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Sample records for extracellularly generated reactive

  1. Fungal variegatic acid and extracellular polysaccharides promote the site-specific generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Mahaney, James; Jellison, Jody; Cao, Jinzhen; Gressler, Julia; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Goodell, Barry

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to clarify the role of variegatic acid (VA) in fungal attack by Serpula lacrymans, and also the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the fungus. VA promotes a mediated Fenton reaction to generated ROS after oxalate solubilizes oxidized forms of iron. The fungal extracellular matrix (ECM) β-glucan scavenged ROS, and we propose this as a mechanism to protect the fungal hyphae while ROS generation is promoted to deconstruct the lignocellulose cell wall. A relatively high pH (4.4) also favored Fe(III) transfer from oxalate to VA as opposed to a lower pH (2.2) conditions, suggesting a pH-dependent Fe(III) transfer to VA employed by S. lacrymans. This permits ROS generation within the higher pH of the cell wall, while limiting ROS production near the fungal hyphae, while β-glucan from the fungal ECM scavenges ROS in the more acidic environments surrounding the fungal hyphae.

  2. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    PubMed

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling.

  3. Extracellular Redox Regulation of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Generation, Mitochondrial Function and Lipid Turnover in Cultured Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcus F.; Burritt, Nathan; Corkey, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many tissues play an important role in metabolic homeostasis and the development of diabetes and obesity. We hypothesized that the circulating redox metabolome is a master metabolic regulatory system that impacts all organs and modulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid peroxidation, energy production and changes in lipid turnover in many cells including adipocytes. Methods Differentiated human preadipocytes were exposed to the redox couples, lactate (L) and pyruvate (P), β–hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) and acetoacetate (Acoc), and the thiol-disulfides cysteine/ cystine (Cys/CySS) and GSH/GSSG for 1.5–4 hours. ROS measurements were done with CM-H2DCFDA. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) was assessed by a modification of the thiobarbituric acid method. Lipolysis was measured as glycerol release. Lipid synthesis was measured as 14C-glucose incorporated into lipid. Respiration was assessed using the SeaHorse XF24 analyzer and the proton leak was determined from the difference in respiration with oligomycin and antimycin A. Results Metabolites with increasing oxidation potentials (GSSG, CySS, Acoc) increased adipocyte ROS. In contrast, P caused a decrease in ROS compared with L. Acoc also induced a significant increase in both LPO and lipid synthesis. L and Acoc increased lipolysis. βOHB increased respiration, mainly due to an increased proton leak. GSSG, when present throughout 14 days of differentiation significantly increased fat accumulation, but not when added later. Conclusions We demonstrated that in human adipocytes changes in the external redox state impacted ROS production, LPO, energy efficiency, lipid handling, and differentiation. A more oxidized state generally led to increased ROS, LPO and lipid turnover and more reduction led to increased respiration and a proton leak. However, not all of the redox couples were the same suggesting compartmentalization. These data are consistent with the concept of the circulating redox metabolome as a

  4. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  5. Aflatoxin B1 Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autophagy and Extracellular Trap Formation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    An, Yanan; Shi, Xiaochen; Tang, Xudong; Wang, Yang; Shen, Fengge; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Mingguo; Liu, Mingyuan; Yu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are a group of highly toxic mycotoxins with high carcinogenicity that are commonly found in foods. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most toxic member of the aflatoxin family. A recent study reported that AFB1 can induce autophagy, but whether AFB1 can induce extracellular traps (ETs) and the relationships among innate immune responses, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and autophagy and the ETs induced by AFB1 remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that AFB1 induced a complete autophagic process in macrophages (MΦ) (THP-1 cells and RAW264.7 cells). In addition, AFB1 induced the generation of MΦ ETs (METs) in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, the formation of METs significantly reduced the AFB1 content. Further analysis using specific inhibitors showed that the inhibition of either autophagy or ROS prevented MET formation caused by AFB1, indicating that autophagy and ROS were required for AFB1-induced MET formation. The inhibition of ROS prevented autophagy, indicating that ROS generation occurred upstream of AFB1-induced autophagy. Taken together, these data suggest that AFB1 induces ROS-mediated autophagy and ETs formation and an M1 phenotype in MΦ. PMID:28280716

  6. Extracellular production of reactive oxygen species during seed germination and early seedling growth in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Kranner, Ilse; Roach, Thomas; Beckett, Richard P; Whitaker, Claire; Minibayeva, Farida V

    2010-07-01

    Extracellularly produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play key roles in plant development, but their significance for seed germination and seedling establishment is poorly understood. Here we report on the characteristics of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development in Pisum sativum. Extracellular superoxide (O2(.-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and the activity of extracellular peroxidases (ECPOX) were determined spectrophotometrically, and O2(.-) was identified by electron paramagnetic resonance. Cell wall fractionation of cotyledons, seed coats and radicles was used in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to investigate substrate specificity and molecular masses of O2(.-)-producing enzymes, and the forces that bind them to the cell wall. Seed imbibition was accompanied by an immediate, transient burst of redox activity that involved O2(.-) and other substances capable of oxidizing epinephrine, and also H2O2. At the final stages of germination, coinciding with radicle elongation, a second increase in O2(.-) but not H2O2 production occurred and was correlated with an increase in extracellular ECPOX activity. Electrophoretic analyses of cell wall fractions demonstrated the presence of enzymes capable of O2(.-) production. The significance of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development, and also during seed aging, is discussed.

  7. Efficient and Safe Chemical Gas Generators with Nanocomposite Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    customized chemical gas generators based on novel energetic materials that will exhibit improved effectiveness, process stability, and fire safety...2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Efficient and Safe Chemical Gas Generators with Nanocomposite Reactive Materials...Building, Room 209 El Paso, TX 79968 -0587 12-Sep-2015 ABSTRACT Final Report: Efficient and Safe Chemical Gas Generators with Nanocomposite Reactive

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inactivation mechanism is affected by capsular extracellular polymeric substances reactivity with chlorine and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Hessler, Christopher M; Panmanee, Warunya; Hassett, Daniel J; Seo, Youngwoo

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of capsular extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to chlorine and monochloramine was assessed and compared in this study. The impact of capsular EPS on Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa inactivation mechanisms was investigated both qualitatively and quantitatively using a combination of batch experiments, viability tests with LIVE/DEAD staining, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Both wild-type and isogenic mutant strains with different alginate EPS production capabilities were used to evaluate their susceptibility to chlorine and monochloramine. The mucA22 mutant strain, which overproduces the EPS composed largely of acidic polysaccharide alginate, exhibited high resistance and prolonged inactivation time to both chlorine and monochloramine relative to PAO1 (wild-type) and algT(U) mutant strains (alginate EPS deficient). Multiple analyses were combined to better understand the mechanistic role of EPS against chlorine-based disinfectants. The extracted EPS exhibited high reactivity with chlorine and very low reactivity with monochloramine, suggesting different mechanism of protection against disinfectants. Moreover, capsular EPS on cell membrane appeared to reduce membrane permeabilization by disinfectants as suggested by deformation of key functional groups in EPS and cell membrane (the C-O-C stretching of carbohydrate and the C=O stretching of ester group). The combined results supported that capsular EPS, acting either as a disinfectant consumer (for chlorine inactivation) or limiting access to reactive sites on cell membrane (for monochloramine inactivation), provide a protective role for bacterial cells against regulatory residual disinfectants by reducing membrane permeabilization.

  9. Extracellular Vpr protein increases cellular permissiveness to human immunodeficiency virus replication and reactivates virus from latency.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, D N; Refaeli, Y; Weiner, D B

    1995-01-01

    The vpr gene product of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus is a virion-associated regulatory protein that has been shown using vpr mutant viruses to increase virus replication, particularly in monocytes/macrophages. We have previously shown that vpr can directly inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell differentiation, events linked to the control of HIV replication, and also that the replication of a vpr mutant but not that of wild-type HIV type 1 (HIV-1) was compatible with cellular proliferation (D. N. Levy, L. S. Fernandes, W. V. Williams, and D. B. Weiner, Cell 72:541-550, 1993). Here we show that purified recombinant Vpr protein, in concentrations of < 100 pg/ml to 100 ng/ml, increases wild-type HIV-1 replication in newly infected transformed cell lines via a long-lasting increase in cellular permissiveness to HIV replication. The activity of extracellular Vpr protein could be completely inhibited by anti-Vpr antibodies. Extracellular Vpr also induced efficient HIV-1 replication in newly infected resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Extracellular Vpr transcomplemented a vpr mutant virus which was deficient in replication in promonocytic cells, restoring full replication competence. In addition, extracellular Vpr reactivated HIV-1 expression in five latently infected cell lines of T-cell, B-cell, and promonocytic origin which normally express very low levels of HIV RNA and protein, indicating an activation of translational or pretranslational events in the virus life cycle. Together, these results describe a novel pathway governing HIV replication and a potential target for the development of anti-HIV therapeutics. PMID:7815499

  10. Selective reactivity of monochloramine with extracellular matrix components affects the disinfection of biofilm and detached clusters.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Lee, Woo Hyoung; Coburn, Kimberly M; Seo, Youngwoo

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of monochloramine disinfection was dependent on the quantity and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilms, as monochloramine has a selective reactivity with proteins over polysaccharides. Biofilms with protein-based (Pseudomonas putida) and polysaccharide based EPS (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), as well as biofilms with varied amount of polysaccharide EPS (wild-type and mutant P. aeruginosa), were compared. The different reactivity of EPS components with monochloramine influenced disinfectant penetration, biofilm inactivation, as well as the viability of detached clusters. Monochloramine transport profiling measured by a chloramine-sensitive microelectrode revealed a broader diffusion boundary layer between bulk and biofilm surface in the P. putida biofilm compared to those of P. aeruginosa biofilms. The reaction with proteins in P. putida EPS multiplied both the time and the monochloramine mass required to achieve a full biofilm penetration. Cell viability in biofilms was also spatially influenced by monochloramine diffusion and reaction within biofilms, showing a lower survival in the surface section and a higher persistence in the middle section of the P. putida biofilm compared to the P. aeruginosa biofilms. While polysaccharide EPS promoted biofilm cell viability by obstructing monochloramine reactive sites on bacterial cells, protein EPS hindered monochloramine penetration by reacting with monochloramine and reduced its concentration within biofilms. Furthermore, the persistence of bacterial cells detached from biofilm (over 70% for P. putida and ∼40% for polysaccharide producing P. aeruginosa) suggested that currently recommended monochloramine residual levels may underestimate the risk of water quality deterioration caused by biofilm detachment.

  11. Fosfomycin enhances phagocyte-mediated killing of Staphylococcus aureus by extracellular traps and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fengge; Tang, Xudong; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of bacterial infections is the achievement of a synergy between the host’s immune defences and antibiotics. Here, we examined whether fosfomycin (FOM) could improve the bactericidal effect of phagocytes, and investigated the potential mechanisms. FOM enhanced the phagocytosis and extra- or intracellular killing of S. aureus by phagocytes. And FOM enhanced the extracellular killing of S. aureus in macrophage (MФ) and in neutrophils mediated by extracellular traps (ETs). ET production was related to NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, FOM increased the intracellular killing of S. aureus in phagocytes, which was mediated by ROS through the oxidative burst process. Our results also showed that FOM alone induced S. aureus producing hydroxyl radicals in order to kill the bacterial cells in vitro. In a mouse peritonitis model, FOM treatment increased the bactericidal extra- and intracellular activity in vivo, and FOM strengthened ROS and ET production from peritoneal lavage fluid ex vivo. An IVIS imaging system assay further verified the observed in vivo bactericidal effect of the FOM treatment. This work may provide a deeper understanding of the role of the host’s immune defences and antibiotic interactions in microbial infections. PMID:26778774

  12. Role of extracellular polymeric substances in the surface chemical reactivity of Hymenobacter aerophilus, a psychrotolerant bacterium.

    PubMed

    Baker, M G; Lalonde, S V; Konhauser, K O; Foght, J M

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial surface layers, such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), are known to play an important role in metal sorption and biomineralization; however, there have been very few studies investigating how environmentally induced changes in EPS production affect the cell's surface chemistry and reactivity. Acid-base titrations, cadmium adsorption assays, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to characterize the surface reactivities of Hymenobacter aerophilus cells with intact EPS (WC) or stripped of EPS (SC) and purified EPS alone. Linear programming modeling of titration data showed SC to possess functional groups corresponding to phosphoryl (pKa approximately 6.5), phosphoryl/amine (pKa approximately 7.9), and amine/hydroxyl (pKa approximately 9.9). EPS and WC both possess carboxyl groups (pKa approximately 5.1 to 5.8) in addition to phosphoryl and amine groups. FT-IR confirmed the presence of polysaccharides and protein in purified EPS that can account for the additional carboxyl groups. An increased ligand density was observed for WC relative to that for SC, leading to an increase in the amount of Cd adsorbed (0.53 to 1.73 mmol/liter per g [dry weight] and 0.53 to 0.59 mmol/liter per g [dry weight], respectively). Overall, the presence of EPS corresponds to an increase in the number and type of functional groups on the surface of H. aerophilus that is reflected by increased metal adsorption relative to that for EPS-free cells.

  13. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  14. The beneficial role of extracellular reactive oxygen species in apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Diwanji, Neha; Bergmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apoptosis-induced proliferation (AiP) maintains tissue homeostasis following massive stress-induced cell death. During this phenomenon, dying cells induce proliferation of the surviving cells to compensate for the tissue loss, and thus restore organ size. Along with wound healing and tissue regeneration, AiP also contributes to tumor repopulation following radiation or chemotherapy. There are several models of AiP. Using an “undead” AiP model that causes hyperplastic overgrowth of Drosophila epithelial tissue, we recently demonstrated that extracellular reactive oxygen species (eROS) are produced by undead epithelial cells, and are necessary for inducing AiP and overgrowth. Furthermore, hemocytes, the Drosophila blood cells, are seen adjacent to the undead epithelial tissue, and may secrete the TNF ortholog Eiger that signals through the TNF receptor to active Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the undead tissue and induce proliferation. We propose that undead epithelial tissue triggers an inflammatory response that resembles recruitment of macrophages to human epithelial tumors, and that these tumor-associated macrophages release signals for proliferation and tumor growth of the epithelium. This Extra View article summarizes these recent findings with a focus on the role of eROS for promoting regeneration and inflammation-induced tumorigenesis. PMID:27575697

  15. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2-. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94–100% H2O2; 10–80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65–95% H2O2; 10–50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even

  16. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Robin; Roe, Kelly; Hansel, Colleen; Voelker, Bettina

    2016-03-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between those that are

  17. Calcite formation in soft coral sclerites is determined by a single reactive extracellular protein.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-09-09

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called "calcite and aragonite seas." Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that -OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature.

  18. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  19. Generation, structure and reactivity of tertiary organolithium reagents.

    PubMed

    Perry, Matthew A; Rychnovsky, Scott D

    2015-04-01

    Tertiary alkyllithium reagents are very useful intermediates in synthesis. Alkyllithium reagents with adjacent heteroatoms may be formed stereoselectively or may react stereoselectively, and have been used in the synthesis of alkaloids, C-glycosides and spirocycles. An overview of the generation, reactivity and stereochemistry of tertiary alkyllithium reagents will be presented, as well as examples of their use in organic synthesis. The discussion will be focused on a conceptual understanding of the generation and reactivity of these intermediates. The reactions described herein generate fully substituted carbon atoms, and the forces driving stereoselectivity will be discussed in detail. Where appropriate, computational results will be introduced to provide a better understanding for the structure and reactivity of tertiary alkyllithium reagents.

  20. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott

    2010-01-01

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  1. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  2. Generation of reactive oxygen species by the faecal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the aetiology of a range of human diseases and there is increasing interest in their role in the development of cancer.
AIM—To develop a suitable method for the detection of reactive oxygen species produced by the faecal matrix.
METHODS—A refined high performance liquid chromatography system for the detection of reactive oxygen species is described.
RESULTS—The method allows baseline separation of the products of hydroxyl radical attack on salicylic acid in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol. The increased efficiency and precision of the method has allowed a detailed evaluation of the dynamics of reactive oxygen species generation in the faecal matrix. The data show that the faecal matrix is capable of generating reactive oxygen species in abundance. This ability cannot be attributed to the bacteria present, but rather to a soluble component within the matrix. As yet, the nature of this soluble factor is not entirely clear but is likely to be a reducing agent.
CONCLUSIONS—The soluble nature of the promoting factor renders it amenable to absorption, and circumstances may exist in which either it comes into contact with either free or chelated iron in the colonocyte, leading to direct attack on cellular DNA, or else it initiates lipid peroxidation processes whereby membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids are attacked by reactive oxygen species propagating chain reactions leading to the generation of promutagenic lesions such as etheno based DNA adducts.


Keywords: colorectal cancer; faecal matrix; hypoxanthine; phytic acid; reactive oxygen species; xanthine oxidase PMID:10644317

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  4. Bio-inspired benchmark generator for extracellular multi-unit recordings

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-González, Sirenia Lizbeth; Burguière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of multi-unit extracellular recordings of brain activity has led to the development of numerous tools, ranging from signal processing algorithms to electronic devices and applications. Currently, the evaluation and optimisation of these tools are hampered by the lack of ground-truth databases of neural signals. These databases must be parameterisable, easy to generate and bio-inspired, i.e. containing features encountered in real electrophysiological recording sessions. Towards that end, this article introduces an original computational approach to create fully annotated and parameterised benchmark datasets, generated from the summation of three components: neural signals from compartmental models and recorded extracellular spikes, non-stationary slow oscillations, and a variety of different types of artefacts. We present three application examples. (1) We reproduced in-vivo extracellular hippocampal multi-unit recordings from either tetrode or polytrode designs. (2) We simulated recordings in two different experimental conditions: anaesthetised and awake subjects. (3) Last, we also conducted a series of simulations to study the impact of different level of artefacts on extracellular recordings and their influence in the frequency domain. Beyond the results presented here, such a benchmark dataset generator has many applications such as calibration, evaluation and development of both hardware and software architectures. PMID:28233819

  5. Bio-inspired benchmark generator for extracellular multi-unit recordings.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-González, Sirenia Lizbeth; Burguière, Eric

    2017-02-24

    The analysis of multi-unit extracellular recordings of brain activity has led to the development of numerous tools, ranging from signal processing algorithms to electronic devices and applications. Currently, the evaluation and optimisation of these tools are hampered by the lack of ground-truth databases of neural signals. These databases must be parameterisable, easy to generate and bio-inspired, i.e. containing features encountered in real electrophysiological recording sessions. Towards that end, this article introduces an original computational approach to create fully annotated and parameterised benchmark datasets, generated from the summation of three components: neural signals from compartmental models and recorded extracellular spikes, non-stationary slow oscillations, and a variety of different types of artefacts. We present three application examples. (1) We reproduced in-vivo extracellular hippocampal multi-unit recordings from either tetrode or polytrode designs. (2) We simulated recordings in two different experimental conditions: anaesthetised and awake subjects. (3) Last, we also conducted a series of simulations to study the impact of different level of artefacts on extracellular recordings and their influence in the frequency domain. Beyond the results presented here, such a benchmark dataset generator has many applications such as calibration, evaluation and development of both hardware and software architectures.

  6. Disulfiram anti-cancer efficacy without copper overload is enhanced by extracellular H2O2 generation: antagonism by tetrathiomolybdate

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Aparicio, Ali; Strasberg-Rieber, Mary; Rieber, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights exogenous SOD increases apoptosis by sub-toxic disulfiram without copper overload H2O2 generation from glucose oxidase also potentiates disulfiram toxicity N-acetylcysteine suppresses antitumor potentiation of DSF by H2O2 generation sub-toxic tetrathiomolybdate inhibits potentiation of DSF by SOD Background Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) like the extracellular SOD3 and cytoplasmic SOD1 regulate cell proliferation by generating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This pro-oxidant inactivates essential cysteine residues in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) helping receptor tyrosine kinase activation by growth factor signaling, and further promoting downstream MEK/ERK linked cell proliferation. Disulfiram (DSF), currently in clinical cancer trials is activated by copper chelation, being potentially capable of diminishing the copper dependent activation of MEK1/2 and SOD1/SOD3 and promoting reactive oxygen species (ROS) toxicity. However, copper (Cu) overload may occur when co-administered with DSF, resulting in toxicity and mutagenicity against normal tissue, through generation of the hydroxyl radical (•OH) by the Fenton reaction. Purpose To investigate: a) whether sub-toxic DSF efficacy can be increased without Cu overload against human melanoma cells with unequal BRAF(V600E) mutant status and Her2-overexpressing SKBR3 breast cancer cells, by increasing H2O2from exogenous SOD; b) to compare the anti-tumor efficacy of DSF with that of another clinically used copper chelator, tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) Results a) without copper supplementation, exogenous SOD potentiated sub-toxic DSF toxicity antagonized by sub-toxic TTM or by the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine; b) exogenous glucose oxidase, another H2O2 generator resembled exogenous SOD in potentiating sub-toxic DSF. Conclusions potentiation of sub-lethal DSF toxicity by extracellular H2O2 against the human tumor cell lines investigated, only requires basal Cu and increased ROS production, being unrelated to non

  7. Detecting, visualizing and quantitating the generation of reactive oxygen species in an amoeba model system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2013-11-05

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) comprise a range of reactive and short-lived, oxygen-containing molecules, which are dynamically interconverted or eliminated either catalytically or spontaneously. Due to the short life spans of most ROS and the diversity of their sources and subcellular localizations, a complete picture can be obtained only by careful measurements using a combination of protocols. Here, we present a set of three different protocols using OxyBurst Green (OBG)-coated beads, or dihydroethidium (DHE) and Amplex UltraRed (AUR), to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively various ROS in professional phagocytes such as Dictyostelium. We optimised the beads coating procedures and used OBG-coated beads and live microscopy to dynamically visualize intraphagosomal ROS generation at the single cell level. We identified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli as a potent stimulator for ROS generation in Dictyostelium. In addition, we developed real time, medium-throughput assays using DHE and AUR to quantitatively measure intracellular superoxide and extracellular H2O2 production, respectively.

  8. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  9. Reactive microgliosis: extracellular μ-calpain and microglia-mediated dopaminergic neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Shannon; Wilson, Belinda; Gregoria, Vincent; Thorpe, Laura B.; Dallas, Shannon; Polikov, Vadim S.; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells in the brain, can become chronically activated in response to dopaminergic neuron death, fuelling a self-renewing cycle of microglial activation followed by further neuron damage (reactive microgliosis), which is implicated in the progressive nature of Parkinson’s disease. Here, we use an in vitro approach to separate neuron injury factors from the cellular actors of reactive microgliosis and discover molecular signals responsible for chronic and toxic microglial activation. Upon injury with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, N27 cells (dopaminergic neuron cell line) released soluble neuron injury factors that activated microglia and were selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons in mixed mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. μ-Calpain was identified as a key signal released from damaged neurons, causing selective dopaminergic neuron death through activation of microglial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and superoxide production. These findings suggest that dopaminergic neurons may be inherently susceptible to the pro-inflammatory effects of neuron damage, i.e. reactive microgliosis, providing much needed insight into the chronic nature of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:20123724

  10. Generation of reactive oxygen species from silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor-liquid-solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals.

  11. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species from Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor–liquid–solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals. PMID:25452695

  12. Generation of reactive oxygen species by raphidophycean phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nakamura, A; Shikayama, M; Kawano, I; Ishimatsu, A; Muramatsu, T

    1997-10-01

    Chattonella marina, a raphidophycean flagellate, is one of the most toxic red tide phytoplankton and causes severe damage to fish farming. Recent studies demonstrated that Chattonella sp. generates superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (.OH), which may be responsible for the toxicity of C. marina. In this study, we found the other raphidophycean flagellates such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Olisthodiscus luteus, and Fibrocapsa japonica also produce O2- and H2O2 under normal growth condition. Among the flagellate species tested, Chattonella has the highest rates of production of O2- and H2O2 as compared on the basis of cell number. This seems to be partly due to differences in their cell sizes, since Chattonella is larger than other flagellate species. The generation of O2- by these flagellate species was also confirmed by a chemiluminescence assay by using 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one (MCLA). All these raphidophycean flagellates inhibited the proliferation of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, in a flagellates/bacteria co-culture system, and their toxic effects were suppressed by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase. Our results suggest that the generation of reactive oxygen species is a common feature of raphidophycean flagellates.

  13. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  14. Targeting and Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Nox Family NADPH Oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Stanislas; Hurt, Darrell; Ueyama, Takehiko

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Nox family NADPH oxidases serve a variety of functions requiring reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, including antimicrobial defense, biosynthetic processes, oxygen sensing, and redox-based cellular signaling. We explored targeting, assembly, and activation of several Nox family oxidases, since ROS production appears to be regulated both spatially and temporally. Nox1 and Nox3 are similar to the phagocytic (Nox2-based) oxidase, functioning as multicomponent superoxide-generating enzymes. Factors regulating their activities include cytosolic activator and organizer proteins and GTP-Rac. Their regulation varies, with the following rank order: Nox2 > Nox1 > Nox3. Determinants of subcellular targeting include: (a) formation of Nox-p22phox heterodimeric complexes allowing plasma membrane translocation, (b) phospholipids-binding specificities of PX domain-containing organizer proteins (p47phox or Nox organizer 1 (Noxo1 and p40phox), and (c) variably splicing of Noxo1 PX domains directing them to nuclear or plasma membranes. Dual oxidases (Duox1 and Duox2) are targeted by different mechanisms. Plasma membrane targeting results in H2O2 release, not superoxide, to support extracellular peroxidases. Human Duox1 and Duox2 have no demonstrable peroxidase activity, despite their extensive homology with heme peroxidases. The dual oxidases were reconstituted by Duox activator 2 (Duoxa2) or two Duoxa1 variants, which dictate maturation, subcellular localization, and the type of ROS generated by forming stable complexes with Duox. Antioxid Redox Signal. 11, 2607–2619. PMID:19438290

  15. Differential protein labeling based on electrochemically generated reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Büter, Lars; Faber, Helene; Wigger, Tina; Vogel, Martin; Karst, Uwe

    2015-10-06

    A specific labeling method for cysteine moieties in proteins was developed. Electrochemical oxidation of phenolic compounds such as phenol or acetaminophen leads to the generation of the reactive intermediates benzoquinone and N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, which can subsequently react with nucleophilic thiol functions in peptides or proteins. Differential labeling of cysteine residues was successfully demonstrated with native as well as heavy-isotope labeled forms of the corresponding labeling compounds. The specific mass differences on the peptide level were successfully analyzed by mass spectrometry for the tripeptide glutathione. Free cysteines in various proteins such as β-lactoglobulin A, human serum albumin, hemoglobin, and human carbonic anhydrase I were successfully labeled. Tryptic digestion of differentially labeled carbonic anhydrase I and hemoglobin allowed the identification of the binding site in the proteins. The obtained mass difference allowed an easy identification of the cysteine containing peptides. With these experiments, it was successfully demonstrated that the developed method can serve as a tool for counting cysteine moieties in proteins and, thus, be used as an additional technique in protein identification experiments.

  16. Fabrication and biological evaluation of uniform extracellular matrix coatings on discontinuous photolithography generated micropallet arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Nicholas M.; Bachman, Mark; Li, Guann-Pyng; Nelson, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT/SYNOPSIS The recent identification of rare cell populations within tissues that are associated with specific biological behaviors, e.g., progenitor cells, has illuminated a limitation of current technologies to study such adherent cells directly from primary tissues. The micropallet array is a recently developed technology designed to address this limitation by virtue of its capacity to isolate and recover single adherent cells on individual micropallets. The capacity to apply this technology to primary tissues and cells with restricted growth characteristics, particularly adhesion requirements, is critically dependent upon the capacity to generate functional extracellular matrix (ECM) coatings. The discontinuous nature of the micropallet array surface provides specific constraints on the processes for generating the desired ECM coatings that are necessary to achieve the full functional capacity of the micropallet array. We have developed strategies, reported herein, to generate functional coatings with various ECM protein components: fibronectin, EHS tumor basement membrane extract, collagen, and laminin-5; confirmed by evaluation for rapid cellular adherence of four dissimilar cell types: fibroblast, breast epithelial, pancreatic epithelial, and myeloma. These findings are important for the dissemination and expanded use of micropallet arrays and similar microtechnologies requiring the integrated use of ECM protein coatings to promote cellular adherence. PMID:20648537

  17. Plasma effects on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cancer cells in-vitro exposed by atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure pulsed helium plasma jets are utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, and duty ratio on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas and liquid phases and within cells is investigated. The apoptotic changes detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay in cells caused by plasma exposure are observed to correlate well with the levels of extracellular and intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  18. Influence of Anode Potentials on Current Generation and Extracellular Electron Transfer Paths of Geobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2017-01-01

    Geobacter species are capable of utilizing solid-state compounds, including anodic electrodes, as electron acceptors of respiration via extracellular electron transfer (EET) and have attracted considerable attention for their crucial role as biocatalysts of bioelectrochemical systems (BES’s). Recent studies disclosed that anode potentials affect power output and anodic microbial communities, including selection of dominant Geobacter species, in various BES’s. However, the details in current-generating properties and responses to anode potentials have been investigated only for a model species, namely Geobacter sulfurreducens. In this study, the effects of anode potentials on the current generation and the EET paths were investigated by cultivating six Geobacter species with different anode potentials, followed by electrochemical analyses. The electrochemical cultivation demonstrated that the G. metallireducens clade species (G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens) constantly generate high current densities at a wide range of anode potentials (≥−0.3 or −0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl), while the subsurface clades species (G. daltonii, G. bemidjensis, G. chapellei, and G. pelophilus) generate a relatively large current only at limited potential regions (−0.1 to −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl). The linear sweep voltammetry analyses indicated that the G. metallireducens clade species utilize only one EET path irrespective of the anode potentials, while the subsurface clades species utilize multiple EET paths, which can be optimized depending on the anode potentials. These results clearly demonstrate that the response features to anode potentials are divergent among species (or clades) of Geobacter. PMID:28067820

  19. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2000-07-01

    This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

  20. Collagenous extracellular matrix of cartilage submitted to mechanical forces studied by second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Werkmeister, Elisabeth; de Isla, Natalia; Netter, Patrick; Stoltz, Jean-François; Dumas, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative pathology leading to degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Similar effects can be visualized when applying mechanical or biochemical constraints on cartilaginous tissue. Here, we characterized modification of the ECM appearing under mechanical compression and/or biochemical action (hypoxia environment, nitric oxide and collagenase action). In recent decades, multiphoton microscopy has proved its interest for observing living, thick and opaque biological tissues. Thus, the main components of the cartilaginous ECM can be observed without fluorescent labeling. In particular, the collagen network emits strong second harmonic generation (SHG) signal which could be collected at half of the excitation wavelength. Combining autofluorescence and SHG signal detection enables to obtain complementary structural information. Here, we proved that multiphoton microscopy represents an appropriate tool for ex vitro cartilage imaging. First, we showed that SHG signal specifically comes from collagen (collagenase digestion). Further, we verified that the use of an appropriate band-pass filter enables to reject the autofluorescence from the ECM. Once this specificity was shown, we followed modification of the cartilage ECM submitted to mechanical or biochemical constraints (compression, enzymatic digestion). By performing textural analysis of SHG images (Haralick's method), we showed the restructuration of the collagen network according to constraints.

  1. Second harmonic generation microscopy analysis of extracellular matrix changes in human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Karissa; Hocker, James; Wen, Bruce L.; Sandbo, Nathan; Singh, Vikas; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Patients with idiopathic fibrosis (IPF) have poor long-term survival as there are limited diagnostic/prognostic tools or successful therapies. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been implicated in IPF progression; however, the structural consequences on the collagen architecture have not received considerable attention. Here, we demonstrate that second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy can quantitatively differentiate normal and IPF human tissues. For SHG analysis, we developed a classifier based on wavelet transforms, principle component analysis, and a K-nearest-neighbor algorithm to classify the specific alterations of the collagen structure observed in IPF tissues. The resulting ROC curves obtained by varying the numbers of principal components and nearest neighbors yielded accuracies of >95%. In contrast, simpler metrics based on SHG intensity and collagen coverage in the image provided little or no discrimination. We also characterized the change in the elastin/collagen balance by simultaneously measuring the elastin autofluorescence and SHG intensities and found that the IPF tissues were less elastic relative to collagen. This is consistent with known mechanical consequences of the disease. Understanding ECM remodeling in IPF via nonlinear optical microscopy may enhance our ability to differentiate patients with rapid and slow progression and, thus, provide better prognostic information. PMID:25134793

  2. Generation of reactive species by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The role of gas mixing in reactive species delivery to treatment surfaces for an atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled plasma helium jet is investigated by numerical modelling. Atomic oxygen in the jet effluent is shown to quickly convert to ozone for increasing device to surface separation due to the molecular oxygen present in the gas mixture. Surface profiles of reactive oxygen species show narrow peaks for atomic oxygen and broader surface distributions for ozone and metastable species. Production efficiency of atomic oxygen to the helium plasma jet by molecular oxygen admixture is shown to be dependent on electro-negativity. Excessive molecular oxygen admixture results in negative ion dominance over electrons which eventually quenches the plasma. Interaction of the plasma jet with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface. Gas heating by the plasma is found to be dominated by elastic electron collisions and positive ion heating. Comparison with experimental measurements for atomic oxygen shows good agreement.

  3. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  4. Modification of host dendritic cells by microchimerism-derived extracellular vesicles generates split tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bracamonte-Baran, William; Florentin, Jonathan; Zhou, Ying; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Haynes, W. John; Zhong, Weixiong; Brennan, Todd V.; Dutta, Partha; Claas, Frans H. J.; van Rood, Jon J.; Burlingham, William J.

    2017-01-01

    Maternal microchimerism (MMc) has been associated with development of allospecific transplant tolerance, antitumor immunity, and cross-generational reproductive fitness, but its mode of action is unknown. We found in a murine model that MMc caused exposure to the noninherited maternal antigens in all offspring, but in some, MMc magnitude was enough to cause membrane alloantigen acquisition (mAAQ; “cross-dressing”) of host dendritic cells (DCs). Extracellular vesicle (EV)-enriched serum fractions from mAAQ+, but not from non-mAAQ, mice reproduced the DC cross-dressing phenomenon in vitro. In vivo, mAAQ was associated with increased expression of immune modulators PD-L1 (programmed death-ligand 1) and CD86 by myeloid DCs (mDCs) and decreased presentation of allopeptide+self-MHC complexes, along with increased PD-L1, on plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Remarkably, both serum EV-enriched fractions and membrane microdomains containing the acquired MHC alloantigens included CD86, but completely excluded PD-L1. In contrast, EV-enriched fractions and microdomains containing allopeptide+self-MHC did not exclude PD-L1. Adoptive transfer of allospecific transgenic CD4 T cells revealed a “split tolerance” status in mAAQ+ mice: T cells recognizing intact acquired MHC alloantigens proliferated, whereas those responding to allopeptide+self-MHC did not. Using isolated pDCs and mDCs for in vitro culture with allopeptide+self-MHC–specific CD4 T cells, we could replicate their normal activation in non-mAAQ mice, and PD-L1–dependent anergy in mAAQ+ hosts. We propose that EVs provide a physiologic link between microchimerism and split tolerance, with implications for tumor immunity, transplantation, autoimmunity, and reproductive success. PMID:28096390

  5. In Silico Investigation of Angiogenesis with Growth and Stress Generation Coupled to Local Extracellular Matrix Density

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lowell T.; Hoying, James B.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical interactions during angiogenesis, i.e., traction applied by neovessels to the extracellular matrix and the corresponding deformation, are important regulators of growth and neovascularization. We have previously designed, implemented, and validated a coupled model of angiogenesis in which a discrete microvessel growth model interacts with a continuous finite element mesh through the application of local remodeling sprout stresses (Edgar et al. in Biomech Model Mechanobiol, 2014). However, the initial implementation of this framework does not take matrix density into account when determined these remodeling stresses and is therefore insufficient for the study of angiogenesis within heterogeneous matrix environments such as those found in vivo. The objective of this study was to implement sensitivity to matrix density in the active stress generation within AngioFE in order to allow the study of angiogenic growth within a heterogeneous density environment. We accomplished this by scaling active sprout stresses relative to local matrix density using a scaling factor previously determined from experimental data. We then exercised the new functionality of the model by simulating angiogenesis within four different scenarios: homogeneous density, a narrow gap model, and matrix density gradient, and a construct subjected to repeated loading/unloading and preconditioning. These numerical experiments predicted heterogeneous matrix density in the initially homogeneous case, the closure and alignment of microvessels along a low-density gap, the formation of a unique cap-like structure during angiogenesis within a density gradient, and the alignment of microvessels in the absence of applied load due to preconditioning. The result of these in silico investigations demonstrate how matrix heterogeneity affects neovascularization and matrix deformation and provides a platform for studying angiogenesis in complicated and multi-faceted mechanical environments that

  6. EGF receptor-ligand interaction generates extracellular hydrogen peroxide that inhibits EGFR-associated protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    DeYulia, Garrett J; Cárcamo, Juan M

    2005-08-19

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) has been shown to be an important modulator of intracellular phosphatase activity involved in cell signaling pathways, including signaling by members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family of receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Intracellular H(2)O(2) can be generated by mitochondria-dependent pathways, whereas we recently showed that H(2)O(2) could be generated extracellularly by receptor-ligand interaction. Here, we show that H(2)O(2) produced by EGF-EGFR interaction can modulate the activity of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Using purified proteins, we found that EGFR-ligand interaction generates H(2)O(2) that is capable of inhibiting the activity of PTP1B in vitro. Furthermore, the addition of catalase rescued phosphatase inhibition consequent to EGF-EGFR interaction. Using cells that overexpress EGFR, we found that the addition of extracellular catalase prevented EGF-induced inhibition of EGFR-associated phosphatase activity. Our findings suggest that extracellular H(2)O(2) generated by EGFR-ligand interaction permeates the plasma membrane and inhibits EGFR-associated tyrosine phosphatase activity, thereby modulating downstream signal transduction pathways.

  7. Development of an Enhanced GenVARR™ (Generator Volt Ampere Reactive Reserve) System

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Joe E.

    2009-03-12

    Transmission system operators require near real time knowledge of reactive power capability to reliably operate large electric power transmission systems. Reactive power produced by, or capable of being produced by, a power generator is often estimated based on a series of mega volt amperes (MVA) capability curves for the generator. These curves indicate the ability of the generator to produce real and reactive power under a variety of conditions. In transmission planning and operating studies, it is often assumed, based on estimates for these capability curves, that the generator can provide its rated MVA capability output when needed for system stability However, generators may not always operate at levels depicted by the maximum MVA capability curve due to present constraints. Transmission system operators utilizing the generators’ capability curves for operation decisions regarding transmission system stability or for planning horizons may overestimate the capability of the generators to supply reactive power when required. Southern Company has enhanced GenVARR(TM), the system of plant data query, retrieval, and analysis and calculates the actual – not estimated -- remaining reactive power output capability. The remaining reactive output is considered spinning reserve and is displayed graphically to transmission control center and generating plant operators to identify real time VAR limits. GenVARR is capable of aggregating generators from a defined region, or other user selectable combinations, to represent the available reserves that the operators are specifically interested in. GenVARR(TM) has been put into live production operation and is expected to significantly improve the overall visibility of the reactive reserve capability of the system. This new version of GenVARR(TM) significantly enhances the products structure and performance, and enables links to other key transmission system operation tools.

  8. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

  9. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  10. Phenol-Soluble Modulin α Peptide Toxins from Aggressive Staphylococcus aureus Induce Rapid Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps through a Reactive Oxygen Species-Independent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Björnsdottir, Halla; Dahlstrand Rudin, Agnes; Klose, Felix P.; Elmwall, Jonas; Welin, Amanda; Stylianou, Marios; Christenson, Karin; Urban, Constantin F.; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils have the ability to capture and kill microbes extracellularly through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are DNA and protein structures that neutrophils release extracellularly and are believed to function as a defense mechanism against microbes. The classic NET formation process, triggered by, e.g., bacteria, fungi, or by direct stimulation of protein kinase C through phorbol myristate acetate, is an active process that takes several hours and relies on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are further modified by myeloperoxidase (MPO). We show here that NET-like structures can also be formed by neutrophils after interaction with phenol-soluble modulin α (PSMα) that are cytotoxic membrane-disturbing peptides, secreted from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). The PSMα-induced NETs contained the typical protein markers and were able to capture microbes. The PSMα-induced NET structures were disintegrated upon prolonged exposure to DNase-positive S. aureus but not on exposure to DNase-negative Candida albicans. Opposed to classic NETosis, PSMα-triggered NET formation occurred very rapidly, independently of ROS or MPO, and was also manifest at 4°C. These data indicate that rapid NETs release may result from cytotoxic membrane disturbance by PSMα peptides, a process that may be of importance for CA-MRSA virulence. PMID:28337204

  11. Phenol-Soluble Modulin α Peptide Toxins from Aggressive Staphylococcus aureus Induce Rapid Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps through a Reactive Oxygen Species-Independent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Björnsdottir, Halla; Dahlstrand Rudin, Agnes; Klose, Felix P; Elmwall, Jonas; Welin, Amanda; Stylianou, Marios; Christenson, Karin; Urban, Constantin F; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils have the ability to capture and kill microbes extracellularly through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are DNA and protein structures that neutrophils release extracellularly and are believed to function as a defense mechanism against microbes. The classic NET formation process, triggered by, e.g., bacteria, fungi, or by direct stimulation of protein kinase C through phorbol myristate acetate, is an active process that takes several hours and relies on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are further modified by myeloperoxidase (MPO). We show here that NET-like structures can also be formed by neutrophils after interaction with phenol-soluble modulin α (PSMα) that are cytotoxic membrane-disturbing peptides, secreted from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). The PSMα-induced NETs contained the typical protein markers and were able to capture microbes. The PSMα-induced NET structures were disintegrated upon prolonged exposure to DNase-positive S. aureus but not on exposure to DNase-negative Candida albicans. Opposed to classic NETosis, PSMα-triggered NET formation occurred very rapidly, independently of ROS or MPO, and was also manifest at 4°C. These data indicate that rapid NETs release may result from cytotoxic membrane disturbance by PSMα peptides, a process that may be of importance for CA-MRSA virulence.

  12. Extracellular phosphates enhance activities of voltage-gated proton channels and production of reactive oxygen species in murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshuai; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kuno, Miyuki

    2017-02-01

    Osteoclasts are highly differentiated bone-resorbing cells and play a significant role in bone remodelling. In the resorption pit, inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations increase because of degradation of hydroxyapatite. We studied effects of extracellular Pi on voltage-gated H(+) channels in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Extracellular Pi (1.25-20 mM) increased the H(+) channel currents dose dependently and reversibly. The Pi-induced increases were attenuated by removal of extracellular Na(+) and by phosphonoformic acid, a blocker of Na(+)-dependent Pi transporters. Pi increased the maximal conductance, decreased activation time constant, increased deactivation time constant, and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more negative voltages. The most marked change was enhanced gating which was mainly caused by elevation of intracellular Pi levels. The Pi-induced enhanced gating was partially inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203X and staurosporine, indicating that PKC-mediated phosphorylation was involved in part. The increase in the maximal conductance was mainly due to accompanying decrease in intracellular pH. These effects of Pi were not affected by intracellular Mg(2+), bafilomycin A1 (V-ATPase inhibitor) and removal of intracellular ATP. Extracellular Pi also upregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, decreased ROS production and partially attenuated the enhanced gating. In the cells during later passages where osteoclastogenesis declined, H(+) channel activities and ROS production were both modest. These results suggest that, in osteoclasts, ambient Pi is a common enhancer for H(+) channels and ROS production and that potentiation of H(+) channels may help ROS production.

  13. Method for generation of peptide-specific IgY antibodies directed to Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen binding protein epitope.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Maciej; Grzywa, Renata; Łupicka-Słowik, Agnieszka; Skoreński, Marcin; Bobrek, Kamila; Nowak, Daria; Boivin, Stephane; Brown, Eric L; Oleksyszyn, Józef; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    The IgY antibodies offer an attractive alternative to mammalian IgGs in research, diagnosis and medicine. The isolation of immunoglobulin Y from the egg yolks is efficient and economical, causing minimal suffering to animals. Here we present the methodology for the production of IgY antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) and its peptidyl epitope (spanning residues 127-140). The Efb is an extracellular, adhesion protein which binds both human fibrinogen and complement C3 protein thus contributing to the high infectious potential of this pathogen. The selected epitope of Efb protein is responsible for the interaction with C3. The immunochemical characterization of both anti-Efb and epitope-specific IgY antibodies revealed their similar avidity, titer, and reactivity profile, although some differences in the hen's immune response to administered antigens is discussed.

  14. Enzymatic treatment of sulfonated aromatic amines generated from reductive degradation of reactive azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Mousumi Mani; Taylor, Keith E; Bewtra, Jatinder K; Biswas, Nihar

    2007-04-01

    Anaerobic degradation, an effective treatment process of textile industry effluent, generates sulfonated aromatic amines, which are carcinogenic, mutagenic, and resistant to microbial degradation. These aromatic amines can be effectively removed by oxidative polymerization catalyzed by peroxidase enzyme. The amines, generated in this study from the anaerobic reduction by zero-valent iron of two reactive azo dyes (Reactive Red 2 [RR2] and Reactive Black 5 [RB5]), were successfully removed (90%) by Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP). For better understanding of the process, enzymatic treatment of two model compounds, diphenylamine (DPA) and 2-amino-8-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid (ANDSA), were also studied. Diphenylamine has a similar diarylamine bond as RR2. The ANDSA has a similar structure as the dye reduction products. The secondary amine bond in DPA and RR2 were oxidized by ARP. Enzymatic reaction of sulfonated aromatic amines generated soluble colored compounds, which were removed by coagulant. Optimum reaction parameters were also determined.

  15. A flexible active and reactive power control strategy for a variable speed constant frequency generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Xu, L.

    1995-07-01

    Variable-speed constant-frequency generating systems are used in wind power, hydro power, aerospace, and naval power generations to enhance efficiency and reduce friction. In these applications, an attractive candidate is the slip power recovery system comprising of doubly excited induction machine or doubly excited brushless reluctance machine and PWM converters with a dc link. In this paper, a flexible active and reactive power control strategy is developed, such that the optimal torque-speed profile of the turbine can be followed and overall reactive power can be controlled, while the machine copper losses have been minimized. At the same time, harmonics injected into the power network has also been minimized. In this manner, the system can function as both a high-efficient power generator and a flexible reactive power compensator.

  16. Dissolution and reactive oxygen species generation of inhaled cemented tungsten carbide particles in artificial human lung fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniak, A. B.; Leonard, S. S.; Hoover, M. D.; Virji, M. A.; Day, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of both cobalt (Co) and tungsten carbide (WC) particles is associated with development of hard metal lung disease (HMD) via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas Co alone is sufficient to cause asthma via solubilization and hapten formation. We characterized bulk and aerodynamically size-separated W, WC, Co, spray dryer (pre-sintered), and chamfer grinder (post-sintered) powders. ROS generation was measured in the murine RAW 264.7 cell line using electron spin resonance. When dose was normalized to surface area, hydroxyl radical generation was independent of particle size, which suggests that particle surface chemistry may be an important exposure factor. Chamfer grinder particles generated the highest levels of ROS, consistent with the hypothesis that intimate contact of metals is important for ROS generation. In artificial extracellular lung fluid, alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride (ABDC), added to prevent mold growth during experiments, did not influence dissolution of Co (44.0±5.2 vs. 48.3±6.4%) however, dissolution was higher (p<0.05) in the absence of phosphate (62.0±5.4 vs. 48.3±6.4%). In artificial macrophage phagolysosomal fluid, dissolution of Co (36.2±10.4%) does not appear to be influenced (p=0.30) by the absence of glycine (29.8±2.1%), phosphate (39.6±8.6%), or ABDC (44.0±10.5%). These results aid in assessing and understanding Co and W inhalation dosimetry.

  17. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  18. Elevated Cytoplasmic Free Zinc and Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in the Context of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christian J; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular zinc release and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to be common ingredients in numerous toxic signaling mechanisms in neurons. A key source for intracellular zinc release is its liberation from metallothionein-III (MT-III). MT-III binds and regulates intracellular zinc levels under physiological conditions, but the zinc-binding thiols readily react with certain ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to result in intracellular zinc liberation. Liberated zinc induces ROS and RNS generation by multiple mechanisms, including the induction of mitochondrial ROS production, and also promotes ROS formation outside the mitochondria by interaction with the enzymes NADPH oxidase and 12-lipoxygenase. Of particular relevance to neuronal injury in the context of ischemia and prolonged seizures, the positive feedback cycle between ROS/RNS generation and increasing zinc liberation will be examined.

  19. Evidence for extracellular, but not intracellular, generation of angiotensin II in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, H.; Khosla, M.C.; Bumpus, M.; Husain, A. )

    1988-11-01

    Based on the observation that high levels of renin and angiotensin II (Ang II) are found in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), it has been postulated that Ang II is formed intracellularly by the renin-converting enzyme cascade in this tissue. To test this hypothesis, the authors examined renin-angiotensin system components in subcellular fractions of the rat adrenal ZG. Renin activity and immunoreactive-Ang II (IR-Ang II) were observed in vesicular fractions but were not colocalized. In addition, angiotensinogen, angiotensin I, and converting enzyme were not observed in the renin or IR-Ang II-containing vesicular fractions. These data do not support the hypothesis that Ang II is formed intracellularly within the renin-containing vesicles of the ZG. Rather, since modulatable renin release from adrenal ZG slices was observed and renin activity was found in dense vesicular fractions (33-39% sucrose), it is likely that Ang II formation in the ZG is extracellular and initiated by the release of vesicular renin. In ZG lysomal fractions {sup 125}I-labeled Ang II was degraded to {sup 125}I-labeled des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II. Since Ang II antibodies do not recognize des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II, these finding explain why IR-Ang II in the ZG is due predominantly to Ang II and not to its C-terminal immunoreactive fragments.

  20. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  1. The generation of hybrid electrospun nanofiber layer with extracellular matrix derived from human pluripotent stem cells, for regenerative medicine applications.

    PubMed

    Shtrichman, Ronit; Zeevi-Levin, Naama; Zaid, Rinat; Barak, Efrat; Fishman, Bettina; Ziskind, Anna; Shulman, Rita; Novak, Atara; Avrahami, Ron; Livne, Erella; Lowenstein, Lior; Zussman, Eyal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) has been utilized as a biological scaffold for tissue engineering applications in a variety of body systems, due to its bioactivity and biocompatibility. In the current study we developed a modified protocol for the efficient and reproducible derivation of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) from human embryonic stem cells as well as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) originating from hair follicle keratinocytes (HFKTs). ECM was produced from these MPCs and characterized in comparison to adipose mesenchymal stem cell ECM, demonstrating robust ECM generation by the excised HFKT-iPSC-MPCs. Exploiting the advantages of electrospinning we generated two types of electrospun biodegradable nanofiber layers (NFLs), fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), which provide mechanical support for cell seeding and ECM generation. Elucidating the optimized decellularization treatment we were able to generate an available "off-the-shelf" implantable product (NFL-ECM). Using rat subcutaneous transplantation model we demonstrate that this stem-cell-derived construct is biocompatible and biodegradable and holds great potential for tissue regeneration applications.

  2. Reactive species in non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas: Generation, transport, and biological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Reuter, S.; Graves, D. B.; Ostrikov, K.

    2016-05-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have recently become a topical area of research owing to their diverse applications in health care and medicine, environmental remediation and pollution control, materials processing, electrochemistry, nanotechnology and other fields. This review focuses on the reactive electrons and ionic, atomic, molecular, and radical species that are produced in these plasmas and then transported from the point of generation to the point of interaction with the material, medium, living cells or tissues being processed. The most important mechanisms of generation and transport of the key species in the plasmas of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets and other non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas are introduced and examined from the viewpoint of their applications in plasma hygiene and medicine and other relevant fields. Sophisticated high-precision, time-resolved plasma diagnostics approaches and techniques are presented and their applications to monitor the reactive species and plasma dynamics in the plasma jets and other discharges, both in the gas phase and during the plasma interaction with liquid media, are critically reviewed. The large amount of experimental data is supported by the theoretical models of reactive species generation and transport in the plasmas, surrounding gaseous environments, and plasma interaction with liquid media. These models are presented and their limitations are discussed. Special attention is paid to biological effects of the plasma-generated reactive oxygen and nitrogen (and some other) species in basic biological processes such as cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, etc. as well as plasma applications in bacterial inactivation, wound healing, cancer treatment and some others. Challenges and opportunities for theoretical and experimental research are discussed and the authors' vision for the emerging convergence trends across several disciplines and application domains is presented to

  3. The Use of Second Harmonic Generation to Image the Extracellular Matrix During Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen; Brown, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer mortality, resulting from changes in the tumor microenvironment which increases tumor cell migration, dispersal to distant organs, and subsequent survival. This is accompanied by changes in tumor collagen which may allow cells to travel more efficiently away from a primary tumor and invade the surrounding tissue. Second Harmonic generation (SHG) is an intrinsic optical signal that has expanded our understanding of collagen evolution throughout tumor progression. This article addresses current research into tumor progression using SHG, as well as the future prospects of using SHG to advance our understanding of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243512

  4. TNFα-induced apoptosis enabled by CCN1/CYR61: pathways of reactive oxygen species generation and cytochrome c release.

    PubMed

    Juric, Vladislava; Chen, Chih-Chiun; Lau, Lester F

    2012-01-01

    Although TNFα is a strong inducer of apoptosis, its cytotoxicity in most normal cells in vitro requires blockade of NFκB signaling or inhibition of de novo protein synthesis, typically by the addition of cycloheximide. However, several members of CCN (CYR61/CTGF/NOV) family of extracellular matrix proteins enable TNFα-dependent apoptosis in vitro without inhibiting NFκB or de novo protein synthesis, and CCN1 (CYR61) is essential for optimal TNFα cytotoxicity in vivo. Previous studies showed that CCN1 unmasks the cytotoxicity of TNFα by binding integrins α(v)β(5), α(6)β(1), and the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan 4 to induce the accumulation of a high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to a biphasic activation of JNK necessary for apoptosis. Here we show for the first time that CCN1 interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in a protein complex, and that binding to LRP1 is critical for CCN1-induced ROS generation and apoptotic synergism with TNFα. We also found that neutral sphingomyelinase 1 (nSMase1), which contributes to CCN1-induced ROS generation, is required for CCN1/TNFα-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, CCN1 promotes the activation of p53 and p38 MAPK, which mediate enhanced cytochrome c release to amplify the cytotoxicity of TNFα. By contrast, LRP1, nSMase1, p53, and p38 MAPK are not required when TNFα-dependent apoptosis is facilitated by the presence of cycloheximide, indicating that they function in the CCN1 signaling pathway that converges with TNFα-induced signaling events. Since CCN1/CYR61 is a physiological regulator of TNFα cytotoxicity at least in some contexts, these findings may reveal important mediators of TNFα-induced apoptosis in vivo and identify potential therapeutic targets for thwarting TNFα-dependent tissue damage.

