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Sample records for extrachromosomal circles structurally

  1. Formation of extrachromosomal circles from telomeric DNA in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarit; Méchali, Marcel

    2002-12-01

    Instability and plasticity of telomeric DNA, which includes extrachromosomal DNA, are usually correlated with the absence of telomerase and with abnormal growth of mammalian cells. Here, we show the formation of extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats (tel-eccDNA) during the development of Xenopus laevis. Tel-eccDNA is double-stranded relaxed circles composed of the vertebrate consensus telomeric repeats [TTAGGG](n). Its size varies from <2 to >20 kb and it comprises up to 10% of the total cellular telomere content of the early embryo (pre-MBT stage). The amount of tel-eccDNA is reduced in later developmental stages and in adult tissues. Using a cell-free system derived from Xenopus egg extracts, we show that tel-eccDNA can be formed de novo from the telomere chromosomal tracts of sperm nuclei and naked DNA in a replication-independent manner. These results reveal an unusual plasticity of telomeric DNA during normal development of Xenopus. PMID:12446568

  2. Amplified DNAs in laboratory stocks of Leishmania tarentolae: extrachromosomal circles structurally and functionally similar to the inverted-H-region amplification of methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo-Peixoto, M.L.; Beverley, S.M. )

    1988-12-01

    We describe the structure of amplified DNA that was discovered in two laboratory stocks of the protozoan parasite Leishmania tarentolae. Restriction mapping and molecular cloning revealed that a region of 42 kilobases was amplified 8- to 30-fold in these lines. Southern blot analyses of digested DNAs or chromosomes separated by pulsed-field electrophoresis showed that the amplified DNA corresponded to the H region, a locus defined originally by its amplification in methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major. Similarities between the amplified DNA of the two species included (i) extensive cross-hybridization; (ii) approximate conservation of sequence order; (iii) extrachromosomal localization; (iv) an overall inverted, head-to-head configuration as a circular 140-kilobase tetrameric molecule; (v) two regions of DNA sequence rearrangement, each of which was closely associated with the two centers of the inverted repeats; (vi) association with methotrexate resistance; and (vii) phenotypically conservative amplification, in which the wild-type chromosomal arrangement was retained without apparent modification. Our data showed that amplified DNA mediating drug resistance arose in unselected L. tarentolae, although the pressures leading to apparently spontaneous amplification and maintenance of the H region are not known. The simple structure and limited extent of DNA amplified in these and other Leishmania lines suggests that the study of gene amplification in Leishmania spp. offers an attractive model system for the study of amplification in cultured mammalian cells and tumors. We also introduced a method for measuring the size of large circular DNAs, using gamma-irradiation to introduce limited double-strand breaks followed by sizing of the linear DNAs by pulsed-field electrophoresis.

  3. Identification of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA in Hop via Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lara, Alfredo; Gent, David H; Martin, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    During a survey for new viruses affecting hop plants, a circular DNA molecule was identified via rolling circle amplification (RCA) and later characterized. A small region of the 5.7-kb long molecule aligned with a microsatellite region in the Humulus lupulus genome, and no coding sequence was identified. Sequence analysis and literature review suggest that the small DNA molecule is an extranuclear DNA element, specifically, an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA), and its presence was confirmed by electron microscopy. This work is the first report of eccDNAs in the family Cannabaceae. Additionally, this work highlights the advantages of using RCA to study extrachromosomal DNA in higher plants. PMID:27160259

  4. Identification of extrachromosomal circular DNA in hop via rolling circle amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a survey looking for viruses affecting hop plants in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, a circular DNA molecule was identified via rolling circle amplification (RCA) and later characterized. The 5.7 kb long molecule only matched in a minor cover to a microsatellite region in the Humulus lupulus...

  5. Sequence and structure of the extrachromosomal palindrome encoding the ribosomal RNA genes in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Sucgang, Richard; Chen, Guokai; Liu, Wen; Lindsay, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Muzny, Donna; Shaulsky, Gad; Loomis, William; Gibbs, Richard; Kuspa, Adam

    2003-05-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are encoded by multicopy families of identical genes. In Dictyostelium and other protists, the rDNA is carried on extrachromosomal palindromic elements that comprise up to 20% of the nuclear DNA. We present the sequence of the 88 kb Dictyostelium rDNA element, noting that the rRNA genes are likely to be the only transcribed regions. By interrogating a library of ordered YAC clones, we provide evidence for a chromosomal copy of the rDNA on chromosome 4. This locus may provide master copies for the stable transmission of the extrachromosomal elements. The extrachromosomal elements were also found to form chromosome-sized clusters of DNA within nuclei of nocodazole-treated cells arrested in mitosis. These clusters resemble true chromosomes and may allow the efficient segregation of the rDNA during mitosis. These rDNA clusters may also explain the cytological observations of a seventh chromosome in this organism.

  6. Archaeal Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haina; Peng, Nan; Shah, Shiraz A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on archaeal extrachromosomal genetic elements (ECEs) has progressed rapidly in the past decade. To date, over 60 archaeal viruses and 60 plasmids have been isolated. These archaeal viruses exhibit an exceptional diversity in morphology, with a wide array of shapes, such as spindles, rods, filaments, spheres, head-tails, bottles, and droplets, and some of these new viruses have been classified into one order, 10 families, and 16 genera. Investigation of model archaeal viruses has yielded important insights into mechanisms underlining various steps in the viral life cycle, including infection, DNA replication and transcription, and virion egression. Many of these mechanisms are unprecedented for any known bacterial or eukaryal viruses. Studies of plasmids isolated from different archaeal hosts have also revealed a striking diversity in gene content and innovation in replication strategies. Highly divergent replication proteins are identified in both viral and plasmid genomes. Genomic studies of archaeal ECEs have revealed a modular sequence structure in which modules of DNA sequence are exchangeable within, as well as among, plasmid families and probably also between viruses and plasmids. In particular, it has been suggested that ECE-host interactions have shaped the coevolution of ECEs and their archaeal hosts. Furthermore, archaeal hosts have developed defense systems, including the innate restriction-modification (R-M) system and the adaptive CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system, to restrict invasive plasmids and viruses. Together, these interactions permit a delicate balance between ECEs and their hosts, which is vitally important for maintaining an innovative gene reservoir carried by ECEs. In conclusion, while research on archaeal ECEs has just started to unravel the molecular biology of these genetic entities and their interactions with archaeal hosts, it is expected to accelerate in the next decade. PMID

  7. Energetics and structures of fullerene crop circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie

    1998-01-01

    The energetics and structures of carbon tori are studied using molecular simulation. They include circular and polygonal tori, formed by bending ( n, n) tubes and by joining ( n, n) and ( n+1, n-1) or ( n+2, n-2) tubes with pentagon-heptagon defects, respectively, in which n=5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of a circular and polygonal torus decreases by D-2 and D-1, respectively, where D is the torus diameter. Comparisons in average and local maximum strain suggest that defect-free circular tori are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than defective polygonal tori. This confirms the hypothesis that circular tori are the predominant constituents of the observed fullerene crop circles in laser-grown single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  8. Telomeric DNA in ALT Cells Is Characterized by Free Telomeric Circles and Heterogeneous t-Loops

    PubMed Central

    Cesare, Anthony J.; Griffith, Jack D.

    2004-01-01

    A prerequisite for cellular immortalization in human cells is the elongation of telomeres through the upregulation of telomerase or by the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway. In this study, telomere structure in multiple ALT cell lines was examined by electron microscopy. Nuclei were isolated from GM847, GM847-Tert, and WI-38 VA13 ALT cells, psoralen photo-cross-linked in situ, and the telomere restriction fragments were purified by gel filtration chromatography. Examination of telomere-enriched fractions revealed frequent extrachromosomal circles, ranging from 0.7 to 56.8 kb. t-loops were also observed, with the loop portion ranging from 0.5 to 70.2 kb. The total length of the loop plus tail of the t-loops corresponded to the telomere restriction fragment length from the ALT cell lines as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The presence of extrachromosomal circles containing telomeric DNA was confirmed by two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These results show that extrachromosomal telomeric DNA circles are present in ALT nuclei and suggest a roll-and-spread mechanism of telomere elongation similar to that seen in previous observations of multiple yeast species. Results presented here also indicate that expression of telomerase in GM847 cells does not affect t-loop or extrachromosomal circle formation. PMID:15509797

  9. Extrachromosomal genetic elements in Micrococcus.

    PubMed

    Dib, Julián Rafael; Liebl, Wolfgang; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María Eugenia; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Micrococci are Gram-positive G + C-rich, nonmotile, nonspore-forming actinomycetous bacteria. Micrococcus comprises ten members, with Micrococcus luteus being the type species. Representatives of the genus play important roles in the biodegradation of xenobiotics, bioremediation processes, production of biotechnologically important enzymes or bioactive compounds, as test strains in biological assays for lysozyme and antibiotics, and as infective agents in immunocompromised humans. The first description of plasmids dates back approximately 28 years, when several extrachromosomal elements ranging in size from 1.5 to 30.2 kb were found in Micrococcus luteus. Up to the present, a number of circular plasmids conferring antibiotic resistance, the ability to degrade aromatic compounds, and osmotolerance are known, as well as cryptic elements with unidentified functions. Here, we review the Micrococcus extrachromosomal traits reported thus far including phages and the only quite recently described large linear extrachromosomal genetic elements, termed linear plasmids, which range in size from 75 kb (pJD12) to 110 kb (pLMA1) and which confer putative advantageous capabilities, such as antibiotic or heavy metal resistances (inferred from sequence analyses and curing experiments). The role of the extrachromosomal elements for the frequently proven ecological and biotechnological versatility of the genus will be addressed as well as their potential for the development and use as genetic tools. PMID:23138713

  10. Extrachromosomal circular DNA is common in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Henrik D.; Parsons, Lance; Jørgensen, Tue S.; Botstein, David; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    Examples of extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are found in many organisms, but their impact on genetic variation at the genome scale has not been investigated. We mapped 1,756 eccDNAs in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using Circle-Seq, a highly sensitive eccDNA purification method. Yeast eccDNAs ranged from an arbitrary lower limit of 1 kb up to 38 kb and covered 23% of the genome, representing thousands of genes. EccDNA arose both from genomic regions with repetitive sequences ≥15 bases long and from regions with short or no repetitive sequences. Some eccDNAs were identified in several yeast populations. These eccDNAs contained ribosomal genes, transposon remnants, and tandemly repeated genes (HXT6/7, ENA1/2/5, and CUP1-1/-2) that were generally enriched on eccDNAs. EccDNAs seemed to be replicated and 80% contained consensus sequences for autonomous replication origins that could explain their maintenance. Our data suggest that eccDNAs are common in S. cerevisiae, where they might contribute substantially to genetic variation and evolution. PMID:26038577

  11. Extrachromosomal DNA isolated from tomato big bud and Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense phytoplasma strains.

    PubMed

    Tran-Nguyen, L T T; Gibb, K S

    2006-11-01

    The nucleotide sequences of two extrachromosomal elements from tomato big bud (TBB) and one extrachromosomal element from Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense (Ca. P. australiense) phytoplasmas were determined. Both TBB plasmids (3319 and 4092 bp) contained an open reading frame ( approximately 570 bp) with homology to the rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep). This gene was shorter than the rep genes identified from other phytoplasma plasmids, geminiviruses and bacterial plasmids. Both TBB extrachromosomal DNAs (eDNAs) encoded a putative DNA primase (dnaG) gene, a chromosomal gene required for DNA replication and which contains the conserved topoisomerase/primase domain. We speculate that the replication mechanism for the TBB phytoplasma eDNA involves the dnaG gene instead of the rep gene. The Ca. P. australiense eDNA (3773 bp) was shown to be circular and contained four open reading frames. The rep gene was encoded on ORF 1 and had homology to both plasmid (pLS1) and geminivirus-like domains.

  12. Interval methods for verifying structural optimality of circle packing configurations in the unit square

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markot, Mihaly Csaba

    2007-02-01

    The paper is dealing with the problem of finding the densest packings of equal circles in the unit square. Recently, a global optimization method based exclusively on interval arithmetic calculations has been designed for this problem. With this method it became possible to solve the previously open problems of packing 28, 29, and 30 circles in the numerical sense: tight guaranteed enclosures were given for all the optimal solutions and for the optimum value. The present paper completes the optimality proofs for these cases by determining all the optimal solutions in the geometric sense. Namely, it is proved that the currently best-known packing structures result in optimal packings, and moreover, apart from symmetric configurations and the movement of well-identified free circles, these are the only optimal packings. The required statements are verified with mathematical rigor using interval arithmetic tools.

  13. Extrachromosomal elements in lower eukaryotes:

    SciTech Connect

    Wickner, R.B.; Hinnebusch, A.; Lambowitz, A.M.; Gunsalus, I.C.; Hollaender, A.

    1986-01-01

    While most genes are chromosomal, the nonchromosomal genes have played a disproportionate role in molecular biology, in part because of their easy accessibility and in part because they represent the most mobile portion of a cell's genome. Fungi, yeasts, protozoa, slime molds, algae, and other single-celled nucleated species, have recently gained dramatic popularity with the development of transformation methods for Saccharomyces, Neurospora, Schizosaccharomyces, Dictyostelium, and others of this group. The realization that Saccharomyces has oncogenes, RNA tumor viruses, intervening sequences, and all the mitotic, mitochondrial, and other structures typical of so-called ''higher'' eukaryotic organisms has confirmed the use of such organisms as model systems. Their use in biotechnology also shows great promise. The study in lower eukaryotes of mitochondria and chloroplasts has yielded many insights into similar structures in higher organisms as well as many unexpected finds, such as mechanisms of intron excision and the biology of introns, RNA catalysis, variation of the genetic code, and mechanisms of protein import across membranes.

  14. Genome-wide Purification of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Møller, Henrik D; Bojsen, Rasmus K; Tachibana, Chris; Parsons, Lance; Botstein, David; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are common genetic elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and are reported in other eukaryotes as well. EccDNAs contribute to genetic variation among somatic cells in multicellular organisms and to evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. Sensitive methods for detecting eccDNA are needed to clarify how these elements affect genome stability and how environmental and biological factors induce their formation in eukaryotic cells. This video presents a sensitive eccDNA-purification method called Circle-Seq. The method encompasses column purification of circular DNA, removal of remaining linear chromosomal DNA, rolling-circle amplification of eccDNA, deep sequencing, and mapping. Extensive exonuclease treatment was required for sufficient linear chromosomal DNA degradation. The rolling-circle amplification step by φ29 polymerase enriched for circular DNA over linear DNA. Validation of the Circle-Seq method on three S. cerevisiae CEN.PK populations of 10(10) cells detected hundreds of eccDNA profiles in sizes larger than 1 kilobase. Repeated findings of ASP3-1, COS111, CUP1, RSC30, HXT6, HXT7 genes on circular DNA in both S288c and CEN.PK suggests that DNA circularization is conserved between strains at these loci. In sum, the Circle-Seq method has broad applicability for genome-scale screening for eccDNA in eukaryotes as well as for detecting specific eccDNA types.

  15. Genome-wide Purification of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Møller, Henrik D; Bojsen, Rasmus K; Tachibana, Chris; Parsons, Lance; Botstein, David; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are common genetic elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and are reported in other eukaryotes as well. EccDNAs contribute to genetic variation among somatic cells in multicellular organisms and to evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. Sensitive methods for detecting eccDNA are needed to clarify how these elements affect genome stability and how environmental and biological factors induce their formation in eukaryotic cells. This video presents a sensitive eccDNA-purification method called Circle-Seq. The method encompasses column purification of circular DNA, removal of remaining linear chromosomal DNA, rolling-circle amplification of eccDNA, deep sequencing, and mapping. Extensive exonuclease treatment was required for sufficient linear chromosomal DNA degradation. The rolling-circle amplification step by φ29 polymerase enriched for circular DNA over linear DNA. Validation of the Circle-Seq method on three S. cerevisiae CEN.PK populations of 10(10) cells detected hundreds of eccDNA profiles in sizes larger than 1 kilobase. Repeated findings of ASP3-1, COS111, CUP1, RSC30, HXT6, HXT7 genes on circular DNA in both S288c and CEN.PK suggests that DNA circularization is conserved between strains at these loci. In sum, the Circle-Seq method has broad applicability for genome-scale screening for eccDNA in eukaryotes as well as for detecting specific eccDNA types. PMID:27077531

  16. [A new method for infering vessel structure based on circle detection and Gabor filter].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qu-bo; Li, Hong-liang; Yang, Yuan; Wu, Gui-liang; Zhou, Shou-jun

    2010-09-01

    To automatically infer the patterns of vessel structure such as the distal ends, segments, bifurvessel structures, and crossing of two vessels in X-ray angiographic images, a novel method is presented based on Gabor filter and circle detector. The method can cope with varying vessel curvature and intensity feature occur along the longitudinal vessel direction. The present study can facilitate 2-D quantitative description of vessel tree and 3-D vessel reconstruction, and provide an elementary clue for the diagnostics. The proposed method has been successively applied to both synthetic images for validation purposes and the actual angiographic images, which yielded encouraging results.

  17. Extrachromosomal plasmids in the plant pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Jabaji-Hare, S H; Burger, G; Forget, L; Lang, B F

    1994-05-01

    Extrachromosomal DNA elements were found in field isolates of Rhizoctonia solani belonging to anastomosis groups (AG) 1-5. An isolate of AG-5 (Rh41) contains a 3.6-kbp plasmid (pRS188) which has a similar A+T content to mitochondrial DNA. pRS188 is linear and has knob structures at its ends, as revealed by electron microscopy. Exonuclease digestions show that the linear ends of pRS188 are protected, and remain protected even after proteinase K digestion. pRS188 does not hybridise to nuclear or mitochondrial DNAs of its host isolate (Rh41), to total DNAs of other plasmid-less AG-5 isolates, or to total DNA of plasmid-harbouring isolates belonging to different AGs. Cellular-fractionation experiments suggest that pRS188 is associated with mitochondria, but it remains undecided whether this occurs inside or outside of the organelles. The nucleotide sequence of about 60% of the plasmid has been determined, revealing no open reading frame longer than 91 amino acids, and no known gene or genetic element is detected in the sequence contigs of 300-1572 bp length. Similar studies were performed with the plasmid pRS104 present in an isolate of AG-4 (Rh36), the sequence of which exhibits essentially the same features as pRS188 except that its A+T content resembles that of nuclear DNA. Pathogenicity tests reveal that the isolates Rh41 and R36 are as virulent as the plasmid-less isolates of AG-4 and -5, indicating that the plasmids do not play any role in pathogenicity.

  18. Extrachromosomal circular ribosomal DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis.

    PubMed Central

    Meyerink, J H; Klootwijk, J; Planta, R J; van der Ende, A; van Bruggen, E F

    1979-01-01

    Purified ribosomal DNA from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis contains a small proportion of circular DNA molecules with a contour length of 3 micron or integral multiples thereof. Hybridization of yeast ribosomal DNA with 26 S rRNA, using the R-loop technique, reveals that these circular molecules contain sequences complementary to yeast ribosomal RNA. We suggest that these extrachromosomal rRNA genes may be intermediates in the amplification of rRNA genes in yeast. Images PMID:493145

  19. Stable transfection of the human parasite Leishmania major delineates a 30-kilobase region sufficient for extrachromosomal replication and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kapler, G M; Coburn, C M; Beverley, S M

    1990-01-01

    To delineate segments of the genome of the human protozoan parasite Leishmania major necessary for replication and expression, we developed a vector (pR-NEO) which can be reproducibly introduced into L. major. This DNA was derived from a 30-kilobase extrachromosomal amplified DNA bearing the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene, with the coding region for neomycin phosphotransferase substituted for that of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase and a bacterial origin of replication and selectable marker added. G418-resistant lines were obtained at high efficiency by electroporation of pR-NEO (approaching 10(-4) per cell), while constructs bearing an inverted neo gene or lacking Leishmania sequences did not confer resistance. pR-NEO replicated in L. major and gave rise to correctly processed transcripts bearing the trans-spliced miniexon. Molecular karyotype analysis showed that in some lines pR-NEO DNA exists exclusively as an extrachromosomal circle, a finding supported by the rescue of intact pR-NEO after transformation of Escherichia coli. These data genetically localize all elements required in cis for DNA replication, transcription, and trans splicing to the Leishmania DNA contained within pR-NEO DNA and signal the advent of stable transfection methodology for addressing molecular phenomena in trypanosomatid parasites. Images PMID:2304458

  20. Solving Problems through Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grahamslaw, Laura; Henson, Lisa H.

    2015-01-01

    Several problem-solving interventions that utilise a "circle" approach have been applied within the field of educational psychology, for example, Circle Time, Circle of Friends, Sharing Circles, Circle of Adults and Solution Circles. This research explored two interventions, Solution Circles and Circle of Adults, and used thematic…

  1. Role of Extrachromosomal Histone H2B on Recognition of DNA Viruses and Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Kawashima, Akira; Jounai, Nao; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Ishii, Ken J.; Ito, Tetsuhide; Suzuki, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Histones are essential components of chromatin structure, and histone modification plays an important role in various cellular functions including transcription, gene silencing, and immunity. Histones also play distinct roles in extrachromosomal settings. Extrachromosomal histone H2B acts as a cytosolic sensor to detect double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments derived from infectious agents or damaged cells to activate innate and acquired immune responses in various cell types. It also physically interacts with interferon (IFN)-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1), an essential adaptor molecule that activates innate immunity, through COOH-terminal importin 9-related adaptor organizing histone H2B and IPS-1 (CIAO), resulting in a distinct signaling complex that induces dsDNA-induced type I IFN production. Such a molecular platform acts as a cellular sensor to recognize aberrant dsDNA in cases of viral infection and cell damage. This mechanism may also play roles in autoimmunity, transplantation rejection, gene-mediated vaccines, and other therapeutic applications. PMID:23734163

  2. Amplification of a Zygosaccharomyces bailii DNA Segment in Wine Yeast Genomes by Extrachromosomal Circular DNA Formation

    PubMed Central

    Galeote, Virginie; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Novo, Maite; Legras, Jean-Luc; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    We recently described the presence of large chromosomal segments resulting from independent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin. We report here evidence for the amplification of one of these segments, a 17 kb DNA segment from Zygosaccharomyces bailii, in the genome of S. cerevisiae strains. The copy number, organization and location of this region differ considerably between strains, indicating that the insertions are independent and that they are post-HGT events. We identified eight different forms in 28 S. cerevisiae strains, mostly of wine origin, with up to four different copies in a single strain. The organization of these forms and the identification of an autonomously replicating sequence functional in S. cerevisiae, strongly suggest that an extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) molecule serves as an intermediate in the amplification of the Z. bailii region in yeast genomes. We found little or no sequence similarity at the breakpoint regions, suggesting that the insertions may be mediated by nonhomologous recombination. The diversity between these regions in S. cerevisiae represents roughly one third the divergence among the genomes of wine strains, which confirms the recent origin of this event, posterior to the start of wine strain expansion. This is the first report of a circle-based mechanism for the expansion of a DNA segment, mediated by nonhomologous recombination, in natural yeast populations. PMID:21423766

  3. Literature Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Claudia Anne; Kuby, Sue Ann

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of literature circles, a student-led reading and discussion method that encourages students to see stories in various ways. Explains the student selection of titles, roles of group members, and collaborative projects that complete the activity. (LRW)

  4. Characterization and origin of extrachromosomal DNA granules in Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Bultmann, H; Mezzanotte, R

    1987-10-01

    We have used endonuclease treatment in situ, followed by Giemsa or ethidium bromide staining, for mapping repetitive sequences on the chromosomes of the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata and thus for studying extrachromosomal DNA granules in this species. All three restriction enzymes employed (HaeIII, A1uI and HindIII) show the same cytological effects, except for a single interstitial band. In both polytene and mitotic chromosomes, chromatin resistant to these endonucleases presumably includes at least three endonucleases presumably includes at least three previously unrecognized buoyant density satellites (1.663, 1.670 and 1.692 g ml-1 in neutral CsCl), and is predominantly localized in the pericentric regions of all five autosomes. Mitotic treated chromosomes show that the entire rod-shaped X chromosome, but no part of the dot-like Y chromosome, consists of endonuclease-resistant chromatin. The most unusual heterochromatic component of polytene nuclei in this species, the 'extrachromosomal DNA granules', are also entirely resistant to digestion with endonucleases. We think that these DNA granules represent dispersed X chromatin and not, as previously assumed, extruded autosomal heterochromatin.

  5. Characterization of extrachromosomal DNA in the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Samols, D; Swift, H

    1979-11-01

    The polytene pupal foot pad cells of the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata contain numerous extrachromosomal DNA containing granules. We have determined both the origin and the nature of the DNA sequences present in these granules. Studies done with quinacrine staining of seven day old pupal foot-pad polytene nuclei showed that the granules fluoresced very brightly while the chromosomal bands to which the granules were attached did not. The only other highly fluorescent regions of the polytene karyotype were the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes C and E and several bands associated with the nucleolus of Chromsome A. When polytene nuclei were hybridized in situ with cRNA made from highly repetitive DNA, many of the granules positively labeled. Most of the label on these slides was concentrated on the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes C and E. Quinacrine staining of the foot-pad cells at very early stages of pupal development showed that when granules were present, they were always closely associated with the same two centromeric regions, those of chromosomes C and E. Since the highly repetitive DNA located in these centromeric regions is underreplicated, we conclude that the granules result from an extrusion process which takes place early during the polytenization of these cells. The chromosomal integrity of the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes C and E is apparently disrupted and repetitive sequences are dissociated from the chromosomes as DNA granules which then secondarily become associated with chromosomal bands throughout the nucleus.

  6. Efficient amplification of self-gelling polypod-like structured DNA by rolling circle amplification and enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yata, Tomoya; Takahashi, Yuki; Tan, Mengmeng; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2015-01-01

    The application of DNA as a functional material such as DNA hydrogel has attracted much attention. Despite an increasing interest, the high cost of DNA synthesis is a limiting factor for its utilization. To reduce the cost, we report here a highly efficient amplification technique for polypod-like structured DNA (polypodna) with adhesive ends that spontaneously forms DNA hydrogel. Two types of polypodna with three (tripodna) and four (tetrapodna) pods were selected, and a template oligodeoxynucleotide, containing a tandem sequence of a looped tripodna or tetrapodna, respectively, along with restriction enzyme (TspRI) sites, was designed. The template was circularized using T4 DNA ligase, and amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The RCA product was highly viscous and resistant to restriction digestion. Observation under an electron microscope revealed microflower-like structures. These structures were composed of long DNA and magnesium pyrophosphate, and their treatment with EDTA followed by restriction digestion with TspRI resulted in numerous copies of polypodna with adhesive ends, which formed a DNA hydrogel. Thus, we believe this technique provides a new approach to produce DNA nanostructures, and helps in expanding their practical applications. PMID:26462616

  7. Efficient amplification of self-gelling polypod-like structured DNA by rolling circle amplification and enzymatic digestion

    PubMed Central

    Yata, Tomoya; Takahashi, Yuki; Tan, Mengmeng; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2015-01-01

    The application of DNA as a functional material such as DNA hydrogel has attracted much attention. Despite an increasing interest, the high cost of DNA synthesis is a limiting factor for its utilization. To reduce the cost, we report here a highly efficient amplification technique for polypod-like structured DNA (polypodna) with adhesive ends that spontaneously forms DNA hydrogel. Two types of polypodna with three (tripodna) and four (tetrapodna) pods were selected, and a template oligodeoxynucleotide, containing a tandem sequence of a looped tripodna or tetrapodna, respectively, along with restriction enzyme (TspRI) sites, was designed. The template was circularized using T4 DNA ligase, and amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The RCA product was highly viscous and resistant to restriction digestion. Observation under an electron microscope revealed microflower-like structures. These structures were composed of long DNA and magnesium pyrophosphate, and their treatment with EDTA followed by restriction digestion with TspRI resulted in numerous copies of polypodna with adhesive ends, which formed a DNA hydrogel. Thus, we believe this technique provides a new approach to produce DNA nanostructures, and helps in expanding their practical applications. PMID:26462616

  8. Argonaute Proteins Affect siRNA Levels and Accumulation of a Novel Extrachromosomal DNA from the Dictyostelium Retrotransposon DIRS-1*

    PubMed Central

    Boesler, Benjamin; Meier, Doreen; Förstner, Konrad U.; Friedrich, Michael; Hammann, Christian; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Nellen, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The retrotransposon DIRS-1 is the most abundant retroelement in Dictyostelium discoideum and constitutes the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the six chromosomes in D. discoideum. The vast majority of cellular siRNAs is derived from DIRS-1, suggesting that the element is controlled by RNAi-related mechanisms. We investigated the role of two of the five Argonaute proteins of D. discoideum, AgnA and AgnB, in DIRS-1 silencing. Deletion of agnA resulted in the accumulation of DIRS-1 transcripts, the expression of DIRS-1-encoded proteins, and the loss of most DIRS-1-derived secondary siRNAs. Simultaneously, extrachromosomal single-stranded DIRS-1 DNA accumulated in the cytoplasm of agnA− strains. These DNA molecules appear to be products of reverse transcription and thus could represent intermediate structures before transposition. We further show that transitivity of endogenous siRNAs is impaired in agnA− strains. The deletion of agnB alone had no strong effect on DIRS-1 transposon regulation. However, in agnA−/agnB− double mutant strains strongly reduced accumulation of extrachromosomal DNA compared with the single agnA− strains was observed. PMID:25352599

  9. Extrachromosomal amplification of rDNA in oocytes of Hemerobius spp. (Insecta, Neuroptera).

    PubMed

    Kubrakiewicz, J; Biliński, S M

    1995-05-01

    In previtellogenic oocytes of the neuropteran, Hemerobius spp., two distinct, DNA-positive intranuclear structures have been observed. Chromosomes of meiotic prophase assemble in the center of the oocyte nucleus forming a highly polymorphic karyosphere, which persists in this position until the very late stages of vitellogenesis. The extrachromosomal DNA body, containing amplified ribosomal genes, undergoes fragmentation and dispersion in the nucleoplasm. At the onset of previtellogenic growth, transcription of extra rDNA starts, which is accompanied by the appearance of dense, granular material (multiple nucleoli). Arising nucleoli gradually fill the nucleoplasm. At the electron microscopic (EM) level two electron dense structural forms of the granular material have been described. Together with general histological and ultrastructural analysis the amplification of rDNA genes in Hemerobius spp. oocytes has been demonstrated by means of the spreading technique, which has shown that extra rDNA is organized in rings containing various numbers of active ribosomal genes. The transcription activity of amplified genes is manifested in the form of typical "Christmas tree" structures.

