undergo calcification and progressive structural deterioration. Glutaraldehyde (GA) is a commonly used crosslinking agent for improving biocompatibility and durability of the natural scaffold materials. However, the nature ECM and GA-crosslinked materials may result in calcification and eventually lead to the transplant failure. Therefore, studies have been conducted to explore new crosslinking agents. In this review, we mainly focused on research progress of ECM-derived cardiovascular scaffolds and their crosslinking strategies. PMID:26816627

  20. The extracellular matrix of Volvox carteri: molecular structure of the cellular compartment

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of Volvox contains insoluble fibrous layers that surround individual cells at a distance to form contiguous cellular compartments. Using immunological techniques, we identified a sulfated surface glycoprotein (SSG 185) as the monomeric precursor of this substructure within the ECM. The primary structure of the SSG 185 poly-peptide chain has been derived from cDNA and genomic DNA. A central domain of the protein, 80 amino acid residues long, consists almost exclusively of hydroxyproline residues. The chemical structure of the highly sulfated polysaccharide covalently attached to SSG 185 has been determined by permethylation analysis. As revealed by EM, SSG 185 is a rod-shaped molecule with a 21-nm-long polysaccharide strand protruding from its central region. The chemical nature of the cross- links between SSG 185 monomers is discussed. PMID:2689458

  1. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Robert P.; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S.; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape. PMID:26190146

  2. Extracellular matrix considerations for scar-free repair and regeneration: insights from regenerative diversity among vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Godwin, James; Kuraitis, Drew; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential feature of development, tissue homeostasis and recovery from injury. How the ECM responds dynamically to cellular and soluble components to support the faithful repair of damaged tissues in some animals but leads to the formation of acellular fibrotic scar tissue in others has important clinical implications. Studies in highly regenerative organisms such as the zebrafish and the salamander have revealed a specialist formulation of ECM components that support repair and regeneration, while avoiding scar tissue formation. By comparing a range of different contexts that feature scar-less healing and full regeneration vs. scarring through fibrotic repair, regenerative therapies that incorporate ECM components could be significantly enhanced to improve both regenerative potential and functional outcomes. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.

  3. Sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to curcumin and its derivatives depends on the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Paul J; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy.

  4. Integrated extracellular matrix signaling in mammary gland development and breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jieqing; Xiong, Gaofeng; Trinkle, Christine; Xu, Ren

    2014-09-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM), a major component of the cellular microenvironment, plays critical roles in normal tissue morphogenesis and disease progression. Binding of ECM to membrane receptor proteins, such as integrin, discoidin domain receptors, and dystroglycan, elicits biochemical and biomechanical signals that control cellular architecture and gene expression. These ECM signals cooperate with growth factors and hormones to regulate cell migration, differentiation, and transformation. ECM signaling is tightly regulated during normal mammary gland development. Deposition and alignment of fibrillar collagens direct migration and invasion of mammary epithelial cells during branching morphogenesis. Basement membrane proteins are required for polarized acinar morphogenesis and milk protein expression. Deregulation of ECM proteins in the long run is sufficient to promote breast cancer development and progression. Recent studies demonstrate that the integrated biophysical and biochemical signals from ECM and soluble factors are crucial for normal mammary gland development as well as breast cancer progression.

  5. Electrospun polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite nanofibers: a biomimetic extracellular matrix for osteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Markel, David C.; Wang, Sunxi; Shi, Tong; Mao, Guangzhao; Ren, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    The failure of prosthesis after total joint replacement is due to the lack of early implant osseointegration. In this study polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite (PVA-Col-HA) electrospun nanofibrous meshes were fabricated as a biomimetic bone-like extracellular matrix for the modification of orthopedic prosthetic surfaces. In order to reinforce the PVA nanofibers, HA nanorods and Type I collagen were incorporated into the nanofibers. We investigated the morphology, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the prepared nanofibers. Our results showed these inorganic-organic blended nanofibers to be degradable in vitro. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen interacted with the PVA content, reinforcing the hydrolytic resistance and mechanical properties of nanofibers that provided longer lasting stability. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen also enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of murine bone cells (MC3T3) in vitro. We propose the PVA-Col-HA nanofibers might be promising modifying materials on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications.

  6. Engineering approaches for investigating tumor angiogenesis: exploiting the role of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Abigail C; Gerecht, Sharon

    2012-12-01

    A major paradigm shift in cancer research is the emergence of multidisciplinary approaches to investigate complex cell behaviors, to elucidate regulatory mechanisms and to identify therapeutic targets. Recently, efforts are focused on the engineering of complex in vitro models, which more accurately recapitulate the growth and progression of cancer. These strategies have proven vital for investigating and targeting the events that control tumor angiogenesis. In this review, we explore how the emerging engineering approaches are being used to unlock the complex mechanisms regulating tumor angiogenesis. Emphasis is placed on models using natural and synthetic biomaterials to generate scaffolds mimicking the extracellular matrix, which is known to play a critical role in angiogenesis. While the models presented in this review are revolutionary, improvements are still necessary and concepts for advancing and perfecting engineering approaches for modeling tumor angiogenesis are proposed. Overall, the marriage between disparate scientific fields is expected to yield significant improvements in our understanding and treatment of cancer.