  5. Two distinct extracellular RNA signatures released by a single cell type identified by microarray and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lässer, Cecilia; Shelke, Ganesh Vilas; Yeri, Ashish; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Crescitelli, Rossella; Raimondo, Stefania; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Gho, Yong Song; Van Keuren Jensen, Kendall; Lötvall, Jan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cells secrete extracellular RNA (exRNA) to their surrounding environment and exRNA has been found in many body fluids such as blood, breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid. However, there are conflicting results regarding the nature of exRNA. Here, we have separated 2 distinct exRNA profiles released by mast cells, here termed high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) exRNA. The exRNA in both fractions was characterized by microarray and next-generation sequencing. Both exRNA fractions contained mRNA and miRNA, and the mRNAs in the LD exRNA correlated closely with the cellular mRNA, whereas the HD mRNA did not. Furthermore, the HD exRNA was enriched in lincRNA, antisense RNA, vault RNA, snoRNA, and snRNA with little or no evidence of full-length 18S and 28S rRNA. The LD exRNA was enriched in mitochondrial rRNA, mitochondrial tRNA, tRNA, piRNA, Y RNA, and full-length 18S and 28S rRNA. The proteomes of the HD and LD exRNA-containing fractions were determined with LC-MS/MS and analyzed with Gene Ontology term finder, which showed that both proteomes were associated with the term extracellular vesicles and electron microscopy suggests that at least a part of the exRNA is associated with exosome-like extracellular vesicles. Additionally, the proteins in the HD fractions tended to be associated with the nucleus and ribosomes, whereas the LD fraction proteome tended to be associated with the mitochondrion. We show that the 2 exRNA signatures released by a single cell type can be separated by floatation on a density gradient. These results show that cells can release multiple types of exRNA with substantial differences in RNA species content. This is important for any future studies determining the nature and function of exRNA released from different cells under different conditions. PMID:27791479

  6. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-02-10

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  7. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)-capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters. PMID:28208642

  8. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of

  9. Pattern-dependent role of NMDA receptors in action potential generation: consequences on extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meilan; Adams, J Paige; Dudek, Serena M

    2005-07-27

    Synaptic long-term potentiation is maintained through gene transcription, but how the nucleus is recruited remains controversial. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 with synaptic stimulation has been shown to require NMDA receptors (NMDARs), yet stimulation intensities sufficient to recruit action potentials (APs) also appear to be required. This has led us to ask the question of whether NMDARs are necessary for AP generation as they relate to ERK activation. To test this, we examined the effects of NMDAR blockade on APs induced with synaptic stimulation using whole-cell current-clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices. NMDAR antagonists were found to potently inhibit APs generated with 5 and 100 Hz synaptic stimulation. Blockade of APs and ERK activation could be overcome with the addition of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, indicating that APs are sufficient to activate signals such as ERK in the nucleus and throughout the neuron in the continued presence of NMDAR antagonists. Interestingly, no effects of the NMDAR antagonists were observed when theta-burst stimulation (TBS) was used. This resistance to the antagonists is conferred by temporal summation during the bursts. These results clarify findings from a previous study showing that ERK activation induced with TBS is resistant to 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, in contrast to that induced with 5 or 100 Hz stimulation, which is sensitive. By showing that NMDAR blockade inhibits AP generation, we demonstrate that a major role that NMDARs play in cell-wide and nuclear ERK activation is through their contribution to action potential generation.

  10. Genotoxicity of volatile and secondary reactive oxygen species generated by photosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Camoirano, A.; De Flora, S.; Dahl, T.A. Tufts Univ. Veterinary, Boston, MA )

    1993-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species were generated in the gas phase by photosensitization involving illumination of Rose Bengal. Depending on whether the chromophore is dry or solubilized, this system produces either energy-transfer reactions leading to generation of singlet oxygen specifically, or a combination of energy-transfer and electron-transfer reactions, providing both singlet oxygen and reduced forms of oxygen, such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. In neither case were the reactive species mutagenic in strain TA104 of Salmonella typhimurium, which had been previously shown to be reverted by oxygen species generated by the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system in aqueous medium. However, mixed oxygen species induced an increased lethality in a variety of DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli strains. This genotoxic effect, mainly reparable by the uvrA and recA mechanisms, was efficiently prevented by the thiol N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Singlet oxygen itself failed to exert direct genotoxic effects, although secondary reactants produced by its reaction with cell components enhanced lethality in some repair-deficient bacteria. Distance-dependence analyses provided measurements of the lifetimes of the oxygen species generated in the gas phase. 35 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Trace heavy metal ions promoted extracellular electron transfer and power generation by Shewanella in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Shang; Zheng, Tao; Yong, Xiao-Yu; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Si, Rong-Wei; Li, Bing; Yu, Yang-Yang; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Although microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is considered as one of the most promising technology for renewable energy harvesting, low power output still accounts one of the bottlenecks and limits its further development. In this work, it is found that Cu(2+) (0.1μgL(-1)-0.1mgL(-1)) or Cd(2+) (0.1μgL(-1)-1mgL(-1)) significantly improve the electricity generation in MFCs. The maximum power output achieved with trace level of Cu(2+) (∼6nM) or Cd(2+) (∼5nM) is 1.3 times and 1.6 times higher than that of the control, respectively. Further analysis verifies that addition of Cu(2+) or Cd(2+) effectively improves riboflavin production and bacteria attachment on the electrode, which enhances bacterial extracellular electron transfer (EET) in MFCs. These results unveil the mechanism for power output enhancement by Cu(2+) or Cd(2+) addition, and suggest that metal ion addition should be a promising strategy to enhance EET as well as power generation of MFCs.

  12. Light Emitting Diode-Generated Blue Light Modulates Fibrosis Characteristics: Fibroblast Proliferation, Migration Speed, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Garcha, Manveer; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Blue light is part of the visible light spectrum that does not generate harmful DNA adducts associated with skin cancer and photoaging, and may represent a safer therapeutic modality for treatment of keloid scars and other fibrotic skin diseases. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that light-emitting diode (LED) red and infrared light inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts. Moreover, different wavelengths of light can produce different biological effects. Furthermore, the effects of LED blue light (LED-BL) on human skin fibroblasts are not well characterized. This study investigated the effects of LED-BL on human skin fibroblast proliferation, viability, migration speed, and reactive oxygen-species (ROS) generation. Methods and Materials Irradiation of adult human skin fibroblasts using commercially-available LED-BL panels was performed in vitro, and modulation of proliferation and viability was quantified using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, migratory speed was assessed using time-lapse video microscopy, and intracellular ROS generation was measured using the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Statistical differences between groups were determined by ANOVA and Student s t-test. Results Human skin fibroblasts treated with LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45, and 80 J/cm2 demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in relative proliferation of 8.4%, 29.1%, 33.8%, 51.7%, and 55.1%, respectively, compared to temperature and environment matched bench control plates, respectively. LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45 and 80 J/cm2 decreased fibroblast migration speed to 95 ± 7.0% (p = 0.64), 81.3 ± 5.5% (p = 0.021), 48.5 ± 2.7% (p < 0.0001), and 32.3 ± 1.9% (p < 0.0001), respectively, relative to matched controls. LED fluences of 5, 10, 30, and 80 J/cm2 resulted in statistically significant increases in reactive oxygen species of 110.4%, 116.6%, 127.5%, and 130%, respectively, relative to bench controls. Conclusion At

  13. Diabetes-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species: Mechanism of Their Generation and Role in Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fakhruddin, Selim; Alanazi, Wael

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes induces the onset and progression of renal injury through causing hemodynamic dysregulation along with abnormal morphological and functional nephron changes. The most important event that precedes renal injury is an increase in permeability of plasma proteins such as albumin through a damaged glomerular filtration barrier resulting in excessive urinary albumin excretion (UAE). Moreover, once enhanced UAE begins, it may advance renal injury from progression of abnormal renal hemodynamics, increased glomerular basement membrane (GBM) thickness, mesangial expansion, extracellular matrix accumulation, and glomerulosclerosis to eventual end-stage renal damage. Interestingly, all these pathological changes are predominantly driven by diabetes-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and abnormal downstream signaling molecules. In diabetic kidney, NADPH oxidase (enzymatic) and mitochondrial electron transport chain (nonenzymatic) are the prominent sources of ROS, which are believed to cause the onset of albuminuria followed by progression to renal damage through podocyte depletion. Chronic hyperglycemia and consequent ROS production can trigger abnormal signaling pathways involving diverse signaling mediators such as transcription factors, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and vasoactive substances. Persistently, increased expression and activation of these signaling molecules contribute to the irreversible functional and structural changes in the kidney resulting in critically decreased glomerular filtration rate leading to eventual renal failure. PMID:28164134

  14. Compensation for Harmonic Currents and Reactive Power in Wind Power Generation System using PWM Inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Katsuji; Shinhatsubo, Kurato; Iimori, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Kichiro; Saruban, Takamichi; Yamaemori, Takahiro

    In recent year, consciousness of environmental problems is enhancing, and the price of the electric power purchased by an electric power company is established expensive for the power plant utilizing the natural energy. So, the introduction of the wind power generation is promoted in Japan. Generally, squirrel-cage induction machines are widely used as a generator in wind power generation system because of its small size, lightweight and low-cost. However, the induction machines do not have a source of excitation. Thus, it causes the inrush currents and the instantaneous voltage drop when the generator is directly connected to a power grid. To reduce the inrush currents, an AC power regulator is used. Wind power generations are frequently connected to and disconnected from the power grid. However, when the inrush currents are reduced, harmonic currents are caused by phase control of the AC power regulator. And the phase control of AC power regulator cannot control the power factor. Therefore, we propose the use of the AC power regulator to compensate for the harmonic currents and reactive power in the wind power generation system, and demonstrate the validity of its system by simulated and experimental results.

  15. Oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation depends on metabolic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David L; Brookes, Paul S

    2009-06-12

    The mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a central role in many cell signaling pathways, but debate still surrounds its regulation by factors, such as substrate availability, [O2] and metabolic state. Previously, we showed that in isolated mitochondria respiring on succinate, ROS generation was a hyperbolic function of [O2]. In the current study, we used a wide variety of substrates and inhibitors to probe the O2 sensitivity of mitochondrial ROS generation under different metabolic conditions. From such data, the apparent Km for O2 of putative ROS-generating sites within mitochondria was estimated as follows: 0.2, 0.9, 2.0, and 5.0 microM O2 for the complex I flavin site, complex I electron backflow, complex III QO site, and electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase of beta-oxidation, respectively. Differential effects of respiratory inhibitors on ROS generation were also observed at varying [O2]. Based on these data, we hypothesize that at physiological [O2], complex I is a significant source of ROS, whereas the electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase may only contribute to ROS generation at very high [O2]. Furthermore, we suggest that previous discrepancies in the assignment of effects of inhibitors on ROS may be due to differences in experimental [O2]. Finally, the data set (see supplemental material) may be useful in the mathematical modeling of mitochondrial metabolism.

  16. Generating favorable growth factor and protease release profiles to enable extracellular matrix accumulation within an in vitro tissue engineering environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Battiston, Kyle G; Labow, Rosalind S; Simmons, Craig A; Santerre, J Paul

    2017-02-24

    Tissue engineering (particularly for the case of load-bearing cardiovascular and connective tissues) requires the ability to promote the production and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components (e.g., collagen, glycosaminoglycan and elastin). Although different approaches have been attempted in order to enhance ECM accumulation in tissue engineered constructs, studies of underlying signalling mechanisms that influence ECM deposition and degradation during tissue remodelling and regeneration in multi-cellular culture systems have been limited. The current study investigated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-monocyte co-culture systems using different VSMC:monocyte ratios, within a degradable polyurethane scaffold, to assess their influence on ECM generation and degradation processes, and to elucidate relevant signalling molecules involved in this in vitro vascular tissue engineering system. It was found that a desired release profile of growth factors (e.g. insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1)) and hydrolytic proteases (e.g. matrix-metalloproteinases 2, 9, 13 and 14 (MMP2, MMP9, MMP13 and MMP14)), could be achieved in co-culture systems, yielding an accumulation of ECM (specifically for 2:1 and 4:1 VSMC:monocyte culture systems). This study has significant implications for the tissue engineering field (including vascular tissue engineering), not only because it identified important cytokines and proteases that control ECM accumulation/degradation within synthetic tissue engineering scaffolds, but also because the established culture systems could be applied to improve the development of different types of tissue constructs.

  17. Molecular characterization of human osteoblast-derived extracellular vesicle mRNA using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Morhayim, Jess; van de Peppel, Jeroen; Dudakovic, Amel; Chiba, Hideki; van Wijnen, Andre J; van Leeuwen, Johannes P

    2017-03-24

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-bound intercellular communication vehicles that transport proteins, lipids and nucleic acids with regulatory capacity between cells. RNA profiling using microarrays and sequencing technologies has revolutionized the discovery of EV-RNA content, which is crucial to understand the molecular mechanism of EV function. Recent studies have indicated that EVs are enriched with specific RNAs compared to the originating cells suggestive of an active sorting mechanism. Here, we present the comparative transcriptome analysis of human osteoblasts and their corresponding EVs using next-generation sequencing. We demonstrate that osteoblast-EVs are specifically depleted of cellular mRNAs that encode proteins involved in basic cellular activities, such as cytoskeletal functions, cell survival and apoptosis. In contrast, EVs are significantly enriched with 254 mRNAs that are associated with protein translation and RNA processing. Moreover, mRNAs enriched in EVs encode proteins important for communication with the neighboring cells, in particular with osteoclasts, adipocytes and hematopoietic stem cells. These findings provide the foundation for understanding the molecular mechanism and function of EV-mediated interactions between osteoblasts and the surrounding bone microenvironment.

  18. Malonate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in rat striatum depends on dopamine release but not on NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ferger, B; Eberhardt, O; Teismann, P; de Groote, C; Schulz, J B

    1999-09-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate produces both energy depletion and striatal lesions similar to that seen in cerebral ischemia and Huntington's disease. The mechanisms of neuronal cell death involve secondary excitotoxicity and the generation of reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigated the effects of dopamine on malonate-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals and striatal lesion volumes. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found that malonate induced a 94-fold increase in extracellular striatal dopamine concentrations. This was paralleled by an increase in the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Prior unilateral lesioning of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway by focal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine blocked the malonate-induced increase in dopamine concentrations and the generation of hydroxyl radicals and attenuated the lesion volume. In contrast, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated malonate-induced lesion volumes but did not block the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Thus, the dopaminergic and glutamatergic pathways are essential in the pathogenesis of malonate-induced striatal lesions. Our results suggest that the malonate-induced release of dopamine but not NMDA receptor activation mediates hydroxyl radical formation.

  19. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  20. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  1. UVB dependence of quantum dot reactive oxygen species generation in common skin cell models

    PubMed Central

    MORTENSEN, LUKE J.; FAULKNOR, RENEA; RAVICHANDRAN, SUPRIYA; ZHENG, HONG; DELOUISE, LISA A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  2. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  3. The regulation of superoxide generation and nitric oxide synthesis by C-reactive protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, S; Mookerjea, S

    1998-01-01

    Activated macrophages utilize both reactive oxygen intermediates and reactive oxynitrogen intermediates for defence against microbes. However, simultaneous generation of superoxide (O- 2;) and nitric oxide (NO) could be harmful to host cells due to the production of peroxynitrite, nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, the regulation of the production of these molecules is critical to host survival. During periods of inflammation or infection, the level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) increases in many species. Human and rat CRP have been shown to bind and interact with phagocytic cells. Since many of the interactions of CRP involve the binding to the phosphocholine ligand, we studied the role of CRP in O- 2; and NO generation through the modulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism in macrophages. This study has shown that, while rat CRP inhibited phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA) induced release of O- 2; by rat macrophages, CRP-treated macrophages released NO in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CRP increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme as well as iNOS mRNA levels in rat macrophages. Tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609), an inhibitor to PC phospholipase C (PC-PLC), suppressed iNOS induction but enhanced PMA-induced release of O- 2;. These data indicate that an increased level of CRP during periods of inflammation may result in differential regulation of macrophage NADPH oxidase and iNOS activity. Increased hepatic synthesis of CRP may contribute to the mechanism by which phagocytic cells avoid simultaneous O- 2; and NO synthesis, and this could possibly be mediated through the regulation of PC-PLC. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9767445

  4. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  5. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-02

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants.

  6. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  7. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  8. Reactive oxygen species generation is not different during isometric and lengthening contractions of mouse muscle.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Darcée D; Brooks, Susan V

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscles can be injured by lengthening contractions, when the muscles are stretched while activated. Lengthening contractions produce structural damage that leads to the degeneration and regeneration of damaged muscle fibers by mechanisms that have not been fully elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated at the time of injury may initiate degenerative or regenerative processes. In the present study we hypothesized that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle would generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. To test our hypothesis, we subjected muscles of mice to lengthening contractions or isometric contractions and simultaneously monitored intracellular ROS generation with the fluorescent indicator 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (CM-DCFH), which is oxidized by ROS to form the fluorescent product CM-DCF. We found that CM-DCF fluorescence was not different during or shortly after lengthening contractions compared with isometric controls, regardless of the amount of stretch and damage that occurred during the lengthening contractions. The only exception was that after severe stretches, the increase in CM-DCF fluorescence was impaired. We conclude that lengthening contractions that damage the muscle do not generate more ROS than isometric contractions that do not cause damage. The implication is that ROS generated at the time of injury are not the initiating signals for subsequent degenerative or regenerative processes.

  9. Visible Light Photocatalysis for the Generation and Use of Reactive Azolyl and Polyfluoroaryl Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Arora, Amandeep; Weaver, Jimmie D

    2016-10-18

    Photocatalysis offers several mechanistically unique pathways that are not rivaled by mainstream catalysis. Primarily, the ability to convert photochemical energy into single electron oxidation and reduction events provides a new dimension for chemists to consider when choosing how to activate a molecule or approach a complex synthesis. Since most organic molecules do not absorb light in the visible region, they are impervious to direct visible light photochemistry, which provides an opportunity for photocatalysis in which a visible light absorbing compound can serve as a mediator. In this Account, we discuss the consequences of catalyst mediated, photoinduced electron transfer to several classes of reducible arenes. While the bulk of the work discussed within this Account utilizes iridium-based photocatalysts, in principle the chemistry is not limited to this class of photocatalyst, and the principles should be more general. Instead, this Account focuses largely on the consequences of single electron transfer to poly- and perfluorinated arenes and 2-halo azoles. Electron transfer converts these stable molecules into reactive intermediates whose behavior often depends entirely on the identity of the halogen that undergoes substitution. The result is both diverse chemistry and an alternative way of thinking about the chemical reactivity of these motifs. Specifically, we discuss our efforts and those of others to develop strategies for the generation of radicals or radical anions from perfluoroarenes and azoles and the behavior of these intermediates as implied by reactions in which they participate. The divergent pathway is illustrated by 2-bromoazoles, which yield azolyl radicals and can be utilized for addition to π-bonds, while use of the 2-chloroazole substrate leads to an entirely different reaction profile. Under the appropriate reaction conditions, the reactive and transient intermediates are useful coupling partners and often provide unrivaled access to new

  10. Oxidation modifies the structure and function of the extracellular matrix generated by human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Christine Y; Degendorfer, Georg; Hammer, Astrid; Whitelock, John M; Malle, Ernst; Davies, Michael J

    2014-04-15

    ECM (extracellular matrix) materials, such as laminin, perlecan, type IV collagen and fibronectin, play a key role in determining the structure of the arterial wall and the properties of cells that interact with the ECM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of peroxynitrous acid, an oxidant generated by activated macrophages, on the structure and function of the ECM laid down by HCAECs (human coronary artery endothelial cells) in vitro and in vivo. We show that exposure of HCAEC-derived native matrix components to peroxynitrous acid (but not decomposed oxidant) at concentrations >1 μM results in a loss of antibody recognition of perlecan, collagen IV, and cell-binding sites on laminin and fibronectin. Loss of recognition was accompanied by decreased HCAEC adhesion. Real-time PCR showed up-regulation of inflammation-associated genes, including MMP7 (matrix metalloproteinase 7) and MMP13, as well as down-regulation of the laminin α2 chain, in HCAECs cultured on peroxynitrous acid-treated matrix compared with native matrix. Immunohistochemical studies provided evidence of co-localization of laminin with 3-nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of peroxynitrous acid damage, in type II-III/IV human atherosclerotic lesions, consistent with matrix damage occurring during disease development in vivo. The results of the present study suggest a mechanism through which peroxynitrous acid modifies endothelial cell-derived native ECM proteins of the arterial basement membrane in atherosclerotic lesions. These changes to ECM and particularly perlecan and laminin may be important in inducing cellular dysfunction and contribute to atherogenesis.

  11. Extracellular matrix molecules exhibit unique expression pattern in the climbing fiber-generating precerebellar nucleus, the inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Kecskes, S; Gaál, B; Rácz, É; Birinyi, A; Hunyadi, A; Matesz, C

    2015-01-22

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulates around different neuronal compartments of the central nervous system (CNS) or appears in diffuse reticular form throughout the neuropil. In the adult CNS, the perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds the perikarya and dendrites of various neuron types, whereas the axonal coats are aggregations of ECM around the individual synapses, and the nodal ECM is localized at the nodes of Ranvier. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated on rats that the heterogeneous distribution and molecular composition of ECM is associated with the variable cytoarchitecture and hodological organization of the vestibular nuclei and may also be related to their specific functions in gaze and posture control as well as in the compensatory mechanisms following vestibular lesion. Here, we investigated the ECM expression pattern in the climbing fiber-generating inferior olive (IO), which is functionally related to the vestibular nuclei. By using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the most characteristic finding was the lack of PNNs, presumably due to the absence of synapses on the perikarya and proximal dendrites of IO neurons. On the other hand, the darkly stained dots or ring-like structures in the neuropil might represent the periaxonal coats around the axon terminals of olivary synaptic glomeruli. We have observed positive ECM reaction for the hyaluronan, tenascin-R, hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (HAPLN1) and various chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The staining intensity and distribution of ECM molecules revealed a number of differences between the functionally different subnuclei of IO. We hypothesized that the different molecular composition and intensity differences of ECM reaction is associated with different control mechanisms of gaze and posture control executed by the visuomotor-vestibular, somatosensory and integrative subnuclei of the IO.

  12. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  13. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  14. Measurements of UV-generated free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Jung, K.; Fuchs, J.

    2006-03-01

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in skin by UV irradiation were measured by electron spin resonance (ESR). To increase the sensitivity of measurement the short life free radicals/ROS were scavenged and accumulated by using the nitroxyl probe 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetrametylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (PCA). The spatial distribution of free radicals/ROS measured in pig skin biopsies with ESR imaging after UV irradiation corresponds to the intensity decay of irradiance in the depth of the skin. The main part of free radicals/ROS were generated by UVA (320-400 nm) so that the spatial distribution of free radicals reaches up to the lower side of the dermis. In vivo measurements on human skin were performed with a L-band ESR spectrometer and a surface coil integrating the signal intensities from all skin layers to get a sufficient signal amplitude. Using this experimental arrangement the protection of UVB and UVA/B filter against the generation of free radicals/ROS in skin were measured. The protection against ROS and the repair of damages caused by them can be realized with active antioxidants characterized by a high antioxidative power (AP). The effect of UV filter and antioxidants corresponding to their protection against free radicals/ROS in skin generated by UVAB irradiation can be quantified by the new radical sun protection factor (RSF). The RSF indicates the increase of time for staying in the sun to generate the same number of free radicals/ROS in the skin like for the unprotected skin. Regarding the amount of generated free radicals/ROS in skin as an biophysical endpoint the RSF characterizes both the protection against UVB and UVA radiation.

  15. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  16. Manipulating the selection forces during affinity maturation to generate cross-reactive HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenshen; Mata-Fink, Jordi; Kriegsman, Barry; Hanson, Melissa; Irvine, Darrell J.; Eisen, Herman N.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Generation of potent antibodies by a mutation-selection process called affinity maturation is a key component of effective immune responses. Antibodies that protect against highly mutable pathogens must neutralize diverse strains. Developing effective immunization strategies to drive their evolution requires understanding how affinity maturation happens in an enviroment where variants of the same antigen are present. We present an in silico model of affinity maturation driven by antigen variants which reveals that induction of cross-reactive antibodies often occurs with low probability because conflicting selection forces, imposed by different antigen variants, can frustrate affinity maturation. We describe how variables such as temporal pattern of antigen administration influence the outcome of this frustrated evolutionary process. Our calculations predict, and experiments in mice with variant gp120 constructs of the HIV envelope protein confirm, that sequential immunization with antigen variants is preferred over a cocktail for induction of cross-reactive antibodies focused on the shared CD4 binding site epitope. PMID:25662010

  17. Catalytic Coupling of Oxidative Phosphorylation, ATP Demand, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Bazil, Jason N.; Beard, Daniel A.; Vinnakota, Kalyan C.

    2016-01-01

    Competing models of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the heart are highly disputed. In addition, the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and scavenging are not well understood. To deepen our understanding of these processes, a computer model was developed to integrate the biophysical processes of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS generation. The model was calibrated with experimental data obtained from isolated rat heart mitochondria subjected to physiological conditions and workloads. Model simulations show that changes in the quinone pool redox state are responsible for the apparent inorganic phosphate activation of complex III. Model simulations predict that complex III is responsible for more ROS production during physiological working conditions relative to complex I. However, this relationship is reversed under pathological conditions. Finally, model analysis reveals how a highly reduced quinone pool caused by elevated levels of succinate is likely responsible for the burst of ROS seen during reperfusion after ischemia. PMID:26910433

  18. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40phox and p47phox) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  19. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration.

  20. p53 activation contributes to patulin-induced nephrotoxicity via modulation of reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huan; Yin, Shutao; Song, Xinhua; Zhang, Enxiang; Fan, Lihong; Hu, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Patulin is a major mycotoxin found in fungal contaminated fruits and their derivative products. Previous studies showed that patulin was able to induce increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress was suggested to play a pivotal role in patulin-induced multiple toxic signaling. The objective of the present study was to investigate the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. Our study demonstrated that higher levels of ROS generation and DNA damage were induced in wild-type p53 cell lines than that found in either knockdown or knockout p53 cell lines in response to patulin exposure, suggesting p53 activation contributed to patulin-induced ROS generation. Mechanistically, we revealed that the pro-oxidant role of p53 in response to patulin was attributed to its ability to suppress catalase activity through up-regulation of PIG3. Moreover, these in vitro findings were further validated in the p53 wild-type/knockout mouse model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report addressing the functional role of p53 in patulin-induced oxidative stress. The findings of the present study provided novel insights into understanding mechanisms behind oxidative stress in response to patulin exposure. PMID:27071452

  1. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  2. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-08

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10-100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  3. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations.

  4. Calcium-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in brain mitochondria is mediated by permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Magnus J; Månsson, Roland; Morota, Saori; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Kallur, Thérese; Sumi, Tetsuo; Ishii, Nagao; Shimazu, Motohide; Keep, Marcus F; Jegorov, Alexandr; Elmér, Eskil

    2008-08-01

    Mitochondrial uptake of calcium in excitotoxicity is associated with subsequent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and delayed cellular calcium deregulation in ischemic and neurodegenerative insults. The mechanisms linking mitochondrial calcium uptake and ROS production remain unknown but activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) may be one such mechanism. In the present study, calcium increased ROS generation in isolated rodent brain and human liver mitochondria undergoing mPT despite an associated loss of membrane potential, NADH and respiration. Unspecific permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane by alamethicin likewise increased ROS independently of calcium, and the ROS increase was further potentiated if NAD(H) was added to the system. Importantly, calcium per se did not induce a ROS increase unless mPT was triggered. Twenty-one cyclosporin A analogs were evaluated for inhibition of calcium-induced ROS and their efficacy clearly paralleled their potency of inhibiting mPT-mediated mitochondrial swelling. We conclude that while intact respiring mitochondria possess powerful antioxidant capability, mPT induces a dysregulated oxidative state with loss of GSH- and NADPH-dependent ROS detoxification. We propose that mPT is a significant cause of pathological ROS generation in excitotoxic cell death.

  5. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  6. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Contributes to the Development of Carbon Black Cytotoxicity to Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Gwan; Noh, Won Jun; Kim, Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Carbon black, a particulate form of pure elemental carbon, is an industrial chemical with the high potential of occupational exposure. Although the relationship between exposure to particulate matters (PM) and cardiovascular diseases is well established, the cardiovascular risk of carbon black has not been characterized clearly. In this study, the cytotoxicity of carbon black to vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells were examined to investigate the potential vascular toxicity of carbon black. Carbon black with distinct particle size, N330 (primary size, 28~36 nm) and N990 (250~350 nm) were treated to A-10, rat aortic smooth muscle cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cell line, ECV304, and cell viability was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay. Treatment of carbon black N990 resulted in the significant reduction of viability in A-10 cells at 100 μg/ml, the highest concentration tested, while N330 failed to cause cell death. Cytotoxicity to ECV304 cells was induced only by N330 at higher concentration, 200 μg/ml, suggesting that ECV304 cells were relatively resistant to carbon black. Treatment of 100 μg/ml N990 led to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected by dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) in A-10 cells. Pretreatment of antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sulforaphane restored decreased viability of N990-treated A-10 cells, and N-acetylcysteine, but not sulforaphane, attenuated N990-induced ROS generation in A-10 cells. Taken together, present study shows that carbon black is cytotoxic to vascular cells, and the generation of reactive oxygen contributes to the development of cytotoxicity. ROS scavenging antioxidant could be a potential strategy to attenuate the toxicity induced by carbon black exposure. PMID:24278567

  7. Surface functionalization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Photo-stability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Kacie M.

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are becoming increasingly prevalent in society for applications of sunscreens, cosmetics, paints, biomedical imaging, and photovoltaics. Due to the increased surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles compared to bulk materials, it is important to know the health and safety impacts of these materials. One mechanism of toxicity of nominally "safe" materials such as TiO 2 is through the photocatalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production and ligand degradation can affect the bioavailability of these particles in aqueous organisms. We have investigated ROS generation by functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles and its influence on aggregation and bioavailability and toxicity to zebrafish embryos/larvae. For these studies we investigated anatase TiO2 nanoparticles. For application purposes and solution stability, the TiO2 nanoparticles were functionalized with a variety of ligands such as citrate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, and ascorbate. We quantitatively examined the amount of ROS produced in aqueous solution using fluorescent probes and see that more ROS is produced under UV light than in the dark control. Our measurements show that TiO2 toxicity reaches a maximum for nanoparticles with smaller diameters, and is correlated with surface area dependent changes in ROS generation. In an effort to reduce toxicity through control of the surface and surface ligands, we synthesized anatase nanoparticles of different sizes, functionalized them with different ligands, and examined the resulting ROS generation and ligand stability. Using a modular ligand containing a hydrophobic inner region and a hydrophilic outer region, we synthesized water-stable nanoparticles, via two different chemical reactions, having much-reduced ROS generation and thus reduced toxicity. These results suggest new strategies for making safer nanoparticles while still retaining their desired properties. We also examine the degradation of the different ligands

  8. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose

    PubMed Central

    Hibbs, John B.; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces. PMID:26895212

  9. Ca2+-dependent generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species serves as a signal for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activation during glutamate excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yuntao; Gross, Robert A; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation are both required for glutamate-induced excitotoxic neuronal death. Since activation of the glutamate receptors can induce increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated the relationship of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and ROS generation, and the possibility that ROS increase is a required signal for PARP-1 activation in cultured striatal neurons. Based on the spatial profile of NMDA-induced ROS generation, we found that only mitochondria showed a significant ROS increase within 30 min after NMDA receptor activation. This ROS increase was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex inhibitors rotenone and oligomycin, but not by the cytosolic phospholipase A2 or xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Mitochondrial ROS generation was also inhibited by both removal of Ca2+ from extracellular medium and blockage of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by either a mitochondrial uncoupler or a Ca2+ uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, both DNA damage and PARP-1 activation induced by NMDA treatment was inhibited by blocking mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake or by antioxidants. Our results demonstrate that ROS production during the early stage of acute excitotoxicity derives primarily from mitochondria and is Ca2+-dependent. More importantly, the increase of mitochondrial ROS serves as a signal for PARP-1 activation, suggesting that concomitant mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and PARP-1 activation constitute a unified mechanism for excitotoxic neuronal death. PMID:17947304

  10. Fucoidan protects ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress via normalization of reactive oxygen species generation through the Ca²⁺-dependent ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Qingfa; Liang, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) and it is the main cause of loss of vision. In previous years, interest in the biological activities of marine organisms has intensified. The effect of fucoidan from the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus on the molecular mechanisms of numerous diseases has been studied, while to date, its effect on DR was yet to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of fucoidan in DR. The human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE‑19 was exposed to high D‑glucose in the presence or absence of fucoidan. Cell viability was monitored using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. Ca2+ influx was measured with a calcium imaging system and the activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) protein was evaluated using western blot analysis. The non‑toxic fucoidan protected ARPE‑19 cells from high glucose‑induced cell death and normalized high glucose‑induced generation of ROS. Fucoidan also inhibited high glucose‑induced cell apoptosis, as well as the Ca2+ influx and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in ARPE‑19 cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that fucoidan protects ARPE‑19 cells against high glucose‑induced oxidative damage via normalization of ROS generation through the Ca2+‑dependent ERK signaling pathway.

  11. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  12. Enterovirus 71 Induces Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Generation That is Required for Efficient Replication

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mei-Ling; Weng, Shiue-Fen; Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ho, Hung-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Redox homeostasis is an important host factor determining the outcome of infectious disease. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection has become an important endemic disease in Southeast Asia and China. We have previously shown that oxidative stress promotes viral replication, and progeny virus induces oxidative stress in host cells. The detailed mechanism for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in infected cells remains elusive. In the current study, we demonstrate that mitochondria were a major ROS source in EV71-infected cells. Mitochondria in productively infected cells underwent morphologic changes and exhibited functional anomalies, such as a decrease in mitochondrial electrochemical potential ΔΨm and an increase in oligomycin-insensitive oxygen consumption. Respiratory control ratio of mitochondria from infected cells was significantly lower than that of normal cells. The total adenine nucleotide pool and ATP content of EV71-infected cells significantly diminished. However, there appeared to be a compensatory increase in mitochondrial mass. Treatment with mito-TEMPO reduced eIF2α phosphorylation and viral replication, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS act to promote viral replication. It is plausible that EV71 infection induces mitochondrial ROS generation, which is essential to viral replication, at the sacrifice of efficient energy production, and that infected cells up-regulate biogenesis of mitochondria to compensate for their functional defect. PMID:25401329

  13. Autophagy-related gene 7 (ATG7) and reactive oxygen species/extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate tetrandrine-induced autophagy in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Chen, Chao; Zhan, Yao; Chen, Yan; Huang, Zebo; Li, Wenhua

    2012-10-12

    Tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the broadly used Chinese medicinal herb Stephaniae tetrandrae, exhibits potent antitumor effects and has the potential to be used as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. We previously reported that high concentrations of tetrandrine induce apoptosis in liver cancer cells. Here, we found that in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, a low dose of tetrandrine (5 μm) induced the expression of LC3-II, resulted in the formation of acidic autophagolysosome vacuoles (AVOs), and caused a punctate fluorescence pattern with the GFP-LC3 protein, which all are markers for cellular autophagy. Tetrandrine induced the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and treatment with ROS scavengers significantly abrogated the tetrandrine-induced autophagy. These results suggest that the generation of ROS plays an important role in promoting tetrandrine-induced autophagy. Tetrandrine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction resulted in ROS accumulation and autophagy. ROS generation activated the ERK MAP kinase, and the ERK signaling pathway at least partially contributed to tetrandrine-induced autophagy in HCC cells. Moreover, we found that tetrandrine transcriptionally regulated the expression of autophagy related gene 7 (ATG7), which promoted tetrandrine-induced autophagy. In addition to in vitro studies, similar results were also observed in vivo, where tetrandrine caused the accumulation of ROS and induced cell autophagy in a tumor xenograft model. Interestingly, tetrandrine treatment also induced autophagy in a ROS-dependent manner in C. elegans muscle cells. Therefore, these findings suggest that tetrandrine is a potent autophagy agonist and may be a promising clinical chemotherapeutic agent.

  14. PKCα promotes generation of reactive oxygen species via DUOX2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiajun; Shao, Miaomiao; Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Li, Lili; Wu, Weicheng; Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang; Zhang, Mingming; Song, Shushu; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-08-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have long been considered as a hallmark of almost all types of cancer including HCC. Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), a serine/threonine kinase among conventional PKC family, is recognized as a major player in signal transduction and tumor progression. Overexpression of PKCα is commonly observed in human HCC and associated with its poor prognosis. However, how PKCα is involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis remains not fully understood. In this study, we found that among the members of conventional PKC family, PKCα, but not PKCβI or βII, promoted ROS production in HCC cells. PKCα stimulated generation of ROS by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. Depletion of DUOX2 abrogated PKCα-induced activation of AKT/MAPK pathways as well as cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC cells. Moreover, the expression of DUOX2 and PKCα was well positively correlated in both HCC cell lines and patient samples. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that PKCα plays a critical role in HCC development by inducing DUOX2 expression and ROS generation, and propose a strategy to target PKCα/DUOX2 as a potential adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. - Highlights: • PKCα promotes the generation of ROS in hepatocellular carcinoma. • PKCα induces ROS production by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. • DUOX2 is required for PKCα-induced AKT/MAPK activation and tumor progression in HCC. • The expression of PKCα is positively correlated with DUOX2 in HCC.

  15. Reactive oxygen species generation by the ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate (EBDC) fungicide mancozeb and its contribution to neuronal toxicity in mesencephalic cells.

    PubMed

    Domico, Lisa M; Cooper, Keith R; Bernard, Laura P; Zeevalk, Gail D

    2007-11-01

    Previous in vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that mancozeb (MZ) and maneb (MB), both widely used EBDC fungicides, are equipotent neurotoxicants that produce cell loss in mesencephalic dopaminergic and GABAergic cells after an acute 24h exposure. Mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition were associated with fungicide exposure. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is known to increase free radical production. Here the mechanism(s) of neuronal damage associated with MZ exposure was further explored by determining the role that reactive oxygen species (ROS) played in toxicity. Damage to mesencephalic dopamine and GABA cell populations were significantly attenuated when carried out in the presence of ascorbate or SOD, indicative of a free radical-mediated contribution to toxicity. ROS generation monitored by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production using Amplex Red increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to MZ. Inhibition of intracellular catalase with aminotriazole had little effect on H(2)O(2) generation, whereas exogenously added catalase significantly reduced H(2)O(2) production, demonstrating a large extracellular contribution to ROS generation. Conversely, cells preloaded with the ROS indicator dye DCF showed significant MZ-induced ROS production, demonstrating an increase in intracellular ROS. Both the organic backbone of MZ as well as its associated Mn ion, but not Zn ion, were responsible and required for H(2)O(2) generation. The functionally diverse NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenylene iodonium chloride, apocynin, and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzene-sulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride significantly attenuated H(2)O(2) production by MZ. In growth medium lacking cells, MZ produced little H(2)O(2), but enhanced H(2)O(2) generation when added with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase whereas, in cultured cells, allopurinol partially attenuated H(2)O(2) production by MZ. Minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation, modestly reduced H(2)O(2) formation in

  16. Interleukin-27 Enhances the Potential of Reactive Oxygen Species Generation from Monocyte-derived Macrophages and Dendritic cells by Induction of p47phox

    PubMed Central

    Sowrirajan, Bharatwaj; Saito, Yoshiro; Poudyal, Deepak; Chen, Qian; Sui, Hongyan; DeRavin, Suk See; Imamichi, Hiromi; Sato, Toyotaka; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Noguchi, Noriko; Malech, Harry L.; Lane, H. Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-27, a member of the IL-12 cytokine family, plays an important and diverse role in the function of the immune system. We have previously demonstrated that IL-27 is an anti-viral cytokine which inhibits HIV-1, HIV-2, Influenza virus and herpes simplex virus infection, and enhances the potential of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating activity during differentiation of monocytes to macrophages. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of the enhanced potential for ROS generation by IL-27. Real time PCR, western blot and knock down assays demonstrate that IL-27 is able to enhance the potential of superoxide production not only during differentiation but also in terminally differentiated-macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDC) in association with the induction of p47phox, a cytosolic component of the ROS producing enzyme, NADPH oxidase, and the increase in amounts of phosphorylated p47phox upon stimulation. We also demonstrate that IL-27 is able to induce extracellular superoxide dismutase during differentiation of monocytes but not in terminal differentiated macrophages. Since ROS plays an important role in a variety of inflammation, our data demonstrate that IL-27 is a potent regulator of ROS induction and may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:28240310

  17. Efficient generation of cavitation bubbles and reactive oxygen species using triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound sequence for sonodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a method of treating cancer using reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cavitation bubbles in collaboration with a sonosensitizer at a target tissue. In this treatment method, both localized ROS generation and ROS generation with high efficiency are important. In this study, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence, which consists of a short, extremely high intensity pulse immediately followed by a long, moderate-intensity burst, was employed for the efficient generation of ROS. In experiments, a solution sealed in a chamber was exposed to a triggered HIFU sequence. Then, the distribution of generated ROS was observed by the luminol reaction, and the amount of generated ROS was quantified using KI method. As a result, the localized ROS generation was demonstrated by light emission from the luminol reaction. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the triggered HIFU sequence has higher efficiency of ROS generation by both the KI method and the luminol reaction emission.

  18. TGF-β1 stimulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and generation of reactive oxygen species in cultured mouse podocytes, mediated in part by the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Sakairi, Toru; Beeson, Craig; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2013-11-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β has been associated with podocyte injury; we have examined its effect on podocyte bioenergetics. We studied transformed mouse podocytes, exposed to TGF-β1, using a label-free assay system, Seahorse XF24, which measures oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extracellular acidification rates (ECAR). Both basal OCR and ATP generation-coupled OCR were significantly higher in podocytes exposed to 0.3-10 ng/ml of TGF-β1 for 24, 48, and 72 h. TGF-β1 (3 ng/ml) increased oxidative capacity 75%, and 96% relative to control after 48 and 72 h, respectively. ATP content was increased 19% and 30% relative to control after a 48- and 72-h exposure, respectively. Under conditions of maximal mitochondrial function, TGF-β1 increased palmitate-driven OCR by 49%. Thus, TGF-β1 increases mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP generation in the presence of diverse energy substrates. TGF-β1 did not increase cell number or mitochondrial DNA copy number but did increase mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which could explain the OCR increase. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased by 32% after TGF-β1 exposure for 48 h. TGF-β activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and rapamycin reduced the TGF-β1-stimulated increases in OCR, ECAR, ATP generation, cellular metabolic activity, and protein generation. Our data suggest that TGF-β1, acting, in part, via mTOR, increases mitochondrial MMP and OCR, resulting in increased ROS generation and that this may contribute to podocyte injury.

  19. c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase signaling axis regulates diallyl trisulfide-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Marynowski, Stanley W; Singh, Shivendra V

    2006-05-15

    We have shown previously that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a critical event in G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest caused by diallyl trisulfide (DATS), which is a highly promising anticancer constituent of processed garlic. Using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model, we now report a novel mechanism involving c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling axis, which is known for its role in regulation of cell survival and apoptosis, in DATS-induced ROS production. The DATS-induced ROS generation, G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest and degradation, and hyperphosphorylation of Cdc25C were significantly attenuated in the presence of EUK134, a combined mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Interestingly, the DATS-induced ROS generation and G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest were also inhibited significantly in the presence of desferrioxamine, an iron chelator, but this protection was not observed with iron-saturated desferrioxamine. DATS treatment caused a marked increase in the level of labile iron that was accompanied by degradation of light chain of iron storage protein ferritin. Interestingly, DATS-mediated degradation of ferritin, increase in labile iron pool, ROS generation, and/or cell cycle arrest were significantly attenuated by ectopic expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of JNK kinase 2 and RNA interference of stress-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (SEK1), upstream kinases in JNK signal transduction pathway. In conclusion, the present study provides experimental evidence to indicate existence of a novel pathway involving JNK signaling axis in regulation of DATS-induced ROS generation.

  20. Effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system for control of airborne microorganisms in meat processing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating AirOcare equipment on the reduction of airborne bacteria in a meat processing environment was determined. Serratia marcescens and lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum) were used to artificiall...

  1. New heterocyclic precursors for thermal generation of reactive, electron-rich 1,2-diaza-1,3-butadienes.

    PubMed

    Boeckman, R K; Ge, P; Reed, J E

    2001-11-15

    [reaction--see text] [corrected] The preparation and thermolysis of new stable heterocyclic precursors of 1,2-diaza-1,3-butadienes is described. The resulting reactive diazadienes are trapped in situ with N-phenylmaleimide [corrected]. The effect of precursor structure on the temperature at which the diazadienes are generated is discussed.

  2. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  3. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    diffusion model at the scale of a single rock is developed incorporating the proposed kinetic rate expressions. Simulations of initiation, washout and AMD flows are discussed to gain a better understanding of the role of porosity, effective diffusivity and reactive surface area in generating AMD. Simulations indicate that flow boundary conditions control generation of acid rock drainage as porosity increases.

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans capsule protects cell from oxygen reactive species generated by antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, Renato Araujo; Hamblin, Michael R.; Kato, Ilka T.; Fuchs, Beth; Mylonakis, Eleytherios; Simões Ribeiro, Martha; Tegos, George

    2011-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) is based on the utilization of substances that can photosensitize biological tissues and are capable of being activated in the presence of light. Cryptococcus neoformans is an yeast surrounded by a capsule composed primarily of glucoronoxylomannan that plays an important role in its virulence. This yeast causes infection on skin, lungs and brain that can be associated with neurological sequelae and neurosurgical interventions, and its conventional treatment requires prolonged antifungal therapy, which presents important adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Cryptococcus neoformans capsule against reactive oxygen species generated by APDI. Cryptococcus neoformans KN99α, which is a strain able to produce capsule, and CAP59 that does not present capsule production were submitted to APDI using methylene blue (MB), rose bengal (RB), and pL-ce6 as photosensitizers (PS). Then microbial inactivation was evaluated by counting colony form units following APDI and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) illustrated localization as well as the preferential accumulation of PS into the fungal cells. C. neoformans KN99α was more resistant to APDI than CAP59 for all PSs tested. CLSM showed incorporation of MB and RB into the cytoplasm and a preferential uptake in mitochondria. A nuclear accumulation of MB was also observed. Contrarily, pL-ce6 appears accumulated in cell wall and cell membrane and minimal florescence was observed inside the fungal cells. In conclusion, the ability of C. neoformans to form capsule enhances survival following APDI.

  5. Heavy metals generate reactive oxygen species in terrestrial and aquatic ciliated protozoa.

    PubMed

    Rico, Daniel; Martín-González, Ana; Díaz, Silvia; de Lucas, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Juan-Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induction by exposure to heavy metals (Cd, Cu or Zn) in diverse free-living ciliated protozoa (Tetrahymena sp. and three strains of Colpoda steinii, isolated from freshwater and soils with different level of metal pollution) has been evaluated. Using specific fluorophores, such as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, hydroethidine and dihydrorhodamine 123, and a fluorescence microscope with the program MetaMorph Imaging System 4.0, we have analyzed both the average fluorescence emission and the heterogeneous distribution of fluorescence in control and treated cells. This is the first time that these fluorophores are used to detect ROS production in ciliated protozoa. All metals generate ROS, mainly superoxide and peroxides, showing a remarkable inter- and intra-specific variations. Likewise, resistance against each metal was also very diverse. Cu and specially Cd, the most toxic heavy metal for these ciliates, are the best oxidative stress inducers. However, a correlation between fluorescence emission intensity and cellular metal sensitivity for each strain cannot be established. Results are discussed and compared with similar findings previously published in other unicellular and pluricellular organisms.

  6. Cadmium induces apoptosis and genotoxicity in rainbow trout hepatocytes through generation of reactive oxygene species.

    PubMed

    Risso-de Faverney, C; Devaux, A; Lafaurie, M; Girard, J P; Bailly, B; Rahmani, R

    2001-06-01

    Cadmium poses a serious environmental threat in aquatic ecosystems but the mechanisms of its toxicity remain unclear. The purpose of this work was first to determine whether cadmium induced apoptosis in trout hepatocytes, second to determine whether or not reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity. Hepatocytes exposed to increasing cadmium concentrations (in the range of 1-10 microM) showed a molecular hallmark of apoptosis which is the fragmentation of the nuclear DNA into oligonucleosomal-length fragments, resulting from an activation of endogenous endonucleases and recognized as a 'DNA ladder' on conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. Exposure of hepatocytes to cadmium led clearly to the DEVD-dependent protease activation, acting upstream from the endonucleases and considered as central mediators of apoptosis. DNA strand breaks in cadmium-treated trout hepatocytes was assessed using the comet assay, a rapid and sensitive single-cell gel electrophoresis technique used to detect DNA primary damage in individual cells. Simultaneous treatment of trout hepatocytes with cadmium and the nitroxide radical TEMPO used as a ROS scavenger, reduced significantly DNA fragmentation, DEVD-related protease activity and DNA strand breaks formation. These results lead to a working hypothesis that cadmium-induced apoptosis and DNA strand breaks in trout hepatocytes are partially triggered by the generation of ROS. Additional studies are required for proposing a mechanistic model of cadmium-induced apoptosis and genotoxicity in trout liver cells, in underlying the balance between DNA damage and cellular defence systems in fish.

  7. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  8. Evidence for the generation of reactive oxygen species from hydroquinone and benzoquinone: Roles in arsenite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenxiu; Wang, Yujun; Fang, Guodong; Wu, Tongliang; Liu, Cun; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-05-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) significantly affects the fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In the present study, we investigated the oxidation of As(III) in the presence of hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ), which were selected as model quinone moieties for NOM. It was found that As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in the presence of HQ or BQ at neutral conditions, and the oxidation efficiency of As(III) increased from 33% to 92% in HQ solutions and from 0 to 80% in BQ solutions with pH increasing from 6.5 to 8.5. The oxidation mechanism was further explored with electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The results showed that semiquinone radicals (SQ(-)) were generated from the comproportionation reaction between BQ and HQ, which mediated the formation of superoxide anion (O2(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH). Both the SQ(-), H2O2 and OH contributed to the oxidation of As(III). The increase of pH favored the formation of SQ(-), and thus promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as As(III) oxidation. Increasing concentrations of HQ and BQ from 0.1 to 1.0 mM enhanced As(III) oxidation from 65% to 94% and from 10% to 53%, respectively. The findings of this study facilitate our understanding of the fate and transformation of As(III) in organic-rich aquatic environments and highlight quinone moieties as the potential oxidants for As(III) in the remediation of arsenic contaminated sites.

  9. Pathophysiological and pharmacological implications of mitochondria-targeted reactive oxygen species generation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jou, Mei-Jie

    2008-01-01

    Astrocytes, in addition to passively supporting neurons, have recently been shown to be actively involved in synaptic transmission and neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system (CNS). This review summarizes briefly our previous observations using fluorescent probes coupled with laser scanning digital imaging microscopy to visualize spatio-temporal alteration of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) generation in intact astrocytes. mROS formation is enhanced by exogenous oxidants exposure, Ca2+ stress and endogenous pathological defect of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. In addition, mROS formation can be specifically stimulated by visible light or visible laser irradiation and can be augmented further by photodynamic coupling with photosensitizers, particularly with mitochondria-targeted photosensitizers. "Severe" oxidative insult often results in massive and homogeneous augmentation of mROS formation which causes cessation of mitochondrial movement, pathological fission and irreversible swelling of mitochondria and eventually apoptosis or necrosis of cells. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and protectors such as MitoQ, melatonin and nanoparticle C(60) effectively prevent "severe" mROS generation. Intriguingly, "minor" oxidative insults enhance heterogeneity of mROS and mitochondrial dynamics. "Minor" mROS formation-induced fission and fusion of mitochondria relocates mitochondrial network to form a mitochondria free gap, i.e., "firewall", which may play a crucial role in mROS-mediated protective "preconditioning" by preventing propagation of mROS during oxidative insults. These mROS-targeted strategies for either enhancement or prevention of mitochondrial oxidative stress in astrocytes may provide new insights for future development of therapeutic interventions in the treatment of cancer such as astrocytomas and gliomas and astrocyte-associated neurodegeneration, mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  10. Biocompatible ZnS:Mn quantum dots for reactive oxygen generation and detection in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Diestra, Daysi; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Bracho-Rincon, Dina P.; González-Feliciano, José A.; González, Carlos I.; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2015-12-01

    We report here the versatility of Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (ZnS:Mn QDs) synthesized in aqueous medium for generating reactive oxygen species and for detecting cells. Our experiments provide evidence leading to the elimination of Cd-based cores in CdSe/ZnS systems by substitution of Mn-doped ZnS. Advanced electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical spectroscopy were applied to elucidate the formation, morphology, and dispersion of the products. We study for the first time the ability of ZnS:Mn QDs to act as immobilizing agents for Tyrosinase (Tyr) enzyme. It was found that ZnS:Mn QDs show no deactivation of Tyr enzyme, which efficiently catalyzed the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation and its eventual reduction (-0.063 V vs. Ag/AgCl) on the biosensor surface. The biosensor showed a linear response in the range of 12 μmol/L-0.1 mmol/L at low operation potential. Our observations are explained in terms of a catalase-cycled kinetic mechanism based on the binding of H2O2 to the axial position of one of the active copper sites of the oxy-Tyr during the catalase cycle to produce deoxy-Tyr. A singlet oxygen quantum yield of 0.62 in buffer and 0.54 in water was found when ZnS:Mn QDs were employed as a photosensitizer in the presence of a chemical scavenger and a standard dye. These results are consistent with a chemical trapping energy transfer mechanism. Our results also indicate that ZnS:Mn QDs are well tolerated by HeLa Cells reaching cell viabilities as high as 88 % at 300 µg/mL of QDs for 24 h of incubation. The ability of ZnS:Mn QDs as luminescent nanoprobes for bioimaging is also discussed.