  10. Uncovering novel mobile genetic elements and their dynamics through an extra-chromosomal sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Douglas R; Utter, Bryan; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major clinically important pathogen with well-studied phage contributions to its virulence potential. In this commentary, we describe our method to enrich and sequence stealth extra-chromosomal DNA elements in the bacterial cell, allowing the identification of novel extra-chromosomal prophages in S. aureus clinical strains. Extra-chromosomal sequencing is a useful and broadly applicable tool to study bacterial genomics, giving a temporal glance at the extra-chromosomal compartment of the cell and allowing researchers to uncover lower-copy plasmidial elements (e.g., prophages) as well as gain a greater understanding of mobile genetic elements that shuffle on and off the chromosome. Here, we describe how episomal and plasmidial DNA elements can have profound downstream effects on the host cell and surrounding bacterial population, and discuss specific examples of their importance in Gram-positive bacteria. We also offer potential avenues of future research where extra-chromosomal sequencing may play a key role in our understanding of the complete virulence potential of infectious bacteria. PMID:27581613

  11. Mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Previous work indicated that extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells could be explained by the single-strand annealing (SSA) model. This model predicts that extrachromosomal recombination leads to nonconservative crossover products and that heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) is formed by annealing of complementary single strands. Mismatched bases in hDNA may subsequently be repaired to wild-type or mutant sequences, or they may remain unrepaired and segregate following DNA replication. We describe a system to examine the formation and mismatch repair of hDNA in recombination intermediates. Our results are consistent with extrachromosomal recombination occurring via SSA and producing crossover recombinant products. As predicted by the SSA model, hDNA was present in double-strand break-induced recombination intermediates. By placing either silent or frameshift mutations in the predicted hDNA region, we have shown that mismatches are efficiently repaired prior to DNA replication. Images PMID:8264607

  12. Extrachromosomal DNA and cell differentiation in cultured pea roots (Pisum sativum)

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1986-01-01

    Histological, cytological and molecular analyses of DNA replication and differentiation and meristematic precursors of vascular parenchyma in cultured pea roots show that the initial steps in the transition from a dividing to a differentiated cell involve retardation of DNA replication in late S phase and production of extrachromosomal molecules by excision from late replicating chromosomal DNA. Portions of the extrachromosomal DNA are displaced by a strand displacement mechanism thereby producing free single-stranded molecules. That extrachromosomal molecules have rDNA reflects the fact that in pea roots replication of the ribosomal genes is maximal during late S phase (unpublished results). It is likely, therefore, that the excised late replicating DNA contains some rDNA sequences. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Universal aptameric system for highly sensitive detection of protein based on structure-switching-triggered rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zai-Sheng; Zhang, Songbai; Zhou, Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ruqin

    2010-03-15

    A universal approach is proposed in this study for the development of an aptameric assay system for proteins based on aptamer structure-switching-triggered ligation-rolling circle amplification (L-RCA) upon target binding. The strategy chiefly depends on the competition for binding the aptamer probe between target protein and a complementary single-stranded DNA (CDNA) that can induce the circularization of the padlock probe. Introduction of target protein into the assay system inhibits the hybridization of the CDNA with the aptamer probe because of the formation of the target/aptamer duplex. The free CDNA can only hybridize with the padlock probe. With the assistance of DNA ligase, the padlock probe is circularized, and the subsequent RCA process can be accomplished by Phi 29 DNA polymerase. Each RCA product containing thousands of repeated sequences might hybridize with a large number of molecular beacons (detection probes), resulting in an enhanced fluorescence signal. In contrast, in the absence of target protein, no obvious change in the fluorescence intensity of the detection probe is observed. This signaling mode for target recognition and transduction events is based on the combination of aptamer recognition elements and L-RCA technology with high specificity and sensitivity. The proposed assay system not only exhibits excellent analytical characteristics (e.g., the detection limit on attomolar scale and a linear dynamic range of more than 3 orders of magnitude) but also possesses significant advantages over existing aptameric assays. The proposed strategy is universal since the sequences of aptamer probe, CDNA, and padlock probe could be easily designed to be compatible with the L-RCA based detection of other proteins without other conditions.

  14. Making Morning Circle Meaningful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Susan; Fasy, Cara; Gulick, Jessica; Jones, Jill; Pike, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Morning Circle, also known as Morning Meeting, is often a daily lesson in both general education and special education classrooms. The primary purpose of the Circle is to support each child to establish membership in the class while developing a classroom community and culture. The Responsive Classroom Approach recommends four Circle components:…

  15. [Willis and his circle].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Willis (1621-1675) grew up in Wiltshire and studied medicine in Oxford, at a time when the city was besieged and then occupied by Parliamentarian troops. He started his career as a country doctor while concurrently taking part in informal gatherings with other scientists (William Petty, Christopher Wren and, later on, Robert Hooke, Richard Lower and Robert Boyle). They performed physical and chemical experiments and carried out a variety of tests on animals. After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 Willis combined his practice with academic teaching. From then on he focused his studies on the structure and function of the brain, dissecting brains after removal from the skull and fixation in 'spirit of wine'. In his 'Cerebri anatome' of 1664, illustrated by Wren, he drew attention to the arterial circle at the base of the brain, including its physiological advantages. This arterial circle had been incompletely described by others in the past and fully, but only in writing, by Wepfer in 1658.

  16. Recumbent Stone Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, British archaeoastronomers were striving to bridge the interpretative gulf between the "megalithic observatories" of Alexander Thom and an archaeological mainstream that, generally speaking, was hostile to any mention of astronomy in relation to the megalithic monuments of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain. The Scottish recumbent stone circles (RSCs) came to represent an example where sounder methodology could overcome many of the data selection issues that had beset earlier studies and, with due restraint, produce credible interpretations. Systematic studies of their orientations consistently concluded that the RSCs had a strong lunar connection, and it was widely envisaged that they were the setting for ceremonies associated with the appearance of the moon over the recumbent stone. Other evidence such as the presence of white quartz and the spatial distribution of cupmarks appeared to back up this conclusion. New archaeological investigations since 1999 have challenged and modified these conclusions, confirming in particular that the circles were built to enclose cairns rather than to demarcate open spaces. Yet the restricted pattern of orientations of these structures could only have been achieved by reference to the basic diurnal motions of the skies, and orientation in relation to simple observations of the midsummer moon remains the most likely reading of the alignment evidence taken as a whole. On the other hand, a consideration of the broader context, which includes the nearby Clava cairns, highlights instead the symbolic importance of the sun.

  17. [Willis and his circle].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Thomas Willis (1621-1675) grew up in Wiltshire and studied medicine in Oxford, at a time when the city was besieged and then occupied by Parliamentarian troops. He started his career as a country doctor while concurrently taking part in informal gatherings with other scientists (William Petty, Christopher Wren and, later on, Robert Hooke, Richard Lower and Robert Boyle). They performed physical and chemical experiments and carried out a variety of tests on animals. After the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 Willis combined his practice with academic teaching. From then on he focused his studies on the structure and function of the brain, dissecting brains after removal from the skull and fixation in 'spirit of wine'. In his 'Cerebri anatome' of 1664, illustrated by Wren, he drew attention to the arterial circle at the base of the brain, including its physiological advantages. This arterial circle had been incompletely described by others in the past and fully, but only in writing, by Wepfer in 1658. PMID:22436528

  18. Telomerase suppresses formation of ALT-associated single-stranded telomeric C-circles.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Matthew J; Pascarelli, Kara M; Merkel, Anna S; Lazar, Alexander J; von Mehren, Margaret; Lev, Dina; Broccoli, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    Telomere maintenance is an essential characteristic of cancer cells, most commonly achieved by activation of telomerase. Telomeres can also be maintained by a recombination-based mechanism, alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Cells using ALT are characterized by the presence of ALT-associated promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies (APB), long, heterogeneously sized telomeres, extrachromosomal telomeric circular DNA, and elevated telomeric recombination. Consistent with other reports, we found that liposarcomas containing APBs, but lacking telomerase expression, always contained C-rich circles (C-circles), and these C-circles were never present in the absence of APBs, indicating a tight link between these features in ALT cells. However, a rare subgroup of tumors showing evidence of telomere maintenance by both telomerase and ALT did not contain C-circles. To test the hypothesis that telomerase expression disrupts the tight link between APBs and C-circles, we used ALT cell lines that were engineered to express telomerase. Introduction of telomerase activity in these ALT cells resulted in, on average, shorter telomeres with retention of APBs. However, at high passage, the level of C-circles was significantly reduced, which was paralleled by a switch from C-strand overhangs to G-strand overhangs. We propose that by extending critically short telomeres in these cells, telomerase is disrupting a key step in the ALT pathway necessary for production and/or maintenance of C-circles.

  19. Get to Know a Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel-Romine, LeAnn E.; Paul, Sara; Shafer, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Middle-grades students have a concept image of a circle, but they lack experience in the act of defining. The structure of definitions needs to include conditions that are necessary and sufficient. Most students are able to identify necessary conditions, but they have trouble determining if sufficient conditions are met. How do teachers engage…

  20. Talking Circles Promote Equitable Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Teachers facilitate math talk in the classroom, but introducing a structured discussion format called the "talking circle" can influence opportunities for equitable student participation. Drawing on his reflections over the 2013-14 academic year and reviewing his detailed teaching notes and lesson plans, Marcus Hung takes a close look at…

  1. Higher order Bezier circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Jin

    1993-01-01

    Rational Bezier and B-spline representations of circles have been heavily publicized. However, all the literature assumes the rational Bezier segments in the homogeneous space are both planar and (equivalent to) quadratic. This creates the illusion that circles can only be achieved by planar and quadratic curves. Circles that are formed by higher order rational Bezier curves which are nonplanar in the homogeneous space are shown. The problem of whether it is possible to represent a complete circle with one Bezier curve is investigated. In addition, some other interesting properties of cubic Bezier arcs are discussed.

  2. Epigenetic Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing in the Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal Contexts in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Sho-hei; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    A plasmid bearing both a replication initiation region and a matrix attachment region is spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells and generates plasmid repeats in the extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs) or the chromosomal homogeneously staining region (HSR). Generally, the repeat sequences are subject to repeat-induced gene silencing, the mechanism of which remains to be elucidated. Previous research showed that gene expression from the same plasmid repeat was higher from repeats located at DMs than at the HSR, which may reflect the extrachromosomal environment of the DMs. In the current study, plasmid repeats in both DMs and HSR were associated with repressive histone modifications (H3K9me3, H3K9me2), and the levels of repressive chromatin markers were higher in HSR than in DMs. Inactive chromatin is known to spread to neighboring regions in chromosome arm. Here, we found that such spreading also occurs in extrachromosomal DMs. Higher levels of active histone modifications (H3K9Ac, H3K4me3, and H3K79me2) were detected at plasmid repeats in DMs than in HSR. The level of DNA CpG methylation was generally low in both DMs and HSR; however, there were some hypermethylated copies within the population of repeated sequences, and the frequency of such copies was higher in DMs than in HSR. Together, these data suggest a “DNA methylation-core and chromatin-spread” model for repeat-induced gene silencing. The unique histone modifications at the extrachromosomal context are discussed with regard to the model. PMID:27525955

  3. Epigenetic Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing in the Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal Contexts in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Sho-Hei; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    A plasmid bearing both a replication initiation region and a matrix attachment region is spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells and generates plasmid repeats in the extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs) or the chromosomal homogeneously staining region (HSR). Generally, the repeat sequences are subject to repeat-induced gene silencing, the mechanism of which remains to be elucidated. Previous research showed that gene expression from the same plasmid repeat was higher from repeats located at DMs than at the HSR, which may reflect the extrachromosomal environment of the DMs. In the current study, plasmid repeats in both DMs and HSR were associated with repressive histone modifications (H3K9me3, H3K9me2), and the levels of repressive chromatin markers were higher in HSR than in DMs. Inactive chromatin is known to spread to neighboring regions in chromosome arm. Here, we found that such spreading also occurs in extrachromosomal DMs. Higher levels of active histone modifications (H3K9Ac, H3K4me3, and H3K79me2) were detected at plasmid repeats in DMs than in HSR. The level of DNA CpG methylation was generally low in both DMs and HSR; however, there were some hypermethylated copies within the population of repeated sequences, and the frequency of such copies was higher in DMs than in HSR. Together, these data suggest a "DNA methylation-core and chromatin-spread" model for repeat-induced gene silencing. The unique histone modifications at the extrachromosomal context are discussed with regard to the model. PMID:27525955

  4. Polygons and Their Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In order to find its circumference, Archimedes famously boxed the circle between two polygons. Ending the first of a series of articles (MT179) with an aside, Francis Lopez-Real reverses the situation to ask: Which polygons can be boxed between two circles? (The official term for such polygons is "bicentric".) The sides of these polygons are…

  5. Extrachromosomal DNA of pea (Pisum sativum) root-tip cells replicates by strand displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Krimer, D.B.; Van't Hof, J.

    1983-04-01

    In cultured pea roots there is extrachromosomal DNA associated with cells that differentiate from the G/sub 2/ phase of the cell cycle that is absent from those that differentiate from the G/sub 1/ phase. The authors examined this extrachromosomal DNA by electron microscopy and found that it consisted of three types: (i) double-stranded linear molecules with single-stranded branches (74%), (ii) double-stranded molecules without branches (26%), and (iii) free single-stranded molecules. The double-stranded molecules with or without branches were similar in length, having a modal length of 10-15 ..mu..m. The free single-stranded molecules were shorter and had a mean length of 3.8 ..mu..m. The length of the branches attached to the duplex molecules was only slightly less than that of the free form. The duplex molecules with branches were interpreted as configurations reflecting an ongoing strand-displacement process that results in free single-stranded molecules. Finally, measurements on duplex molecules with multiple branches suggested that the extrachromosomal DNA may exist in the form of tandemly repeated sequences. 8 references, 8 figures.

  6. Beyond the Chromosome: The Prevalence of Unique Extra-Chromosomal Bacteriophages with Integrated Virulence Genes in Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Utter, Bryan; Deutsch, Douglas R.; Schuch, Raymond; Winer, Benjamin Y.; Verratti, Kathleen; Bishop-Lilly, Kim; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs) throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01) from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC). Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:24963913

  7. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Utter, Bryan; Deutsch, Douglas R; Schuch, Raymond; Winer, Benjamin Y; Verratti, Kathleen; Bishop-Lilly, Kim; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2014-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs) throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01) from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC). Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:24963913

  8. An Examination of the Effects of Double-Strand Breaks on Extrachromosomal Recombination in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D.; Waldman, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the effects of double-strand breaks on intramolecular extrachromosomal homologous recombination in mammalian cells. Pairs of defective herpes thymidine kinase (tk) sequences were introduced into mouse Ltk(-) cells on a DNA molecule that also contained a neo gene under control of the SV40 early promoter/enhancer. With the majority of the constructs used, gene conversions or double crossovers, but not single crossovers, were recoverable. DNA was linearized with various restriction enzymes prior to transfection. Recombination events producing a functional tk gene were monitored by selecting for tk-positive colonies. For double-strand breaks placed outside of the region of homology, maximal recombination frequencies were measured when a break placed the two tk sequences downstream from the SV40 early promoter/enhancer. We observed no relationship between recombination frequency and either the distance between a break and the tk sequences or the distance between the tk sequences. The quantitative effects of the breaks appeared to depend on the degree of homology between the tk sequences. We also observed that inverted repeats recombined as efficiently as direct repeats. The data indicated that the breaks influenced recombination indirectly, perhaps by affecting the binding of a factor(s) to the SV40 promoter region which in turn stimulated or inhibited recombination of the tk sequences. Taken together, we believe that our results provide strong evidence for the existence of a pathway for extrachromosomal homologous recombination in mammalian cells that is distinct from single-strand annealing. We discuss the possibility that intrachromosomal and extrachromosomal recombination have mechanisms in common. PMID:1459429

  9. Quantization on the circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merad, M.

    2006-05-01

    We present, via the path-integral approach, the quantum study of a particle without spin constrained to move on a circle and subjected to the action of an external field (V, A). In the first stage, we follow the Faddeev-Senjanovic constraints technique that is essentially based on the Dirac algorithm; and in the second stage, we use the path-integral coherent state relative to the circle, compatible with the topological properties. In the two cases, the free particle and the problem of the magnetic field are shown as an illustrative calculation.

  10. The Extrachromosomal EAST Protein of Drosophila Can Associate with Polytene Chromosomes and Regulate Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wasser, Martin; Chia, William

    2007-01-01

    The EAST protein of Drosophila is a component of an expandable extrachromosomal domain of the nucleus. To better understand its function, we studied the dynamics and localization of GFP-tagged EAST. In live larval salivary glands, EAST-GFP is highly mobile and localizes to the extrachromosomal nucleoplasm. When these cells are permeabilized, EAST-GFP rapidly associated with polytene chromosomes. The affinity to chromatin increases and mobility decreases with decreasing salt concentration. Deleting the C-terminal residues 1535 to 2301 of EAST strongly reduces the affinity to polytene chromosomes. The bulk of EAST-GFP co-localizes with heterochromatin and is absent from transcriptionally active chromosomal regions. The predominantly chromosomal localization of EAST-GFP can be detected in non-detergent treated salivary glands of pupae as they undergo apoptosis, however not in earlier stages of development. Consistent with this chromosomal pattern of localization, genetic evidence indicates a role for EAST in the repression of gene expression, since a lethal east mutation is allelic to the viable mutation suppressor of white-spotted. We propose that EAST acts as an ion sensor that modulates gene expression in response to changing intracellular ion concentrations. PMID:17476334

  11. Unstable amplification of two extrachromosomal elements in alpha-difluoromethylornithine-resistant Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, S; Beverley, S M; Wagner, W; Ullman, B

    1992-01-01

    We describe the first example of unstable gene amplification consisting of linear extrachromosomal DNAs in drug-resistant eukaryotic cells. alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)-resistant Leishmania donovani with an amplified ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene copy number contained two new extrachromosomal DNAs, both present in 10 to 20 copies. One of these was a 140-kb linear DNA (ODC140-L) on which all of the amplified copies of the odc gene were located. The second was a 70-kb circular DNA (ODC70-C) containing an inverted repeat but lacking the odc gene. Both ODC140-L and ODC70-C were derived from a preexisting wild-type chromosome, probably by a conservative amplification mechanism. Both elements were unstable in the absence of DFMO, and their disappearance coincided with a decrease in ODC activity and an increase in DFMO growth sensitivity. These results suggest the possibility that ODC70-C may play a role in DFMO resistance. These data expand the diversity of known amplification mechanisms in eukaryotes to include the simultaneous unstable amplification of both linear and circular DNAs. Further characterization of these molecules will provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying gene amplification, including the ability of linear amplified DNAs to acquire telomeres and the determinants of chromosomal stability. Images PMID:1448081

  12. Formation of Extrachromosomal Circular DNA from Long Terminal Repeats of Retrotransposons in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Henrik D.; Larsen, Camilla E.; Parsons, Lance; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Regenberg, Birgitte; Mourier, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA) derived from chromosomal Ty retrotransposons in yeast can be generated in multiple ways. Ty eccDNA can arise from the circularization of extrachromosomal linear DNA during the transpositional life cycle of retrotransposons, or from circularization of genomic Ty DNA. Circularization may happen through nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of long terminal repeats (LTRs) flanking Ty elements, by Ty autointegration, or by LTR–LTR recombination. By performing an in-depth investigation of sequence reads stemming from Ty eccDNAs obtained from populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c, we find that eccDNAs predominantly correspond to full-length Ty1 elements. Analyses of sequence junctions reveal no signs of NHEJ or autointegration events. We detect recombination junctions that are consistent with yeast Ty eccDNAs being generated through recombination events within the genome. This opens the possibility that retrotransposable elements could move around in the genome without an RNA intermediate directly through DNA circularization. PMID:26681518

  13. Literature Circles Go Digital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, Karen; Faughnan, Michelle; Ham, Susan; Miller, Melissa; Armstrong, Traci; Crandall, Cassandra; Garrison, Julia; Marrone, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a literature circle of seven pre-service teacher education students who read "Al Capone Shines My Shoes" (G. Choldenko, 2009). Students used the Internet to complete their roles, shared what they learned as they discussed the book, and then wrote about the digital experience. Four themes emerged from an analysis of…

  14. Quality Circle: Member Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewar, Donald L.

    This training manual provides information on the operation and function of "quality circles," a factory program introduced in Japan in which workers participate voluntarily in quality control and management decisions through various means of communication. Following an introduction, the manual presents a series of frequently asked questions about…

  15. Collaboration through Study Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Martha L.

    2005-01-01

    Communities are telling inspiring stories about what happens when they use public dialogue and action to involve large numbers of citizens--with the greatest diversity possible--in a search for common ground to resolve tough issues like race, community police relations, and education reform. These efforts, often called "study circles," are…

  16. Japanese Quality Control Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishiyama, Kazuo

    In recent years, United States scholars with an interest in international business and organizational communication have begun to notice the success of Japanese "quality control circles." These are small groups, usually composed of seven to ten workers, who are organized at the production levels within most large Japanese factories. A typical…

  17. Circling "the Scourge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Bess

    2005-01-01

    In Kenya alone, where the infection rate is estimated to have reached 13 percent of the population, 27,000 teachers will die and more than 2 million children will lose one or both parents to AIDS in the next five years. The Kenyan project uses "study circles," in which teachers learn together about HIV, script new sexual behaviors for themselves,…

  18. Review: The Closing Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Two views of prominent biologists are presented side-by-side. Focal point is Barry Commoner's book, The Closing Circle, with a subsequent review by Paul Ehrlich. Growth of population, increases in affluence, and increased pollution from products of technology are considered. (BL)

  19. Circles Inscribed in Rhombuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    In this teaching oriented article, I am introducing the concept of an equilateral rhombus, which is completely characterized. Three main theorems are given with proofs in Section 2. Most of the time, the rhombuses that are discussed are not squares. For a given circle of a specified radius sigma greater than?0, there is exactly one equilateral…

  20. Inside Larry's Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Last spring, students from several North Carolina middle schools were invited to participate in the annual Celebrate the Arts festival in Columbus Country. Larry Hewett, a local art teacher, had been selected to instruct the middle-school students. Larry's River Rock Circles project was made as the starting point for the Celebrate the Arts…

  1. Why Story Circle Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, George Ella

    2016-01-01

    If adult attention is screen scrambled, what about kids, whose brains are still developing? In a world where we are over stimulated and hyperlinked-in we are deprived of the kind of time with a person or experience that deepens and sustains us. Here, poet laureate George Ella Lyon writes that the story circle can be such an experience. A school…

  2. VIEW DOWN BIRCH CIRCLE FROM CORNER OF BIRCH CIRCLE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW DOWN BIRCH CIRCLE FROM CORNER OF BIRCH CIRCLE AND ELM DRIVE. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Circling optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupel, M.; Weiss, C. O.

    1995-05-01

    Using a photorefractive oscillator, we show experimental optical patterns whose principal features are optical vortices moving around an optical axis on circles. These patterns can be interpreted as simultaneous emission of helical fields with high-charge phase singularities and other rotationally symmetric fields. Patterns with up to nine circling vortices are shown, as well as patterns with two concentric ``wheels'' of vortices. Mode locking in these rotating patterns corresponds to a stopping of the rotation. An intermediate case between free rotation and locking, in which the pattern ``jumps'' between certain angular positions, is demonstrated, showing that phase locking of these modes, which is not possible for an isotropic resonator, can come about by small anisotropies.

  4. Black Pine Circle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mytko, Christine

    2014-03-31

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  5. Black Pine Circle Project

    ScienceCinema

    Mytko, Christine

    2016-07-12

    A group of seventh graders from Black Pine Circle school in Berkeley had the opportunity to experience the Advanced Light Source (ALS) as "users" via a collaborative field trip and proposal project. The project culminated with a field trip to the ALS for all seventh graders, which included a visit to the ALS data visualization room, a diffraction demonstration, a beamline tour, and informative sessions about x-rays and tomography presented by ALS scientists.

  6. [A new planarian extrachromosomal virus-like element revealed by subtraction hybridization].

    PubMed

    Rebrikov, D V; Bogdanova, E A; Bulina, M E; Luk'ianov, S A

    2002-01-01

    A combination of suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) and a new technique of mirror orientation selection (MOS) was used to compare the total DNA for two, sexual (SR) and asexual (AR), races of freshwater planarian Giradia tigrina. Several race-specific DNA fragments were found. A new element termed planarian extrachromosomal virus-like element (PEVE) was revealed in AR. The PEVE genome contains two unique regions, Ul and Us, which are flanked by inverted repeats. Two variants observed for the PEVE genome differ in combination of single- and double-stranded regions corresponding to Ul and Us. The PEVE genome codes for two helicases, one homologous to the circovirus replication initiation protein (Rep) and one corresponding to the helicase domain of papillomavirus E1. PEVE is nonuniformly distributed though the planarian body and is possibly replicated only in certain parenchymal cells.

  7. Oxidative stress and starvation in Dinoroseobacter shibae: the role of extrachromosomal elements

    PubMed Central

    Soora, Maya; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wang, Hui; Michael, Victoria; Petersen, Jörn; Engelen, Bert; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Cypionka, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAP) are abundant in the photic zone of the marine environment. Dinoroseobacter shibae, a representative of the Roseobacter group, converts light into additional energy that enhances its survival especially under starvation. However, light exposure results in the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in AAPs. Here we investigated the response of D. shibae to starvation and oxidative stress, focusing on the role of extrachromosomal elements (ECRs). D. shibae possessing five ECRs (three plasmids and two chromids) was starved for 4 weeks either in the dark or under light/dark cycles and the survival was monitored. Transcriptomics showed that on the chromosome genes with a role in oxidative stress response and photosynthesis were differentially expressed during the light period. Most extrachromosomal genes in contrast showed a general loss of transcriptional activity, especially in dark-starved cells. The observed decrease of gene expression was not due to plasmid loss, as all five ECRs were maintained in the cells. Interestingly, the genes on the 72-kb chromid were the least downregulated, and one region with genes of the oxygen stress response and a light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase of cyanobacterial origin was strongly activated under the light/dark cycle. A Δ72-kb curing mutant lost the ability to survive under starvation in a light/dark cycle demonstrating the essential role of this chromid for adaptation to starvation and oxidative stress. Our data moreover suggest that the other four ECRs of D. shibae have no vital function under the investigated conditions and therefore were transcriptionally silenced. PMID:25859246

  8. Characterization of Rhizobium grahamii extrachromosomal replicons and their transfer among rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhizobium grahamii belongs to a new phylogenetic group of rhizobia together with Rhizobium mesoamericanum and other species. R. grahamii has a broad-host-range that includes Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris, although it is a poor competitor for P. vulgaris nodulation in the presence of Rhizobium etli or Rhizobium phaseoli strains. This work analyzed the genome sequence and transfer properties of R. grahamii plasmids. Results Genome sequence was obtained from R. grahamii CCGE502 type strain isolated from Dalea leporina in Mexico. The CCGE502 genome comprises one chromosome and two extrachromosomal replicons (ERs), pRgrCCGE502a and pRgrCCGE502b. Additionally, a plasmid integrated in the CCGE502 chromosome was found. The genomic comparison of ERs from this group showed that gene content is more variable than average nucleotide identity (ANI). Well conserved nod and nif genes were found in R. grahamii and R. mesoamericanum with some differences. R. phaseoli Ch24-10 genes expressed in bacterial cells in roots were found to be conserved in pRgrCCGE502b. Regarding conjugative transfer we were unable to transfer the R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and its megaplasmid to other rhizobial hosts but we could transfer the symbiotic plasmid to Agrobacterium tumefaciens with transfer dependent on homoserine lactones. Conclusion Variable degrees of nucleotide identity and gene content conservation were found among the different R. grahamii CCGE502 replicons in comparison to R. mesoamericanum genomes. The extrachromosomal replicons from R. grahamii were more similar to those found in phylogenetically related Rhizobium species. However, limited similarities of R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and megaplasmid were observed in other more distant Rhizobium species. The set of conserved genes in R. grahamii comprises some of those that are highly expressed in R. phaseoli on plant roots, suggesting that they play an important role in root colonization

  9. Oxidative stress and starvation in Dinoroseobacter shibae: the role of extrachromosomal elements.

    PubMed

    Soora, Maya; Tomasch, Jürgen; Wang, Hui; Michael, Victoria; Petersen, Jörn; Engelen, Bert; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Cypionka, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAP) are abundant in the photic zone of the marine environment. Dinoroseobacter shibae, a representative of the Roseobacter group, converts light into additional energy that enhances its survival especially under starvation. However, light exposure results in the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species in AAPs. Here we investigated the response of D. shibae to starvation and oxidative stress, focusing on the role of extrachromosomal elements (ECRs). D. shibae possessing five ECRs (three plasmids and two chromids) was starved for 4 weeks either in the dark or under light/dark cycles and the survival was monitored. Transcriptomics showed that on the chromosome genes with a role in oxidative stress response and photosynthesis were differentially expressed during the light period. Most extrachromosomal genes in contrast showed a general loss of transcriptional activity, especially in dark-starved cells. The observed decrease of gene expression was not due to plasmid loss, as all five ECRs were maintained in the cells. Interestingly, the genes on the 72-kb chromid were the least downregulated, and one region with genes of the oxygen stress response and a light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase of cyanobacterial origin was strongly activated under the light/dark cycle. A Δ72-kb curing mutant lost the ability to survive under starvation in a light/dark cycle demonstrating the essential role of this chromid for adaptation to starvation and oxidative stress. Our data moreover suggest that the other four ECRs of D. shibae have no vital function under the investigated conditions and therefore were transcriptionally silenced.

  10. Nonselective Persistence of a Rickettsia conorii Extrachromosomal Plasmid during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Sean P.; Fish, Abigail I.; Garza, Daniel A.; Banajee, Kaikhushroo H.; Harris, Emma K.; del Piero, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Scientific analysis of the genus Rickettsia is undergoing a rapid period of change with the emergence of viable genetic tools. The development of these tools for the mutagenesis of pathogenic bacteria will permit forward genetic analysis of Rickettsia pathogenesis. Despite these advances, uncertainty still remains regarding the use of plasmids to study these bacteria in in vivo mammalian models of infection, namely, the potential for virulence changes associated with the presence of extrachromosomal DNA and nonselective persistence of plasmids in mammalian models of infection. Here, we describe the transformation of Rickettsia conorii Malish 7 with the plasmid pRam18dRGA[AmTrCh]. Transformed R. conorii stably maintains this plasmid in infected cell cultures, expresses the encoded fluorescent proteins, and exhibits growth kinetics in cell culture similar to those of nontransformed R. conorii. Using a well-established murine model of fatal Mediterranean spotted fever, we demonstrate that R. conorii(pRam18dRGA[AmTrCh]) elicits the same fatal outcomes in animals as its untransformed counterpart and, importantly, maintains the plasmid throughout infection in the absence of selective antibiotic pressure. Interestingly, plasmid-transformed R. conorii was readily observed both in endothelial cells and within circulating leukocytes. Together, our data demonstrate that the presence of an extrachromosomal DNA element in a pathogenic rickettsial species does not affect either in vitro proliferation or in vivo infectivity in models of disease and that plasmids such as pRam18dRGA[AmTrCh] are valuable tools for the further genetic manipulation of pathogenic rickettsiae. PMID:26755154

  11. Small DNA circles as probes of DNA topology.

    PubMed

    Bates, Andrew D; Noy, Agnes; Piperakis, Michael M; Harris, Sarah A; Maxwell, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Small DNA circles can occur in Nature, for example as protein-constrained loops, and can be synthesized by a number of methods. Such small circles provide tractable systems for the study of the structure, thermodynamics and molecular dynamics of closed-circular DNA. In the present article, we review the occurrence and synthesis of small DNA circles, and examine their utility in studying the properties of DNA and DNA-protein interactions. In particular, we highlight the analysis of small circles using atomistic simulations.

  12. Introducing healing circles and talking circles into primary care.

    PubMed

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Mainguy, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We report on the incorporation of a North American aboriginal procedure called "the talking circle" into primary care in areas serving this population. Communication is regulated through the passing of a talking piece (an object of special meaning or symbolism to the circle facilitator, who is usually called the circle keeper). Twelve hundred people participated in talking circles in which 415 attended 4 sessions and completed pre- and postquestionnaires. Outcome measures included baseline and end Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile version 2 forms. Participation in at least 4 talking circles resulted in a statistically significant improvement in reported symptoms and overall quality of life (p < 0.001 and effect sizes ranging from 0.75 to 1.19). The talking circle is a useful tool to use with Native Americans. It may be useful as a means to reduce health care costs by providing other alternative settings to deal with stress-related and other life problems.

  13. Circle of Ashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Circle of Ashes

    This plot tells astronomers that a pulsar, the remnant of a stellar explosion, is surrounded by a disk of its own ashes. The disk, revealed by the two data points at the far right from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, is the first ever found around a pulsar. Astronomers believe planets might rise up out of these stellar ashes.

    The data in this plot, or spectrum, were taken by ground-based telescopes and Spitzer. They show that light from around the pulsar can be divided into two categories: direct light from the pulsar, and light from the dusty disk swirling around the pulsar. This excess light was detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Dust gives off more infrared light than the pulsar because it's cooler.

    The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star, until about 100,000 years ago, when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the leftover stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born.

    The data have been corrected to remove the effects of light scattering from dust that lies between Earth and the pulsar.

    The ground-based data is from the Keck I telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  14. Role of the silkworm argonaute2 homolog gene in double-strand break repair of extrachromosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsukioka, Haruna; Takahashi, Masateru; Mon, Hiroaki; Okano, Kazuhiro; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru; Lee, Jae Man; Kawaguchi, Yutaka; Koga, Katsumi; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2006-01-01

    The argonaute protein family provides central components for RNA interference (RNAi) and related phenomena in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we isolated, from a Bombyx mori cell, a cDNA clone named BmAGO2, which is homologous to Drosophila ARGONAUTE2, the gene encoding a repressive factor for the recombination repair of extrachromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs). RNAi-mediated silencing of the BmAGO2 sequence markedly increased homologous recombination (HR) repair of DSBs in episomal DNA, but had no effect on that in chromosomes. Moreover, we found that RNAi for BmAGO2 enhanced the integration of linearized DNA into a silkworm chromosome via HR. These results suggested that BmAgo2 protein plays an indispensable role in the repression of extrachromosomal DSB repair.