  7. Three-Dimensional Characterization of Mechanical Interactions between Endothelial Cells and Extracellular Matrix during Angiogenic Sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yue; Herath, Sahan C. B.; Wang, Qing-guo; Wang, Dong-an; Asada, H. Harry; Chen, Peter C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the three-dimensional cell-extracellular matrix interactions of endothelial cells that form multicellular structures called sprouts. We analyzed the data collected in-situ from angiogenic sprouting experiments and identified the differentiated interaction behavior exhibited by the tip and stalk cells. Moreover, our analysis of the tip cell lamellipodia revealed the diversity in their interaction behavior under certain conditions (e.g., when the heading of a sprout is switched approximately between the long-axis direction of two different lamellipodia). This study marks the first time that new characteristics of such interactions have been identified with shape changes in the sprouts and the associated rearrangements of collagen fibers. Clear illustrations of such changes are depicted in three-dimensional views. PMID:26903154

  8. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Li, Zheng-Wei; Luo, Min; Li, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Ke-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was

  9. A potential role for glia-derived extracellular matrix remodeling in postinjury epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Young; Porter, Brenda E; Friedman, Alon; Kaufer, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Head trauma and vascular injuries are known risk factors for acquired epilepsy. The sequence of events that lead from the initial injury to the development of epilepsy involves complex plastic changes and circuit rewiring. In-depth, comprehensive understanding of the epileptogenic process is critical for the identification of disease-modifying targets. Here we review the complex interactions of cellular and extracellular components that may promote epileptogenesis, with an emphasis on the role of astrocytes. Emerging evidence demonstrates that astrocytes promptly respond to brain damage and play a critical role in the development of postinjury epilepsy. Astrocytes have been shown to regulate extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, which can affect plasticity and stability of synapses and, in turn, contribute to the epileptogenic process. From these separate lines of evidence, we present a hypothesis suggesting a possible role for astrocyte-regulated remodeling of ECM and perineuronal nets, a specialized ECM structure around fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons, in the development and progression of posttraumatic epilepsies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Yael; Natale, Frank; Sherrell, Robert M.; LaVigne, Michèle; Starovoytov, Valentin; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity in animals required the production of extracellular matrices that serve to spatially organize cells according to function. In corals, three matrices are involved in spatial organization: (i) an organic ECM, which facilitates cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion; (ii) a skeletal organic matrix (SOM), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate skeleton itself, which provides the structural support for the 3D organization of coral colonies. In this report, we examine the production of these three matrices by using an in vitro culturing system for coral cells. In this system, which significantly facilitates studies of coral cell physiology, we demonstrate in vitro excretion of ECM by primary (nondividing) tissue cultures of both soft (Xenia elongata) and hard (Montipora digitata) corals. There are structural differences between the ECM produced by X. elongata cell cultures and that of M. digitata, and ascorbic acid, a critical cofactor for proline hydroxylation, significantly increased the production of collagen in the ECM of the latter species. We further demonstrate in vitro production of SOM and extracellular mineralized particles in cell cultures of M. digitata. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of Sr/Ca ratios revealed the particles to be aragonite. De novo calcification was confirmed by following the incorporation of 45Ca into acid labile macromolecules. Our results demonstrate the ability of isolated, differentiated coral cells to undergo fundamental processes required for multicellular organization. PMID:18162537

  11. The widely expressed extracellular matrix protein SMOC-2 promotes keratinocyte attachment and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Silke; Paulsson, Mats; Hartmann, Ursula

    2008-08-01

    SMOC-2 is a recently discovered member of the BM-40/SPARC/osteonectin family of extracellular multidomain proteins of so far unknown function. While we have shown earlier that the homologous protein SMOC-1 is associated with basement membranes, in this study we demonstrate that, in the mouse, SMOC-2 could be detected in a large number of non-basement membrane localizations, often showing a diffuse tissue distribution. A more distinct expression pattern was seen in skin where SMOC-2 is mainly present in the basal layers of the epidermis. Functionally, recombinant SMOC-2 stimulated attachment of primary epidermal cells as well as several epidermal-derived cell lines but had no effect on the attachment of non-epidermal cells. Inhibition experiments using blocking antibodies against individual integrin subunits allowed the identification of {alpha}v{beta}6 and {alpha}v{beta}1 integrins as important cellular receptors for SMOC-2. Cell attachment as well as the formation of focal adhesions could be attributed to the extracellular calcium-binding domain. The calcium-binding domain also stimulated migration, but not proliferation of keratinocyte-like HaCaT cells. We conclude that SMOC-2, like other members of the BM40/SPARC family, acts as a regulator of cell-matrix interactions.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of a Model Extracellular Matrix that Induces Partial Regeneration of Adult Mammalian Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannas, I. V.; Lee, E.; Orgill, D. P.; Skrabut, E. M.; Murphy, G. F.

    1989-02-01

    Regeneration of the dermis does not occur spontaneously in the adult mammal. The epidermis is regenerated spontaneously provided there is a dermal substrate over which it can migrate. Certain highly porous, crosslinked collagen--glycosaminoglycan copolymers have induced partial morphogenesis of skin when seeded with dermal and epidermal cells and then grafted on standard, full-thickness skin wounds in the adult guinea pig. A mature epidermis and a nearly physiological dermis, which lacked hair follicles but was demonstrably different from scar, were regenerated over areas as large as 16 cm2. These chemical analogs of extracellular matrices were morphogenetically active provided that the average pore diameter ranged between 20 and 125 μ m, the resistance to degradation by collagenase exceeded a critical limit, and the density of autologous dermal and epidermal cells inoculated therein was >5 × 104 cells per cm2 of wound area. Unseeded copolymers with physical structures that were within these limits delayed the onset of wound contraction by about 10 days but did not eventually prevent it. Seeded copolymers not only delayed contraction but eventually arrested and reversed it while new skin was being regenerated. The data identify a model extracellular matrix that acts as if it were an insoluble growth factor with narrowly specified physicochemical structure, functioning as a transient basal lamina during morphogenesis of skin.