  11. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-04

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  12. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  13. Elevated Generation of Reactive Oxygen/Nitrogen Species in Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ian C.; Zajac, Allan J.; Nolte, Kurt B.; Botten, Jason; Hjelle, Brian; Matalon, Sadis

    2002-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a life-threatening respiratory disease characterized by profound pulmonary edema and myocardial depression. Most cases of HCPS in North America are caused by Sin Nombre virus (SNV), which is carried asymptomatically by deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). The underlying pathophysiology of HCPS is poorly understood. We hypothesized that pathogenic SNV infection results in increased generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS), which contribute to the morbidity and mortality of HCPS. Human disease following infection with SNV or Andes virus was associated with increased nitrotyrosine (NT) adduct formation in the lungs, heart, and plasma and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the lungs compared to the results obtained for normal human volunteers. In contrast, NT formation was not increased in the lungs or cardiac tissue from SNV-infected deer mice, even at the time of peak viral antigen expression. In a murine (Mus musculus) model of HCPS (infection of NZB/BLNJ mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13), HCPS-like disease was associated with elevated expression of iNOS in the lungs and NT formation in plasma, cardiac tissue, and the lungs. In this model, intraperitoneal injection of 1400W, a specific iNOS inhibitor, every 12 h during infection significantly improved survival without affecting intrapulmonary fluid accumulation or viral replication, suggesting that cardiac damage may instead be the cause of mortality. These data indicate that elevated production of RONS is a feature of pathogenic New World hantavirus infection and that pharmacologic blockade of iNOS activity may be of therapeutic benefit in HCPS cases, possibly by ameliorating the myocardial suppressant effects of RONS. PMID:12134039

  14. Nucleic acid reactivity : challenges for next-generation semiempirical quantum models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    Semiempirical quantum models are routinely used to study mechanisms of RNA catalysis and phosphoryl transfer reactions using combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods. Herein, we provide a broad assessment of the performance of existing semiempirical quantum models to describe nucleic acid structure and reactivity in order to quantify their limitations and guide the development of next-generation quantum models with improved accuracy. Neglect of diatomic diffierential overlap (NDDO) and self-consistent density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) semiempirical models are evaluated against high-level quantum mechanical benchmark calculations for seven biologically important data sets. The data sets include: proton affinities, polarizabilities, nucleobase dimer interactions, dimethyl phosphate anion, nucleoside sugar and glycosidic torsion conformations, and RNA phosphoryl transfer model reactions. As an additional baseline, comparisons are made with several commonly used density-functional models, including M062X and B3LYP (in some cases with dispersion corrections). The results show that, among the semiempirical models examined, the AM1/d-PhoT model is the most robust at predicting proton affinities. AM1/d-PhoT and DFTB3-3ob/OPhyd reproduce the MP2 potential energy surfaces of 6 associative RNA phosphoryl transfer model reactions reasonably well. Further, a recently developed linear-scaling “modified divide-and-conquer” model exhibits the most accurate results for binding energies of both hydrogen bonded and stacked nucleobase dimers. The semiempirical models considered here are shown to underestimate the isotropic polarizabilities of neutral molecules by approximately 30%. The semiempirical models also fail to adequately describe torsion profiles within the dimethyl phosphate anion, the nucleoside sugar ring puckers, and the rotations about the nucleoside glycosidic bond. The modeling of pentavalent phosphorus, particularly with thio

  15. Control of Reactive Species Generated by Low-frequency Biased Nanosecond Pulse Discharge in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-09-01

    The control of hydroxyl radical and the other gas phase species generation in the ejected gas through air plasma (air plasma effluent) has been experimentally studied, which is a key to extend the range of plasma treatment. Nanosecond pulse discharge is known to produce high reduced electric field (E/N) discharge that leads to efficient generation of the reactive species than conventional low frequency discharge, while the charge-voltage cycle in the low frequency discharge is known to be well-controlled. In this study, the nanosecond pulse discharge biased with AC low frequency high voltage is used to take advantages of these discharges, which allows us to modulate the reactive species composition in the air plasma effluent. The utilization of the gas-liquid interface and the liquid phase chemical reactions between the modulated long-lived reactive species delivered from the air plasma effluent could realize efficient liquid phase chemical reactions leading to short-lived reactive species production far from the air plasma, which is crucial for some plasma agricultural applications.

  16. Enhanced intracellular delivery of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating copper chelator D-penicillamine via a novel gelatin--D-penicillamine conjugate.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Anshul; Wadhwa, Saurabh; Mumper, Russell J

    2008-07-01

    D-Penicillamine (D-pen) is an established copper chelator. We have recently shown that the copper-catalyzed D-pen oxidation generates concentration-dependent hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2). Additionally, D-pen coincubated with cupric sulfate resulted in cytotoxicity in human leukemia and breast cancer cells due to the extracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The inherent physicochemical properties of D-pen such as its short in vivo half-life, low partition coefficient, and rapid metal catalyzed oxidation limit its intracellular uptake and the potential utility as an anticancer agent in vivo. Therefore, to enhance the intracellular delivery and to protect the thiol moiety of D-pen, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel gelatin-D-pen conjugate. D-pen was covalently coupled to gelatin with a biologically reversible disulfide bond with the aid of a heterobifunctional cross-linker ( N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate) (SPDP). Additionally, fluorescein-labeled gelatin-D-pen conjugate was synthesized for cell uptake studies. D-pen alone was shown not to enter leukemia cells. In contrast, the qualitative intracellular uptake of the conjugate in human leukemia cells (HL-60) was shown with confocal microscopy. The conjugate exhibited slow cell uptake (over the period of 48 to 72 h). A novel HPLC assay was developed to simultaneously quantify both D-pen and glutathione in a single run. The conjugate was shown to completely release D-pen in the presence of glutathione (1 mM) in approximately 3 h in PBS buffer, pH 7.4. The gelatin-D-pen conjugate resulted in significantly greater cytotoxicity compared to free D-pen, gelatin alone, and a physical mixture of gelatin and D-pen in human leukemia cells. Further studies are warranted to assess the potential of D-pen conjugate in the delivery of D-pen as a ROS generating anticancer agent.

  17. Structure-reactivity relationships of flavan-3-ols on product generation in aqueous glucose/glycine model systems.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yuko; Peterson, Devin G

    2007-05-02

    Ring structure-reactivity relationships of three flavan-3-ols [epicatechin (EC), epicatechin gallate (ECG), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)] and three simple phenolic compounds (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene, 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene, and methylgallate as the analogous individual A, B, and C benzene rings of EGCG) on product generation in an aqueous glucose-glycine reaction model system (125 degrees C and 30 min) were investigated. The addition of EC, ECG, or EGCG to a glucose-glycine model was reported to similarly significantly reduce the formation of pyrazine, methyl-substituted pyrazines, and cyclotene. All three flavan-3-ols were also reported to generate phenolic-C2, C3, C4, and C6 sugar fragment adducts and to statistically reduce the concentration of glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, diacetyl, acetoin, and 3-deoxyglucosone during the reaction time course, except for the EGCG reaction where 3-deoxyglucosone was not statistically different from the control after 20 min. For the simple phenolic compounds, methylgallate followed by 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene was the least reactive, while 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene was reported as the most reactive phenolic structure for quenching or reducing the concentration of the alpha-hydroxy- and alpha-dicarbonyl sugar fragments during the reaction time course. These results imply that the main mechanism flavan-3-ols reduced product generation was phenolic-sugar fragment carbonyl trapping reactions primarily on the A ring (the meta-polyhydroxylated benzene ring) or not due to the alteration of the reaction reduction potential.

  18. From Microbiology to Cancer Biology: The Rid Protein Family Prevents Cellular Damage Caused by Endogenously Generated Reactive Nitrogen Species

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Diana M.; Ernst, Dustin C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Rid family of proteins is highly conserved and broadly distributed throughout the domains of life. Genetic and biochemical studies, primarily in Salmonella enterica, have defined a role for RidA in responding to endogenously generated reactive metabolites. The data show that 2-aminoacrylate (2AA), a reactive enamine intermediate generated by some pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes, accumulates in the absence of RidA. The accumulation of 2AA leads to covalent modification and inactivation of several enzymes involved in essential metabolic processes. This review describes the 2AA hydrolyzing activity of RidA and the effect of this biochemical activity on the metabolic network, which impacts organism fitness. The reported activity of RidA and the consequences encountered in vivo when RidA is absent have challenged fundamental assumptions in enzymology, biochemistry and cell metabolism regarding the fate of transiently-generated reactive enamine intermediates. The current understanding of RidA in Salmonella and the broad distribution of Rid family proteins provide exciting opportunities for future studies to define metabolic roles of Rid family members from microbes to man. PMID:25620221

  19. Flow cytometric assessment of reactive oxygen species generations that are directly related to cellular ZnO nanoparticle uptake.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyun Ju; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple flow cytometry protocol to evaluate nanoparticle associated biological response was proposed. Particularly, we have evaluated the effect of surface charge on the cellular nanoparticle associations and nanoparticle-induced apoptosis. Significant enhancement in side scattering intensity was observed for the HeLa cells treated with positively charged (PLL)ZnO nanoparticles, suggesting that the (PLL)ZnO nanoparticles may induce cell death via adsorption and endocytosis of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, the negatively charged (PAA)ZnO nanoparticle seems to cause cell death process indirectly via the released Zn ions, with less contribution from cellular association of nanoparticles. Time- and dose-dependent studies on cellular association of ZnO nanoparticles, and ZnO associated reactive oxygen species generation were also performed for the HeLa cells exposed to the (PLL)ZnO nanoparticle. For those cells associated with (PLL)ZnO nanoparticle, a significant enhancement in reactive oxygen species generation was observed even at a lower concentration (10 ppm), which was not observable for the results with the whole cell population. By using this approach, we are able to distinguish biological responses (e.g., reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation) directly related to the cellular associations of NPs from those indirectly related to the cellular associations of NPs, such as the cytotoxicity caused by the NP released metal ions.

  20. The effect of the copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine on reactive oxygen species generation by human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Prus, Eugenia; Fibach, Eitan

    2007-12-01

    Clinical observations suggest that copper (Cu) plays a role in regulating hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) development. Cu is known to generate oxidative stress in cells which in turn affects proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. To study this role of Cu, we used double staining flow cytometry to measure reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by neonatal cord blood-derived CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. ROS was increased by Cu and was decreased by the Cu chelator tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). Previously, we showed that TEPA reduces the free Cu content of HPCs and stimulates their ex vivo expansion. The present results suggest that TEPA affects expansion of HPCs by lowering their oxidative stress.

  1. Production of Ca(2+)-Independent and Acidstable Recombinant α-Amylase of Bacillus acidicola Extracellularly and its Applicability in Generating Maltooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Deepak; Satyanarayana, T

    2016-11-01

    The recombinant acidstable α-amylase (Ba-amy) of acidophilic bacterium Bacillus acidicola TSAS1 has been produced extracellularly using a combination of cloning (E. coli and P. pastoris) and physico-chemical treatment strategies. A total of 150,000 U/L of Ba-amy were attained under constitutive promoter in P. pastoris, which is 15-fold higher than that of the wild strain B. acidicola (10,000 U/L). The recombinant P. pastoris integrated two copies of Ba-amy under GAP promoter. The pure Ba-amy expressed in P. pastoris is a glycoprotein of 66 kDa, which is optimally active at pH 4.0 and 60 °C with a T 1/2 of 25 min at 70 °C. The K m, V max and K cat values of the recombinant Ba-amy are 1.66 mg/mL, 53.6 µmol/mg/min and 106.8/s, respectively. The enzyme generates maltose (30 %), maltotriose (20 %) and other higher maltooligosaccharides from starch, thus, useful in baking as an antistale. This is the first report on the optimization of extracellular production of recombinant acidic α-amylase of an acidophilic bacterium.

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  3. The HemQ coprohaem decarboxylase generates reactive oxygen species: implications for the evolution of classical haem biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Charlie; Dailey, Harry A.; Shepherd, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria require a haem biosynthetic pathway for the assembly of a variety of protein complexes, including cytochromes, peroxidases, globins, and catalase. Haem is synthesised via a series of tetrapyrrole intermediates, including non-metallated porphyrins, such as protoporphyrin IX, which is well known to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of light and oxygen. Staphylococcus aureus has an ancient haem biosynthetic pathway that proceeds via the formation of coproporphyrin III, a less reactive porphyrin. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that HemY of S. aureus is able to generate both protoporphyrin IX and coproporphyrin III, and that the terminal enzyme of this pathway, HemQ, can stimulate the generation of protoporphyrin IX (but not coproporphyrin III). Assays with hydrogen peroxide, horseradish peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase confirm that this stimulatory effect is mediated by superoxide. Structural modelling reveals that HemQ enzymes do not possess the structural attributes that are common to peroxidases that form compound I [FeIV==O]+, which taken together with the superoxide data leaves Fenton chemistry as a likely route for the superoxide-mediated stimulation of protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase activity of HemY. This generation of toxic free radicals could explain why HemQ enzymes have not been identified in organisms that synthesise haem via the classical protoporphyrin IX pathway. This work has implications for the divergent evolution of haem biosynthesis in ancestral microorganisms, and provides new structural and mechanistic insights into a recently discovered oxidative decarboxylase reaction. PMID:27597779

  4. A Reactive-Heat-Pipe for Combined Heat Generation and Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    Pumping Heights for Different Temperatures. . . 70 22 Effect of Flow Losses on System Thermal Performance with No Argon in the Condenser...73 23 Flow Losses in the Vapor Transport System with Argon in the Condenser ................... 75 24 Temperature Distributions in a Reactive-Heat...shroud flow of inert gas, usually argon. The inert gas is recirculated through a vent system . The outer shroud flow prevents the direct contact

  5. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Reactive Species Generation of N-Benzenesulfonyl Derivatives of Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Sol Romina; Miana, Gisele Emilse; Albesa, Inés; Mazzieri, María Rosa; Becerra, María Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Two N-benzenesulfonyl (BS) derivatives of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) were designed, prepared, and screened for antibacterial activity. This approach was based on combining the two privileged structures, BS and THQ, which are known to be active. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of BS-THQ and its analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ, and to investigate the roles of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in their lethality. Both showed bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300, with transmission electron microscopy revealing a disturbed membrane architecture. Furthermore, an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in strains treated with BS-THQ with respect to the control was detected when fluorescent microscopy and spectrophotometric techniques were used. The analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ demonstrated a broader spectrum of activity than BS-THQ, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL against reference strains of S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The assayed compounds represent promising structures for the development of new synthetic classes of antimicrobials.

  6. FRAS1-related extracellular matrix 3 (FREM3) single-nucleotide polymorphism effects on gene expression, amygdala reactivity and perceptual processing speed: An accelerated aging pathway of depression risk

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Iruku, Swetha P.; Lin, Chien-Wei; Conley, Emily Drabant; Puralewski, Rachel; French, Beverly; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Sibille, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    The A allele of the FRAS1-related extracellular matrix protein 3 (FREM3) rs7676614 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was linked to major depressive disorder (MDD) in an early genome-wide association study (GWAS), and to symptoms of psychomotor retardation in a follow-up investigation. In line with significant overlap between age- and depression-related molecular pathways, parallel work has shown that FREM3 expression in postmortem human brain decreases with age. Here, we probe the effect of rs7676614 on amygdala reactivity and perceptual processing speed, both of which are altered in depression and aging. Amygdala reactivity was assessed using a face-matching BOLD fMRI paradigm in 365 Caucasian participants in the Duke Neurogenetics Study (DNS) (192 women, mean age 19.7 ± 1.2). Perceptual processing speed was indexed by reaction times in the same task and the Trail Making Test (TMT). The effect of rs7676614 on FREM3 mRNA brain expression levels was probed in a postmortem cohort of 169 Caucasian individuals (44 women, mean age 50.8 ± 14.9). The A allele of rs7676614 was associated with blunted amygdala reactivity to faces, slower reaction times in the face-matching condition (p < 0.04), as well as marginally slower performance on TMT Part B (p = 0.056). In the postmortem cohort, the T allele of rs6537170 (proxy for the rs7676614 A allele), was associated with trend-level reductions in gene expression in Brodmann areas 11 and 47 (p = 0.066), reminiscent of patterns characteristic of older age. The low-expressing allele of another FREM3 SNP (rs1391187) was similarly associated with reduced amygdala reactivity and slower TMT Part B speed, in addition to reduced BA47 activity and extraversion (p < 0.05). Together, these results suggest common genetic variation associated with reduced FREM3 expression may confer risk for a subtype of depression characterized by reduced reactivity to environmental stimuli and slower perceptual processing speed, possibly suggestive of

  7. [Formation of reactive oxygen species during pollen grain germination].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, A V; Matveeva, N P; Polesskaia, O G; Ermakov, I P

    2009-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen species in pollen at the early germination stage, which precedes the formation of the pollen tube, was studied. During this period, pollen grain is being hydrated, abruptly increasing its volume, and it passes from the resting state to active metabolism. Fluorescent methods have made it possible to reveal reactive oxygen species in the cytoplasm and inner layer of the pollen wall, intine. The cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species were mostly found in mitochondria, while extracellular ones were localized in aperture zones of intine, as well as in the solution surrounding pollen grains in vitro. The content of extracellular reactive oxygen species decreased after superoxide dismutase (100 units per ml) and diphenylene iodonium (100 microM), which indicates NADPH oxidase as one of possible producent of them. In conditions of suppression of extracellular reactive oxygen species production (100 microM diphenilene iodonium) or their promoted removal (after addition of 10 to 100 microM ascorbic acid), the number of germinating pollen grains increased. This effect disappeared after further increase in the concentration of the listed reagents. The result is evidence of the significance of processes of generation/removal of extracellular reactive oxygen species for pollen germination.

  8. Inorganic Polyphosphates Regulate Hexokinase Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Mitochondria of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Amanda; Moraes, Jorge; da Silva, José Roberto; Costa, Evenilton P.; Menezes, Jackson; da Silva Vaz Jr, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Campos, Eldo

    2013-01-01

    The physiological roles of polyphosphates (poly P) recently found in arthropod mitochondria remain obscure. Here, the possible involvement of poly P with reactive oxygen species generation in mitochondria of Rhipicephalus microplus embryos was investigated. Mitochondrial hexokinase and scavenger antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase were assayed during embryogenesis of R. microplus. The influence of poly P3 and poly P15 were analyzed during the period of higher enzymatic activity during embryogenesis. Both poly Ps inhibited hexokinase activity by up to 90% and, interestingly, the mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase activity was stimulated by the hexokinase reaction product, glucose-6-phosphate. Poly P increased hydrogen peroxide generation in mitochondria in a situation where mitochondrial hexokinase is also active. The superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities were higher during embryo cellularization, at the end of embryogenesis and during embryo segmentation, respectively. All of the enzymes were stimulated by poly P3. However, superoxide dismutase was not affected by poly P15, catalase activity was stimulated only at high concentrations and glutathione reductase was the only enzyme that was stimulated in the same way by both poly Ps. Altogether, our results indicate that inorganic polyphosphate and mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase regulation can be correlated with the generation of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria of R. microplus embryos. PMID:23983617

  9. arNOX: generator of reactive oxygen species in the skin and sera of aging individuals subject to external modulation.

    PubMed

    Morré, Dorothy M; Meadows, Christiaan; Morré, D James

    2010-01-01

    An aging-related cell-surface oxidase (aging-related NADH oxidase, arNOX) generating superoxide and other reactive oxygen species is shed from the cell surface and is found in saliva, urine, perspiration, and interstitial fluids that surround the collagen and elastin matrix underlying dermis. arNOX activity correlates with age and reaches a maximum at about age 65 in males and 55 in females. arNOX activities are highly correlated with values of human skin where a causal relationship is indicated. Ongoing efforts focus on cloning arNOX proteins and development of antiaging formulas based on arNOX inhibition (intervention).

  10. Calcium and Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Generation: How to Read the Facts

    PubMed Central

    Adam-Vizi, Vera; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2011-01-01

    A number of recent discoveries indicate that abnormal Ca2+ signaling, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the neuronal damage in Alzheimer’s disease. However, the literature on the interactions between these factors is controversial especially in the interpretation of the cause-effect relationship between mitochondrial damage induced by Ca2+ overload and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, we survey the experimental observations on the Ca2+-induced mitochondrial ROS production, explain the sources of controversy in interpreting these results, and discuss the different molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of Ca2+ on the ROS emission by brain mitochondria. PMID:20421693

  11. NQO2 is a reactive oxygen species generating off-target for acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity.

  12. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  13. Oxidation-extraction spectrometry of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) under ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuwei; Cheng, Chunping; Wang, Jun; Jin, Xudong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhiqiu; Gao, Jingqun; Kang, Pingli

    2011-09-01

    In order to examine the mechanism and process of sonodynamic reaction, the chlorophyllin magnesium (Chl-Mg) acting as a sonosensitizer was irradiated by ultrasound, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of oxidation-extraction spectrometry (OES). That is, under ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of Chl-Mg, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can be extracted by mixed organic solvent and display a obvious visible absorption at 563 nm wavelength. Besides, the generation conditions of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated that the quantities of generated ROS increased with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time, Chl-Mg concentration and DPCI concentration. Finally, several radical scavengers (l-Histidine (His), 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-methylphenol (BHT) and Vitamin C (VC)) were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It was found that at least the hydroxyl radical (OH) and singlet oxygen ( 1O 2) were generated in the presence of Chl-Mg under ultrasonic irradiation. It is wish that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the mechanism of SDT and the application of Chl-Mg in tumor treatment.

  14. A LAIR-1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Abdirahman; Perez, Mathilde Foglierini; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Maina Ndungu, Francis; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro; Marsh, Kevin; Thathy, Vandana; Corti, Davide; Sallusto, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies1–4. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here, we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 100 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR-1, an Ig superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR-1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine. PMID:26700814

  15. A LAIR1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joshua; Pieper, Kathrin; Piccoli, Luca; Abdi, Abdirahman; Foglierini, Mathilde; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Ndungu, Francis Maina; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro; Marsh, Kevin; Thathy, Vandana; Corti, Davide; Sallusto, Federica; Bull, Peter; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2016-01-07

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 98 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR1, an immunoglobulin superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B-cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine.

  16. Next-generation re-sequencing of genes involved in increased platelet reactivity in diabetic patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Postula, Marek; Janicki, Piotr K; Eyileten, Ceren; Rosiak, Marek; Kaplon-Cieslicka, Agnieszka; Sugino, Shigekazu; Wilimski, Radosław; Kosior, Dariusz A; Opolski, Grzegorz; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rare missense genetic variants in several genes related to platelet functions and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) response are associated with the platelet reactivity in patients with diabetes type 2 (T2D) on ASA therapy. Fifty eight exons and corresponding introns of eight selected genes, including PTGS1, PTGS2, TXBAS1, PTGIS, ADRA2A, ADRA2B, TXBA2R, and P2RY1 were re-sequenced in 230 DNA samples from T2D patients by using a pooled PCR amplification and next-generation sequencing by Illumina HiSeq2000. The observed non-synonymous variants were confirmed by individual genotyping of 384 DNA samples comprising of the individuals from the original discovery pools and additional verification cohort of 154 ASA-treated T2DM patients. The association between investigated phenotypes (ASA induced changes in platelets reactivity by PFA-100, VerifyNow and serum thromboxane B2 level [sTxB2]), and accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was tested using statistical collapsing tests. We identified a total of 35 exonic variants, including 3 common missense variants, 15 rare missense variants, and 17 synonymous variants in 8 investigated genes. The rare missense variants exhibited statistically significant difference in the accumulation pattern between a group of patients with increased and normal platelet reactivity based on PFA-100 assay. Our study suggests that genetic burden of the rare functional variants in eight genes may contribute to differences in the platelet reactivity measured with the PFA-100 assay in the T2DM patients treated with ASA.

  17. Effect of electron-transport inhibitors on the generation of reactive oxygen species by pea mitochondria during succinate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Popov, V N; Ruuge, E K; Starkov, A A

    2003-07-01

    The effect of inhibitors of the cytochrome pathway and alternative oxidase on the rate of respiration and generation of reactive oxygen species by pea mitochondria was studied. Respiration of mitochondria from pea cotyledons was inhibited by 70-80% by salicylhydroxamate (SHAM). The rate of hydrogen peroxide production by pea cotyledon mitochondria during succinate oxidation was 0.15 nmol/min per mg protein. SHAM considerably accelerated the hydrogen peroxide production. The SHAM-dependent H2O2 production was stimulated by 2 micro M antimycin A and inhibited by 5 mM KCN and 1 micro M myxothiazol. The study of the rate of O2*- generation by pea mitochondria using EPR spin traps and epinephrine oxidation showed that H2O2 accumulation can be accounted for by a significant increase in the rate of O2*- production.

  18. Caspase-independent cell death without generation of reactive oxygen species in irradiated MOLT-4 human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Kubo, Yoshiko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Hayashi, Ikue; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Seyama, Toshio; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    To improve our understanding of ionizing radiation effects on immune cells, we investigated steps leading to radiation-induced cell death in MOLT-4, a thymus-derived human leukemia cell. After exposure of MOLT-4 cells to 4 Gy of X-rays, irradiated cells sequentially showed increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and eventually apoptotic cell death. In the presence of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, irradiated cells exhibited necrotic characteristics such as mitochondrial swelling instead of apoptosis. ROS generation was not detected during this necrotic cell death process. These results indicate that radiation-induced apoptosis in MOLT-4 cells requires elevation of intracellular ROS as well as activation of a series of caspases, whereas the cryptic necrosis program--which is independent of intracellular ROS generation and caspase activation--is activated when the apoptosis pathway is blocked.

  19. HVCN1 modulates BCR signal strength via regulation of BCR-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Melania; Bhamrah, Mandeep K; Henley, Tom; Boyd, Robert S; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; Dinsdale, David; Pulford, Karen; Kan, Mahmood; Musset, Boris; Cherny, Vladimir V; Morgan, Deri; Gascoyne, Randy D; Vigorito, Elena; DeCoursey, Thomas E; MacLennan, Ian C M; Dyer, Martin J S

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton currents regulate generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytic cells. In B cells, stimulation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the production of ROS that participate in B cell activation, but the involvement of proton channels is unknown. We report here that the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 associated with the BCR complex and was internalized together with the BCR after activation. BCR-induced generation of ROS was lower in HVCN1-deficient B cells, which resulted in attenuated BCR signaling via impaired BCR-dependent oxidation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. This resulted in less activation of the kinases Syk and Akt, impaired mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and diminished antibody responses in vivo. Our findings identify unanticipated functions for proton channels in B cells and demonstrate the importance of ROS in BCR signaling and downstream metabolism. PMID:20139987

  20. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-12-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma.

  1. Copper chelation by D-penicillamine generates reactive oxygen species that are cytotoxic to human leukemia and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Anshul; Mumper, Russell J

    2007-11-01

    Serum and tumor copper levels are significantly elevated in a variety of malignancies including breast, ovarian, gastric, lung, and leukemia. D-Penicillamine (D-pen), a copper-chelating agent, at low concentrations in the presence of copper generates concentration-dependent cytotoxic hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The purpose of these studies was to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and the reduction in intracellular thiol levels due to H(2)O(2) and other ROS generated from copper-catalyzed D-pen oxidation in human breast cancer cells (BT474, MCF-7) and human leukemia cells (HL-60, HL-60/VCR, HL-60/ADR). D-pen (< or = 400 microM) in the presence of cupric sulfate (10 microM) resulted in concentration-dependent cytotoxicity. Catalase was able to completely protect the cells, substantiating the involvement of H(2)O(2) in cancer cell cytotoxicity. A linear correlation between the D-pen concentration and the intracellular ROS generated was shown in both breast cancer and leukemia cells. D-pen in the presence of copper also resulted in a reduction in intracellular reduced thiol levels. The H(2)O(2)-mediated cytotoxicity was greater in leukemia cells compared to breast cancer cells. These results support the hypothesis that D-pen can be employed as a cytotoxic copper-chelating agent based on its ROS-generating ability.

  2. Influence of ionic liquid and ionic salt on protein against the reactive species generated using dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Pankaj; Sarinont, Thapanut; Kim, Minsup; Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Cho, Art E.; Ha Choi, Eun; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The presence of salts in biological solution can affect the activity of the reactive species (RS) generated by plasma, and so they can also have an influence on the plasma-induced sterilization. In this work, we assess the influence that diethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (DEAP), an ionic liquid (IL), and sodium chloride (NaCl), an ionic salt (IS), have on the structural changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in the presence of RS generated using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in the presence of various gases [O2, N2, Ar, He, NO (10%) + N2 and Air]. We carry out fluorescence spectroscopy to verify the generation of •OH with or without the presence of DEAP IL and IS, and we use electron spin resonance (ESR) to check the generation of H• and •OH. In addition, we verified the structural changes in the Hb structure after treatment with DBD in presence and absence of IL and IS. We then assessed the structural stability of the Hb in the presence of IL and IS by using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Our results indicate that the IL has a strong effect on the conservation of the Hb structure relative to that of IS against RS generated by plasma. PMID:26656857

  3. Effect of plasma jet diameter on the efficiency of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kakuta, Maito; Furuta, Hiroshi; Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-06-01

    The plasma jet generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in solution is important in biology, medicine, and disinfection. Studies using a wide variety of plasma jet devices have been carried out for this purpose, making it difficult to compare the performance between devices. In this study, we compared the efficiency of RONS generation in deionized (DI) water between 3.7-mm- and 800-µm-sized helium (He) plasma jets (hereafter mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively) at different treatment distances and times. The efficiency of RONS generation was determined by considering the total amount of RONS generated in DI water with respect to the input energy and gas consumption. We found that the mm-jet generated 20% more RONS in the DI water than the µm-jet at the optimized distance. However, when the input power and He gas consumption were taken into account, we discovered that the µm-jet was 5 times more efficient in generating RONS in the DI water. Under the parameters investigated in this study, the concentration of RONS continued to increase as a function of treatment time (up to 30 min). However treatment distance had a marked effect on the efficiency of RONS generation: treatment distances of 25 and 30 mm were optimal for the mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively. Our method of comparing the efficiency of RONS generation in solution between plasma jets could be used as a reference protocol for the development of efficient plasma jet sources for use in medicine, biology, and agriculture.

  4. Fhit interaction with ferredoxin reductase triggers generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Trapasso, Francesco; Pichiorri, Flavia; Gaspari, Marco; Palumbo, Tiziana; Aqeilan, Rami I; Gaudio, Eugenio; Okumura, Hiroshi; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Di Leva, Giampiero; Fabbri, Muller; Birk, David E; Raso, Cinzia; Green-Church, Kari; Spagnoli, Luigi G; Venuta, Salvatore; Huebner, Kay; Croce, Carlo M

    2008-05-16

    Fhit protein is lost in most cancers, its restoration suppresses tumorigenicity, and virus-mediated FHIT gene therapy induces apoptosis and suppresses tumors in preclinical models. We have used protein cross-linking and proteomics methods to characterize a Fhit protein complex involved in triggering Fhit-mediated apoptosis. The complex includes Hsp60 and Hsp10 that mediate Fhit stability and may affect import into mitochondria, where it interacts with ferredoxin reductase, responsible for transferring electrons from NADPH to cytochrome P450 via ferredoxin. Viral-mediated Fhit restoration increases production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, followed by increased apoptosis of lung cancer cells under oxidative stress conditions; conversely, Fhit-negative cells escape apoptosis, carrying serious oxidative DNA damage that may contribute to an increased mutation rate. Characterization of Fhit interacting proteins has identified direct effectors of the Fhit-mediated apoptotic pathway that is lost in most cancers through loss of Fhit.

  5. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  6. Cadmium induces reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation in cortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    López, E; Arce, C; Oset-Gasque, M J; Cañadas, S; González, M P

    2006-03-15

    Cadmium is a toxic agent that it is also an environmental contaminant. Cadmium exposure may be implicated in some humans disorders related to hyperactivity and increased aggressiveness. This study presents data indicating that cadmium induces cellular death in cortical neurons in culture. This death could be mediated by an apoptotic and a necrotic mechanism. The apoptotic death may be mediated by oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation which could be induced by mitochondrial membrane dysfunction since this cation produces: (a) depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential and (b) diminution of ATP levels with ATP release. Necrotic death could be mediated by lipid peroxidation induced by cadmium through an indirect mechanism (ROS formation). On the other hand, 40% of the cells survive cadmium action. This survival seems to be mediated by the ability of these cells to activate antioxidant defense systems, since cadmium reduced the intracellular glutathione levels and induced catalase and SOD activation in these cells.

  7. Regulatory mechanisms of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation and their role in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Mase, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Miki; Kobayashi, Michie; Asai, Shuta

    2011-08-01

    Rapid production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in diverse physiological processes, such as programmed cell death, development, cell elongation and hormonal signaling, in plants. Much attention has been paid to the regulation of plant innate immunity by these signal molecules. Recent studies provide evidence that an NADPH oxidase, respiratory burst oxidase homolog, is responsible for pathogen-responsive ROS burst. However, we still do not know about NO-producing enzymes, except for nitrate reductase, although many studies suggest the existence of NO synthase-like activity responsible for NO burst in plants. Here, we introduce regulatory mechanisms of NO and ROS bursts by mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, calcium-dependent protein kinase or riboflavin and its derivatives, flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and we discuss the roles of the bursts in defense responses against plant pathogens.

  8. Peroxisomes as cell generators of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Palma, José M; del Río, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gaseous free radical with a wide range of direct and indirect actions in plant cells. However, the enzymatic sources of NO and its subcellular localization in plants are still under debate. Among the different subcellular compartments where NO has been found to be produced, peroxisomes are the best characterized since in these organelles it has been demonstrated the presence of NO and it has been biochemically characterized a L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity. This chapter summarizes the present knowledge of the NO metabolism and its derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in plant peroxisomes and how this gaseous free radical is involved in natural senescence, and is released to the cytosol under salinity stress conditions acting as a signal molecule.

  9. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  10. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases Differentially Regulate Agonist-Receptor Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Huzoor; Duan, Xin; Saleem, Saima; Davis, Ashley K.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Agonist induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases (NOX) enhances platelet aggregation and hence the risk of thrombosis. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases are involved in ROS generation by NOX in a variety of cells, but their roles in platelet ROS production remain unclear. In this study we used platelets from RhoA and Rac1 conditional knockout mice as well as human platelets treated with Rhosin and NSC23767, rationally designed small molecule inhibitors of RhoA and Rac GTPases, respectively, to better define the contributions of RhoA and Rac1 signaling to ROS generation and platelet activation. Treatment of platelets with Rhosin inhibited: (a) U46619 induced activation of RhoA; (b) phosphorylation of p47phox, a critical component of NOX; (c) U46619 or thrombin induced ROS generation; (d) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC); (e) platelet shape change; (f) platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen; and (g) release of P-selectin, secretion of ATP and aggregation. Conditional deletion of RhoA or Rac1 gene inhibited thrombin induced ROS generation in platelets. Addition of Y27632, a RhoA inhibitor, NSC23766 or Phox-I, an inhibitor of Rac1-p67phox interaction, to human platelets blocked thrombin induced ROS generation. These data suggest that: (a) RhoA/ROCK/p47phox signaling axis promotes ROS production that, at least in part, contributes to platelet activation in conjunction with or independent of the RhoA/ROCK mediated phosphorylation of MLC; and (b) RhoA and Rac1 differentially regulate ROS generation by inhibiting phosphorylation of p47phox and Rac1-p67phox interaction, respectively. PMID:27681226

  11. Variation in structure of proteins by adjusting reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated from dielectric barrier discharge jet

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Minsup; Shiratani, Masaharu; Cho, Art. E.; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, the variation in liquid chemistry due to the development of radicals generated by cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has played an important role in plasma medicine. CAP direct treatment or CAP activated media treatment in cancer cells shows promising anticancer activity for both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, the anticancer activity or antimicrobial activity varies between plasma devices due to the different abilities among plasma devices to generate the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) at different ratios and in different concentrations. While the generation of RONS depends on many factors, the feeding gas plays the most important role among the factors. Hence, in this study we used different compositions of feeding gas while fixing all other plasma characteristics. We used Ar, Ar-O2 (at different ratios), and Ar-N2 (at different ratios) as the working gases for CAP and investigated the structural changes in proteins (Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)). We then analyzed the influence of RONS generated in liquid on the conformations of proteins. Additionally, to determine the influence of H2O2 on the Hb and Mb structures, we used molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:27779212

  12. Variation in structure of proteins by adjusting reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated from dielectric barrier discharge jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Minsup; Shiratani, Masaharu; Cho, Art. E.; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-10-01

    Over the last few years, the variation in liquid chemistry due to the development of radicals generated by cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has played an important role in plasma medicine. CAP direct treatment or CAP activated media treatment in cancer cells shows promising anticancer activity for both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, the anticancer activity or antimicrobial activity varies between plasma devices due to the different abilities among plasma devices to generate the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) at different ratios and in different concentrations. While the generation of RONS depends on many factors, the feeding gas plays the most important role among the factors. Hence, in this study we used different compositions of feeding gas while fixing all other plasma characteristics. We used Ar, Ar-O2 (at different ratios), and Ar-N2 (at different ratios) as the working gases for CAP and investigated the structural changes in proteins (Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)). We then analyzed the influence of RONS generated in liquid on the conformations of proteins. Additionally, to determine the influence of H2O2 on the Hb and Mb structures, we used molecular dynamic simulation.

  13. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  14. Reactive-power compensation of coal mining excavators by using a new-generation STATCOM

    SciTech Connect

    Bilgin, H.F.; Ermis, M.; Kose, K.N.; Cadirci, I.; Acik, A.; Demirci, T.; Terciyanli, A.; Kocak, C.; Yorukoglu, M.

    2007-01-15

    This paper deals with the development and implementation of a current-source-converter-based static synchronous compensator (CSC-STATCOM) applied to the volt-ampere-reactive (VAR) compensation problem of coal mining excavators. It is composed of a +/- 750-kVAR full-bridge CSC with selective harmonic elimination, a low-pass input filter tuned to 200 Hz, and a Delta/Y-connected coupling transformer for connection to medium-voltage load bus. Each power semiconductor switch is composed of an asymmetrical integrated gate commutated thyristor (IGCT) connected in series with a reverse-blocking diode and switched at 500 Hz to eliminate 5th, 7th, 11th, and 13th current harmonics produced by the CSC. Operating principles, power stage, design of dc link, and input filter are also described in this paper. It has been verified by field tests that the developed STATCOM follows rapid fluctuations in nearly symmetrical lagging and leading VAR consumption of electric excavators, resulting in nearly unity power factor on monthly basis, and the harmonic current spectra in the lines of CSC-STATCOM at the point of common coupling comply with the IEEE Standard 519-1992.

  15. Trial of Growth Control of Farm-raised Fish by Plasma-generated Reactive Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Hideki; Kubota, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Ryo; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    As one of the biological applications of plasmas, growth control of agricultural products attracts attentions. There are many papers on growth enhancement of crops by plasma treatment. However, there are few published papers concerning growth enhancement of fishery products excepting reports of goldfish growth enhancement in 1980s. In this study, growth characteristics of edible fish (tilapia) under the plasma treatment has been investigated. An arc discharge reactor was employed and plasma treated air was introduced to two aquariums with a flow rate of 2.5 L/min. Measured concentrations of main reactive species were 43 ppm for NO, 23 ppm for NO2 and 7.5 ppm for O3. Each aquarium had 60 L capacity and contained 15 tilapia fish. The plasma treated air was supplied to an aquarium once a day and to the other aquarium twice a day with total duration of 10 min. Compared to no plasma treatment case, the growth rate decreased by 18% by once a day plasma treatment, whereas almost same growth rate was observed by twice a day plasma treatment. A possible reason of growth suppression is excess concentrations of nitrite and nitrate in water. The relationship between their concentrations and growth characteristics under several treatment conditions will be shown at the conference. Tirapia fish was supplied from SEFREC of Ehime University.

  16. Colloidal gold nanorings for improved photodynamic therapy through field-enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yue; Yang, Yamin; Wang, Hongjun; Du, Henry

    2013-02-01

    Au nanostructures that exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have excellent potential for photo-medicine, among a host of other applications. Here, we report the synthesis and use of colloidal gold nanorings (GNRs) with potential for enhanced photodynamic therapy of cancer. The GNRs were fabricated via galvanic replacement reaction of sacrificial Co nanoparticles in gold salt solution with low molecular weight (Mw = 2,500) poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a stabilizing agent. The size and the opening of the GNRs were controlled by the size of the starting Co particles and the concentration of the gold salt. UV-Vis absorption measurements indicated the tunability of the SPR of the GNRs from 560 nm to 780 nm. MTT assay showed that GNRs were non-toxic and biocompatible when incubated with breast cancer cells as well as the healthy counterpart cells. GNRs conjugated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) photosensitizer precursor led to elevated formation of reactive oxygen species and improved efficacy of photodynamic therapy of breast cancer cells under light irradiation compared to 5-ALA alone. These results can be attributed to significantly enhance localized electromagnetic field of the GNRs.

  17. Impact of reactive oxygen species generation on Helicobacter pylori-related extragastric diseases: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kountouras, Jannis; Boziki, Marina; Polyzos, Stergios A; Katsinelos, Panagiotis; Gavalas, Emmanouel; Zeglinas, Christos; Tzivras, Dimitri; Romiopoulos, Iordanis; Giorgakis, Nikolaos; Anastasiadou, Kyriaki; Vardaka, Elizabeth; Kountouras, Constantinos; Kazakos, Evangelos; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Deretzi, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that contribute to pathogenesis of a variety of H. pylori-related gastric diseases, as shown in animal and human studies. Helicobacter pylori infection is also associated with variety of systemic extragastric diseases in which H. pylori-related ROS production might also be involved in the pathogenesis of these systemic conditions. We proposed that Hp-related ROS may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of Hp-related systemic diseases including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma and other relative neurodegenerative diseases, thereby suggesting introduction of relative ROS scavengers as therapeutic strategies against these diseases which are among the leading causes of disability and are associated with a large public health global burden. Moreover, we postulated that H. pylori-related ROS might also be involved in the pathogenesis of extragastric common malignancies, thereby suggesting that H. pylori eradication might inhibit the development or delay the progression of aforementioned diseases. However, large-scale future studies are warranted to elucidate the proposed pathophysiological mechanisms, including H. pylori-related ROS, involved in H. pylori-associated systemic and malignant conditions.

  18. Development and characterization of a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies generated using H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun-yan; Tang, Yi-gui; Qi, Zong-li; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Xiang-rong; Huo, Xue-ping; Li, Yan; Feng, Qing; Zhao, Peng-hua; Wang, Xin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Hai-fang; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Xin-jian

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the antigenic epitopes of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of H1N1 influenza virus, a panel consisting of 84 clones of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated using the HA proteins from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine lysate and the seasonal influenza H1N1(A1) vaccines. Thirty-three (39%) of the 84 mAbs were found to be strain-specific, and 6 (7%) of the 84 mAbs were subtype-specific. Twenty (24%) of the 84 mAbs recognized the common HA epitopes shared by 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1), and A3 (H3N2) influenza viruses. Twenty-five of the 84 clones recognized the common HA epitopes shared by the 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal A1 (H1N1) and A3 (H3N2) human influenza viruses, and H5N1 and H9N2 avian influenza viruses. We found that of the 16 (19%) clones of the 84 mAbs panel that were cross-reactive with human respiratory pathogens, 15 were made using the HA of the seasonal A1 (H1N1) virus and 1 was made using the HA of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue microarray (TMA) showed that 4 of the 84 mAb clones cross-reacted with human tissue (brain and pancreas). Our results indicated that the influenza virus HA antigenic epitopes not only induce type-, subtype-, and strain-specific monoclonal antibodies against influenza A virus but also cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies against human tissues. Further investigations of these cross-reactive (heterophilic) epitopes may significantly improve our understanding of viral antigenic variation, epidemics, pathophysiologic mechanisms, and adverse effects of influenza vaccines.

  19. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization: Carbon nanohorn-induced reactive oxygen species generation and toxicity by this neglected mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mei; Zhang, Minfang; Tahara, Yoshio; Chechetka, Svetlana; Miyako, Eijiro; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxic effects of carbon nanomaterials is important for their future biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubular materials induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes cell death; however, the exact details of this process are still unclear. Here, we identify a mechanism of ROS generation that is involved in the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages caused by excess uptake of carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a typical type of carbon nanotubule. CNH accumulated in the lysosomes, where they induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and the subsequent release of lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsins, which in turn caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered the generation of ROS in the mitochondria. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase was not directly involved in CNH-related ROS production, and the ROS generation cannot be regulated by mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS fed back to amplify the mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to the subsequent activation of caspases and cell apoptosis. Carbon nanotubules commonly accumulate in the lysosomes after internalization in cells; however, lysosomal dysfunction has not attracted much attention in toxicity studies of these materials. These results suggest that LMP, a neglected mechanism, may be the primary reason for carbon nanotubule toxicity. - Highlights: • We clarify an apoptotic mechanism of RAW264.7 cells caused by carbon nanohorns. • In the meantime, the mechanism of CNH-induced ROS generation is identified. • LMP is the initial factor of CNH-induced ROS generation and cell death. • Cathepsins work as mediators that connect LMP and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Hierarchical Testing with Automated Document Generation for Amanzi, ASCEM's Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, J. D.; Steefel, C. I.; Yabusaki, S.; Castleton, K.; Scheibe, T. D.; Keating, E. H.; Freedman, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Simulation Capabililty for Environmental Management (ASCEM) program is developing an approach and open-source tool suite for standardized risk and performance assessments at legacy nuclear waste sites. These assessments use a graded and iterative approach, beginning with simplified highly abstracted models, and adding geometric and geologic complexity as understanding is gained. To build confidence in this assessment capability, extensive testing of the underlying tools is needed. Since the tools themselves, such as the subsurface flow and reactive-transport simulator, Amanzi, are under active development, testing must be both hierarchical and highly automated. In this presentation we show how we have met these requirements, by leveraging the python-based open-source documentation system called Sphinx with several other open-source tools. Sphinx builds on the reStructured text tool docutils, with important extensions that include high-quality formatting of equations, and integrated plotting through matplotlib. This allows the documentation, as well as the input files for tests, benchmark and tutorial problems, to be maintained with the source code under a version control system. In addition, it enables developers to build documentation in several different formats (e.g., html and pdf) from a single source. We will highlight these features, and discuss important benefits of this approach for Amanzi. In addition, we'll show that some of ASCEM's other tools, such as the sampling provided by the Uncertainty Quantification toolset, are naturally leveraged to enable more comprehensive testing. Finally, we will highlight the integration of this hiearchical testing and documentation framework with our build system and tools (CMake, CTest, and CDash).

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Lunar Simulants in Simulated Lung Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Kaur, J.; Rickman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies has rekindled research into the harmful effects of Lunar dust on human health. Our team has evaluated the spontaneous formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS; hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide) of a suite of lunar simulants when dispersed in deionized water. Of these species, hydroxyl radical reacts almost immediately with any biomolecule leading to oxidative damage. Sustained production of OH radical as a result of mineral exposure can initiate or enhance disease. The results in deionized water indicate that mechanical stress and the absence of molecular oxygen and water, important environmental characteristics of the lunar environment, can lead to enhanced production of ROS in general. On the basis of the results with deionized water, a few of the simulants were selected for additional studies to evaluate the formation of hydrogen peroxide, a precursor of hydroxyl radical in Simulated Lung Fluid. These simulants dispersed in deionized water typically produce a maximum in H2O2 within 10 to 40 minutes. However, experiments in SLF show a slow steady increase in H2O2 concentration that has been documented to continue for as long as 7 hours. Control experiments with one simulant demonstrate that the rise in H2O2 depends on the availability of dissolved O2. We speculate that this continuous rise in oxygenated SLF might be a result of metal ion-mediated oxidation of organic components, such as glycine in SLF. Ion-mediated oxidation essentially allows dissolved molecular oxygen to react with dissolved organic compounds by forming a metal-organic complex. Results of separate experiments with dissolved Fe, Ni, and Cu and speciation calculations support this notion.

  2. Generation of reactive astrocytes from NG2 cells is regulated by sonic hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Honsa, Pavel; Valny, Martin; Kriska, Jan; Matuskova, Hana; Harantova, Lenka; Kirdajova, Denisa; Valihrach, Lukas; Androvic, Peter; Kubista, Mikael; Anderova, Miroslava

    2016-09-01

    NG2 cells, a fourth glial cell type in the adult mammalian central nervous system, produce oligodendrocytes in the healthy nervous tissue, and display wide differentiation potential under pathological conditions, where they could give rise to reactive astrocytes. The factors that control the differentiation of NG2 cells after focal cerebral ischemia (FCI) are largely unknown. Here, we used transgenic Cspg4-cre/Esr1/ROSA26Sortm14(CAG-tdTomato) mice, in which tamoxifen administration triggers the expression of red fluorescent protein (tomato) specifically in NG2 cells and cells derived therefrom. Differentiation potential (in vitro and in vivo) of tomato-positive NG2 cells from control or postischemic brains was determined using the immunohistochemistry, single cell RT-qPCR and patch-clamp method. The ischemic injury was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion, a model of FCI. Using genetic fate-mapping method, we identified sonic hedgehog (Shh) as an important factor that influences differentiation of NG2 cells into astrocytes in vitro. We also manipulated Shh signaling in the adult mouse brain after FCI. Shh signaling activation significantly increased the number of astrocytes derived from NG2 cells in the glial scar around the ischemic lesion, while Shh signaling inhibition caused the opposite effect. Since Shh signaling modifications did not change the proliferation rate of NG2 cells, we can conclude that Shh has a direct influence on the differentiation of NG2 cells and therefore, on the formation and composition of a glial scar, which consequently affects the degree of the brain damage. GLIA 2016;64:1518-1531.

  3. Sites of reactive oxygen species generation by mitochondria oxidizing different substrates☆

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Casey L.; Perevoshchikova, Irina V.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Orr, Adam L.; Brand, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial radical production is important in redox signaling, aging and disease, but the relative contributions of different production sites are poorly understood. We analyzed the rates of superoxide/H2O2 production from different defined sites in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidizing a variety of conventional substrates in the absence of added inhibitors: succinate; glycerol 3-phosphate; palmitoylcarnitine plus carnitine; or glutamate plus malate. In all cases, the sum of the estimated rates accounted fully for the measured overall rates. There were two striking results. First, the overall rates differed by an order of magnitude between substrates. Second, the relative contribution of each site was very different with different substrates. During succinate oxidation, most of the superoxide production was from the site of quinone reduction in complex I (site IQ), with small contributions from the flavin site in complex I (site IF) and the quinol oxidation site in complex III (site IIIQo). However, with glutamate plus malate as substrate, site IQ made little or no contribution, and production was shared between site IF, site IIIQo and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. With palmitoylcarnitine as substrate, the flavin site in complex II (site IIF) was a major contributor (together with sites IF and IIIQo), and with glycerol 3-phosphate as substrate, five different sites all contributed, including glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Thus, the relative and absolute contributions of specific sites to the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria depend very strongly on the substrates being oxidized, and the same is likely true in cells and in vivo. PMID:24024165

  4. Analysis of reactive oxygen species generating systems in rat epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vernet, P; Fulton, N; Wallace, C; Aitken, R J

    2001-10-01

    Epididymal sperm maturation culminates in the acquisition of functional competence by testicular spermatozoa. The expression of this functional state is dependent upon a redox-regulated, cAMP-mediated signal transduction cascade that controls the tyrosine phosphorylation status of the spermatozoa during capacitation. Analysis of superoxide anion (O2(-.)) generation by rat epididymal spermatozoa has revealed a two-component process involving electron leakage from the sperm mitochondria at complexes I and II and a plasma membrane NAD(P)H oxidoreductase. Following incubation in a glucose-, lactate-, and pyruvate-free medium (-GLP), O2(-.) generation was suppressed by 86% and 96% in caput and cauda spermatozoa, respectively. The addition of lactate, malate, or succinate to spermatozoa incubated in medium -GLP stimulated O2(-.) generation. This increase could be blocked by rotenone and oligomycin (R/O) in the presence of malate or lactate but not succinate. Stimulation with all three substrates, as well as spontaneous O2(-.) production in +GLP medium, was blocked by the flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium. Diphenylene iodonium, but not R/O, suppressed NAD(P)H-induced lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. This NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme resided in the sperm plasma membrane and its activity was regulated by zinc and uncharacterized cytosolic factors. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the sperm NAD(P)H oxidoreductase complex is quite distinct from the equivalent leukocyte system.

  5. Intracellular delivery of the reactive oxygen species generating agent D-penicillamine upon conjugation to poly-L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Saurabh; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-06-07

    D-penicillamine is an aminothiol that is cytotoxic to cancer cells and generates dose dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) via copper catalyzed oxidation. However, the delivery of D-pen to cancer cells remains a challenge due to its high hydrophilicity, highly reactive thiol group and impermeability to the cell membrane. To overcome this challenge, we investigated a novel poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) conjugate of D-pen (PGA-D-pen) where D-pen was conjugated to PGA modified with 2-(2-pyridyldithio)-ethylamine (PDE) via disulfide bonds. Confocal microscopy and cell uptake studies showed that the fluorescently labeled PGA-D-pen was taken up by human leukemia cells (HL-60) in a time dependent manner. Treatment of HL-60, murine leukemia cells (P388) and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-468) with PGA-D-pen resulted in dose dependent cytotoxicity and elevation of intracellular ROS levels. PGA-D-pen induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells which was verified by Annexin V binding. The in vivo evaluation of the conjugate in the P388 murine leukemia model (intraperitoneal) resulted in significant enhancement in the survival of CD2F1 mice over vehicle control.

  6. Derivatization of haemoglobin with periodate-generated reticulation agents: evaluation of oxidative reactivity for potential blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Deac, Florina; Iacob, Bianca; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Damian, Grigore; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Periodate modification of the sugar moiety in sugars, including adenosine triphosphate (ATP), has previously been employed in order to prepare dialdehyde-type reagents, which were then utilized in crosslinking reactions on haemoglobin, yielding polymerized material with useful dioxygen-binding properties and hence proposed as possible artificial oxygen carriers ('blood substitutes'). Here, the periodate protocol is shown to be applicable to a wider range of oxygen-containing compounds, illustrated by starch and polyethylene glycol. Derivatization protocols are described for haemoglobin with such periodate-treated crosslinking agents, and the dioxygen-binding properties and redox reactivities are investigated for the derivatized haemoglobins, with emphasis on pro-oxidative properties. There is a general tendency of the derivatization to result in higher autooxidation rates. The peroxide reactivity of the met (ferric) form is also affected by derivatization, as witnessed, among others, by varying yields of ferryl [Fe (IV)-oxo] and free radical generated. In cell, culture tests (human umbilical vein epithelial cells, HUVEC), the derivatization protocols show no toxic effect.

  7. Measurement of reactive species generated by dielectric barrier discharge in direct contact with water in different atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačević, Vesna V.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.; Jović, Milica; Roglić, Goran M.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.

    2017-04-01

    The formation of hydroxyl radical and long-living chemical species (H2O2, O3, \\text{NO}3- and \\text{NO}2- ) generated in the liquid phase of a water falling film dielectric barrier discharge in dependence on the gas atmosphere (air, nitrogen, oxygen, argon and helium) was studied. The chemical molecular probe dimethyl sulfoxide was employed for quantification of ˙OH, and the influence of hydroxyl radical scavenging on formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species was investigated. In addition to liquid analysis, plasma diagnostics was applied to indicate possible reaction pathways of plasma–liquid interaction. The highest ˙OH production rate of 1.19  ×  10‑5 mol l‑1 s‑1 was found when water was treated in oxygen, with a yield of 2.75  ×  10‑2 molecules of ˙OH per 100 eV. Formation of hydrogen peroxide in air, nitrogen and argon discharges is determined by recombination reaction of hydroxyl radicals, reaching the highest yield of about 0.7 g kWh‑1 when distilled water was treated in argon discharge. Ozone formation was dominant in oxygen and air discharges. Strong acidification along with formation of reactive nitrogen species was detected in water treated in air and nitrogen discharges.