  15. Introducing Healing Circles and Talking Circles into Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Mainguy, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We report on the incorporation of a North American aboriginal procedure called “the talking circle” into primary care in areas serving this population. Communication is regulated through the passing of a talking piece (an object of special meaning or symbolism to the circle facilitator, who is usually called the circle keeper). Twelve hundred people participated in talking circles in which 415 attended 4 sessions and completed pre- and postquestionnaires. Outcome measures included baseline and end Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile version 2 forms. Participation in at least 4 talking circles resulted in a statistically significant improvement in reported symptoms and overall quality of life (p < 0.001 and effect sizes ranging from 0.75 to 1.19). The talking circle is a useful tool to use with Native Americans. It may be useful as a means to reduce health care costs by providing other alternative settings to deal with stress-related and other life problems. PMID:24867544

  16. Squaring cooperative binding circles

    PubMed Central

    Deutman, Alexander B. C.; Monnereau, Cyrille; Moalin, Mohamed; Coumans, Ruud G. E.; Veling, Nico; Coenen, Michiel; Smits, Jan M. M.; de Gelder, René; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Ercolani, Gianfranco; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Rowan, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    The cooperative binding effects of viologens and pyridines to a synthetic bivalent porphyrin receptor are used as a model system to study how the magnitudes of these effects relate to the experimentally obtained values. The full thermodynamic and kinetic circles concerning both activation and inhibition of the cage of the receptor for the binding of viologens were measured and evaluated. The results strongly emphasize the apparent character of measured binding and rate constants, in which the fractional saturation of receptors with other guests is linearly expressed in these constants. The presented method can be used as a simple tool to better analyze and comprehend the experimentally observed kinetics and thermodynamics of natural and artificial cooperative systems. PMID:19470643

  17. Learning about Aboriginal contexts: the reading circle approach.

    PubMed

    Begoray, Deborah L; Banister, Elizabeth

    2008-07-01

    As more opportunities arise for nursing students to obtain experience in community sites, they will be called on to practice in culturally appropriate ways more often. Although nurses remain challenged by the range of populations needing differentiated approaches, Aboriginal cultural contexts deserve special attention. Nurse educators must help students increase their understanding of Aboriginal life and ways of knowing. One way to facilitate this understanding is through a learning approach called reading circles. Reading circles offer a structure in the classroom for students to interact about ideas or readings. The reading circle process is congruent with Aboriginal ways of learning, which emphasize working in circle, with each member having a role and an equal chance to be heard. Aboriginal students in the class may be particularly comfortable with this learning method. This article describes specific steps for incorporating the reading circle approach into the nurse education classroom.

  18. Transaction Circles with Digital Texts as a Foundation for Democratic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Transaction circles weave together elements of guided reading and literature circles in an open conversational structure that supports students as agentive learners. Discourse within these circles utilizing digital informational texts assist in the development of democratic practices even in a time when federal mandates limit curricula and…

  19. Structuring waveguide-grating-based wavelength-division multiplexing/optical code division multiple access network codecs over topology of concentric circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jen-Fa; Nieh, Ta-Chun; Chen, Kai-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic period and free spectral range of arrayed-waveguide gratings (AWG) in a wavelength-division multiplexing/optical code division multiple access optical code division multiple access network are exploited. The total optical network unit (ONU) of network capacity is partitioned into groups of different wavelength in accordance with the geographical location of subscribers based on the radial distance of the ONU to the optical line terminal. Combining concentric circles round by round for ONU groups enables a fixed round-trip time in the data transmission and a significant increase in system performance. Using AWG router, the proposed topology of concentric circles retains signature orthogonality and minimizes wavelength collisions on the photo-detector. Furthermore, the adoption of extended M-sequence codes corresponding to the AWG codec provides a simpler, more efficient coding procedure and accommodates more users in a single group.

  20. Quality circles promote mine safety

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, S.D.

    1983-04-01

    A ''quality circle'' is a small group of people (usually seven to 10 members), who meet on a regular basis to identify, analyze, and solve work-related problems. It is a means to develop employees rather than simply a technique to increase production or reduce waste. The ''people-oriented'' philosophy underlying quality circles is based on the idea that workers who are involved in decisions that affect their work become more productive. Quality circles are based on the concept of statistical analysis control first introduced in Japan by Dr. W. Edwards Deming. Today, there are more than 8,000,000 industrial workers in Japan participating in quality circles. This article outlines this concept as it evolved in quite a different setting, a surface coal mine in southwestern Illinois, United States.

  1. Introducing Motion in a Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2001-01-01

    Motion in a circle troubled Newton and his contemporaries and troubles students today. Presents a clear presentation of certain aspects, particularly centripetal acceleration and centrifugal force. (Author/MM)

  2. Director Circles of Conic Sections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2002-01-01

    Given a conic section, the locus of a moving point in the plane of the conic section such that the two tangent lines drawn to the conic section from the moving point are all mutually perpendicular is a curve. In the case of an ellipse and hyperbola this curve is a circle referred to as the director circle. In the case of the parabola this curve…

  3. The 'inner circle' of the cereal genomes.

    PubMed

    Bolot, Stéphanie; Abrouk, Michael; Masood-Quraishi, Umar; Stein, Nils; Messing, Joachim; Feuillet, Catherine; Salse, Jérôme

    2009-04-01

    Early marker-based macrocolinearity studies between the grass genomes led to arranging their chromosomes into concentric 'crop circles' of synteny blocks that initially consisted of 30 rice-independent linkage groups representing the ancestral cereal genome structure. Recently, increased marker density and genome sequencing of several cereal genomes allowed the characterization of intragenomic duplications and their integration with intergenomic colinearity data to identify paleo-duplications and propose a model for the evolution of the grass genomes from a common ancestor. On the basis of these data an 'inner circle' comprising five ancestral chromosomes was defined providing a new reference for the grass chromosomes and new insights into their ancestral relationships and origin, as well as an efficient tool to design cross-genome markers for genetic studies.

  4. Study Circle Guide: Adult Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This study circle was created by the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL). The study circle is part of NCSALL's efforts to help connect research and practice in the field of adult basic education and adult literacy. The Adult Student Persistence Study Circle is one of a series of study circles that NCSALL has…

  5. Gene amplification system based on double rolling-circle replication as a model for oncogene-type amplification.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takaaki; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Gene amplification contributes to a variety of biological phenomena, including malignant progression and drug resistance. However, details of the molecular mechanisms remain to be determined. Here, we have developed a gene amplification system in yeast and mammalian cells that is based on double rolling-circle replication (DRCR). Cre-lox system is used to efficiently induce DRCR utilizing a recombinational process coupled with replication. This system shows distinctive features seen in amplification of oncogenes and drug-resistance genes: (i) intra- and extrachromosomal amplification, (ii) intensive chromosome rearrangement and (iii) scattered-type amplification resembling those seen in cancer cells. This system can serve as a model for amplification of oncogenes and drug-resistance genes, and improve amplification systems used for making pharmaceutical proteins in mammalian cells.

  6. Two Circles and Their Common Tangents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2002-01-01

    Given two circles C 1 and C 2 in a plane such that neither one of the two circles is contained in the other, there are either four common tangents when the circles do not intersect at all or the circles have three common tangents when they touch each other externally or only two common tangents when the circles intersect exactly at two points. The…

  7. Tracking of microinjected DNA in live cells reveals the intracellular behavior and elimination of extrachromosomal genetic material

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Noriaki; Kamezaki, Fumie; Shigematsu, Shiho

    2005-01-01

    We here addressed the basic question, how does extrachromosomal DNA behave when it is placed in the nuclear or the cytoplasmic environment and how is it eliminated? To do this, we tracked microinjected DNA molecules in live cells. In the cytoplasm, the diffusion of microinjected DNA was inhibited in a size- and linearity-dependent manner, probably by the intermediate filament. This was followed by the rapid disappearance of the DNA fluorescent signal. In the nucleus, the diffusion was also dependent on the size of the molecule and was accompanied by the aggregation of the DNA. The aggregation may be due to a putative DNA-binding molecule, whose level is high during the G1 phase. Surprisingly, the injected DNA could move across the nuclear membrane and appeared in the cytoplasm, which suggests the presence of a transport system. The intracytoplasmic behavior and the elimination of such DNA was obviously different from the DNA that was directly injected at the cytoplasm. The DNA remaining in the nucleus appeared to be stable and persisted in the nucleus or, after cell division, in the cytoplasm, for more than one cell cycle. These findings provide a novel and basic understanding of the behavior and elimination of a wide variety of extrachromosomal genetic material. PMID:16269822

  8. Seeds of change: using peacemaking circles to build a village for every child.

    PubMed

    Boyes-Watson, Carolyn

    2005-01-01

    Roca, Inc., a grassroots human development and community organization, has adopted the peacemaking circle as a tool in its relationship building with youth, communities, and formal systems. Circles are a method of communication derived from aboriginal and native traditions. In Massachusetts, the Department of Social Services and the Department of Youth Services are exploring the application of the circle in programming with youth and families. By providing a consistent structure for open, democratic communication, peacemaking circles enhance the formation of positive relationships in families, communities, and systems. The outcome is a stronger community with greater unity across truly diverse participants. This article presents the theory and practice of peacemaking circles, the lessons and challenges of implementing circles in formal organizations, and the potential of the circle to support a strengths-based and community-based approach to child welfare.

  9. Critical phenomena of invariant circles

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, B.; Shi, J. ); Kim, S. )

    1991-04-15

    Some novel critical phenomena are discovered in a class of nonanalytic twist maps. It is found that the degree of inflection {ital z} plays a role reminiscent of that of dimensionality in phase transitions with {ital z}=2 and 3 corresponding to the lower and upper critical dimensions, respectively. Moreover, recurrence of invariant circles has also been observed. An inverse residue criterion,'' complementary to the residue criterion'' for the determination of the disappearance point, is introduced to determine the reappearance point of invariant circles.

  10. On a Family of Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeman, Timothy G.

    2011-01-01

    We generalize a standard example from precalculus and calculus texts to give a simple description in polar coordinates of any circle that passes through the origin. We discuss an occurrence of this formula in the context of medical imaging. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. On the Circle of Apollonius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2006-01-01

    The circle discussed in this paper is named after "The Great Geometer of Antiquity", that is Apollonius of Perga (ca. 262-190 BCE). Among his many contributions to geometry is a book with the title "Plane Loci." This book included, among others, a problem about the locus of a point moving in a plane such that the ratio of its distances from two…

  12. Making Decisions in Quality Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Mildred

    This monograph provides educational staff with a theoretical basis for decision-making skills for application in quality circles. Roadblocks to good decisions are outlined, as well as the differences between group decision-making and individual decision-making (both have problems). The influence of values and personality characteristics on…

  13. The Circle Approach to Trigonometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kevin c.; LaForest, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    How do students think about an angle measure of ninety degrees? How do they think about ratios and values on the unit circle? How might angle measure be used to connect right-triangle trigonometry and circular functions? And why might asking these questions be important when introducing trigonometric functions to students? When teaching…

  14. Digital Storytelling: Reinventing Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Maryann Tatum

    2012-01-01

    New literacies in reading research demand the study of comprehension skills using multiple modalities through a more complex, multi-platform view of reading. Taking into account the robust roll of technology in our daily lives, this article presents an update to the traditional literature circle lesson to include digital storytelling and…

  15. Toolbox: Textbook Circles for Teaching Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Teach students to use their literacy skills in the content areas. Textbook circles are a great way to make the most of the skills students learn during literature circles and help them transfer these skills to assigned content area texts.

  16. Quality circles: Organizational adaptations, improvements and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorich, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effective application in industry and government of quality circles work was demonstrated. The results achieved in quality and productivity improvements and cost savings are impressive. The circle process should be institutionalized within industry and government. The stages of circle program growth, innovations that help achieve circle process institutionalization, and the result achieved at Martin Marietta's Michoud Division and within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are addressed.

  17. Soma to germline inheritance of extrachromosomal genetic information via a LINE-1 reverse transcriptase-based mechanism.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Corrado

    2016-08-01

    Mature spermatozoa are permeable to foreign DNA and RNA molecules. Here I propose a model, whereby extrachromosomal genetic information, mostly encoded in the form of RNA in somatic cells, can cross the Weismann barrier and reach epididymal spermatozoa. LINE-1 retrotransposon-derived reverse transcriptase (RT) can play key roles in the process by expanding the RNA-encoded information. Retrotransposon-encoded RT is stored in mature gametes, is highly expressed in early embryos and undifferentiated cells, and becomes downregulated in differentiated cells. In turn, RT plays a role in developmental control, as its inhibition arrests developmental progression of early embryos with globally altered transcriptomic profiles. Thus, sperm cells act as recipients, and transgenerational vectors of somatically derived genetic information which they pass to the next generation with the potential to modify the fate of the developing embryos. PMID:27315018

  18. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  19. Yarning Circles in the Literacy Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kathy A.; Sunderland, Naomi; Davis-Warra, John

    2014-01-01

    This article explains how the speaking and listening practice of yarning circles can be used in the literacy classroom. The article opens with an account of a live enactment of yarning circles with elementary students in a mainstream classroom in Australia. It explains the purpose and origin of yarning circles in Indigenous communities, and…

  20. Science Literacy Circles: Big Ideas about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devick-Fry, Jane; LeSage, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Science literacy circles incorporate the organization of both science notebooks and literature circles to help K-8 students internalize big ideas about science. Using science literacy circles gives students opportunities to engage in critical thinking as they inductively develop understanding about science concepts. (Contains 1 table and 7…

  1. Creating Circle of Courage Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bockern, Steve; McDonald, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Dream what a school would be like in which the purpose is to meet the needs of children and the larger community so that all can lead a good life. Using the Circle of Courage[TM]--a model grounded in values of deep respect for the dignity of all--the authors of this article outline overarching goals and indicators that can turn this dream into…

  2. Strong interaction between plants induces circular barren patches: fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Oto, C; Tlidi, M; Escaff, D; Clerc, M G

    2014-10-28

    Fairy circles consist of isolated or randomly distributed circular areas devoid of any vegetation. They are observed in vast territories in southern Angola, Namibia and South Africa. We report on the formation of fairy circles, and we interpret them as localized structures with a varying plateau size as a function of the aridity. Their stabilization mechanism is attributed to a combined influence of the bistability between the bare state and the uniformly vegetation state, and Lorentzian-like non-local coupling that models the competition between plants. We show how a circular shape is formed, and how the aridity level influences the size of fairy circles. Finally, we show that the proposed mechanism is model-independent.

  3. Circle detection using scan lines and histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Zhang, Feng; Du, Zhenhong; Liu, Renyi

    2013-11-01

    Circle detection is significant in image processing and pattern recognition. We present a new algorithm for detecting circles, which is based on the global geometric symmetry of circles. First, the horizontal and vertical midpoint histograms of the edge image are obtained by using scan lines. Then, we apply the peak-finding algorithm to the midpoint histograms to look for the center of the circle. The normalized radius histogram is finally used to verify the existence of the circle and extract its radius. Synthetic images with different levels of pepper noise and real images containing several circles have been taken to test the performance. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has the advantage of computational efficiency as compared with the randomized Hough transform and some other algorithms.

  4. Assessment of the Circle of Willis with Cranial Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Ayse; Coban, Gokmen; Cinar, Celal; Oran, Ismail; Uz, Aysun

    2015-01-01

    Background The circle of Willis is a major collateral pathway important in ischemic conditions. The aim of our study was to assess the structural characteristics of the circle of Willis within the Turkish adult population, along with variations and arteries involved in the measurement of diameters and lengths on cranial computed tomography angiography (CTA). Material/Methods One hundred adult patients who underwent CTA images were evaluated retrospectively. Results Results of the study revealed 82% adult, 17% fetal, and 1% transitional configurations. A complete polygonal structure was observed in 28% of cases. Variations of the circle of Willis were more common in the posterior portion. Hypoplasia was found to be the most common variation and was observed as a maximum in the posterior communicating artery (AComP). Conclusions The patency and size of arteries in the circle of Willis are important in occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and cerebrovascular surgery. Although CTA is an easily accessible non-invasive clinical method for demonstrating the vascular structure, CTA should be evaluated taking into account image resolution quality and difficulties in the identification of small vessels. PMID:26343887

  5. Small RNA-based feedforward loop with AND-gate logic regulates extrachromosomal DNA transfer in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Espinosa, Elena; Casadesús, Josep; Vogel, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer via plasmid conjugation is a major driving force in microbial evolution but constitutes a complex process that requires synchronization with the physiological state of the host bacteria. Although several host transcription factors are known to regulate plasmid-borne transfer genes, RNA-based regulatory circuits for host–plasmid communication remain unknown. We describe a posttranscriptional mechanism whereby the Hfq-dependent small RNA, RprA, inhibits transfer of pSLT, the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica. RprA employs two separate seed-pairing domains to activate the mRNAs of both the sigma-factor σS and the RicI protein, a previously uncharacterized membrane protein here shown to inhibit conjugation. Transcription of ricI requires σS and, together, RprA and σS orchestrate a coherent feedforward loop with AND-gate logic to tightly control the activation of RicI synthesis. RicI interacts with the conjugation apparatus protein TraV and limits plasmid transfer under membrane-damaging conditions. To our knowledge, this study reports the first small RNA-controlled feedforward loop relying on posttranscriptional activation of two independent targets and an unexpected role of the conserved RprA small RNA in controlling extrachromosomal DNA transfer. PMID:26307765

  6. Extrachromosomal homologous DNA recombination in plant cells is fast and is not affected by CpG methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Puchta, H; Kocher, S; Hohn, B

    1992-01-01

    Using a sensitive transient assay, we investigated extrachromosomal homologous DNA recombination (ECR) in plant cells. As the plant genome is highly C methylated, we addressed the question of whether CpG methylation has an influence on DNA recombination efficiencies. Whereas the expression level of the fully CpG-methylated DNA molecules was reduced drastically, we found no significant changes in ECR efficiencies between two partly CpG-methylated plasmids or between one fully CpG-methylated and one nonmethylated plasmid. Using a modified polymerase chain reaction analysis, we were able to detect recombination between two fully CpG-methylated plasmids. Furthermore, we characterized the kinetics of the ECR reaction. Cotransfection of plasmids carrying truncated copies of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene resulted in enzyme activity with a delay of only half an hour compared with that of the plasmid carrying the functional marker gene. This indicates that the ECR reaction itself requires no more than 30 min. By polymerase chain reaction, we were able to detect the recombined GUS gene as early as 2 h after transfection. This result and the time course of the transient GUS activity indicate that ECR occurs mainly early after transfection. The biological significance of this finding is discussed, and properties of ECR and intrachromosomal recombination are compared. Images PMID:1630452

  7. "Online Literature Circles Rock!" Organizing Online Literature Circles in a Middle School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Deanna; Kroon, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-one sixth graders participated in three rounds of online literature circles and three face-to-face literature circles. The authors describe how the online literature circles were introduced and organized in the classroom and discuss the tensions, struggles, and successes from their implementation. An analysis of qualitative data yielded…

  8. The Circle of Courage and Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Brokenleg, Martin; Van Bockern, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The Circle of Courage identifies four universal needs of all children: Belonging, Mastery, Independence, and Generosity. When these needs are met, children grow and thrive. But when these growth needs are frustrated, multiple problems follow. The Circle of Courage defines problems of youth in terms of strengths and developmental needs. These…

  9. Literature Circles in the Physical Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, Suzanne; Reilly, Erin

    2004-01-01

    Daniels (1994) defines literature circles as small groups of students reading the same text(s) on the same topic. Literature circles have been linked to valued outcomes, such as helping students reach a clearer understanding of themselves and others; collaborative learning fosters true inquiry in small, student-centered discussion groups that…

  10. The Reading Circle Movement in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearman, Mindy

    2007-01-01

    In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, state-sponsored reading circles provided American teachers with an opportunity for low-cost professional development. Teachers who participated in reading circles read professional literature, discussed the material with colleagues, and, occasionally, completed written assignments based on the…

  11. Developing Soft Skills Using "Literature Circles"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azmi, Mohd Nazri Bin Latiff

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of the implementation of "Literature Circles" in an Active Learning classroom in relations to developing soft skills among university students. The use of Literature Circles is a well-known strategy in teaching the students to be more creative, independent, and think out of the box. A group of…

  12. Unit Circles and Inverse Trigonometric Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Azael

    2014-01-01

    Historical accounts of trigonometry refer to the works of many Indian and Arab astronomers on the origin of the trigonometric functions as we know them now, in particular Abu al-Wafa (ca. 980 CE), who determined and named all known trigonometric functions from segments constructed on a regular circle and later on a unit circle (Moussa 2011;…

  13. Is that Square Really a Circle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    While teaching a methods class for preservice secondary school mathematics teachers, Christopher E. Smith found that although all students could draw a reasonably close approximation of a circle, not all could provide an entirely accurate definition of a circle. A discussion with students led him to think about ways of reintroducing students to…

  14. Building Background Knowledge within Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Diane; Barone, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the strength of literature circles in developing background knowledge--an acknowledged sticking point in the development of understanding for middle graders--with a special focus on the literature circle role of "investigator," where it is student initiative and not teacher direction that guides comprehension. Observing…

  15. Drum Circles and the National Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidyk, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The beauty of hand drums is that a child of nearly any age can grab one and get a sound. So how can classroom teachers incorporate this enjoyable activity into something that's actually educational? For young students especially, a drum circle can be liberating. Children can be given various responsibilities--as participants, circle organizers,…

  16. Euclidean Circles and Their Modular Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Joe Dan

    1990-01-01

    Shows a series of Euclidean equations using the Euclidean algorithm to get the greatest common divisor of two integers. Describes the use of the equations to generate a series of circles. Discusses computer generation of Euclidean circles and provides a BASIC program. (YP)

  17. Biomechanical analysis of circles on pommel horse.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Toshiyuki; Fuchimoto, Takafumi; Gervais, Pierre

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the principal mechanics of circles. Seventeen university male gymnasts performed circles on an instrumented pommel horse model that enabled the pommel reaction forces to be recorded at 1000 Hz with two force plates. The circles were also videotaped using two digital video cameras operating at 60 frames per second. During circles, the vertical component of the reaction forces peaked in the double-hand support phases. Changes in the velocity of the centre of mass corresponded to the change in the tangential components of horizontal reaction forces. The velocity of the centre of mass had its peaks in the single-hand support phases and its local minimums in the double-hand support phases. The velocity of the ankles and that of the centre of mass of the head and trunk were minimal in the single-hand support phases and were maximal in the double-hand support phases. These results suggest that the circles were composed of vertical movements and two kinds of rotations: rotation of the centre of mass and rotation of the body itself about the centre of mass. These two kinds of rotations, which influence the legs' rotational velocity, are phase dependent. To further our understanding of circles, research on circles in different orientations on the pommel horse will be beneficial. PMID:19391492

  18. Characterization of the extrachromosomal function (ECF) sigma factors of Arcobacter butzleri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported cause of bacterial foodborne illness in North America. C. jejuni decorates its surface polysaccharides with a variety of variable phosphorylated structures, including O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modifications on the capsular polysaccharide. Alt...

  19. Examination of the Circle Spline Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolin, R. M.; Jaeger, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Circle Spline routine is currently being used for generating both two and three dimensional spline curves. It was developed for use in ESCHER, a mesh generating routine written to provide a computationally simple and efficient method for building meshes along curved surfaces. Circle Spline is a parametric linear blending spline. Because many computerized machining operations involve circular shapes, the Circle Spline is well suited for both the design and manufacturing processes and shows promise as an alternative to the spline methods currently supported by the Initial Graphics Specification (IGES).

  20. The experience of meaning in circle dance

    PubMed Central

    Borges da Costa, Ana L.; Cox, Diane L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circle dance, which derives from the tradition of folk dances, is practised worldwide. This article explores the meanings participants attribute to it. In-depth interviews with 39 participants, teachers and coordinators of teacher training programmes from the circle dance network in the United Kingdom were undertaken. Applying a constructivist grounded theory approach, major categories, representing respectively the experiences of circle dance participants, teachers and coordinators, were developed. This article specifically focuses on the first major category, termed “I can't imagine life without it”, which relates to the experience of 22 dancers. From an occupational perspective, the study reveals how participants realise a sense of meaning and satisfaction through engagement in circle dance and the potential contribution of this occupation to well-being. PMID:27366111

  1. [Health education based on culture circles].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Estela Maria Leite Meirelles; Vieira, Neiva Francenely Cunha

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at systematizing with the participants of Culture Circles a proposal of reconstruction of actions of health education that show the necessary competences to the nurses of Family Health Program for a practice in education on critical and reflexive health. It is constituted of a research action, where the researcher based in "Paulo Freire Method" is encouraging debates in eight Culture Circles having the participation of ten nurses. The Circles give them the training of a political conscience , essential to the process of " empowerment " of the health professional in practicing his socio-politics competence. The proposal of achieving the Culture Circles establish a link of complicity between health professionals and communitarian groups with the actions of health promotion. PMID:20658073

  2. Dark circles: etiology and management options.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Daniel P; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2015-01-01

    Given their multifactorial nature and the fact that individual patients may have more than a single underlying cause, cosmetic practitioners should be well versed in a number of potential treatment options encompassing all facets of under-eye dark circles. New therapeutic options are also forthcoming. Longer-lasting HA fillers, wavelength tunable laser devices, and topicals speeding up healing and enhancing results after fractionated laser therapy will all serve to make the future of dark circle treatment unabatedly bright.

  3. Sets that Contain Their Circle Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Say that a subset S of the plane is a "circle-center set" if S is not a subset of a line, and whenever we choose three non-collinear points from S, the center of the circle through those three points is also an element of S. A problem appearing on the Macalester College Problem of the Week website stated that a finite set of points in the plane,…

  4. Switch circles from IL-4-directed epsilon class switching from human B lymphocytes. Evidence for direct, sequential, and multiple step sequential switch from mu to epsilon Ig heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Mills, F C; Saxon, A

    1994-04-01

    Ig isotype switch via deletional recombination is accompanied by excision of the intervening DNA between the two switch regions. The excised DNA is looped out as extrachromosomal circular DNA or switch circle. Such switch circles have been isolated and characterized in mice. We investigated deletional recombination in human B cells undergoing Ig isotype switching to demonstrate whether switch circles are also excised, and to thereby gain insight into the processes involved in human isotype switching. We characterized the deleted switch circular DNA from IL-4 directed mu to epsilon switching in polyclonal human B lymphocytes. By using two sets of specially designed PCR primers, we amplified switch circle fragments representing switch circles resulting from mu to epsilon direct switching and mu-gamma-epsilon sequential switching. The PCR-amplified products were subcloned by a TA cloning strategy and resulting clones were screened by hybridization with a 5'S epsilon probe. Sequence analysis of the positive clones revealed that all clones representing mu to epsilon direct switching indeed had 5'S epsilon directly joined to 3' S mu. Most clones representing mu-gamma-epsilon sequential switching showed 5'S epsilon joined to 3' S gamma as expected. However, two clones contained S mu and S alpha 1 sequences interposed between 5'S epsilon and 3'S gamma, respectively. These data demonstrate that switch circles are excised during human B cell isotype switching, and that IL-4 directed epsilon class switching is accomplished by 1) direct mu to epsilon switching, 2) sequential mu-gamma-epsilon switching, and 3) double sequential mu-alpha-gamma-epsilon switching.

  5. Formation of the circle of Willis during human embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Takakuwa, Tetsuya; Koike, Teppei; Muranaka, Taiga; Uwabe, Chigako; Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-09-01

    The circle of Willis (CW) is a circulatory anastomosis that supplies blood to the brain and adjacent structures. We examined the timing of formation of CW in 20 Japanese human embryo samples by using 3-dimensional reconstruction of serial histological sections. The CW was closed in 1 (n = 6), 2 (n = 8), 2 (n = 3) and 2 (n = 3) samples at Carnegie stages 20, 21, 22, and 23, respectively. The CW was unclosed in 13 samples (unclosed at ACOM alone, 6 samples; ACOM and bilateral P1, 4; left PCOM and right P1, 1; right PCOM and right P1, 1; ACOM and left PCOM, 1). It was difficult to predict whether the circle would close during further development, as such variations frequently exist in adults.

  6. The Director Circle of a Central Conic Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2007-01-01

    Each ellipse and hyperbola has a circle associated with it called the director circle. In this article, the author derives the equations of the circle for the ellipse and hyperbola through a different approach. Then the author concentrates on the director circle of the central conic given by the general quadratic equation. The content of this…

  7. Physiological and lifestyle factors contributing to risk and severity of peri-orbital dark circles in the Brazilian population*

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S; Schalka, Sérgio; Vanderover, Garrett; Fthenakis, Christina G.; Christopher, J; Bombarda, Patricia Camarano Pinto; Bueno, Juliana Regina; Viscomi, Bianca Lenci Inácio; Bombarda Júnior, Mário Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peri-orbital dark circles are a cosmetic concern worldwide, and have been attributed to hyperpigmentation from allergy or atopic dermatitis, blood stasis, structural shadowing effects, and a thin epidermis/dermis under the eye. It is of interest to better understand lifestyle and demographic risk factors and the relative impact of melanin, blood and epidermal/dermal factors on the severity of Peri-orbital dark circles. OBJECTIVE To compare by non-invasive imaging the impact of biological factors to a visual grading scale for Peri-orbital dark circles, and test the correlation of various demographic factors with Peri-orbital dark circles. METHODS Subjects completed a lifestyle and health survey, and Peri-orbital dark circles severity was evaluated using standardized photographs. Hyperspectral image analysis was used to assess the contributions of melanin, blood volume, degree of blood oxygen saturation, and dermal scattering. RESULTS Family history was the most significant risk factor for Peri-orbital dark circles. The average age of onset was 24 years, and earlier onset correlated with higher severity scores. Asthma was significantly associated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores, but self-reported allergy was not. In this study, sleep was not correlated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores. Hyperspectral imaging indicated that melanin was the dominant correlate for Peri-orbital dark circles severity, while oxygen saturation was secondary. The difference between under-eye and cheek measurements for ∆L*and ∆E* were the most significant instrumental parameters correlated with visual assessment of Peri-orbital dark circles severity. CONCLUSION Although typically associated with lack of sleep, risk of Peri-orbital dark circles is primarily hereditary. The main factors contributing to the appearance of Peri-orbital dark circles are melanin and (deoxygenated) blood. PMID:26375218

  8. Experiments Testing the Causes of Namibian Fairy Circles

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.