  13. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  14. Overview of the Matrisome—An Inventory of Extracellular Matrix Constituents and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Richard O.; Naba, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Completion of genome sequences for many organisms allows a reasonably complete definition of the complement of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In mammals this “core matrisome” comprises ∼300 proteins. In addition there are large numbers of ECM-modifying enzymes, ECM-binding growth factors, and other ECM-associated proteins. These different categories of ECM and ECM-associated proteins cooperate to assemble and remodel extracellular matrices and bind to cells through ECM receptors. Together with receptors for ECM-bound growth factors, they provide multiple inputs into cells to control survival, proliferation, differentiation, shape, polarity, and motility of cells. The evolution of ECM proteins was key in the transition to multicellularity, the arrangement of cells into tissue layers, and the elaboration of novel structures during vertebrate evolution. This key role of ECM is reflected in the diversity of ECM proteins and the modular domain structures of ECM proteins both allow their multiple interactions and, during evolution, development of novel protein architectures. PMID:21937732

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a model extracellular matrix that induces partial regeneration of adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed Central

    Yannas, I V; Lee, E; Orgill, D P; Skrabut, E M; Murphy, G F

    1989-01-01

    Regeneration of the dermis does not occur spontaneously in the adult mammal. The epidermis is regenerated spontaneously provided there is a dermal substrate over which it can migrate. Certain highly porous, crosslinked collagen-glycosaminoglycan copolymers have induced partial morphogenesis of skin when seeded with dermal and epidermal cells and then grafted on standard, full-thickness skin wounds in the adult guinea pig. A mature epidermis and a nearly physiological dermis, which lacked hair follicles but was demonstrably different from scar, were regenerated over areas as large as 16 cm2. These chemical analogs of extracellular matrices were morphogenetically active provided that the average pore diameter ranged between 20 and 125 microns, the resistance to degradation by collagenase exceeded a critical limit, and the density of autologous dermal and epidermal cells inoculated therein was greater than 5 x 10(4) cells per cm2 of wound area. Unseeded copolymers with physical structures that were within these limits delayed the onset of wound contraction by about 10 days but did not eventually prevent it. Seeded copolymers not only delayed contraction but eventually arrested and reversed it while new skin was being regenerated. The data identify a model extracellular matrix that acts as if it were an insoluble growth factor with narrowly specified physiochemical structure, functioning as a transient basal lamina during morphogenesis of skin. Images PMID:2915988

  16. Ischemic injury leads to extracellular matrix alterations in retina and optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Renner, Marina; Wiemann, Susanne; Shakoor, Daniel A.; Stute, Gesa; Dick, H. Burkhard; Faissner, Andreas; Joachim, Stephanie C.

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ischemia occurs in a variety of eye diseases. Restrained blood flow induces retinal damage, which leads to progressive optic nerve degeneration and vision loss. Previous studies indicate that extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents play an important role in complex tissues, such as retina and optic nerve. They have great impact on de- and regeneration processes and represent major candidates of central nervous system glial scar formation. Nevertheless, the importance of the ECM during ischemic retina and optic nerve neurodegeneration is not fully understood yet. In this study, we analyzed remodeling of the extracellular glycoproteins fibronectin, laminin, tenascin-C and tenascin-R and the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) aggrecan, brevican and phosphacan/RPTPβ/ζ in retinae and optic nerves of an ischemia/reperfusion rat model via quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. A variety of ECM constituents were dysregulated in the retina and optic nerve after ischemia. Regarding fibronectin, significantly elevated mRNA and protein levels were observed in the retina following ischemia, while laminin and tenascin-C showed enhanced immunoreactivity in the optic nerve after ischemia. Interestingly, CSPGs displayed significantly increased expression levels in the optic nerve. Our study demonstrates a dynamic expression of ECM molecules following retinal ischemia, which strengthens their regulatory role during neurodegeneration. PMID:28262779

  17. Biotensegrity of the Extracellular Matrix: Physiology, Dynamic Mechanical Balance, and Implications in Oncology and Mechanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tadeo, Irene; Berbegall, Ana P.; Escudero, Luis M.; Álvaro, Tomás; Noguera, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Cells have the capacity to convert mechanical stimuli into chemical changes. This process is based on the tensegrity principle, a mechanism of tensional integrity. To date, this principle has been demonstrated to act in physiological processes such as mechanotransduction and mechanosensing at different scales (from cell sensing through integrins to molecular mechanical interventions or even localized massage). The process involves intra- and extracellular components, including the participation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and microtubules that act as compression structures, and actin filaments which act as tension structures. The nucleus itself has its own tensegrity system which is implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Despite present advances, only the tip of the iceberg has so far been uncovered regarding the role of ECM compounds in influencing biotensegrity in pathological processes. Groups of cells, together with the surrounding ground substance, are subject to different and specific forces that certainly influence biological processes. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the role of ECM elements in determining biotensegrity in malignant processes and describe their implication in therapeutic response, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and subsequent tumor progression. Original data based on the study of neuroblastic tumors will be provided. PMID:24624363