  8. Aloe-emodin induced DNA damage through generation of reactive oxygen species in human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Zin; Lin, Ching-Ju; Yang, Wen-Hui; Leung, Wing-Cheung; Chang, Shen-Pen

    2006-07-28

    The DNA aggregation was found in aloe-emodin-induced H460 cell apoptosis in this study. Aloe-emodin (40microM)-induced DNA single strand breaks were observed by comet assay. Aloe-emodin induced decreases in the mRNA of DNA repair enzymes such as hMTH1, hOGG1 and APE. Although the activity of the radical-scavenging enzyme SOD was enhanced by aloe-emodin, the effects of aloe-emodin on H460 cell apoptosis were suspected to result from the prooxidant. These results suggest that aloe-emodin induced DNA damage through generation of reactive oxygen species in human lung carcinoma cells.

  9. Synthesis of SiC/Ag/Cellulose Nanocomposite and Its Antibacterial Activity by Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Cłapa, Tomasz; Szala, Mateusz; Gąsiński, Arkadiusz; Selwet, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of nanocomposites, based on nanofibers of silicon carbide, silver nanoparticles, and cellulose. Silver nanoparticle synthesis was achieved with chemical reduction using hydrazine by adding two different surfactants to obtain a nanocomposite with silver nanoparticles of different diameters. Determination of antibacterial activity was based on respiration tests. Enzymatic analysis indicates oxidative stress, and viability testing was conducted using an epifluorescence microscope. Strong bactericidal activity of nanocomposites was found against bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus, which were used in the study as typical Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. It is assumed that reactive oxygen species generation was responsible for the observed antibacterial effect of the investigated materials. Due to the properties of silicon carbide nanofiber, the obtained nanocomposite may have potential use in technology related to water and air purification. Cellulose addition prevented silver nanoparticle release and probably enhanced bacterial adsorption onto aggregates of the nanocomposite material. PMID:28335299

  10. Generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by a novel semiconductor catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, K. L.; Mak, N. K.; Wong, M. H.; Zhou, X. F.; Liang, Y.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate antimicrobial mechanisms of a new catalytic material (charge transfer auto oxidation-reduction type catalyst, CT catalyst) that may have great potential for application in water/wastewater treatment. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacteria-free solution, induction of ROS and oxidative damage in bacteria (including E. coli and S. aureus) were examined for the CT catalyst. The results showed that significantly higher ( p < 0.05, via t-test) amount of hydroxyl radicals was generated by the CT catalyst compared with the control, particularly after 6 h of contact time that more than twice of the amount of the control was produced. The generation of ROS in the bacteria was greater under higher pH and temperature levels, which closely related with the oxidative damage in cells. The results indicated that CT catalyst induced oxidative damage in the bacteria might serve as an important mechanism interpreting the anti-microbial function of the CT catalyst.

  11. A Synthetic High-Spin Oxoiron(IV) Complex: Generation, Spectroscopic Characterization, and Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    England, J.; Martinho, M; Farquhar, E; Frisch, J; Bominaar, E; Munck, E; Que, L

    2009-01-01

    The high-yield generation of a synthetic high-spin oxoiron(IV) complex, (Fe{sup IV}(O)(TMG{sub 3}tren)){sup 2+} (TMG{sub 3}tren = 1,1,1-tris{l_brace}2-(N2-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidino))ethyl{r_brace}amine), has been achieved by using the very bulky tetradentate TMG{sub 3}tren ligand, in order to both sterically protect the oxoiron(IV) moiety and enforce a trigonal bipyramidal geometry at the iron center, for which an S=2 ground state is favored.

  12. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations generated via the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) in response to extracellular Ca2+ or L-phenylalanine: impact of the highly conservative mutation Ser170Thr

    PubMed Central

    Young, Steven H.; Rey, Osvaldo; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) is an allosteric protein that responds to changes in the extracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) and aromatic amino acids with the production of different patterns of oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). An increase in [Ca2+]e stimulates sinusoidal oscillations in [Ca2+]i whereas aromatic amino acid-induced CaR activation in the presence of a threshold [Ca2+]e promotes transient oscillations in [Ca2+]i. Here, we examined spontaneous and ligand-evoked [Ca2+]i oscillations in single HEK-293 cells transfected with the wild type CaSR or with a mutant CaSR in which Ser170 was converted to Thr (CaSRS170T). Our analysis demonstrates that cells expressing CaSRS170T display [Ca2+]i oscillations in the presence of low concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ and respond to L-Phe with robust transient [Ca2+]i oscillations. Our results indicate that the S170T mutation induces a marked increase in CaSR sensitivity to [Ca2+]e and imply that the allosteric regulation of the CaSR by aromatic amino acids is not only mediated by an heterotropic positive effect on Ca2+ binding cooperativity but, as biased agonists, aromatic amino acids stabilize a CaSR conformation that couples to a different signaling pathway leading to transient [Ca2+]i oscillations. PMID:26431875

  13. Pleiotrophin-induced endothelial cell migration is regulated by xanthine oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsirmoula, Sotiria; Lamprou, Margarita; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Kieffer, Nelly; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2015-03-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a heparin-binding growth factor that induces cell migration through binding to its receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta (RPTPβ/ζ) and integrin alpha v beta 3 (ανβ3). In the present work, we studied the effect of PTN on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human endothelial cells and the involvement of ROS in PTN-induced cell migration. Exogenous PTN significantly increased ROS levels in a concentration and time-dependent manner in both human endothelial and prostate cancer cells, while knockdown of endogenous PTN expression in prostate cancer cells significantly down-regulated ROS production. Suppression of RPTPβ/ζ through genetic and pharmacological approaches, or inhibition of c-src kinase activity abolished PTN-induced ROS generation. A synthetic peptide that blocks PTN-ανβ3 interaction abolished PTN-induced ROS generation, suggesting that ανβ3 is also involved. The latter was confirmed in CHO cells that do not express β3 or over-express wild-type β3 or mutant β3Y773F/Y785F. PTN increased ROS generation in cells expressing wild-type β3 but not in cells not expressing or expressing mutant β3. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) or Erk1/2 inhibition suppressed PTN-induced ROS production, suggesting that ROS production lays down-stream of PI3K or Erk1/2 activation by PTN. Finally, ROS scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibition completely abolished both PTN-induced ROS generation and cell migration, while NADPH oxidase inhibition had no effect. Collectively, these data suggest that xanthine oxidase-mediated ROS production is required for PTN-induced cell migration through the cell membrane functional complex of ανβ3 and RPTPβ/ζ and activation of c-src, PI3K and ERK1/2 kinases.

  14. Insulin reverses D-glucose-increased nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    González, Marcelo; Rojas, Susana; Avila, Pía; Cabrera, Lissette; Villalobos, Roberto; Palma, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio; Peña, Eduardo; Gallardo, Victoria; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Sáez, Tamara; Salsoso, Rocío; Sanhueza, Carlos; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tone is controlled by the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway, and NO bioavailability is strongly affected by hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress. Insulin leads to high expression and activity of human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1), NO synthesis and vasodilation; thus, a protective role of insulin on high D-glucose-alterations in endothelial function is likely. Vascular reactivity to U46619 (thromboxane A2 mimetic) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was measured in KCl preconstricted human umbilical vein rings (wire myography) incubated in normal (5 mmol/L) or high (25 mmol/L) D-glucose. hCAT-1, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), 42 and 44 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44mapk), protein kinase B/Akt (Akt) expression and activity were determined by western blotting and qRT-PCR, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) level was determined by HPLC, and L-arginine transport (0-1000 μmol/L) was measured in response to 5-25 mmol/L D-glucose (0-36 hours) in passage 2 human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Assays were in the absence or presence of insulin and/or apocynin (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase [NADPH oxidase] inhibitor), tempol or Mn(III)TMPyP (SOD mimetics). High D-glucose increased hCAT-1 expression and activity, which was biphasic (peaks: 6 and 24 hours of incubation). High D-glucose-increased maximal transport velocity was blocked by insulin and correlated with lower hCAT-1 expression and SLC7A1 gene promoter activity. High D-glucose-increased transport parallels higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anion (O2•-) generation, and increased U46619-contraction and reduced CGRP-dilation of vein rings. Insulin and apocynin attenuate ROS and O2•- generation, and restored vascular reactivity to U46619 and CGRP. Insulin, but not apocynin or tempol reversed high D-glucose-increased NO synthesis; however, tempol and Mn(III)TMPyP reversed the high D-glucose-reduced BH4 level. Insulin and

  15. Generation and reactivation of T-cell receptor A joining region pseudogenes in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, C.; Lanchbury, J.S.; Otting, N.

    1996-06-01

    Tandemly duplicated T-cell receptor (Tcr) AJ (J{alpha}) segments contribute significantly to TCRA chain junctional region diversity in mammals. Since only limited data exists on TCRA diversity in nonhuman primates, we examined the TCRAJ regions of 37 chimpanzee and 71 rhesus macaque TCRA cDNA clones derived from inverse polymerase chain reaction on peripheral blood mononuclear cell cDNA of healthy animals. Twenty-five different TCRAJ regions were characterized in the chimpanzee and 36 in the rhesus macaque. Each bears a close structural relationship to an equivalent human TCRAJ region. Conserved amino acid motifs are shared between all three species. There are indications that differences between nonhuman primates and humans exist in the generation of TCRAJ pseudogenes. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the various characterized TCRAJ of each species are reported and we compare our results to the available information on human genomic sequences. Although we provide evidence of dynamic processes modifying TCRAJ segments during primate evolution, their repertoire and primary structure appears to be relatively conserved. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation-Scavenging and Signaling during Plant-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Piriformospora indica Interaction under Stress Condition

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Manoj; Bhatt, Deepesh; Prasad, Ram; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    A defined balance between the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential to utilize ROS as an adaptive defense response of plants under biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Moreover, ROS are not only a major determinant of stress response but also act as signaling molecule that regulates various cellular processes including plant-microbe interaction. In particular, rhizosphere constitutes the biologically dynamic zone for plant–microbe interactions which forms a mutual link leading to reciprocal signaling in both the partners. Among plant–microbe interactions, symbiotic associations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and arbuscular mycorrhizal-like fungus especially Piriformospora indica with plants are well known to improve plant growth by alleviating the stress-impacts and consequently enhance the plant fitness. AMF and P. indica colonization mainly enhances ROS-metabolism, maintains ROS-homeostasis, and thereby averts higher ROS-level accrued inhibition in plant cellular processes and plant growth and survival under stressful environments. This article summarizes the major outcomes of the recent reports on the ROS-generation, scavenging and signaling in biotic-abiotic stressed plants with AMF and P. indica colonization. Overall, a detailed exploration of ROS-signature kinetics during plant-AMF/P. indica interaction can help in designing innovative strategies for improving plant health and productivity under stress conditions. PMID:27818671

  17. Mitochondrial complex II can generate reactive oxygen species at high rates in both the forward and reverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Casey L; Orr, Adam L; Perevoshchikova, Irina V; Treberg, Jason R; Ackrell, Brian A; Brand, Martin D

    2012-08-03

    Respiratory complex II oxidizes succinate to fumarate as part of the Krebs cycle and reduces ubiquinone in the electron transport chain. Previous experimental evidence suggested that complex II is not a significant contributor to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isolated mitochondria or intact cells unless mutated. However, we find that when complex I and complex III are inhibited and succinate concentration is low, complex II in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria can generate superoxide or H(2)O(2) at high rates. These rates approach or exceed the maximum rates achieved by complex I or complex III. Complex II generates these ROS in both the forward reaction, with electrons supplied by succinate, and the reverse reaction, with electrons supplied from the reduced ubiquinone pool. ROS production in the reverse reaction is prevented by inhibition of complex II at either the ubiquinone-binding site (by atpenin A5) or the flavin (by malonate), whereas ROS production in the forward reaction is prevented by malonate but not by atpenin A5, showing that the ROS from complex II arises only from the flavin site (site II(F)). We propose a mechanism for ROS production by complex II that relies upon the occupancy of the substrate oxidation site and the reduction state of the enzyme. We suggest that complex II may be an important contributor to physiological and pathological ROS production.

  18. Plumbagin induces apoptosis via the p53 pathway and generation of reactive oxygen species in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linqiang; Yin, Delong; Ren, Ye; Gong, Chen; Chen, Anmin; Guo, Feng-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma, which is the most common primary bone tumor, occurs most frequently in adolescents. A number of studies have indicated that plumbagin (PL) (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1, 4-naphthoquinone), a compound found in the plants of the Plumbaginaceae and Droseraceae families, possesses anticancer activity. However, its anticancer effects and mechanisms against osteosarcoma have not been explored. To determine the anticancer effect of PL on osteosarcoma cell lines MG-63 and U2OS, cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured, and Western blot analyses were performed. PL significantly inhibited the growth of osteosarcoma cells, particularly U2OS cells. PL up-regulated the expression of p53 in U2OS cells and p21 in the two osteosarcoma cell lines causing cell cycle arrest by decreasing the expression of murine double minute 2 (MDM2)/cyclin B1 and cyclin D1. Furthermore, PL altered the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, and may have triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, resulting in caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. We also found that PL induced the generation of ROS in osteosarcoma cell lines. To conclude, PL exerted anticancer activity on osteosarcoma cells by inducing pro-apoptotic signaling and modulating the intracellular ROS that causes induction of apoptosis. These effects may relate to the p53 status.

  19. Reactive oxygen species generated in the presence of fine pyrite particles and its implication in thermophilic mineral bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Jones, G C; van Hille, R P; Harrison, S T L

    2013-03-01

    In the tank bioleaching process, maximising solid loading and mineral availability, the latter through decreasing particle size, are key to maximising metal extraction. In this study, the effect of particle size distribution on bioleaching performance and microbial growth was studied through applying knowledge based on medical geology research to understand the adverse effects of suspended fine pyrite particles. Small-scale leaching studies, using pyrite concentrate fractions (106-75, 75-25, -25 μm fines), were used to confirm decreasing performance with decreasing particle size (D 50 <40 μm). Under equivalent experimental conditions, the generation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals from pyrite was illustrated. ROS generation measured from the different pyrite fractions was found to increase with increasing pyrite surface area loading (1.79-74.01 m(2) L(-1)) and Fe(2+) concentration (0.1-2.8 g L(-1)) in solution. The highest concentration of ROS was measured from the finest fraction of pyrite (0.85 mM) and from the largest concentration of Fe(2+) (0.78 mM). No ROS was detected from solutions containing only Fe(3+) under the same conditions tested. The potential of ROS to inhibit microbial performance under bioleaching conditions was demonstrated. Pyrite-free Sulfolobus metallicus cultures challenged with hydrogen peroxide (0.5-2.5 mM) showed significant decrease in both cell growth and Fe(2+) oxidation rates within the concentration range 1.5-2.5 mM. In combination, the results from this study suggest that conditions of large pyrite surface area loading, coupled with high concentrations of dissolved Fe(2+), can lead to the generation of ROS, resulting in oxidative stress of the microorganisms.

  20. Osimertinib induces autophagy and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species generation in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Su, Min-Xia; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-04-15

    Osimertinib (OSI), also known as AZD9291, is a third-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR T790M mutation. Herein, we indicated for the first time that OSI increased the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II), and the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta in various cancer cells. The OSI-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased when combined treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and the mRFP-EGFP-LC3 plasmid-transfected cells exposed to OSI led to the production of more red-fluorescent puncta than green-fluorescent puncta, indicating OSI induced autophagic flux in the NSCLC cells. Knockdown of EGFR showed no effect on the OSI-induced expression of LC3-II in NCI-H1975 cells. In addition, OSI increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and scavenge of ROS via pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), catalase (CAT), or vitamin E (Vita E) significantly inhibited OSI-induced the accumulations of cytoplasmic vacuoles, the expression of LC3-II, as well as the formation of GFP-LC3 puncta. Combinative treatment with CQ could not remarkably change the OSI-induced cell viability decrease, whereas the OSI-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis could be reversed through pretreatment with NAC, CAT, and Vita E, respectively. Taken together, this is the first report that OSI induces an accompanied autophagy and the generation of ROS is critical for the OSI-induced autophagy, cell viability decrease, and apoptosis in NSCLC cells.

  1. Antioxidative response in variegated Pelargonium zonale leaves and generation of extracellular H2O2 in (peri)vascular tissue induced by sunlight and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Marija; Morina, Filis; Prokić, Ljiljana; Milić-Komić, Sonja; Živanović, Bojana; Jovanović, Sonja Veljović

    2016-11-01

    In this study we exposed variegated leaves of Pelargonium zonale to strong sunlight (>1100μmolm(-2)s(-1) of photosynthetically active radiation) with and without paraquat (Pq), with the aim to elucidate the mechanisms of H2O2 regulation in green and white tissues with respect to the photosynthetically-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sunlight induced marked accumulation of H2O2 in the apoplast of vascular and (peri)vascular tissues only in green sectors. This effect was enhanced by the addition of Pq. In the presence of diphenyl iodide, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, H2O2 accumulation was abolished. Distinct light-induced responses were observed: in photosynthetic cells, sunlight rapidly provoked ascorbate (Asc) biosynthesis and an increase of glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase activities, while in non-photosynthetic cells, early up-regulation of soluble ascorbate peroxidase, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and GR activities was observed. Paraquat addition stimulated DHAR and GR activities in green sectors, while in white sectors activities of monodehydroascorbate reductase, DHAR and class III peroxidases, as well as Asc content rapidly increased. Differential antioxidative responses in the two tissues in the frame of their contrasting metabolisms, and the possible role of (peri)vascular H2O2 in signaling were discussed.

  2. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  3. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution, fate and reactive oxygen species generation of polymer brush engineered CeO2-x NPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuan; Rojas, Elena; Murray, Richard A.; Irigoyen, Joseba; Gregurec, Danijela; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Fledderman, Jana; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Donath, Edwin; Moya, Sergio E.

    2015-04-01

    Cerium Oxide nanoparticles (CeO2-x NPs) are modified with polymer brushes of negatively charged poly (3-sulfopropylmethacrylate) (PSPM) and positively charged poly (2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-trimethylammonium chloride) (PMETAC) by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerisation (ATRP). CeO2-x NPs are fluorescently labelled by covalently attaching Alexa Fluor® 488/Fluorescein isothiocyanate to the NP surface prior to polymerisation. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution and the impact on the generation of intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) with respect to CeO2-x NPs are studied by means of Raman Confocal Microscopy (CRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PSPM and PMETAC coated CeO2-x NPs show slower and less uptake compared to uncoated Brush modified NPs display a higher degree of co-localisation with cell endosomes and lysosomes after 24 h of incubation. They also show higher co-localisation with lipid bodies when compared to unmodified CeO2-x NPs. The brush coating does not prevent CeO2-x NPs from displaying antioxidant properties.Cerium Oxide nanoparticles (CeO2-x NPs) are modified with polymer brushes of negatively charged poly (3-sulfopropylmethacrylate) (PSPM) and positively charged poly (2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-trimethylammonium chloride) (PMETAC) by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerisation (ATRP). CeO2-x NPs are fluorescently labelled by covalently attaching Alexa Fluor® 488/Fluorescein isothiocyanate to the NP surface prior to polymerisation. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution and the impact on the generation of intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) with respect to CeO2-x NPs are studied by means of Raman Confocal Microscopy (CRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PSPM and PMETAC coated CeO2-x NPs show slower and less uptake compared to uncoated Brush modified NPs display a higher degree of co-localisation with cell

  4. Combustion-derived flame generated ultrafine soot generates reactive oxygen species and activates Nrf2 antioxidants differently in neonatal and adult rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urban particulate matter (PM) has been epidemiologically correlated with multiple cardiopulmonary morbidities and mortalities, in sensitive populations. Children exposed to PM are more likely to develop respiratory infections and asthma. Although PM originates from natural and anthropogenic sources, vehicle exhaust rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) can be a dominant contributor to the PM2.5 and PM0.1 fractions and has been implicated in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Objectives Current studies of ambient PM are confounded by the variable nature of PM, so we utilized a previously characterized ethylene-combusted premixed flame particles (PFP) with consistent and reproducible physiochemical properties and 1) measured the oxidative potential of PFP compared to ambient PM, 2) determined the ability of PFPs to generate oxidative stress and activate the transcription factor using in vitro and ex vivo models, and 3) we correlated these responses with antioxidant enzyme expression in vivo. Methods We compared oxidative stress response (HMOX1) and antioxidant enzyme (SOD1, SOD2, CAT, and PRDX6) expression in vivo by performing a time-course study in 7-day old neonatal and young adult rats exposed to a single 6-hour exposure to 22.4 μg/m3 PFPs. Results We showed that PFP is a potent ROS generator that induces oxidative stress and activates Nrf2. Induction of the oxidative stress responsive enzyme HMOX1 in vitro was mediated through Nrf2 activation and was variably upregulated in both ages. Furthermore, antioxidant enzyme expression had age and lung compartment variations post exposure. Of particular interest was SOD1, which had mRNA and protein upregulation in adult parenchyma, but lacked a similar response in neonates. Conclusions We conclude that PFPs are effective ROS generators, comparable to urban ambient PM2.5, that induce oxidative stress in neonatal and adult rat lungs. PFPs upregulate a select set of antioxidant enzymes in

  5. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G; Enghild, Jan J; Praetorius, Jeppe; Borregaard, Niels; Petersen, Steen V

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and increasing evidence supports a role for EC-SOD in the development of an inflammatory response. Here we show that human EC-SOD is present at the cell surface of isolated neutrophils as well as stored within secretory vesicles. Interestingly, we find that EC-SOD mRNA is absent throughout neutrophil maturation indicating that the protein is synthesized by other cells and subsequently endocytosed by the neutrophil. When secretory vesicles were mobilized by neutrophil stimulation using formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide in the extracellular space, but does not affect the capacity to generate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Consequently, our data signifies that EC-SOD released from activated neutrophils affects the redox conditions of the extracellular space and may offer protection against highly reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl radicals otherwise generated as a result of respiratory burst activity of activated neutrophils.

  6. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  7. Generation of reactive species and fate of thiols during peroxidase-catalyzed metabolic activation of aromatic amines and phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.; Moldeus, P.

    1985-12-01

    The horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed oxidation of p-phenetidine and acetaminophen was investigated. Studies using the spin probe 2-ethyl-1-hydroxy-2,5,5-trimethyl-3-oxazolidine (OXANOH) suggested these oxidations involve the generation of substrate-derived free radicals. This was confirmed by using glutathione (GSH) in these incubations in the presence of the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), DMPO-glutathionyl radical adducts were observed using EPR spectroscopy during HRP-catalyzed oxidation of both p-phenetidine and acetaminophen. Investigations of oxygen uptake and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) formation during HRP-catalyzed oxidations of p-phenetidine and acetaminophen suggested that further reactions of the glutathionyl radical involve glutathione peroxysulfenyl radical and glutathione sulfenyl hydroperoxide production. Quinonoid products of the peroxidatic oxidations of p-phenetidine and acetaminophen, and their interaction with GSH via both conjugation and redox mechanisms are described. The relevance of these reactions of GSH with reactive species as detoxification mechanisms is discussed. 29 references.

  8. Salinomycin simultaneously induces apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species in osteosarcoma U2OS cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hun; Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Yu, Sun-Nyoung; Seo, Young-Kyo; Chun, Sung-Sik; Noh, Kyung-Tae; Suh, Jeung-Tak; Ahn, Soon-Cheol

    2016-04-29

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, acts as a highly selective potassium ionophore. It was reported to anticancer activity on various cancer cell lines. In this study, salinomycin was examined on apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Apoptosis, autophagy, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ROS were analyzed using flow cytometry. Also, expressions of apoptosis- and autophagy-related proteins were determined by western blotting. As a result, salinomycin triggered apoptosis of U2OS cells, which was accompanied by change of MMP and cleavage of caspases-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. And salinomycin increased the expression of autophagy-related protein and accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO). Salinomycin-induced ROS production promotes both apoptosis and autophagy, as evidenced by the result that treatment of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, attenuated both apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3 MA) enhanced the salinoymcin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggested that salinomycin-induced autophagy, as a survival mechanism, might be a potential strategy through ROS regulation in cancer therapy.

  9. Induction of apoptosis by three marine algae through generation of reactive oxygen species in human leukemic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Lan; Wu, Shwu-Li; Liao, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Huang, Ray-Ling; Chen, Yu-Yawn; Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2005-03-09

    In this study, we examined the antitumor effect of marine algae extracts on human hepatoma and leukemia cells. Ethyl acetate extracts from Colpomenia sinuosa (Cs-EA), Halimeda discoidae (Hd-EA), and Galaxaura oblongata (Go-EA) directly inhibited the growth of human hepatoma HuH-7 cells and leukemia U937 and HL-60 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Specifically, these algae extracts induced apoptosis of U937 and HL-60 cells as evaluated by detection of hypodiploid cells using flow cytometry and observation of condensed and fragmented nuclei in algae extract-treated cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, were increased about 2-3-fold in U937 cells treated with Cs-EA for 3-5 h. Interestingly, antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively blocked Cs-EA-, Hd-EA-, and Go-EA-induced apoptosis, suggesting that ROS is a key mediator in the apoptotic signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results show that algae extracts induce apoptosis in human leukemia cells through generation of ROS.

  10. Study on the generation mechanism of reactive oxygen species on calcium peroxide by chemiluminescence and UV-visible spectra.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong; Zhang, Bo-Tao; Zhao, Lixia; Guo, Guangsheng; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the generation mechanism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on calcium peroxide (CaO(2)) was studied. A very intense chemiluminescence (CL) signal was observed when adding an aqueous solution of luminol or 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2alpha]-pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride (MCLA) to a suspension of CaO(2). The ROS released on CaO(2) were thought to be oxidizing agents leading to CL, and were characterized by CL, UV-visible (UV-vis) spectra and the effective scavengers of the special ROS. From experimental results, the hydroxyl (.OH) and superoxide (.O(2) (-)) radicals were suggested to exist on the surface of CaO(2). A reaction scheme for the formation of the ROS on CaO(2) was also proposed and discussed. Of more interest was the finding that the CaO(2) which released the .OH and .O(2) (-) on the surface exhibited good transition properties compared with alkaline-earth metal peroxides of the same group (MgO(2), BaO(2)).

  11. Physalis angulata induces death of promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis via the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, B J M; Da Silva, R R P; Rodrigues, A P D; Farias, L H S; Do Nascimento, J L M; Silva, E O

    2016-03-01

    Leishmaniasis are a neglected group of emerging diseases that have been found in 98 countries and are caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania. The therapy for leishmaniasis causes several side effects and leads to drug-resistant strains. Natural products from plants have exhibited activities against Leishmania in various experimental models. Physalis angulata is a widely used plant in popular medicine, and in the literature it has well-documented leishmanicidal activity. However, its mechanism of action is still unknown. Thus, this study aims to evaluate the mechanism driving the leishmanicidal activity of an aqueous extract of P. angulata root (AEPa). AEPa was effective against both promastigotes and intracellular amastigote forms of Leishmania amazonensis. This effect was mediated by an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not of nitric oxide (NO). The increased production of ROS induces cell death by phenotypes seems by apoptosis cell death in Leishmania, but not autophagy or necrosis. In addition, morphological analysis of macrophages showed that AEPa induced a high number of cytoplasmic projections, increased the volume of cytoplasm and number of vacuoles, caused cytoskeleton alterations and resulted in high spreading ability. AEPa also promoted superoxide anion (O2(-)) production in both uninfected macrophages and those infected with Leishmania. Therefore, these results revealed that AEPa causes cell death by phenotypes seems by apoptosis cell death in L. amazonensis and modulates macrophage activation through morphofunctional alterations and O2(-) generation to induce Leishmania death.

  12. Heat shock protein 75 (TRAP1) antagonizes reactive oxygen species generation and protects cells from granzyme M-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Zhang, Qixiang; Fan, Zusen

    2007-07-13

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in innate immunity against virally infected or transformed cells as the first defense line. Granzyme M (GzmM) is an orphan granzyme that is constitutively highly expressed in NK cells and is consistent with NK cell-mediated cytolysis. We recently demonstrated that GzmM induces caspase-dependent apoptosis with DNA fragmentation through direct cleavage of inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD). However, the molecular mechanisms for GzmM-induced apoptosis are unclear. We found GzmM causes mitochondrial swelling and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Moreover, GzmM initiates reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cytochrome c release. Heat shock protein 75 (HSP75, also known as TRAP1) acts as an antagonist of ROS and protects cells from GzmM-mediated apoptosis. GzmM cleaves TRAP1 and abolishes its antagonistic function to ROS, resulting in ROS accumulation. Silencing TRAP1 through RNA interference increases ROS accumulation, whereas TRAP1 overexpression attenuates ROS production. ROS accumulation is in accordance with the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and enhances GzmM-mediated apoptosis.

  13. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Junghwa; Jung, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders.

  14. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-07

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by NADPH Oxidases Promote Radicle Protrusion and Root Elongation during Rice Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Yan; Chen, Bing-Xian; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Gao, Yin-Tao; Chen, Zhuang; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Seed germination is a complicated biological process that requires regulation through various enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms. Although it has been recognized that reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate radicle emergence and root elongation in a non-enzymatic manner during dicot seed germination, the role of ROS in monocot seed germination remains unknown. NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are the major ROS producers in plants; however, whether and how NOXs regulate rice seed germination through ROS generation remains unclear. Here, we report that diphenyleneiodinium (DPI), a specific NOX inhibitor, potently inhibited embryo and seedling growth—especially that of the radicle and of root elongation—in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the DPI-mediated inhibition of radicle and root growth could be eliminated by transferring seedlings from DPI to water. Furthermore, ROS production/accumulation during rice seed germination was quantified via histochemistry. Superoxide radicals (O2−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH) accumulated steadily in the coleorhiza, radicle and seedling root of germinating rice seeds. Expression profiles of the nine typical NOX genes were also investigated. According to quantitative PCR, OsNOX5, 7 and 9 were expressed relatively higher. When seeds were incubated in water, OsNOX5 expression progressively increased in the embryo from 12 to 48 h, whereas OsNOX7 and 9 expressions increased from 12 to 24 h and decreased thereafter. As expected, DPI inhibits the expression at predetermined time points for each of these genes. Taken together, these results suggest that ROS produced by NOXs are involved in radicle and root elongation during rice seed germination, and OsNOX5, 7 and 9 could play crucial roles in rice seed germination. These findings will facilitate further studies of the roles of ROS generated by NOXs during seed germination and seedling establishment and also provide valuable information for the regulation of NOX

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingyong; Zhang, Li; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Baoyou; He, Wuna

    2013-04-19

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma.

  17. Curcumin induces ER stress-mediated apoptosis through selective generation of reactive oxygen species in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boyun; Kim, Hee Seung; Jung, Eun-Ji; Lee, Jung Yun; K Tsang, Benjamin; Lim, Jeong Mook; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged accumulation of misfolded or unfolded proteins caused by cellular stress, including oxidative stress, induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, which then activates an unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress is usually maintained at higher levels in cancer cells as compared to normal cells due to altered metabolism in cancer. Here, we investigated whether curcumin is ER stress-mediated apoptosis in cervical cancer cells, and ROS increased by curcumin are involved in the process as an upstream contributor. Curcumin inhibited proliferation of cervical cancer cells (C33A, CaSki, HeLa, and ME180) and induced apoptotic cell death. Curcumin activated ER-resident UPR sensors, such as PERK, IRE-1α, and ATF6, and their downstream-signaling proteins in cervical cancer cells, but not in normal epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). CHOP, a key factor involved in ER stress-mediated apoptosis, was also activated by curcumin. CHOP decreased the ratio of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 to pro-apoptotic protein Bax expression, and subsequently increased the apoptotic population of cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, curcumin elevated levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cervical cancer cells, but not in normal epithelial cells. Scavenging ROS resulted in inhibition of ER stress and partially restored cell viability in curcumin-treated cancer cells. Collectively, these observations show that curcumin promotes ER stress-mediated apoptosis in cervical cancer cells through increase of cell type-specific ROS generation. Therefore, modulation of these differential responses to curcumin between normal and cervical cancer cells could be an effective therapeutic strategy without adverse effects on normal cells.

  18. Humic acid effect on catalase activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species in corn (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Flávio Couto; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Silveira, Vanildo; de Souza, Sonia Regina

    2011-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) have positive effects on plant physiology, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are only partially understood. The induction of root growth and emission of lateral roots (LRs) promoted by exogenous auxin is a natural phenomenon. Exogenous auxins are also associated with HA. Gas nitric oxide (NO) is a secondary messenger produced endogenously in plants. It is associated with metabolic events dependent on auxin. With the application of auxin, NO production is significantly increased, resulting in positive effects on plant physiology. Thus it is possible to evaluate the beneficial effects of the application of HA as an effect of auxin. To investigate the effects of HA the parameters of root growth, Zea mays was studied by evaluating the application of 3 mM C L⁻¹ of HA extracted from Oxisol and 100 µM SNP (sodium nitroprusside) and the NO donor, subject to two N-NO₃⁻, high dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻) and low dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻). Treatments with HA and NO were positively increased, regardless of the N-NO₃⁻ taken, as assessed by fresh weight and dry root, issue of LRs. The effects were more pronounced in the treatment with a lower dose of N-NO₃⁻. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo and catalase activity were evaluated; these tests were associated with root growth. Under application of the bioactive substances tested, detection of ROS and catalase activity increased, especially in treatments with lower doses of N-NO₃⁻. The results of this experiment indicate that the effects of HA are dependent on ROS generation, which act as a messenger that induces root growth and the emission of LRs.

  19. A photoreducible copper(II)-tren complex of practical value: generation of a highly reactive click catalyst.

    PubMed

    Harmand, Lydie; Lambert, Romain; Scarpantonio, Luca; McClenaghan, Nathan D; Lastécouères, Dominique; Vincent, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-25

    A detailed study on the photoreduction of the copper(II) precatalyst 1 to generate a highly reactive cuprous species for the copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) click reaction is presented. For the photoactive catalyst described herein, the activation is driven by a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process harnessing a benzophenone-like ketoprofenate chromophore as a photosensitizer, which is equally the counterion. The solvent is shown to play a major role in the Cu(II) to Cu(I) reduction process as the final electron source, and the influence of the solvent nature on the photoreduction efficiency has been studied. Particular attention was paid to the use of water as a potential solvent, aqueous media being particularly appealing for CuAAC processes. The ability to solubilize the copper-tren complexes in water through the formation of inclusion complexes with β-CDs is demonstrated. Data is also provided on the fate of the copper(I)-tren catalytic species when reacting with O2, O2 being used to switch off the catalysis. These data show that partial oxidation of the secondary benzylamine groups of the ligand to benzylimines occurs. Preliminary results show that when prolonged irradiation times are employed a Cu(I) to Cu(0) over-reduction process takes place, leading to the formation of copper nanoparticles (NPs). Finally, the main objective of this work being the development of photoactivable catalysts of practical value for the CuAAC, the catalytic, photolatent, and recycling properties of 1 in water and organic solvents are reported.

  20. Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Arany, Praveen R.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Saleem, Taimur; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810-nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NFkB was observed for fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2. NF-kB activation by laser was detectable at 1-hour time point. Moreover, we demonstrated that laser phosphorylated both IKK α/β and NF-kB 15 minutes after irradiation, which implied that laser activates NF-kB via phosphorylation of IKK α/β. Suspecting mitochondria as the source of NF-kB activation signaling pathway, we demonstrated that laser increased both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy with dichlorodihydrofluorescein and ATP synthesis by luciferase assay. Mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat increased ROS and NF-kB activation but had no effect on ATP. The ROS quenchers N-acetyl-L-cysteine and ascorbic acid abrogated laser-induced NF-kB and ROS but not ATP. These results suggested that ROS might play an important role in the signaling pathway of laser induced NF-kB activation. However, the western blot showed that antimycin A, a mitochondrial inhibitor, did not activate NF-kB via serine phosphorylation of IKK α/β as the laser did. On the other hand, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that light also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. ATP upregulation reached a maximum at 0.3 J/cm2 or higher. We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kB by generating ROS as signaling molecules.

  1. Phototoxicity of nano titanium dioxides in HaCaT keratinocytes—Generation of reactive oxygen species and cell damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jun-Jie; Liu, Jun; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Roberts, Joan E.; Fu, Peter P.; Mason, Ronald P.; Zhao, Baozhong

    2012-08-15

    Nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is among the top five widely used nanomaterials for various applications. In this study, we determine the phototoxicity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) with different molecular sizes and crystal forms (anatase and rutile) in human skin keratinocytes under UVA irradiation. Our results show that all nano-TiO{sub 2} particles caused phototoxicity, as determined by the MTS assay and by cell membrane damage measured by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, both of which were UVA dose- and nano-TiO{sub 2} dose-dependent. The smaller the particle size of the nano-TiO{sub 2} the higher the cell damage. The rutile form of nano-TiO{sub 2} showed less phototoxicity than anatase nano-TiO{sub 2}. The level of photocytotoxicity and cell membrane damage is mainly dependent on the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Using polyunsaturated lipids in plasma membranes and human serum albumin as model targets, and employing electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry and immuno-spin trapping as unique probing methods, we demonstrated that UVA irradiation of nano-TiO{sub 2} can induce significant cell damage, mediated by lipid and protein peroxidation. These overall results suggest that nano-TiO{sub 2} is phototoxic to human skin keratinocytes, and that this phototoxicity is mediated by ROS generated during UVA irradiation. Highlights: ► We evaluate the phototoxicity of nano-TiO{sub 2} with different sizes and crystal forms. ► The smaller the particle size of the nano-TiO{sub 2} the higher the cell damage. ► The rutile form of nano-TiO{sub 2} showed less phototoxicity than anatase nano-TiO{sub 2}. ► ESR oximetry and immuno-spin trapping techniques confirm UVA-induced cell damage. ► Phototoxicity is mediated by ROS generated during UVA irradiation of nano-TiO{sub 2}.

  2. Sequential reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species in early programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a physiological process commonly defined by alterations in nuclear morphology (apoptosis) and/or characteristic stepwise degradation of chromosomal DNA occurring before cytolysis. However, determined characteristics of PCD such as loss in mitochondrial reductase activity or cytolysis can be induced in enucleated cells, indicating cytoplasmic PCD control. Here we report a sequential disregulation of mitochondrial function that precedes cell shrinkage and nuclear fragmentation. A first cyclosporin A-inhibitable step of ongoing PCD is characterized by a reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, as determined by specific fluorochromes (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine++ + iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide). Cytofluorometrically purified cells with reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential are initially incapable of oxidizing hydroethidine (HE) into ethidium. Upon short-term in vitro culture, such cells acquire the capacity of HE oxidation, thus revealing a second step of PCD marked by mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This step can be selectively inhibited by rotenone and ruthenium red yet is not affected by cyclosporin A. Finally, cells reduce their volume, a step that is delayed by radical scavengers, indicating the implication of ROS in the apoptotic process. This sequence of alterations accompanying early PCD is found in very different models of apoptosis induction: glucocorticoid-induced death of lymphocytes, activation-induced PCD of T cell hybridomas, and tumor necrosis factor-induced death of U937 cells. Transfection with the antiapoptotic protooncogene Bcl-2 simultaneously inhibits mitochondrial alterations and apoptotic cell death triggered by steroids or ceramide. In vivo injection of fluorochromes such as 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide; or HE allows for the detection of

  3. Silver nanoparticles synthesized from Adenium obesum leaf extract induced DNA damage, apoptosis and autophagy via generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Farah, Mohammad Abul; Ali, Mohammad Ajmal; Chen, Shen-Ming; Li, Ying; Al-Hemaid, Fahad Mohammad; Abou-Tarboush, Faisal Mohammad; Al-Anazi, Khalid Mashay; Lee, Joongku

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are an important class of nanomaterial used for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. Adenium obesum is a plant of the family Apocynaceae that is rich in toxic cardiac glycosides; however, there is scarce information on the anticancer potential of its AgNPs. We herein report the novel biosynthesis of AgNPs using aqueous leaf extract of A. obesum (AOAgNPs). The synthesis of AOAgNPs was monitored by color change and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (425 nm). It was further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FTIR spectra for the AOAgNPs indicated the presence of terpenoids, long chain fatty acids, secondary amide derivatives and proteins that could be responsible for the reduction and capping of the formed AOAgNPs. X-ray diffraction confirmed the crystallinity of the AgNPs. The TEM images revealed mostly spherical particles in the size range of 10-30 nm. The biological properties of novel AOAgNPs were investigated on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA damage, induction of apoptosis and autophagy were assessed. A dose-dependent decrease in the cell viability was observed. The IC50 value was calculated as 217 μg/ml. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluation confirmed about a 2.5 fold increase in the generation of ROS at the highest concentration of 150 μg/ml. A significant (p<0.05) increase in the DNA damage evaluated by comet assay was evident. Flow cytometry revealed an increase in the apoptotic cells (24%) in the AOAgNPs treated group compared to the control. Acridine orange staining of acidic vesicles in exposed cells confirmed the induction of autophagy. These findings suggest that AOAgNPs increased the level of ROS resulting in heightened the DNA damage, apoptosis and autophagy in MCF-7 cells.

  4. Application of simultaneous active and reactive power modulation of superconducting magnetic energy storage unit to damp turbine-generator subsynchronous oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chijui; Lee, Yuangshung )

    1993-03-01

    An active and reactive power (P-Q) simultaneous control scheme which is based on a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is designed to damp out the subsynchronous resonant (SSR) oscillations of a turbine-generator unit. In order to suppress unstable torsional mode oscillations, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is employed to modulate the active and reactive power input/output of the SMES unit according to speed deviation of the generator shaft. The gains of the proposed PID controller are determined by pole assignment approach based on modal control theory. Eigenvalue analysis of the studied system shows that the PID controller is quite effective over a wide range of operating conditions. Dynamic simulations using the nonlinear system model are also performed to demonstrate the damping effect of the proposed control scheme under disturbance conditions.

  5. Sum-Frequency Generation Spectroscopy for Studying Organic Layers at Water-Air Interfaces: Microlayer Monitoring and Surface Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laß, Kristian; Kleber, Joscha; Bange, Hermann; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2015-04-01

    The sea surface microlayer, according to commonly accepted terminology, comprises the topmost millimetre of the oceanic water column. It is often enriched with organic matter and is directly influenced by sunlight exposure and gas exchange with the atmosphere, hence making it a place for active biochemistry and photochemistry as well as for heterogeneous reactions. In addition, surface active material either is formed or accumulates directly at the air-water interface and gives rise to very thin layers, sometimes down to monomolecular thickness. This "sea surface nanolayer" determines the viscoelastic properties of the seawater surface and thus may impact the turbulent air-sea gas exchange rates. To this effect, this small scale layer presumably plays an important role for large scale changes of atmospheric trace gas concentrations (e.g., by modulating the ocean carbon sink characteristics) with possible implications for coupled climate models. To date, detailed knowledge about the composition, structure, and reactivity of the sea surface nanolayer is still scarce. Due to its small vertical dimension and the small amount of material, this surfactant layer is very difficult to separate and analyse. A way out is the application of second-order nonlinear optical methods, which make a direct surface-specific and background-free detection of this interfacial layer possible. In recent years, we have introduced the use of vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy to gain insight into natural and artificial organic monolayers at the air-water interface. In this contribution, the application of VSFG spectroscopy for the analysis of the sea surface nanolayer will be illustrated. Resulting spectra are interpreted in terms of layer composition and surfactant classes, in particular with respect to carbohydrate-containing molecules such as glycolipids. The partitioning of the detected surfactants into soluble and non-soluble ("wet" and "dry") surfactants will be

  6. Nebivolol prevents ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the rat kidney by regulating NADPH oxidase activation and expression.

    PubMed

    do Vale, Gabriel T; Gonzaga, Natália A; Simplicio, Janaina A; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2017-03-15

    We studied whether the β1-adrenergic antagonist nebivolol would prevent ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the rat renal cortex. Male Wistar rats were treated with ethanol (20% v/v) for 2 weeks. Nebivolol (10mg/kg/day; p.o. gavage) prevented both the increase in superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration induced by ethanol in the renal cortex. Ethanol decreased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentration in the renal cortex, and nebivolol prevented this response. Nebivolol did not affect the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration induced by ethanol. Nebivolol prevented the ethanol-induced increase of catalase (CAT) activity. Both SOD activity and the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were not affected by treatment with nebivolol or ethanol. Neither ethanol nor nebivolol affected the expression of Nox1, Nox4, eNOS, nNOS, CAT, Nox organizer 1 (Noxo1), c-Src, p47(phox) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms in the renal cortex. On the other hand, treatment with ethanol increased Nox2 expression, and nebivolol prevented this response. Finally, nebivolol reduced the expression of protein kinase (PK) Cδ and Rac1. The major finding of our study is that nebivolol prevented ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the kidney by a mechanism that involves reduction on the expression of Nox2, a catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase. Additionally, we demonstrated that nebivolol reduces NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species by decreasing the expression of PKCδ and Rac1, which are important activators of NADPH oxidase.

  7. Lycopene inhibits cyclic strain-induced endothelin-1 expression through the suppression of reactive oxygen species generation and induction of heme oxygenase-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Chin; Chao, Hung-Hsing; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Tsai, Jen-Chen; Liu, Ju-Chi; Hong, Hong-Jye; Cheng, Tzu-Hurng; Chen, Jin-Jer

    2015-06-01

    Lycopene is the most potent active antioxidant among the major carotenoids, and its use has been associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a powerful vasopressor synthesized by endothelial cells and plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CVD. However, the direct effects of lycopene on vascular endothelial cells have not been fully described. This study investigated the effects of lycopene on cyclic strain-induced ET-1 gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and identified the signal transduction pathways that are involved in this process. Cultured HUVECs were exposed to cyclic strain (20% in length, 1 Hz) in the presence or absence of lycopene. Lycopene inhibited strain-induced ET-1 expression through the suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through attenuation of p22(phox) mRNA expression and NAD(P)H oxidase activity. Furthermore, lycopene inhibited strain-induced ET-1 secretion by reducing ROS-mediated extrace-llular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Conversely, lycopene treatment enhanced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene expression through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, followed by induction of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation; in addition, HO-1 silencing partially inhibited the repressive effects of lycopene on strain-induced ET-1 expression. In summary, our study showed, for the first time, that lycopene inhibits cyclic strain-induced ET-1 gene expression through the suppression of ROS generation and induction of HO-1 in HUVECs. Therefore, this study provides new valuable insight into the molecular pathways that may contribute to the proposed beneficial effects of lycopene on the cardiovascular system.

  8. Extracellular Cl(-)-free-induced cardioprotection against hypoxia/reoxygenation is associated with attenuation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Gui; Zhao, Le; Zhang, Yi; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Huan; Duan, Guang-Ling; Xiao, Lin; Li, Xiao-Ran; Chen, He-Ping

    2017-02-01

    The isotonic substitution of extracellular chloride by gluconate (extracellular Cl(-)-free) has been demonstrated to elicit cardioprotection by attenuating ischaemia/reperfusion-induced elevation of intracellular chloride ion concentration ([Cl(-)]i). However, the downstream mechanism underlying the cardioprotective effect of extracellular Cl(-)-free is not fully established. Here, it was investigated whether extracellular Cl(-)-free attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) and whether mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) plays a key role in the extracellular Cl(-)-free cardioprotection. H9c2 cells were incubated with or without Cl(-)-free solution, in which Cl(-) was replaced with equimolar gluconate, during H/R. The involvement of mPTP was determined with atractyloside (Atr), a specific mPTP opener. The results showed that extracellular Cl(-)-free attenuated H/R-induced the elevation of [Cl(-)]i, accompanied by increase of cell viability and reduction of lactate dehydrogenase release. Moreover, extracellular Cl(-)-free inhibited mPTP opening, and improved mitochondria function, as indicated by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and respiratory chain complex activities, decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, and increased ATP content. Intriguingly, pharmacologically opening of the mPTP with Atr attenuated all the protective effects caused by extracellular Cl(-)-free, including suppression of mPTP opening, maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, and subsequent improvement of mitochondrial function. These results indicated that extracellular Cl(-)-free protects mitochondria from H/R injury in H9c2 cells and inhibition of mPTP opening is a crucial step in mediating the cardioprotection of extracellular Cl(-)-free.

  9. Influence of extracellular zinc on M1 microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Youichirou; Aratake, Takaaki; Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kumiko; Tsuda, Masayuki; Yawata, Toshio; Ueba, Tetuya; Saito, Motoaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular zinc, which is released from hippocampal neurons in response to brain ischaemia, triggers morphological changes in microglia. Under ischaemic conditions, microglia exhibit two opposite activation states (M1 and M2 activation), which may be further regulated by the microenvironment. We examined the role of extracellular zinc on M1 activation of microglia. Pre-treatment of microglia with 30–60 μM ZnCl2 resulted in dose-dependent increases in interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) secretion when M1 activation was induced by lipopolysaccharide administration. In contrast, the cell-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, the radical scavenger Trolox, and the P2X7 receptor antagonist A438079 suppressed the effects of zinc pre-treatment on microglia. Furthermore, endogenous zinc release was induced by cerebral ischaemia–reperfusion, resulting in increased expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and the microglial M1 surface marker CD16/32, without hippocampal neuronal cell loss, in addition to impairments in object recognition memory. However, these effects were suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. These findings suggest that extracellular zinc may prime microglia to enhance production of pro-inflammatory cytokines via P2X7 receptor activation followed by reactive oxygen species generation in response to stimuli that trigger M1 activation, and that these inflammatory processes may result in deficits in object recognition memory. PMID:28240322

  10. NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species: A new mechanism for X-ray-induced HeLa cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qing; He Xiaoqing; Liu Yongsheng; Du Bingbing; Wang Xiaoyan; Zhang Weisheng; Jia Pengfei; Dong Jingmei; Ma Jianxiu; Wang Xiaohu; Li Sha; Zhang Hong

    2008-12-19

    Oxidative damage is an important mechanism in X-ray-induced cell death. Radiolysis of water molecules is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to X-ray-induced cell death. In this study, we showed by ROS detection and a cell survival assay that NADPH oxidase has a very important role in X-ray-induced cell death. Under X-ray irradiation, the upregulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase membrane subunit gp91{sup phox} was dose-dependent. Meanwhile, the cytoplasmic subunit p47{sup phox} was translocated to the cell membrane and localized with p22{sup phox} and gp91{sup phox} to form reactive NADPH oxidase. Our data suggest, for the first time, that NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS is an important contributor to X-ray-induced cell death. This suggests a new target for combined gene transfer and radiotherapy.

  11. UV Light-Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Antimicrobial Properties of Cellulose Fabric Modified by 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone Tetracarboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hou, Aiqin; Feng, Guanchen; Zhuo, Jingyuan; Sun, Gang

    2015-12-23

    3,3',4,4'-Benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTCA) could directly react with hydroxyl groups on cellulose to form ester bonds. The modified cotton fabrics not only provided good wrinkle-free and ultraviolet (UV) protective functions, but also exhibited important photochemical properties such as producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under UV light exposure. The amounts of the produced hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide were measured, and photochemical reactive mechanism of the BPTCA treated cellulose was discussed. The results reveal that the fabrics possess good washing durability in generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The cotton fabrics modified with different concentrations of BPTCA and cured at an elevated temperature demonstrated excellent antimicrobial activities, which provided 99.99% antibacterial activities against both E. coli and S. aureus. The advanced materials have potential applications in medical textiles and biological material fields.

  12. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  13. Oxidative and other posttranslational modifications in extracellular vesicle biology.

    PubMed

    Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Ryan, Brent; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó, Tamás G; Sódar, Barbara; Holub, Marcsilla; Németh, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Pállinger, Éva; Winyard, Paul; Buzás, Edit I

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles, are phospholipid bilayer surrounded structures secreted by cells universally, in an evolutionarily conserved fashion. Posttranslational modifications such as oxidation, citrullination, phosphorylation and glycosylation play diverse roles in extracellular vesicle biology. Posttranslational modifications orchestrate the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles. The signals extracellular vesicles transmit between cells also often function via modulating posttranslational modifications of target molecules, given that extracellular vesicles are carriers of several active enzymes catalysing posttranslational modifications. Posttranslational modifications of extracellular vesicles can also contribute to disease pathology by e.g. amplifying inflammation, generating neoepitopes or carrying neoepitopes themselves.

  14. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  15. Detection and comparison of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin metal (Fe, Mg and Cu) complexes under ultrasonic and visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Guo, Yuwei; Gao, Jingqun; Jin, Xudong; Wang, Zhiqiu; Wang, Baoxin; Li, Kai; Li, Ying

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, in order to examine the mechanisms of sonodynamic and photodynamic reactions, the chlorophyllin metal (Chl-M (M=Fe, Mg and Cu)) complexes were irradiated by ultrasound (US) and visible-light (VL), respectively, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of Oxidation-Extraction Spectrometry (OES). That is, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by the generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can display a various visible absorption around 563 nm wavelength. Besides, some influence parameters on the generation of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated an apparent synergistic effect of Chl-M and ultrasonic or visible-light irradiation for the generation of ROS. Moreover, the quantities of generated ROS increase with the increase of (ultrasonic or visible-light) irradiation time and Chl-M (M=Fe, Mg and Cu) concentration. Finally, several quenchers were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It is wished that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the sonodynamic therapy (SDT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) mechanisms and the application of Chl-M in tumor treatment.

  16. The Use of Chimeric Virus-like Particles Harbouring a Segment of Hantavirus Gc Glycoprotein to Generate a Broadly-Reactive Hantavirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80–89) or site #4 (aa 280–289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications. PMID:24513568

  17. The use of chimeric virus-like particles harbouring a segment of hantavirus Gc glycoprotein to generate a broadly-reactive hantavirus-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-02-07

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80-89) or site #4 (aa 280-289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications.