    2015-01-01

    The grasslands on the sandy soils of the eastern edge of the Namib Desert of Namibia are strikingly punctuated by millions of mostly regularly-spaced circular bare spots 2 to 10 m or more in diameter, generally with a margin of taller grasses. The causes of these so called fairy circles are unknown, but several hypotheses have been advanced. In October 2009, we set up experiments that specifically tested four hypothesized causes, and monitored these 5 times between 2009 and 2015. Grass exclusion in circles due to seepage of subterranean vapors or gases was tested by burying an impermeable barrier beneath fairy circles, but seedling density and growth did not differ from barrier-less controls. Plant germination and growth inhibition by allelochemicals or nutrient deficiencies in fairy circle soils were tested by transferring fairy circle soil to artificially cleared circles in the grassy matrix, and matrix soil to fairy circles (along with circle to circle and matrix to matrix controls). None of the transfers changed the seedling density and growth from the control reference conditions. Limitation of plant growth due to micronutrient depletion within fairy circles was tested by supplementing circles with a micronutrient mixture, but did not result in differences in plant seedling density and growth. Short-range vegetation competitive feedbacks were tested by creating artificially-cleared circles of 2 or 4 m diameter located 2 or 6 m from a natural fairy circle. The natural circles remained bare and the artificial circles revegetated. These four experiments provided evidence that fairy circles were not caused by subterranean vapors, that fairy circle soil per se did not inhibit plant growth, and that the circles were not caused by micronutrient deficiency. There was also no evidence that vegetative feedbacks affected fairy circles on a 2 to 10 m scale. Landscape-scale vegetative self-organization is discussed as a more likely cause of fairy circles. PMID:26510015

  9. Experiments Testing the Causes of Namibian Fairy Circles.

    PubMed

    Tschinkel, Walter R

    2015-01-01

    The grasslands on the sandy soils of the eastern edge of the Namib Desert of Namibia are strikingly punctuated by millions of mostly regularly-spaced circular bare spots 2 to 10 m or more in diameter, generally with a margin of taller grasses. The causes of these so called fairy circles are unknown, but several hypotheses have been advanced. In October 2009, we set up experiments that specifically tested four hypothesized causes, and monitored these 5 times between 2009 and 2015. Grass exclusion in circles due to seepage of subterranean vapors or gases was tested by burying an impermeable barrier beneath fairy circles, but seedling density and growth did not differ from barrier-less controls. Plant germination and growth inhibition by allelochemicals or nutrient deficiencies in fairy circle soils were tested by transferring fairy circle soil to artificially cleared circles in the grassy matrix, and matrix soil to fairy circles (along with circle to circle and matrix to matrix controls). None of the transfers changed the seedling density and growth from the control reference conditions. Limitation of plant growth due to micronutrient depletion within fairy circles was tested by supplementing circles with a micronutrient mixture, but did not result in differences in plant seedling density and growth. Short-range vegetation competitive feedbacks were tested by creating artificially-cleared circles of 2 or 4 m diameter located 2 or 6 m from a natural fairy circle. The natural circles remained bare and the artificial circles revegetated. These four experiments provided evidence that fairy circles were not caused by subterranean vapors, that fairy circle soil per se did not inhibit plant growth, and that the circles were not caused by micronutrient deficiency. There was also no evidence that vegetative feedbacks affected fairy circles on a 2 to 10 m scale. Landscape-scale vegetative self-organization is discussed as a more likely cause of fairy circles.

  10. Quality Circle Effectiveness as a Function of Upper-Management Support, Circle Initiation, and Collar Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; And Others

    Japanese management practices have attracted much interest in the United States. The use of quality circles (QCs) common in Japan, has been considered a promising approach to improving Americn workers' productivity. A quality circle is made up of workers from the same group who meet to discuss quality problems, recommend solutions, and implement…

  11. Attributions of Quality Circles' Failure: Perceptions among Top-Management, Supporting Staff, and Quality Circle Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Thomas Li-Ping; Butler, Edie Aguilar

    Quality circles, a management practice that involves groups of workers from the same work area voluntarily meeting on a regular basis to identify, analyze, and solve various work-related problems, have been used in Japan for over 40 years. In the United States, quality circles have been tried in many organizations during the past 2 decades and…

  12. Expanding-Circle Students Learning "Standard English" in the Outer-Circle Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon Kachru's concentric circles of English, the present study explores whether middle-class Japanese students who chose to study English solo at private language schools in Singapore diverge from many others who (wish to) study inner-circle English. The study is stimulated by the repeated interdisciplinary findings that, in spite of the…

  13. Generic Rigidity for Circle Diffeomorphisms with Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocić, Saša

    2016-06-01

    We prove that {C^r}-smooth ({r > 2}) circle diffeomorphisms with a break, i.e., circle diffeomorphisms with a single singular point where the derivative has a jump discontinuity, are generically, i.e., for almost all irrational rotation numbers, not {C^{1+\\varepsilon}}-rigid, for any {\\varepsilon > 0}. This result complements our recent proof, joint with Khanin (Geom Funct Anal 24:2002-2028, 2014), that such maps are generically {C^1}-rigid. It stands in remarkable contrast to the result of Yoccoz (Ann Sci Ec Norm Sup 17:333-361, 1984) that {C^r}-smooth circle diffeomorphisms are generically {C^{r-1-κ}}-rigid, for any {κ > 0}.

  14. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles

    PubMed Central

    Zelnik, Yuval R.; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-01-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions—regime shifts—are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water–vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  15. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts. PMID:26362787

  16. Gradual regime shifts in fairy circles.

    PubMed

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Meron, Ehud; Bel, Golan

    2015-10-01

    Large responses of ecosystems to small changes in the conditions--regime shifts--are of great interest and importance. In spatially extended ecosystems, these shifts may be local or global. Using empirical data and mathematical modeling, we investigated the dynamics of the Namibian fairy circle ecosystem as a case study of regime shifts in a pattern-forming ecosystem. Our results provide new support, based on the dynamics of the ecosystem, for the view of fairy circles as a self-organization phenomenon driven by water-vegetation interactions. The study further suggests that fairy circle birth and death processes correspond to spatially confined transitions between alternative stable states. Cascades of such transitions, possible in various pattern-forming systems, result in gradual rather than abrupt regime shifts.

  17. Literature Circles Go to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Ronna J.

    2011-01-01

    In basic writing classrooms and scholarship, reading too often remains invisible; neither research nor established practice provides tangible activities to support reading and connect it to writing. This article documents a search for structured, scaffolded, low-stakes reading activities, a search that moves off the college campus and into the…

  18. Origin and evolution of the archaeo-eukaryotic primase superfamily and related palm-domain proteins: structural insights and new members

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Leipe, Detlef D.; Aravind, L.

    2005-01-01

    We report an in-depth computational study of the protein sequences and structures of the superfamily of archaeo-eukaryotic primases (AEPs). This analysis greatly expands the range of diversity of the AEPs and reveals the unique active site shared by all members of this superfamily. In particular, it is shown that eukaryotic nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses, including poxviruses, asfarviruses, iridoviruses, phycodnaviruses and the mimivirus, encode AEPs of a distinct family, which also includes the herpesvirus primases whose relationship to AEPs has not been recognized previously. Many eukaryotic genomes, including chordates and plants, encode previously uncharacterized homologs of these predicted viral primases, which might be involved in novel DNA repair pathways. At a deeper level of evolutionary connections, structural comparisons indicate that AEPs, the nucleases involved in the initiation of rolling circle replication in plasmids and viruses, and origin-binding domains of papilloma and polyoma viruses evolved from a common ancestral protein that might have been involved in a protein-priming mechanism of initiation of DNA replication. Contextual analysis of multidomain protein architectures and gene neighborhoods in prokaryotes and viruses reveals remarkable parallels between AEPs and the unrelated DnaG-type primases, in particular, tight associations with the same repertoire of helicases. These observations point to a functional equivalence of the two classes of primases, which seem to have repeatedly displaced each other in various extrachromosomal replicons. PMID:16027112

  19. Adult Multiple Intelligences. NCSALL Study Circle Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrella, A.; Hofer, J.; Bubp, S.; Finn-Miller, S.; Graves, N.; Meador, P.

    2004-01-01

    This Study Circle guide was created by the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) as part of the Practitioner Dissemination and Research Network (PDRN). The guide is part of NCSALL's effort to help connect research and practice in the field of adult basic education and adult literacy. The purpose of the study circle…

  20. Circles and the Lines That Intersect Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Ellen L.; Rhee, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Clay and Rhee use the mathematics topic of circles and the lines that intersect them to introduce the idea of looking at the single mathematical idea of relationships--in this case, between angles and arcs--across a group of problems. They introduce the mathematics that underlies these relationships, beginning with the questions…

  1. Raccoon Circles: A Handbook for Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Jim

    This handbook presents a collection of over 35 experiential and adventure-based activities using only a single item of equipment--a 15-foot long section of 1-inch tubular climbing webbing, called a raccoon circle. Some of the activities are quiet, some are loud, and they range from low to high challenge levels. Different-sized groups can be…

  2. Quality Circles: An Alternative for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Larry C.; Wagner, Thomas E.

    1983-01-01

    The times demand that institutions make the best use of resources. College administrators must ensure that each faculty and staff member has the opportunity to work at his or her fullest potential. One means toward achieving this goal may be the introduction of a quality circle program. (MLW)

  3. Syllable Circles for Pronunciation Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, John; Cullen, Charlie; Gardiner, Keith; Savage, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Syllable Circles are interactive visualizations representing prominence as a feature in short phrases or multi-syllable words. They were designed for computer-aided pronunciation teaching. This study explores whether and how interactive visualizations can affect language learners' awareness of prominence, or stress, in English pronunciation. The…

  4. Literature Circles as Support for Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elhess, Mohamed; Egbert, Joy

    2015-01-01

    There are many instructional approaches for helping English language learners improve both reading comprehension and overall language proficiency. One such approach, the literature circle--which is somewhat like a student book club in the classroom--has drawn a great deal of attention in recent years (Schlick Noe and Johnson 1999). Many teachers…

  5. Community Social Work and the Learning Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavan, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Outlines an approach for introducing students to Community Social Work by use of clear, engaging stated objectives. Approach is called the Learning Circle and was devised as a tool to enhance student participation and to stimulate networking, dialogue and conversation about social work commitment to community intervention and community-based…

  6. Quality Circles--A "Third Wave" Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Elaine

    1981-01-01

    Examines the Quality Circle concept, which is a management plan in which workers meet in a small group to identify, analyze and provide solutions to problems in their work area. As these groups implement their solutions, they can cause increased production, cost containment, reduction in turnover, and improved attendance. (CT)

  7. Inside the Circle: Kehewin Native Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Rosa; And Others

    The book is divided into four sections in a way that ensures seasonal recognition and environmental awareness. Each chapter within the sections begins with one or more oral histories from Native nations relevant to the concepts and ideas covered in that chapter. The student is introduced to the Native perspective through the concept of the circle,…

  8. Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance in Bacillus subtilis, dependence on flagellation factor FliF and moonlighting mediator EdmS.

    PubMed

    Hakumai, Yuichi; Shimomoto, Kouko; Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    Extra-chromosomal DNA maintenance (EDM) as an important process in the propagation and genetic engineering of microbes. Bacillus subtilis EdmS (formerly PgsE), a protein comprising 55 amino acids, is a mediator of the EDM process. In this study, the effect of mutation of global regulators on B. subtilis EDM was examined. Mutation of the swrA gene abolished EdmS-mediated EDM. It is known that swrA predominantly regulates expression of the fla/che operon in B. subtilis. We therefore performed EDM analysis using fla/che-deletion mutants and identified an EDM-mediated EDM cooperator in the flgB-fliL region. Further genetic investigation identified the flagellation factor FliF is a crucial EDM cooperator. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of the moonlighting function of FliF in DNA maintenance.

  9. Helitrons on a roll: eukaryotic rolling-circle transposons.

    PubMed

    Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Jurka, Jerzy

    2007-10-01

    Rolling-circle eukaryotic transposons, known as Helitron transposons, were first discovered in plants (Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa) and in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. To date, Helitrons have been identified in a diverse range of species, from protists to mammals. They represent a major class of eukaryotic transposons and are fundamentally different from classical transposons in terms of their structure and mechanism of transposition. Helitrons seem to have a major role in the evolution of host genomes. They frequently capture diverse host genes, some of which can evolve into novel host genes or become essential for helitron transposition.

  10. 1. 4 LOGAN CIRCLE, SIDE ELEVATION (Photograph of photograph in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 4 LOGAN CIRCLE, SIDE ELEVATION (Photograph of photograph in possession of Turner Associates and Nicholas Satterlee Associates, Washington, DC, 1973.) - 4 Logan Circle (House), Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 2. 4 LOGAN CIRCLE, SIDE ELEVATION (Photograph of line drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 4 LOGAN CIRCLE, SIDE ELEVATION (Photograph of line drawing by Turner Associates and Nicholas Satterlee Associates, Washington, DC, 1973.) - 4 Logan Circle (House), Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. VIEW ACROSS BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING PLAYGROUND #1 NEAR DATE DRIVE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW ACROSS BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING PLAYGROUND #1 NEAR DATE DRIVE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH DATE DRIVE. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH DATE DRIVE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 5. DETAIL OF ENTRANCE OF 14 LOGAN CIRCLE WITH SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF ENTRANCE OF 14 LOGAN CIRCLE WITH SIDE BAY OF 1500 THIRTEENTH STREET NW ON RIGHT. - Logan Circle, Vermont Avenue, Rhode Island Avenue, & Thirteenth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 6. VIEW OF WASHINGTON CIRCLE WITH LOOKING WEST PAST STATUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF WASHINGTON CIRCLE WITH LOOKING WEST PAST STATUE ALONG K STREET VISTA TO THE KEY BRIDGE AND THE PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE VISTA TO GEORGETOWN - Washington Circle, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. The "Us" in Discuss: Grouping in Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This article describes one middle school teacher's use of literature circles using heterogeneous grouping. It begins with a brief rationale for using literature circles in the language arts classroom. Next, it describes techniques to form literature circles. Then, it shares how to build and establish a supportive environment within each group. It…

  19. VIEW OF FACILITY 628 ON BIRCH CIRCLE, ON THE CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF FACILITY 628 ON BIRCH CIRCLE, ON THE CORNER OF CEDAR DRIVE AND BIRCH CIRCLE, ON THE NAVY SIDE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Effective Teaching Circles: Support for Math Anxious Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mary Ann; Harrington, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Teaching circles are an innovative mechanism to support faculty and improve student learning. This article describes the use of instructor teaching circles to support math-anxious students at a mid-sized urban university, including the purposes, formation, and sometimes surprising outcomes associated with using this method. Teaching circles for…

  1. A Spring Playscape Project: Building a Tree Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Rusty

    2009-01-01

    The Tree Circle is a green gathering area for children made by planting trees in a circle. For children, the Tree Circle becomes a magical place for dramatic play, quiet retreat, or lively nature exploration. For teachers and parents it becomes a shady grove for snacks and stories. The trees create a sweet spot that changes during the seasons and…

  2. Rolling circle amplification of metazoan mitochondrialgenomes

    SciTech Connect

    Simison, W. Brian; Lindberg, D.R.; Boore, J.L.

    2005-07-31

    Here we report the successful use of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the amplification of complete metazoan mt genomes to make a product that is amenable to high-throughput genome sequencing techniques. The benefits of RCA over PCR are many and with further development and refinement of RCA, the sequencing of organellar genomics will require far less time and effort than current long PCR approaches.

  3. Walking in circles: a modelling approach

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Seyfarth, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Blindfolded or disoriented people have the tendency to walk in circles rather than on a straight line even if they wanted to. Here, we use a minimalistic walking model to examine this phenomenon. The bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum exhibits asymptotically stable gaits with centre of mass (CoM) dynamics and ground reaction forces similar to human walking in the sagittal plane. We extend this model into three dimensions, and show that stable walking patterns persist if the leg is aligned with respect to the body (here: CoM velocity) instead of a world reference frame. Further, we demonstrate that asymmetric leg configurations, which are common in humans, will typically lead to walking in circles. The diameter of these circles depends strongly on parameter configuration, but is in line with empirical data from human walkers. Simulation results suggest that walking radius and especially direction of rotation are highly dependent on leg configuration and walking velocity, which explains inconsistent veering behaviour in repeated trials in human data. Finally, we discuss the relation between findings in the model and implications for human walking. PMID:25056215

  4. Walking in circles: a modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Seyfarth, Andre

    2014-10-01

    Blindfolded or disoriented people have the tendency to walk in circles rather than on a straight line even if they wanted to. Here, we use a minimalistic walking model to examine this phenomenon. The bipedal spring-loaded inverted pendulum exhibits asymptotically stable gaits with centre of mass (CoM) dynamics and ground reaction forces similar to human walking in the sagittal plane. We extend this model into three dimensions, and show that stable walking patterns persist if the leg is aligned with respect to the body (here: CoM velocity) instead of a world reference frame. Further, we demonstrate that asymmetric leg configurations, which are common in humans, will typically lead to walking in circles. The diameter of these circles depends strongly on parameter configuration, but is in line with empirical data from human walkers. Simulation results suggest that walking radius and especially direction of rotation are highly dependent on leg configuration and walking velocity, which explains inconsistent veering behaviour in repeated trials in human data. Finally, we discuss the relation between findings in the model and implications for human walking.

  5. Stone circles: form and soil kinematics.

    PubMed

    Hallet, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Distinct surface patterns are ubiquitous and diverse in soils of polar and alpine regions, where the ground temperature oscillates about 0°C. They constitute some of the most striking examples of clearly visible, abiotic self-organization in nature. This paper outlines the interplay of frost-related physical processes that produce these patterns spontaneously and presents unique data documenting subsurface soil rotational motion and surface displacement spanning 20 years in well-developed circles of soil outlined by gravel ridges. These sorted circles are particularly attractive research targets for a number of reasons that provide focus for this paper: (i) their exceptional geometric regularity captures the attention of any observer; (ii) they are currently forming and evolving, hence the underlying processes can be monitored readily, especially because they are localized near the ground surface on a scale of metres, which facilitates comprehensive characterization; and (iii) a recent, highly successful numerical model of sorted circle development helps to draw attention to particular field observations that can be used to assess the model, its assumptions and parameter choices, and to the considerable potential for synergetic field and modelling studies.

  6. A simple technique for morphological measurement of cerebral arterial circle variations using public domain software (Osiris).

    PubMed

    Ansari, Saeed; Dadmehr, Majid; Eftekhar, Behzad; McConnell, Douglas J; Ganji, Sarah; Azari, Hassan; Kamali-Ardakani, Shahab; Hoh, Brian L; Mocco, J

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a straightforward method to measure the dimensions and identify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle using the general-purpose software program Osiris. This user-friendly and portable program displays, manipulates, and analyzes medical digital images, and it has the capability to determine morphometric properties of selected blood vessels (or other anatomical structures) in humans and animals. To ascertain morphometric variations in the cerebral arterial circle, 132 brains of recently deceased fetuses, infants, and adults were dissected. The dissection procedure was first digitized, and then the dimensions were measured with Osiris software. Measurements of each vessel's length and external diameters were used to identify and classify morphological variations in the cerebral arterial circle. The most commonly observed anatomical variations were uni- and bilateral hypoplasia of the posterior communicating artery. This study demonstrates that public domain software can be used to measure and classify cerebral arterial circle vessels. This method could be extended to examine other anatomical regions or to study other animals. Additionally, knowledge of variations within the circle could be applied clinically to enhance diagnostic and treatment specificity.

  7. [Characteristics of ischemic stroke in patients with congenital anomalies of the circle of Willis].

    PubMed

    Popova, E N; Vishniakova, M V; Maratkanova, T V; Sherman, L A; Kotov, S V; Isakova, E V

    2011-01-01

    The study included 76 patients with ischemic stroke in the carotid system (56 patients) and in the vertebrobasilar system (20 patients). The magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed congenital anomalies of Willis circle in 31 patients. These anomalies were stratified as follows: back trifurcation of the internal carotid artery (ICA) (19 patients), anterior trifurcation of the ICA (4 patients), the combination of anterior trifurcation of the one of ICA and posterior trifurcation of the other ICA (4 patients), double back trifurcation of ICA (2 patients), the normal structure of the circle of Willis (45 patients). Patients with anomalies of the circle of Willis scored significantly higher on the Neurological deficit scale NIH-NINDS. Despite the lack of significant differences in the size of lesions in 2 groups, the foci in patients with the abnormalities of the circle of Willis were frequently localized in adjacent blood supply zones. The signs of vascular encephalopathy were seen as well. The data obtained suggest that the presence of anomalies in the circle of Willis is a risk factor, together with in the additional adversities, including iatrogenic factor, for the development of hemodynamic ischemic stroke.

  8. Increasingly branched rolling circle amplification for the cancer gene detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongling; Xu, Jianguo; Wang, Zhenmeng; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Jia, Lee

    2016-12-15

    An increasingly branched rolling circle amplification (IB-RCA) which contains a padlock probe (PP) and a structurally tailored molecular beacon (MB) was innovatively developed for highly sensitive detection of cancer gene, Kras gene codon 12. In this system, the PP can be circularized after hybridization with the precisely-matched target DNA, while the stem of MB can be also opened by target DNA, resulting in hybridization with the circularized PP to generate a long tandem single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product. Since the MB is also designed to hybridize with ssDNA product, the newly-opened MBs are able to trigger the next RCA reactions, therapy producing branched rolling circle amplification (RCA) products and in turn leading to the increasingly branched RCA (IB-RCA). This alternately and continuously operates hybridization-based MB opening and opened MBs-triggered RCA. As a result, a great number of MBs are opened that is associated with a dramatically amplified fluorescent signal, enabling to quantify target DNA down to 100 fM. This sensing method demonstrates a new concept of IB-RCA amplification even in a simple way to efficiently transduce the fluorescence signal, accomplishing the highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer gene. PMID:27569300

  9. Increasingly branched rolling circle amplification for the cancer gene detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongling; Xu, Jianguo; Wang, Zhenmeng; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Jia, Lee

    2016-12-15

    An increasingly branched rolling circle amplification (IB-RCA) which contains a padlock probe (PP) and a structurally tailored molecular beacon (MB) was innovatively developed for highly sensitive detection of cancer gene, Kras gene codon 12. In this system, the PP can be circularized after hybridization with the precisely-matched target DNA, while the stem of MB can be also opened by target DNA, resulting in hybridization with the circularized PP to generate a long tandem single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product. Since the MB is also designed to hybridize with ssDNA product, the newly-opened MBs are able to trigger the next RCA reactions, therapy producing branched rolling circle amplification (RCA) products and in turn leading to the increasingly branched RCA (IB-RCA). This alternately and continuously operates hybridization-based MB opening and opened MBs-triggered RCA. As a result, a great number of MBs are opened that is associated with a dramatically amplified fluorescent signal, enabling to quantify target DNA down to 100 fM. This sensing method demonstrates a new concept of IB-RCA amplification even in a simple way to efficiently transduce the fluorescence signal, accomplishing the highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer gene.

  10. Novel limiting circle theory in acoustic wave scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Changzheng

    Wave scattering theory is the basis for many key technologies that have important military and commercial applications. The familiar examples are radar, sonar, and various ultrasound instruments commonly used in remote sensing, target identification, non-destructive evaluation, medical diagnosis, and many other areas. Their mathematical model involves the solution of the so- called inverse scattering problem where an incident wave is used to probe a remote or inaccessible object. From the scattered field measurement, the shape and/or the material composition of the object can be determined. A new wave scattering theory, termed limiting circle theory (LCT), has been developed in this dissertation based on a novel approach of decomposing the wave scattering matrix. LCT has rigorously proved that the scattered wave field from any penetrable object (of cylinder and sphere geometries) is composed of three contributions: a rigid background, a soft background, and a pure resonance. This is a significant modification to the existing resonance scattering theory (RST) which states that the scattered field is made up of only two components: a proper background (either rigid or soft), and a pure resonance. LCT formalism led to the discovery of the limiting circle patterns associated with all normal modes or partial waves. These patterns provide a clear understanding of the resonance behavior such as the resonance period and the resonance intensity. The analytical LCT approach could also be the key to solving the background problems for shell structures that have remained unsolved for many years in acoustics.

  11. The Life Cycle and Life Span of Namibian Fairy Circles

    PubMed Central

    Tschinkel, Walter R.

    2012-01-01

    In Namibia of southwestern Africa, the sparse grasslands that develop on deep sandy soils under rainfall between 50 and 100 mm per annum are punctuated by thousands of quasi-circular bare spots, usually surrounded by a ring of taller grass. The causes of these so-called “fairy circles” are unknown, although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. This paper provides a more complete description of the variation in size, density and attributes of fairy circles in a range of soil types and situations. Circles are not permanent; their vegetative and physical attributes allow them to be arranged into a life history sequence in which circles appear (birth), develop (mature) and become revegetated (die). Occasionally, they also enlarge. The appearance and disappearance of circles was confirmed from satellite images taken 4 years apart (2004, 2008). The frequency of births and deaths as a fraction of the total population of circles allowed the calculation of an approximate turnover rate, and from this, an estimate of circle lifespan. Lifespan appeared to vary with circle size, with small circles averaging about 24 years, and larger ones 43–75 years. Overall lifespan averaged about 41 yr. A second, independent estimate of lifespan was made by revisiting circles 2 to 9 years after their clear status had been confirmed. This resulted in a lifespan estimate of about 60 years. Any causal explanation of fairy circles must include their birth, development and death, their mean lifespan and the variation of their features under different conditions. PMID:22761663

  12. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  13. Talking Circles, Leadership Competencies, and Inclusive Learning: Expanding the Frame of Business Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, David A.; Beard Adams, Kathy M.

    2008-01-01

    Business education typically embodies traditional organizational values, structures, and processes that focus learning mostly on uniformity and efficiency. In contrast, many First Nation peoples have long used the imagery of a circle as a guiding metaphor for both organizing and educating in ways that respect diversity and align themselves with…

  14. Infinite Maxwell fisheye inside a finite circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangjié; Chen, Huanyang

    2015-12-01

    This manuscript proposes a two-dimensional heterogeneous imaging medium composed of an isotropic refractive index. We exploit conformal-mapping to transfer the full Maxwell fisheye into a finite circle. Unlike our previous design that requires a mirror of Zhukovski airfoil shape, this approach can work without a mirror, while offering a comparable imaging resolution. This medium may also be used as an isotropic gradient index lens to transform a light source inside it into two identical sources of null interference. A merit of this approach is reduction of the near-zero-index area from an infinite zone into a finite one, which shall ease its realization.

  15. Expanding Circles within the Outer Circle: The Rural Kisii in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michieka, Martha M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates a range of factors that have contributed to the limited spread of English to rural Kisii, Kenya, making the presence of English in this non-urban context fall closer to an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) or Expanding Circle continuum than to the expected English as a Second Language (ESL) context. Kenya is an Outer Circle…

  16. Phytoplasma PMU1 exists as linear chromosomal and circular extrachromosomal elements and has enhanced expression in insect vectors compared with plant hosts.

    PubMed

    Toruño, Tania Y; Musić, Martina Seruga; Simi, Silvia; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2010-09-01

    Phytoplasmas replicate intracellularly in plants and insects and are dependent on both hosts for dissemination in nature. Phytoplasmas have small genomes lacking genes for major metabolic pathways. Nevertheless, their genomes harbour multicopy gene clusters that were named potential mobile units (PMUs). PMU1 is the largest most complete repeat among the PMUs in the genome of Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom (AY-WB). PMU1 is c. 20 kb in size and contains 21 genes encoding DNA replication and predicted membrane-targeted proteins. Here we show that AY-WB has a chromosomal linear PMU1 (L-PMU1) and an extrachromosomal circular PMU1 (C-PMU1). The C-PMU1 copy number was consistently higher by in average approximately fivefold in insects compared with plants and PMU1 gene expression levels were also considerably higher in insects indicating that C-PMU1 synthesis and expression are regulated. We found that the majority of AY-WB virulence genes lie on chromosomal PMU regions that have similar gene content and organization as PMU1 providing evidence that PMUs contribute to phytoplasma host adaptation and have integrated into the AY-WB chromosome.

  17. Time-lapse ultrashort pulse microscopy of infection in three-dimensional versus two-dimensional culture environments reveals enhanced extra-chromosomal virus replication compartment formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Holly C.; Sing, Garwin; Armas, Juan Carlos González; Campbell, Colin J.; Ghazal, Peter; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms that enable viruses to harness cellular machinery for their own survival are primarily studied in cell lines cultured in two-dimensional (2-D) environments. However, there are increasing reports of biological differences between cells cultured in 2-D versus three-dimensional (3-D) environments. Here we report differences in host-virus interactions based on differences in culture environment. Using ultrashort pulse microscopy (UPM), a form of two-photon microscopy that utilizes sub-10-fs pulses to efficiently excite fluorophores, we have shown that de novo development of extra-chromosomal virus replication compartments (VRCs) upon murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) infection is markedly enhanced when host cells are cultured in 3-D collagen gels versus 2-D monolayers. In addition, time-lapse imaging revealed that mCMV-induced VRCs have the capacity to grow by coalescence. This work supports the future potential of 3-D culture as a useful bridge between traditional monolayer cultures and animal models to study host-virus interactions in a more physiologically relevant environment for the development of effective anti-viral therapeutics. These advances will require broader adoption of modalities, such as UPM, to image deep within scattering tissues.

  18. The arithmetic of elliptic fibrations in gauge theories on a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Thomas W.; Kapfer, Andreas; Klevers, Denis

    2016-06-01

    The geometry of elliptic fibrations translates to the physics of gauge theories in F-theory. We systematically develop the dictionary between arithmetic structures on elliptic curves as well as desingularized elliptic fibrations and symmetries of gauge theories on a circle. We show that the Mordell-Weil group law matches integral large gauge transformations around the circle in Abelian gauge theories and explain the significance of Mordell-Weil torsion in this context. We also use Higgs transitions and circle large gauge transformations to introduce a group law for genus-one fibrations with multi-sections. Finally, we introduce a novel arithmetic structure on elliptic fibrations with non-Abelian gauge groups in F-theory. It is defined on the set of exceptional divisors resolving the singularities and divisor classes of sections of the fibration. This group structure can be matched with certain integral non-Abelian large gauge transformations around the circle when studying the theory on the lower-dimensional Coulomb branch. Its existence is required by consistency with Higgs transitions from the non-Abelian theory to its Abelian phases in which it becomes the Mordell-Weil group. This hints towards the existence of a new underlying geometric symmetry.

  19. Existence of Chimera State on Two Parallel Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Larry; Yang, Pei-Kun

    2016-06-01

    A nonlocal coupling system with oscillators on two parallel circles can evolve into a chimera state for suitable values of the parameters α and β. The parameter β is the distance between the circles and affects the phase-locked areas of the chimera state. The Kuramoto theory successfully describes whether and where the oscillators are phase-locked or drifting. The position difference ΔX describes the displacement of phase-locked areas between the circles. The dynamics of the model with four oscillators also show similar phenomena. The position difference ΔX results from the arrangement of oscillators on the two parallel circles.

  20. General view, showing eastern view from atop hemi circle. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view, showing eastern view from atop hemi circle. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  2. Algebraic criteria for positive realness relative to the unit circle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    A definition is presented of the circle positive realness of real rational functions relative to the unit circle in the complex variable plane. The problem of testing this kind of positive reality is reduced to the algebraic problem of determining the distribution of zeros of a real polynomial with respect to and on the unit circle. Such reformulation of the problem avoids the search for explicit information about imaginary poles of rational functions. The stated algebraic problem is solved by applying the polynomial criteria of Marden (1966) and Jury (1964), and a completely recursive algorithm for circle positive realness is obtained.

  3. No evidence for anomalously low variance circles on the sky

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Adam; Scott, Douglas; Zibin, James P. E-mail: dscott@phas.ubc.ca

    2011-04-01

    In a recent paper, Gurzadyan and Penrose claim to have found directions on the sky centred on which are circles of anomalously low variance in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These features are presented as evidence for a particular picture of the very early Universe. We attempted to repeat the analysis of these authors, and we can indeed confirm that such variations do exist in the temperature variance for annuli around points in the data. However, we find that this variation is entirely expected in a sky which contains the usual CMB anisotropies. In other words, properly simulated Gaussian CMB data contain just the sorts of variations claimed. Gurzadyan and Penrose have not found evidence for pre-Big Bang phenomena, but have simply re-discovered that the CMB contains structure.

  4. Collusive attacks to "circle-type" multi-party quantum key agreement protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Xiao, Di; Jia, Heng-Yue; Liu, Run-Zong

    2016-05-01

    We find that existing multi-party quantum key agreement (MQKA) protocols designed for fairness of the key are, in fact, unfair. Our analysis shows that these protocols are sensitive to collusive attacks; that is, dishonest participants can collaborate in predetermining the key without being detected. In fact, the transmission structures of the quantum particles in those unfair MQKA protocols, three of which have already been analyzed, have much in common. We call these unfair MQKA protocols circle-type MQKA protocols. Likewise, the transmission structures of the quantum particles in MQKA protocols that can resist collusive attacks are also similar. We call such protocols complete-graph-type MQKA protocols. A MQKA protocol also exists that can resist the above attacks but is still not fair, and we call it the tree-type MQKA protocol. We first point out a common, easily missed loophole that severely compromises the fairness of present circle-type MQKA protocols. Then we show that two dishonest participants at special positions can totally predetermine the key generated by circle-type MQKA protocols. We anticipate that our observations will contribute to secure and fair MQKA protocols, especially circle-type protocols.

  5. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same.