  18. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  19. Gene expression in human hippocampus from cocaine abusers identifies genes which regulate extracellular matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Mash, Deborah C; ffrench-Mullen, Jarlath; Adi, Nikhil; Qin, Yujing; Buck, Andrew; Pablo, John

    2007-11-14

    The chronic effects of cocaine abuse on brain structure and function are blamed for the inability of most addicts to remain abstinent. Part of the difficulty in preventing relapse is the persisting memory of the intense euphoria or cocaine "rush". Most abused drugs and alcohol induce neuroplastic changes in brain pathways subserving emotion and cognition. Such changes may account for the consolidation and structural reconfiguration of synaptic connections with exposure to cocaine. Adaptive hippocampal plasticity could be related to specific patterns of gene expression with chronic cocaine abuse. Here, we compare gene expression profiles in the human hippocampus from cocaine addicts and age-matched drug-free control subjects. Cocaine abusers had 151 gene transcripts upregulated, while 91 gene transcripts were downregulated. Topping the list of cocaine-regulated transcripts was RECK in the human hippocampus (FC = 2.0; p<0.05). RECK is a membrane-anchored MMP inhibitor that is implicated in the coordinated regulation of extracellular matrix integrity and angiogenesis. In keeping with elevated RECK expression, active MMP9 protein levels were decreased in the hippocampus from cocaine abusers. Pathway analysis identified other genes regulated by cocaine that code for proteins involved in the remodeling of the cytomatrix and synaptic connections and the inhibition of blood vessel proliferation (PCDH8, LAMB1, ITGB6, CTGF and EphB4). The observed microarray phenotype in the human hippocampus identified RECK and other region-specific genes that may promote long-lasting structural changes with repeated cocaine abuse. Extracellular matrix remodeling in the hippocampus may be a persisting effect of chronic abuse that contributes to the compulsive and relapsing nature of cocaine addiction.

  20. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Extracellular Matrix and Methylcellulose Hydrogels Augments and Regenerates the Paralyzed Vocal Fold

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Na; Sung, Myung Whun; Kwon, Tack-Kyun; Cho, Yong Woo; Kwon, Seong Keun

    2016-01-01

    Vocal fold paralysis results from various etiologies and can induce voice changes, swallowing complications, and issues with aspiration. Vocal fold paralysis is typically managed using injection laryngoplasty with fat or synthetic polymers. Injection with autologous fat has shown excellent biocompatibility. However, it has several disadvantages such as unpredictable resorption rate, morbidities associated with liposuction procedure which has to be done in operating room under general anesthesia. Human adipose-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) grafts have been reported to form new adipose tissue and have greater biostability than autologous fat graft. Here, we present an injectable hydrogel that is constructed from adipose tissue derived soluble extracellular matrix (sECM) and methylcellulose (MC) for use in vocal fold augmentation. Human sECM derived from adipose tissue was extracted using two major steps—ECM was isolated from human adipose tissue and was subsequently solubilized. Injectable sECM/MC hydrogels were prepared by blending of sECM and MC. Sustained vocal fold augmentation and symmetric vocal fold vibration were accomplished by the sECM/MC hydrogel in paralyzed vocal fold which were confirmed by laryngoscope, histology and a high-speed imaging system. There were increased number of collagen fibers and fatty granules at the injection site without significant inflammation or fibrosis. Overall, these results indicate that the sECM/MC hydrogel can enhance vocal function in paralyzed vocal folds without early resorption and has potential as a promising material for injection laryngoplasty for stable vocal fold augmentation which can overcome the shortcomings of autologous fat such as unpredictable duration and morbidity associated with the fat harvest. PMID:27768757

  1. Responses of cultured neural retinal cells to substratum-bound laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules.

    PubMed

    Adler, R; Jerdan, J; Hewitt, A T

    1985-11-01

    The responses of cultured chick embryo retinal neurons to several extracellular matrix molecules are described. Retinal cell suspensions in serum-free medium containing the "N1" supplement (J. E. Bottenstein, S. D. Skaper, S. Varon, and J. Sato, 1980, Exp. Cell Res. 125, 183-190) were seeded on tissue culture plastic surfaces pretreated with polyornithine (PORN) and with one of the factors to be tested. Substantial cell survival could be observed after 72 hr in vitro on PORN pretreated with serum or laminin, whereas most cells appeared to be degenerating on untreated PORN, PORN-fibronectin, and PORN-chondronectin. Cell attachment, although quantitatively similar for all these substrata, was temperature-dependent on serum and laminin but not on fibronectin or untreated PORN. In a short-term bioassay, neurite development was abundant on laminin, scarce on serum and fibronectin, and absent on PORN. No positive correlation between cell spreading and neurite production could be seen: cell spreading was more extensive on PORN and fibronectin than on laminin or serum, while on laminin-treated dishes, spreading was similar for neurite-bearing and non-neurite-bearing cells. Laminin effects on retinal neurons were clearly substratum dependent. When bound to tissue culture plastic, laminin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell attachment and did not stimulate neurite development. PORN-bound laminin, on the other hand, did not affect cell attachment but caused marked stimulation of neurite development, suggesting that laminin conformation and/or the spatial distribution of active sites play an important role in the neurite-promoting function of this extracellular matrix molecule. Investigation of the embryonic retina with ELISA and immunocytochemical methods showed that laminin is present in this organ during development. Therefore, in vivo and in vitro observations are consistent with the possibility that laminin might influence neuronal development in the retina.