  18. Generation and reactivity of putative support systems, Ce-Al neutral binary oxide nanoclusters: CO oxidation and C-H bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2013-11-01

    Both ceria (CeO2) and alumina (Al2O3) are very important catalyst support materials. Neutral binary oxide nanoclusters (NBONCs), CexAlyOz, are generated and detected in the gas phase and their reactivity with carbon monoxide (CO) and butane (C4H10) is studied. The very active species CeAlO4• can react with CO and butane via O atom transfer (OAT) and H atom transfer (HAT), respectively. Other CexAlyOz NBONCs do not show reactivities toward CO and C4H10. The structures, as well as the reactivities, of CexAlyOz NBONCs are studied theoretically employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The ground state CeAlO4• NBONC possesses a kite-shaped structure with an OtCeObObAlOt configuration (Ot, terminal oxygen; Ob, bridging oxygen). An unpaired electron is localized on the Ot atom of the AlOt moiety rather than the CeOt moiety: this Ot centered radical moiety plays a very important role for the reactivity of the CeAlO4• NBONC. The reactivities of Ce2O4, CeAlO4•, and Al2O4 toward CO are compared, emphasizing the importance of a spin-localized terminal oxygen for these reactions. Intramolecular charge distributions do not appear to play a role in the reactivities of these neutral clusters, but could be important for charged isoelectronic BONCs. DFT studies show that the reaction of CeAlO4• with C4H10 to form the CeAlO4H•C4H9• encounter complex is barrierless. While HAT processes have been previously characterized for cationic and anionic oxide clusters, the reported study is the first observation of a HAT process supported by a ground state neutral oxide cluster. Mechanisms for catalytic oxidation of CO over surfaces of AlxOy/MmOn or MmOn/AlxOy materials are proposed consistent with the presented experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Development of new generation of copolymers via reactive extrusion in a twin screw extruder and application in various PVC blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In

    Polymerization in twin screw extruders has largely involved homopolymers. Here we generalize this and polymerize a range of copolymers and terpolymers including epsilon-caprolactam(CA), o-lauryl lactam(LA), epsilon-caprolactone(CL), and gamma-butyrolactone(GBL) in a modular intermeshing co-rotating twin screw extruder. We considered different types of copolymer structures (di-block, tri-block, and random-block) and different backbones of copolymer(lactams-lactones) as well as the variables of temperature profile, screw speed, monomer feed rate, the ratio of monomer to initiator, and feeding order of co-monomers on reactive extrusion of polyamides-polylactones based (co)polymers. Specially designed block copolymers have played a role as compatibilizing agents in the system of immiscible polymer blends. We apply the di-block copolymer(P(LA-b-CL)) and random block copolymer (P(LA/CA-b-CL)) produced by reactive extrusion as a compatibilizing agent in immiscible polymer blend systems: (i) poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)/polyamide 12 (PA12), (ii) PVC/polypropylene(PP), and (iii) PVC/Ethylene-propylene-non-conjugated diene elastomer(EPDM).

  20. Interferon-gamma-treated murine macrophages inhibit growth of tubercle bacilli via the generation of reactive nitrogen intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Denis, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Murine peritoneal macrophages were isolated and their ability to restrict growth of a virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis in response to IFN-gamma was assessed in various conditions. Doses of IFN-gamma ranging from 10 to 100 U stimulated high levels of antimycobacterial activity, as seen by inhibition of growth. Addition of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and other scavengers of reactive oxygen species before infection failed to abrogate this restriction of growth, suggestive of a lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species in this phenomenon. Addition of arginase before infection inhibited the bacteriostatic ability of IFN-gamma-pulsed macrophages as did addition of NG-monomethyl L-arginine, an inhibitor of the synthesis of inorganic nitrogen oxide. In both cases, this inhibition was reversed by adding excess L-arginine in the medium. Moreover, nitrite production in macrophages was correlated with their ability to restrict tubercle bacilli growth. These results imply that nitric oxide or another inorganic nitrogen oxide is an important effector molecule in restricting growth of M. tuberculosis in IFN-gamma-pulsed murine macrophages.

  1. Generation of protein-reactive antibodies by short peptides is an event of high frequency: implications for the structural basis of immune recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Niman, H L; Houghten, R A; Walker, L E; Reisfeld, R A; Wilson, I A; Hogle, J M; Lerner, R A

    1983-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that chemically synthesized small peptides can induce antibodies that often react with intact proteins regardless of their position in the folded molecule. These findings are difficult to explain in view of the experimental and theoretical data which suggest that in the absence of forces provided by the folded protein, small peptides in aqueous solution do not readily adopt stable structures. In order to rationalize the two findings, there has been general acceptance of a stochastic model which suggests that the multiple conformers of a peptide in solution induce sets of antibodies with a small percentage reactive with conformations shared by the folded protein. This stochastic model has become less tenable as the success rate for the generation of protein-reactive anti-peptide antibodies has grown. To test the stochastic model, we have used monoclonal anti-peptide antibodies as a way of estimating the frequency with which small peptides induce antibodies that react with folded proteins. We have made monoclonal antibodies to six chemically synthesized peptides from three proteins. The frequency with which the peptides induce protein-reactive antibodies is at least 4 orders of magnitude greater than expected from previous experimental work and vastly different from what would be predicted by calculating the possible number of peptide conformers in solution. These findings make the stochastic model less likely and lead to consideration of other models. Aside from their practical significance for generation of highly specific reagents, these findings may have important implications for the protein folding problem. Images PMID:6192445

  2. Redox Cycling of Catechol Estrogens Generating Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites and 8-oxo-Deoxyguanosine via Reactive Oxygen Species Differentiates Equine and Human Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhican; Chandrasena, Esala R.; Yuan, Yang; Peng, Kuan-wei; van Breemen, Richard B.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic activation of estrogens to catechols and further oxidation to highly reactive o-quinones generates DNA damage including apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. 4-Hydroxyequilenin (4-OHEN) is the major catechol metabolite of equine estrogens present in estrogen replacement formulations, known to cause DNA strand breaks, oxidized bases, and stable and depurinating adducts. However, the direct formation of AP sites by 4-OHEN has not been characterized. In the present study, the induction of AP sites in vitro by 4-OHEN and the endogenous catechol estrogen metabolite, 4-hydroxyestrone (4-OHE) was examined by an aldehyde reactive probe assay. Both 4-OHEN and 4-OHE can significantly enhance the levels of AP sites in calf thymus DNA in the presence of the redox cycling agents, copper ion and NADPH. The B-ring unsaturated catechol 4-OHEN induced AP sites without added copper, whereas 4-OHE required copper. AP sites were also generated much more rapidly by 4-OHEN. For both catechol estrogens, the levels of AP sites correlated linearly with 8-oxo-dG levels, implying that depuriniation resulted from reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather than depurination of estrogen-DNA adducts. ROS modulators such as catalase which scavenges hydrogen peroxide and a Cu(I) chelator blocked the formation of AP sites. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, 4-OHEN significantly enhanced the formation of AP sites with added NADH. In contrast, no significant induction of AP sites was detected in 4-OHE-treated cells. The greater redox activity of the equine catechol estrogen produces rapid oxidative DNA damage via ROS, which is enhanced by redox cycling agents and interestingly by NADPH-dependent quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1). PMID:20509668

  3. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-15

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N{sub 2} gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C{sub 2} and CN radicals, revealing that C{sub 2} radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  4. Formation of diatomic molecular radicals in reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance discharge and pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; You, Qinghu; Cai, Hua; Yang, Xu; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen-carbon plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target was characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy with space resolution for a study of gas-phase reactions and molecular radical formation in the plasma. The plasma exhibits very high reactivity compared with the plasma generated solely by ECR discharge or by pulsed laser ablation and contains highly excited species originally present in the ambient gaseous environment and directly ablated from the target as well as formed as the products of gas-phase reactions occurring in the plasma. The space distribution and the time evolution of the plasma emission give an access to the gas-phase reactions for the formation of C2 and CN radicals, revealing that C2 radicals are formed mainly in the region near the target while CN radicals can be formed in a much larger region not only in the vicinity of the target, but especially in the region near a substrate far away from the target.

  5. Hypochlorous acid regulates neutrophil extracellular trap release in humans.

    PubMed

    Palmer, L J; Cooper, P R; Ling, M R; Wright, H J; Huissoon, A; Chapple, I L C

    2012-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) comprise extracellular chromatin and granule protein complexes that immobilize and kill bacteria. NET release represents a recently discovered, novel anti-microbial strategy regulated non-exclusively by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), particularly hydrogen peroxide. This study aimed to characterize the role of ROIs in the process of NET release and to identify the dominant ROI trigger. We employed various enzymes, inhibitors and ROIs to record their effect fluorometrically on in vitro NET release by human peripheral blood neutrophils. Treatment with exogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) supported the established link between hydrogen peroxide and NET production. However, treatment with myeloperoxidase inhibitors and direct addition of hypochlorous acid (HOCl; generated in situ from sodium hypochlorite) established that HOCl was a necessary and sufficient ROI for NET release. This was confirmed by the ability of HOCl to stimulate NET release in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patient neutrophils which, due to the lack of a functional NADPH oxidase, also lack the capacity for NET release in response to classical stimuli. Moreover, the exogenous addition of taurine, abundantly present within the neutrophil cytosol, abrogated NET production stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and HOCl, providing a novel mode of cytoprotection by taurine against oxidative stress by taurine.

  6. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  7. Induction of Apoptosis by [8]-shogaol via Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Glutathione Depletion and Caspase Activation in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Po-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Own; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Chang, Ing-Shing; Wu, Hou; Sang, Shengmin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2010-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, is a traditional medicine with carminative effect, anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. This study examined the growth inhibitory effects of [8]-shogaol, one of pungent phenolic compounds in ginger, on human leukemia HL-60 cells. It demonstrated that [8]-shogaol was able to induce apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with [8]-shogaol caused a rapid loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol, and subsequent induction of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3 processing. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that ROS production and depletion of the glutathione that committed to [8]-shogaol-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. PMID:20163181

  8. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  9. The Fumarate Reductase of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, unlike That of Escherichia coli, Is Configured so that It Does Not Generate Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The impact of oxidative stress upon organismal fitness is most apparent in the phenomenon of obligate anaerobiosis. The root cause may be multifaceted, but the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) likely plays a key role. ROS are formed when redox enzymes accidentally transfer electrons to oxygen rather than to their physiological substrates. In this study, we confirm that the predominant intestinal anaerobe Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron generates intracellular ROS at a very high rate when it is aerated. Fumarate reductase (Frd) is a prominent enzyme in the anaerobic metabolism of many bacteria, including B. thetaiotaomicron, and prior studies of Escherichia coli Frd showed that the enzyme is unusually prone to ROS generation. Surprisingly, in this study biochemical analysis demonstrated that the B. thetaiotaomicron Frd does not react with oxygen at all: neither superoxide nor hydrogen peroxide is formed. Subunit-swapping experiments indicated that this difference does not derive from the flavoprotein subunit at which ROS normally arise. Experiments with the related enzyme succinate dehydrogenase discouraged the hypothesis that heme moieties are responsible. Thus, resistance to oxidation may reflect a shift of electron density away from the flavin moiety toward the iron-sulfur clusters. This study shows that the autoxidizability of a redox enzyme can be suppressed by subtle modifications that do not compromise its physiological function. One implication is that selective pressures might enhance the oxygen tolerance of an organism by manipulating the electronic properties of its redox enzymes so they do not generate ROS. PMID:28049145

  10. Airborne particulate matter PM2.5 from Mexico City affects the generation of reactive oxygen species by blood neutrophils from asthmatics: an in vitro approach

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Vargas, Martha Patricia; Guzman-Grenfell, Alberto Martin; Blanco-Jimenez, Salvador; Sepulveda-Sanchez, Jose David; Bernabe-Cabanillas, Rosa Maria; Cardenas-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Ceballos, Guillermo; Hicks, Juan Jose

    2009-01-01

    Background The Mexico City Metropolitan Area is densely populated, and toxic air pollutants are generated and concentrated at a higher rate because of its geographic characteristics. It is well known that exposure to particulate matter, especially to fine and ultra-fine particles, enhances the risk of cardio-respiratory diseases, especially in populations susceptible to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fine particles on the respiratory burst of circulating neutrophils from asthmatic patients living in Mexico City. Methods In total, 6 subjects diagnosed with mild asthma and 11 healthy volunteers were asked to participate. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral venous blood and incubated with fine particles, and the generation of reactive oxygen species was recorded by chemiluminescence. We also measured plasma lipoperoxidation susceptibility and plasma myeloperoxidase and paraoxonase activities by spectrophotometry. Results Asthmatic patients showed significantly lower plasma paraoxonase activity, higher susceptibility to plasma lipoperoxidation and an increase in myeloperoxidase activity that differed significantly from the control group. In the presence of fine particles, neutrophils from asthmatic patients showed an increased tendency to generate reactive oxygen species after stimulation with fine particles (PM2.5). Conclusion These findings suggest that asthmatic patients have higher oxidation of plasmatic lipids due to reduced antioxidant defense. Furthermore, fine particles tended to increase the respiratory burst of blood human neutrophils from the asthmatic group. On the whole, increased myeloperoxidase activity and susceptibility to lipoperoxidation with a concomitant decrease in paraoxonase activity in asthmatic patients could favor lung infection and hence disrupt the control of asthmatic crises. PMID:19563660

  11. Inorganic chemical composition and chemical reactivity of settled dust generated by the World Trade Center building collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Hageman, Philip L.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Ziegler, Thomas L.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Theodorakos, Peter M.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Adams, Monique G.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Taggart, Joseph E.; Clark, Roger N.; Wilson, S.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of dust deposited around lower Manhattan by the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) collapse have inorganic chemical compositions that result in part from the variable chemical contributions of concrete, gypsum wallboard, glass fibers, window glass, and other materials contained in the buildings. The dust deposits were also modified chemically by variable interactions with rain water or water used in street washing and fire fighting. Chemical leach tests using deionized water as the extraction fluid show the dust samples can be quite alkaline, due primarily to reactions with calcium hydroxide in concrete particles. Calcium and sulfate are the most soluble components in the dust, but many other elements are also readily leached, including metals such as Al, Sb, Mo Cr, Cu, and Zn. Indoor dust samples produce leachates with higher pH, alkalinity, and dissolved solids than outdoor dust samples, suggesting most outdoor dust had reacted with water and atmospheric carbon dioxide prior to sample collection. Leach tests using simulated lung fluids as the extracting fluid suggest that the dust might also be quite reactive in fluids lining the respiratory tract, resulting in dissolution of some particles and possible precipitation of new phases such as phosphates, carbonates, and silicates. Results of these chemical characterization studies can be used by health scientists as they continue to track and interpret health effects resulting from the short-term exposure to the initial dust cloud and the longer-term exposure to dusts resuspended during cleanup.

  12. Nebivolol Reduces Proteinuria and Renal NADPH Oxidase-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species in the Transgenic Ren2 Rat

    PubMed Central

    Whaley-Connell, Adam; Habibi, Javad; Johnson, Megan; Tilmon, Roger; Rehmer, Nathan; Rehmer, Jenna; Wiedmeyer, Charles; Ferrario, Carlos M.; Sowers, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system activation are crucial in the pathogenesis of hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disease. NADPH oxidase-mediated increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important mediator for RAAS-induced cardiovascular and renal injury. Increased levels of ROS can diminish the bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO), a critical modulator of RAAS effects on the kidney. Thereby, we hypothesized that in vivo nebivolol therapy in a rodent model of activated RAAS would attenuate glomerular damage and proteinuria through its actions to reduce NADPH oxidase activity/ROS and increase bioavailable NO. Methods We utilized the transgenic Ren2 rat which displays heightened tissue RAAS, hypertension, and proteinuria. Ren2 rats (6–9 weeks of age) and age-matched Sprague-Dawley littermates were treated with nebivolol 10 mg/kg/day (osmotic mini-pump) for 21 days. Results Ren2 rats exhibited increases in systolic blood pressure, proteinuria, kidney cortical tissue total NADPH oxidase activity and subunits (Rac1, p67phox, and p47phox), ROS and 3-nitrotyrosine, as well as reductions in podocyte protein markers; each of these parameters improved with nebivolol treatment along with increases in renal endothelial NO synthase expression. Conclusions Our data suggest that nebivolol improves proteinuria through reductions in renal RAAS-mediated increases in NADPH oxidase/ROS and increases in bioavailable NO. PMID:19609077

  13. Molecular mechanisms of generation for nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, and role of the radical burst in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Asai, Shuta; Yoshioka, Miki; Kobayashi, Michie

    2009-10-31

    Rapid production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in the regulation of innate immunity in plants. A potato calcium-dependent protein kinase (StCDPK5) activates an NADPH oxidase StRBOHA to D by direct phosphorylation of N-terminal regions, and heterologous expression of StCDPK5 and StRBOHs in Nicotiana benthamiana results in oxidative burst. The transgenic potato plants that carry a constitutively active StCDPK5 driven by a pathogen-inducible promoter of the potato showed high resistance to late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans accompanied by HR-like cell death and H(2)O(2) accumulation in the attacked cells. In contrast, these plants showed high susceptibility to early blight necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria solani, suggesting that oxidative burst confers high resistance to biotrophic pathogen, but high susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogen. NO and ROS synergistically function in defense responses. Two MAPK cascades, MEK2-SIPK and cytokinesis-related MEK1-NTF6, are involved in the induction of NbRBOHB gene in N. benthamiana. On the other hand, NO burst is regulated by the MEK2-SIPK cascade. Conditional activation of SIPK in potato plants induces oxidative and NO bursts, and confers resistance to both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, indicating the plants may have obtained during evolution the signaling pathway which regulates both NO and ROS production to adapt to wide-spectrum pathogens.

  14. Novel type 1 photosensitizers: viability of leukemia cells exposed to reactive intermediates generated in situ by in vitro photofragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Karwa, Amol; Lusiak, Przemyslaw M.; Srivastava, Kripa; Poreddy, Amruta R.; Pandurangi, Raghootama S.; Galen, Karen P.; Neumann, William L.; Cantrell, Gary E.; Dorshow, Richard B.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy of tumors involving Type 2 photosenstizers has been conspicuously successful, but the Type 1 process, in contrast, has not received much attention despite its considerable potential. Accordingly, several classes of molecules containing fragile bonds such as azido (-N=N=N), azo (-N=N-), sulfenato (-S-O-) and oxaza (-N-O-) functional groups that produce reactive intermediates such as radicals and nitrenes upon photoexcitation were prepared and tested for cell viability using U397 leukemia cell line. The azido photosensitizer was conjugated to leukemia cell binding peptide, SFFWRLS, for targeted cell viability study. The cells were incubated with the photosensitizer at various concentrations, and were illuminated for 5, 10, and 20 minutes. The results show that all the photosensitizers caused cell death compared to the controls when exposed to both the photosensitizers and light. Most importantly, selective cell death was observed with the azido peptide conjugate 6, which clearly demonstrates that these Type 1 sensitizers are useful for phototherapeutic applications.

  15. Macrophages generate reactive oxygen species in response to minimally oxidized LDL: TLR4- and Syk-dependent activation of Nox2

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yun Soo; Lee, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Ho; Kim, Sunah; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a causative role in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we demonstrate that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) stimulates intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in macrophages through NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91phox/Nox2), which in turn induces production of RANTES and migration of smooth muscle cells. Peritoneal macrophages from gp91phox/Nox2−/− mice or J774 macrophages in which Nox2 was knocked down by siRNA failed to generate ROS in response to mmLDL. Because mmLDL-induced cytoskeletal changes were dependent on TLR4, we analyzed ROS generation in peritoneal macrophages from wild type, TLR4−/−, or MyD88−/− mice and found that mmLDL-mediated ROS was generated in a TLR4-dependent, but MyD88-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that ROS generation required the recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that mmLDL also induced PLCγ1 phosphorylation and PKC membrane translocation. Importantly, the PLCγ1 phosphorylation was reduced in J774 cells expressing Syk-specific shRNA. Nox2 modulated mmLDL activation of macrophages by regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and RANTES. We showed that purified RANTES was able to stimulate migration of mouse aortic smooth muscle cells (MASMC) and addition of neutralizing antibody against RANTES abolished the migration of MASMC stimulated by mmLDL-stimulated macrophages. These results suggest that mmLDL induces generation of ROS through sequential activation of TLR4, Syk, PLCγ1, PKC, and gp91phox/Nox2 and thereby stimulates expression of proinflammatory cytokines. These data help explain mechanisms by which endogenous ligands, such as mmLDL, can induce TLR4-dependent, proatherogenic activation of macrophages. PMID:19096031

  16. Dopamine mediates striatal malonate toxicity via dopamine transporter-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and D2 but not D1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Xia, X G; Schmidt, N; Teismann, P; Ferger, B; Schulz, J B

    2001-10-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate results in both chemically induced hypoxia and striatal lesions that are similar to those seen in Huntington's disease and cerebral ischaemia. The mechanisms leading to neuronal death involve secondary excitotoxicity, the release of dopamine from nigrostriatal fibres and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl radicals. Here, we further investigated the contribution and mechanism of dopamine on malonate-induced striatal lesions. Prior lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway with 6-OHDA or the depletion of striatal dopamine stores by pretreatment with reserpine, an inhibitor or the vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), in combination with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine resulted in a significant reduction of malonate-induced striatal lesion volumes. This was paralleled by block or reduction of the malonate-induced generation of ROS, as measured by the conversions of salicylate to 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) using microdialysis. Systemic or intrastriatal application of L-DOPA or dopamine, respectively, reconstituted malonate toxicity and the generation of ROS in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR12909 did not result in a reduction of malonate-induced dopamine release, but significantly reduced the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The D2 receptor agonist lisuride and the mixed D1 and D2 receptor agonist apomorphine, but not the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393, partially restored malonate toxicity in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without increasing the generation of ROS. In line with these results sulpiride, an inhibitor of D2 receptors, reduced the malonate-induced lesion volume, whereas SCH23390, an inhbitor of D1 receptors, was ineffective. Our data suggest that malonate-induced dopamine toxicity to energetically impaired neurons is mediated by two independent pathways: (i) dopamine transporter uptake

  17. NTRC and chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species regulate Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato disease development in tomato and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Ishiga, Takako; Wangdi, Tamding; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao

    2012-03-01

    Coronatine (COR)-producing pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae, including pvs. tomato, maculicola, and glycinea, cause important diseases on tomato, crucifers, and soybean, respectively, and produce symptoms with necrotic lesions surrounded by chlorosis. The chlorosis is mainly attributed to COR. However, the significance of COR-induced chlorosis in localized lesion development and the molecular basis of disease-associated cell death is largely unknown. To identify host (chloroplast) genes that play a role in COR-mediated chlorosis, we used a forward genetics approach using Nicotiana benthamiana and virus-induced gene silencing and identified a gene which encodes 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prxs) that, when silenced, produced a spreading hypersensitive or necrosis-like phenotype instead of chlorosis after COR application in a COI1-dependent manner. Loss-of-function analysis of Prx and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC), the central players of a chloroplast redox detoxification system, resulted in spreading accelerated P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 disease-associated cell death with enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in a COR-dependent manner in tomato and Arabidopsis. Consistent with these results, virulent strain DC3000 suppressed the expression of Prx and NTRC in Arabidopsis and tomato during pathogenesis. However, interestingly, authentic COR suppressed the expression of Prx and NTRC in tomato but not in Arabidopsis, suggesting that COR in conjunction with other effectors may modulate ROS and cell death in different host species. Taken together, these results indicated that NTRC or Prx function as a negative regulator of pathogen-induced cell death in the healthy tissues that surround the lesions, and COR-induced chloroplast-localized ROS play a role in enhancing the disease-associated cell death.

  18. Photosensitized damage inflicted on plasma membranes of live cells by an extracellular generator of singlet oxygen--a linear dependence of a lethal dose on light intensity.

    PubMed

    Zarębski, Mirosław; Kordon, Magdalena; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2014-01-01

    We describe a study of the influence of a dose rate, i.e. light intensity or photon flux, on the efficiency of induction of a loss of integrity of plasma membranes of live cells in culture. The influence of a photon flux on the size of the light dose, which was capable of causing lethal effects, was measured in an experimental system where singlet oxygen was generated exclusively outside of live cells by ruthenium(II) phenantroline complex. Instantaneous, sensitive detection of a loss of integrity of a plasma membrane was achieved by fluorescence confocal imaging of the entry of this complex into a cell interior. We demonstrate that the size of the lethal dose of light is directly proportional to the intensity of the exciting light. Thus, the probability of a photon of the exciting light inflicting photosensitized damage on plasma membranes diminishes with increasing density of the incident photons.

  19. The Influence of Extracellular Superoxide on Iron Redox Chemistry and Bioavailability to Aquatic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Superoxide, the one-electron reduced form of dioxygen, is produced in the extracellular milieu of aquatic microbes through a range of abiotic chemical processes and also by microbes themselves. Due to its ability to promote both oxidative and reductive reactions, superoxide may have a profound impact on the redox state of iron, potentially influencing iron solubility, complex speciation, and bioavailability. The interplay between iron, superoxide, and oxygen may also produce a cascade of other highly reactive transients in oxygenated natural waters. For microbes, the overall effect of reactions between superoxide and iron may be deleterious or beneficial, depending on the organism and its chemical environment. Here I critically discuss recent advances in understanding: (i) sources of extracellular superoxide in natural waters, with a particular emphasis on microbial generation; (ii) the chemistry of reactions between superoxide and iron; and (iii) the influence of these processes on iron bioavailability and microbial iron nutrition. PMID:22514548

  20. Generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and its effects on DNA damage in lung cancer cells exposed to atmospheric pressure helium/oxygen plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Choi, Ji Ye; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of the operating parameters on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the gas and liquid phases exposed to atmospheric pressure a pulsed-dc helium plasma jets. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. And the nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas and liquids. Exposure of plasma to cancer cells increases the cellular levels of RONS, which has been linked to apoptosis and the damage of cellular proteins, and may also indirectly cause structural damage to DNA. To identify the correlation between the production of RONS in cells and plasmas, various assay analyses were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549) cells. In addition, the effect of additive oxygen gas on the plasma-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells was investigated. It was observed that DNA damage was significantly increased with helium/oxygen plasma compared to with pure helium plasma.

  1. Synthetic Peptide Vaccine Development: Designing Dual Epitopes into a Single Pilin Peptide Immunogen Generates Antibody Cross-reactivity between Two Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, Clifton; Hodges, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main challenges of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) vaccine development is the design of an antigen that elicits cross-reactive antibodies against multiple virulent strains. Using a rational design approach, we have developed a single 17-residue peptide immunogen that generates antibodies that target the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the type IV pilus of more than one strain of P. aeruginosa. Using the RBD sequence, of native strain PAO as a template, we have systematically changed up to five residues in the PAO sequence of the peptide immunogen, into that of the PAK sequence. We show by indirect and competitive ELISA, that the mutant peptide immunogens elicit the development of polyclonal sera that is cross-reactive to both native strain PAO and PAK pilin. We further show that there are at least two separate antibody populations in the polyclonal sera that possess closely-related epitopes but which are each strain specific. Moreover, part of the epitope for the PAO specific antibodies consists of several residues outside the disulfide loop of the receptor binding domain. This allows us to create two unique epitopes within the same receptor binding domain sequence. PMID:20807222

  2. The metabolic impact of extracellular nitrite on aerobic metabolism of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Hartop, K R; Sullivan, M J; Giannopoulos, G; Gates, A J; Bond, P L; Yuan, Z; Clarke, T A; Rowley, G; Richardson, D J

    2017-02-07

    Nitrite, in equilibrium with free nitrous acid (FNA), can inhibit both aerobic and anaerobic growth of microbial communities through bactericidal activities that have considerable potential for control of microbial growth in a range of water systems. There has been much focus on the effect of nitrite/FNA on anaerobic metabolism and so, to enhance understanding of the metabolic impact of nitrite/FNA on aerobic metabolism, a study was undertaken with a model denitrifying bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans PD1222. Extracellular nitrite inhibits aerobic growth of P. denitrificans in a pH-dependent manner that is likely to be a result of both nitrite and free nitrous acid (pKa = 3.25) and subsequent reactive nitrogen oxides generated from the intracellular passage of FNA into P. denitrificans. Increased expression of a gene encoding a flavohemoglobin protein (Fhp) (Pden_1689) was observed in response to extracellular nitrite. Construction and analysis of a deletion mutant established Fhp to be involved in endowing nitrite/FNA resistance at high extracellular nitrite concentrations. Global transcriptional analysis confirmed nitrite-dependent expression of fhp and indicated that P. denitrificans expressed a number of stress response systems associated with protein, DNA and lipid repair. It is therefore suggested that nitrite causes a pH-dependent stress response that is due to the production of associated reactive nitrogen species, such as nitric oxide from the internalisation of FNA.

  3. The Effects of Realistic Synaptic Distribution and 3D Geometry on Signal Integration and Extracellular Field Generation of Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells and Inhibitory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gulyás, Attila I.; Freund, Tamás F.; Káli, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro multichannel field and somatic intracellular recordings are frequently used to study mechanisms of network pattern generation. When interpreting these data, neurons are often implicitly considered as electrotonically compact cylinders with a homogeneous distribution of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. However, the actual distributions of dendritic length, diameter, and the densities of excitatory and inhibitory input are non-uniform and cell type-specific. We first review quantitative data on the dendritic structure and synaptic input and output distribution of pyramidal cells (PCs) and interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 area. Second, using multicompartmental passive models of four different types of neurons, we quantitatively explore the effect of differences in dendritic structure and synaptic distribution on the errors and biases of voltage clamp measurements of inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents. Finally, using the 3-dimensional distribution of dendrites and synaptic inputs we calculate how different inhibitory and excitatory inputs contribute to the generation of local field potential in the hippocampus. We analyze these effects at different realistic background activity levels as synaptic bombardment influences neuronal conductance and thus the propagation of signals in the dendritic tree. We conclude that, since dendrites are electrotonically long and entangled in 3D, somatic intracellular and field potential recordings miss the majority of dendritic events in some cell types, and thus overemphasize the importance of perisomatic inhibitory inputs and belittle the importance of complex dendritic processing. Modeling results also suggest that PCs and inhibitory neurons probably use different input integration strategies. In PCs, second- and higher-order thin dendrites are relatively well-isolated from each other, which may support branch-specific local processing as suggested by studies of active dendritic integration. In

  4. The Effects of Realistic Synaptic Distribution and 3D Geometry on Signal Integration and Extracellular Field Generation of Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells and Inhibitory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Attila I; Freund, Tamás F; Káli, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro multichannel field and somatic intracellular recordings are frequently used to study mechanisms of network pattern generation. When interpreting these data, neurons are often implicitly considered as electrotonically compact cylinders with a homogeneous distribution of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. However, the actual distributions of dendritic length, diameter, and the densities of excitatory and inhibitory input are non-uniform and cell type-specific. We first review quantitative data on the dendritic structure and synaptic input and output distribution of pyramidal cells (PCs) and interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 area. Second, using multicompartmental passive models of four different types of neurons, we quantitatively explore the effect of differences in dendritic structure and synaptic distribution on the errors and biases of voltage clamp measurements of inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents. Finally, using the 3-dimensional distribution of dendrites and synaptic inputs we calculate how different inhibitory and excitatory inputs contribute to the generation of local field potential in the hippocampus. We analyze these effects at different realistic background activity levels as synaptic bombardment influences neuronal conductance and thus the propagation of signals in the dendritic tree. We conclude that, since dendrites are electrotonically long and entangled in 3D, somatic intracellular and field potential recordings miss the majority of dendritic events in some cell types, and thus overemphasize the importance of perisomatic inhibitory inputs and belittle the importance of complex dendritic processing. Modeling results also suggest that PCs and inhibitory neurons probably use different input integration strategies. In PCs, second- and higher-order thin dendrites are relatively well-isolated from each other, which may support branch-specific local processing as suggested by studies of active dendritic integration. In

  5. Responses of Solid Tumor Cells in DMEM to Reactive Oxygen Species Generated by Non-Thermal Plasma and Chemically Induced ROS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Neha; Uddin, Nizam; Sim, Geon Bo; Hong, Young June; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Lee, Su Jae; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the role of different reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by soft jet plasma and chemical-induced ROS systems with regard to cell death in T98G, A549, HEK293 and MRC5 cell lines. For a comparison with plasma, we generated superoxide anion (O2-), hydroxyl radical (HO.), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with chemicals inside an in vitro cell culture. Our data revealed that plasma decreased the viability and intracellular ATP values of cells and increased the apoptotic population via a caspase activation mechanism. Plasma altered the mitochondrial membrane potential and eventually up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of BAX, BAK1 and H2AX gene but simultaneously down-regulated the levels of Bcl-2 in solid tumor cells. Moreover, a western blot analysis confirmed that plasma also altered phosphorylated ERK1/2/MAPK protein levels. At the same time, using ROS scavengers with plasma, we observed that scavengers of HO. (mannitol) and H2O2 (catalase and sodium pyruvate) attenuated the activity of plasma on cells to a large extent. In contrast, radicals generated by specific chemical systems enhanced cell death drastically in cancer as well as normal cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion but not specific with regard to the cell type as compared to plasma.

  6. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation triggers inflammatory response and tissue injury associated with hepatic ischemia-reperfusion: therapeutic potential of mitochondrially targeted antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horváth, Bėla; Zsengellėr, Zsuzsanna; Bátkai, Sándor; Cao, Zongxian; Kechrid, Malek; Holovac, Eileen; Erdėlyi, Katalin; Tanchian, Galin; Liaudet, Lucas; Stillman, Isaac E; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Pacher, Pál

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury; however, its exact role and its spatial-temporal relationship with inflammation are elusive. Herein we explore the spatial-temporal relationship of oxidative/nitrative stress and inflammatory response during the course of hepatic I/R and the possible therapeutic potential of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, using a mouse model of segmental hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Hepatic I/R was characterized by early (at 2 h of reperfusion) mitochondrial injury, decreased complex I activity, increased oxidant generation in the liver or liver mitochondria, and profound hepatocellular injury/dysfunction with acute proinflammatory response (TNF-α, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-2/CXCL2) without inflammatory cell infiltration, followed by marked neutrophil infiltration and a more pronounced secondary wave of oxidative/nitrative stress in the liver (starting from 6 h of reperfusion and peaking at 24 h). Mitochondrially targeted antioxidants, MitoQ or Mito-CP, dose-dependently attenuated I/R-induced liver dysfunction, the early and delayed oxidative and nitrative stress response (HNE/carbonyl adducts, malondialdehyde, 8-OHdG, and 3-nitrotyrosine formation), and mitochondrial and histopathological injury/dysfunction, as well as delayed inflammatory cell infiltration and cell death. Mitochondrially generated oxidants play a central role in triggering the deleterious cascade of events associated with hepatic I/R, which may be targeted by novel antioxidants for therapeutic advantage.

  7. Effect of pulmonary-generated reactive oxygen species on left-ventricular dysfunction associated with cardio-pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mahmood; Brauner, Mark E; Plewa, Michael C; Kutala, Vijay K; Angelos, Mark; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to demonstrate the contribution of pulmonary-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cardiac dysfunction using a rat model of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Three groups of rats were subjected to regional IR injury in (i) lung, (ii) heart, (iii) lung + heart. A fourth (control) group of rats were instrumented using the same methods but without induction IR. Hemodynamic data were recorded in real time. Blood from the proximal aorta was sampled during baseline, ischemia, and reperfusion, mixed with α-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) for measuring ROS by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry. Data were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance. The results showed that the lung IR generated an increased burst of ROS that resulted in significant cardiac dysfunction, including hypotension and ECG changes. The results indicated that generation of ROS as a result of acute IR lung injury may be sufficiently large enough to cause direct cardiac dysfunction that is independent of injury caused to the myocardium as a result of regional myocardial IR injury alone.

  8. Numerical simulation of the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in water by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their effects on Escherichia coli (E. coli)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuse, Kazumasa; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    We have used two types of numerical simulations to examine biological effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated in water by an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) that irradiates the water surface. One is numerical simulation for the generation and transport of RONS in water based on the reaction-diffusion-advection equations coupled with Poisson equation. The rate constants, mobilities, and diffusion coefficients used in the equations are obtained from the literature. The gaseous species are given as boundary conditions and time evolution of the concentrations of chemical species in pure water is solved numerically as functions of the depth in one dimension. Although it is not clear how living organisms respond to such exogenous RONS, we also use numerical simulation for metabolic reactions of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and examine possible effects of such RONS on an in-silico model organism. The computation model is based on the flux balance analysis (FBA), where the fluxes of the metabolites in a biological system are evaluated in steady state, i.e., under the assumption that the fluxes do not change in time. The fluxes are determined with liner programming to maximize the growth rate of the bacteria under the given conditions. Although FBA cannot be directly applied to dynamical responses of metabolic reactions, the simulation still gives insight into the biological reactions to exogenous chemical species generated by an APP. Partially supported by JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research.

  9. Cellular adaptation to anthrax lethal toxin-induced mitochondrial cholesterol enrichment, hyperpolarization, and reactive oxygen species generation through downregulating MLN64 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ha, Soon-Duck; Park, Sangwook; Han, Chae Young; Nguyen, Marilyn L; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2012-12-01

    Cellular adaptation to different stresses related to survival and function has been demonstrated in several cell types. Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) induces rapid cell death, termed "pyroptosis," by activating NLRP1b/caspase-1 in murine macrophages. We and others (S. D. Ha et al., J. Biol. Chem. 282:26275-26283, 2007; I. I. Salles et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 100:12426 -12431, 2003) have shown that RAW264.7 cells preexposed to sublethal doses of LeTx become resistant to subsequent high cytolytic doses of LeTx, termed toxin-induced resistance (TIR). To date, the cellular mechanisms of pyroptosis and TIR are largely unknown. We found that LeTx caused NLRP1b/caspase-1-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, including hyperpolarization and generation of reactive oxygen species, which was distinct from that induced by stimuli such as NLRP3-activating ATP. In TIR cells, these mitochondrial events were not detected, although caspase-1 was activated, in response to LeTx. We identified that downregulation of the late endosomal cholesterol-transferring protein MLN64 in TIR cells was involved in TIR. The downregulation of MLN64 in TIR cells was at least in part due to DNA methyltransferase 1-mediated DNA methylation. In wild-type RAW264.7 cells and primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, LeTx caused NLRP1b/caspase-1-dependent mitochondrial translocation of MLN64, resulting in cholesterol enrichment, membrane hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and depletion of free glutathione (GSH). This study demonstrates for the first time that MLN64 plays a key role in LeTx/caspase-1-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. The study of radiation-induced damage and remodeling of extracellular matrix of rectum and bladder by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochueva, Marina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Ignatjeva, Natalya Yu.; Zakharkina, Olga L.; Kuznetzov, Sergej S.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Babak, Ksenia V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Maslennikova, Anna V.

    2014-02-01

    Adverse events in normal tissues after irradiation of malignant tumors are of great importance in modern radiation oncology. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy allows observe the structure of collagen fibers and bundles without additional staining. The study objective was evaluation the dose-time dependences of the structural changes occurring in collagen of rat rectum and bladder after gamma-irradiation. Animals were irradiated by a local field at single doses of 10 Gy and 40 Gy. The study of collagen state was carried out in a week and a month after radiation exposure. Paraffin-embedded material was sectioned on the slices 10 mkm thick and SHG-imaging was performed by LSM 510 Meta (Carl Zeiss, Germany). Excitation was implemented with a pulsed (100-fs) titanium-sapphire laser at a wavelength of 800 nm and a pulse repetition frequency of 80 MHz, registration was performed at two wavelengths: 362-415 nm according to collagen fluorescence and 512-576 nm according to myoglobin fluorescence. In a week after irradiation, sings of epithelial damage and edema of submucosal layer, more significant after the dose of 40 Gy were observed on LSM-images. The SHG signal decreased at this time reflecting the processes of collagen degradation independently either in bladder or in rectum. In a month after radiation the increase of size and number of collagen-bearing structures was observed, more essential after irradiation in a dose of 40 Gy. LSM microscopy with SHG allows evaluate changes of normal tissues after ionizing radiation and get information in addition to standard and special histological staining.

  11. Platelet reactivity after administration of third generation P2Y12-antagonists does not depend on body weight in contrast to clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Christoph B; Schnabel, Katharina; Weber, Susanne; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    The current standard of antiplatelet therapy for patients with myocardial infarction (MI) includes the P2Y12-receptor antagonist clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor. While it has been shown that platelet reactivity after clopidogrel administration depends on factors such as body weight, it is not known if these factors have an effect on the activity of prasugrel or ticagrelor. Thus, this study aimed to analyse factors associated with high residual platelet reactivity after administration of third generation P2Y12-antagonists compared to clopidogrel. In a single centre registry the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor was investigated by aggregometry in patients after MI. To assess the overall capacity of platelet aggregation whole blood was induced with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP; 32 µM). To specifically quantify the effect of P2Y12-antagonists, blood was stimulated with 6.4 µM adenosine diphophosphate (ADP). Relative ADP induced aggregation (r-ADP-agg) was defined as the ADP-TRAP-ratio to reflect an individual degree of P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition. Platelet function of 238 patients was analysed [clopidogrel (n = 58), prasugrel (n = 65), ticagrelor (n = 115)]. It was found that the r-ADP-agg correlated significantly with body weight in patients after clopidogrel administration (r = 0.423; p < 0.001). In contrast, this association was not present in patients after prasugrel (r = -0.117; p = 0.354) or ticagrelor (r = -0.082; p = 0.382) administration. Comparison of the correlation coefficients showed a significant difference (p = 0.003). In contrast to clopidogrel, platelet reactivity after administration of prasugrel or ticagrelor does not depend on body weight in patients after MI. Hence, our mechanistic data support the results of large clinical trials indicating that patients with high body weight do not need to be treated with increased doses of third generation P2Y12-antagonists to achieve

  12. The in situ generation and reactive quench of diazonium compounds in the synthesis of azo compounds in microreactors

    PubMed Central

    Akwi, Faith M

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this paper, a micro-fluidic optimized process for the continuous flow synthesis of azo compounds is presented. The continuous flow synthesis of Sudan II azo dye was used as a model reaction for the study. At found optimal azo coupling reaction temperature and pH an investigation of the optimum flow rates of the reactants for the diazotization and azo coupling reactions in Little Things Factory-MS microreactors was performed. A conversion of 98% was achieved in approximately 2.4 minutes and a small library of azo compounds was thus generated under these reaction conditions from couplers with aminated or hydroxylated aromatic systems. The scaled up synthesis of these compounds in PTFE tubing (i.d. 1.5 mm) was also investigated, where good reaction conversions ranging between 66–91% were attained. PMID:27829903

  13. Inorganic pyrophosphate generation by transforming growth factor-beta-1 is mainly dependent on ANK induction by Ras/Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cailotto, Frederic; Bianchi, Arnaud; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Moulin, David; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Netter, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ANK is a multipass transmembrane protein transporter thought to play a role in the export of intracellular inorganic pyrophosphate and so to contribute to the pathophysiology of chondrocalcinosis. As transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta1) was shown to favor calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition, we investigated the contribution of ANK to the production of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) by chondrocytes and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of Ank expression by TGF-beta1. Chondrocytes were exposed to 10 ng/mL of TGF-beta1, and Ank expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. ePPi was quantified in cell supernatants. RNA silencing was used to define the respective roles of Ank and PC-1 in TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Finally, selective kinase inhibitors and dominant-negative/overexpression plasmid strategies were used to explore the contribution of several signaling pathways to Ank induction by TGF-beta1. TGF-beta1 strongly increased Ank expression at the mRNA and protein levels, as well as ePPi production. Using small interfering RNA technology, we showed that Ank contributed approximately 60% and PC-1 nearly 20% to TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Induction of Ank by TGF-beta1 required activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway but not of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase or of protein kinase A. In line with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, Gö6976 (a Ca2+-dependent PKC inhibitor) diminished TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression by 60%, whereas a 10% inhibition was observed with rottlerin (a PKCdelta inhibitor). These data suggest a regulatory role for calcium in TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the stimulatory effect of TGF-beta1 on Ank expression was inhibited by the suppression of the Ras/Raf-1 pathway, while being enhanced by their constitutive activation. Transient overexpression of Smad 7, an

  14. Metformin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced renal tubular cell injury by suppressing reactive oxygen species generation via reducing receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S

    2012-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play a role in tubulointerstitial damage in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, metformin has been shown to ameliorate tubular injury both in cell culture and diabetic animal model. However, effects of metformin on AGEs-induced tubular cell apoptosis and damage remain unknown. We examined here whether and how metformin could block the AGEs-RAGE-elicited tubular cell injury in vitro. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured with dihydroethidium staining. Apoptosis was evaluated by DNA fragmentation and annexin V expression level. AGEs upregulated RAGE mRNA levels and subsequently increased ROS generation and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β gene expression in human renal proximal tubular cells, all of which were significantly blocked by the treatment of 0.01 and 0.1 mM metformin. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase significantly blocked the effects of metformin on RAGE gene expression and ROS generation in AGEs-exposed tubular cells. Furthermore, metformin dose-dependently inhibited the AGEs-induced apoptotic cell death of tubular cells; 1 mM metformin completely suppressed the pro-apoptotic effects of AGEs in 2 different assay systems. Our present study suggests that metformin could inhibit the AGEs-induced apoptosis and inflammatory and fibrotic reactions in tubular cells probably by reducing ROS generation via suppression of RAGE expression through AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Metformin may protect against tubular cell injury in diabetic nephropathy by blocking the AGEs-RAGE-ROS axis.

  15. The pepper calmodulin gene CaCaM1 is involved in reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide generation required for cell death and the defense response.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2009-11-01

    Calcium signaling has emerged as an important signal transduction pathway of higher plants in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Ca2+-bound calmodulin (CaM) plays a critical role in decoding and transducing stress signals by activating specific targets. Here, we isolated and functionally characterized the pathogen-responsive CaM gene, Capsicum annuum calmodulin 1 (CaCaM1), from pepper (C. annuum) plants. The cellular function of CaCaM1 was verified by Agrobacterium spp.-mediated transient expression in pepper and transgenic overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana. Agrobacterium spp.-mediated transient expression of CaCaM1 activated reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) generation, and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in pepper leaves, ultimately leading to local acquired resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. CaCaM1-overexpression (OX) Arabidopsis exhibited enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora parasitica, which was accompanied by enhanced ROS and NO generation and HR-like cell death. Treatment with the calcium-channel blocker suppressed the oxidative and NO bursts and HR-like cell death that were triggered by CaCaM1 expression in pepper and Arabidopsis, suggesting that calcium influx is required for the activation of CaCaM1-mediated defense responses in plants. Upon treatment with the CaM antagonist, virulent P. syringae pv. tomato-induced NO generation was also compromised in CaCaM1-OX leaves. Together, these results suggest that the CaCaM1 gene functions in ROS and NO generation are essential for cell death and defense responses in plants.

  16. Gene Expressions Underlying Mishandled Calcium Clearance and Elevated Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells of Chronic Heart Failure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang; Su, Xian-Xiu; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Xu, Yu-Xiang; Pan, Xue-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background: The calcium clearance and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generations in the coronary artery smooth muscle cells in chronic heart failure (HF) have not been fully investigated. Therefore, we attempted to understand the gene expressions underlying the mishandling of calcium clearance and the accumulations of ROS. Methods: We initially established an animal model of chronic HF by making the left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (CAL) in rats, and then isolated the coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells from the ischemic and the nonischemic parts of the coronary artery vessels in 12 weeks after CAL operation. The intracellular calcium concentration and ROS level were measured using flow cytometry, and the gene expressions of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a), encoding sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2a, encoding sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX), and p47phox encoding a subunit of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase were examined using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Results: We found that the calcium accumulation and ROS generation in the coronary artery smooth muscle cells isolated from either the ischemic or the nonischemic part of the CAL coronary artery vessel were significantly increased irrespective of blood supply (all P < 0.01). Moreover, these were accompanied by the increased expressions of NCX and p47phox, the decreased expression of SERCA2a, and the increased amount of phosphorylated forms of p47phox in NADPH oxidase (all P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that the disordered calcium clearance and the increased ROS generation occurred in the coronary artery smooth muscle cells in rats with chronic HF produced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (CAL), and which was found to be disassociated from blood supply, and the increased generation of ROS in the cells was found to make

  17. Characterizing reactive oxygen generation and bacterial inactivation by a zerovalent iron-fullerene nano-composite device at neutral pH under UV-A illumination.

    PubMed

    Erdim, Esra; Badireddy, Appala Raju; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    A nano-composite device composed of nano-scale zerovalent iron (ZVI) and C60 fullerene aggregates (ZVI/nC60) was produced via a rapid nucleation method. The device was conceived to deliver reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by photosensitization and/or electron transfer to targeted contaminants, including waterborne pathogens under neutral pH conditions. Certain variations of the nano-composite were fabricated differing in the amounts of (1) ZVI (0.1mM and 2mM) but not nC60 (2.5mg-C/L), and (2) nC60 (0-25mg-C/L) but not ZVI (0.1mM). The generation of ROS by the ZVI/nC60 nano-composites and ZVI nanoparticles was quantified using organic probe compounds. 0.1mM ZVI/2.5mg-C/L C60 generated 3.74-fold higher O2(-) concentration and also resulted in an additional 2-log inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa when compared to 0.1mM ZVI (3-log inactivation). 2mM ZVI/2.5mg-C/L nC60 showed negligible improvement over 2mM ZVI in terms of O2(-) generation or inactivation. Further, incremental amounts of nC60 in the range of 0-25mg-C/L in 0.1mM ZVI/nC60 led to increased O2(-) concentration, independent of UV-A. This study demonstrates that ZVI/nC60 device delivers (1) enhanced O2(-) with nC60 as a mediator for electron transfer, and (2) (1)O2 (only under UV-A illumination) at neutral pH conditions.

  18. Iron deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species generation leads to non-autolytic PCD in Brassica napus leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Hadacek, Franz; Sassmann, Stefan; Lang, Ingeborg

    2013-01-01

    Using iron-deprived (–Fe) chlorotic as well as green iron-deficient (5 μM Fe) and iron-sufficient supplied (50 μM Fe) leaves of young hydroponically reared Brassica napus plants, we explored iron deficiency effects on triggering programmed cell death (PCD) phenomena. Iron deficiency increased superoxide anion but decreased hydroxyl radical (•OH) formation (TBARS levels). Impaired photosystem II efficiency led to hydrogen peroxide accumulation in chloroplasts; NADPH oxidase activity, however, remained on the same level in all treatments. Non-autolytic PCD was observed especially in the chlorotic leaf of iron-deprived plants, to a lesser extent in iron-deficient plants. It correlated with higher DNAse-, alkaline protease- and caspase-3-like activities, DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and higher superoxide dismutase activity. A significant decrease in catalase activity together with rising levels of dehydroascorbic acid indicated a strong disturbance of the redox homeostasis, which, however, was not caused by •OH formation in concordance with the fact that iron is required to catalyse the Fenton reaction leading to •OH generation. This study documents the chain of events that contributes to the development of non-autolytic PCD in advanced stages of iron deficiency in B. napus leaves. PMID:23825883

  19. Model combustion-generated particulate matter containing persistent free radicals redox cycle to produce reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Matthew A; Hebert, Valeria Y; Thibeaux, Taylor M; Orchard, Mackenzie A; Hasan, Farhana; Cormier, Stephania A; Thevenot, Paul T; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Varner, Kurt J; Dellinger, Barry; Latimer, Brian M; Dugas, Tammy R

    2013-12-16

    Particulate matter (PM) is emitted during thermal decomposition of waste. During this process, aromatic compounds chemisorb to the surface of metal-oxide-containing PM, forming a surface-stabilized environmentally persistent free radical (EPFR). We hypothesized that EPFR-containing PM redox cycle to produce ROS and that this redox cycle is maintained in biological environments. To test our hypothesis, we incubated model EPFRs with the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine (DHR). Marked increases in DHR fluorescence were observed. Using a more specific assay, hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) were also detected, and their level was further increased by cotreatment with thiols or ascorbic acid (AA), known components of epithelial lining fluid. Next, we incubated our model EPFR in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) or serum. Detection of EPFRs and (•)OH verified that PM generate ROS in biological fluids. Moreover, incubation of pulmonary epithelial cells with EPFR-containing PM increased (•)OH levels compared to those in PM lacking EPFRs. Finally, measurements of oxidant injury in neonatal rats exposed to EPFRs by inhalation suggested that EPFRs induce an oxidant injury within the lung lining fluid and that the lung responds by increasing antioxidant levels. In summary, our EPFR-containing PM redox cycle to produce ROS, and these ROS are maintained in biological fluids and environments. Moreover, these ROS may modulate toxic responses of PM in biological tissues such as the lung.

  20. Alantolactone induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells via reactive oxygen species generation, glutathione depletion and inhibition of the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YAN; XU, HANJIE; WANG, JIAFEI

    2016-01-01

    Alantolactone is the active ingredient in frankincense, and is extracted from the dry root of elecampane. It has a wide variety of uses, including as an insect repellent, antibacterial, antidiuretic, analgesic and anticancer agent. In addition, alantolactone induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells, however, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated whether alantolactone was able to induce apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells, and its potential mechanisms of action were analyzed. Treatment of HeLa cells with alantolactone (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 µM) for 12 h significantly inhibited growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cells treated with 30 µM of alantolactone for 0, 3, 6 and 12 h demonstrated marked induction of apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of HeLa cells with 30 µM of alantolactone for 0, 3, 6 and 12 h significantly induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibited glutathione (GSH) production in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Alantolactone additionally markedly inhibited the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway in HeLa cells. Therefore, administration of alantolactone induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells via ROS generation, GSH depletion and inhibition of the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway. PMID:27313767

  1. PEGylated FePt-Fe3O4 composite nanoassemblies (CNAs): in vitro hyperthermia, drug delivery and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

    PubMed

    Sahu, Niroj Kumar; Gupta, Jagriti; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2015-05-21

    Chemothermal therapy is widely used in clinical applications for the treatment of tumors. However, the major challenge is the use of a multifunctional nano platform for significant regression of the tumor. In this study, a simple synthesis of highly aqueous stable, carboxyl enriched, PEGylated mesoporous iron platinum-iron(ii,iii) oxide (FePt-Fe3O4) composite nanoassemblies (CNAs) by a simple hydrothermal approach is reported. CNAs exhibit a high loading capacity ∼90 wt% of the anticancer therapeutic drug, doxorubicin (DOX) because of its porous nature and the availability of abundant negatively charged carboxylic groups on its surface. DOX loaded CNAs (CNAs + DOX) showed a pH responsive drug release in a cell-mimicking environment. Furthermore, the release was enhanced by the application of a alternating current magnetic field. CNAs show no appreciable cytotoxicity in mouse fibroblast (L929) cells but show toxic effects in cervical cancer (HeLa) cells at a concentration of ∼1 mg mL(-1). A suitable composition of CNAs with a concentration of 2 mg mL(-1) can generate a hyperthermic temperature of ∼43 °C. Also, CNAs, because of their Fe and Pt contents, have an ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide inside the cancer cells which helps to enhance its therapeutic effects. The synergistic combination of chemotherapy and ROS is very efficient for killing cancer cells.

  2. A novel synthetic protoapigenone analogue, WYC02-9, induces DNA damage and apoptosis in DU145 prostate cancer cells through generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Ya-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Hsieh, Kun-Chou; Tsai, Lih-Min; Lin, An-Shen; Wu, Yang-Chang; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou

    2011-05-01

    The protoapigenone analogue WYC02-9, a novel synthetic flavonoid, has been shown to act against a variety of experimental tumors. However, its effects on prostate cancer and its mechanism of action are unknown. Thus, WYC02-9 was investigated for its cytotoxicity against DU145 prostate cancer cells, as was the underlying mechanisms by which WYC02-9 might induce DNA damage and apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species (ROS). WYC02-9 inhibited the cell growth of three prostate cancer cell lines, especially DU145 cells. In DU145 cells, WYC02-9 increased the generation of intracellular ROS, followed by induction of DNA damage and activation of the ATM-p53-H2A.X pathway and checkpoint-related signals Chk1/Chk2, which led to increased numbers of cells in the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Furthermore, WYC02-9 induced apoptotic cell death through mitochondrial membrane potential decrease and activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP. The above effects were all prevented by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Administration of WYC02-9 in a nude mouse DU145 xenograft model further identified the anti-cancer activity of WYC02-9. These findings therefore suggest that WYC02-9-induced DNA damage and mitochondria-dependent cell apoptosis in DU145 cells are mediated via ROS generation.