  6. Vector Solutions for Great Circle Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Michael A.

    2005-09-01

    Traditionally, navigation has been taught with methods employing Napier's rules for spherical triangles while methods derived from vector analysis and calculus appear to have been avoided in the teaching environment. In this document, vector methods are described that allow distance and azimuth at any point on a great circle to be determined. These methods are direct and avoid reliance on the formulae of spherical trigonometry. The vector approach presented here allows waypoints to be established without the need to either ascertain the position of the vertex or select the nearest pole; the method discussed here requires only one spherical triangle having an apex at the North Pole and is also easy to implement on a small computer.

  7. A circle swimmer at low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Aguilar, R; Löwen, H; Yeomans, J M

    2012-08-01

    Swimming in circles occurs in a variety of situations at low Reynolds number. Here we propose a simple model for a swimmer that undergoes circular motion, generalising the model of a linear swimmer proposed by Najafi and Golestanian (Phys. Rev. E 69, 062901 (2004)). Our model consists of three solid spheres arranged in a triangular configuration, joined by two links of time-dependent length. For small strokes, we discuss the motion of the swimmer as a function of the separation angle between its links. We find that swimmers describe either clockwise or anticlockwise circular motion depending on the tilting angle in a non-trivial manner. The symmetry of the swimmer leads to a quadrupolar decay of the far flow field. We discuss the potential extensions and experimental realisation of our model.

  8. Medicine circles defeating tuberculosis in southern California.

    PubMed

    Trafzer, Clifford E

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, two medicine circles existed in Indian country: one Native and one Euro-American. Traditional doctors among First Nations peoples approached disease in spiritual ways and also used herbal medicine to treat their patients. First Nations people tried to treat infectious diseases brought by newcomers through plant medicine, ritual, and ceremony. Generally unsuccessful, First Nations people and doctors of California learned from practitioners of Western medicine to care for tubercular patients, to avoid the bacteria, and to remove active tubercular patients to sanatoria. Native agency and Western medical practices intersected and worked successfully from 1928-48 to reduce cases and deaths caused by tuberculosis.

  9. Distribution of Circles on a Circle and Correlation Between Vortex Rings of Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onur Fen, Mehmet; Erkoç, Šakír

    2007-05-01

    Superfluids are characterized by absence of viscosity. When superfluids are rotated, differently from normal fluids, they form more than one vortex in the containers where they are placed. The number of vortices change as the rotation velocity changes, but this change is not linear. M.W. Zwierlein et al. observed the vortices in experiments, observing up to a number of 80. Experiments also showed that the vortex distributions cannot include large spaces. By using experimental data, we noticed that when we think of vortices as vortex rings, their centers are at the same geometric location and these geometric locations are concentric circles. We generalized the distribution of these geometric places and formulized it. Our formula includes the magic circle numbers. When the number of vortices reach these magic numbers, the number of geometric locations increase by 1.

  10. College Students' Science Societies and Special-Interest Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, A.

    2005-01-01

    From the point of view of their age, student science societies and special-interest circles are among the most venerable forms of corporate association among students in colleges and universities. In this article, the author traces the formation of different societies and special-interest circles by college students in different universities in…

  11. NCSALL Study Circle Guide: Performance Accountability in Adult Basic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL), 2000

    2000-01-01

    This guide provides step-by-step instructions to facilitate a multi-session study circle for practitioners on the topic of accountability. Practitioners will read and analyze research and discuss how to apply it in their classrooms and programs. In the first session, the Study Circle group will examine the concept of performance accountability in…

  12. The Four Circles of Hollow Water. Aboriginal Peoples Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivell-Ferri, Christine; And Others

    This report examines the Community Holistic Circle Healing (CHCH) model, an innovative approach to intervention adopted by the First Nations Hollow Water Community (Canada) for sex offenders, their victims, and their community. The first section, "Ojibwa Circle," overviews traditional Ojibwa culture, sex roles, child rearing practices, and how…

  13. Integrating Literature Circles into a Cotaught Inclusive Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Catharine R.

    2012-01-01

    Literature circles or book clubs are small, heterogeneous groups of students who have chosen to read and discuss the same book together. The research on literature circles suggests that they hold great promise for increasing students' enjoyment of reading and honing their literacy skills. When evidence-based strategies are embedded into a…

  14. Empowerment of Children through Circle Time: Myth or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this paper is circle time, a widely used method in primary schools in Ireland and elsewhere. It involves children sitting in a circle with their teacher using method-specific techniques and strategies for self-esteem enhancement, promoting positive relationships and development of social skills. Qualitative research was undertaken in…

  15. D'Nealian Handwriting versus Circle-Stick Print.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Donald N.

    This paper argues against teaching children to make letters using circle-stick writing. It contends that the circle-stick method requires continued pen/pencil lifts hindering rhythm or flow in the writing process and that there is little carry-over value into cursive writing as the two scripts are totally different. D'Nealian print, one type of…

  16. The Japanese Quality Control Circle: Why It Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Susumu

    1991-01-01

    The competitiveness of Japanese industry is in part because of their quality circles. Despite the West's interest in most Japanese business practices, quality circles have been difficult to transplant. This may be a result of misconceptions about their nature and the erroneous idea that workers' motivation is sociocultural, whereas in fact it is…

  17. Participation and Gender in Circle-Time Situations in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emilson, Anette; Johansson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to investigate participatory values in relation to gender, as expressed in interactions between teachers and children in circle-time situations in Swedish and Norwegian preschools. This paper reports evidence from three research questions: How is children's participation conditioned in circle-time situations? How are…

  18. Seven Aspects of Democracy as Related to Study Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Staffan

    2001-01-01

    Applies a conceptualization of democracy (equal participation, horizontal relations, deliberative knowledge that informs viewpoints, recognition of diversity, internal democratic decision making, action to form society) to Swedish study circles. Concludes that study circles are only partly successful: they foster participation but their power to…

  19. VIEW OF THE OUTER RING OF CENTER CIRCLE, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE OUTER RING OF CENTER CIRCLE, LOOKING NORTH. GRANITE COPING DEFINES THE SWAIN FAMILY PLOT, WHICH CONTAINS A CELTIC CROSS, ON WHICH THE CIRCLE REFERS TO ETERNAL LIFE, AND A RECLINING HUMAN FIGURE IN ETERNAL SLEEP - Woodlands Cemetery, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. VIEW OF ELM CIRCLE, FROM BETWEEN FACILITIES 750 AND 750. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM CIRCLE, FROM BETWEEN FACILITIES 750 AND 750. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. VIEW OF BACKYARD AREA BEHIND FACILITIES 529 (BIRCH CIRCLE) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BACKYARD AREA BEHIND FACILITIES 529 (BIRCH CIRCLE) AND 606 (CEDAR DRIVE). VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #3 ON SOUTHERN PORTION OF BIRCH CIRCLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #3 ON SOUTHERN PORTION OF BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING BENCH AND DRINKING FOUNTAIN. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CEDAR DRIVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CEDAR DRIVE, ON THE MARINE SIDE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. RESIDENTIAL TOWER VISIBLE ON FAR RIGHT. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING SEGMENT WHICH FORMS THE WESTERNMOST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, SHOWING SEGMENT WHICH FORMS THE WESTERNMOST BOUNDARY OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH BIRCH CIRCLE, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH BIRCH CIRCLE, WITH FACILITY 809 ON LEFT, 816 ON RIGHT. NOTE THE MANY DATE PALMS. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #4 NEAR ELM CIRCLE, SHOWING PICNIC TABLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #4 NEAR ELM CIRCLE, SHOWING PICNIC TABLE. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Circle of Courage: Reaching Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bethany; Perales, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    The Circle of Courage, based on traditional Native American philosophy, emphasizes belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity. This study assessed the prevalence of the Circle of Courage values among youth in a residential facility and examined the relationship between these ideals and indicators of placement success. After 12 weeks in…

  8. Teaching Powerful Social Studies Ideas through Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Ava L.

    2010-01-01

    The author describes the use of literature circles in a social studies methods course for elementary preservice teachers and analyzes their effectiveness in teaching powerful social studies ideas. Literature circles encourage students to take more of a leadership role in the classroom, expect their active involvement, and challenge them to think…

  9. DETAIL VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY. SEEN FROM EAST SIDE OF CIRCLE LOOKING NORTH AT 2395 PIEDMONT, SIGMA PI HOUSE BY FREDERICK H. REIMERS, 1928. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Families and the Circle of Courage[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfat, Thom; Van Bockern, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Circle of Courage philosophy encourages thoughts about the importance of courage in the lives of children and young people--the courage to face what life offers and the resilience to handle life's challenges. Belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity, the four areas identified by the Circle of Courage, are pathways to help young people…

  11. Growing a Circle of Courage Culture: One School's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espiner, Deborah; Guild, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Mt. Richmond Special School is the first Circle of Courage school in New Zealand. The school reflects the richness of the cultural and learning diversity found in many New Zealand schools. Located in the heart of South Auckland, the school's 130 students represent a wide range of ethnic backgrounds. The universal values in the Circle of Courage…

  12. An Effective Time and Management Strategy in Quality Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Don E.

    Contending that participation in quality circles enhances effective time management by school administrators and teachers, this guide provides both a theoretical briefing and practical recommendations for better time management. A pre- posttest prefaces a review of basic concepts of quality circles with reference to the work of Abraham Maslow,…

  13. Using Social Psychology To Make Quality Circles More Effective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smither, Robert D.

    Quality circles have proliferated in organizations throughout the 1980s, but their success depends on careful planning and monitoring, and on an awareness of social psychology and group dynamics. This presentation accordingly evaluates some of the assumptions of the literature on quality circles and suggests ways in which social psychology…

  14. 29 CFR 1620.26 - Red circle rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red circle rates. 1620.26 Section 1620.26 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.26 Red circle rates. (a) The term “red circle” rate is used to describe certain unusual, higher than...

  15. Study Circles and the Dialogue to Change Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Mary; Brophy, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The origins of study circles can be traced back to the Chautauqua movement in the USA in the late nineteenth century. However, interest diminished in the USA and the Swedes discovered and enthusiastically imported the study circle idea as a remedy to their problems of poverty and illiteracy and to educate the broadest possible spectrum of society…

  16. Sleep disturbances and PTSD: a perpetual circle?

    PubMed Central

    van Liempt, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep facilitates the consolidation of fear extinction memory. Nightmares and insomnia are hallmark symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), possibly interfering with fear extinction and compromising recovery. A perpetual circle may develop when sleep disturbances increase the risk for PTSD and vice versa. To date, therapeutic options for alleviating sleep disturbances in PTSD are limited. Methods We conducted three studies to examine the relationship between sleep and posttraumatic symptoms: (1) a prospective longitudinal cohort study examining the impact of pre-deployment insomnia symptoms and nightmares on the development of PTSD; (2) a cross-sectional study examining subjective sleep measures, polysomnography, endocrinological parameters, and memory in veterans with PTSD, veterans without PTSD, and healthy controls (HCs); (3) a randomized controlled trial (RCT) (n=14) comparing the effect of prazosin and placebo on sleep disturbances in veterans with PTSD. In addition to these studies, we systematically reviewed the literature on treatment options for sleep disturbances in PTSD. Results Pre-deployment nightmares predicted PTSD symptoms at 6 months post-deployment; however, insomnia symptoms did not. Furthermore, in patients with PTSD, a correlation between the apnea index and PTSD severity was observed, while obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was not more prevalent. We observed a significant increase in awakenings during sleep in patients with PTSD, which were positively correlated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, negatively correlated with growth hormone (GH) secretion, and the subjective perception of sleep depth. Also, heart rate was significantly increased in PTSD patients. Interestingly, plasma levels of GH during the night were decreased in PTSD. Furthermore, GH secretion and awakenings were independent predictors for delayed recall, which was lower in PTSD. In our RCT, prazosin was not associated with improvement of any

  17. Controlled Microwave Heating Accelerates Rolling Circle Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Takeo; Suzuki, Takamasa; Mineki, Shigeru; Ohuchi, Shokichi

    2015-01-01

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates single-stranded DNAs or RNA, and the diverse applications of this isothermal technique range from the sensitive detection of nucleic acids to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Microwave chemistry is widely applied to increase reaction rate as well as product yield and purity. The objectives of the present research were to apply microwave heating to RCA and indicate factors that contribute to the microwave selective heating effect. The microwave reaction temperature was strictly controlled using a microwave applicator optimized for enzymatic-scale reactions. Here, we showed that microwave-assisted RCA reactions catalyzed by either of the four thermostable DNA polymerases were accelerated over 4-folds compared with conventional RCA. Furthermore, the temperatures of the individual buffer components were specifically influenced by microwave heating. We concluded that microwave heating accelerated isothermal RCA of DNA because of the differential heating mechanisms of microwaves on the temperatures of reaction components, although the overall reaction temperatures were the same. PMID:26348227

  18. Quantifying in vivo MR spectra with circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2006-03-01

    Accurate and robust quantification of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data is essential to its application in research and medicine. The performance of existing analysis methods is problematic for in vivo studies where low signal-to-noise ratio, overlapping peaks and intense artefacts are endemic. Here, a new frequency-domain technique for MRS data analysis is introduced wherein the circular trajectories which result when spectral peaks are projected onto the complex plane, are fitted with active circle models. The use of active contour strategies naturally allows incorporation of prior knowledge as constraint energy terms. The problem of phasing spectra is eliminated, and baseline artefacts are dealt with using active contours-snakes. The stability and accuracy of the new technique, CFIT, is compared with a standard time-domain fitting tool, using simulated 31P data with varying amounts of noise and 98 real human chest and heart 31P MRS data sets. The real data were also analyzed by our standard frequency-domain absorption-mode technique. On the real data, CFIT demonstrated the least fitting failures of all methods and an accuracy similar to the latter method, with both these techniques outperforming the time-domain approach. Contrasting results from simulations argue that performance relative to Cramer-Rao Bounds may not be a suitable indicator of fitting performance with typical in vivo data such as these. We conclude that CFIT is a stable, accurate alternative to the best existing methods of fitting in vivo data.

  19. Continuous, Full-Circle Arctangent Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    A circuit generates an analog voltage proportional to an angle, in response to two sinusoidal input voltages having magnitudes proportional to the sine and cosine of the angle, respectively. That is to say, given input voltages proportional to sin(Omega(t))sin(Theta) and sin(Omega(t))cos(Theta) [where Theta denotes the angle, mega denotes 2(pi) x a carrier frequency, and t denotes time], the circuit generates a steady voltage proportional to Theta. The output voltage varies continuously from its minimum to its maximum value as Theta varies from -180deg to 180deg. While the circuit could accept input modulated sine and cosine signals from any source, it must be noted that such signals are typical of the outputs of shaft-angle resolvers in electromagnetic actuators used to measure and control shaft angles for diverse purposes like aiming scientific instruments and adjusting valve openings. In effect, the circuit is an analog computer that calculates the arctangent of the ratio between the sine and cosine signals. The full-circle angular range of this arctangent circuit stands in contrast to the range of prior analog arctangent circuits, which is from slightly greater than -90deg to slightly less than +90deg. Moreover, for applications in which continuous variation of output is preferred to discrete increments of output, this circuit offers a clear advantage over resolver- to-digital integrated circuits.

  20. Inhomogeneous field theory inside the arctic circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Nicolas; Dubail, Jérôme; Stéphan, Jean-Marie; Viti, Jacopo

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by quantum quenches in spin chains, a one-dimensional toy-model of fermionic particles evolving in imaginary-time from a domain-wall initial state is solved. The main interest of this toy-model is that it exhibits the arctic circle phenomenon, namely a spatial phase separation between a critically fluctuating region and a frozen region. Large-scale correlations inside the critical region are expressed in terms of correlators in a (euclidean) two-dimensional massless Dirac field theory. It is observed that this theory is inhomogenous: the metric is position-dependent, so it is in fact a Dirac theory in curved space. The technique used to solve the toy-model is then extended to deal with the transfer matrices of other models: dimers on the honeycomb and square lattice, and the six-vertex model at the free fermion point (Δ =0 ). In all cases, explicit expressions are given for the long-range correlations in the critical region, as well as for the underlying Dirac action. Although the setup developed here is heavily based on fermionic observables, the results can be translated into the language of height configurations and of the gaussian free field, via bosonization. Correlations close to the phase boundary and the generic appearance of Airy processes in all these models are also briefly revisited in the appendix.

  1. Rolling-circle replication of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S A

    1997-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids replicate by a rolling-circle (RC) mechanism. Their replication properties have many similarities to as well as significant differences from those of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) coliphages, which also replicate by an RC mechanism. Studies on a large number of RC plasmids have revealed that they fall into several families based on homology in their initiator proteins and leading-strand origins. The leading-strand origins contain distinct sequences that are required for binding and nicking by the Rep proteins. Leading-strand origins also contain domains that are required for the initiation and termination of replication. RC plasmids generate ssDNA intermediates during replication, since their lagging-strand synthesis does not usually initiate until the leading strand has been almost fully synthesized. The leading- and lagging-strand origins are distinct, and the displaced leading-strand DNA is converted to the double-stranded form by using solely the host proteins. The Rep proteins encoded by RC plasmids contain specific domains that are involved in their origin binding and nicking activities. The replication and copy number of RC plasmids, in general, are regulated at the level of synthesis of their Rep proteins, which are usually rate limiting for replication. Some RC Rep proteins are known to be inactivated after supporting one round of replication. A number of in vitro replication systems have been developed for RC plasmids and have provided insight into the mechanism of plasmid RC replication. PMID:9409148

  2. Professional nurses' perception of the implementation of quality circle programme in a public hospital in the Eastern Cape Province.

    PubMed

    Mbovane, M M; Mavundla, T R; Roos, J H

    2007-03-01

    A qualitative research design that is explorative, descriptive and contextual in nature was employed in order to understand and describe the professional nurses' perception of the implementation of a quality circle programme in a public hospital in the Eastern Cape Province. The data-collection techniques were individual semi-structured interviews and field notes. The sample was drawn from a population of 425 Xhosa-speaking professional nurses employed in this institution. The sample comprised eight (8) professional nurses all of whom volunteered for in-depth individual semi-structured interviews. All the respondents answered one question: How do you perceive the implementation of the quality circle programme in your hospital? During data collection and analysis only one theme emerged, namely the perception of quality circle as a forum for discussing patient care problems and future plans. There were four broad categories in this theme, namely. Staff empowerment. Teambuilding in the nursing discipline. Maintenance of standards by nurses. Challenges to the momentum of a quality circle programme. It is recommended that all three tiers of nursing management be involved in the quality circle programme to improve interpersonal, interdepartmental and intradepartmental communication and concomitantly the nursing care.

  3. The Influence of Copy-Number of Targeted Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements on the Outcome of CRISPR-Cas Defense.

    PubMed

    Severinov, Konstantin; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Semenova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic type I CRISPR-Cas systems respond to the presence of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and phages in two different ways. CRISPR interference efficiently destroys foreign DNA harboring protospacers fully matching CRISPR RNA spacers. In contrast, even a single mismatch between a spacer and a protospacer can render CRISPR interference ineffective but causes primed adaptation-efficient and specific acquisition of additional spacers from foreign DNA into the CRISPR array of the host. It has been proposed that the interference and primed adaptation pathways are mediated by structurally different complexes formed by the effector Cascade complex on matching and mismatched protospacers. Here, we present experimental evidence and present a simple mathematical model that shows that when plasmid copy number maintenance/phage genome replication is taken into account, the two apparently different outcomes of the CRISPR-Cas response can be accounted for by just one kind of effector complex on both targets. The results underscore the importance of consideration of targeted genome biology when considering consequences of CRISPR-Cas systems action. PMID:27630990

  4. The Influence of Copy-Number of Targeted Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements on the Outcome of CRISPR-Cas Defense

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Semenova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic type I CRISPR-Cas systems respond to the presence of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and phages in two different ways. CRISPR interference efficiently destroys foreign DNA harboring protospacers fully matching CRISPR RNA spacers. In contrast, even a single mismatch between a spacer and a protospacer can render CRISPR interference ineffective but causes primed adaptation—efficient and specific acquisition of additional spacers from foreign DNA into the CRISPR array of the host. It has been proposed that the interference and primed adaptation pathways are mediated by structurally different complexes formed by the effector Cascade complex on matching and mismatched protospacers. Here, we present experimental evidence and present a simple mathematical model that shows that when plasmid copy number maintenance/phage genome replication is taken into account, the two apparently different outcomes of the CRISPR-Cas response can be accounted for by just one kind of effector complex on both targets. The results underscore the importance of consideration of targeted genome biology when considering consequences of CRISPR-Cas systems action.

  5. The Influence of Copy-Number of Targeted Extrachromosomal Genetic Elements on the Outcome of CRISPR-Cas Defense

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Semenova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic type I CRISPR-Cas systems respond to the presence of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and phages in two different ways. CRISPR interference efficiently destroys foreign DNA harboring protospacers fully matching CRISPR RNA spacers. In contrast, even a single mismatch between a spacer and a protospacer can render CRISPR interference ineffective but causes primed adaptation—efficient and specific acquisition of additional spacers from foreign DNA into the CRISPR array of the host. It has been proposed that the interference and primed adaptation pathways are mediated by structurally different complexes formed by the effector Cascade complex on matching and mismatched protospacers. Here, we present experimental evidence and present a simple mathematical model that shows that when plasmid copy number maintenance/phage genome replication is taken into account, the two apparently different outcomes of the CRISPR-Cas response can be accounted for by just one kind of effector complex on both targets. The results underscore the importance of consideration of targeted genome biology when considering consequences of CRISPR-Cas systems action. PMID:27630990

  6. The circle before willis: a historical account of the intracranial anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Lo, William B; Ellis, Harold

    2010-01-01

    The circle of Willis is one of the most famous eponymous structures in human anatomy. There is no doubt Thomas Willis at Oxford accurately demonstrated the anastomotic arterial supply at the base of the brain. However, this eponymous name does not reveal the history of the discovery of the ramification, nor does it give credit to the anatomists and artists who have contributed to the understanding of this clinically important structure. This article first traces the story of the discovery of the circle of Willis. Willis' contribution and innovative approaches are then discussed. Finally, despite Willis' not being the first to describe the circle, we explain why he still deserves to retain the eponymous title. The earlier description of the vasculature at the base of the brain was fixated on a nonexistent structure, at least not in humans, named the rete mirabile. The more scientific study of the blood supply to the brain took place during the Renaissance period, which culminated in the work of Thomas Willis in the 17th century.

  7. 7. VIEW NORTHWEST, OLD WHITE HORSE PIKE FORM CIRCLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW NORTHWEST, OLD WHITE HORSE PIKE FORM CIRCLE - White Horse Pike Rond Point, Intersection of Crescent Boulevard (U.S. Route 130), White Horse Pike (U.S. Route 30), & Clay Avenue, Collingswood, Camden County, NJ

  8. General view, showing detail atop hemi circle at southern end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view, showing detail atop hemi circle at southern end of Memorial Avenue. - Arlington Memorial Bridge, Spanning Potomac River between Lincoln Memorial & Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 1. AERIAL VIEW OF BRIDGE IN CONTEXT INCLUDING VICTORY CIRCLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW OF BRIDGE IN CONTEXT INCLUDING VICTORY CIRCLE FROM SOUTH. LOOKING NORTH. - Rue Road Bridge, Rue Road, spanning Matchaponix Brook, .35 mile east of intersection with Route 613, Jamesburg, Middlesex County, NJ

  10. Path discrepancies between great circle and rhumb line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Rajan

    1987-01-01

    A simulation of a mathematical model to compute path discrepancies between great circle and rhumb line flight paths is presented. The model illustrates that the path errors depend on the latitude, the bearing, and the trip length of the flight.

  11. The Euler Line and Nine-Point-Circle Theorems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccles, Frank M.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the Euler line theorem and the nine-point-circle theorem which emphasize transformations and the power of functions in a geometric concept. Presents definitions and proofs of theorems. (ASK)

  12. 6. Threequarter view of Awing, building 500, from Minuteman Circle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Three-quarter view of A-wing, building 500, from Minuteman Circle looking northeast - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. Circles South East: the first 10 years 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Bates, Andrew; Williams, Dominic; Wilson, Chris; Wilson, Robin J

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the first 10 years of the implementation of Circles of Support and Accountability (Circles) in the management of sexual offenders in South-East England by Circles South East (CSE). The Circles of 71 core members are reviewed in detail, with reference to demographic data, offense and sentencing histories, risk assessment data, and considerations regarding Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements. A group of 71 comparison subjects who were referred to CSE and deemed suitable for but did not receive the service was identified. Follow-up behaviors of both groups are examined (including all forms of reconviction, breach of orders, and prison recall). Over a comparable follow-up period of 55 months, the incidence of violent and contact sexual reconviction in the comparison group was significantly higher than for the Circles cohort. Comparisons are made between expected and actual levels of sexual reconviction, with the Circles cohort showing lower than expected rate of sexual reconviction but not to a statistically significant degree.

  14. Biology coming full circle: Joining the whole and the parts

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The new cover of Experimental Biology and Medicine features the hermeneutic circle of biology, a concept we have adapted from the hermeneutic principle that one understands the whole only in terms of each part and the parts only in terms of the whole. Our hermeneutic circle summarizes the course of experimental biology through 2500 years of the achievements of reductionist research (understanding the parts), which culminates in our ability to rapidly sequence the genome. Rather than returning along the same path in a constructionist approach that simply builds upon this knowledge, but in reverse, an alternative is to close the circle with synthetic constructions that seek to integrate the full complexity of biological and physiological systems (understanding the whole), of which organs-on-chips are one example. This closing of the circle cannot be a comprehensively accurate representation of biology, but it can be a synthetic one that effectively defines particular biological subsystems. The illustration of the hermeneutic circle of biology is also intended to suggest both the multiple cycles that may be required to reach such a synthesis and the expansion of the circle in an outward spiral as knowledge increases. Our commentary explains the symbolism of the new cover in a philosophical and scientific discussion. PMID:25583953

  15. Biology coming full circle: joining the whole and the parts.

    PubMed

    Wikswo, John P; Porter, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    The new cover of Experimental Biology and Medicine features the hermeneutic circle of biology, a concept we have adapted from the hermeneutic principle that one understands the whole only in terms of each part and the parts only in terms of the whole. Our hermeneutic circle summarizes the course of experimental biology through 2500 years of the achievements of reductionist research (understanding the parts), which culminates in our ability to rapidly sequence the genome. Rather than returning along the same path in a constructionist approach that simply builds upon this knowledge, but in reverse, an alternative is to close the circle with synthetic constructions that seek to integrate the full complexity of biological and physiological systems (understanding the whole), of which organs-on-chips are one example. This closing of the circle cannot be a comprehensively accurate representation of biology, but it can be a synthetic one that effectively defines particular biological subsystems. The illustration of the hermeneutic circle of biology is also intended to suggest both the multiple cycles that may be required to reach such a synthesis and the expansion of the circle in an outward spiral as knowledge increases. Our commentary explains the symbolism of the new cover in a philosophical and scientific discussion.

  16. Maxi-circles, glycosomes, gene transposition, expression sites, transsplicing, transferrin receptors and base J.

    PubMed

    Borst, Piet

    2016-01-01

    This is a personal story of the author of his research on trypanosomatids, covering a period of 1970-2015. Some of the highlights include the discovery of new aspects of kDNA, the mini-circle heterogeneity and the maxi-circle; the glycosome; the discovery of gene transposition as a major mechanism for antigenic variation; trans-splicing as an essential step in the synthesis of all trypanosome mRNAs; Pulsed Field Gradient gels to size-fractionate chromosome-sized DNA molecules of protozoa; the sequence of trypanosome telomeres and their growth and contraction; the first ABC-transporter of trypanosomatids, LtpgpA; the variable transferrin receptor of T. brucei and its role in Fe uptake; and base J, its structure, biosynthesis and function.

  17. PyMGC3: Finding stellar streams in the Galactic Halo using a family of Great Circle Cell counts methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, C.

    2014-11-01

    PyMGC3 is a Python toolkit to apply the Modified Great Circle Cell Counts (mGC3) method to search for tidal streams in the Galactic Halo. The code computes pole count maps using the full mGC3/nGC3/GC3 family of methods. The original GC3 method (Johnston et al., 1996) uses positional information to search for 'great-circle-cell structures'; mGC3 makes use of full 6D data and nGC3 uses positional and proper motion data.

  18. Three Concentric Circles: Young Chinese English Learners' Perceptions of Purposeful Audiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jack Jinghui

    2015-01-01

    English learners have more access to communicate with different purposeful audiences across the Three Concentric Circles of English (Kachu, 1985): the Inner Circle, the Outer Circle and the Expanding Circle. However, young language learners' purposeful audience as a focus of communication has not been emphasized as much as other linguistic…

  19. Putting the Unit in Pre-Service Secondary Teachers' Unit Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kevin C.; LaForest, Kevin R.; Kim, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a teaching experiment that explored two pre-service secondary teachers' meanings for the unit circle. Our analyses suggest that the participants' initial unit circle meanings predominantly consisted of calculational strategies for relating a given circle to what they called "the unit circle." These strategies did not entail…

  20. Coal geology of the Northeast Circle area, McCone and Dawson counties, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wincentsen, Herbert

    1979-01-01

    The Northeast Circle area is in central McCone and northern Dawson Counties, northeastern Montana. The area encompasses about 940 square miles and has a maximum relief of greater than 1,000 feet. The lowest point (altitude of less than 2,200 feet) is in the Redwater River Valley in the northern part of the area. The highest point (altitude of less than 3,200 feet) is on the Yellowstone-Missouri divide, located in parts of Tps. 18 and 19 N., Rso 49, 50, and 51E., and T. 20 N., Rs. 52 and 53 E. Surface exposures in most of the area consist of yellowish or light-colored sandy shales of the Tongue River Member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The coal beds in the Northeast Circle area occur in the lower 500 feet of this member and are persistent in the field. The predominant structural features of the area are the northeast end of the Weldon monocline-fault in Tps. 21 and 22 N., R. 47 E., and a small steep depression near Circle in sec. 10, T. 19 N., R. 48 E. Otherwise, the structure of the area is nearly flat. Coal in the Northeast Circle area is composed of six main beds: the S, L1, R, Q, P, and Pust beds, in ascending stratigraphic order. Of these, the S, Pust, and P beds are the thickest. The S bed is more than 20 feet thick in some places, but usually ranges in thickness from 6 to 10 feet. The Pust bed, which is about 430-490 feet above the S bed, is more than 18 feet thick in the upper bench and as much as 9 feet thick in the lower bench. Coal thickness in the P bed varies from 0 to 10.5 feet. The other coal seams in the area are generally less than 5 feet thick. All coals are lignite in rank.

  1. Circling behavior following unilateral kainic acid injections into rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; Reavill, C; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1981-12-01

    Unilateral injection of kainic acid (2.5-25 nmol) into rat anterior caudate putamen induced dose-related circling behaviour. Kainic acid (10 nmol) consistently caused initial weak ipsiversive circling lasting 1 h followed by prolonged strong contraversive rotation lasting in excess of 10 h. Unilateral intrastriatal administration of L-glutamic acid, or of monosodium L-glutamate, to normal rats, or administration of monosodium L-glutamate to rats with extensive decortication, did not induce circling behaviour. The simultaneous unilateral injection of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol) with kainic acid (10 nmol) did not modify circling behaviour induced by kainic acid. However, extensive decortication greatly reduced circling induced by unilateral intrastriatal kainic acid (10 nmol), and effect not reversed by the simultaneous administration of monosodium L-glutamate (1 mumol). Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the left nigrostriatal pathway abolished the initial ipsiversive rotation and potentiated the subsequent contraversive rotation for up to 4 h after intrastriatal injection of kainic acid (10 nmol). Peripheral administration of haloperidol (1 mg/kg i.p.) also abolished initial ipsiversive rotation and decreased the subsequent contraversive rotation. Electro-coagulation of the ipsilateral strio-nigral pathway prolonged the initial ipsiversive rotation produced by kainic acid, but markedly attenuated contraversive rotation. These findings suggest that circling induced by intrastriatal administration of kainic acid depends on intact corticostriate pathways, but it cannot be reproduced or modified by intrastriatal administration of glutamate. Kainic acid circling appears to be mediated via strio-nigral pathways, and to be modulated by dopaminergic function. PMID:7333356

  2. Circles of Support and personalization: Exploring the economic case.

    PubMed

    Wistow, Gerald; Perkins, Margaret; Knapp, Martin; Bauer, Annette; Bonin, Eva-Maria

    2016-06-01

    Circles of Support aim to enable people with learning disabilities (and others) to live full lives as part of their communities. As part of a wider study of the economic case for community capacity building conducted from 2012 to 2014, we conducted a mixed methods study of five Circles in North West England. Members of these Circles were supporting adults with moderate to profound learning disabilities and provided accounts of success in enabling the core member to live more independent lives with improved social care outcomes within cost envelopes that appeared to be less than more traditional types of support. The Circles also reported success in harnessing community resources to promote social inclusion and improve well-being. This very small-scale study can only offer tentative evidence but does appear to justify more rigorous research into the potential of Circles to secure cost-effective means of providing support to people with learning disabilities than the alternative, which in most cases would have been a long-term residential care placement.