  2. Heparin modulates the composition of the extracellular matrix domain surrounding arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Snow, A. D.; Bolender, R. P.; Wight, T. N.; Clowes, A. W.

    1990-01-01

    Heparin and related molecules influence vascular wall structure by their ability to inhibit smooth muscle cell (smc) proliferation and migration. However, little is known as to whether heparin has an effect on the extracellular matrix. In the present study, the effect of heparin on the content and regional distribution of elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans (PGs) in blood vessels following experimental injury was determined. Two groups of rats were subjected to left common carotid balloon injury and were infused with either 0.9% saline or heparin in a saline solution, for 2 weeks. Using a new morphometric method of analysis, the authors determined changes in volumes of elastin, collagen, and PGs contained within an 'extracellular matrix domain (ECM domain),' the average envelope of connective tissue surrounding each smc. Heparin treatment inhibited intimal thickening and decreased the elastin content in the ECM domain in the upper and lower arterial intima. Collagen also was found to be significantly decreased 5.0-fold and 7.6-fold in the ECM domains of upper and lower intima, respectively, of heparin-treated animals. The decrease in both elastin and collagen was balanced by a significant increase in amorphous and filamentous electron-dense material. Heparin also caused a significant 1.8-fold and 1.9-fold increase in the PG content in the ECM domain in the upper and lower intima, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis, using antibodies to elastin and PG subclasses, supported the morphometric observations. This study has shown that heparin administered in vivo can alter the accumulation and distribution of each of the major vascular ECM components in a specific and differential manner. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2386199

  3. [Effect of extracellular matrix components on adhesion of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to polytetrafluoroethylene].

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Rozanova, I A; Poveshchenko, O V; Lykov, A P; Bondarenko, N A; Kim, I I; Nikonorova, Iu V; Podkhvatilina, N A; Sergeevichev, D S; Popova, I V; Konenkov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Search for new bioengineering materials for creation of small-diameter vascular grafts is currently a priority task. One of the promising trends of creating tissue engineering constructions is coating the internal layer of implants made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with autologous mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. In the study we assessed the ability of separate components of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin, type I collagen and type IV collagen to influence adhesion, proliferation and morphology of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells being cultured on PTFE. Bone marrow multipotent stromal cells taken from second-passage Wistar rats in the amount of 106 per 1 cm2 were applied onto PTFE. We used the following variants of preliminary treatment of the material prior to seeding: fibronectin with type I collagen, fibronectin with type IV collagen, fibronectin with a mixture of type I and IV collagens, as well as a control group without coating. After six weeks of cell growth on PTFE patches the samples were subjected to fixation in 10% formalin followed by haematoxylin-eosin stain and morphometric assessment of adhered cells by calculation using the software AxioVision (Carl Zeiss), assessing the number of cells, area of the cellular monolayer, dimensions and ratios of the area of separate cells and the area of cellular nuclei. The maximal area of the monolayer from mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on the PTFE surface was revealed while culturing with a mixture of fibronectin and type I and IV collagens. Cell colonization density while treatment of the synthetic material with mixtures of fibronectin with type I collagen, type IV collagen and type I and IV collagens demonstrated the results exceeding the parameters of the control specimen 5-, 2.5- and 7-fold, respectively. Hence, extracellular matrix components considerably increase enhance adhesion of cells to PTFE, as well as improve formation of a monolayer from mesenchymal multipotent

  4. Baicalin Down-Regulates IL-1β-Stimulated Extracellular Matrix Production in Nasal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Min; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Park, Il-Ho; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Baicalin, a Chinese herbal medicine, has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aims of present study were to investigate the effects of baicalin on the myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts and to determine the molecular mechanism of baicalin in nasal fibroblasts. Methods Nasal fibroblasts were isolated from the inferior turbinate of patients. Baicalin was used to treat IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. To evaluate cytotoxicity, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), fibronectin, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK), p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα were measured by western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT—PCR),or immunofluorescence staining. Fibroblast migration was analyzed with scratch assays and transwell migration assays. Total collagen was evaluated with the Sircol collagen assay. Contractile activity was measured with a collagen gel contraction assay. Results Baicalin (0–50 μM) had no significant cytotoxic effects in nasal fibroblasts. The expression of α–SMA and fibronectin were significantly down-regulated in baicalin-treated nasal fibroblasts. Migration, collagen production, and contraction of IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts were significantly inhibited by baicalin treatment. Baicalin also significantly down-regulated p-MAPK, p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. Conclusions We showed that baicalin down-regulated myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction via the MAPK and Akt/ NF-κB pathways in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. PMID:28002421

  5. Protein Modification by Deamidation Indicates Variations in Joint Extracellular Matrix Turnover*

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, Jonathan B.; Hsueh, Ming F.; Stabler, Thomas V.; McCudden, Christopher R.; Bolognesi, Michael; Zura, Robert; Jordan, Joanne M.; Renner, Jordan B.; Feng, Sheng; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2012-01-01