  3. Aqueous fullerene aggregates (nC60) generate minimal reactive oxygen species and are of low toxicity in fish: a revision of previous reports.

    PubMed

    Henry, Theodore B; Petersen, Elijah J; Compton, Robert N

    2011-08-01

    This review aims to clarify inconsistencies in previous reports regarding the potential for aqueous aggregates of fullerenes (nC60) to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause toxicity in fish. Methods for evaluation of ROS production and toxicity of aqueous nC60 have evolved over time and limitations in initial studies have led to unintentional erroneous reports of nC60 ROS generation and toxicity. Some of these reports continue to lead to misconceptions of the environmental effects of C60. Critical review of the evidence (2007-2011) indicates that aqueous nC60 have minimal potential to produce ROS and that oxidative stress in fish is not induced by environmentally relevant exposure to nC60. Future studies should acknowledge that current evidence indicates low toxicity of nC60 and refrain from citing articles that attribute toxicity in fish to nC60 based on methods shown to be compromised by experimental artifacts. Despite low toxicity of nC60 in fish, an emerging environmental issue is that nC60 can affect environmental fate, transport, and bioavailability of co-contaminants in aquatic environments in a similar manner to that observed for other anthropogenic particulates (e.g., microplastics).

  4. Effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on several eukaryotic cell lines: elucidating cytotoxicity, endocrine disruption, and reactive oxygen species generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Anne; Maletz, Sibylle X.; Hollert, Henner; Schäffer, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M.

    2014-08-01

    To date, only a few reports about studies on toxic effects of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are available, and their results are often controversial. Three different cell lines (rainbow trout liver cells (RTL-W1), human adrenocortical carcinoma cells (T47Dluc), and human adrenocarcinoma cells (H295R)) were exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the antimicrobial agent triclocarban (TCC) as well as the mixture of both substances in a concentration range of 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L, 31.25 to 500 μg TCC/L, and 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L + 1% TCC (percentage relative to carbon nanotubes concentration), respectively. Triclocarban is a high-production volume chemical that is widely used as an antimicrobial compound and is known for its toxicity, hydrophobicity, endocrine disruption, bioaccumulation potential, and environmental persistence. Carbon nanotubes are known to interact with hydrophobic organic compounds. Therefore, triclocarban was selected as a model substance to examine mixture toxicity in this study. The influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on various toxicological endpoints was specified: neither cytotoxicity nor endocrine disruption could be observed after exposure of the three cell lines to carbon nanotubes, but the nanomaterial caused intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in all cell types. For TCC on the other hand, cell vitality of 80% could be observed at a concentration of 2.1 mg/L for treated RTL-W1 cells. A decrease of luciferase activity in the ER Calux assay at a triclocarban concentration of 125 μg/L and higher was observed. This effect was less pronounced when multiwalled carbon nanotubes were present in the medium. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes induce the production of reactive oxygen species in RTL-W1, T47Dluc, and H295R cells, reveal no cytotoxicity, and reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of the biocide triclocarban.

  5. Effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on several eukaryotic cell lines: elucidating cytotoxicity, endocrine disruption, and reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Anne; Maletz, Sibylle X; Hollert, Henner; Schäffer, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M

    2014-01-01

    To date, only a few reports about studies on toxic effects of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are available, and their results are often controversial. Three different cell lines (rainbow trout liver cells (RTL-W1), human adrenocortical carcinoma cells (T47Dluc), and human adrenocarcinoma cells (H295R)) were exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the antimicrobial agent triclocarban (TCC) as well as the mixture of both substances in a concentration range of 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L, 31.25 to 500 μg TCC/L, and 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L + 1% TCC (percentage relative to carbon nanotubes concentration), respectively. Triclocarban is a high-production volume chemical that is widely used as an antimicrobial compound and is known for its toxicity, hydrophobicity, endocrine disruption, bioaccumulation potential, and environmental persistence. Carbon nanotubes are known to interact with hydrophobic organic compounds. Therefore, triclocarban was selected as a model substance to examine mixture toxicity in this study. The influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on various toxicological endpoints was specified: neither cytotoxicity nor endocrine disruption could be observed after exposure of the three cell lines to carbon nanotubes, but the nanomaterial caused intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in all cell types. For TCC on the other hand, cell vitality of 80% could be observed at a concentration of 2.1 mg/L for treated RTL-W1 cells. A decrease of luciferase activity in the ER Calux assay at a triclocarban concentration of 125 μg/L and higher was observed. This effect was less pronounced when multiwalled carbon nanotubes were present in the medium. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes induce the production of reactive oxygen species in RTL-W1, T47Dluc, and H295R cells, reveal no cytotoxicity, and reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of the biocide triclocarban.

  6. Effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on several eukaryotic cell lines: elucidating cytotoxicity, endocrine disruption, and reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To date, only a few reports about studies on toxic effects of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are available, and their results are often controversial. Three different cell lines (rainbow trout liver cells (RTL-W1), human adrenocortical carcinoma cells (T47Dluc), and human adrenocarcinoma cells (H295R)) were exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes, the antimicrobial agent triclocarban (TCC) as well as the mixture of both substances in a concentration range of 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L, 31.25 to 500 μg TCC/L, and 3.13 to 50 mg CNT/L + 1% TCC (percentage relative to carbon nanotubes concentration), respectively. Triclocarban is a high-production volume chemical that is widely used as an antimicrobial compound and is known for its toxicity, hydrophobicity, endocrine disruption, bioaccumulation potential, and environmental persistence. Carbon nanotubes are known to interact with hydrophobic organic compounds. Therefore, triclocarban was selected as a model substance to examine mixture toxicity in this study. The influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and triclocarban on various toxicological endpoints was specified: neither cytotoxicity nor endocrine disruption could be observed after exposure of the three cell lines to carbon nanotubes, but the nanomaterial caused intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in all cell types. For TCC on the other hand, cell vitality of 80% could be observed at a concentration of 2.1 mg/L for treated RTL-W1 cells. A decrease of luciferase activity in the ER Calux assay at a triclocarban concentration of 125 μg/L and higher was observed. This effect was less pronounced when multiwalled carbon nanotubes were present in the medium. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes induce the production of reactive oxygen species in RTL-W1, T47Dluc, and H295R cells, reveal no cytotoxicity, and reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of the biocide triclocarban. PMID:25170332

  7. TMEM16A Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction by Facilitating Nox2 NADPH Oxidase-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-Ming; Gao, Min; Guo, Kai-Min; Wang, Mi; Li, Xiang-Yu; Zeng, Xue-Lin; Sun, Lu; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Du, Yan-Hua; Wang, Guan-Lei; Zhou, Jia-Guo; Guan, Yong-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels play a crucial role in various physiological processes. However, the role of TMEM16A in vascular endothelial dysfunction during hypertension is unclear. In this study, we investigated the specific involvement of TMEM16A in regulating endothelial function and blood pressure and the underlying mechanism. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, confocal imaging, patch-clamp recordings, and TMEM16A endothelial-specific transgenic and knockout mice were used. We found that TMEM16A was expressed abundantly and functioned as a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel in endothelial cells. Angiotensin II induced endothelial dysfunction with an increase in TMEM16A expression. The knockout of endothelial-specific TMEM16A significantly lowered the blood pressure and ameliorated endothelial dysfunction in angiotensin II-induced hypertension, whereas the overexpression of endothelial-specific TMEM16A resulted in the opposite effects. These results were related to the increased reactive oxygen species production, Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase activation, and Nox2 and p22phox protein expression that were facilitated by TMEM16A on angiotensin II-induced hypertensive challenge. Moreover, TMEM16A directly bound with Nox2 and reduced the degradation of Nox2 through the proteasome-dependent degradation pathway. Therefore, TMEM16A is a positive regulator of endothelial reactive oxygen species generation via Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase, which induces endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Modification of TMEM16A may be a novel therapeutic strategy for endothelial dysfunction-associated diseases.

  8. The inhibitory effect of CIL-102 on the growth of human astrocytoma cells is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of ERK1/2 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Chih-Chuan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Cheng, Ho-Chen; Wang, Ting-Chung; Sze, Chun-I

    2012-08-15

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone) is the major active agent of the alkaloid derivative of Camptotheca acuminata, with multiple pharmacological activities, including anticancer effects and promotion of apoptosis. The mechanism by which CIL-102 inhibits growth remains poorly understood in human astrocytoma cells. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CIL-102 affects the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle G2/M arrest in glioma cells. Treatment of U87 cells with 1.0 μM CIL-102 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins (cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, and cdk1), and phosphorylation of cdk1Tyr{sup 15} and Cdc25cSer{sup 216}. Furthermore, treatment with the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 abolished CIL-102-induced Cdc25cSer{sup 216} expression and reversed CIL-102-inhibited cdk1 activation. In addition, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an ROS scavenger, blocked cell cycle G2/M arrest and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} in U87 cells. CIL-102-mediated ERK1/2 and ROS production, and cell cycle arrest were blocked by treatment with specific inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a novel CIL-102-inhibited proliferation in U87 cells by activating the ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} cell cycle-related proteins and inducing ROS production; this might be a new mechanism in human astrocytoma cells. -- Highlights: ► We show the effects of CIL-102 on the G2/M arrest of human astrocytoma cells. ► ROS and the Ras/ERK1/2 triggering pathways are involved in the CIL-102 treatment. ► CIL-102 induces sustained activation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25c and ROS are required.

  9. Catha edulis Extract Induces H9c2 Cell Apoptosis by Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Activation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Syam, Suvitha; Al-Zubairi, Adel S.; Al-Sanousi, Rashad; Oraiby, Magbool Essa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen shrub or small tree, traditionally used by various peoples of the Arabian Peninsula and Africa as an integral component of the socioeconomic traditions. It is believed that the psychostimulant nature and toxic nature of khat is primarily due to the presence of cathinone and cathine respectively. Studies have shown that khat chewing is closely associated with cardiac complications, especially myocardial infarction. Hence in this study, we exposed cathine-rich khat extract in a cardiomyoblast H9c2 (2-1) cell line to check the cell death mechanism. Materials and Methods: Extraction of Catha edulis leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with LC-MS-MS. The anti-proliferative activity was assayed using MTT and apoptosis detection by acridine orange/propidium iodide assay. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bax protein and caspase-3/7 expression were analyzed. The level of reactive oxygen species generation was also evaluated. Results: The khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 hours treatment. We have observed significant early apoptosis events by intervened acridine orange within the fragmented DNA with bright green fluorescence upon treatment. The Bcl-2 expression in the treatment with IC50 concentration of khat extract for 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation significantly decreased with increase in bax level. The increased activation of caspase-3/7 was significantly observed upon treatment together with significant increase of ROS was detected at 24 and 48 hours treatment. Conclusion: Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanisms by which Catha edulis leaves mediate cell death in cardiomyocytes. SUMMARY Catha edulis (Khat) is an evergreen psychotropic shrub or small treeExtraction of khat leaves was done and the presence of cathine was confirmed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometryThe khat extract showed an IC50 value of 86.5 μg/ml at 48 h treatment in

  10. Exposure to low- vs iso-osmolar contrast agents reduces NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species generation in a cellular model of renal injury.

    PubMed

    Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Prattichizzo, Clelia; Montemurno, Eustacchio; Simone, Simona; Cafiero, Cesira; Rascio, Federica; Stallone, Giovanni; Ranieri, Elena; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2014-03-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy represents the third cause of hospital-acquired acute renal failure. This study investigated the effects of low- vs iso-osmolar contrast medium (CM) exposure on NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by tubular cells. X-ray attenuation of iohexol, iopamidol, and iodixanol was assessed at equimolar iodine concentrations and their effects on human renal proximal tubular cells (PTCs) were evaluated with equally attenuating solutions of each CM. Cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and necrosis were investigated by trypan blue exclusion, MTT assay, and annexin V/propidium iodide assay, respectively. ROS production was assessed by DCF assay, NADPH oxidase activity by the lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence method, and Nox4 expression by immunoblot. Yielding the same X-ray attenuation, CM cytotoxicity was assessed in PTCs at equimolar iodine concentrations. More necrosis was present after incubation with iohexol and iopamidol than after incubation with equal concentrations of iodixanol. Iohexol and iodixanol at low iodine concentrations induced less cytotoxicity than iopamidol. Moreover, both iohexol and iopamidol induced more apoptosis than iodixanol, with a dose-dependent effect. ROS generation was significantly higher with iopamidol and iohexol compared to iodixanol. NADPH oxidase activity and Nox4 protein expression significantly increased after exposure to iopamidol and iohexol, with a dose-dependent effect, compared with iodixanol. CM-induced Nox4 expression and activity depended upon Src activation. In conclusion, at angiographic concentrations, iodixanol induces fewer cytotoxic effects on cultured tubular cells than iohexol and iopamidol along with a lower induction of Nox4-dependent ROS generation. This enzyme may, thus, represent a potential therapeutic target to prevent iodinated CM-related oxidative stress.

  11. On Development and Characterisation of a Mobile and Metrologically Traceable Reference Gas Generator for Ammonia and Other Reactive Species in Ambient Air Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Daiana; Pascale, Céline; Guillevic, Myriam; Ackermann, Andreas; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia NH3 in the atmosphere is the major precursor for neutralising atmospheric acids and is thus affecting not only the long-range transport of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides but also stabilies secondary particulate matter. These aerosols have negative impacts on air quality and human health. Moreover, they negatively affect terrestrial ecosystems after deposition. NH3 has been included in the air quality monitoring networks and emission reduction directives of European nations. Atmospheric concentrations are in the order of 0.5-500 nmol/mol. However, the lowest substance amount fraction of available certified reference material (CRM) is 30 μmol/mol. The EMRP JRP ENV55 MetNH3 aims at overcoming this discrepancy by assessing and developing novel approaches for the production of CRM and measurement methods. The Federal Institute of Metrology METAS has developed a mobile and metrologically traceable reference gas generator for reactive gases (ReGaS1). This device is based on the specific temperature dependent permeation of the reference substance through a membrane into a flow of carrier gas and subsequent dynamic dilution to desired amount fractions. The characteristics of individual components lead to the uncertainty estimation for the generated NH3 gas mixture according to GUM, which is aimed to be <3 %. Here we present insights into the development of said instrument and results of the first performance tests. Moreover, we include results of the study on adsorption/desorption effects in dry as well as humidified matrix gas into the discussion on the generation of reference gas mixtures.

  12. Mice congenitally infected with low-to-moderate virulence Neospora caninum isolates exhibited clinical reactivation during the mating period without transmission to the next generation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Álvarez-García, Gema; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Ortega-Mora, Luis M

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous transplacental transmission (EnTT) is the major transmission route of Neospora caninum in cattle. Thus, the development of a standardised experimental model of EnTT is needed for more appropriate testing of parasite biology and control strategies. A recent study reported up to 40-50% EnTT rates in chronically infected dams with either high or low-to-moderate virulence isolates, although low fertility rates were observed in dams inoculated with the high virulence isolate. Therefore, low-to-moderate virulence N. caninum isolates (Nc-Spain 3H; G1 and Nc-Spain 8; G2) that previously showed high TT rates versus low mortality and morbidity rates in a congenital mouse model were inoculated into BALB/c dams (first generation). The new approach followed in the present study aimed to start with a high number of congenitally infected mice (second generation), which allowed a more efficient EnTT from congenitally infected dams to their progeny (third generation). Interestingly, a reactivation of infection occurred in several congenitally infected non-pregnant females (second generation) from both infected groups. This fact was evidenced by neosporosis-associated clinical signs after mating accompanied by an increase of specific antibody levels (IgG1, IgG2a and specific antibodies against rNcGRA7) (P<0.0001; one-way ANOVA). Moreover, a higher number of PCR-positive mice compared to pregnant females were observed (P<0.05; Fisher's exact test). These results support the hypothesis that only mice without clinical signs and with a low parasite burden in the brain became pregnant, which may explain the posterior failure in inducing EnTT from the second to the third generation. These findings confirm that this mouse model is not a suitable experimental EnTT model for testing the efficacy of drugs and vaccine candidates against EnTT. The employment of other putative suitable species with a similar placenta structure, such as small ruminants, should be taken into

  13. Extracellular purines, purinergic receptors and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Di Virgilio, F; Adinolfi, E

    2017-01-01

    Virtually, all tumor cells as well as all immune cells express plasma membrane receptors for extracellular nucleosides (adenosine) and nucleotides (ATP, ADP, UTP, UDP and sugar UDP). The tumor microenvironment is characterized by an unusually high concentration of ATP and adenosine. Adenosine is a major determinant of the immunosuppressive tumor milieu. Sequential hydrolysis of extracellular ATP catalyzed by CD39 and CD73 is the main pathway for the generation of adenosine in the tumor interstitium. Extracellular ATP and adenosine mold both host and tumor responses. Depending on the specific receptor activated, extracellular purines mediate immunosuppression or immunostimulation on the host side, and growth stimulation or cytotoxicity on the tumor side. Recent progress in this field is providing the key to decode this complex scenario and to lay the basis to harness the potential benefits for therapy. Preclinical data show that targeting the adenosine-generating pathway (that is, CD73) or adenosinergic receptors (that is, A2A) relieves immunosuppresion and potently inhibits tumor growth. On the other hand, growth of experimental tumors is strongly inhibited by targeting the P2X7 ATP-selective receptor of cancer and immune cells. This review summarizes the recent data on the role played by extracellular purines (purinergic signaling) in host–tumor interaction and highlights novel therapeutic options stemming from recent advances in this field. PMID:27321181

  14. Non-transferrin bound iron, cytokine activation and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation in hemodialysis patients receiving intravenous iron dextran or iron sucrose.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Conner, Todd; McQuade, Charles R; Olp, Jonathan; Hicks, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Intravenous (IV) iron supplementation is widely used to support erythropoeisis in hemodialysis patients. IV iron products are associated with oxidative stress that has been measured principally by circulating biomarkers such as products of lipid peroxidation. The pro-oxidant effects of IV iron are presumed to be due at least in part, by free or non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI). However, the effects of IV iron on intracellular redox status and downstream effectors is not known. This prospective, crossover study compared cytokine activation, reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress after single IV doses of iron sucrose and iron dextran. This was a prospective, open-label, crossover study. Ten patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis and four age and sex-matched healthy were assigned to receive 100 mg of each IV iron product over 5 min in random sequence with a 2 week washout between products. Subjects were fasted and fed a low iron diet in the General Clinical Research Center at the University of New Mexico. Serum and plasma samples for IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 and NTBI were obtained at baseline, 60 and 240 min after iron infusion. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated at the same time points and stained with fluorescent probes to identify intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) by flow cytometry. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by plasma F(2) isoprostane concentration. Mean ± SEM maximum serum NTBI values were significantly higher among patients receiving IS compared to ID (2.59 ± 0.31 and 1.0 ± 0.36 µM, respectively, P = 0.005 IS vs. ID) Mean ± SEM NTBI area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) was 3-fold higher after IS versus ID (202 ± 53 vs. 74 ± 23 µM*min/l, P = 0.04) in ESRD patients, indicating increased exposure to NTBI. IV iron administration was associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Serum IL-6 concentrations increased most

  15. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  16. Deconvoluting Mixtures ofEmissions Sources to Investigate PM2.5's Ability to Generate Reactive Oxygen Species and its Associations with Cardiorespiratory Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Bates, J.; Abrams, J.; Verma, V.; Fang, T.; Klein, M.; Strickland, M. J.; Sarnat, S. E.; Chang, H. H.; Mulholland, J. A.; Tolbert, P. E.; Russell, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    It is hypothesized that fine particulate matter (PM2.5) inhalation can catalytically generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of the body's antioxidant capacity, leading to oxidative stress and ultimately adverse health. PM2.5 emissions from different sources vary widely in chemical composition, with varied effects on the body. Here, the ability of mixtures of different sources of PM2.5 to generate ROS and associations of this capability with acute health effects were investigated. A dithiothreitol (DTT) assay that integrates over different sources was used to quantify ROS generation potential of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 in Atlanta from June 2012 - June 2013. PM2.5 source impacts, estimated using the Chemical Mass Balance method with ensemble-averaged source impact profiles, were related to DTT activity using a linear regression model, which provided information on intrinsic DTT activity (i.e., toxicity) of each source. The model was then used to develop a time series of daily DTT activity over a ten-year period (1998-2010) for use in an epidemiologic study. Light-duty gasoline vehicles exhibited the highest intrinsic DTT activity, followed by biomass burning and heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Biomass burning contributed the largest fraction to total DTT activity, followed by gasoline and diesel vehicles (45%, 20% and 14%, respectively). These results suggest the importance of aged oxygenated organic aerosols and metals in ROS generation. Epidemiologic analyses found significant associations between estimated DTT activity and emergency department visits for congestive heart failure and asthma/wheezing attacks in the 5-county Atlanta area. Estimated DTT activity was the only pollutant measure out of PM2.5, O3, and PM2.5 constituents elemental carbon and organic carbon) that exhibited a significant link to congestive heart failure. In two-pollutant models, DTT activity was significantly associated with asthma/wheeze and congestive heart failure while PM2

  17. UV-B Induced Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Promotes Formation of BFA-Induced Compartments in Cells of Arabidopsis Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Yokawa, Ken; Kagenishi, Tomoko; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    UV-B radiation is an important part of the electromagnetic spectrum emitted by the sun. For much of the period of biological evolution organisms have been exposed to UV radiation, and have developed diverse mechanisms to cope with this potential stress factor. Roots are usually shielded from exposure to UV by the surrounding soil, but may nevertheless be exposed to high energy radiation on the soil surface. Due to their high sensitivity to UV-B radiation, plant roots need to respond rapidly in order to minimize exposure on the surface. In addition to root gravitropism, effective light perception by roots has recently been discovered to be essential for triggering negative root phototropism in Arabidopsis. However, it is not fully understood how UV-B affects root growth and phototropism. Here, we report that UV-B induces rapid generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn promotes the formation of BFA-induced compartments in the Arabidopsis root apex. During unilateral UV-B irradiation of roots changes in auxin concentration on the illuminated side have been recorded. In conclusion, UV-B-induced and ROS-mediated stimulation of vesicle recycling promotes root growth and induces negative phototropism. PMID:26793199

  18. Generation of leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-identical donors of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia using modifications of a limiting dilution assay.

    PubMed

    Smit, W M; Rijnbeek, M; van Bergen, C A; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H

    1998-03-01

    Donor leukocyte transfusions (DLT) have an anti-leukemic effect in most patients with a relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. However, DLT are often complicated by graft-versus-host disease. Selection of donor lymphocytes with a relative specificity for leukemic cells is desirable. The generation of leukemia-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses between HLA-identical donors and patients in bulk cultures showed major variations, and false negative results were observed. In a modification of a limiting dilution analysis (LDA) two-fold serial dilutions of HLA-identical donor mononuclear cells (MNC) were cultured in the presence of CML cells. The anti-leukemic CTL precursor frequencies in these donors varied between <1 and 9 per 106 MNC. HLA-restricted CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocytes as well as MHC non-restricted gammadelta T cells were responsible for the anti-leukemic responses. A positive correlation between cytotoxicity in the various wells after 3, 4 and 5 weeks of culture could be found. The LDA may be superior to bulk cultures in selecting stable immune responses and in separating multiple different anti-leukemic T cell responses in each donor-patient combination.

  19. SIRT3 Expression Decreases with Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Rat Cortical Neurons during Early Brain Injury Induced by Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Huang, Yong; Huang, Ren-qiang; Gu, Jin-mao; Dong, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important protein deacetylase which predominantly presents in mitochondria and exhibits broad bioactivities including regulating energy metabolism and counteracting inflammatory effect. Since inflammatory cascade was proved to be critical for pathological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we investigated the overall expression and cell-specific distribution of SIRT3 in the cerebral cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats with experimental SAH induced by internal carotid perforation. Results suggested that SIRT3 was expressed abundantly in neurons and endothelia but rarely in gliocytes in normal cerebral cortex. After experimental SAH, mRNA and protein expressions of SIRT3 decreased significantly as early as 8 hours and dropped to the minimum value at 24 h after SAH. By contrast, SOD2 expression increased slowly as early as 12 hours after experimental SAH, rose up sharply at the following 12 hours, and then was maintained at a higher level. In conclusion, attenuated SIRT3 expression in cortical neurons was associated closely with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and cellular apoptosis, implying that SIRT3 might play an important neuroprotective role during early brain injury following SAH. PMID:28053989

  20. Core-shell AgSiO2-protoporphyrin IX nanoparticle: Effect of the Ag core on reactive oxygen species generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lismont, M.; Pá; ez-Martinez, C.; Dreesen, L.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer is based on the use of a light sensitive molecule to produce, under specific irradiation, toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). A way to improve the therapy efficiency is to increase the amount of produced ROS near cancer cells. This aim can be achieved by using a metal enhanced process arising when an optically active molecule is located near a metallic nanoparticle (NP). Here, the coupling effect between silver (Ag) NPs and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) molecules, a clinically approved photosensitizer, is studied compared first, to PpIX fluorescence yield and second, to ROS production efficiency. By applying a modified Stöber process, PpIX was encapsulated into a silica (SiO2) shell, surrounding a 60 nm sized Ag core. We showed that, compared to SiO2-PpIX NPs, Ag coated SiO2-PpIX NPs dramatically decreased PpIX fluorescence together with singlet oxygen production efficiency. However, after incubation time in the dark, the amount of superoxide anions generated by the Ag doped sample was higher than the control sample one.

  1. The interaction of atmospheric pressure plasma jets with cancer and normal cells: generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and changes of the cell proliferation and cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Leem, Sun Hee

    2013-09-01

    The possibility of atmospheric pressure plasmas is emerging as a candidate in cancer therapy. The primary role is played by reactive oxygen species (ROS), UV photons, charged particles and electric fields. Among them, intracellular ROS induced by plasma are considered to be the key constituents that induce cellular changes and apoptosis. In this study, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. The plasma treatment was performed under different working gases, applied voltages, gas flow rates, and with and without additive oxygen flow. Using a detection dye, we observed that plasma exposure leads to the increase of the intracellular ROS and that the intracellular ROS production can be controlled by plasma parameters. A significant ROS generation was induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells and the overproduction of ROS contributes to the reduced cell proliferation. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS and cell proliferation was less changed. The plasma treatment also resulted in the alteration of the cell cycle that contributes to the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as cancer therapy. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea under Contract No. 2012R1A1A2002591 and 2012R1A1A3010213.

  2. Insulin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase underlie the cerebrovascular insulin resistance in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Katakam, Prasad V G; Snipes, James A; Steed, Mesia M; Busija, David W

    2012-05-01

    Hyperinsulinemia accompanying insulin resistance (IR) is an independent risk factor for stroke. The objective is to examine the cerebrovascular actions of insulin in Zucker obese (ZO) rats with IR and Zucker lean (ZL) control rats. Diameter measurements of cerebral arteries showed diminished insulin-induced vasodilation in ZO compared with ZL. Endothelial denudation revealed vasoconstriction to insulin that was greater in ZO compared with ZL. Nonspecific inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) paradoxically improved vasodilation in ZO. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), supplementation of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) precursor, and inhibition of neuronal NOS or NADPH oxidase or cyclooxygenase (COX) improved insulin-induced vasodilation in ZO. Immunoblot experiments revealed that insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt, endothelial NOS, and expression of GTP cyclohydrolase-I (GTP-CH) were diminished, but phosphorylation of PKC and ERK was enhanced in ZO arteries. Fluorescence studies showed increased ROS in ZO arteries in response to insulin that was sensitive to NOS inhibition and BH(4) supplementation. Thus, a vicious cycle of abnormal insulin-induced ROS generation instigating NOS uncoupling leading to further ROS production underlies the cerebrovascular IR in ZO rats. In addition, decreased bioavailability and impaired synthesis of BH(4) by GTP-CH induced by insulin promoted NOS uncoupling.

  3. A ‘tissue model’ to study the barrier effects of living tissues on the reactive species generated by surface air discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tongtong; Liu, Dingxin; Xu, Han; liu, Zhichao; Xu, Dehui; Li, Dong; Li, Qiaosong; Rong, Mingzhe; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin gels are used as surrogates of human tissues to study their barrier effects on incoming reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by surface air discharge. The penetration depth of nitrite into gelatin gel is measured in real time during plasma treatment, and the permeabilities of nitrite, nitrate, O3 and H2O2 through gelatin gel films are quantified by measuring their concentrations in the water underneath such films after plasma treatment. It is found that the penetration speed of nitrite increases linearly with the mass fraction of water in the gelatin gels, and the permeabilities of nitrite and O3 are comparably smaller than that for H2O2 and nitrate due to differences in their chemistry in gelatin gels. These results provide a quantitative basis to estimate the penetration processes of RONS in human tissues, and they also confirm that the composition of RONS is strongly dependent on the tissue depth and the plasma treatment time. A small electric field of up to 20 V cm-1 can greatly reduce the barrier effects of the tissue model regardless of their directions, for which the underlying mechanism is unclear. However, the electric field force on the objective RONS should not be the dominant mechanism.

  4. The application of profluorescent nitroxides to detect reactive oxygen species derived from combustion-generated particulate matter: Cigarette smoke - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljevic, B.; Fairfull-Smith, K. E.; Bottle, S. E.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2010-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related free radicals are considered to be key factors underpinning the various adverse health effects associated with exposure to ambient particulate matter. Therefore, measurement of ROS is a crucial factor for assessing the potential toxicity of particles. In this work, a novel profluorescent nitroxide, BPEAnit, was investigated as a probe for detecting particle-derived ROS. BPEAnit has a very low fluorescence emission due to inherent quenching by the nitroxide group, but upon radical trapping or redox activity, a strong fluorescence is observed. BPEAnit was tested for detection of ROS present in mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke. In the case of mainstream cigarette smoke, there was a linear increase in fluorescence intensity with an increasing number of cigarette puffs, equivalent to an average of 101 nmol ROS per cigarette based on the number of moles of the probe reacted. Sidestream cigarette smoke sampled from an environmental chamber exposed BPEAnit to much lower concentrations of particles, but still resulted in a clearly detectible increase in fluorescence intensity with sampling time. It was calculated that the amount of ROS was equivalent to 50 ± 2 nmol per mg of particulate matter; however, this value decreased with ageing of the particles in the chamber. Overall, BPEAnit was shown to provide a sensitive response related to the oxidative capacity of the particulate matter. These findings present a good basis for employing the new BPEAnit probe for the investigation of particle-related ROS generated from cigarette smoke as well as from other combustion sources.

  5. In vitro effect of copper chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complex activities of mitochondria isolated from broiler liver.

    PubMed

    Su, Rongsheng; Wang, Rongmei; Guo, Shining; Cao, Huabin; Pan, Jiaqiang; Li, Chengmei; Shi, Dayou; Tang, Zhaoxin

    2011-12-01

    This study is to examine if Cu(2+) can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated broiler hepatic mitochondria were exposed to different concentrations of Cu(2+) (10, 30, 50 μM). Respiratory chain complex activities, ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and mitochondrial membrane potential were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed, which coincided with decreasing RCR both with glutamate + malate or succinate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by rhodamine 123 release decreased after CuCl(2) exposure at 30 and 50 μM. In addition, the effects of the antioxidants NAC (200 μM) and GSH (200 μM) were studied at 50 μM Cu(2+). The results indicate that Cu can induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose and the effect of Cu(2+) exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondrial function by reducing the formation of free radicals.

  6. Characterization of xanthophyll pigments, photosynthetic performance, photon energy dissipation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination during artemisinin-induced stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug, is phytotoxic to many crops and weeds. The effects of artemisinin on stress markers, including fluorescence parameters, photosystem II photochemistry, photon energy dissipation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0) seedlings were grown in perlite and watered with 50% Hoagland nutrient solution. Adult plants of Arabidopsis were treated with artemisinin at 0, 40, 80, 160 μM for one week. Artemisinin, in the range 40-160 μM, decreased the fresh biomass, chl a, b and leaf mineral contents. Photosynthetic efficiency, yield and electron transport rate in Arabidopsis were also reduced following exposure to 80 and 160 μM artemisinin. The ΦNPQ and NPQ were less than control. Artemisinin treatment caused an increase in root oxidizability and lipid peroxidation (MDA contents) of Arabidopsis. Calcium and nitrogen contents decreased after 80 and 160 μM artemisinin treatment compared to control. δ13C values were less negative following treatment with artemisinin as compared to the control. Artemisinin also decreased leaf protein contents in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these data suggest that artemisinin inhibits many physiological and biochemical processes in Arabidopsis.

  7. Incompatibility of silver nanoparticles with lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay for cellular viability test is attributed to protein binding and reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Jeong; Kim, Hwa; Liu, Yingqiu; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Kwon, Kyenghee; Chang, Kyung-Hwa; Park, Kwangsik; Kim, Younghun; Shim, Kyuhwan; An, Seong Soo A; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2014-03-21

    A growing number of studies report that conventional cytotoxicity assays are incompatible with certain nanoparticles (NPs) due to artifacts caused by the distinctive characteristics of NPs. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assays have inadequately detected cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), leading to research into the underlying mechanism. When ECV304 endothelial-like umbilical cells were treated with citrate-capped AgNPs (cAgNPs) or bare AgNPs (bAgNPs), the plasma membrane was disrupted, but the LDH leakage assay failed to detect cytotoxicity, indicating interference with the assay by AgNPs. Both cAgNPs and bAgNPs inactivated LDH directly when treated to cell lysate as expected. AgNPs adsorbed LDH and thus LDH, together with AgNPs, was removed from assay reactants during sample preparation, with a resultant underestimation of LDH leakage from cells. cAgNPs, but not bAgNPs, generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were successfully scavenged by N-acetylcysteine or ascorbic acid. LDH inhibition by cAgNPs could be restored partially by simultaneous treatment with those antioxidants, suggesting the contribution of ROS to LDH inactivation. Additionally, the composition of the protein corona surrounding AgNPs was identified employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. In sum, the LDH leakage assay, a conventional cell viability test method, should be employed with caution when assessing cytotoxicity of AgNPs.

  8. Generation of monoclonal antibodies reactive against subtype specific conserved B-cell epitopes on haemagglutinin protein of influenza virus H5N1.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Petra; Shehata, Awad A; Liebert, Uwe G

    2015-03-02

    H5-specific monoclonal antibodies may serve as valuable tools for rapid diagnosis of H5N1 avian influenza virus. Therefore, conserved H5-specific sequences of the haemagglutinin (HA) protein were expressed in Pichia pastoris and used for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The two mAbs, FD6 and HE4, were strongly reactive against native HA protein and exhibited specificity for subtype H5. By epitope mapping linear epitopes of mAbs were identified that are highly conserved among influenza A virus of subtype H5. Additionally no sequence similarities to homologous regions on HA proteins of other influenza A virus subtypes (i.e. H1, H3, H7, H9) were detected by sequence alignment analysis. Both mAbs did not cross react with native or denatured HA proteins of other influenza A virus subtypes. Furthermore, using ELISA and immunofluorescence test mAb FD6 reacted only to the native H5 protein of recently circulating highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses but not to low pathogenic H5N1 isolates. In conclusion, the use of the two mAbs in non-molecular tests like antigen-capture-ELISA appears promising for detecting influenza A H5N1 virus.

  9. Characterization of Xanthophyll Pigments, Photosynthetic Performance, Photon Energy Dissipation, Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Carbon Isotope Discrimination during Artemisinin-Induced Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J.

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug, is phytotoxic to many crops and weeds. The effects of artemisinin on stress markers, including fluorescence parameters, photosystem II photochemistry, photon energy dissipation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0) seedlings were grown in perlite and watered with 50% Hoagland nutrient solution. Adult plants of Arabidopsis were treated with artemisinin at 0, 40, 80, 160 μM for one week. Artemisinin, in the range 40–160 μM, decreased the fresh biomass, chl a, b and leaf mineral contents. Photosynthetic efficiency, yield and electron transport rate in Arabidopsis were also reduced following exposure to 80 and 160 μM artemisinin. The ΦNPQ and NPQ were less than control. Artemisinin treatment caused an increase in root oxidizability and lipid peroxidation (MDA contents) of Arabidopsis. Calcium and nitrogen contents decreased after 80 and 160 μM artemisinin treatment compared to control. δ13C values were less negative following treatment with artemisinin as compared to the control. Artemisinin also decreased leaf protein contents in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these data suggest that artemisinin inhibits many physiological and biochemical processes in Arabidopsis. PMID:25635811

  10. Generation and Improvement of Effector Function of a Novel Broadly Reactive and Protective Monoclonal Antibody against Pneumococcal Surface Protein A of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Rebecca; Groff, Brian C.; Kubota, Tsuguo; Destito, Giuseppe; Laudenslager, John; Koriazova, Lilia; Tahara, Tomoyuki; Kanda, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A proof-of-concept study evaluating the potential of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumococcal Surface Protein A (PspA) as a passive immunization target was conducted. We describe the generation and isolation of several broadly reactive mouse anti-PspA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). MAb 140H1 displayed (i) 98% strain coverage, (ii) activity in complement deposition and opsonophagocytic killing (OPK) assays, which are thought to predict the in vivo efficacy of anti-pneumococcal mAbs, (iii) efficacy in mouse sepsis models both alone and in combination with standard-of-care antibiotics, and (iv) therapeutic activity in a mouse pneumonia model. Moreover, we demonstrate that antibody engineering can significantly enhance anti-PspA mAb effector function. We believe that PspA has promising potential as a target for the therapy of invasive pneumococcal disease by mAbs, which could be used alone or in conjunction with standard-of-care antibiotics. PMID:27171010

  11. Combinational Immunotherapy with Allo-DRibble Vaccines and Anti-OX40 Co-Stimulation Leads to Generation of Cross-Reactive Effector T Cells and Tumor Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guangjie; Li, Yuhuan; Cui, Zhihua; Morris, Nicholas P.; Weinberg, Andrew D.; Fox, Bernard A.; Urba, Walter J.; Wang, Lixin; Hu, Hong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that vaccines comprising of irradiated whole tumor cells or tumor-derived heat shock proteins can generate tumor-specific immune responses. In contrast, we showed recently that vaccines composed of autophagosomes (DRibbles) derived from syngeneic sarcomas could induce cross-reactive T-cell responses and cross-protection against the tumor. This unusual property of DRibbles was related to the selective recruitment of defective ribosomal products (DRiPs) and other short-lived proteins (SLiPs) into autophagosomes via sequestosome (SQSTM1, p62) mediated association of ubiquitinated SLiPs to the autophagy gene product LC3. Here, we extend our observations to mammary carcinomas from mice of different genetic background. We demonstrated that combined of intranodal administration of autologous or allogeneic DRibbles together with anti-OX40 antibody led to robust proliferation, expansion, and differentiation of memory and effector T cells. We also showed that SLiPs is an excellent source of antigen for cross-priming of CD8+ T-cells that recognize shared tumor antigens in the context of host MHC class I molecules. Thus, our results provide a strong basis for novel clinical trials that combine allogeneic “off-the-shelf” DRibble vaccines together with antibodies against co-stimulatory molecules. PMID:27874054

  12. A time course assessment of changes in reactive oxygen species generation and antioxidant defense in hydroponically grown wheat in response to lead ions (Pb2+).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2012-10-01

    We examined the effect of Pb(2+) (8 and 40 mg l(-1)) on reactive oxygen species generation and alterations in antioxidant enzymes in hydroponically grown wheat at 24, 72, and 120 h after exposure. Pb(2+) toxicity was more pronounced on root growth, and it correlated with the greater Pb accumulation in roots. Pb exposure (40 mg l(-1)) enhanced superoxide anion, H(2)O(2), and MDA content in wheat roots by 1.9- to 2.2-folds, 56-255%, and 41-90%, respectively, over the control. Pb-induced loss of membrane integrity was confirmed by the enhanced electrolyte leakage and in vivo histochemical localization. Activities of scavenging enzymes, superoxide dismutases and catalases, enhanced in Pb-treated wheat roots by 1.4- to 5.7-folds over that in the control. In contrast, the activities of ascorbate and guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases decreased significantly, suggesting their non-involvement in detoxification process. The study concludes that Pb(2+)-induced oxidative damage in wheat roots involve greater H(2)O(2) accumulation and the deactivation of the related scavenging enzymes.

  13. Compound K, a metabolite of ginseng saponin, induces mitochondria-dependent and caspase-dependent apoptosis via the generation of reactive oxygen species in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Kyung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lim, Chae Moon; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Hee Sun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Chang, Weon Young; Choi, Jae Hyuck; Hyun, Jin Won

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the cytotoxic mechanism of Compound K, with respect to the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitochondrial involved apoptosis, in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Compound K exhibited a concentration of 50% growth inhibition (IC(50)) at 20 μg/mL and cytotoxicity in a time dependent manner. Compound K produced intracellular ROS in a time dependent fashion; however, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment resulted in the inhibition of this effect and the recovery of cell viability. Compound K induced a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway via the modulation of Bax and Bcl-2 expressions, resulting in the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)). Loss of the Δψ(m) was followed by cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, resulting in the activation of caspase-9, -3, and concomitant poly ADP-ribosyl polymerase (PARP) cleavage, which are the indicators of caspase-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic effect of Compound K, exerted via the activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), was abrogated by specific MAPK inhibitors. This study demonstrated that Compound K-mediated generation of ROS led to apoptosis through the modulation of a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway and MAPK pathway.

  14. Contribution of water-soluble and insoluble components and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the reactive oxygen species-generating potential of fine ambient aerosols.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Rico-Martinez, Roberto; Kotra, Neel; King, Laura; Liu, Jiumeng; Snell, Terry W; Weber, Rodney J

    2012-10-16

    Relative contributions of water- and methanol-soluble compounds and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the ROS (reactive oxygen species)-generating potential of ambient fine aerosols (D(p) < 2.5 μm) are assessed. ROS-generating (or oxidative) potential of the particulate matter (PM) was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Particles were collected on quartz filters (N = 8) at an urban site near central Atlanta during January-February 2012 using a PM(2.5) high-volume sampler. Filter punches were extracted separately in both water and methanol. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were then subsequently segregated via a C-18 solid phase extraction column. The DTT assay response was significantly higher for the methanol extract, and for both extracts a substantial fraction of PM oxidative potential was associated with the hydrophobic compounds as evident from a substantial attenuation in DTT response after passing PM extracts through the C-18 column (64% for water and 83% for methanol extract; both median values). The DTT activities of water and methanol extracts were correlated with the water-soluble (R = 0.86) and water-insoluble organic carbon (R = 0.94) contents of the PM, respectively. Brown carbon (BrC), which predominantly represents the hydrophobic organic fraction (referred to as humic-like substances, HULIS), was also correlated with DTT activity in both the water (R = 0.78) and methanol extracts (R = 0.83). Oxidative potential was not correlated with any metals measured in the extracts. These findings suggest that the hydrophobic components of both water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols substantially contribute to the oxidative properties of ambient PM. Further investigation of these hydrophobic organic compounds could help identify sources of a significant fraction of ambient aerosol toxicity.

  15. Cytotoxicity of Manganese (III) Complex in Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cell Line Is Mediated by the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Followed by Mitochondrial Damage.

    PubMed

    Al-Anbaky, Qudes; Al-Karakooly, Zeiyad; Kilaparty, Surya P; Agrawal, Megha; Albkuri, Yahya M; RanguMagar, Ambar B; Ghosh, Anindya; Ali, Nawab

    2016-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) complexes are widely studied because of their important catalytic properties in synthetic and biochemical reactions. A Mn (III) complex of an amidoamine ligand was synthesized using a tetradentate amidoamine ligand. In this study, the Mn (III) complex was evaluated for its biological activity by measuring its cytotoxicity in human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). Cytotoxic effects of the Mn (III) complex were determined using established biomarkers in an attempt to delineate the mechanism of action and the utility of the complex as a potential anticancer drug. The Mn (III) complex induces cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner as shown by microculture tetrazolium assay, a measure of cytotoxic cell death. Our results demonstrated that cytotoxic effects were significantly increased at higher concentrations of Mn (III) complex and with longer time of treatment. The IC50 (Inhibitor concentration that results in 50% cell death) value of Mn (III) complex in MCF-7 cells was determined to be 2.5 mmol/L for 24 hours of treatment. In additional experiments, we determined the Mn (III) complex-mediated cell death was due to both apoptotic and nonspecific necrotic cell death mechanisms. This was assessed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and flow cytometry techniques. The Mn (III) complex produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggering the expression of manganese superoxide dismutase 1 and ultimately damaging the mitochondrial function as is evident by a decline in mitochondrial membrane potential. Treatment of the cells with free radical scavenger, N, N-dimethylthiourea decreased Mn (III) complex-mediated generation of ROS and attenuated apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that the Mn (III) complex-mediated MCF-7 cell death utilizes combined mechanism involving apoptosis and necrosis perhaps due to the generation of ROS.

  16. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  17. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  18. NADPH Oxidase Promotes Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J.; D'Auria, Anthony C.; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47phox−/−) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47phox−/− mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47phox−/− mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  19. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  20. Age-related increase of reactive oxygen generation in the brains of mammals and birds: is reactive oxygen a signaling molecule to determine the aging process and life span?

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toru; Unno, Keiko; Tahara, Shoichi; Kaneko, Takao

    2010-07-01

    Since Harman proposed the "free-radical theory of aging", oxidative stress has been postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. The accumulation of oxidative stress-induced oxidatively modified macromolecules, including protein, DNA and lipid, were found in tissues during the aging process; however, it is not necessarily clear which factor is more critical, an increase in endogenous reactive oxygen and/or a decrease in anti-oxidative defense, to the age-related increase in oxidative damage. To clarify the increasing production of reactive oxygen with age, we examined reactive oxygen-dependent chemiluminescent (CL) signals in ex vivo brain slices prepared from different-aged animal brains during hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment using a novel photonic imaging method. The CL signal was intensified during reoxygenation. The signals in SAMP10 (short-life strain) and SAMR1 (control) brain slices increased with aging. The slope of the increase of CL intensity with age in P10 was steeper than in R1. Age-dependent increase of CL intensity was also observed in C57BL/6 mice, Wistar rats and pigeons; however, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the brain did not change with age. These results suggest that reactive oxygen production itself increased with aging. The rate of age-related increases of CL intensity was inversely related to the maximum lifespan of animals. We speculate that reactive oxygen might be a signaling molecule and its levels in tissue might determine the aging process and lifespan. Decelerating age-related increases of reactive oxygen production are expected to be a potent strategy for anti-aging interventions.

  1. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  2. Cross-talk between salicylic acid and NaCl-generated reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in tomato during acclimation to high salinity.

    PubMed

    Gémes, Katalin; Poór, Péter; Horváth, Edit; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Szopkó, Dóra; Szepesi, Agnes; Tari, Irma

    2011-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and nitric oxide (NO) generated by salicylic acid (SA) are considered to be functional links of cross-tolerance to various stressors. SA-stimulated pre-adaptation state was beneficial in the acclimation to subsequent salt stress in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Rio Fuego). At the whole-plant level, SA-induced massive H₂O₂ accumulation only at high concentrations (10⁻³-10⁻² M), which later caused the death of plants. The excess accumulation of H₂O₂ as compared with plants exposed to 100 mM NaCl was not associated with salt stress response after SA pre-treatments. In the root tips, 10⁻³-10⁻² M SA triggered the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO with a concomitant decline in the cell viability. Sublethal concentrations of SA, however, decreased the effect of salt stress on ROS and NO production in the root apex. The attenuation of oxidative stress because of high salinity occurred not only in pre-adapted plants but also at cell level. When protoplasts prepared from control leaves were exposed to SA in the presence of 100 mM NaCl, the production of NO and ROS was much lower and the viability of the cells was higher than in salt-treated samples. This suggests that, the cross-talk of signalling pathways induced by SA and high salinity may occur at the level of ROS and NO production. Abscisic acid (ABA), polyamines and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, the compounds accumulating in pre-treated plants, enhanced the diphenylene iodonium-sensitive ROS and NO levels, but, in contrast to others, ABA and putrescine preserved the viability of protoplasts.

  3. Generation of reactive oxygen species by polyenylpyrroles derivatives causes DNA damage leading to G2/M arrest and apoptosis in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kuo-Feng; Liao, Pei-Chun; Fang, Zhanxiong; Yang, Feng-Ling; Yang, Yu-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lin; Chiu, Yi-Chich; Liu, May-Lan; Lam, Yulin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for 5.8% of all malignancies in Taiwan and the incidence of OSCC is on the rise. OSCC is also a common malignancy worldwide and the five-year survival rate remains poor. Therefore, new and effective treatments are needed to control OSCC. In the present study we have investigated the efficacy and associated mechanisms of polyenylpyrroles and their analogs in both in vitro cell culture and in vivo nude mice xenografts. Auxarconjugatin B (compound 1a) resulted in cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and caspase-dependent apoptosis in OEC-M1 and HSC-3 cells by activating DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction through the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, increase in B-cell lymphoma-2-associated X protein level, and decrease in B-cell lymphoma-2 level. Compound 1a-induced generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species through cytochrome P450 1A1 was identified as a major mechanism of its effect for DNA damage, mitochondria dysfunction and apoptosis, which was reversed by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine as well as cytochrome P450 1A1 inhibitor and specific siRNA. Furthermore, compound 1a-treated nude mice showed a reduction in the OEC-M1 xenograft tumor growth and an increase in the caspase-3 activation in xenograft tissue. These results provide promising insights as to how compound 1a mediates cytotoxicity and may prove to be a molecular rationale for its translation into a potential therapeutic against OSCC.

  4. Generation of reactive oxygen species in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) treated dopaminergic neurons occurs as an NADPH oxidase-dependent two-wave cascade

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are necessary for appropriate responses to immune challenges. In the brain, excess superoxide production predicts neuronal cell loss, suggesting that Parkinson's disease (PD) with its wholesale death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (nigra) may be a case in point. Although microglial NADPH oxidase-produced superoxide contributes to dopaminergic neuron death in an MPTP mouse model of PD, this is secondary to an initial die off of such neurons, suggesting that the initial MPTP-induced death of neurons may be via activation of NADPH oxidase in neurons themselves, thus providing an early therapeutic target. Methods NADPH oxidase subunits were visualized in adult mouse nigra neurons and in N27 rat dopaminergic cells by immunofluorescence. NADPH oxidase subunits in N27 cell cultures were detected by immunoblots and RT-PCR. Superoxide was measured by flow cytometric detection of H2O2-induced carboxy-H2-DCFDA fluorescence. Cells were treated with MPP+ (MPTP metabolite) following siRNA silencing of the Nox2-stabilizing subunit p22phox, or simultaneously with NADPH oxidase pharmacological inhibitors or with losartan to antagonize angiotensin II type 1 receptor-induced NADPH oxidase activation. Results Nigral dopaminergic neurons in situ expressed three subunits necessary for NADPH oxidase activation, and these as well as several other NADPH oxidase subunits and their encoding mRNAs were detected in unstimulated N27 cells. Overnight MPP+ treatment of N27 cells induced Nox2 protein and superoxide generation, which was counteracted by NADPH oxidase inhibitors, by siRNA silencing of p22phox, or losartan. A two-wave ROS cascade was identified: 1) as a first wave, mitochondrial H2O2 production was first noted at three hours of MPP+ treatment; and 2) as a second wave, H2O2 levels were further increased by 24 hours. This second wave was eliminated by pharmacological inhibitors

  5. Listeria monocytogenes induces mast cell extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Leyva-Paredes, Kahiry; Donis-Maturano, Luis; González-Jiménez, Marco; Paredes-Vivas, Yuriria; Cerbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Serafín-López, Jeanet; García-Pérez, Blanca; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2017-02-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in different immunological phenomena including allergy and infectious diseases. Several bacteria induce mast cell activation leading to degranulation and the production of several cytokines and chemokines. However, mast cells also have different microbicidal activities such as phagocytosis and the release of DNA with embedded granular proteins known as Mast Cell Extracellular Traps (MCETs). Although previous reports indicate that extracellular bacteria are able to induce MCETs little is known if intracellular bacteria can induce these structures. In this work, we evaluated MCETs induction by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. We found that mast cells released DNA after stimulation with L. monocytogenes, and this DNA was complexed to histone and tryptase. Before extracellular DNA release, L. monocytogenes induced modifications to the mast cell nuclear envelope and DNA was detected outside the nucleus. L. monocytogenes stimulated mast cells to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking NADPH oxidase diminished DNA release by mast cells. Finally, MCETs showed antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes that was partially blocked when β-hexosaminidase activity was inhibited. These results show that L. monocytogenes induces mast cells to produce microbicidal MCETs, suggesting a role for mast cells in containing infection beyond the induction of inflammation.

  6. The role of extracellular conductivity profiles in compartmental models for neurons: particulars for layer 5 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Riera, Jorge; Enjieu-Kadji, Herve; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-07-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of technologies aimed at observing electric activity inside the brain, scientists have felt the urge to create proper links between intracellular- and extracellular-based experimental approaches. Biophysical models at both physical scales have been formalized under assumptions that impede the creation of such links. In this work, we address this issue by proposing a multicompartment model that allows the introduction of complex extracellular and intracellular resistivity profiles. This model accounts for the geometrical and electrotonic properties of any type of neuron through the combination of four devices: the integrator, the propagator, the 3D connector, and the collector. In particular, we applied this framework to model the tufted pyramidal cells of layer 5 (PCL5) in the neocortex. Our model was able to reproduce the decay and delay curves of backpropagating action potentials (APs) in this type of cell with better agreement with experimental data. We used the voltage drops of the extracellular resistances at each compartment to approximate the local field potentials generated by a PCL5 located in close proximity to linear microelectrode arrays. Based on the voltage drops produced by backpropagating APs, we were able to estimate the current multipolar moments generated by a PCL5. By adding external current sources in parallel to the extracellular resistances, we were able to create a sensitivity profile of PCL5 to electric current injections from nearby microelectrodes. In our model for PCL5, the kinetics and spatial profile of each ionic current were determined based on a literature survey, and the geometrical properties of these cells were evaluated experimentally. We concluded that the inclusion of the extracellular space in the compartmental models of neurons as an extra electrotonic medium is crucial for the accurate simulation of both the propagation of the electric potentials along the neuronal dendrites and the

  7. The Extracellular Matrix of Candida albicans Biofilms Impairs Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Wang, Steven X.; Huttenlocher, Anna; Ansari, Hamayail; Nett, Jeniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to planktonic C. albicans. These complexes composed of DNA, histones, and proteins inhibit Candida growth and dissemination. Considering the resilience of Candida biofilms to host defenses, we examined the neutrophil response to C. albicans during biofilm growth. In contrast to planktonic C. albicans, biofilms triggered negligible release of NETs. Time lapse imaging confirmed the impairment in NET release and revealed neutrophils adhering to hyphae and migrating on the biofilm. NET inhibition depended on an intact extracellular biofilm matrix as physical or genetic disruption of this component resulted in NET release. Biofilm inhibition of NETosis could not be overcome by protein kinase C activation via phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and was associated with suppression of neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The degree of impaired NET release correlated with resistance to neutrophil attack. The clinical relevance of the role for extracellular matrix in diminishing NET production was corroborated in vivo using a rat catheter model. The C. albicans pmr1Δ/Δ, defective in production of matrix mannan, appeared to elicit a greater abundance of NETs by scanning electron microscopy imaging, which correlated with a decreased fungal burden. Together, these findings show that C. albicans biofilms impair neutrophil response through an inhibitory pathway induced by the extracellular matrix. PMID:27622514

  8. Extracellular histones inhibit efferocytosis.

    PubMed

    Friggeri, Arnaud; Banerjee, Sami; Xie, Na; Cui, Huachun; De Freitas, Andressa; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Dupont, Hervé; Abraham, Edward; Liu, Gang

    2012-07-18

    The uptake and clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, a process called efferocytosis, is a major component in the resolution of inflammation. Increased concentrations of extracellular histones are found during acute inflammatory states and appear to contribute to organ system dysfunction and mortality. In these studies, we examined the potential role of histones in modulating efferocytosis. We found that phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils or thymocytes by macrophages was significantly diminished in the presence of histones H3 or H4, but not histone H1. Histone H3 demonstrated direct binding to macrophages, an effect that was diminished by preincubation of macrophages with the opsonins growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor (EGF) 8 (MFG-E8). Incubation of histone H3 with soluble α(v)β₅ integrin and Mer, but not with α(v)β₃, diminished its binding to macrophages. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages in vivo was diminished in the presence of histone H3. Incubation of histone H3 with activated protein C, a treatment that degrades histones, abrogated its inhibitory effects on efferocytosis under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The present studies demonstrate that histones have inhibitory effects on efferocytosis, suggesting a new mechanism by which extracellular histones contribute to acute inflammatory processes and tissue injury.