  3. Design of Circle Array Pattern for Transparent Nanomesh-Type Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungsu; Ganorkar, Shraddha; Kim, Jungyoon; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Seong-Il

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we report simulation results for the optical properties of nanomesh-type electrodes for transparent electrode. Usually, indium tin oxide (ITO) is commonly used for transparent conductor to solar cell, display, LED and other electronic modules. However, the cost is high due to the rarity of indium. An alternative way is use of transparent nanomesh-type metal electrode for solar cell. Finite different time domain (FDTD) method was used to simulate and analyze their optical properties. Various array patterns (square, circle and circle hexagonal array) of metal on glass (SiO2) substrates were designed and their properties of transmission and reflection were simulated by using the broad band (λ = 300~1200 nm) plane wave source. To compare basic characteristics of each pattern, various structural parameters such as hole diameter, pitch and metal thickness were applied. The effect of three typical metals, such as Ag, Au, and Al was also compared. In the results, we will discuss about large dip of transmission appeared at the particular wavelength region from the circle array pattern, which is design with pitch of 500 nm at the wavelength range 700 to 800 nm. The surface plasmonpolaritons (SPP) effect can be the cause of large dip and we could find a broad and high transmission from the properly designed in nanomesh-type electrodes, which was calculated as a function of wavelength. PMID:26726388

  4. Discovery of fairy circles in Australia supports self-organization theory.

    PubMed

    Getzin, Stephan; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bell, Bronwyn; Erickson, Todd E; Postle, Anthony C; Katra, Itzhak; Tzuk, Omer; Zelnik, Yuval R; Wiegand, Kerstin; Wiegand, Thorsten; Meron, Ehud

    2016-03-29

    Vegetation gap patterns in arid grasslands, such as the "fairy circles" of Namibia, are one of nature's greatest mysteries and subject to a lively debate on their origin. They are characterized by small-scale hexagonal ordering of circular bare-soil gaps that persists uniformly in the landscape scale to form a homogeneous distribution. Pattern-formation theory predicts that such highly ordered gap patterns should be found also in other water-limited systems across the globe, even if the mechanisms of their formation are different. Here we report that so far unknown fairy circles with the same spatial structure exist 10,000 km away from Namibia in the remote outback of Australia. Combining fieldwork, remote sensing, spatial pattern analysis, and process-based mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that these patterns emerge by self-organization, with no correlation with termite activity; the driving mechanism is a positive biomass-water feedback associated with water runoff and biomass-dependent infiltration rates. The remarkable match between the patterns of Australian and Namibian fairy circles and model results indicate that both patterns emerge from a nonuniform stationary instability, supporting a central universality principle of pattern-formation theory. Applied to the context of dryland vegetation, this principle predicts that different systems that go through the same instability type will show similar vegetation patterns even if the feedback mechanisms and resulting soil-water distributions are different, as we indeed found by comparing the Australian and the Namibian fairy-circle ecosystems. These results suggest that biomass-water feedbacks and resultant vegetation gap patterns are likely more common in remote drylands than is currently known. PMID:26976567

  5. Discovery of fairy circles in Australia supports self-organization theory.

    PubMed

    Getzin, Stephan; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bell, Bronwyn; Erickson, Todd E; Postle, Anthony C; Katra, Itzhak; Tzuk, Omer; Zelnik, Yuval R; Wiegand, Kerstin; Wiegand, Thorsten; Meron, Ehud

    2016-03-29

    Vegetation gap patterns in arid grasslands, such as the "fairy circles" of Namibia, are one of nature's greatest mysteries and subject to a lively debate on their origin. They are characterized by small-scale hexagonal ordering of circular bare-soil gaps that persists uniformly in the landscape scale to form a homogeneous distribution. Pattern-formation theory predicts that such highly ordered gap patterns should be found also in other water-limited systems across the globe, even if the mechanisms of their formation are different. Here we report that so far unknown fairy circles with the same spatial structure exist 10,000 km away from Namibia in the remote outback of Australia. Combining fieldwork, remote sensing, spatial pattern analysis, and process-based mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that these patterns emerge by self-organization, with no correlation with termite activity; the driving mechanism is a positive biomass-water feedback associated with water runoff and biomass-dependent infiltration rates. The remarkable match between the patterns of Australian and Namibian fairy circles and model results indicate that both patterns emerge from a nonuniform stationary instability, supporting a central universality principle of pattern-formation theory. Applied to the context of dryland vegetation, this principle predicts that different systems that go through the same instability type will show similar vegetation patterns even if the feedback mechanisms and resulting soil-water distributions are different, as we indeed found by comparing the Australian and the Namibian fairy-circle ecosystems. These results suggest that biomass-water feedbacks and resultant vegetation gap patterns are likely more common in remote drylands than is currently known.

  6. The Circle of Apollonius and Its Applications in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partensky, Michael B.

    2008-02-01

    The circle of Apollonius is named after the ancient geometrician Apollonius of Perga. This beautiful geometric construct can be helpful when solving some general problems of geometry and mathematical physics, optics, and electricity. Here we discuss two of its applications: localizing an object in space and calculating electric fields. First, we pose an entertaining localization problem to trigger students' interest in the subject. Analyzing this problem, we introduce the circle of Apollonius and show that this geometric technique helps solve the problem in an elegant and intuitive manner. Then we switch to seemingly unrelated problems of calculating the electric fields. We show that the zero equipotential line for two unlike charges is the Apollonius circle for these two charges and use this discovery to find the electric field of a charge positioned near a grounded conductive sphere. Finally, we pose some questions for further examination.

  7. An efficient circle detector not relying on edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Accurate and efficient detection of circular modules fixed on non-cooperative target is a key technology for Tethered Space Robot. This paper presents an efficient circle detector based on region-growing of gradient and histogram distribution of Euclidean distance. Region-growing of gradient is applied to generate arc support regions from single point. And the corresponding square fitting areas are defined to accelerate the detection and decrease storage. A histogram is then used to count frequency of the distances that participates in the accumulator and the parameters of each circle are acquired. Finally, a verification strategy of circular integrity is designed to test the detection results. We have tested our algorithm on 35 images dealing with kinds of circles and ellipses. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to detect circular objects under occlusion, image noises and moderate shape deformations with a good precision.

  8. Organometallic chemistry: Fused ferrocenes come full circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrave, Rebecca A.; Manners, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Chemists have long been fascinated by electron delocalization, from both a fundamental and applied perspective. Macrocyclic oligomers containing fused ferrocenes provide a new structural framework -- containing strongly interacting metal centres -- that is capable of supporting substantial charge delocalization.

  9. A Phase Transition for Circle Maps and Cherry Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmisano, Liviana

    2013-07-01

    We study C 2 weakly order preserving circle maps with a flat interval. The main result of the paper is about a sharp transition from degenerate geometry to bounded geometry depending on the degree of the singularities at the boundary of the flat interval. We prove that the non-wandering set has zero Hausdorff dimension in the case of degenerate geometry and it has Hausdorff dimension strictly greater than zero in the case of bounded geometry. Our results about circle maps allow to establish a sharp phase transition in the dynamics of Cherry flows.

  10. Weighted Circle Actions on the Heegaard Quantum Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; Fairfax, Simon A.

    2013-11-01

    Weighted circle actions on the quantum Heeqaard 3-sphere are considered. The fixed point algebras, termed quantum weighted Heegaard spheres, and their representations are classified and described on algebraic and topological levels. On the algebraic side, coordinate algebras of quantum weighted Heegaard spheres are interpreted as generalised Weyl algebras, quantum principal circle bundles and Fredholm modules over them are constructed, and the associated line bundles are shown to be non-trivial by an explicit calculation of their Chern numbers. On the topological side, the C*-algebras of continuous functions on quantum weighted Heegaard spheres are described and their K-groups are calculated.

  11. Easing The Calculation Of Bolt-Circle Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    Bolt Circle Calculation (BOLT-CALC) computer program used to reduce significant time consumed in manually computing trigonometry of rectangular Cartesian coordinates of holes in bolt circle as shown on blueprint or drawing. Eliminates risk of computational errors, particularly in cases involving many holes or in cases in which coordinates expressed to many significant digits. Program assists in many practical situations arising in machine shops. Written in BASIC. Also successfully compiled and implemented by use of Microsoft's QuickBasic v4.0.

  12. Toroidal Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Fullerene Crop Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We investigate energetics and structure of circular and polygonal single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using large scale molecular simulations on NAS SP2, motivated by their unusual electronic and magnetic properties. The circular tori are formed by bending tube (no net whereas the polygonal tori are constructed by turning the joint of two tubes of (n, n), (n+1, n-1) and (n+2, n-2) with topological pentagon-heptagon defect, in which n =5, 8 and 10. The strain energy of circular tori relative to straight tube decreases by I/D(sup 2) where D is torus diameter. As D increases, these tori change from buckling to an energetically stable state. The stable tori are perfect circular in both toroidal and tubular geometry with strain less than 0. 03 eV/atom when D greater than 10, 20 and 40 nm for torus (5,5), (8,8) and (10, 10). Polygonal tori, whose strain is proportional to the number of defects and I/D are energetically stable even for D less than 10 nm. However, their strain is higher than that of perfect circular tori. In addition, the local maximum strain of polygonal tori is much higher than that of perfect circular tori. It is approx. 0.03 eV/atom or less for perfect circular torus (5,5), but 0.13 and 0.21 eV/atom for polygonal tori (6,4)/(5,5) and (7,3)/(5,5). Therefore, we conclude that the circular tori with no topological defects are more energetically stable and kinetically accessible than the polygonal tori containing the pentagon-heptagon defects for the laser-grown SWNTs and Fullerene crop circles.

  13. Production of dumbbell probe through hairpin cleavage-ligation and increasing RCA sensitivity and specificity by circle to circle amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Tang, Suming; Hu, Tianyu; Zhao, Guojie; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    Dumbbell probe (DP) attracts increasing interests in rolling circle amplification (RCA). A universal DP production method through cleavage-ligation of hairpin was proposed and optimized. The production is characterized by restriction endonuclease (RE)-induced cleavage ends ligation. It has the advantage of phosphorylation-free, splint-free and purification-free. To optimize designing, we found that the position of RE cleavage sequence in the stem and the primer position in the loop affected the formation and amplification of DP obviously. Both sticky and blunt ends cleaved by RE produce DP efficiently. Moreover, we introduced this DP into circle to circle (C2C) RCA based on the same cleavage-ligation principle, and acquired high sensitivity. By combining a two-ligation design and the C2C strategy, specificity for detecting let-7 family members was increased extremely. Furthermore, coreaction of different steps facilitated convenient formation and amplification process of DP. PMID:27385060

  14. NCSALL Study Circle Guide: Teaching and Learning in Authentic Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL), 2003

    2003-01-01

    This Study Circle is based on research conducted by a team led by Victoria Purcell-Gates. Their research examines the relationships between two dimensions of literacy instruction (the degree of authenticity of activities and texts and the degree of student/teacher collaboration) and changes in the literacy practices of students outside the…

  15. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY VIEW OF 2401 PIEDMONT, ALPHA EPSILON PHI HOUSE BY RATCLIFF & RATCLIFF, 1958. SEEN FROM NW CORNER LOOKING SE. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. The Circle of Courage and Erikson's Psychological Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlan, Felicity; Welsh-Breetzke, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Describes the application of positive youth development principles to challenges faced by adolescent females in South Africa. A mainline, Euro-centric theory, Erikson's life stages (1963), is compared with the Circle of Courage model based on Native American Tribal wisdom. The differences and correlation in these approaches are explored through…

  17. Revisiting Cyberbullying in Schools Using the Quality Circle Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Simone; Smith, Peter K.; Blumberg, Herbert H.

    2012-01-01

    An earlier study reported the use of Quality Circles (QC) in a UK school in the context of understanding and reducing bullying and cyberbullying. Here, we report further work in the same school setting. The QC approach allows explorative analysis of problems in school settings, whereby students embark on a problem-solving exercise over a period of…

  18. School of Urban Wilderness Survival and the Circle of Courage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Jay M.; Pearl, Nick L.; Marlowe, Mike J.

    2009-01-01

    Brendtro, Brokenleg, and Van Bockern (2002) describe the Circle of Courage model for creating environments in which all children can thrive. This approach blends youth developmental research, the wisdom of pioneer workers, and Native American philosophies of child care. This model for reclaiming youth at risk posits four elements as essential for…

  19. The Circle of Apollonius and Its Applications in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partensky, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    The circle of Apollonius is named after the ancient geometrician Apollonius of Perga. This beautiful geometric construct can be helpful when solving some general problems of geometry and mathematical physics, optics, and electricity. Here we discuss two of its applications: localizing an object in space and calculating electric fields. First, we…

  20. Circle Detection Based on Voting for Maximum Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanqi; Liu, Yuehu; Huang, Xiao

    We present a fast voting scheme for localizing circular objects among clutter and occlusion. Typical solutions for the problem are based on Hough transform that evaluates an instance of circle by counting the number of edge points along its boundary. The evaluated value is proportional to radius, making the normalization with respect to the factor necessary for detecting circles with different radii. By representing circle with a number of sampled points, we get rid of the step. To evaluate an instance then involves obtaining the same number of edge points, each close to a sampled point in both spatial position and orientation. The closeness is measured by compatibility function, where a truncating operation is used to suppress noise and deal with occlusion. To evaluate all instances of circle is fulfilled by letting edge point vote in a maximizing way such that any instance possesses a set of maximally compatible edge points. The voting process is further separated into the radius-independent and -dependent parts. The time-consuming independent part can be shared by different radii and outputs the sparse matrices. The radius-dependent part shifts these sparse matrices according to the radius. We present precision-recall curves showing that the proposed approach outperforms the solutions based on Hough transform, at the same time, achieves the comparable time complexity as algorithm of Hough transform using 2D accumulator array.

  1. Literature Circles: A Perfect Match for Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittingham, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the author's search for an appropriate and satisfying online teaching method. After experimenting with several methods (chat room, discussion board, student led discussion), the author reached back to his face-to-face classroom success with literature circles. This article reports the results of research conducted by the…

  2. The Misuse of the Circle Notation to Represent Aromatic Rings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the confusion and erroneous conclusions that can result from the overuse and misuse of the circle notation to represent aromaticity in polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons. Includes nature of the problem, textbook treatment, and a possible compromise method of representation. (Author/JN)

  3. Full Circle: A New Look at Multiage Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Penelle; Doan, Jane

    Noting that there is a great demand for information to help educators learn about and develop programs in multiage education, this book shares many ideas on multiage instruction. The 12 chapters of the book are: (1) "Circling Back" (Jane Doan), on the resurgence of interest in the multiage movement; (2) "One Day" (Penelle Chase), exploring a day…

  4. The Study Circle--For Learning and Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerkaker, Sturla

    2006-01-01

    The study circle is described as a democratic and emancipatory method for learning that can be summarized in three words: learning by sharing. This method offers opportunities and possibilities for all participants to contribute their previous knowledge and experiences through open and democratic dialogue. As a method for "liberal adult…

  5. Synthetic aperture radar speckle reduction for circle mode SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images contain a grainy pattern, called speckle, that is a consequence of a coherent imaging system. For fine resolution SAR images speckle can obscure subtle features and reduce visual appeal. Many speckle reduction methods result in a loss of image resolution and reduce visual appeal which can obscure subtle features. Another approach to maintain resolution while reducing speckle is to register and combine multiple images. For persistent surveillance applications it is more efficient for an airborne platform to fly circles around the particular area of interest. In these cases, it would be beneficial to combine multiple circle mode SAR images, however the image registration process is not so straightforward because the layover angle changes in each image. This paper develops a SAR image registration process for combining multiple circle mode SAR images to reduce speckle while preserving resolution. The registration first uses a feature matching algorithm for a coarse rotation and alignment, and then uses a fine registration and warp. Ku band SAR data from a circle mode SAR collection is used to show the effectiveness of the registration and enhanced visual appeal from multi-looking.

  6. Intersections of a Circle and a Square: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Dan; Blair, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of how a circle and square lying in the same plane could intersect each other is an excellent example of geometric problem-solving. This paper explores three facets of the investigation: (1) finding out how many points of intersection are possible, (2) classifying the different ways of intersection, and (3) determining which ways…

  7. Using Literature Circles to Discuss Social Justice in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhuri, Marga; Walker, Nancy; Landmann-Johnsey, Erica; Laughter, Judson

    2015-01-01

    Literacy educators feel it is incumbent on teacher preparation programs to prepare teacher candidates with the dispositions and competencies needed to work with students from diverse racial, cultural, and economic backgrounds. As a way to initiate the discussion and help candidates examine their own views on race, literature circles are used. The…

  8. First Voice: The Circle of Courage and Independent Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Jennifer S.; Ross, Jean W.

    2005-01-01

    Adolescents in foster care must have a voice and play an active role in envisioning and planning for successful adulthood. This principle serves as the philosophy of First Voice, a training package for anyone who works with youth in foster care. The philosophy corresponds with the four parts of the Circle of Courage--Independence, Belonging,…

  9. The Sharing Circle: Themes for Home and School Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Carol

    This guide describes a program that turns ordinary show-and-tell time into a theme-related sharing time, or "sharing circle." In this program, each child is assigned a special sharing day once a month, with the sharing days evenly distributed throughout the month and with no more than three children sharing on a particular day. Monthly themes are…

  10. The Characterizations of Triangles Using the Nine-Point Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    In this note, primarily intended for high school students and high school teachers, characterizations of a right triangle and an equilateral triangle in the Euclidean plane are presented using the nine-point circle of a given triangle. Geometrical applications are explored along with their possible uses in the teaching environment. (Contains 4…

  11. Algebraic criteria for positive realness relative to the unit circle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    A purely algebraic algorithm is developed for testing positive real character of real rational functions and matrices relative to the unit circle in the complex plane. Since the algorithm is entirely recursive and is performed in finite number of steps, it is suitable for machine computations.

  12. First Nations Education in Canada: The Circle Unfolds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battiste, Marie, Ed.; Barman, Jean, Ed.

    This collection of 15 writings by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators examines the issues and dilemmas of First Nations education in Canada 25 years after the beginnings of First Nations control of education. Organized around the concept of the Sacred Circle, the essays are grouped into four sections: reconceptualizing First Nations education,…

  13. Examining Circle of Security™: A Review of Research and Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The Circle of Security™ interventions are psychosocial treatments intended to increase maternal sensitivity and thus child attachment security in infants and young children. A small number of publications have reported empirical research on outcomes of these treatments. This article reviews the research evidence, plausibility, theoretical…

  14. Reading without Teachers: Literature Circles in an EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Jeng-yih Tim

    2004-01-01

    Unsuccessful college education often turns our students into book haters who will stop reading as soon as they graduate. The idea of literature circles embraces the concept of "reading for fun" and is intended to create more independent readers and book addicts who will continuously read for the rest of their lives. Pioneers in literacy theories…

  15. Maximum-likelihood estimation of circle parameters via convolution.

    PubMed

    Zelniker, Emanuel E; Clarkson, I Vaughan L

    2006-04-01

    The accurate fitting of a circle to noisy measurements of circumferential points is a much studied problem in the literature. In this paper, we present an interpretation of the maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE) and the Delogne-Kåsa estimator (DKE) for circle-center and radius estimation in terms of convolution on an image which is ideal in a certain sense. We use our convolution-based MLE approach to find good estimates for the parameters of a circle in digital images. In digital images, it is then possible to treat these estimates as preliminary estimates into various other numerical techniques which further refine them to achieve subpixel accuracy. We also investigate the relationship between the convolution of an ideal image with a "phase-coded kernel" (PCK) and the MLE. This is related to the "phase-coded annulus" which was introduced by Atherton and Kerbyson who proposed it as one of a number of new convolution kernels for estimating circle center and radius. We show that the PCK is an approximate MLE (AMLE). We compare our AMLE method to the MLE and the DKE as well as the Cramér-Rao Lower Bound in ideal images and in both real and synthetic digital images. PMID:16579374

  16. United States Participation in the Pacific Circle Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The goal of the Pacific Circle Project is to improve international and intercultural understanding among the people and nations of the Pacific. Consortium member countries are Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. Within the countries are chosen member institutions. Two major types of activities of the consortium are the exchange…

  17. Topographic control of sorted circle morphology on Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Joana; Hauber, Ernst; Reiss, Dennis; Hiesinger, Harald; Johnsson, Andreas; van Gasselt, Stephan; Balme, Matt; Head, Jim; de Verra, Jean-Pierre; Steinbrügge, Gregor; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Patterned ground is a typical phenomenon in polar, subpolar and alpine regions [1]. As it is commonly (but not necessarily!) related to freeze-thaw cycles, its presence on Mars could possibly point to locations and periods where and when liquid water existed in the recent past [2]. Sorted circles are a class of patterned ground that was tentatively identified in Elysium Planitia (Mars) [3], but this interpretation has been challenged on the basis of physical considerations [4]. Without direct access to potential patterned ground on Mars, the analysis of terrestrial analogues can inform the interpretation of Martian landforms. Svalbard (Norway) offers a wide variety of permafrost features that are morphologically analogous to Martian cold-climate landforms [5]. It hosts some of the best examples of sorted circles on Earth, which are located on the westernmost tip of Brøgger peninsula, on a broad strand flat that is characterized by a series of postglacial beach ridges [6]. Here we report on our analysis of sorted circle morphology (especially their plan-view shape, i.e. their "roundness" or ellipticity) and its correlation with local topography (slopes, curvature). Sorted circle morphology was determined from HRSC-AX images (for details on the flight campaign and image properties see ref [5]) and through field work. Topographic information comes from a 50 cm gridded DEM derived from HRSC-AX stereo images. We measured sorted circle morphology (ellipticity, azimuth of major axis) along a WNW-ESE traverse that runs from the inland towards the sea and is oriented perpendicular to the local beach ridge trend. Selected areas with homogeneous sorted circle appearance were visually mapped, and compared to the average slope, aspect, and the calculated topographic wetness index (TWI). Furthermore the whole traverse was classified into four different morphologies of the sorted patterned ground (sorted circles, sorted "ellipses", sorted nets and areas without patterned ground

  18. Are Namibian "fairy circles" the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning?

    PubMed

    Cramer, Michael D; Barger, Nichole N

    2013-01-01

    Causes of over-dispersed barren "fairy circles" that are often surrounded by ca. 0.5 m tall peripheral grasses in a matrix of shorter (ca. 0.2 m tall) grasses in Namibian grasslands remain mysterious. It was hypothesized that the fairy circles are the consequence of self-organizing spatial vegetation patterning arising from resource competition and facilitation. We examined the edaphic properties of fairy circles and variation in fairy circle size, density and landscape occupancy (% land surface) with edaphic properties and water availability at a local scale (<50 km) and with climate and vegetation characteristics at a regional scale. Soil moisture in the barren fairy circles declines from the center towards the periphery and is inversely correlated with soil organic carbon, possibly indicating that the peripheral grass roots access soil moisture that persists into the dry season within fairy circles. Fairy circle landscape occupancy is negatively correlated with precipitation and soil [N], consistent with fairy circles being the product of resource-competition. Regional fairy circle presence/absence is highly predictable using an empirical model that includes narrow ranges of vegetation biomass, precipitation and temperature seasonality as predictor variables, indicating that fairy circles are likely a climate-dependent emergent phenomenon. This dependence of fairy circle occurrence on climate explains why fairy circles in some locations may appear and disappear over time. Fairy circles are only over-dispersed at high landscape occupancies, indicating that inter-circle competition may determine their spacing. We conclude that fairy circles are likely to be an emergent arid-grassland phenomenon that forms as a consequence of peripheral grass resource-competition and that the consequent barren circle may provide a resource-reservoir essential for the survival of the larger peripheral grasses and provides a habitat for fossicking fauna.

  19. From EUCLID to Ptolemy in English Crop Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, G. S.

    1997-12-01

    The late Lord Soli Zuckerman, science advisor to several British governments, encouraged the author, an astronomer, to test the theory that all crop circles were made by hoaxers. Within the hundreds of formations in Southern England he saw a thread of surprising historical content at the intellectual level of College Dons. One diagram in celestial mechanics involved triple conjunctions of Mercury, Venus and Mars every 67 2/3 years. Ptolemy's fourth musical scale, tense diatonic, occurred in the circles during the period 1978-88. Starting on E, Ptolemaic ratios make our perfect diatonic scale of white notes on the keyboard of the piano or church organ. For separated circles the ratio was given by diameters, and for concentric circles it was diameters squared. A series of rotationally symmetric figures began in 1988 which combined Ptolemy's ratios with Euclid's theorems. In his last plane theorem, Euclid (Elements 13,12) proved that the square on the side of an equilateral triangle is 3 times the square on the circum-circle radius -- diatonic note G(2). From the 1988 figure one can prove the square on the side is 16/3 times the square on the semi-altitude, giving note F(3). Later rotational figures over the next 5 years led to diatonic ratios for the hexagon, square and triangle. They gave with the exactness of Euclidean theorems the notes F, C(2) and E(2), and they are the only regular polygons to do so. Although these 4 crop theorems derive from Euclid, they were previously unknown as a set in the literature, nor had the Ptolemaic connection been published. Professional magazines asked the readers to provide a fifth theorem that would generate the above 4 theorems, but none was forthcoming. Ultimately the cicle makers showed knowledge of this generating theorem using a 200-ft design at Litchfield, Hampshire. After 1993, rotationally symmetric geometries continued to appear, but with much more complicated patterns. One design showed 6 crescent moons in a hexagon

  20. First the Look and Then the Sound: Creating Conversations at Circle Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Rebecca; And Others

    Presented is an interactional analysis of preschool circle time that builds on the view of classrooms as social systems within the broader culture of schooling. In the preschool studied, 18 children, 2 teachers, and several student teachers learned to use circle time together. The head teacher's approach to circle time was a developmental one,…

  1. Native American Values and Management Education: Envisioning an Inclusive Virtuous Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbos, Amy Klemm; Gladstone, Joe S.; Kennedy, Deanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Circles are symbols of interconnectedness. Behavioral circles can be vicious or virtuous. Many American Indians are caught in a vicious circle of exclusion from the purported benefits of Westernization, entrapment in its negative elements, and the ongoing undermining of their culture and thus their identities. Yet Native Americans, along with many…

  2. Getting Started with Literature Circles. The Bill Harp Professional Teachers Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Katherine L. Schlick; Johnson, Nancy J.

    Designed to help teachers get started using literature circles in their classrooms, this book gives teachers a boost to begin, offers some insights from other teachers, and helps teachers clarify where to go next. It notes that literature circles (or literature study groups, book clubs, or discussion circles) take many forms and engage students in…

  3. Expanding the Reach of Extension to Underserved Audiences through Study Circles in Rural Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Melissa; Petty, Barbara; Hansen, Lyle; Hoffman, Katie; Wittman, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Extension educators expanded the reach of their programming to underserved audiences through the implementation of Study Circles in rural Southern Idaho. Study Circles gave educators entry into communities by establishing relationships necessary for long-term change. Study Circle discussions in rural Southern Idaho led to stronger relationships…

  4. Problematizing Literature Circles as Forums for Discussion of Multicultural and Political Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thein, Amanda Haertling; Guise, Megan; Sloan, DeAnn Long

    2011-01-01

    In a six-week literature circle unit in a tenth-grade classroom, one group of students discussed Dorothy Allison's novel "Bastard out of Carolina." By criteria frequently used to judge the quality of discussion, this literature circle was successful. However, several key moments are highlighted that point to the limits of literature circles as…

  5. Quality Circles: Implications for Training. Overview: ERIC Fact Sheet No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    Quality circles are part of the movement to provide workers with increased autonomy, responsibility, and authority. Key elements of quality circles are the characteristics of their members, volunteer participation, regular meetings, training, problem identification, and solution implementation. The theoretical bases of quality circles include:…

  6. Calculation of Latitude and Longitude for Points on Perimeter of a Circle on a Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Heidi E.

    2015-08-14

    This document describes the calculation of the Earth-Centered Earth Fixed (ECEF) coordinates for points lying on the perimeter of a circle. Here, the perimeter of the circle lies on the surface of the sphere and the center of the planar circle is below the surface. These coordinates are converted to latitude and longitude for mapping fields on the surface of the earth.

  7. The Chicken and the Egg: Inviting Response and Talk through Socratic Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styslinger, Mary E.; Pollock, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This collaborative inquiry answers the following questions: 1) What is the nature of talk during Socratic Circles? 2) What is student response to talk? 3) How might knowing more about student response to talk and the nature of talk improve teaching during Socratic Circles? The article first describes the process of implementing Socratic Circles,…

  8. Error-prone rolling circle amplification greatly simplifies random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Ryota; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Hayashi, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple and easy protocol to introduce random mutations into plasmid DNA: error-prone rolling circle amplification. A template plasmid is amplified via rolling circle amplification with decreased fidelity in the presence of MnCl2 and is used to transform a host strain resulting in a mutant library with several random point mutations per kilobase through the entire plasmid. The primary advantage of this method is its simplicity. This protocol does not require the design of specific primers or thermal cycling. The reaction mixture can be used for direct transformation of a host strain. This method allows rapid preparation of randomly mutated plasmid libraries, enabling wider application of random mutagenesis.

  9. Culture Circles in adolescent empowerment for the prevention of violence

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Estela Maria Leite Meirelles; Neto, Waldemar Brandão; de Lima, Luciane Soares; de Aquino, Jael Maria; Gontijo, Daniela Tavares; Pereira, Beatriz Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    An action research based on Paulo Freire's Culture Circles was developed to implement a health education intervention involving adolescents, in collective knowledge construction about strategies for the prevention of violence. The data collection in the Culture Circles involved 11 adolescents and included observation and field diary, photographic records and recording. The educational action aroused a critical socio-political and cultural position in the adolescents towards the situations of vulnerability to violence, including the guarantee of human rights, justice and the combat of inequities; changes in the social relations, combat against discrimination and intolerance; expansion of access and reorientation of health services through intersectoral public policies. The intervention empowered the group of adolescents for the prevention of violence and permitted the inclusion of health professionals in the school context, from an interdisciplinary perspective, contributing to the establishment of social support and protection networks. PMID:25931647

  10. Rolling Circle Amplification of Complete Nematode Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C.

    2005-01-01

    To enable investigation of nematode mitochondrial DNA evolution, methodology has been developed to amplify intact nematode mitochondrial genomes in preparative yields using a rolling circle replication strategy. Successful reactions were generated from whole cell template DNA prepared by alkaline lysis of the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and a mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei. These taxa, representing the two major nematode classes Chromodorea and Enoplea, maintain mitochondrial genomes of 13.8 kb and 20.0 kb, respectively. Efficient amplifications were conducted on template DNA isolated from individual or pooled nematodes that were alive or stored at -80°C. Unexpectedly, these experiments revealed that multiple T. cosgrovei mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are maintained in our local population. Rolling circle amplification products can be used as templates for standard PCR reactions with specific primers that target mitochondrial genes or for direct DNA sequencing. PMID:19262866

  11. Landscapes, Circles and Antikythera: The Birth of the Mechanical Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmunds, M. G.

    The joint Greek/UK/US Antikythera Mechanism Research Project is currently producing a definitive set of experimental optical and X-ray imaging data of the Mechanism. The interpretation will require a good knowledge of the context in which it was made. Following from the sacred landscapes of northern Europe it is difficult to escape the symbolism of the "circle" in prehistoric cosmologies, and the pre-eminence of the circle in Greek astronomical thought is obvious. Is the "circular" ikon of the main wheel in Antikythera Mechanism simply another gear wheel, or might ideas of cosmology have influenced its design? How important would devices like the Antikythera Mechanism have been in providing a physical model of the Universe , pushing mathematical abstraction into reality? The relevance of the Mechanism is understanding the development of ideas and philosophy, particularly determinism is emphasized.