    As extracellular proteins age, they undergo and accumulate nonenzymatic post-translational modifications that cannot be repaired. We hypothesized that these could be used to systemically monitor loss of extracellular matrix due to chronic arthritic diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA). To test this, we predicted sites of deamidation in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and confirmed, by mass spectroscopy, the presence of deamidated (Asp64) and native (Asn64) COMP epitopes (mean 0.95% deamidated COMP (D-COMP) relative to native COMP) in cartilage. An Asp64, D-COMP-specific ELISA was developed using a newly created monoclonal antibody 6-1A12. In a joint replacement study, serum D-COMP (p = 0.017), but not total COMP (p = 0.5), declined significantly after replacement demonstrating a joint tissue source for D-COMP. In analyses of 450 participants from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project controlled for age, gender, and race, D-COMP was associated with radiographic hip (p < 0.0001) but not knee (p = 0.95) OA severity. In contrast, total COMP was associated with radiographic knee (p < 0.0001) but not hip (p = 0.47) OA severity. D-COMP was higher in soluble proteins extracted from hip cartilage proximal to OA lesions compared with remote from lesions (p = 0.007) or lesional and remote OA knee (p < 0.01) cartilage. Total COMP in cartilage did not vary by joint site or proximity to the lesion. This study demonstrates the presence of D-COMP in articular cartilage and the systemic circulation, and to our knowledge, it is the first biomarker to show specificity for a particular joint site. We believe that enrichment of deamidated epitope in hip OA cartilage indicates a lesser repair response of hip OA compared with knee OA cartilage. PMID:22179616

  6. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Jun; Nakayama, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Garcia, Andres J.; Horiike, Yasuhiro

    2011-08-01

    The development of methods for the off-on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three disulfide compounds containing (i) a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), (ii) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and (iii) hepta(ethylene glycol) (EG7). Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag) sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7-10) to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  7. Changes in muscle fiber contractility and extracellular matrix production during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Schwartz, Andrew J; Grekin, Jeremy A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle can adapt to increased mechanical loads by undergoing hypertrophy. Transient reductions in whole muscle force production have been reported during the onset of hypertrophy, but contractile changes in individual muscle fibers have not been previously studied. Additionally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) stores and transmits forces from muscle fibers to tendons and bones, and determining how the ECM changes during hypertrophy is important in understanding the adaptation of muscle tissue to mechanical loading. Using the synergist ablation model, we sought to measure changes in muscle fiber contractility, collagen content, and cross-linking, and in the expression of several genes and activation of signaling proteins that regulate critical components of myogenesis and ECM synthesis and remodeling during muscle hypertrophy. Tissues were harvested 3, 7, and 28 days after induction of hypertrophy, and nonoverloaded rats served as controls. Muscle fiber specific force (sFo), which is the maximum isometric force normalized to cross-sectional area, was reduced 3 and 7 days after the onset of mechanical overload, but returned to control levels by 28 days. Collagen abundance displayed a similar pattern of change. Nearly a quarter of the transcriptome changed over the course of overload, as well as the activation of signaling pathways related to hypertrophy and atrophy. Overall, this study provides insight into fundamental mechanisms of muscle and ECM growth, and indicates that although muscle fibers appear to have completed remodeling and regeneration 1 mo after synergist ablation, the ECM continues to be actively remodeling at this time point.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study utilized a rat synergist ablation model to integrate changes in single muscle fiber contractility, extracellular matrix composition, activation of important signaling pathways in muscle adaption, and corresponding changes in the muscle transcriptome to provide novel insight into the basic

  8. A polygenic burden of rare variants across extracellular matrix genes among individuals with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Haller, Gabe; Alvarado, David; Mccall, Kevin; Yang, Ping; Cruchaga, Carlos; Harms, Matthew; Goate, Alison; Willing, Marcia; Morcuende, Jose A; Baschal, Erin; Miller, Nancy H; Wise, Carol; Dobbs, Matthew B; Gurnett, Christina A

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a complex inherited spinal deformity whose etiology has been elusive. While common genetic variants are associated with AIS, they explain only a small portion of disease risk. To explore the role of rare variants in AIS susceptibility, exome sequence data of 391 severe AIS cases and 843 controls of European ancestry were analyzed using a pathway burden analysis in which variants are first collapsed at the gene level then by Gene Ontology terms. Novel non-synonymous/splice-site variants in extracellular matrix genes were significantly enriched in AIS cases compared with controls (P = 6 × 10(-9), OR = 1.7, CI = 1.4-2.0). Specifically, novel variants in musculoskeletal collagen genes were present in 32% (126/391) of AIS cases compared with 17% (146/843) of in-house controls and 18% (780/4300) of EVS controls (P = 1 × 10(-9), OR = 1.9, CI = 1.6-2.4). Targeted resequencing of six collagen genes replicated this association in combined 919 AIS cases (P = 3 × 10(-12), OR = 2.2, CI = 1.8-2.7) and revealed a highly significant single-gene association with COL11A2 (P = 6 × 10(-9), OR = 3.8, CI = 2.6-7.2). Importantly, AIS cases harbor mainly non-glycine missense mutations and lack the clinical features of monogenic musculoskeletal collagenopathies. Overall, our study reveals a complex genetic architecture of AIS in which a polygenic burden of rare variants across extracellular matrix genes contributes strongly to risk.