  9. Phase separation in NiCrN coatings induced by N2 addition in the gas phase: A way to generate magnetic thin films by reactive sputtering of a non-magnetic NiCr target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciu, I.; Duday, D.; Choquet, P.; Perigo, E. A.; Michels, A.; Wirtz, T.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic coatings are used for a lot of applications from data storage in hard discs, spintronics and sensors. Meanwhile, magnetron sputtering is a process largely used in industry for the deposition of thin films. Unfortunately, deposition of magnetic coatings by magnetron sputtering is a difficult task due to the screening effect of the magnetic target lowering the magnetic field strength of the magnet positioned below the target, which is used to generate and trap ions in the vicinity of the target surface to be sputtered. In this work we present an efficient method to obtain soft magnetic thin films by reactive sputtering of a non-magnetic target. The aim is to recover the magnetic properties of Ni after dealloying of Ni and Cr due to the selective reactivity of Cr with the reactive nitrogen species generated during the deposition process. The effects of nitrogen content on the dealloying and DC magnetron sputtering (DCMS) deposition processes are studied here. The different chemical compositions, microstructures and magnetic properties of DCMS thin films obtained by sputtering in reactive gas mixtures with different ratios of Ar/N2 from a non-magnetic Ni-20Cr target have been determined. XPS data indicate that the increase of nitrogen content in the films has a strong influence on the NiCr phase decomposition into Ni and CrN, leading to ferromagnetic coatings due to the Ni phase. XRD results show that the obtained Ni-CrN films consist of a metallic fcc cubic Ni phase mixed with fcc cubic CrN. The lattice parameter decreases with the N2 content and reaches the theoretical value of the pure fcc-Ni, when Cr is mostly removed from the Ni-Cr phase. Dealloying of Cr from a Ni80-Cr20 solid solution is achieved in our experimental conditions and the deposition of Ni ferromagnetic coatings embedding CrN from a non-magnetic target is possible with reactive DC magnetron sputtering.

  10. Eosinophil peroxidase-derived reactive brominating species target the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens generating a novel chemoattractant, alpha-bromo fatty aldehyde.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyn J; Thukkani, Arun K; Heuertz, Rita M; Slungaard, Arne; Hazen, Stanley L; Ford, David A

    2003-03-14

    Plasmalogens are a subclass of glycerophospholipids that are enriched in the plasma membrane of many mammalian cells. The vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens renders them susceptible to oxidation. Accordingly, it was hypothesized that reactive brominating species, a unique oxidant formed at the sites of eosinophil activation, such as in asthma, might selectively target plasmalogens for oxidation. Here we show that reactive brominating species produced by the eosinophil peroxidase system of activated eosinophils attack the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens. Reactive brominating species produced by eosinophil peroxidase target the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens resulting in the production of a neutral lipid and lysophosphatidylcholine. Chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses of this neutral lipid demonstrated that it was 2-bromohexadecanal (2-BrHDA). Reactive brominating species produced by eosinophil peroxidase attacked the plasmalogen vinyl ether bond at acidic pH. Bromide was the preferred substrate for eosinophil peroxidase, and chloride was not appreciably used even at a 1000-fold molar excess. Furthermore, 2-BrHDA production elicited by eosinophil peroxidase-derived reactive brominating species in the presence of 100 microM NaBr doubled with the addition of 100 mM NaCl. The potential physiological significance of this pathway was suggested by the demonstration that 2-BrHDA was produced by phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated eosinophils and by the demonstration that 2-BrHDA is a phagocyte chemoattractant. Taken together, the present studies demonstrate the targeting of the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens by the reactive brominating species produced by eosinophil peroxidase and by activated eosinophils, resulting in the production of brominated fatty aldehydes.

  11. Using copper ions to amplify ROS-mediated fluorescence for continuous online monitoring of extracellular glucose in living rat brain.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Chen, Chen-Yu; Tseng, Po-Jen; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2015-02-15

    In this study we developed a facile and sensitive method for continuous monitoring of extracellular glucose concentration in living rat brain through microdialysis (MD) sampling in conjunction with (i) online sample derivatization using glucose oxidase to generate H2O2, which converted a reactive oxygen species-responsive fluorescent dye, 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCFH), into fluorescent species, and (ii) a novel non-immobilized enzyme-based fluorescence assay strategy, featuring copper ion (Cu(2+))-facilitated amplification of the fluorescence intensity. After evaluating the experimental conditions for glucose oxidation and fluorescence generation, the introduction of Cu(2+) ions to this system resulted in an additional 51-fold amplification of the net fluorescence intensity. By sequentially loading brain microdialysate into the dual sample collection loops, the sampling frequency was 7.5h(-1). Based on a 40-μL sample volume, the system's detection limit reached as low as 0.18 mM, sufficiently accurate to determine the extracellular glucose concentrations in living rat brains. To demonstrate the proposed system's practical performance and applicability, we conducted (i) spike analyses of biomolecule-rich fetal bovine serum sample, confirming that the analytical reliability was similar to that of a commercial glucose kit, and (ii) in vivo dynamic monitoring of the extracellular glucose concentrations in living rat brains after inducing neural depolarization by perfusing a high-K(+) medium from the MD probe.

  12. Extracellular matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  13. Reactivity of San Andres dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.S. )

    1991-05-01

    The San Andres formation is routinely stimulated with acid. Although numerous acidizing simulators are available to aid in treatment optimization, existing reactivity data were generated with quarried rock rather than formation samples. This paper presents reactivity data for five San Andres dolomite samples. These data can be used in most fracture-acidizing-design simulators to allow more accurate simulation of the acidizing process.

  14. Induction of extracellular ATP mediates increase in intracellular thioredoxin in RAW264.7 cells exposed to low-dose γ-rays.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kitami, Akihiro; Kawano, Ayumi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Kojima, Shuji

    2011-09-15

    We previously showed that low doses (0.25-0.5 Gy) of γ-rays elevated thioredoxin (Trx-1) in various organs of mice after whole-body irradiation. Also, it is reported that extracellular ATP, which is released in response to various stresses, regulates the expression of intracellular antioxidants through activation of P2 receptors. We have recently found that low-dose γ-rays induce ATP release from the exposed cells. However, it is not yet clear whether the radiation-induced extracellular ATP modulates the cellular redox balance. Here, we investigated whether γ-ray irradiation-induced release of extracellular ATP contributes to the induction of the cellular antioxidant Trx-1, using mouse macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Irradiation with γ-rays or exogenously added ATP increased the expression of Trx-1, and in both cases the increase was blocked by pretreatment with an ectonucleotidase, apyrase. Then, the involvement of ATP-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the increase in antioxidant capacity was examined. ATP stimulation promoted the generation of intracellular ROS and also increased Trx-1 expression. The increase in Trx-1 expression was significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants. In conclusion, the γ-ray irradiation-induced release of extracellular ATP may, at least in part, contribute to the production of ROS via purinergic signaling, leading to promotion of intracellular antioxidants as an adaptive response to an oxidative stress.

  15. Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Cell Membrane Resealing during Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun; Cui, Jianmin; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Sonoporation has been exploited as a novel strategy for intracellular drug and gene delivery. In sonoporation, ultrasound application generates transient pores or openings in the cell membrane that allow entry of extracellular agents normally not permeable to the cell membrane. In order to improve the sonoporation outcome, we seek to obtain improved understanding of the sonoporation mechanism and investigate the factors affecting sonoporation process. We established a voltage clamp technique for real time measurement of sonoporation at single cell level using Xenopus oocytes as a model system. As both cell survival and intracellular delivery efficiency of drug or genes depend on the sonoporation dynamic process, and Calcium plays important roles in cellular processes, we focus on studying of the effect of extracellular Calcium concentration on the formation, extension, and resealing of membrane pores in sonoporation. We obtained experimental results demonstrating that the cell membrane reseals in the order of seconds in the presence of physiological level of extracellular [Ca]. We measured the resealing as function of extracellular [Ca] (0-1.8mM) and observed that the resealing rate decreases as extracellular [Ca] decreases from normal physiological level. No resealing was demonstrated when 1mM EGTA was added in the extracellular medium to chelate the [Ca] extracellularly. Our experimental findings suggest that extracellular Calcium plays an important role in controlling membrane resealing in sonoporation and thus the sonoporation outcome such as cell survival and delivery efficiency.

  16. Characterization of human T cells reactive with the Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM): generation of a monoclonal antibody against V beta 17, the T cell receptor gene product expressed by a large fraction of MAM-reactive human T cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    While all known microbial superantigens are mitogenic for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), the functional response induced by Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen (MAM) is unique in that MAM stimulation of PBL consistently results in T cell-dependent B cell activation characterized by polyclonal IgM and IgG production. These immunostimulatory effects of MAM on the humoral arm of the human immune system warranted a more precise characterization of MAM-reactive human T cells. Using an uncloned MAM reactive human T cell line as immunogen, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (termed C1) specific for the T cell receptor V beta gene expressed by the major fraction of MAM- reactive human T cells, V beta 17. In addition, a V beta 17- MAM- reactive T cell population exists, assessed by MAM, induced T cell proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity. mAb C1 will be useful in characterizing the functional properties of V beta 17+ T cells and their potential role in autoimmune disease. PMID:1833503

  17. The evolution of metazoan extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The modular domain structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and their genes has allowed extensive exon/domain shuffling during evolution to generate hundreds of ECM proteins. Many of these arose early during metazoan evolution and have been highly conserved ever since. Others have undergone duplication and divergence during evolution, and novel combinations of domains have evolved to generate new ECM proteins, particularly in the vertebrate lineage. The recent sequencing of several genomes has revealed many details of this conservation and evolution of ECM proteins to serve diverse functions in metazoa. PMID:22431747

  18. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Glasauer, Susan; Korenevsky, Anton; Ferris, F. Grant

    2000-08-08

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals and their impact on the solubility of metal contaminants. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  19. Molecular cloning of an Onchocerca volvulus extracellular Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    James, E R; McLean, D C; Perler, F

    1994-01-01

    Onchocerca volvulus, a human parasitic nematode, is the third leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. This study describes the molecular cloning of a novel superoxide dismutase (SOD) from the parasite. This putative O. volvulus extracellular SOD (OvEcSOD) is 628 nucleotides (nt) long, including a 22-nt 5' spliced leader (SL1) and a portion encoding an N-terminal hydrophobic 42-amino-acid signal peptide. The remainder of the cDNA shares 71% identity with an O. volvulus cytosolic SOD sequence and is 3 nt longer. All residues involved in metal ion binding, active site formation, folding, and dimer formation in SODs are conserved. Data indicate the OvEcSOD and O. volvulus cytosolic SOD are separate gene products and that the OvEcSOD appears to possess the characteristics of a membrane-bound or secreted enzyme which may be involved in the parasite defense against phagocyte-generated reactive oxygen species. Images PMID:8300230

  20. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  1. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  2. Extracellular RNA in aging.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, Douglas F; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Evans, Michele K

    2017-03-01

    Since the discovery of extracellular RNA (exRNA) in circulation and other bodily fluids, there has been considerable effort to catalog and assess whether exRNAs can be used as markers for health and disease. A variety of exRNA species have been identified including messenger RNA and noncoding RNA such as microRNA (miRNA), small nucleolar RNA, transfer RNA, and long noncoding RNA. Age-related changes in exRNA abundance have been observed, and it is likely that some of these transcripts play a role in aging. In this review, we summarize the current state of exRNA profiling in various body fluids and discuss age-related changes in exRNA abundance that have been identified in humans and other model organisms. miRNAs, in particular, are a major focus of current research and we will highlight and discuss the potential role that specific miRNAs might play in age-related phenotypes and disease. We will also review challenges facing this emerging field and various strategies that can be used for the validation and future use of exRNAs as markers of aging and age-related disease. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1385. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1385 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  3. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  4. Reactive sintering and reactive hot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. C.; German, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    NbAl3 has been synthesized from elemental powders by reactive sintering (RS) and reactive hot isostatic pressing (RHIP). Both processes involve a self-propagating exothermic reaction between the constituent powders to form an intermetallic compound. The RHIP approach uses simultaneous external pressurization to make a higher density product. This study focused on developing a method to use reactive synthesis to form high-density NbAl3 compacts. High RS and RHIP densities were possible with the appropriate raw materials and processing parameters. These include powder purity, particle sizes, degassing, heating rate, furnace temperature, and compaction pressures. Near full density was attained with RHIP, and up to 95 pct density was attained with RS.

  5. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis Aj; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis AJ; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria. PMID:26432659

  7. Targeting extracellular ROS signaling of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2014-04-01

    Expression of membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX1) represents a characteristic feature of malignant cells. NOX1-derived extracellular superoxide anions are the basis for autocrine stimulation of proliferation, but also drive the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathways. This may cause the elimination of transformed cells. Tumor cells express membrane-associated catalase that efficiently protects the cells against apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Membrane-associated superoxide dismutase (SOD) plays a co-modulatory protective role that is functionally interrelated with the protective effect mediated by catalase. Due to the co-localization of NOX1, catalase and SOD on the outer membrane of tumor cells, specific inhibition of membrane-associated SOD causes superoxide anion-dependent inhibition of catalase. This establishes a strong apoptotic signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite pathway. In parallel, it causes a drastic decrease in the concentration of proliferation-stimulating H2O2. Knowledge of the biochemical network on the surface of tumor cells should, therefore, allow development of specific novel strategies for tumor therapy, based on the specific features of tumor cell-specific extracellular ROS interactions.

  8. In Chemico Evaluation of Tea Tree Essential Oils as Skin Sensitizers: Impact of the Chemical Composition on Aging and Generation of Reactive Species.

    PubMed

    Avonto, Cristina; Chittiboyina, Amar G; Wang, Mei; Vasquez, Yelkaira; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-07-18

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is an essential oil obtained from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia, M. linariifolia, or M. dissitiflora. Because of the commercial importance of TTO, substitution or adulteration with other tea tree species (such as cajeput, niaouli, manuka, or kanuka oils) is common and may pose significant risks along with perceived health benefits. The distinctive nature, qualitative and quantitative compositional variation of these oils, is responsible for the various pharmacological as well as adverse effects. Authentic TTOs (especially aged ones) have been identified as potential skin sensitizers, while reports of adverse allergic reactions to the other tea trees essential oils are less frequent. Chemical sensitizers are usually electrophilic compounds, and in chemico methods have been developed to identify skin allergens in terms of their ability to bind to biological nucleophiles. However, little information is available on the assessment of sensitization potential of mixtures, such as essential oils, due to their complexity. In the present study, 10 "tea tree" oils and six major TTO constituents have been investigated for their sensitization potential using a fluorescence in chemico method. The reactivity of authentic TTOs was found to correlate with the age of the oils, while the majority of nonauthentic TTOs were less reactive, even after aging. Further thio-trapping experiments with DCYA and characterization by UHPLC-DAD-MS led to the identification of several possible DCYA-adducts which can be used to deduce the structure of the candidate reactive species. The major TTO components, terpinolene, α-terpinene, and terpinene-4-ol, were unstable under accelerated aging conditions, which led to the formation of several DCYA-adducts.

  9. Generation, Characterization, and Reactivity of a Cu(II)-Alkylperoxide/Anilino Radical Complex: Insight into the O-O Bond Cleavage Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Paria, Sayantan; Ohta, Takehiro; Morimoto, Yuma; Ogura, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Goto, Kei; Asano, Kaori; Suzuki, Takeyuki; Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-09-02

    The reaction of [Cu(I)(TIPT3tren) (CH3CN)]ClO4 (1) and cumene hydroperoxide (C6H5C(CH3)2OOH, ROOH) at -60 °C in CH2Cl2 gave a Cu(II)-alkylperoxide/anilino radical complex 2, the formation of which was confirmed by UV-vis, resonance Raman, EPR, and CSI-mass spectroscopy. The mechanism of formation of 2, as well as its reactivity, has been explored.

  10. A new type of donor-acceptor cyclopropane reactivity: the generation of formal 1,2- and 1,4-dipoles.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Roman A; Tarasova, Anna V; Korolev, Victor A; Timofeev, Vladimir P; Tomilov, Yury V

    2014-03-17

    A new type of donor-acceptor cyclopropane reactivity has been discovered. On treatment with anhydrous GaCl3 , they react as sources of even-numbered 1,2- and 1,4-dipoles instead of the classical odd-numbered 1,3-dipoles due to migration of positive charge from the benzyl center. This type of reactivity has been demonstrated for new reactions, namely, cyclodimerizations of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes that occur as [2+2]-, [3+2]-, [4+2]-, [5+2], [4+3]-, and [5+4]-annulations. The [4+2]-annulation of 2-arylcyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxylates to give polysubstituted 2-aryltetralins has been developed in a preparative version that provides exceedingly high regio- and diastereoselectivity and high yields. The strategy for selective hetero-combination of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes was also been developed. The mechanisms of the discovered reactions involving the formation of a comparatively stable 1,2-ylide intermediate have been studied.

  11. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects.

  12. Extracellular Acidification Inhibits the ROS-Dependent Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Behnen, Martina; Möller, Sonja; Brozek, Antonia; Klinger, Matthias; Laskay, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory microenvironment is commonly characterized by extracellular acidosis (pH < 7.35). Sensitivity to pH, CO2 or bicarbonate concentrations allows neutrophils to react to changes in their environment and to detect inflamed areas in the tissue. One important antimicrobial effector mechanism is the production of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are released during a programmed reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death, the so-called NETosis. Although several functions of neutrophils have been analyzed under acidic conditions, the effect of extracellular acidosis on NETosis remains mainly unexplored and the available experimental results are contradictory. We performed a comprehensive study with the aim to elucidate the effect of extracellular acidosis on ROS-dependent NETosis of primary human neutrophils and to identify the underlying mechanisms. The study was performed in parallel in a CO2–bicabonate-buffered culture medium, which mimics in vivo conditions, and under HEPES-buffered conditions to verify the effect of pH independent of CO2 or bicarbonate. We could clearly show that extracellular acidosis (pH 6.5, 6.0, and 5.5) and intracellular acidification inhibit the release of ROS-dependent NETs upon stimulation of neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate and immobilized immune complexes. Moreover, our findings suggest that the diminished NET release is a consequence of reduced ROS production and diminished glycolysis of neutrophils under acidic conditions. It was suggested previously that neutrophils can sense the border of inflamed tissue by the pH gradient and that a drop in pH serves as an indicator for the progress of inflammation. Following this hypothesis, our data indicate that an acidic inflammatory environment results in inhibition of extracellular operating effector mechanisms of neutrophils such as release of ROS and NETs. This way the release of toxic components and tissue damage can be avoided. However, we

  13. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps of Cynoglossus semilaevis: Production Characteristics and Antibacterial Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-li; Chi, Heng; Sun, Li

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are structures released by neutrophils as a cellular immune defense against microbial invasion. The process of NETs generation, netosis (NETosis), can take place via either a suicidal mechanism, during which the NETs-releasing cells became dead, or a “live” mechanism, during which the NETs-releasing cells remain vital. NETosis has been studied intensively in mammals in recent years, but very little is known about the NETosis in fish. In this study, we examined NETosis in tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis), a species of teleost with important economic values. We found that following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and three common fish bacterial pathogens, abundant NETs structures were released by neutrophils that were most likely in a live state. The released NETs captured, but did not kill, the bacterial pathogens; however, the replication of extracellular, but not intracellular, pathogens was inhibited by NETs to significant extents. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) production were observed to be enhanced in NETosing neutrophils, and blocking the production of these factors by inhibitors significantly decreased NETs production induced by PMA and all three bacteria. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that in teleost there exists a non-cell death pathway of NETosis that produces NETs with antibacterial effects in a ROS-, NO-, and MPO-dependent manner. PMID:28382034

  14. Extracellular calcium triggers unique transcriptional programs and modulates staurosporine-induced cell death in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, A. P.; Monteiro, João; Lucchi, Chiara; Kowbel, David J.; Cordeiro, J. M.; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Rigden, Daniel J.; Glass, N. L.; Videira, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the intracellular levels of calcium are a common response to cell death stimuli in animals and fungi and, particularly, in the Neurospora crassa response to staurosporine. We highlight the importance of the extracellular availability of Ca2+ for this response. Limitation of the ion in the culture medium further sensitizes cells to the drug and results in increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conversely, an approximately 30-fold excess of external Ca2+ leads to increased drug tolerance and lower ROS generation. In line with this, distinct staurosporine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ signaling profiles were observed in the absence or presence of excessive external Ca2+. High-throughput RNA sequencing revealed that different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ define distinct transcriptional programs. Our transcriptional profiling also pointed to two putative novel Ca2+-binding proteins, encoded by the NCU08524 and NCU06607 genes, and provides a reference dataset for future investigations on the role of Ca2+ in fungal biology. PMID:28357255

  15. Mobilization of iron from urban particulates leads to generation of reactive oxygen species in vitro and induction of ferritin synthesis in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, K R; Aust, A E

    1997-07-01

    Many of the biochemical effects of asbestos in cultured cells have been shown to be due to iron, which can be as high as 27% by weight. Urban air particulates also contain iron, and some of the pathological effects after inhalation may be due to reactive oxygen species produced by iron-catalyzed reactions. Two standard reference material (SRM) urban air particulate samples were used for the studies described here. SRM 1648 (3.9% iron by weight) was collected in the St. Louis, MO, area, and SRM 1649 (3% iron by weight) was collected in the Washington, DC, area. To determine if iron associated with urban particulates could be mobilized, as it is from asbestos, SRMs 1648 and 1649 were incubated with 1 mM citrate or EDTA, in the presence or absence of ascorbate. Iron was mobilized from both particulates by either chelator, especially in the presence of ascorbate. Citrate, in the presence of ascorbate, mobilized 30.9 nmol of Fe/mg of SRM 1648 and 65.1 nmol of Fe/mg of SRM 1649 in 24 h. EDTA, in the presence of ascorbate, mobilized 53.8 nmol of Fe/mg of SRM 1648 and 98.8 nmol of Fe/mg of SRM 1649 in 24 h. To determine whether reactive oxygen species were being produced by the particulate iron, each particulate was incubated with phi X174 RFI DNA in the presence or absence of ascorbate. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) were produced by either particulate, but only in the presence of ascorbate. Incubation of SRM 1648 or 1649 (0.5 mg/mL) with DNA in the presence of ascorbate and citrate resulted in 20% or 34% DNA with SSBs, respectively. Incubation of SRM 1648 or 1649 (0.1 mg/mL) with DNA in the presence of ascorbate and EDTA resulted in 26% or 45% DNA with SSBs, respectively. To determine if iron associated with urban particulates could be mobilized by human lung epithelial cells (A549), cells were treated with particulates and the amount of the iron storage protein ferritin was determined at the end of treatment. The 6.4- or 8.4-fold increase in ferritin observed in cells

  16. [Effect of myelopeptides on reactive oxygen species generation and IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production by peripheral blood cells].

    PubMed

    Chereshnev, V A; Mazunina, L S; Geĭn, S V; Gavrilova, T V; Chereshneva, M V

    2012-01-01

    Myelopeptides MP-3, MP-5, and MP-6 were found to suppress zymosan-induced production of reactive oxygen species by leukocytes both under one-way introduction and under pretreatment. All of myelopeptides under examination in case of one-way introduction in cultures with zymosan demonstrated a decrease in zymosan-stimulated (1500 mkg/ml) production of IL-1beta, and activation of spontaneous production of this cytokine by whole blood cells. TNF-alpha production under myelopeptide effect was lowered in cultures with 150 mkg/ml zymosan. Under pretreatment myelopeptides did not render effect on IL-1beta and TNF-alpha production, with the exception of single stimulating effect of MP-5 on IL-1beta level in spontaneous cultures. Using comparative analysis the difference in direction and expressivity of effects of various myelopeptides was not revealed that suggests the existence of common mechanism of action in this group of peptide bioregulators.

  17. The Effect of CO2 on Partial Reactive Crystallization of MORB-Eclogite-derived Basaltic Andesite in Peridotite and Generation of Silica-Undersaturated Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recycled oceanic crust (MORB-eclogite) is considered to be the dominant heterogeneity in Earth's mantle. Because MORB-eclogite is more fusible than peridotite, siliceous partial melt derived from it must react with peridotite while the latter is still in the subsolidus state. Thus, studying such reactive process is important in understanding melting dynamics of the Earth's mantle. Reaction of MORB-eclogite-derived andesitic partial melt with peridotite can produce alkalic melts by partial reactive crystallization but these melts are not as silica-undersaturated as many natural basanites, nephelinites or melititites [1]. In this study, we constrain how dissolved CO2 in a siliceous MORB-eclogite-derived partial melt affects the reaction phase equilibria involving peridotite and can produce nephelinitic melts. Here we compare experiments on CO2-free [1] and 2.6 wt.% CO2 bearing andesitic melt+lherzolite mixtures conducted at 1375 °C and 3 GPa with added melt fraction of 8-50 wt.%. In both CO2-free and CO2-bearing experiments, melt and olivine are consumed and opx and garnet are produced, with the extent of modal change for a given melt-rock ratio being greater for the CO2-bearing experiments. While the residue evolves to a garnet websterite by adding 40% of CO2-bearing melt, the residue becomes olivine-free by adding 50% of the CO2-free melt. Opx mode increases from 12 to ~55 wt.% for 0 to 40% melt addition in CO2-bearing system and 12 to ~43 wt.% for 0 to 50% melt addition in CO2-free system. Garnet mode, for a similar range of melt-rock ratio, increases from ~10 to ~15 wt.% for CO2 bearing system and to ~11 wt.% for CO2-free system. Reacted melts from 25-33% of CO2-bearing melt-added runs contain ~39 wt.% SiO2 , ~11-13 wt.% TiO2, ~9 wt.% Al2O3, ~11 wt.% FeO*, 16 wt.% MgO, 10-11 wt.% CaO, and 3 wt.% Na2O whereas experiments with a similar melt-rock ratio in a CO2-free system yield melts with 44-45 wt.% SiO2, 6-7 wt.% TiO2, 13-14 wt.% Al2O3, 10-11 wt.% FeO*, 12-13 wt

  18. Modulation of macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity by kerosene soot: Possible role of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Arif, J.M.; Khan, S.G.; Ashquin, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1993-05-01

    The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytotoxicity of soot on rat alveolar macrophages has been postulated. A single intratracheal injection of soot (5 mg) in corn oil significantly induced the macrophage population, hydrogen peroxide (H[sub 2]O[sub 2]) generation, thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substanced of lipid peroxidation, and the activities of extracellular acid phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at 1, 4, 8, and 16 days of postinoculation. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) were significantly inhibited at all the stages, while glutathione reductase (GR) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) showed a different pattern. These results show that soot is cytotoxic to alveolar macrophages and suggest that ROS may play a primary role in the cytotoxic process. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce

  20. Impact of solar UV radiation on toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles through photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and photo-induced dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongbo; Wallis, Lindsay K; Diamond, Steve; Li, Shibin; Canas-Carrell, Jaclyn; Parra, Amanda

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the impact of solar UV radiation on ZnO nanoparticle toxicity through photocatalytic ROS generation and photo-induced dissolution. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Daphnia magna was examined under laboratory light versus simulated solar UV radiation (SSR). Photocatalytic ROS generation and particle dissolution were measured on a time-course basis. Two toxicity mitigation assays using CaCl2 and N-acetylcysteine were performed to differentiate the relative importance of these two modes of action. Enhanced ZnO nanoparticle toxicity under SSR was in parallel with photocatalytic ROS generation and enhanced particle dissolution. Toxicity mitigation by CaCl2 to a less extent under SSR than under lab light demonstrates the role of ROS generation in ZnO toxicity. Toxicity mitigation by N-acetylcysteine under both irradiation conditions confirms the role of particle dissolution and ROS generation. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering environmental solar UV radiation when assessing ZnO nanoparticle toxicity and risk in aquatic systems.

  1. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  2. CONVECTIVE-REACTIVE PROTON-{sup 12}C COMBUSTION IN SAKURAI'S OBJECT (V4334 SAGITTARII) AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION AND YIELDS FROM THE FIRST GENERATIONS OF STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Herwig, Falk; Pignatari, Marco; Woodward, Paul R.; Porter, David H.; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Fryer, Chris L.; Bennett, Michael; Hirschi, Raphael

    2011-02-01

    Depending on mass and metallicity as well as evolutionary phase, stars occasionally experience convective-reactive nucleosynthesis episodes. We specifically investigate the situation when nucleosynthetically unprocessed, H-rich material is convectively mixed with an He-burning zone, for example in a convectively unstable shell on top of electron-degenerate cores in asymptotic giant branch stars, young white dwarfs, or X-ray bursting neutron stars. Such episodes are frequently encountered in stellar evolution models of stars of extremely low or zero metal content, such as the first stars. We have carried out detailed nucleosynthesis simulations based on stellar evolution models and informed by hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on the convective-reactive episode in the very late thermal pulse star Sakurai's object (V4334 Sagittarii). Asplund et al. determined the abundances of 28 elements, many of which are highly non-solar, ranging from H, He, and Li all the way to Ba and La, plus the C isotopic ratio. Our simulations show that the mixing evolution according to standard, one-dimensional stellar evolution models implies neutron densities in the He intershell ({approx}< few 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) that are too low to obtain a significant neutron capture nucleosynthesis on the heavy elements. We have carried out three-dimensional hydrodynamic He-shell flash convection simulations in 4{pi} geometry to study the entrainment of H-rich material. Guided by these simulations we assume that the ingestion process of H into the He-shell convection zone leads only after some delay time to a sufficient entropy barrier that splits the convection zone into the original one driven by He burning and a new one driven by the rapid burning of ingested H. By making such mixing assumptions that are motivated by our hydrodynamic simulations we obtain significantly higher neutron densities ({approx} few 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) and reproduce the key observed abundance trends found in Sakurai

  3. Convective-reactive Proton-12C Combustion in Sakurai's Object (V4334 Sagittarii) and Implications for the Evolution and Yields from the First Generations of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwig, Falk; Pignatari, Marco; Woodward, Paul R.; Porter, David H.; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Fryer, Chris L.; Bennett, Michael; Hirschi, Raphael

    2011-02-01

    Depending on mass and metallicity as well as evolutionary phase, stars occasionally experience convective-reactive nucleosynthesis episodes. We specifically investigate the situation when nucleosynthetically unprocessed, H-rich material is convectively mixed with an He-burning zone, for example in a convectively unstable shell on top of electron-degenerate cores in asymptotic giant branch stars, young white dwarfs, or X-ray bursting neutron stars. Such episodes are frequently encountered in stellar evolution models of stars of extremely low or zero metal content, such as the first stars. We have carried out detailed nucleosynthesis simulations based on stellar evolution models and informed by hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on the convective-reactive episode in the very late thermal pulse star Sakurai's object (V4334 Sagittarii). Asplund et al. determined the abundances of 28 elements, many of which are highly non-solar, ranging from H, He, and Li all the way to Ba and La, plus the C isotopic ratio. Our simulations show that the mixing evolution according to standard, one-dimensional stellar evolution models implies neutron densities in the He intershell (lsim few 1011 cm-3) that are too low to obtain a significant neutron capture nucleosynthesis on the heavy elements. We have carried out three-dimensional hydrodynamic He-shell flash convection simulations in 4π geometry to study the entrainment of H-rich material. Guided by these simulations we assume that the ingestion process of H into the He-shell convection zone leads only after some delay time to a sufficient entropy barrier that splits the convection zone into the original one driven by He burning and a new one driven by the rapid burning of ingested H. By making such mixing assumptions that are motivated by our hydrodynamic simulations we obtain significantly higher neutron densities (~ few 1015 cm-3) and reproduce the key observed abundance trends found in Sakurai's object. These include an

  4. A novel and simple method for generation of human dendritic cells from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 2 days: its application for induction of HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cells in the hu-PBL SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Akira; Tanaka, Reiko; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2013-01-01

    Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, they have been ideal candidates for cell-based immunotherapy of cancers and infections in humans. Generally, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) were generated from purified monocytes by multiple steps of time-consuming physical manipulations for an extended period cultivation. In this study, we developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the generation of type-1 helper T cell (Th1)-stimulating human DCs directly from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were cultivated in the presence of 20 ng/ml of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, 20 ng/ml of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and 1,000 U/ml of interferon-β for 24 h followed by 24 h maturation with a cytokine cocktail containing 10 ng/ml of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), 10 ng/ml of IL-1β and 1 μg/ml of prostaglandin E2. The phenotype and biological activity of these new DCs for induction of allogeneic T cell proliferation and cytokine production were comparable to those of the MDDCs. Importantly, these new DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV-1 could generated HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cell responses in humanized mice reconstituted with autologous PBMCs from HIV-1-negative donors. This simple and quick method for generation of functional DCs will be useful for future studies on DC-mediated immunotherapies.

  5. Impact of solar UV radiation on toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles through photocatalytic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and photo-induced dissolution

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study investigated the impact of solar UV radiation on ZnO nanoparticle toxicity through photocatalytic ROS generation and photo-induced dissolution. Toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Daphnia magna was examined under laboratory light versus simulated solar UV radiatio...

  6. Generation of antibodies reactive with fumonisins B1, B2, and B3 by using cholera toxin as the carrier-adjuvant.

    PubMed Central

    Azcona-Olivera, J I; Abouzied, M M; Plattner, R D; Norred, W P; Pestka, J J

    1992-01-01

    Murine polyclonal antibodies reactive with fumonisins B1, B2, and B3 were produced after a novel immunization procedure with cholera toxin as both a hapten carrier protein and adjuvant. Immunization of mice with two 7.5-micrograms doses of fumonisin B1-cholera toxin conjugate without adjuvant resulted in the production of fumonisin B1-specific antibodies in all mice within 15 days when intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and intravenous routes were used. In contrast, conventional immunization procedures with fumonisin B1-bovine serum albumin conjugates with and without Freund's adjuvant were largely ineffective. Fumonisin antibodies could be readily mass-produced in ascites fluid by using cholera toxin as a carrier-adjuvant. A competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was devised whereby immobilized fumonisin B1-ovalbumin and free fumonisin B1 competed for antibody binding. The detection limit for fumonisin B1 in the ELISA was 100 ng/ml. The antiserum cross-reacted with fumonisins B2 and B3 but not with the hydrolyzed backbone of fumonisin B1 and tricarballylic acid. Concentrations of fumonisins B1, B2, and B3 required for 50% binding inhibition were 260, 300, and 650 ng/ml, respectively. These polyclonal antibodies should find wide usage in the ELISA for fumonisins in foods, feeds, and tissues. PMID:1539971

  7. Silver nanoparticles from Dendropanax morbifera Léveille inhibit cell migration, induce apoptosis, and increase generation of reactive oxygen species in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castro Aceituno, Verónica; Ahn, Sungeun; Simu, Shakina Yesmin; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-12-01

    Green synthesized silver nanoparticles have significant potential in the pharmaceutical field because of their biological functions such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Novel silver nanoparticles synthesized from Dendropanax morbifera Léveille leaves (D-AgNPs) exhibit antimicrobial activity and reduce the viability of cancer cells without affecting the viability of RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effect of D-AgNPs by measuring the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and toxicity against A549 and HepG2 cell lines. The effect of D-AgNPs on cell migration, induction of apoptosis, and modification of gene and/or protein expression of cancer-related markers was determined using A549 cells. D-AgNPs exhibited cytotoxicity in A549 and HepG2 cell at different concentrations and enhanced the production of ROS in both cell lines. An increase in cell apoptosis and a reduction in cell migration in A549 cells were also observed after D-AgNP treatment. Furthermore, the effect of D-AgNPs in A549 cells was shown to be related to modification of the EGFR/p38 MAPK pathway. Our data provide the first evidence supporting the potential of D-AgNPs as a possible anticancer agent, particularly for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

  8. Synergistic anticandidal activity of pure polyphenol curcumin I in combination with azoles and polyenes generates reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Manoharlal, Raman; Negi, Arvind Singh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-08-01

    We have shown previously that pure polyphenol curcumin I (CUR-I) shows antifungal activity against Candida species. By employing the chequerboard method, filter disc and time-kill assays, in the present study we demonstrate that CUR-I at non-antifungal concentration interacts synergistically with azoles and polyenes. For this, pure polyphenol CUR-I was tested for synergy with five azole and two polyene drugs - fluconazole (FLC), miconazole, ketoconazole (KTC), itraconazole (ITR), voriconazole (VRC), nystatin (NYS) and amphotericin B (AMB) - against 21 clinical isolates of Candida albicans with reduced antifungal sensitivity, as well as a drug-sensitive laboratory strain. Notably, there was a 10-35-fold drop in the MIC(80) values of the drugs when CUR-I was used in combination with azoles and polyenes, with fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) values ranging between 0.09 and 0.5. Interestingly, the synergistic effect of CUR-I with FLC and AMB was associated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which could be reversed by the addition of an antioxidant such as ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the combination of CUR-I and FLC/AMB triggered apoptosis that could also be reversed by ascorbic acid. We provide the first evidence that pure CUR-I in combination with azoles and polyenes represents a novel therapeutic strategy to improve the activity of common antifungals.

  9. Bamboo Vinegar Decreases Inflammatory Mediator Expression and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Protein Kinase C-α/δ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Tasi, Yu-Ling; Liu, May-Lan; Chiu, Yi-Chich; Hua, Kuo-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo vinegar (BV), a natural liquid derived from the condensation produced during bamboo charcoal production, has been used in agriculture and as a food additive, but its application to immune modulation has not been reported. Here, we demonstrated that BV has anti-inflammatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. BV reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide levels in, and interleukin-6 secretion by, lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages without affecting tumor necrosis factor-α secretion and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. The mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of BV involved decreased reactive oxygen species production and protein kinase C-α/δ activation. Furthermore, creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) was indentified as the major anti-inflammatory compound in BV. Impaired cytokine expression and NLR family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation was seen in mice treated with creosol. These findings provide insights into how BV regulates inflammation and suggest that it may be a new source for the development of anti-inflammatory agents or a healthy supplement for preventing and ameliorating inflammation- and NLRP3 inflammasome-related diseases, including metabolic syndrome. PMID:24124509

  10. Effect of natural porcine surfactant in Staphylococcus aureus induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species generation in monocytes and neutrophils from human blood.

    PubMed

    de Guevara, Yuliannis Lugones Ladrón; Hidalgo, Odalys Blanco; Santos, Sidnéia Sousa; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Faure, Roberto; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2014-08-01

    Surfacen® is a clinical surfactant preparation of porcine origin. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of Surfacen® in the modulation of oxidative burst in monocytes and neutrophils in human blood and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was measured in monocytes and neutrophils by flow cytometry using 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) as substrate, while, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were estimated in PBMC supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Our results show that Staphylococcus aureus-induced ROS level was slightly affected by Surfacen® added to whole blood monocytes and neutrophils. The time course experiments of pre-incubation with Surfacen® showed no significant increase of ROS level at 2h; however, the ROS level decreased when pre incubated for 4h and 6h with Surfacen®. Pre-incubation of PBMC cells with Surfacen® at 0.125 and 0.5mg/mL showed a dose-dependent suppression of TNF-α levels measured after 4h of S. aureus stimulation, an effect less impressive when cells were stimulated for 24h. A similar behavior was observed in IL-6 release. In summary, the present study provides experimental evidence supporting an anti-inflammatory role of Surfacen® in human monocytes and neutrophils in vitro.

  11. Antiproliferative activity of Alisol B in MDA-MB-231 cells is mediated by apoptosis, dysregulation of mitochondrial functions, cell cycle arrest and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aifeng; Sheng, Yuqing; Zou, Mingchang

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Alisol B has inhibitory activity in cancer cells. However, the exact mechanism through which inhibition is achieved is still poorly understood. In the present study, the authors examined the effects of Alisol B in human breast cancer cells. Alisol B showed significant anticancer activity in MDA-MB-231 cells. The results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by Alisol B was mediated by induction of apoptosis, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle arrest, activation of caspases and accumulation of ROS (reactive oxygen species) level. Interestingly, pretreatment of cells with the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK significantly prevented Alisol B-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed the upregulation of p-p38 and downregulation of p-AKT, p-p65 and p-mTOR. Taken together, the above results suggest that Alisol B suppresses the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells mainly through induction of apoptosis; this outcome may represent the major mechanism of Alisol B-mediated apoptosis.

  12. Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field Stimulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells is Ca2+-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Lui, Kaying; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    The cellular response to 100 ns pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) exposure includes the formation of transient nanopores in the plasma membrane and organelle membranes, an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. 100 ns, 30 kV/cm nsPEF stimulates an increase in ROS proportional to the pulse number. This increase is inhibited by the anti-oxidant, Trolox, as well as the presence of Ca2+ chelators in the intracellular and extracellular media. This suggests that the nsPEF-triggered Ca2+ increase is required for ROS generation. PMID:23680664

  13. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    PubMed

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  14. Binding of EBP50 to Nox organizing subunit p47phox is pivotal to cellular reactive species generation and altered vascular phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Al Ghouleh, Imad; Meijles, Daniel N.; Zhang, Qiangmin; Sahoo, Sanghamitra; Gorelova, Anastasia; Henrich Amaral, Jefferson; Rodríguez, Andrés I.; Mamonova, Tatyana; Song, Gyun Jee; Bisello, Alessandro; Friedman, Peter A.; Cifuentes-Pagano, M. Eugenia; Pagano, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous reports implicating NADPH oxidases (Nox) in the pathogenesis of many diseases, precise regulation of this family of professional reactive oxygen species (ROS) producers remains unclear. A unique member of this family, Nox1 oxidase, functions as either a canonical or hybrid system using Nox organizing subunit 1 (NoxO1) or p47phox, respectively, the latter of which is functional in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this manuscript, we identify critical requirement of ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50; aka NHERF1) for Nox1 activation and downstream responses. Superoxide (O2•−) production induced by angiotensin II (AngII) was absent in mouse EBP50 KO VSMC vs. WT. Moreover, ex vivo incubation of aortas with AngII showed a significant increase in O2•− in WT but not EBP50 or Nox1 nulls. Similarly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress was attenuated in femoral arteries from EBP50 KO vs. WT. In silico analyses confirmed by confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay, FRET, and gain-/loss-of-function mutagenesis revealed binding of EBP50, via its PDZ domains, to a specific motif in p47phox. Functional studies revealed AngII-induced hypertrophy was absent in EBP50 KOs, and in VSMC overexpressing EBP50, Nox1 gene silencing abolished VSMC hypertrophy. Finally, ex vivo measurement of lumen diameter in mouse resistance arteries exhibited attenuated AngII-induced vasoconstriction in EBP50 KO vs. WT. Taken together, our data identify EBP50 as a previously unidentified regulator of Nox1 and support that it promotes Nox1 activity by binding p47phox. This interaction is pivotal for agonist-induced smooth muscle ROS, hypertrophy, and vasoconstriction and has implications for ROS-mediated physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:27540115

  15. Physalin F Induces Cell Apoptosis in Human Renal Carcinoma Cells by Targeting NF-kappaB and Generating Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Szu-Ying; Leu, Yann-Lii; Chang, Ya-Ling; Wu, Tian-Shung; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Liao, Yu-Ren; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms of physalin F, an effective purified extract of Physalis angulata L. (Solanacae), in renal carcinoma A498 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Physalin F was observed to significantly induce cytotoxicity of three human renal carcinoma A498, ACHN, and UO-31 cells in a concentration-dependent manner; this was especially potent in A498 cells. The physalin F-induced cell apoptosis of A498 cells was characterized by MTT assay, nuclear DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. Using flow cytometry analysis, physalin F induced A498 cell apoptosis as demonstrated by the accumulation of the sub-G1 phase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, physalin F-mediated accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused Bcl-2 family proteins, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL degradation, which led to disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. These effects were associated with induction of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, which led to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. However, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH) resulted in the inhibition of these events and reversed physalin F-induced cell apoptosis. In addition, physalin F suppressed NF-κB activity and nuclear translocation of p65 and p50, which was reversed by NAC and GSH. Conclusion Physalin F induced cell apoptosis through the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway and suppressed NF-κB activation in human renal cancer A498 cells. Thus, physalin F appears to be a promising anti-cancer agent worthy of further clinical development. PMID:22815798

  16. Reactive oxygen species are generated by the respiratory complex II--evidence for lack of contribution of the reverse electron flow in complex I.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rivero-Segura, Nadia A; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Neuzil, Jiri; Ralph, Stephen J; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2013-02-01

    Succinate-driven oxidation via complex II (CII) may have a significant contribution towards the high rates of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria. Here, we show that the CII Q site inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) blocks succinate + rotenone-driven ROS production, whereas the complex III (CIII) Qo inhibitor stigmatellin has no effect, indicating that CII, not CIII, is the ROS-producing site. The complex I (CI) inhibitor rotenone partially reduces the ROS production driven by high succinate levels (5 mm), which is commonly interpreted as being due to inhibition of a reverse electron flow from CII to CI. However, experimental evidence presented here contradicts the model of reverse electron flow. First, ROS levels produced using succinate + rotenone were significantly higher than those produced using glutamate + malate + rotenone. Second, in tumor mitochondria, succinate-driven ROS production was significantly increased (not decreased) by rotenone. Third, in liver mitochondria, rotenone had no effects on succinate-driven ROS production. Fourth, using isolated heart or hepatoma (AS-30D) mitochondria, the CII Qp anti-cancer drug mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES) induced elevated ROS production in the presence of low levels of succinate(0.5 mm), but rotenone had no effect. Using sub-mitochondrial particles, the Cu-based anti-cancer drug Casiopeina II-gly enhanced succinate-driven ROS production. Thus, the present results are inconsistent with and question the interpretation of reverse electron flow from CII to CI and the rotenone effect on ROS production supported by succinate oxidation. Instead, a thermodynamically more favorable explanation is that, in the absence of CIII or complex IV (CIV) inhibitors (which, when added, facilitate reverse electron flow by inducing accumulation of ubiquinol, the CI product), the CII redox centers are the major source of succinate-driven ROS production.

  17. Novel HLA-B27-restricted Epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis Generated upon Endogenous Processing of Bacterial Proteins Suggest a Role of Molecular Mimicry in Reactive Arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J.; Dos Santos, Helena G.; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na+-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27+ cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330–338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211–223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211–223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA. PMID:23867464

  18. Novel HLA-B27-restricted epitopes from Chlamydia trachomatis generated upon endogenous processing of bacterial proteins suggest a role of molecular mimicry in reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Cragnolini, Juan J; Dos Santos, Helena G; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie; Morreale, Antonio; López de Castro, José A

    2013-09-06

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is an HLA-B27-associated spondyloarthropathy that is triggered by diverse bacteria, including Chlamydia trachomatis, a frequent intracellular parasite. HLA-B27-restricted T-cell responses are elicited against this bacterium in ReA patients, but their pathogenetic significance, autoimmune potential, and relevant epitopes are unknown. High resolution and sensitivity mass spectrometry was used to identify HLA-B27 ligands endogenously processed and presented by HLA-B27 from three chlamydial proteins for which T-cell epitopes were predicted. Fusion protein constructs of ClpC, Na(+)-translocating NADH-quinone reductase subunit A, and DNA primase were expressed in HLA-B27(+) cells, and their HLA-B27-bound peptidomes were searched for endogenous bacterial ligands. A non-predicted peptide, distinct from the predicted T-cell epitope, was identified from ClpC. A peptide recognized by T-cells in vitro, NQRA(330-338), was detected from the reductase subunit. This is the second HLA-B27-restricted T-cell epitope from C. trachomatis with relevance in ReA demonstrated to be processed and presented in live cells. A novel peptide from the DNA primase, DNAP(211-223), was also found. This was a larger variant of a known epitope and was highly homologous to a self-derived natural ligand of HLA-B27. All three bacterial peptides showed high homology with human sequences containing the binding motif of HLA-B27. Molecular dynamics simulations further showed a striking conformational similarity between DNAP(211-223) and its homologous and much more flexible human-derived HLA-B27 ligand. The results suggest that molecular mimicry between HLA-B27-restricted bacterial and self-derived epitopes is frequent and may play a role in ReA.

  19. Folate Deficiency Triggered Apoptosis of Synoviocytes: Role of Overproduction of Reactive Oxygen Species Generated via NADPH Oxidase/Mitochondrial Complex II and Calcium Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Ming; Wu, Jin-Yi; Huang, Chin-Chin; Lu, Fung-Jou; Chuang, Yi-Wen; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chen, Kai-Hua; Hong, Chang-Zern; Yeh, Rang-Hui; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Chen, Ching-Hsein

    2016-01-01

    Despite a plethora of literature has documented that osteoarthritis (OA) is veritably associated with oxidative stress-mediated chondrocyte death and matrix degradation, yet the possible involvement of synoviocyte abnormality as causative factor of OA has not been thoroughly investigated. For this reason, we conduct the current studies to insight into how synoviocytes could respond to an episode of folate-deprived (FD) condition. First, when HIG-82 synoviocytes were cultivated under FD condition, a time-dependent growth impediment was observed and the demise of these cells was demonstrated to be apoptotic in nature mediated through FD-evoked overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and drastically released of cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentrations. Next, we uncovered that FD-evoked ROS overproduction could only be strongly suppressed by either mitochondrial complex II inhibitors (TTFA and carboxin) or NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitors (AEBSF and apocynin), but not by mitochondrial complex I inhibitor (rotenone) and mitochondrial complex III inhibitor (antimycin A). Interestingly, this selective inhibition of FD-evoked ROS by mitochondrial complex II and NOX inhibitors was found to correlate excellently with the suppression of cytosolic Ca2+ release and reduced the magnitude of the apoptotic TUNEL-positive cells. Taken together, we present the first evidence here that FD-triggered ROS overproduction in synoviocytes is originated from mitochondrial complex II and NOX. Both elevated ROS in tandem with cytosolic Ca2+ overload serve as final arbitrators for apoptotic lethality of synoviocytes cultivated under FD condition. Thus, folate supplementation may be beneficial to patients with OA.

  20. Water deficit and aluminum interactive effects on generation of reactive oxygen species and responses of antioxidative enzymes in the seedlings of two rice cultivars differing in stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Poonam; Srivastava, Rajneesh Kumar; Rajpoot, Ritika; Rani, Anjana; Pandey, Akhilesh Kumar; Dubey, R S

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a major constraint to crop productivity in acid soils, whereas water deficit severely limits crop production in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of both stresses, Al excess and water deficit, individually and in combination on the production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide anion (O2˙(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical, and lipid peroxidation and the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) in the seedlings of two rice (Oryza sativa L.) cvs. Malviya-36 (sensitive to water deficit and Al) and Vandana (tolerant to water deficit and Al). When 15-day grown seedlings were exposed to water deficit (created with 15% polyethylene glycol, PEG-6000) or Al (1 mM AlCl3) treatment or both treatments together for 24-72 h, the lengths and fresh weights of root/shoot declined in the seedlings of the sensitive cultivar, whereas in the tolerant seedlings, either little or insignificant decline in these parameters was observed due to the treatments. Biochemical determinations and histochemical studies revealed that under a similar level of water deficit, Al, or combined treatment, seedlings of sensitive cultivar showed a higher level of production of O2˙(-), H2O2, hydroxyl radical, and lipid peroxides compared to the tolerant seedlings. Seedlings of tolerant cultivars, both in roots and shoots, had constitutively higher activity levels of antioxidative enzymes SOD, CAT, and GPX and showed a greater increase in activity under water deficit or Al treatment alone or in combination compared to the similarly treated seedlings of sensitive cultivar. Our results suggest that a lower constitutive level of ROS and a high antioxidative enzyme capacity are associated with tolerance to both water deficit and Al excess in rice seedlings.

  1. Controlled Delivery of Extracellular ROS Based on Hematoporphyrin-Incorporated Polyurethane Film for Enhanced Proliferation of Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Min-Ah; Kim, Bong-Jin; Lee, Mi Hee; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Min Sung; Seon, Gyeung Mi; Kim, Dohyun; Nam, Ki Chang; Wang, Kangkyun; Kim, Yong-Rok; Park, Jong-Chul

    2016-10-04

    The principle of photodynamic treatment (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizer (PS) at diseased tissues, followed by light irradiation to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). In cells, a moderate increase in ROS plays an important role as signaling molecule to promote cell proliferation, whereas a severe increase of ROS causes cell damage. Previous studies have shown that low levels of ROS stimulate cell growth through PS drugs-treating PDT and non-thermal plasma treatment. However, these methods have side effects which are associated with low tissue selectivity and remaining of PS residues. To overcome such shortcomings, we designed hematoporphyrin-incorporated polyurethane (PU) film induced generation of extracellular ROS with singlet oxygen and free radicals. The film can easily control ROS production rate by regulating several parameters including light dose, PS dose. Also, its use facilitates targeted delivery of ROS to the specific lesion. Our study demonstrated that extracellular ROS could induce the formation of intracellular ROS. In vascular endothelial cells, a moderated increase in intracellular ROS also stimulated cell proliferation and cell cycle progression by accurate control of optimum levels of ROS with hematoporphyrin-incorporated polymer films. This modulation of cellular growth is expected to be an effective strategy for the design of next generation PDT.

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps enriched in oxidized mitochondrial DNA are interferogenic and contribute to lupus-like disease.