  12. Sevoflurane degradation by soda lime in a circle breathing system.

    PubMed

    Munday, I T; Ward, P M; Foden, N D; Jones, R M; Van Pelt, F N; Kenna, J G

    1996-07-01

    Sevoflurane is degraded by soda lime to a vinyl ether commonly referred to as compound A. We measured the concentration of compound A in the circle breathing system of 31 patients receiving sevoflurane anaesthesia. Inspiratory and expiratory gas samples were analysed using gas chromatography and flame ionisation detection. The end-tidal sevoflurane concentration and soda lime temperature were recorded. The peak compound A concentration ranged between 10 to 32 ppm in the inspiratory limb and 7 to 26 ppm in the expiratory limb. There was a positive correlation between the peak compound A concentration and the end-tidal sevoflurane concentration (r2 = 0.545, p < 0.0001) and the soda lime temperature (r2 = 0.301, p = 0.0014). We conclude that the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane and the temperature of the soda lime are important variables in determining concentration of compound A in a circle system.

  13. Algorithm of semicircular laser spot detection based on circle fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengzhou; Xu, Ruihua; Hu, Bingliang

    2013-07-01

    In order to obtain the exact center of an asymmetrical and semicircular aperture laser spot, a method for laser spot detection method based on circle fitting was proposed in this paper, threshold of laser spot image was segmented by the method of gray morphology algorithm, rough edge of laser spot was detected in both vertical and horizontal direction, short arcs and isolated edge points were deleted by contour growing, the best circle contour was obtained by iterative fitting and the final standard round was fitted in the end. The experimental results show that the precision of the method is obviously better than the gravity model method being used in the traditional large laser automatic alignment system. The accuracy of the method to achieve asymmetrical and semicircular laser spot center meets the requirements of the system.

  14. Micro-IBA analysis of Au/Si eutectic "crop-circles"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Giampiero; Battiato, Alfio; Croin, Luca; Jaksic, Milko; Siketic, Zdravko; Vignolo, Umberto; Vittone, Ettore

    2015-04-01

    When a thin gold layer is deposited onto the native oxide of a silicon wafer and is annealed at temperatures greater than 600 °C, peculiar circular features, few micrometers in diameter, with a regular polygon at the centre of each circle, reminiscent of so called "alien" crop circles, can be observed. A model has been recently proposed in Matthews et al. [1], where the formation of such circular structures is attributed to the interdiffusion of gold and silicon through holes in the native oxide induced by the weakening of the amorphous silica matrix occurring during the annealing process. The rupture of the liquid Au/Si eutectic disc surrounding the pinhole in the oxide causes the debris to be pulled to the edges of the disk, forming Au droplets around it and leaving an empty zone of bare silicon oxide. In this paper, we present a morphological study and a RBS/PIXE analyses of these circular structures, carried out by scanning electron microscopy and by 4 MeV C microbeam, respectively. The results confirm the depletion of gold in the denuded circular zones, and the presence of gold droplets in the centers, which can be attributed to the Au segregation occurring during the cooling stage.

  15. SL(2, r) Yang-Mills Theory on a Circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Hallin, Joakim

    The kinematic of SL(2, ℝ) Yang-Mills theory on a circle is considered, for reasons that are spelt out. The gauge transformations exhibit hyperbolic fixed points, and this results in a physical configuration space with a non-Hausdorff “network” topology. The ambiguity encountered in canonical quantization is then much more pronounced than in the compact case and cannot be resolved through the kind of appeal made to group theory in that case.

  16. BANQUET SPEECH Full Circle: Star Ferry to Stardust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Clifford N.

    2008-10-01

    Good evening. I'd like to invite you to join me on a journey that could be entitled “Full Circle: Star Ferry to Stardust”. “Star Ferry” represents Hong Kong, my home town, and especially its university - Hong Kong University - as I knew it during the years of World War II. “Stardust” refers to our gathering here to report on our research on possible organic chemistry in space.

  17. Rolling circle amplification detection of RNA and DNA

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Pattee, Melissa S.; Attix, Cristina M.; Tucker, James D.

    2004-08-31

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been useful for detecting point mutations in isolated nucleic acids, but its application in cytological preparations has been problematic. By pretreating cells with a combination of restriction enzymes and exonucleases, we demonstrate RCA in solution and in situ to detect gene copy number and single base mutations. It can also detect and quantify transcribed RNA in individual cells, making it a versatile tool for cell-based assays.

  18. A multiloop generalization of the circle stability criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safonov, M. G.; Athans, M.

    1979-01-01

    A frequency-domain stability criterion is presented, generalizing the well-known circle stability criterion to multiloop feedback systems having bounded nonlinearity, parameter variations, and/or frequency-dependent ignorance of component dynamics. Unlike previous generalizations, the theory is not restricted to weakly-coupled, diagonally dominant or nearly normal systems. Potential applications include the analysis of feedback system integrity and multiloop feedback system stability margins.

  19. Discovery of fairy circles in Australia supports self-organization theory

    PubMed Central

    Getzin, Stephan; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bell, Bronwyn; Erickson, Todd E.; Postle, Anthony C.; Katra, Itzhak; Tzuk, Omer; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Wiegand, Kerstin; Wiegand, Thorsten; Meron, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Vegetation gap patterns in arid grasslands, such as the “fairy circles” of Namibia, are one of nature’s greatest mysteries and subject to a lively debate on their origin. They are characterized by small-scale hexagonal ordering of circular bare-soil gaps that persists uniformly in the landscape scale to form a homogeneous distribution. Pattern-formation theory predicts that such highly ordered gap patterns should be found also in other water-limited systems across the globe, even if the mechanisms of their formation are different. Here we report that so far unknown fairy circles with the same spatial structure exist 10,000 km away from Namibia in the remote outback of Australia. Combining fieldwork, remote sensing, spatial pattern analysis, and process-based mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that these patterns emerge by self-organization, with no correlation with termite activity; the driving mechanism is a positive biomass–water feedback associated with water runoff and biomass-dependent infiltration rates. The remarkable match between the patterns of Australian and Namibian fairy circles and model results indicate that both patterns emerge from a nonuniform stationary instability, supporting a central universality principle of pattern-formation theory. Applied to the context of dryland vegetation, this principle predicts that different systems that go through the same instability type will show similar vegetation patterns even if the feedback mechanisms and resulting soil–water distributions are different, as we indeed found by comparing the Australian and the Namibian fairy-circle ecosystems. These results suggest that biomass–water feedbacks and resultant vegetation gap patterns are likely more common in remote drylands than is currently known. PMID:26976567

  20. The replication of plastid minicircles involves rolling circle intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Siu Kai; Wong, Joseph T. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Plastid genomes of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates are unique in that its genes are found on multiple circular DNA molecules known as ‘minicircles’ of ∼2–3 kb in size, carrying from one to three genes. The non-coding regions (NCRs) of these minicircles share a conserved core region (250–500 bp) that are AT-rich and have several inverted or direct repeats. Southern blot analysis using an NCR probe, after resolving a dinoflagellate whole DNA extract in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), revealed additional positive bands (APBs) of 6–8 kb in size. APBs preferentially diminished from cells treated with the DNA-replication inhibitor aphidicolin, when compared with 2–3 kb minicircles, implicating they are not large minicircles. The APBs are also exonuclease III-sensitive, implicating the presence of linear DNA. These properties and the migration pattern of the APBs in a 2D-gel electrophoresis were in agreement with a rolling circle type of replication, rather than the bubble-forming type. Atomic force microscopy of 6–8 kb DNA separated by PFGE revealed DNA intermediates with rolling circle shapes. Accumulating data thus supports the involvement of rolling circle intermediates in the replication of the minicircles. PMID:19208639

  1. Humidity of the Bain and circle systems reassessed.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, J P; Bengtson, A; Sonander, H; Stenqvist, O

    1989-07-01

    The humidity outputs of the Bain circuit, a traditional non-coaxial Mapleson D system, and a circle system with and without a soda lime absorber were evaluated in a laboratory model simulating a 70-kg subject. The breathing systems were tested with tidal volumes of 0.35 and 0.70 L and frequencies of 10-20 breaths/min to maintain an end-expiratory CO2 of 4.5%. There were small differences in inspiratory gas humidity between the Bain and the non-coaxial Mapleson D system. With a fresh gas flow of 5 L/min in the Bain circuit, the humidity was 9.8-16.5 mg H2O/L depending on tidal volume and respiratory frequency. The humidity output of the circle absorber system with fresh gas flows of 0.5 or 2 L/min was 21.6-25.2 mg H2O/L at 60 min. Therefore, this study does not support previous studies, which propose that the Bain circuit has superior humidifying properties compared with those of the circle absorber system.

  2. Host RNA circles and the origin of hepatitis delta virus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John M

    2014-03-21

    Recent reports show that many cellular RNAs are processed to form circular species that are relatively abundant and resistant to host nucleases. In some cases, such circles actually bind host microRNAs. Such depletion of available microRNAs appears to have biological roles; for instance, in homeostasis and disease. These findings regarding host RNA circles support a speculative reappraisal of the origin and mode of replication of hepatitis delta virus, hepatitis delta virus (HDV), an agent with a small circular RNA genome; specifically, it is proposed that in hepatocytes infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), some viral RNA species are processed to circular forms, which by a series of chance events lead to an RNA that can be both replicated by host enzymes and assembled, using HBV envelope proteins, to form particles some of which are infectious. Such a model also may provide some new insights into the potential pathogenic potential of HDV infections. In return, new insights into HDV might provide information leading to a better understanding of the roles of the host RNA circles.

  3. Nuclear structures in Tribolium castaneum oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bogolyubov, Dmitry S; Batalova, Florina M; Kiselyov, Artyom M; Stepanova, Irina S

    2013-10-01

    The first ultrastructural and immunomorphological characteristics of the karyosphere (karyosome) and extrachromosomal nuclear bodies in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, are presented. The karyosphere forms early in the diplotene stage of meiotic prophase by the gathering of all oocyte chromosomes in a limited nuclear volume. Using the BrUTP assay, T. castaneum oocyte chromosomes united in the karyosphere maintain their transcriptional activity until the end of oocyte growth. Hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II and basal transcription factors (TFIID and TFIIH) were detected in the perichromatin region of the karyosphere. The T. castaneum karyosphere has an extrachromosomal capsule that separates chromosomes from the rest of the nucleoplasm. Certain structural proteins (F-actin, lamin B) were found in the capsule. Unexpectedly, the karyosphere capsule in T. castaneum oocytes was found to be enriched in TMG-capped snRNAs, which suggests that the capsule is not only a structural support for the karyosphere, but may be involved in biogenesis of snRNPs. We also identified the counterparts of 'universal' extrachromosomal nuclear domains, Cajal bodies (CBs) and interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs). Nuclear bodies containing IGC marker protein SC35 display some features unusual for typical IGCs. SC35 domains in T. castaneum oocytes are predominantly fibrillar complex bodies that do not contain trimethyl guanosine (TMG)-capped small nuclear (sn) RNAs. Microinjections of 2'-O-methyl (U)22 probes into the oocytes allowed revealing poly(A)+ RNAs in these nuclear domains. Several proteins related to mRNA export (heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein core protein A1, export adapters Y14 and Aly and export receptor NXF1) were also detected there. We believe that unusual SC35 nuclear domains of T. castaneum oocytes are possibly involved in mRNP but not snRNP biogenesis.

  4. Can the Expanding Circle Own English? Comments on Yoo's "Nonnative Teachers in the Expanding Circle and the Ownership of English"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Yoo's (2014) article raises a number of questions concerning local teachers' status and the ownership of English in the Expanding Circle. In this article, I address five issues that I see as most important relating to the ownership of English and empowering local teachers in the Expanding Circle. I provide up-to-date evidence of World…

  5. Detecting miRNA by producing RNA: a sensitive assay that combines rolling-circle DNA polymerization and rolling circle transcription.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Zheng, Fuwei; Ren, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Target miRNA was detected by producing RNA: rolling circle polymerization (RCP) and rolling circle transcription (RCT) were interlinked to provide dual amplification, producing multiplied malachite green (MG) aptamers, and a signal was generated by the SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering) quantification of the MG molecules that were bound to the transcripts. PMID:26120604

  6. Numerical simulations of the blood flow in the patient-specific arterial cerebral circle region.

    PubMed

    Reorowicz, Piotr; Obidowski, Damian; Klosinski, Przemyslaw; Szubert, Wojciech; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Jozwik, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    The Cerebral Circle Region, also known as the Circle of Willis (CoW), is a loop of arteries that form arterial connections between supply arteries to distribute blood throughout the cerebral mass. Among the population, only 25% to 50% have a complete system of arteries forming the CoW. 3D time-varying simulations for three different patient-specific artery anatomies of CoW were performed in order to gain a better insight into the phenomena existing in the cerebral blood flow. The models reconstructed on the basis of computer tomography images start from the aorta and include the largest arteries that supply the CoW and the arteries of CoW. Velocity values measured during the ultrasound examination have been compared with the results of simulations. It is shown that the flow in the right anterior artery in some cases may be supplied from the left internal carotid artery via the anterior communicating artery. The investigations conducted show that the computational fluid dynamic tool, which provides high resolution in both time and space domains, can be used to support physicians in diagnosing patients of different ages and various anatomical arterial structures.

  7. Role of DNA damage and repair in the function of eukaryotic genes: radiation-induced single-strand breaks and their rejoining in chromosomal and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1980-04-01

    The production and rejoining of single-strand breaks (SSB) in chromosomal DNA and extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were investigated after sublethal doses of ..gamma.. radiation to exponentially growing Tetrahymena. Hydrogen-3-labeled total nuclear DNA isolated from either control or irradiated cells was heat denatured and electrophoresed in agarose gels containing formaldehyde. Ribosomal DNA was identified by hybridization to (/sup 32/P)rRNA after transferring the DNA from the gels to nitrocellulose strips. It was found that (a) approximately 0.68 SSB is produced in each strand of rDNA exposed to 40 krad; (b) greater than 80% of SSB were rejoined within the first 20 min after irradiation in both chromosomal and rDNA; and (c) the rejoining process in both chromosomal and rDNA proceeded in the presence of inhibitors of protein synthesis, RNA synthesis, or oxidative metabolism. While the majority of SSB induced by 40 krad is rejoined within 20 min after irradiation, the resumption of rRNA synthesis does not occur until 30 min thereafter; it is concluded that the restoration of the normal size of the rDNA template is probably necessary but not sufficient for the resumption of rRNA synthesis.

  8. Stereoscopic Machine-Vision System Using Projected Circles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    A machine-vision system capable of detecting obstacles large enough to damage or trap a robotic vehicle is undergoing development. The system includes (1) a pattern generator that projects concentric circles of laser light forward onto the terrain, (2) a stereoscopic pair of cameras that are aimed forward to acquire images of the circles, (3) a frame grabber and digitizer for acquiring image data from the cameras, and (4) a single-board computer that processes the data. The system is being developed as a prototype of machine- vision systems to enable robotic vehicles ( rovers ) on remote planets to avoid craters, large rocks, and other terrain features that could capture or damage the vehicles. Potential terrestrial applications of systems like this one could include terrain mapping, collision avoidance, navigation of robotic vehicles, mining, and robotic rescue. This system is based partly on the same principles as those of a prior stereoscopic machine-vision system in which the cameras acquire images of a single stripe of laser light that is swept forward across the terrain. However, this system is designed to afford improvements over some of the undesirable features of the prior system, including the need for a pan-and-tilt mechanism to aim the laser to generate the swept stripe, ambiguities in interpretation of the single-stripe image, the time needed to sweep the stripe across the terrain and process the data from many images acquired during that time, and difficulty of calibration because of the narrowness of the stripe. In this system, the pattern generator does not contain any moving parts and need not be mounted on a pan-and-tilt mechanism: the pattern of concentric circles is projected steadily in the forward direction. The system calibrates itself by use of data acquired during projection of the concentric-circle pattern onto a known target representing flat ground. The calibration- target image data are stored in the computer memory for use as a

  9. 3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, and River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, Paul R.; Hermanson, Jan

    2002-09-09

    The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models.

  10. Fear, black people and mental illness: a vicious circle?

    PubMed

    Keating, Frank; Robertson, David

    2004-09-01

    The relationships between black communities and the mental health (MH) services are fraught. Paradoxically, black communities receive the MH services they don't want, but not the ones they do or might want. Black people mistrust and often fear services, and staff are often wary of the black community, fearing criticism, and not knowing how to respond, are fearful of black people, in particular, young black men. The situation is fueled by prejudice, misunderstanding, misconceptions and sometimes racism. The present paper describes the findings of a study to explore the issues in greater depth. The study was premised on a belief that there are 'circles of fear' which lead to poorer treatment of black communities. A purposive sampling approach was used to seek out groups and individuals in whom the 'circles of fear' were likely to be evident. The findings suggest that there are fears which impact negatively on the interaction between black communities and MH services. Two major themes emerged in this study, i.e. the sources of fear and the consequences of fear. Sources of fear included perceptions of MH services, attitudes to mental illness and diagnosis, and experiences of hospital care. The impact of fear included limited trust, limited engagement and delayed help-seeking behaviour. The study concludes that these fears mar the interactions between these communities and MH services, affect help-seeking behaviour adversely, and lead to restrictive and punitive interventions. Progress will only be made in breaking the 'circles of fear' if there is a systematic change in the experience of black services users at each point in the care pathway.

  11. The Phenomenological Circle and the Unity of Life and Thought.

    PubMed

    Atwood, George E; Stolorow, Robert D

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the important role of our deep immersions in philosophy in the development of our phenomenological-contextualist approach to psychoanalysis. Influenced most particularly by the phenomenological movement, our collaborative dialogue over more than four decades has led us to a shared commitment to reflection upon the philosophical underpinnings and constitutive contexts of origin of all our theoretical ideas. The growth of our thinking follows an endlessly recurring phenomenological circle joining theoretical perspectives with the inquirers from whose emotional worlds they arise. PMID:27248037

  12. The Phenomenological Circle and the Unity of Life and Thought.

    PubMed

    Atwood, George E; Stolorow, Robert D

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the important role of our deep immersions in philosophy in the development of our phenomenological-contextualist approach to psychoanalysis. Influenced most particularly by the phenomenological movement, our collaborative dialogue over more than four decades has led us to a shared commitment to reflection upon the philosophical underpinnings and constitutive contexts of origin of all our theoretical ideas. The growth of our thinking follows an endlessly recurring phenomenological circle joining theoretical perspectives with the inquirers from whose emotional worlds they arise.

  13. Social Circles: A 3D User Interface for Facebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Diego; Oakley, Ian

    Online social network services are increasingly popular web applications which display large amounts of rich multimedia content: contacts, status updates, photos and event information. Arguing that this quantity of information overwhelms conventional user interfaces, this paper presents Social Circles, a rich interactive visualization designed to support real world users of social network services in everyday tasks such as keeping up with friends and organizing their network. It achieves this by using 3D UIs, fluid animations and a spatial metaphor to enable direct manipulation of a social network.

  14. From spherical circle coverings to the roundest polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnai, T.; Gáspár, Z.; Lengyel, A.

    2013-11-01

    The problem treated here is: amongst the convex polyhedra that can be circumscribed about the unit sphere and have ? faces, which has the minimum surface area? A new optimization method based on mechanical analogies is worked out to solve this problem. By using this method, new computer-generated solutions are presented for ? and ?. The second of these two conjectured roundest polyhedra has icosahedral symmetry. The relation of the results of this problem to the minimum coverings of the sphere with equal circles is discussed.

  15. Path discrepancies between great circle and rhumb line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, R.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model for a comparative analysis of great circle vs. rhumb line navigation in the continental United States has been developed at the Avionics Engineering Center, Ohio University. A FORTRAN simulation of the model has been implemented on the IBM 370 computer. The simulation predicts pertinent navigation information for the two flight paths. The basis for the project, which is a part of an M.S. thesis, is to provide a data base for computing discrepancies between the two flight paths. This document briefly describes the model and discusses the implications of the results obtained.

  16. Circle of least confusion of a spherical reflector.

    PubMed

    Hosken, Robert W

    2007-06-01

    A simple, tractable equation is provided for determining the size and location of the circle of least confusion of a concave spherical reflector. This method is exact for the object at infinity and with wave effects neglected. Designers of large radius Arecibo-like telescopes, both radio and optical, with symmetrical, spherical primaries should find the method useful. The mathematical results are valid for apertures with an angle of incidence up to 45 degrees. Comparisons of the location of the disk of least confusion with longitudinal spherical aberration and the radius of the disk with transverse spherical aberration are presented. PMID:17514263

  17. Circle of Willis Configuration as a Determinant of Intracranial Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Sultan, Sally; Bagci, Ahmet; Rundek, Tatjana; Alperin, Noam; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Circle of Willis (COW) variants might influence arterial caliber in the brain. We hypothesized that these variants would be associated with the prevalence of intracranial dolichoectasia (DE). Methods We examined COW variants and DE in a sample of stroke-free participants (n = 436) undergoing magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) as part of a population-based study. Large intracranial arterial diameters were obtained when available; if not, the artery was defined as hypoplastic or absent according to its visibility on MRA. Subscores for the anterior and the posterior circulations were created. DE was defined as arterial diameters ≥ 2 SD above the population mean for that artery, adjusting for intracranial volume. Generalized linear models with a Poisson distribution were used to evaluate predictors of both absent and hypoplastic vessels, and logistic regression was used to assess the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of DE depending on COW variants. Results Only 44% of the sample had all 14 arteries present, 32% lacked 1 artery, 18% lacked 2 and 6% lacked 3 or more. DE of at least 1 artery was not associated with the total number of hypoplastic or absent arteries, but DE in a posterior circulation artery was weakly associated with the number of absent arteries in the posterior circulation (β coefficient = 0.36, p = 0.06). DE of at least 1 artery was more frequent in those with 1 or more absent arteries (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.03–1.57). Posterior circulation DE was more frequent in participants with at least 1 or more absent arteries at any location (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02–1.78). Participants with an incomplete posterior COW were more likely to have DE in the anterior circulation (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.01–2.33). Having an absent left anterior cerebral artery (ACA) A1 segment was associated with right ACA DE (OR 34.1, 95% CI 3.16–368.2); an absent right ACA was associated with left ACA DE (OR 14.1, 95% CI 1.69–118.28). Absence of 1 (OR 1

  18. Lorentz-boosted circles-in-the-sky and cosmic topology

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Janna

    2004-10-15

    A topologically finite universe, smaller than the observable horizon, will have circles-in-the-sky: pairs of circles around which the temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background are correlated. The circles occur along the intersection of copies of the spherical surface of last scattering. For any observer moving with respect to the microwave background, the circles will be deformed into ovals. The ovals will also be displaced relative to the direction they appear in a comoving frame. The displacement is the larger of the two effects, being proportional to the velocity. For the Earth's motion, the effect is on the order of 0.14 deg. at the very worst. This can affect all pattern-based searches for the topology of the universe. In particular, although the deviation is too small to impact the search for circles in the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP) data, higher-resolution searches for circle pairs will need to compensate for this effect.

  19. Role of SAGA in the asymmetric segregation of DNA circles during yeast ageing.

    PubMed

    Denoth-Lippuner, Annina; Krzyzanowski, Marek Konrad; Stober, Catherine; Barral, Yves

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, intra-chromosomal recombination generates DNA circles, but little is known about how cells react to them. In yeast, partitioning of such circles to the mother cell at mitosis ensures their loss from the population but promotes replicative ageing. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of partitioning are debated. In this study, we show that the SAGA complex mediates the interaction of non-chromosomal DNA circles with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and thereby promotes their confinement in the mother cell. Reciprocally, this causes retention and accumulation of NPCs, which affects the organization of ageing nuclei. Thus, SAGA prevents the spreading of DNA circles by linking them to NPCs, but unavoidably causes accumulation of circles and NPCs in the mother cell, and thereby promotes ageing. Together, our data provide a unifying model for the asymmetric segregation of DNA circles and how age affects nuclear organization.

  20. Perturbing polynomials with all their roots on the unit circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossinghoff, M. J.; Pinner, C. G.; Vaaler, J. D.

    1998-10-01

    Given a monic real polynomial with all its roots on the unit circle, we ask to what extent one can perturb its middle coefficient and still have a polynomial with all its roots on the unit circle. We show that the set of possible perturbations forms a closed interval of length at most 4, with 4 achieved only for polynomials of the form x(2n) + cx(n) + 1 with c in [-2, 2]. The problem can also be formulated in terms of perturbing the constant coefficient of a polynomial having all its roots in [-1, 1]. If we restrict to integer coefficients, then the polynomials in question are products of cyclotomics. We show that in this case there are no perturbations of length 3 that do not arise from a perturbation of length 4. We also investigate the connection between slightly perturbed products of cyclotomic polynomials and polynomials with small Mahler measure. We describe an algorithm for searching for polynomials with small Mahler measure by perturbing the middle coefficients of products of cyclotomic polynomials. We show that the complexity of this algorithm is O(C-root d), where d is the degree, and we report on the polynomials found by this algorithm through degree 64.

  1. Effect of noise on the critical golden-mean quasiperiodic dynamics in the circle map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Alexander P.; Kuznetsov, Sergey P.; Sedova, Julia V.

    2006-01-01

    Scaling regularities are examined associated with effect of additive noise on a critical circle map at the golden-mean rotation number. We present an improved numerical estimate for the scaling constant of Hamm and Graham (Phys. Rev. A46, (1992) 6323) responsible for the effect of noise, γ=2.3061852653. Decrease of the noise amplitude by this number ensures possibility to distinguish one more level of fractal-like structure, associated with increase of characteristic time scale by the golden mean factor (√{5}+1)/2. Numeric results demonstrating evidence of the expected scaling are presented, e.g. portraits of the noisy attractors, devil's staircase plots, Lyapunov charts on the parameter plane in different scales.

  2. Literature circles book club for science and language arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombard, Britain

    Students from an urban middle school participated in a Science Book Club for one semester using the literature circles format. These students voluntarily attended twice weekly lunch meetings, reading books that followed their Grade 7 science classes. Groups of three to six participants read the same text, each performing rotating jobs to improve group discussions during meetings. When a group completed a book, participants created a presentation to share what they learned with the other groups in the club and the researcher/teacher. This research measured gains in science content knowledge and language arts skills focusing on reading comprehension, and literary response and analysis. Gains were measured using pre-existing district benchmarks. An ANCOVA showed that while no gains were found in science content knowledge, there were gains in language arts in the areas of reading comprehension and literary response and analysis.

  3. Quantum walks on a circle with optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moqadam, Jalil Khatibi; Portugal, Renato; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar

    2015-10-01

    We propose an implementation of a quantum walk on a circle in an optomechanical system by encoding the walker on the phase space of a radiation field and the coin on a two-level state of a mechanical resonator. The dynamics of the system is obtained by applying Suzuki-Trotter decomposition. We numerically show that the system displays typical behaviors of quantum walks, namely the probability distribution evolves ballistically and the standard deviation of the phase distribution is linearly proportional to the number of steps. We also analyze the effects of decoherence by using the phase-damping channel on the coin space, showing the possibility to implement the quantum walk with present-day technology.

  4. Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging on ITER with Rowland Circle Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jason; Lee, Woochang; Leem, June-Eok; Bitter, Manfred; Park, Hyeon; Yun, Gunsu

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on the major tokamaks TEXTOR1, DIII-D2,3, KSTAR4, EAST5, and ASDEX Upgrade6 has revolutionized the diagnosis of MHD activities and improved our understanding of various instabilities. However, the conventional ECEI systems cannot be applied to ITER because of the space constraints and excessive radiation that would be encountered in the diagnostic port plugs. This paper describes an alternative optical concept that employs the Rowland circle imaging geometry to implement an advanced ECEI system on ITER that is suitable for the tight space and harsh environments of the diagnostic port plugs. Such a system would match the capabilities of conventional ECEI diagnostics and would be capable of simultaneous core and edge measurements.

  5. Coordinated circling behavior of Daphnia swarming around an optical marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordemann, Anke; Russell, David F.; Moss, Frank

    2002-03-01

    The common fresh water zooplankton Daphnia, as well as many other zooplankton species, are known to form swarms as a predator confusing behavior. In rare events in the field as well as in laboratory environments a swarm of Daphnia has been observed to perform a vortex like motion, similar to a flock of birds circling before coming to rest. To shed more light on this coordinated behavior we study experimentally the motion of Daphnia inside a swarm in respect to the motion of single Daphnia. Daphnia can be induced to swarm by an optical marker such as a vertical shaft of light in the visual range, to which they are attracted. Following the tracks of several Daphnia and characterizing their paths by a variety of measures we observe the development of a circular motion around the optical marker.

  6. Carnegie, Dupont Circle, and the AAUP: (Re)Shaping a Cosmopolitan, Locally Engaged Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author looks back at the academic profession in the 20th century, as it was shaped by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, by key higher education associations situated at One Dupont Circle in Washington D.C. ("Dupont Circle" became the collective name for these associations), and by the American…

  7. Young Puerto Rican Children's Exploration of Racial Discourses within the Figured Worlds of Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castrodad-Rodriguez, Patricia Margarita

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the racial discourses of six and seven year old Puerto Rican children participating in small group literature circles over one academic year. The main research question is "How do Puerto Rican young children in a multiage classroom construct race through dialogue within the figured worlds of literature circles?" This study…

  8. Educational Community Study Circles: How Superintendents Can Enhance School Improvement through Community Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesser, Jo Sykes; McNeal, Larry

    In 1998, the Study Circles Resource Center, Arkansas Friends for Better Schools, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, and Oklahoma League of Women Voters involved 900 people in Arkansas and Oklahoma in the Calling the Roll: Study Circles for Better Schools program to address educational problems and link the community and schools. Study…

  9. 77 FR 55691 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Circle Town, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Circle Town County... Circle Town, MT (77 FR 39651). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort... a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,...