  9. Removal of sulfadimethoxine in soil mediated by extracellular oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi; Sidhu, Sudeep S; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Qingguo

    2015-11-01

    Sulfadimethoxine (SDM) is an antibiotic commonly used in concentrated animal feeding operations and released into the environment via manure application on agricultural lands. Transformation of antibiotics in soil impacts the likelihood of their entry to water bodies, uptake by plants, and thus their effect on terrestrial and aquatic organisms. We conducted experiments to incubate SDM in a sandy loam soil in the presence of humification enzymes commonly found in natural soil, laccase, horseradish peroxidase, and lignin peroxidase. Incubation with the enzymes led to significant reduction in the fraction of SDM extractable from soil, indicating the formation of bound residues. Such transformation was enhanced when the organic matter content in soil is increased or when certain chemical mediators were used along with laccase. The study provided a basis for understanding the environmental fate of sulfonamides and help with the development of remediation methods to mitigate the release of sulfonamides from soil to water.

  10. Identification of Extracellular Matrix Components and Biological Factors in Micronized Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jennifer; Priddy, Lauren B; Lim, Jeremy J; Massee, Michelle; Koob, Thomas J

    2017-02-01

    Objective: The use of bioactive extracellular matrix (ECM) grafts such as amniotic membranes is an attractive treatment option for enhancing wound repair. In this study, the concentrations, activity, and distribution of matrix components, growth factors, proteases, and inhibitors were evaluated in PURION(®) Processed, micronized, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM; MiMedx Group, Inc.). Approach: ECM components in dHACM tissue were assessed by using immunohistochemical staining, and growth factors, cytokines, proteases, and inhibitors were quantified by using single and multiplex ELISAs. The activities of proteases that were native to the tissue were determined via gelatin zymography and EnzChek(®) activity assay. Results: dHACM tissue contained the ECM components collagens I and IV, hyaluronic acid, heparin sulfate proteoglycans, fibronectin, and laminin. In addition, numerous growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, proteases, and protease inhibitors that are known to play a role in the wound-healing process were quantified in dHACM. Though matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were present in dHACM tissues, inhibitors of MMPs overwhelmingly outnumbered the MMP enzymes by an overall molar ratio of 28:1. Protease activity assays revealed that the MMPs in the tissue existed primarily either in their latent form or complexed with inhibitors. Innovation: This is the first study to characterize components that function in wound healing, including inhibitor and protease content and activity, in micronized dHACM. Conclusion: A variety of matrix components and growth factors, as well as proteases and their inhibitors, were identified in micronized dHACM, providing a better understanding of how micronized dHACM tissue can be used to effectively promote wound repair.

  11. Identification of Extracellular Matrix Components and Biological Factors in Micronized Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jennifer; Priddy, Lauren B.; Lim, Jeremy J.; Massee, Michelle; Koob, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The use of bioactive extracellular matrix (ECM) grafts such as amniotic membranes is an attractive treatment option for enhancing wound repair. In this study, the concentrations, activity, and distribution of matrix components, growth factors, proteases, and inhibitors were evaluated in PURION® Processed, micronized, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM; MiMedx Group, Inc.). Approach: ECM components in dHACM tissue were assessed by using immunohistochemical staining, and growth factors, cytokines, proteases, and inhibitors were quantified by using single and multiplex ELISAs. The activities of proteases that were native to the tissue were determined via gelatin zymography and EnzChek® activity assay. Results: dHACM tissue contained the ECM components collagens I and IV, hyaluronic acid, heparin sulfate proteoglycans, fibronectin, and laminin. In addition, numerous growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, proteases, and protease inhibitors that are known to play a role in the wound-healing process were quantified in dHACM. Though matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were present in dHACM tissues, inhibitors of MMPs overwhelmingly outnumbered the MMP enzymes by an overall molar ratio of 28:1. Protease activity assays revealed that the MMPs in the tissue existed primarily either in their latent form or complexed with inhibitors. Innovation: This is the first study to characterize components that function in wound healing, including inhibitor and protease content and activity, in micronized dHACM. Conclusion: A variety of matrix components and growth factors, as well as proteases and their inhibitors, were identified in micronized dHACM, providing a better understanding of how micronized dHACM tissue can be used to effectively promote wound repair. PMID:28224047

  12. Co-transfection of decorin and interleukin-10 modulates pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix gene expression in human tenocyte culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbah, Sunny A.; Thomas, Dilip; Browne, Shane; O’Brien, Timothy; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix synthesis and remodelling are driven by increased activity of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). In tendon tissue repair, increased activity of TGF-β1 leads to progressive fibrosis. Decorin (DCN) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) antagonise pathological collagen synthesis by exerting a neutralising effect via downregulation of TGF-β1. Herein, we report that the delivery of DCN and IL-10 transgenes from a collagen hydrogel system supresses the constitutive expression of TGF-β1 and a range of pro-fibrotic extracellular matrix genes.