    PubMed

    Lood, Christian; Blanco, Luz P; Purmalek, Monica M; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; De Ravin, Suk S; Smith, Carolyne K; Malech, Harry L; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A; Elkon, Keith B; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are implicated in autoimmunity, but how they are generated and their roles in sterile inflammation remain unclear. Ribonucleoprotein immune complexes (RNP ICs), inducers of NETosis, require mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) for maximal NET stimulation. After RNP IC stimulation of neutrophils, mitochondria become hypopolarized and translocate to the cell surface. Extracellular release of oxidized mitochondrial DNA is proinflammatory in vitro, and when this DNA is injected into mice, it stimulates type I interferon (IFN) signaling through a pathway dependent on the DNA sensor STING. Mitochondrial ROS are also necessary for spontaneous NETosis of low-density granulocytes from individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus. This was also observed in individuals with chronic granulomatous disease, who lack NADPH oxidase activity but still develop autoimmunity and type I IFN signatures. Mitochondrial ROS inhibition in vivo reduces disease severity and type I IFN responses in a mouse model of lupus. Together, these findings highlight a role for mitochondria in the generation not only of NETs but also of pro-inflammatory oxidized mitochondrial DNA in autoimmune diseases.

  3. Photochemical behavior of carbon nanotubes in natural waters: reactive oxygen species production and effects on •OH generation by Suwannee River fulvic acid, nitrate, and Fe (III).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Qi; Ferronato, Corinne; Yang, Xi; Chovelon, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The photochemical activities of three kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated in the present study. Efficient procedures of dispersing the three kinds of carbon nanotubes in water were established, and the quantitative analysis methods were also developed by TOC-absorbance method. High pH value or low ionic strength of the colloidal solutions facilitated the dispersion of CNTs. The suspensions of three kinds of CNTs could generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical (•OH) under irradiation of simulated sunlight, while superoxide radical (O2 (•-)) was not detected. The steady-state concentrations of (1)O2 and •OH generated by these CNTs were also determined. The presence of CNTs in natural waters can affect the photochemical behavior of water constituents, such as nitrate, dissolved organic matter, and Fe(3+). Specifically, in nitrate solution, the presence of CNTs could inhibit the generation of •OH by nitrate through light screening effect, while the quenching effect of hydroxyl radicals by CNTs was not observed. Besides light screening effect, the three kinds of CNTs used in the experiments also have a strong inhibiting effect on the ability of DOM to produce •OH by binding to the active sites. Moreover, the adsorption of Fe(3+) on MWCNT-OH and MWCNT-COOH could lead to its inactivation of formation of •OH in acidic conditions. However, the presence of the three kinds of CNTs did not affect the ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) reaction of DOM-Fe (III) complex.

  4. Protection of rat skeletal muscle fibers by either L-carnitine or coenzyme Q10 against statins toxicity mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen generation

    PubMed Central

    La Guardia, P. G.; Alberici, L. C.; Ravagnani, F. G.; Catharino, R. R.; Vercesi, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial redox imbalance has been implicated in mechanisms of aging, various degenerative diseases and drug-induced toxicity. Statins are safe and well-tolerated therapeutic drugs that occasionally induce myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Previous studies indicate that myotoxicity caused by statins may be linked to impairment of mitochondrial functions. Here, we report that 1-h incubation of permeabilized rat soleus muscle fiber biopsies with increasing concentrations of simvastatin (1–40 μM) slowed the rates of ADP-or FCCP-stimulated respiration supported by glutamate/malate in a dose-dependent manner, but caused no changes in resting respiration rates. Simvastatin (1 μM) also inhibited the ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration supported by succinate by 24% but not by TMPD/ascorbate. Compatible with inhibition of respiration, 1 μM simvastatin stimulated lactate release from soleus muscle samples by 26%. Co-incubation of muscle samples with 1 mM L-carnitine, 100 μM mevalonate or 10 μM coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) abolished simvastatin effects on both mitochondrial glutamate/malate-supported respiration and lactate release. Simvastatin (1 μM) also caused a 2-fold increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation and a decrease in Co-Q10 content by 44%. Mevalonate, Co-Q10 or L-carnitine protected against stimulation of hydrogen peroxide generation but only mevalonate prevented the decrease in Co-Q10 content. Thus, independently of Co-Q10 levels, L-carnitine prevented the toxic effects of simvastatin. This suggests that mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction induced by simvastatin, is associated with increased generation of superoxide, at the levels of complexes-I and II of the respiratory chain. In all cases the damage to these complexes, presumably at the level of 4Fe-4S clusters, is prevented by L-carnitine. PMID:23720630

  5. Protection of rat skeletal muscle fibers by either L-carnitine or coenzyme Q10 against statins toxicity mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    La Guardia, P G; Alberici, L C; Ravagnani, F G; Catharino, R R; Vercesi, A E

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial redox imbalance has been implicated in mechanisms of aging, various degenerative diseases and drug-induced toxicity. Statins are safe and well-tolerated therapeutic drugs that occasionally induce myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Previous studies indicate that myotoxicity caused by statins may be linked to impairment of mitochondrial functions. Here, we report that 1-h incubation of permeabilized rat soleus muscle fiber biopsies with increasing concentrations of simvastatin (1-40 μM) slowed the rates of ADP-or FCCP-stimulated respiration supported by glutamate/malate in a dose-dependent manner, but caused no changes in resting respiration rates. Simvastatin (1 μM) also inhibited the ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration supported by succinate by 24% but not by TMPD/ascorbate. Compatible with inhibition of respiration, 1 μM simvastatin stimulated lactate release from soleus muscle samples by 26%. Co-incubation of muscle samples with 1 mM L-carnitine, 100 μM mevalonate or 10 μM coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) abolished simvastatin effects on both mitochondrial glutamate/malate-supported respiration and lactate release. Simvastatin (1 μM) also caused a 2-fold increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation and a decrease in Co-Q10 content by 44%. Mevalonate, Co-Q10 or L-carnitine protected against stimulation of hydrogen peroxide generation but only mevalonate prevented the decrease in Co-Q10 content. Thus, independently of Co-Q10 levels, L-carnitine prevented the toxic effects of simvastatin. This suggests that mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction induced by simvastatin, is associated with increased generation of superoxide, at the levels of complexes-I and II of the respiratory chain. In all cases the damage to these complexes, presumably at the level of 4Fe-4S clusters, is prevented by L-carnitine.

  6. Effects of thermophoresis and heat generation/absorption on MHD flow due to an oscillatory stretching sheet with chemically reactive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Mariam; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-12-01

    The effects of chemical reaction and heat generation/absorption on MHD flow over an oscillatory stretching surface in a viscous fluid have been studied in the presence of thermophoresis. The porous plate is oscillated back and forth in its own plane and suction/injection is also taking into account. The similarity solution of the developed non-linear governing partial differential equations is constructed in the form of series using homotopy analysis method. The convergence of the obtained series solutions is discussed in the whole domain (0 ≤ η ≤ ∞) . A parametric study of the all governing parameters is accomplished and the physical results are shown graphically.

  7. p-Cresol Affects Reactive Oxygen Species Generation, Cell Cycle Arrest, Cytotoxicity and Inflammation/Atherosclerosis-Related Modulators Production in Endothelial Cells and Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Hsien, Hsiang-Chi; Lin, Bor-Ru; Yeh, Chien-Yang; Tseng, Wan-Yu; Tseng, Shui-Kuan; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Aims Cresols are present in antiseptics, coal tar, some resins, pesticides, and industrial solvents. Cresol intoxication leads to hepatic injury due to coagulopathy as well as disturbance of hepatic circulation in fatal cases. Patients with uremia suffer from cardiovascular complications, such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, hemolysis, and bleeding, which may be partly due to p-cresol toxicity and its effects on vascular endothelial and mononuclear cells. Given the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation in vascular thrombosis, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-cresol on endothelial and mononuclear cells. Methods EA.hy926 (EAHY) endothelial cells and U937 cells were exposed to different concentrations of p-cresol. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 -diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and trypan blue dye exclusion technique, respectively. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by propidium iodide flow cytometry. Endothelial cell migration was studied by wound closure assay. ROS level was measured by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCF) fluorescence flow cytometry. Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), and uPA production were determined by Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results Exposure to 100–500 µM p-cresol decreased EAHY cell number by 30–61%. P-cresol also decreased the viability of U937 mononuclear cells. The inhibition of EAHY and U937 cell growth by p-cresol was related to induction of S-phase cell cycle arrest. Closure of endothelial wounds was inhibited by p-cresol (>100 µM). P-cresol (>50 µM) also stimulated ROS production in U937 cells and EAHY cells but to a lesser extent. Moreover, p-cresol markedly stimulated PAI-1 and suPAR, but not PGF2α, and uPA production in EAHY cells. Conclusions p-Cresol may contribute to atherosclerosis and thrombosis in patients with

  8. Reactive oxygen species generated by a heat shock protein (Hsp) inducing product contributes to Hsp70 production and Hsp70-mediated protective immunity in Artemia franciscana against pathogenic vibrios.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Linayati, Linayati; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The cytoprotective role of heat shock protein (Hsp70) described in a variety of animal disease models, including vibriosis in farmed aquatic animals, suggests that new protective strategies relying upon the use of compounds that selectively turn on Hsp genes could be developed. The product Tex-OE® (hereafter referred to as Hspi), an extract from the skin of the prickly pear fruit, Opuntia ficus indica, was previously shown to trigger Hsp70 synthesis in a non-stressful situation in a variety of animals, including in a gnotobiotically (germ-free) cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana model system. This model system offers great potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of compounds that have health benefit effects. By using this model system, we aimed to disclose the underlying cause behind the induction of Hsp70 by Hspi in the shrimp host, and to determine whether the product affects the shrimp in inducing resistance towards pathogenic vibrios. We provide unequivocal evidences indicating that during the pretreatment period with Hspi, there is an initial release of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide anion), generated by the added product, in the rearing water and associated with the host. The reactive molecules generated are the triggering factors responsible for causing Hsp70 induction within Artemia. We have also shown that Hspi acts prophylactically at an optimum dose regimen to confer protection against pathogenic vibrios. This salutary effect was associated with upregulation of two important immune genes, prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase of the innate immune system. These findings suggest that inducers of stress protein (e.g. Hsp70) are potentially important modulator of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to cultured shrimp against Vibrio infection.

  9. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Microminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F. Grant

    1999-06-01

    The overall purpose of the project is to explore and quantify the processes that control the formation and reactivity of biogenic iron microminerals, and the impact of these processes on the solubility of metal contaminants, e.g., uranium, chromium and nickel. The research addresses how surface components of bacterial cells, extracellular organic material, and the aqueous geochemistry of the DIRB microenvironment impacts the mineralogy, chemical state and micromorphology of reduced iron phases.

  10. A common theme in extracellular fluids of beetles: extracellular superoxide dismutases crucial for balancing ROS in response to microbial challenge.

    PubMed

    Gretscher, René R; Streicher, Priska E; Strauß, Anja S; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Wang, Ding; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2016-04-12

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical for balancing the level of reactive oxygen species in the extracellular matrix of eukaryotes. In the present study we have detected constitutive SOD activity in the haemolymph and defensive secretions of different leaf beetle species. Exemplarily, we have chosen the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae, as representative model organism to investigate the role of extracellular SODs in antimicrobial defence. Qualitative and quantitative proteome analyses resulted in the identification of two extracellular Cu/Zn SODs in the haemolymph and one in the defensive secretions of juvenile P. cochleariae. Furthermore, quantitative expression studies indicated fat body tissue and defensive glands as the main synthesis sites of these SODs. Silencing of the two SODs revealed one of them, PcSOD3.1, as the only relevant enzyme facilitating SOD activity in haemolymph and defensive secretions in vivo. Upon challenge with the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, PcSOD3.1-deficient larvae exhibited a significantly higher mortality compared to other SOD-silenced groups. Hence, our results serve as a basis for further research on SOD regulated host-pathogen interactions. In defensive secretions PcSOD3.1-silencing affected neither deterrent production nor activity against fungal growth. Instead, we propose another antifungal mechanism based on MRJP/yellow proteins in the defensive exudates.

  11. A common theme in extracellular fluids of beetles: extracellular superoxide dismutases crucial for balancing ROS in response to microbial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gretscher, René R.; Streicher, Priska E.; Strauß, Anja S.; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Wang, Ding; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical for balancing the level of reactive oxygen species in the extracellular matrix of eukaryotes. In the present study we have detected constitutive SOD activity in the haemolymph and defensive secretions of different leaf beetle species. Exemplarily, we have chosen the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae, as representative model organism to investigate the role of extracellular SODs in antimicrobial defence. Qualitative and quantitative proteome analyses resulted in the identification of two extracellular Cu/Zn SODs in the haemolymph and one in the defensive secretions of juvenile P. cochleariae. Furthermore, quantitative expression studies indicated fat body tissue and defensive glands as the main synthesis sites of these SODs. Silencing of the two SODs revealed one of them, PcSOD3.1, as the only relevant enzyme facilitating SOD activity in haemolymph and defensive secretions in vivo. Upon challenge with the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, PcSOD3.1-deficient larvae exhibited a significantly higher mortality compared to other SOD-silenced groups. Hence, our results serve as a basis for further research on SOD regulated host-pathogen interactions. In defensive secretions PcSOD3.1-silencing affected neither deterrent production nor activity against fungal growth. Instead, we propose another antifungal mechanism based on MRJP/yellow proteins in the defensive exudates. PMID:27068683

  12. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  13. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells by cross-linking of CD70 is dependent upon generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of p38 MAPK and JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Song, Hyunkeun; Cho, Dae-Ho; Lee, Wang Jae; Hur, Dae Young

    2010-12-15

    CD70 is expressed in normal activated immune cells as well as in several types of tumors. It has been established that anti-CD70 mAb induces complement-dependent death of CD70(+) tumor cells, but how anti-CD70 mAb affects the intrinsic signaling is poorly defined. In this report, we show that ligation of CD70 expressed on EBV-transformed B cells using anti-CD70 mAb induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent apoptosis. We observed an early expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes that preceded the release of apoptotic molecules from the mitochondria and the cleavage of caspases. CD70-induced apoptosis was inhibited by pretreatment with the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal, ROS quencher N-acetylcysteine, and Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA. We supposed that ROS generation might be the first event of CD70-induced apoptosis because N-acetylcysteine blocked increases of ROS and Ca(2+), but BAPTA did not block ROS generation. We also found that CD70 stimulation activated JNK and p38 MAPK. JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 effectively blocked upregulation of ER stress-related genes and cleavage of caspases. Inhibition of ROS generation completely blocked phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK and induction of ER stress-related genes. Taken together, we concluded that cross-linking of CD70 on EBV-transformed B cells triggered ER stress-mediated apoptosis via ROS generation and JNK and p38 MAPK pathway activation. Our report reveals alternate mechanisms of direct apoptosis through CD70 signaling and provides data supporting CD70 as a viable target for an Ab-based therapy against EBV-related tumors.

  15. Cytotoxic effect of p-Coumaric acid on neuroblastoma, N2a cell via generation of reactive oxygen species leading to dysfunction of mitochondria inducing apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shailasree, S; Venkataramana, M; Niranjana, S R; Prakash, H S

    2015-02-01

    p-Coumaric acid (p-CA), an ubiquitous plant phenolic acid, has been proven to render protection against pathological conditions. In the present study, p-CA was evaluated for its capacity to induce cytotoxic effect to neuroblastoma N2a cells and we report here the possible mechanism of its action. p-CA at a concentration of 150 μmol/L, upon exposure for 72 h, stimulated 81.23 % of cells to apoptosis, as evidenced by flow cytometer studies mediated through elevated levels of ROS (7.5-fold over control). Excess ROS production activated structural injury to mitochondrial membrane, observed as dissipation of its membrane potential and followed by the release of cytochrome c (8.73-fold). Enhanced generation of intracellular ROS correlated well with the decreased levels (~60 %) of intracellular GSH. Sensitizing neuroblastoma cells for induction of apoptosis by p-CA identified p53-mediated upregulated accumulation of caspase-8 messenger RNA (2.8-fold). Our data report on autophagy, representing an additional mechanism of p-CA to induce growth arrest, detected by immunoblotting and fluorescence, correlated with accumulation of elevated levels (1.2-fold) of the LC3-II protein and acridine orange-stained autophagosomes, both autophagy markers. The present study indicates p-CA was effective in production of ROS-dependent mitochondrial damage-induced cytotoxicity in N2a cells.

  16. Functional Advantages Conferred by Extracellular Prokaryotic Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Andrew J.; Kuehn, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials, and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world. PMID:23615201

  17. Functional advantages conferred by extracellular prokaryotic membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Manning, Andrew J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane-derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here, we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane-bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world.

  18. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  19. Crosstalk between glia, extracellular matrix and neurons.

    PubMed

    Song, Inseon; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-03-08

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in the central nervous system form highly organized ECM structures around cell somata, axon initial segments, and synapses and play prominent roles in early development by guiding cell migration, neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, and by regulating closure of the critical period of development, synaptic plasticity and stability, cognitive flexibility, and axonal regeneration in adults. Major components of neural ECM, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), tenascin-R and hyaluronic acid, are synthesized by both neurons and glial cells. The expression of these molecules is dynamically regulated during brain development in physiological conditions, shaping both neuronal and glial functions through multitude of molecular mechanisms. Upregulation of particular CSPGs and other ECM molecules, in particular by reactive astrocytes, after CNS injuries, during aging, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration on the one hand results in formation of growth-impermissive environment and impaired synaptic plasticity. On the other hand, ECM appeared to have a neuroprotective effect, at least in the form of perineuronal nets. CSPGs-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and several members of the disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family of proteases are secreted by neurons and glia and may drive neural ECM remodeling in physiological conditions as well as after brain injury and other brain disorders. Thus, targeting expression of specific ECM molecules, associated glycans and degrading enzymes may lead to development of new therapeutic strategies promoting regeneration and synaptic plasticity.

  20. β-Amyloid Fibrils in Alzheimer Disease Are Not Inert When Bound to Copper Ions but Can Degrade Hydrogen Peroxide and Generate Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Jennifer; Tinker-Mill, Claire; Kolosov, Oleg; Zhang, Hao; Tabner, Brian J.; Allsop, David

    2014-01-01

    According to the “amyloid cascade” hypothesis of Alzheimer disease, the formation of Aβ fibrils and senile plaques in the brain initiates a cascade of events leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neurodegeneration, and the symptom of dementia. Recently, however, emphasis has shifted away from amyloid fibrils as the predominant toxic form of Aβ toward smaller aggregates, referred to as “soluble oligomers.” These oligomers have become one of the prime suspects for involvement in the early oxidative damage that is evident in this disease. This raises the question whether or not Aβ fibrils are actually “inert tombstones” present at the end of the aggregation process. Here we show that, when Aβ(1–42) aggregates, including fibrils, are bound to Cu(II) ions, they retain their redox activity and are able to degrade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with the formation of hydroxyl radicals and the consequent oxidation of the peptide (detected by formation of carbonyl groups). We find that this ability increases as the Cu(II):peptide ratio increases and is accompanied by changes in aggregate morphology, as determined by atomic force microscopy. When aggregates are prepared in the copresence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, the ratio of Cu(II):Zn(II) becomes an important factor in the degeneration of H2O2, the formation of carbonyl groups in the peptide, and in aggregate morphology. We believe, therefore, that Aβ fibrils can destroy H2O2 and generate damaging hydroxyl radicals and, so, are not necessarily inert end points. PMID:24619420

  1. β-amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer disease are not inert when bound to copper ions but can degrade hydrogen peroxide and generate reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Jennifer; Tinker-Mill, Claire; Kolosov, Oleg; Zhang, Hao; Tabner, Brian J; Allsop, David

    2014-04-25

    According to the "amyloid cascade" hypothesis of Alzheimer disease, the formation of Aβ fibrils and senile plaques in the brain initiates a cascade of events leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neurodegeneration, and the symptom of dementia. Recently, however, emphasis has shifted away from amyloid fibrils as the predominant toxic form of Aβ toward smaller aggregates, referred to as "soluble oligomers." These oligomers have become one of the prime suspects for involvement in the early oxidative damage that is evident in this disease. This raises the question whether or not Aβ fibrils are actually "inert tombstones" present at the end of the aggregation process. Here we show that, when Aβ(1-42) aggregates, including fibrils, are bound to Cu(II) ions, they retain their redox activity and are able to degrade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with the formation of hydroxyl radicals and the consequent oxidation of the peptide (detected by formation of carbonyl groups). We find that this ability increases as the Cu(II):peptide ratio increases and is accompanied by changes in aggregate morphology, as determined by atomic force microscopy. When aggregates are prepared in the copresence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, the ratio of Cu(II):Zn(II) becomes an important factor in the degeneration of H2O2, the formation of carbonyl groups in the peptide, and in aggregate morphology. We believe, therefore, that Aβ fibrils can destroy H2O2 and generate damaging hydroxyl radicals and, so, are not necessarily inert end points.

  2. Inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human lung epithelial cells via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation, NF-κB activation and Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Hoon; Yang, Eun Sun; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2012-12-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play an important role in inflammatory response, angiogenesis and tumor progression. Butein (tetrahydroxychalcone) is a small molecule from natural sources, known to be a potential therapeutic drug with anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antioxidant activities. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of butein on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced adhesion molecule expression and its molecular mechanism of action. Butein significantly decreased TNF-α-induced monocyte (U937) cell adhesion to lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein also inhibited the protein and mRNA expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Butein inhibited TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in A549 cells; it also inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPKs and Akt, suggesting that the MAPK/Akt signaling pathway may be involved in the butein-mediated inhibition of TNF-α-induced leukocyte adhesion to A549 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that butein affects cell adhesion through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression by inhibiting the NF-κB/MAPK/Akt signaling pathway and ROS generation, thereby, elucidating the role of butein in the anti-inflammatory response.

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  4. Analysis of Yeast Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Oliveira, Debora L; Vargas, Gabriele; Girard-Dias, Wendell; Franzen, Anderson J; Frasés, Susana; Miranda, Kildare; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are important carriers of biologically active components in a number of organisms, including fungal cells. Experimental characterization of fungal EVs suggested that these membranous compartments are likely involved in the regulation of several biological events. In fungal pathogens, these events include mechanisms of disease progression and/or control, suggesting potential targets for therapeutic intervention or disease prophylaxis. In this manuscript we describe methods that have been used in the last 10 years for the characterization of EVs produced by yeast forms of several fungal species. Experimental approaches detailed in this chapter include ultracentrifugation methods for EV fractionation, chromatographic approaches for analysis of EV lipids, microscopy techniques for analysis of both intracellular and extracellular vesicular compartments, interaction of EVs with host cells, and physical chemical analysis of EVs by dynamic light scattering.

  5. Propagation of thrombosis by neutrophils and extracellular nucleosome networks

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Stark, Konstantin; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils, early mediators of the innate immune defense, are recruited to developing thrombi in different types of thrombosis. They amplify intravascular coagulation by stimulating the tissue factor-dependent extrinsic pathway via inactivation of endogenous anticoagulants, enhancing factor XII activation or decreasing plasmin generation. Neutrophil-dependent prothrombotic mechanisms are supported by the externalization of decondensed nucleosomes and granule proteins that together form neutrophil extracellular traps. These traps, either in intact or fragmented form, are causally involved in various forms of experimental thrombosis as first indicated by their role in the enhancement of both microvascular thrombosis during bacterial infection and carotid artery thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps can be induced by interactions of neutrophils with activated platelets; vice versa, these traps enhance adhesion of platelets via von Willebrand factor. Neutrophil-induced microvascular thrombus formation can restrict the dissemination and survival of blood-borne bacteria and thereby sustain intravascular immunity. Dysregulation of this innate immune pathway may support sepsis-associated coagulopathies. Notably, neutrophils and extracellular nucleosomes, together with platelets, critically promote fibrin formation during flow restriction-induced deep vein thrombosis. Neutrophil extracellular traps/extracellular nucleosomes are increased in thrombi and in the blood of patients with different vaso-occlusive pathologies and could be therapeutically targeted for the prevention of thrombosis. Thus, during infections and in response to blood vessel damage, neutrophils and externalized nucleosomes are major promoters of intravascular blood coagulation and thrombosis. PMID:27927771

  6. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    DOEpatents

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  7. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  8. Generating Cu(II)-Oxyl / Cu(III)-Oxo Species from Cu(I)-α-Ketocarboxylate Complexes and O2: In silico Studies on Ligand Effects and C-H-activation Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stefan M.; Ertem, M. Zahid; Aquilante, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism for the oxygenation of Cu(I) complexes with α-ketocarboxylate ligands is elaborated that is based on a combination of density functional theory and multireference second-order perturbation theory (CASSCF/CASPT2) calculations. The reaction proceeds in a manner largely analogous to those of similar Fe(II) α-ketocarboxylate systems, i.e. by initial attack of a coordinated oxygen molecule on a ketocarboxylate ligand with concomitant decarboxylation. Subsequently, two reactive intermediates may be generated, a Cu-peracid structure and a [CuO]+ species, both of which are capable of oxidizing a phenyl ring that is a component of the supporting ligand. Hydroxylation by the [CuO]+ species is predicted to proceed with a smaller activation free energy. The effects of electronic and steric variatons on the oxygenation mechanisms were studied by introducing substituents at several positions of the ligand backbone and by investigating various N-donor ligands. In general, more electron-donation by the N-donor ligand leads to increased stabilization of the more Cu(II)/Cu(III)-like intermediates (oxygen adducts and [CuO]+ species) relative to the more Cu(I)-like peracid intermediate. For all ligands investi-gated, the [CuO]+ intermediates are best described as Cu(II)-O•- species having triplet ground states. The reactivity of these compounds in C-H abstraction reactions decreases with more electron-donating N-donor ligands, which also increase the Cu-O bond strength, although the Cu-O bond is generally predicted to be rather weak (with a bond order of about 0.5). A comparison of several methods to obtain singlet energies for the reaction intermediates indicates that multireference second-order perturbation theory is likely more accurate for the initial oxygen adducts, but not necessarily for subsequent reaction intermediates. PMID:19322769

  9. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  10. Release of extracellular purines from plant roots and effect on ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Dark, Adeeba; Demidchik, Vadim; Richards, Siân L; Shabala, Sergey; Davies, Julia M

    2011-11-01

    Extracellular purine nucleotides appear capable of regulating plant development, defence and stress responses by acting in part as agonists of plasma membrane calcium channels. Factors stimulating ATP release include wounding, osmotic stress and elicitors. Here we show that exogenous abscisic acid and L-glutamate can also cause ATP accumulation around Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Release of ADP from root epidermis would trigger ionotropic receptor-like activity in the plasma membrane, resulting in transient elevation of cytosolic free calcium. Root epidermal protoplasts (expressing aequorin as a cytosolic free calcium reporter) can support an extracellular ADP-induced cytosolic calcium elevation in the presence of an extracellular reductant. This confirms that ADP could elicit calcium-based responses distinct to those of ATP, which have been shown previously to involve production of extracellular reactive oxygen species.

  11. Generation of high reactive fluids by rapid clinopyroxene-seawater interaction: An experimental study at 425 °C, 40 and 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beermann, Oliver; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Schächinger, Steffen; Arzi, Lisa; Holzheid, Astrid

    2014-05-01

    experiments significant amounts (~10-20 rel. %) of secondary mineral phases, i.e. talc, the serpentine-group minerals lizardite, antigorite, and chrysotile, and minor abundances of pyrrhotite and pentlandite were formed primarily on Cpx even after short run durations of 3 hours. Our results show that intense leaching of Ca, REEs, transition and trace metals only occurred with Cpx and only in the seawater experiments. Leaching was caused by rapid precipitation of the intitial seawater Mg (1400 ppm) on Cpx, which generated HCl(aq) with pH (25 °C) < 2 prior to significant leaching. Because element exchange reactions between seawater and the other widespread abundant mineral olivine in the oceanic lithosphere are very sluggish at elevated pressure and temperature conditions [10], we conclude that in particular seawater interactions with un-leached pyroxenes creates high element fluxes during early-stage, high temperature MOR hydrothermalism, as it is evident from MAR 5° S fluids. This kind of hydrothermalism is expected to be not uncommon in particular at the slow-spreading MAR [9], and the high element fluxes here, most probably caused by seawater-pyroxene interactions, should be taken into account when modelling global chemical fluxes of MOR hydrothermalism. References: [1] German C. R., Thurnherr A. M., Knoery J., Charlou J.-L., Jean-Babtiste P., and Edmonds H. N. (2010) Deep Sea Res. 157, 518-527. [2] Schmidt K., Garbe-Schönberg D., Bau M., and Koschinsky A. (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 4058-4077. [3] Saito M. A., Noble A. E., Tagliabue A., Goepfert T. G., Lamborg C. H., and Jenkins W. J. (2013) Nat. Geosci. 5, 775-779. [4] German C. R., Bennett S. A., Connelly D. P., Evans A. J., Murton B. J., Parson L. M., Prien R. D., Ramirez-Llodra E., Jakuba M., Shank T. M., Yoerger D. R., Baker E. T., Walker S. L., and Nakamura K. (2008) Earth. Planet. Sci. Lett. 273, 332-344. [5] Haase K. M., Petersen S., Koschinsky A., and M64/1, M68/1 Scient. Parties (2007) Geochem. Geophys

  12. In vitro effect of 4-nonylphenol on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulated hormone secretion, cell viability and reactive oxygen species generation in mice Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Jambor, Tomáš; Tvrdá, Eva; Tušimová, Eva; Kováčik, Anton; Bistáková, Jana; Forgács, Zsolt; Lukáč, Norbert

    2017-03-01

    Nonylphenol is considered an endocrine disruptor and has been reported to affect male reproductive functions. In our in vitro study, we evaluated the effects of 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) on cholesterol levels, hormone formation and viability in cultured Leydig cells from adult ICR male mice. We also determined the potential impact of 4-NP on generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 44 h of cultivation. The cells were cultured with addition of 0.04; 0.2; 1.0; 2.5 and 5.0 μg/mL of 4-NP in the present of 1 IU/mL human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and compared to the control. The quantity of cholesterol was determined from culture medium using photometry. Determination of hormone production was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Metabolic activity assay was used for quantification of cell viability. The chemiluminescence technique, which uses a luminometer to measure reactive oxygen species, was employed. Applied doses of 4-NP (0.04-5.0 μg/mL) slight increase cholesterol levels and decrease production of dehydroepiandrosterone after 44 h of cultivation, but not significantly. Incubation of 4-NP treated cells with hCG significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited androstenedione, but not testosterone, formation at the highest concentration (5.0 μg/mL). The viability was significantly (P < 0.05); (P < 0.001) increased at 1.0; 2.5 and 5.0 μg/mL of 4-NP after 44 h treatment. Furthermore, 44 h treatment of 4-NP (0.04-5.0 μg/mL) caused significant (P < 0.001) intracellular accumulation of ROS in exposed cells. Taken together, the results of our in vitro study reported herein is consistent with the conclusion that 4-nonylphenol is able to influence hormonal profile, cell viability and generate ROS.

  13. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M.; Brooks, Philip J.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T. Kevin; Kelley, Christine A.; Kuo, Lillian S.; Labosky, Patricia A.; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A.; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A.; Tucker, Jessica M.; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c) identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d) demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e) developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators. PMID:26320938

  14. Different virulence of candida albicans is attributed to the ability of escape from neutrophil extracellular traps by secretion of DNase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohuan; Zhao, Sainan; Sun, Luping; Li, Wenqing; Wei, Qiao; Ashman, Robert B; Hu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungus causing both disseminated and local infections. The discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has presented a new strategy to kill microorganisms in host’s innate immune response. Although it has been reported that NETs can trap and kill both yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans, the mechanism by which C. albicans escape from NETs has not been fully understood. In this study, the ability of two strains of C. albicans SC5314 and 3683 to escape NETs-mediated killing was compared. It was found that SC5314 induced higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and expressions of Rac1/2 and more NETs formation by neutrophils, and also generated more deoxyribonucleases (DNase) than 3683 did. However, resistance to neutrophils killing was greater in SC5314 than that of 3683. When extracellular traps were degraded by exogenous DNase I or catalase, and neutrophil phagocytic activity blocked by cytochalasin D, the killing capacity of neutrophils co-cultured with either C. albicans SC5314 or 3683 was significantly decreased. This study indicates that C. albicans can escape from the trapping and killing of NETs by secreting DNase, which offers further insights into the basis for differences in virulence of different strains of C. albicans. PMID:28123633

  15. Problems with extracellular recording of electrical activity in gastrointestinal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Hennig, Grant W

    2016-12-01

    Motility patterns of the gastrointestinal tract are important for efficient processing of nutrients and waste. Peristalsis and segmentation are based on rhythmic electrical slow waves that generate the phasic contractions fundamental to gastrointestinal motility. Slow waves are generated and propagated actively by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and these events conduct to smooth muscle cells to elicit excitation-contraction coupling. Extracellular electrical recording has been utilized to characterize slow-wave generation and propagation and abnormalities that might be responsible for gastrointestinal motility disorders. Electrode array recording and digital processing are being used to generate data for models of electrical propagation in normal and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we discuss techniques of extracellular recording as applied to gastrointestinal organs and how mechanical artefacts might contaminate these recordings and confound their interpretation. Without rigorous controls for movement, current interpretations of extracellular recordings might ascribe inaccurate behaviours and electrical anomalies to ICC networks and gastrointestinal muscles, bringing into question the findings and validity of models of gastrointestinal electrophysiology developed from these recordings.

  16. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists (Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea) and fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes. PMID:28174578

  17. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R; Marcec, Matthew J; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists (Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea) and fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes.

  18. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  19. Oxidative modification enhances the immunostimulatory effects of extracellular mitochondrial DNA on plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Agod, Zsofia; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabo, Attila; Fekete, Tunde; Sogor, Viktoria; Veres, Agota; Boldogh, Istvan; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Lanyi, Arpad; Bacsi, Attila

    2014-12-01

    Inflammation is associated with oxidative stress and characterized by elevated levels of damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules released from injured or even living cells into the surrounding microenvironment. One of these endogenous danger signals is the extracellular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) containing evolutionary conserved unmethylated CpG repeats. Increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by recruited inflammatory cells modify mtDNA oxidatively, resulting primarily in accumulation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) lesions. In this study, we examined the impact of native and oxidatively modified mtDNAs on the phenotypic and functional properties of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which possess a fundamental role in the regulation of inflammation and T cell immunity. Treatment of human primary pDCs with native mtDNA up-regulated the expression of a costimulatory molecule (CD86), a specific maturation marker (CD83), and a main antigen-presenting molecule (HLA-DQ) on the cell surface, as well as increased TNF-α and IL-8 production from the cells. These effects were more apparent when pDCs were exposed to oxidatively modified mtDNA. Neither native nor oxidized mtDNA molecules were able to induce interferon (IFN)-α secretion from pDCs unless they formed a complex with human cathelicidin LL-37, an antimicrobial peptide. Interestingly, simultaneous administration of a Toll-like receptor (TLR)9 antagonist abrogated the effects of both native and oxidized mtDNAs on human pDCs. In a murine model, oxidized mtDNA also proved a more potent activator of pDCs compared to the native form, except for induction of IFN-α production. Collectively, we demonstrate here for the first time that elevated levels of 8-oxoG bases in the extracellular mtDNA induced by oxidative stress increase the immunostimulatory capacity of mtDNA on pDCs.

  20. β-Sitosterol enhances cellular glutathione redox cycling by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondrial respiration: protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells and rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Na; Leong, Pou Kuan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2014-07-01

    Herba Cistanches (Cistanche deserticola Y. C. Ma) is a 'Yang-invigorating' tonic herb in Chinese medicine. Preliminary chemical analysis indicated that β-sitosterol (BS) is one of the chemical constituents in an active fraction of Herba Cistanches. To investigate whether BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches, the effects of BS on H9c2 cells and rat hearts were examined. The results indicated that BS stimulated the mitochondrial ATP generation capacity in H9c2 cells, which was associated with the increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. BS also stimulated mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration, with the resultant decrease in coupling efficiency. BS produced an up-regulation of cellular glutathione redox cycling and protected against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, the protective effect of BS against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was seen in female but not male rats ex vivo. The cardioprotection afforded by BS was likely mediated by an up-regulation of mitochondrial glutathione redox cycling in female rat hearts. In conclusion, the ensemble of results suggests that BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches. The gender-dependent effect of BS on myocardial protection will further be investigated.

  1. Induction of the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human esophageal cancer cells by DS2, a newly synthetic diterpenoid analog, is regulated by Bax and caused by generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Xiaolin; Zhao, Fei; Yuan, Lin; Zhu, Ying-Li; Fan, Xia-Xia; Zhao, Ning-Min; Li, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Yu-Hua; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Ent-kaurane diterpene compounds have attracted considerable attention in recent years due to its antitumor, antibacterial, and antiviral activities. However, the clinical development of natural kaurane diterpenes, for example, oridonin for cancer therapy has been hampered by its relatively moderate potency, limited bioavailability. Herein, we report a newly synthetic analog of natural ent-kaurane diterpene, DS2, which exhibits significantly improved activity of antiproliferation against various cancer cell lines relative to oridonin. DS2 treatment triggers the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human esophageal cancer cell lines (EC9706, EC109). Interestingly, normal human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs) and normal human liver cells (HL-7702) are both significantly more resistant to the growth inhibition by DS2 compared with esophageal cancer cells. The DS2-induced apoptosis in EC9706 cells correlated with the drop of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and activation of caspase-9 and -3. The induction of proapoptotic proteins p21 and Bax were also observed in DS2-treated cells. The DS2-induced apoptosis was significantly attenuated by knockdown of Bax proteins. Meanwhile, the DS2 treatment caused generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human esophageal cancer cells, but not in HEECs, which was attenuated by pretreatment with ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). More interestingly, the antioxidants pretreatment completely attenuated DS2 mediated loss of the MMP and apoptosis, as well as Bax expression and growth inhibition. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the mitochondria-mediated cell death by DS2 is associated with Bax regulation and ROS generation, and understanding the function and mechanism of DS2 will help us to design better anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27863415

  2. Induction of the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human esophageal cancer cells by DS2, a newly synthetic diterpenoid analog, is regulated by Bax and caused by generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yong-Cheng; Ke, Yu; Zi, Xiaolin; Zhao, Fei; Yuan, Lin; Zhu, Ying-Li; Fan, Xia-Xia; Zhao, Ning-Min; Li, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Yu-Hua; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-12-27

    Ent-kaurane diterpene compounds have attracted considerable attention in recent years due to its antitumor, antibacterial, and antiviral activities. However, the clinical development of natural kaurane diterpenes, for example, oridonin for cancer therapy has been hampered by its relatively moderate potency, limited bioavailability. Herein, we report a newly synthetic analog of natural ent-kaurane diterpene, DS2, which exhibits significantly improved activity of antiproliferation against various cancer cell lines relative to oridonin. DS2 treatment triggers the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human esophageal cancer cell lines (EC9706, EC109). Interestingly, normal human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs) and normal human liver cells (HL-7702) are both significantly more resistant to the growth inhibition by DS2 compared with esophageal cancer cells. The DS2-induced apoptosis in EC9706 cells correlated with the drop of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and activation of caspase-9 and -3. The induction of proapoptotic proteins p21 and Bax were also observed in DS2-treated cells. The DS2-induced apoptosis was significantly attenuated by knockdown of Bax proteins. Meanwhile, the DS2 treatment caused generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human esophageal cancer cells, but not in HEECs, which was attenuated by pretreatment with ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). More interestingly, the antioxidants pretreatment completely attenuated DS2 mediated loss of the MMP and apoptosis, as well as Bax expression and growth inhibition. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the mitochondria-mediated cell death by DS2 is associated with Bax regulation and ROS generation, and understanding the function and mechanism of DS2 will help us to design better anti-cancer drugs.

  3. Complement-mediated cell death induced by rituximab in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is mediated in vitro by a caspase-independent mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bellosillo, B; Villamor, N; López-Guillermo, A; Marcé, S; Esteve, J; Campo, E; Colomer, D; Montserrat, E

    2001-11-01

    Mechanisms involving the in vitro effect of rituximab in cells from 55 patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders were investigated. No cytotoxic effect was observed when cells were incubated with rituximab alone, but in the presence of human AB serum rituximab induced complement-dependent cell death (R-CDC). A cytotoxic effect was observed in cells from 9 of 33 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 16 of 16 patients with mantle-cell lymphoma, 4 of 4 patients with follicular lymphoma, and 2 of 2 patients with hairy-cell leukemia. R-CDC was observed in cells from patients expressing more than 50 x 10(3) CD20 molecules per cell, and directly correlated with the number of CD20 molecules per cell. Preincubation with anti-CD59 increased the cytotoxic effect of rituximab and sensitized cells from nonsensitive cases. Neither cleavage of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) nor activation of caspase-3 was observed in R-CDC. In addition, no cells with a hypodiploid DNA content were detected and R-CDC was not prevented by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism. Incubation with rituximab in the presence of AB serum induced a rapid and intense production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). R-CDC was blocked by the incubation of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or Tiron, 2 ROS scavengers, indicating that the cytotoxic effect was due to the generation of superoxide (O) radicals. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that CD20, CD59, and complement have a role in the in vitro cytotoxic effect of rituximab, which is mediated by a caspase-independent process that involves ROS generation.

  4. The evolution of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P; Adams, Josephine C

    2010-12-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or "adhesome" also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology.

  5. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Gary

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  6. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes

    PubMed Central

    Yael, Dorin

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results. PMID:28358895

  7. Selective Generation of the Radical Cation Isomers [CH3CN](•+) and [CH2CNH](•+) via VUV Photoionization of Different Neutral Precursors and Their Reactivity with C2H4.

    PubMed

    Polášek, Miroslav; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Alcaraz, Christian; Žabka, Ján; Křížová, Věra; Giacomozzi, Linda; Tosi, Paolo; Ascenzi, Daniela

    2016-07-14

    Experimental and theoretical studies have been carried out to demonstrate the selective generation of two different C2H3N(+) isomers, namely, the acetonitrile [CH3CN](•+) and the ketenimine [CH2CNH](•+) radical cations. Photoionization and dissociative photoionization experiments from different neutral precursors (acetonitrile and butanenitrile) have been performed using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation in the 10-15 eV energy range, delivered by the DESIRS beamline at the SOLEIL storage ring. For butanenitrile (CH3CH2CH2CN) an experimental ionization threshold of 11.29 ± 0.05 eV is obtained, whereas the appearance energy for the formation of [CH2CNH](•+) fragments is 11.52 ± 0.05 eV. Experimental findings are fully supported by theoretical calculations at the G4 level of theory (ZPVE corrected energies at 0 K), giving a value of 11.33 eV for the adiabatic ionization energy of butanenitrile and an exothermicity of 0.49 for fragmentation into [CH2CNH](•+) plus C2H4, hampered by an energy barrier of 0.29 eV. The energy difference between [CH3CN](•+) and [CH2CNH](•+) is 2.28 eV (with the latter being the lowest energy isomer), and the isomerization barrier is 0.84 eV. Reactive monitoring experiments of the [CH3CN](•+) and [CH2CNH](•+) isomers with C2H4 have been performed using the CERISES guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer and exploiting the selectivity of ethylene that gives exothermic charge exchange and proton transfer reactions with [CH3CN](•+) but not with [CH2CNH](•+) isomers. In addition, minor reactive channels are observed leading to the formation of new C-C bonds upon reaction of [CH3CN](•+) with C2H4, and their astrochemical implications are briefly discussed.

  8. Overexpression of stanniocalcin-1 inhibits reactive oxygen species and renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Luping; Belousova, Tatiana; Chen, Minyi; DiMattia, Gabriel; Liu, Dajun; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2012-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and mitogen-activated protein kinases have important roles in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) suppresses superoxide generation in many systems through the induction of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and blocks the cytokine-induced rise in endothelial permeability. Here we tested whether transgenic overexpression of STC1 protects from bilateral ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury. This injury in wild-type mice caused a halving of the creatinine clearance; severe tubular vacuolization and cast formation; increased infiltration of macrophages and T cells; higher vascular permeability; greater production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide; and higher ratio of activated extracellular regulated kinase/activated Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38, all compared to sham-treated controls. Mice transgenic for human STC1 expression, however, had resistance to equivalent ischemia/reperfusion injury indicated as no significant change from controls in any of these parameters. Tubular epithelial cells in transgenic mice expressed higher mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and lower superoxide generation. Pre-treatment of transgenic mice with paraquat, a generator of reactive oxygen species, before injury restored the susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury, suggesting that STC1 protects by an anti-oxidant mechanism. Thus, STC1 may be a therapeutic target for ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury.

  9. Ratiometric Imaging of Extracellular pH in Dental Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Dige, Irene

    2016-03-09

    The pH in bacterial biofilms on teeth is of central importance for dental caries, a disease with a high worldwide prevalence. Nutrients and metabolites are not distributed evenly in dental biofilms. A complex interplay of sorption to and reaction with organic matter in the biofilm reduces the diffusion paths of solutes and creates steep gradients of reactive molecules, including organic acids, across the biofilm. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic methods, such as fluorescence life time imaging or pH ratiometry, can be employed to visualize pH in different microenvironments of dental biofilms. pH ratiometry exploits a pH-dependent shift in the fluorescent emission of pH-sensitive dyes. Calculation of the emission ratio at two different wavelengths allows determining local pH in microscopic images, irrespective of the concentration of the dye. Contrary to microelectrodes the technique allows monitoring both vertical and horizontal pH gradients in real-time without mechanically disturbing the biofilm. However, care must be taken to differentiate accurately between extra- and intracellular compartments of the biofilm. Here, the ratiometric dye, seminaphthorhodafluor-4F 5-(and-6) carboxylic acid (C-SNARF-4) is employed to monitor extracellular pH in in vivo grown dental biofilms of unknown species composition. Upon exposure to glucose the dye is up-concentrated inside all bacterial cells in the biofilms; it is thus used both as a universal bacterial stain and as a marker of extracellular pH. After confocal microscopic image acquisition, the bacterial biomass is removed from all pictures using digital image analysis software, which permits to exclusively calculate extracellular pH. pH ratiometry with the ratiometric dye is well-suited to study extracellular pH in thin biofilms of up to 75 µm thickness, but is limited to the pH range between 4.5 and 7.0.

  10. Electrophoretic and antigenic characterisation of Dermatophilus congolensis extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, N C; el Jack, M A; McOrist, S; Boid, R

    1997-12-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis is the causative agent of bovine dermatophilosis and lumpy wool in sheep. Two field isolates of D. congolensis, one each from a cow in Ghana and a sheep in Scotland, were cultured for 24-72 h in a synthetic medium based on RPMI-1640. Culture filtrates were examined by SDS-PAGE and considered to contain extracellular products released by growing hyphae and filaments. Electrophoretic profiles of culture filtrates of the two isolates contained common bands and bands that were unique to each isolate. The composition of extracellular products altered with increasing culture periods indicating that specific products were released at different stages of growth. Culture filtrate prepared in the presence of serine protease and metalloprotease inhibitors contained more and better defined bands than that prepared without protease inhibitors indicating the presence of proteases in culture filtrates. Western blot analysis of extracellular products using a panel of sera showed that the two isolates from different host species and distant geographical locations contained cross-reactive antigens. Natural and experimental infections stimulated antibody responses to antigens in culture filtrates, sera from animals that were disease free but in-contact with dermatophilosis-infected animals also contained antibodies to extracellular antigens. The antigens recognised by most sera had molecular weights of 200 kDa in the bovine isolate, 170 kDa in the ovine isolate and 67, 27 and 52-55 kDa in both isolates. The number of antigenic bands of both isolates was positively correlated with the intensity of challenge and the severity of infection: antibodies in sera from disease-free cattle in Ghana recognised more antigens than sera from disease-free sheep in Scotland and more antigens were recognised by sera from chronically-infected Ghanaian cattle than by sera from experimentally-infected calves and sheep. The latter developed antibodies to antigens of 27 and 24 k

  11. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  12. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  13. Using Paraquat to Generate Anion Free Radicals and Hydrogen Peroxide in "In Vitro": Antioxidant Effect of Vitamin E--A Procedure to Teach Theoretical and Experimental Principles of Reactive Oxygen Species Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Suarez-Cedeno, Gerson; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical basis of reactive oxygen species and their impact on health issues are relatively easy to understand by biomedical students. The detection of reactive oxygen species requires expensive equipment, the procedures are time consuming and costly, and the results are hard to interpret. Moreover, cause-and-effect relationships in the…

  14. Parthenolide generates reactive oxygen species and autophagy in MDA-MB231 cells. A soluble parthenolide analogue inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    D'Anneo, A; Carlisi, D; Lauricella, M; Puleio, R; Martinez, R; Di Bella, S; Di Marco, P; Emanuele, S; Di Fiore, R; Guercio, A; Vento, R; Tesoriere, G

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are clinically aggressive forms associated with a poor prognosis. We evaluated the cytotoxic effect exerted on triple-negative MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells both by parthenolide and its soluble analogue dimethylamino parthenolide (DMAPT) and explored the underlying molecular mechanism. The drugs induced a dose- and time-dependent decrement in cell viability, which was not prevented by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. In particular in the first hours of treatment (1–3 h), parthenolide and DMAPT strongly stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The drugs induced production of superoxide anion by activating NADPH oxidase. ROS generation caused depletion of thiol groups and glutathione, activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and downregulation of nuclear factor kB (NF-kB). During this first phase, parthenolide and DMAPT also stimulated autophagic process, as suggested by the enhanced expression of beclin-1, the conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-I (LC3-I) to LC3-II and the increase in the number of cells positive to monodansylcadaverine. Finally, the drugs increased RIP-1 expression. This effect was accompanied by a decrement of pro-caspase 8, while its cleaved form was not detected and the expression of c-FLIPS markedly increased. Prolonging the treatment (5–20 h) ROS generation favoured dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and the appearance of necrotic events, as suggested by the increased number of cells positive to propidium iodide staining. The administration of DMAPT in nude mice bearing xenografts of MDA-MB231 cells resulted in a significant inhibition of tumour growth, an increment of animal survival and a marked reduction of the lung area invaded by metastasis. Immunohistochemistry data revealed that treatment with DMAPT reduced the levels of NF-kB, metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and vascular endothelial growth factor, while induced upregulation of phosphorylated

  15. Regulation of Osteoblast Survival by the Extracellular Matrix and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus. Ruth K.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight adversely affects the skeleton, posing a substantial risk to astronaut's health during long duration missions. The reduced bone mass observed in growing animals following spaceflight is due at least in part to inadequate bone formation by osteoblasts. Thus, it is of central importance to identify basic cellular mechanisms underlying normal bone formation. The fundamental ideas underlying our research are that interactions between extracellular matrix proteins, integrin adhesion receptors, cytoplasmic signaling and cytoskeletal proteins are key ingredients for the proper functioning of osteoblasts, and that gravity impacts these interactions. As an in vitro model system we used primary fetal rat calvarial cells which faithfully recapitulate osteoblast differentiation characteristically observed in vivo. We showed that specific integrin receptors ((alpha)3(beta)1), ((alpha)5(beta)1), ((alpha)8(betal)1) and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, laminin) were needed for the differentiation of immature osteoblasts. In the course of maturation, cultured osteoblasts switched from depending on fibronectin and laminin for differentiation to depending on these proteins for their very survival. Furthermore, we found that manipulating the gravity vector using ground-based models resulted in activation of key intracellular survival signals generated by integrin/extracellular matrix interactions. We are currently testing the in vivo relevance of some of these observations using targeted transgenic technology. In conclusion, mechanical factors including gravity may participate in regulating survival via cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix. This leads us to speculate that microgravity adversely affects the survival of osteoblasts and contributes to spaceflight-induced osteoporosis.

  16. [Extracellular ribonuclease from Bacillus thuringiensis].

    PubMed

    Chepurnova, N K; Liakhov, D L; Rechinskiĭ, V O; Karpeĭskiĭ, M Ia

    1988-04-01

    The ability of the strain Bacillus thuringiensis var. subtoxicus to produce extracellular ribonuclease (ribonuclease Bt) was studied. It was found that the culture medium possesses a RNA-depolymerizing activity whose maximum is observed 4-5 hours after the beginning of the linear growth phase. A three-step chromatography of the culture extract on phosphocellulose resulted in a homogeneous enzyme with a molecular mass of 12000 Da. The enzyme showed the maximum activity towards RNA at pH 8.5, catalyzed the hydrolysis of polyribonucleotides and guanosine-2',3'-cyclophosphate. Hence, the enzyme can be related to base-nonspecific cyclizing ribonucleases showing the guanylic specificity towards nucleoside-2',3'-cyclophosphates.

  17. plasmatis Center for Innovation Competence: Controlling reactive component output of atmospheric pressure plasmas in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    The novel approach of using plasmas in order to alter the local chemistry of cells and cell environment presents a significant development in biomedical applications. The plasmatis center for innovation competence at the INP Greifswald e.V. performs fundamental research in plasma medicine in two interdisciplinary research groups. The aim of our plasma physics research group ``Extracellular Effects'' is (a) quantitative space and time resolved diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and liquids to determine distribution and composition of reactive species (b) to control the plasma and apply differing plasma source concepts in order to produce a tailored output of reactive components and design the chemical composition of the liquids/cellular environment and (c) to identify and understand the interaction mechanisms of plasmas with liquids and biological systems. Methods to characterize the plasma generated reactive species from plasma-, gas- and liquid phase and their biological effects will be presented. The diagnostic spectrum ranges from absorption/emission/laser spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and cell biological diagnostic techniques. Concluding, a presentation will be given of the comprehensive approach to plasma medicine in Greifswald where the applied and clinical research of the Campus PlasmaMed association is combined with the fundamental research at plasmatis center.

  18. Protein cross-linking by chlorinated polyamines and transglutamylation stabilizes neutrophil extracellular traps

    PubMed Central

    Csomós, Krisztián; Kristóf, Endre; Jakob, Bernadett; Csomós, István; Kovács, György; Rotem, Omri; Hodrea, Judit; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Muszbek, Laszlo; Balajthy, Zoltán; Csősz, Éva; Fésüs, László

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) ejected from activated dying neutrophils is a highly ordered structure of DNA and selected proteins capable to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms. Biochemical determinants of the non-randomly formed stable NETs have not been revealed so far. Studying the formation of human NETs we have observed that polyamines were incorporated into the NET. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase, which is essential for NET formation and can generate reactive chlorinated polyamines through hypochlorous acid, decreased polyamine incorporation. Addition of exogenous primary amines that similarly to polyamines inhibit reactions catalyzed by the protein cross-linker transglutaminases (TGases) has similar effect. Proteomic analysis of the highly reproducible pattern of NET components revealed cross-linking of NET proteins through chlorinated polyamines and ɛ(γ-glutamyl)lysine as well as bis-γ-glutamyl polyamine bonds catalyzed by the TGases detected in neutrophils. Competitive inhibition of protein cross-linking by monoamines disturbed the cross-linking pattern of NET proteins, which resulted in the loss of the ordered structure of the NET and significantly reduced capacity to trap bacteria. Our findings provide explanation of how NETs are formed in a reproducible and ordered manner to efficiently neutralize microorganisms at the first defense line of the innate immune system. PMID:27512953

  19. Heme-induced neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to the pathogenesis of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Grace; Zhang, Dachuan; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Manwani, Deepa; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by recurring episodes of vascular occlusion in which neutrophil activation plays a major role