  13. Physical, Spatial, and Molecular Aspects of Extracellular Matrix of In Vivo Niches and Artificial Scaffolds Relevant to Stem Cells Research

    PubMed Central

    Akhmanova, Maria; Osidak, Egor; Domogatsky, Sergey; Rodin, Sergey; Domogatskaya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix can influence stem cell choices, such as self-renewal, quiescence, migration, proliferation, phenotype maintenance, differentiation, or apoptosis. Three aspects of extracellular matrix were extensively studied during the last decade: physical properties, spatial presentation of adhesive epitopes, and molecular complexity. Over 15 different parameters have been shown to influence stem cell choices. Physical aspects include stiffness (or elasticity), viscoelasticity, pore size, porosity, amplitude and frequency of static and dynamic deformations applied to the matrix. Spatial aspects include scaffold dimensionality (2D or 3D) and thickness; cell polarity; area, shape, and microscale topography of cell adhesion surface; epitope concentration, epitope clustering characteristics (number of epitopes per cluster, spacing between epitopes within cluster, spacing between separate clusters, cluster patterns, and level of disorder in epitope arrangement), and nanotopography. Biochemical characteristics of natural extracellular matrix molecules regard diversity and structural complexity of matrix molecules, affinity and specificity of epitope interaction with cell receptors, role of non-affinity domains, complexity of supramolecular organization, and co-signaling by growth factors or matrix epitopes. Synergy between several matrix aspects enables stem cells to retain their function in vivo and may be a key to generation of long-term, robust, and effective in vitro stem cell culture systems. PMID:26351461

  14. Human retinal pigment epithelial lysis of extracellular matrix: functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, collagenase, and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Susan G

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show (1) human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) expression of functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR; CD87), (2) HRPE secretion of collagenase and elastase, (3) uPAR-dependent HRPE migration, and (4) uPAR expression in diseased human retinal tissue. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry for uPAR was performed on cultured HRPE cells and in sections of human retina. Double-immunofluorescent staining of live human RPE cells with anti-CR3 antibody (CD11b) was performed to demonstrate the physical proximity of this beta 2 integrin with uPAR and determine whether associations were dependent on RPE confluence and polarity. Extracellular proteolysis by HRPE uPAR was evaluated using fluorescent bodipy-BSA and assessed for specificity by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) inhibition. The effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on uPAR expression was assessed. Collagenase and elastase secretion by unstimulated and IL-1-stimulated HRPE cells was measured by 3H-labelled collagen and elastin cleavage. HRPE-associated collagenase was also assessed by cleavage of fluorescent DQ-collagen and inhibited by phenanthroline. Using an extracellular matrix assay, the roles of uPAR and collagenase in HRPE migration were assessed. RESULTS: Immunoreactive uPAR was detected on cultured HRPE cells and increased by IL-1. On elongated, live HRPE cells, uPAR dissociated from CD11b (CR3) and translocated to anterior poles of migrating cells. Extracellular proteolysis was concentrated at sites of uPAR expression and specifically inhibited by PAI-1. Cultured HRPE cells secreted substantial, functional collagenase and elastase. IL-1 upregulated uPAR, collagenase, and elastase activities. Specific inhibition of uPAR, and to a lesser degree collagenase, reduced HRPE migration in matrix/gel assays. Immunoreactive uPAR was present along the HRPE basolateral membrane in retinal sections and in sections of diseased retinal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: HRPE cells express functional u

  15. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  16. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions. PMID:27886077

  17. The Gyc76C Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase and the Foraging cGMP-Dependent Kinase Regulate Extracellular Matrix Organization and BMP Signaling in the Developing Wing of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Justin; Blair, Seth S

    2015-10-01

    The developing crossveins of the wing of Drosophila melanogaster are specified by long-range BMP signaling and are especially sensitive to loss of extracellular modulators of BMP signaling such as the Chordin homolog Short gastrulation (Sog). However, the role of the extracellular matrix in BMP signaling and Sog activity in the crossveins has been poorly explored. Using a genetic mosaic screen for mutations that disrupt BMP signaling and posterior crossvein development, we identify Gyc76C, a member of the receptor guanylyl cyclase family that includes mammalian natriuretic peptide receptors. We show that Gyc76C and the soluble cGMP-dependent kinase Foraging, likely linked by cGMP, are necessary for normal refinement and maintenance of long-range BMP signaling in the posterior crossvein. This does not occur through cell-autonomous crosstalk between cGMP and BMP signal transduction, but likely through altered extracellular activity of Sog. We identify a novel pathway leading from Gyc76C to the organization of the wing extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases, and show that both the extracellular matrix and BMP signaling effects are largely mediated by changes in the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We discuss parallels and differences between this pathway and other examples of cGMP activity in both Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian cells and tissues.

  18. The Gyc76C Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase and the Foraging cGMP-Dependent Kinase Regulate Extracellular Matrix Organization and BMP Signaling in the Developing Wing of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schleede, Justin; Blair, Seth S.

    2015-01-01

    The developing crossveins of the wing of Drosophila melanogaster are specified by long-range BMP signaling and are especially sensitive to loss of extracellular modulators of BMP signaling such as the Chordin homolog Short gastrulation (Sog). However, the role of the extracellular matrix in BMP signaling and Sog activity in the crossveins has been poorly explored. Using a genetic mosaic screen for mutations that disrupt BMP signaling and posterior crossvein development, we identify Gyc76C, a member of the receptor guanylyl cyclase family that includes mammalian natriuretic peptide receptors. We show that Gyc76C and the soluble cGMP-dependent kinase Foraging, likely linked by cGMP, are necessary for normal refinement and maintenance of long-range BMP signaling in the posterior crossvein. This does not occur through cell-autonomous crosstalk between cGMP and BMP signal transduction, but likely through altered extracellular activity of Sog. We identify a novel pathway leading from Gyc76C to the organization of the wing extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases, and show that both the extracellular matrix and BMP signaling effects are largely mediated by changes in the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We discuss parallels and differences between this pathway and other examples of cG