  10. Providing a Full Circle of Support to Teachers in an Inclusive Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Nancy L.; Redd, Lacy

    2011-01-01

    Providing a full circle of support to teachers in an inclusive elementary school, the Newberry Elementary School (NES) principal and staff have worked for 5 years to ensure the inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. The authors would like to share their perceptions of how this full circle (the multiple systems) of…

  11. Report of a Study of the Pacific Circle Consortium. [Final Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmis, Stephen

    A five-part cumulative report details the activities of the Pacific Circle Consortium. Section 1, on the origins of the Pacific Circle, describes the consortium on three levels: participating organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, participating institutions, and development teams. In section 2, the involvement of…

  12. Three Keys for Successful Circle Time: Responding to Children with Diverse Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wald, Penelope J.; And Others

    This article presents strategies that promote responsive instruction of young children with diverse abilities during teacher-directed large group times, specifically "circle time." It uses a traditional circle time format to show how such typical activities as observing the weather can be modified to provide multisensory, multilevel, and multiple…

  13. Improving the Reading Attitudes of College Students: Using Literature Circles to Learn about Content Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernadowski, Carianne

    2013-01-01

    Literature circles and book clubs have become a popular instructional literacy strategy. In recent years, educators attempt to motivate students to read more in quantity and quality at an early age. A case study design was utilized that required undergraduate education majors to participate in literature circles reading historical fiction and…

  14. An Action Research Study Involving Motivating Middle School Students' Learning through Online Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falter Thomas, Angela

    2014-01-01

    In this study, I explored the motivation of middle school students participating in online literature circles facilitated by college students, compared to traditional face-to-face literature circles they previously utilized. Sixty-eight rural, middle school students from two English teachers' classrooms took part in two sets of online literature…

  15. A Historical Note on the Proof of the Area of a Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilamowsky, Yonah; Epstein, Sheldon; Dickman, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Proofs that the area of a circle is nr[superscript 2] can be found in mathematical literature dating as far back as the time of the Greeks. The early proofs, e.g. Archimedes, involved dividing the circle into wedges and then fitting the wedges together in a way to approximate a rectangle. Later more sophisticated proofs relied on arguments…

  16. When Two Circles Determine a Triangle. Discovering and Proving a Geometrical Condition in a Computer Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metaxas, Nikolaos; Karagiannidou, Andromachi

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of mathematical relationships enables students to formulate conjectures as well as to search for mathematical arguments to support these conjectures. In this project students are asked to discover the sufficient and necessary condition so that two circles form the circumscribed and inscribed circle of a triangle and investigate how…

  17. Literature Circles in a Bilingual Classroom: The Power of Language Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta-Nash, Claudia

    2003-01-01

    Shares selected observations on bilingual children's language and role choices within literature circles, focusing on one particular student. Concentrates on one child within one cycle of literature circles, but notes that the data speak to learner behaviors that also were observable in other instructional groups and cycles in this classroom. (SG)

  18. VIEW FROM EAST SIDE OF ELM DRIVE/BIRCH CIRCLE BLOCK, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM EAST SIDE OF ELM DRIVE/BIRCH CIRCLE BLOCK, SHOWING SLOPING TOPOGRAPHY. VIEW FACING WEST. - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Learning Circles: One Form of Knowledge Production in Social Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravensbergen, Frances; Vanderplaat, Madine

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the use of "learning circles" as one form of knowledge production in social action research. It reports on a project that used learning circles as a setting within which to increase the engagement of people living with low income in developing strategies for the reduction and elimination of poverty in Canada. It presents the…

  20. We Can All Participate! Adapting Circle Time for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Erin E.; Reichow, Brian; Wolery, Mark; Chen, Ching-I

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a set of strategies for including children with autism in circle time. Successful inclusion involves careful planning, collaboration, and consideration of individual needs. Circle time can be a positive activity for children with autism when individual needs and strengths are considered. Environmental modifications and…

  1. Analysis of Student Responses to Participation in Literature Circles in a University Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Lynda E.; DeCastro-Ambrosetti, Debra

    2009-01-01

    This combined quantitative and qualitative study examined the responses of students to participation in literature circles and the use of trade books in a university classroom. Students in an adolescence course participated in this strategy throughout the semester. The literature circles involved small groups of students who had chosen to read the…

  2. Circle Time: An Exploratory Study of Activities and Challenging Behavior in Head Start Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaghlawan, Hasan Y.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine circle time activities in eight Head Start classrooms. A total of 7 h of observations occurred in eight classrooms. Songs and academic activities were the most frequently occurring activities. Challenging behavior during circle time also was examined. The three activities with the highest…

  3. Table or Circles: A Comparison of Two Methods for Choosing among Career Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amit, Adi; Gati, Itamar

    2013-01-01

    A sample of 182 young adults about to choose their college major were randomly assigned to 2 guidance methods aimed at facilitating choosing among promising career alternatives: Table-for-Choice and Circles-for-Choice. Table-for-Choice was perceived as more effective, but individuals' confidence in their choice was higher in the Circles-for-Choice…

  4. Comparing Interactions in Literature Circles in Both Online and in Class Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeen, Christel Ghrist

    2014-01-01

    Discourse analysis of literature circles can lead educators to understand the different types of interactions taking place as students talk about text. Social and academic interactions exist in both face-to-face and online discussions of reading material. This study examines two different settings of literature circles and compares interactions of…

  5. Collaborative Inquiry in Reading Recovery, or "Why Sit in a Circle?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Emily

    2000-01-01

    In Reading Recovery, training participants sit in a circle to discuss lessons that have been communally observed. The rationale for sitting in a circle without a table for discussion can be better understood by considering these two ideas: (1) the role of language in learning; and (2) the way conversation is affected by the physical positioning of…

  6. Toward a "Lifetime of Literacies": Library Reading Circles for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howrey, Mary M.; Rachelson, Esther S.

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study of the ReadDeVry reading circles program, a DeVry University funded project, identifies the theoretical and practical considerations for reading circles programs serving college students. As designed, the program addresses a number of the issues raised recently by national organizations such as the American College…

  7. The Revival of Research Circles: Meeting the Needs of Modern Aging and the Third Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostlund, Britt

    2008-01-01

    This article provides evidence that it is worthwhile to reconsider the traditional research circle method as a means of involving people in the third age in fulfilling their needs to participate in learning activities and make their voices heard. The findings are based on three cases of research circles consistently driven by the interests of the…

  8. Social constructions of the male contraception pill: When are we going to break the vicious circle?

    PubMed

    Dismore, Lorelle; Van Wersch, Anna; Swainston, Katherine

    2016-05-01

    Social constructions of men towards the availability of a male hormonal contraceptive, the 'male pill', were explored. A qualitative approach applying semi-structured interviews and scenarios with 22 men (mean age 35 years) from the North East of England revealed two core constructs and six sub-constructs using a Thematic-Construct Analysis in line with the method of Toerien and Wilkinson and Clarke and Kitzinger. Verbal accounts were inductively used to balance the deductively created two core constructs 'Constructing the male pill norm: dominant system of sensemaking' and 'Living by the male pill norm' to represent a normative framework within a changing ideology of shared responsibility in contraceptive choice. Constructing the male pill norm was divided into two sub-constructs: 'Male pill: we are going to join the women and become responsible - too!' and 'Male pill: you look so girly - what are they going to think of me?' The 'Living by the male pill norm' was further divided into four sub-constructs 'Male pill - thank you for giving me promises not to have to become a dad as yet!'; 'Male pill: thank you for the idea of fun - sorry about my morals!'; 'Male pill: in stable relations - yes, I would have you now - sorry, I am too late!' and 'Male pill, we love you - but we are too anxious - we are not ready as yet!' From this male discourse, it is clear that discussions over the male pill follow the line of a vicious circle. In order to establish long-term side effects, Phase IV studies are necessary, and these cannot commence without the male hormonal contraception being a marketable product. So, unless this circle gets broken by some brave men, the male pill will remain a virtual rotating idea for a long time. PMID:24997170

  9. A new method for fast circle detection in a complex background image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meijun; Yang, Jie; Sun, Yadong

    2011-11-01

    A new method for circle detection, Hough gradient clustering method, has been developed in this paper. By using gradient direction angle to find the diameter of a circle, the new method can rapidly detect the circle in a complex background. The crucial steps in this method are the feature extraction and the clustering of the points which have the same gray direction angle and are collinear along the gradient direction. The application of the two-to-one space mapping and 1-2Hough transform can further reduce the useless calculation in the process of circle detection. Comparing with the Hough gradient method in OpenCV, the newly developed method shows a higher efficiency of circle detection in a complex background image as well as a great improvement in the anti-noise ability.

  10. [Clinical pathway, quality circle and standard operating procedures as tools for quality management in the trauma suite].

    PubMed

    Wurmb, Thomas; Frühwald, Peter; Roewer, Norbert; Brederlau, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    In each hospital the trauma resuscitation room in emergency departments is one of the areas with the highest rate of critical incidents. Delayed and insufficient medical interventions have a high impact on negative patient outcomes. Anticipating and dealing with critical situations might reduce preventable errors in the treatment process. This can be achieved by implementing an algorithm-based structured work flow. In this context some elements of quality management are well-established in clinical practice. In the present study we describe the implementation of a clinical pathway and an interdisciplinary quality circle to improve management of the trauma patient.

  11. Monte Carlo method based radiative transfer simulation of stochastic open forest generated by circle packing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shengye; Tamura, Masayuki

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method is a versatile application for simulating radiative transfer regime of the Solar - Atmosphere - Landscape system. Moreover, it can be used to compute the radiation distribution over a complex landscape configuration, as an example like a forest area. Due to its robustness to the complexity of the 3-D scene altering, MCRT method is also employed for simulating canopy radiative transfer regime as the validation source of other radiative transfer models. In MCRT modeling within vegetation, one basic step is the canopy scene set up. 3-D scanning application was used for representing canopy structure as accurately as possible, but it is time consuming. Botanical growth function can be used to model the single tree growth, but cannot be used to express the impaction among trees. L-System is also a functional controlled tree growth simulation model, but it costs large computing memory. Additionally, it only models the current tree patterns rather than tree growth during we simulate the radiative transfer regime. Therefore, it is much more constructive to use regular solid pattern like ellipsoidal, cone, cylinder etc. to indicate single canopy. Considering the allelopathy phenomenon in some open forest optical images, each tree in its own `domain' repels other trees. According to this assumption a stochastic circle packing algorithm is developed to generate the 3-D canopy scene in this study. The canopy coverage (%) and the tree amount (N) of the 3-D scene are declared at first, similar to the random open forest image. Accordingly, we randomly generate each canopy radius (rc). Then we set the circle central coordinate on XY-plane as well as to keep circles separate from each other by the circle packing algorithm. To model the individual tree, we employ the Ishikawa's tree growth regressive model to set the tree parameters including DBH (dt), tree height (H). However, the relationship between canopy height (Hc) and trunk height (Ht) is

  12. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    From its unique perspective, Ulysses has provided scientists with the very first all-round map of the heliosphere, the huge bubble in space filled by the Sun's wind. The Earth swims deep inside the heliosphere, and gusts and shocks in the solar wind can harm satellites, power supplies and ommunications. They may also affect our planet's weather. A better grasp of the solar weather in the heliosphere is therefore one of the major aims of ESA's science programme. In a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA, Ulysses was launched towards Jupiter in October 1990 by the US space shuttle Discovery. Arriving in February 1992, Ulysses stole energy from the giant planet in a slingshot manoeuvre and was propelled back towards the Sun in an elongated orbit almost at right angles to the ecliptic plane, where the Earth and other planets circle the Sun. "This month Ulysses returns to the point in space where its out-of-ecliptic journey began, but Jupiter isn't there," explains Richard Marsden, ESA's project scientist for Ulysses. "Following its own inexorable path around the Sun, Jupiter is far away on the opposite side of the Solar System. So Ulysses' course will not be changed a second time. The spacecraft is now in effect a man-made comet, forever bound into a 6-year polar orbit around the Sun." Ulysses now starts its second orbit. It will travel over the poles of the Sun in 2000-2001 just as the count of dark sunspots is expected to reach a maximum. With its operational life extended for the Ulysses Solar Maximum Mission, the spacecraft will find the heliosphere much stormier than during its first orbit. Discoveries so far Like its mythical namesake, Ulysses has already had an eventful voyage of discovery. Its unique trajectory has provided the scientific teams with a new perspective, from far out in space and especially in the previously unknown regions of the heliosphere over the Sun's poles. Passing within 9.8 degrees of the polar axis, the highly

  13. Localized vegetation patterns, fairy circles, and localized patches in arid landscapes.

    PubMed

    Escaff, D; Fernandez-Oto, C; Clerc, M G; Tlidi, M

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the formation of localized structures with varying widths in one- and two-dimensional systems. The mechanism of stabilization is attributed to strongly nonlocal coupling mediated by a Lorentzian type of kernel. We show that, in addition to stable dips found recently [see, e.g. Fernandez-Oto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 174101 (2013)], there are stable localized peaks which appear as a result of strongly nonlocal coupling. We applied this mechanism to arid ecosystems by considering a prototype model of a Nagumo type. In one dimension, we study the front connecting the stable uniformly vegetated state to the bare one under the effect of strongly nonlocal coupling. We show that strongly nonlocal coupling stabilizes both-dip and peak-localized structures. We show analytically and numerically that the width of a localized structure, which we interpret as a fairy circle, increases strongly with the aridity parameter. This prediction is in agreement with published observations. In addition, we predict that the width of localized patch decreases with the degree of aridity. Numerical results are in close agreement with analytical predictions.

  14. Modelling of the toe trajectory during normal gait using circle-fit approximation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Juan; Hunt, Kenneth J; Xie, Le; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed to validate the approach of using a circle to fit the toe trajectory relative to the hip and to investigate linear regression models for describing such toe trajectories from normal gait. Twenty-four subjects walked at seven speeds. Best-fit circle algorithms were developed to approximate the relative toe trajectory using a circle. It was detected that the mean approximation error between the toe trajectory and its best-fit circle was less than 4 %. Regarding the best-fit circles for the toe trajectories from all subjects, the normalised radius was constant, while the normalised centre offset reduced when the walking cadence increased; the curve range generally had a positive linear relationship with the walking cadence. The regression functions of the circle radius, the centre offset and the curve range with leg length and walking cadence were definitively defined. This study demonstrated that circle-fit approximation of the relative toe trajectories is generally applicable in normal gait. The functions provided a quantitative description of the relative toe trajectories. These results have potential application for design of gait rehabilitation technologies.

  15. Gold Nanowire Based Electrical DNA Detection Using Rolling Circle Amplification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present an electrical sensor that uses rolling circle amplification (RCA) of DNA to stretch across the gap between two electrodes, interact with metal nanoparticle seeds to generate an electrically conductive nanowire, and produce electrical signals upon detection of specific target DNA sequences. RCA is a highly specific molecular detection mechanism based on DNA probe circularization. With this technique, long single-stranded DNA with simple repetitive sequences are produced. Here we show that stretched RCA products can be metalized using silver or gold solutions to form metal wires. Upon metallization, the resistance drops from TΩ to kΩ for silver and to Ω for gold. Metallization is seeded by gold nanoparticles aligned along the single-stranded DNA product through hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides. We show that combining RCA with electrical DNA detection produces results in readout with very high signal-to-noise ratio, an essential feature for sensitive and specific detection assays. Finally, we demonstrate detection of 10 ng of Escherichia coli genomic DNA using the sensor concept. PMID:24433087

  16. Quantifying in vivo MR spectra with circles

    PubMed Central

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate and robust quantification of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data is essential to its application in research and medicine. The performance of existing analysis methods is problematic for in vivo studies where low signal-to-noise ratio, overlapping peaks and intense artefacts are endemic. Here, a new frequency-domain technique for MRS data analysis is introduced wherein the circular trajectories which result when spectral peaks are projected onto the complex plane, are fitted with active circle models. The use of active contour strategies naturally allows incorporation of prior knowledge as constraint energy terms. The problem of phasing spectra is eliminated, and baseline artefacts are dealt with using active contours-snakes. The stability and accuracy of the new technique, CFIT, is compared with a standard time-domain fitting tool, using simulated 31P data with varying amounts of noise and 98 real human chest and heart 31P MRS data sets. The real data were also analyzed by our standard frequency-domain absorption-mode technique. On the real data, CFIT demonstrated the least fitting failures of all methods and an accuracy similar to the latter method, with both these techniques outperforming the time-domain approach. Contrasting results from simulations argue that performance relative to Cramer-Rao Bounds may not be a suitable indicator of fitting performance with typical in vivo data such as these. We conclude that CFIT is a stable, accurate alternative to the best existing methods of fitting in vivo data. PMID:16325436

  17. Molecular identification of Histoplasma capsulatum using rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Jason L; Sun, Jiufeng; do Nascimento, Mariana M F; Gomes, Renata R; Waculicz-Andrade, Caroline E; Sessegolo, Gisele C; Rodrigues, Anderson M; Galvão-Dias, Maria A; de Camargo, Zoilo P; Queiroz-Telles, Flávio; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; de Hoog, Sybren G; Vicente, Vania A

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that occurs worldwide, causing symptomatic infection mostly in immunocompromised hosts. Etiological agent is the dimorphic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum, which occurs in soil contaminated with bird or bat droppings. Major limitation in recognition of H. capsulatum infections is the low awareness, since other diseases may have similar symptomatology. The molecular methods have gained importance because of unambiguous diagnostic ability and efficiency. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a padlock probe in view of rolling circle amplification (RCA) detection method which targets ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) rDNA of H. capsulatum enabling rapid and specific detection of the fungus in clinical samples. Two padlock probes were designed and one of these (HcPL2) allowed specific amplification of H. capsulatum DNA while no cross-reactivity was observed with fungi used as negative controls. This method proved to be effective for H. capsulatum specific identification and demonstrated to be faster than the traditional method of microbiological identification. PMID:26578301

  18. Multiplexed protein profiling on microarrays by rolling-circle amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Barry; Roberts, Scott; Grimwade, Brian; Shao, Weiping; Wang, Minjuan; Fu, Qin; Shu, Quiping; Laroche, Isabelle; Zhou, Zhimin; Tchernev, Velizar T.; Christiansen, Jason; Velleca, Mark; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent-sandwich immunoassays on microarrays hold appeal for proteomics studies, because equipment and antibodies are readily available, and assays are simple, scalable, and reproducible. The achievement of adequate sensitivity and specificity, however, requires a general method of immunoassay amplification. We describe coupling of isothermal rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to universal antibodies for this purpose. A total of 75 cytokines were measured simultaneously on glass arrays with signal amplification by RCA with high specificity, femtomolar sensitivity, 3 log quantitative range, and economy of sample consumption. A 51-feature RCA cytokine glass array was used to measure secretion from human dendritic cells (DCs) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). As expected, LPS induced rapid secretion of inflammatory cytokines such as macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, interleukin (IL)-8, and interferon-inducible protein (IP)-10. We found that eotaxin-2 and I-309 were induced by LPS; in addition, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R), and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor I (sTNF-RI) were induced by TNF-α treatment. Because microarrays can accommodat ~1,000 sandwich immunoassays of this type, a relatively small number of RCA microarrays seem to offer a tractable approach for proteomic surveys. PMID:11923841

  19. Hypomagnesemia in Type 2 Diabetes: A Vicious Circle?

    PubMed

    Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M; de Baaij, Jeroen H F

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, hypomagnesemia (serum Mg(2+) <0.7 mmol/L) has been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with hypomagnesemia show a more rapid disease progression and have an increased risk for diabetes complications. Clinical studies demonstrate that T2DM patients with hypomagnesemia have reduced pancreatic β-cell activity and are more insulin resistant. Moreover, dietary Mg(2+) supplementation for patients with T2DM improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Intracellular Mg(2+) regulates glucokinase, KATP channels, and L-type Ca(2+) channels in pancreatic β-cells, preceding insulin secretion. Moreover, insulin receptor autophosphorylation is dependent on intracellular Mg(2+) concentrations, making Mg(2+) a direct factor in the development of insulin resistance. Conversely, insulin is an important regulator of Mg(2+) homeostasis. In the kidney, insulin activates the renal Mg(2+) channel transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 that determines the final urinary Mg(2+) excretion. Consequently, patients with T2DM and hypomagnesemia enter a vicious circle in which hypomagnesemia causes insulin resistance and insulin resistance reduces serum Mg(2+) concentrations. This Perspective provides a systematic overview of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of Mg(2+) on insulin secretion and insulin signaling. In addition to providing a review of current knowledge, we provide novel directions for future research and identify previously neglected contributors to hypomagnesemia in T2DM.

  20. Circle diagram approach for self excited induction generators

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Carlin, P.W.; Osgood, R.M.

    1993-05-01

    When an induction generator is connected to a utility line supply, the voltage and frequency at the terminal output are the same as the voltage and frequency of the utility line supply to which the generator is connected. The reactive power needed by the induction generator is supplied by the utility and the real power is returned to the utility. With a fixed frequency dictated by the utility, the induction machine starts generating above the synchronous speed. The range of speed is also limited by the slip. At a very high slip, the copper losses increases as the current increases. On the other hand, in an isolated operation, the induction generator operates in self-excitation mode. It determines its own voltage and frequency. These two quantities depend on the size of the AC capacitor, the induction machine parameters, the electrical load, and the speed of the generator. The operating speed of the induction generator is extended without generating excessive loss. This paper presents an analytical study by utilizing a circle diagram to illustrate the operation of the induction generator in isolated operation. The steady-state calculations are presented to support the analysis. Possible applications for the system in variable-speed generation are currently under investigation. The output can be directly connected to equipment that is non-sensitive to the frequency (a heater, battery charger, etc.) or can be connected to a converter to get a fixed-frequency AC output.

  1. Distribution of x ṡ p for quantum states on a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. H.; Qin, L.; Huang, X. L.; Zhang, D. Y.; Xun, D. M.

    2015-05-01

    We first give the proper definition of the particle's position-momentum dot product, the so-called posmomx ṡ p, to quantum states on a circular circle, in which the momentum turns out to be the geometric one that is recently intensively studied. Second, we carry out the posmom distributions for eigenstates of the free motion on the circle, i.e. \\exp (\\varphi)/√ {2π }, (m = 0, ±1, ±2, …). The results are not only potentially experimentally testable, but also reflect a fact that the embedding of the circle S1 in two-dimensional flat space R2 is physically reasonable.

  2. Constructing knowledge about the trigonometric functions and their geometric meaning on the unit circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Renana; Kidron, Ivy

    2016-10-01

    Processes of knowledge construction are investigated. A learner is constructing knowledge about the trigonometric functions and their geometric meaning on the unit circle. The analysis is based on the dynamically nested epistemic action model for abstraction in context. Different tasks are offered to the learner. In his effort to perform the different tasks, he has the opportunity to understand the process used to create unit circle representations of trigonometric expressions. The theoretical framework of abstraction in context is used to analyse the evolution of the learner's construction of knowledge in the transition from 'triangle' trigonometry to 'circle' trigonometry.

  3. Two-dimensional gel analysis of rolling circle replication in the presence and absence of bacteriophage T4 primase.

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, K G; Mirzayan, C; Kreuzer, H E; Alberts, B M; Kreuzer, K N

    1996-01-01

    The rolling circle DNA replication structures generated by the in vitro phage T4 replication system were analyzed using two-dimensional agarose gels. Replication structures were generated in the presence or absence of T4 primase (gp61), permitting the analysis of replication forks with either duplex or single-stranded tails. A characteristic arc shape was visualized when forks with single-stranded tails were cleaved by a restriction enzyme with the help of an oligonucleotide that anneals to restriction sites in the single-stranded tail. After calibrating the gel system with this well-studied rolling circle replication reaction, we then analyzed the in vivo replication directed by a T4 replication origin cloned within a plasmid. DNA samples were generated from infections with either wild-type or primase-deletion mutant phage. The only replicative arc that could be detected in the wild-type sample corresponded to duplex Y forms, consistent with very efficient lagging strand synthesis. Surprisingly, we obtained evidence for both duplex and single-stranded DNA tails in the samples from the primase-deficient infection. We conclude that a relatively inefficient mechanism primes lagging strand DNA synthesis in vivo when gp61 is absent. PMID:8668550

  4. Design of Novel Relaxase Substrates Based on Rolling Circle Replicases for Bioconjugation to DNA Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sagredo, Sandra; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    During bacterial conjugation and rolling circle replication, HUH endonucleases, respectively known as relaxases and replicases, form a covalent bond with ssDNA when they cleave their target sequence (nic site). Both protein families show structural similarity but limited amino acid identity. Moreover, the organization of the inverted repeat (IR) and the loop that shape the nic site differs in both proteins. Arguably, replicases cleave their target site more efficiently, while relaxases exert more biochemical control over the process. Here we show that engineering a relaxase target by mimicking the replicase target, results in enhanced formation of protein-DNA covalent complexes. Three widely different relaxases, which belong to MOBF, MOBQ and MOBP families, can properly cleave DNA sequences with permuted target sequences. Collaterally, the secondary structure that the permuted targets acquired within a supercoiled plasmid DNA resulted in poor conjugation frequencies underlying the importance of relaxase accessory proteins in conjugative DNA processing. Our results reveal that relaxase and replicase targets can be interchangeable in vitro. The new Rep substrates provide new bioconjugation tools for the design of sophisticated DNA-protein nanostructures.

  5. Design of Novel Relaxase Substrates Based on Rolling Circle Replicases for Bioconjugation to DNA Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Sagredo, Sandra; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    During bacterial conjugation and rolling circle replication, HUH endonucleases, respectively known as relaxases and replicases, form a covalent bond with ssDNA when they cleave their target sequence (nic site). Both protein families show structural similarity but limited amino acid identity. Moreover, the organization of the inverted repeat (IR) and the loop that shape the nic site differs in both proteins. Arguably, replicases cleave their target site more efficiently, while relaxases exert more biochemical control over the process. Here we show that engineering a relaxase target by mimicking the replicase target, results in enhanced formation of protein-DNA covalent complexes. Three widely different relaxases, which belong to MOBF, MOBQ and MOBP families, can properly cleave DNA sequences with permuted target sequences. Collaterally, the secondary structure that the permuted targets acquired within a supercoiled plasmid DNA resulted in poor conjugation frequencies underlying the importance of relaxase accessory proteins in conjugative DNA processing. Our results reveal that relaxase and replicase targets can be interchangeable in vitro. The new Rep substrates provide new bioconjugation tools for the design of sophisticated DNA-protein nanostructures. PMID:27027740

  6. Exact and efficient cone-beam reconstruction algorithm for a short-scan circle combined with various lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennerlein, Frank; Katsevich, Alexander; Lauritsch, Guenter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2005-04-01

    X-ray 3D rotational angiography based on C-arm systems has become a versatile and established tomographic imaging modality for high contrast objects in interventional environment. Improvements in data acquisition, e.g. by use of flat panel detectors, will enable C-arm systems to resolve even low-contrast details. However, further progress will be limited by the incompleteness of data acquisition on the conventional short-scan circular source trajectories. Cone artifacts, which result from that incompleteness, significantly degrade image quality by severe smearing and shading. To assure data completeness a combination of a partial circle with one or several line segments is investigated. A new and efficient reconstruction algorithm is deduced from a general inversion formula based on 3D Radon theory. The method is theoretically exact, possesses shift-invariant filtered backprojection (FBP) structure, and solves the long object problem. The algorithm is flexible in dealing with various circle and line configurations. The reconstruction method requires nothing more than the theoretically minimum length of scan trajectory. It consists of a conventional short-scan circle and a line segment approximately twice as long as the height of the region-of-interest. Geometrical deviations from the ideal source trajectory are considered in the implementation in order to handle data of real C-arm systems. Reconstruction results show excellent image quality free of cone artifacts. The proposed scan trajectory and reconstruction algorithm assure excellent image quality and allow low-contrast tomographic imaging with C-arm based cone-beam systems. The method can be implemented without any hardware modifications on systems commercially available today.

  7. DINE-1, the highest copy number repeats in Drosophila melanogaster are non-autonomous endonuclease-encoding rolling-circle transposable elements (Helentrons)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila INterspersed Elements-1 (DINE-1/INE1) transposable elements (TEs) are the most abundant component of the Drosophila melanogaster genome and have been associated with functional gene duplications. DINE-1 TEs do not encode any proteins (non-autonomous) thus are moved by autonomous partners. The identity of the autonomous partners has been a mystery. They have been allied to Helitrons (rolling-circle transposons), MITEs (DNA transposons), and non-LTR retrotransposons by different authors. Results We report multiple lines of bioinformatic evidence that illustrate the relationship of DINE-1 like TEs to endonuclease-encoding rolling-circle TEs (Helentrons). The structural features of Helentrons are described, which resemble the organization of the non-autonomous partners, but differ significantly from canonical Helitrons. In addition to the presence of an endonuclease domain fused to the Rep/Helicase protein, Helentrons have distinct structural features. Evidence is presented that illustrates that Helentrons are widely distributed in invertebrate, fish, and fungal genomes. We describe an intermediate family from the Phytophthora infestans genome that phylogenetically groups with Helentrons but that displays Helitron structure. In addition, evidence is presented that Helentrons can capture gene fragments in a pattern reminiscent of canonical Helitrons. Conclusions We illustrate the relationship of DINE-1 and related TE families to autonomous partners, the Helentrons. These findings will allow their proper classification and enable a more accurate understanding of the contribution of rolling-circle transposition to the birth of new genes, gene networks, and genome composition. PMID:24959209

  8. Introduction of the carbon dioxide absorption method with closed circle breathing into anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Foregger, R

    2000-07-01

    The circle breathing CO2 absorption system for use during acetylene anesthesia was described by Carl Gauss in 1924/1925. The apparatus was manufactured by Drägerwerk of Lübeck. A considerable number of publications on the apparatus employing the closed circle method of CO2 absorption appeared in the medical press soon thereafter. Later apparatus models, also built by Drägerwerk, were adapted for nitrous oxide-oxygen-ether anesthesia and introduced into practice by Paul Sudeck and Helmut Schmidt. Information about all this was transmitted to America through the German medical press, including the Draeger-Hefte. American anesthesia machine manufacturers began to develop closed circle CO2 absorbers several years later. Claims that the circle breathing CO2 absorption method was introduced into anesthesia practice by Brian Sword are not valid. PMID:10969391

  9. DC66820 VISTA EAST ALONG M STREET TO THOMAS CIRCLE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-20 VISTA EAST ALONG M STREET TO THOMAS CIRCLE FROM RESERVATION NO. 14 0 AT NEW HAMPSHIRE AVENUE AND 21ST STREET, NW - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. DC66842 VIEW WEST FROM BANNEKER CIRCLE (RESERVATION NO. 719) TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DC-668-42 VIEW WEST FROM BANNEKER CIRCLE (RESERVATION NO. 719) TO THE DOME OF THE JEFFERSON MEMORIAL IN WEST POTOMAC PARK - L'Enfant-McMillan Plan of Washington, DC, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Sister Circles as a Culturally Relevant Intervention for Anxious African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Neal-Barnett, Angela; Stadulis, Robert; Murray, Marsheena; Payne, Margaret Ralston; Thomas, Anisha; Salley, Bernadette B.

    2011-01-01

    Research on anxiety treatment with African American women reveals a need to develop interventions that address factors relevant to their lives. Such factors include feelings of isolation, multiple roles undertaken by Black women, and faith. A recurrent theme across treatment studies is the importance of having support from other Black women. Sister circles are support groups that build upon existing friendships, fictive kin networks, and the sense of community found among African Americans females. Sister circles appear to offer many of the components Black women desire in an anxiety intervention. In this article, we explore sister circles as an intervention for anxious African American women. Culturally-infused aspects from our sister circle work with middle-class African American women are presented. Further research is needed. PMID:22081747

  12. Real-time monitoring of rolling-circle amplification using a modified molecular beacon design.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Mats; Gullberg, Mats; Dahl, Fredrik; Szuhai, Karoly; Raap, Anton K

    2002-07-15

    We describe a method to monitor rolling-circle replication of circular oligonucleotides in dual-color and in real-time using molecular beacons. The method can be used to study the kinetics of the polymerization reaction and to amplify and quantify circularized oligonucleotide probes in a rolling-circle amplification (RCA) reaction. Modified molecular beacons were made of 2'-O-Me-RNA to prevent 3' exonucleolytic degradation by the polymerase used. Moreover, the complement of one of the stem sequences of the molecular beacon was included in the RCA products to avoid fluorescence quenching due to inter-molecular hybridization of neighboring molecular beacons hybridizing to the concatemeric polymerization product. The method allows highly accurate quantification of circularized DNA over a broad concentration range by relating the signal from the test DNA circle to an internal reference DNA circle reporting in a distinct fluorescence color.

  13. (j,0) {circle_plus} (0,j) representation space: Majorana-like construct

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, D.V.; Goldman, T.; Johnson, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    This is second of the two invited lectures presented at the ``XVII International School of Theoretical Physics: Standard Model and Beyond` 93.`` The text is essentially based on a recent publication by the present authors. Here, after briefly reviewing the (j, 0) {circle_plus} (0, j) Dirac-like construct in the front form, we present a detailed construction of the (j, 0) {circle_plus} (0, j) Majorana-like fields.

  14. Fostering Positive Peer Relations in the Primary Classroom through Circle Time and Co-Operative Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mary, Latisha

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of co-operative games and circle time activities in fostering positive peer relations in two French Primary classrooms (N = 40). It presents French teachers' and pupils' perceptions of a set of co-operative games and circle time activities implemented within a year long study on personal,…

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: W1J00 and W2J00 Transit Circle Catalogs (Rafferty+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, T. J.; Holdenried, E. R.; Urban, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    The W1J00, named because it was the first (of two) Washington transit circle catalog to be referred to the Equinox of J2000.0, is the result of observations made with the Six-inch Transit Circle in Washington, D.C., between September 1977 and July 1982. The observing program was structured to be absolute, in the sense that the positions were not explicitly relying on any previous observations. The absolute positions were defined with respect to an internally consistent frame that was unique to the particular instrument. Following the reductions, comparisons with stars from the Hipparcos Catalogue (European Space Agency 1997) revealed unaccounted for systematic differences on the level of 100-200mas. It was decided, therefore, to include data on both the absolute positions reduced in way common to many past Washington transit circle catalogs, as well as the positions differentially adjusted to the system of the Hipparcos Catalog. The W1J00 contains mean positions of 7267 stars and 4383 observations of solar system objects. The majority of the stars fall into two categories; those from the Fifth Fundamental Catalog (FK5; Fricke et al 1988), and those from the Catalog Of 3539 Zodiacal Stars For The Equinox 1950.0 (Robertson 1940). The solar system objects include the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, eight minor planets (Eunomia, Flora, Hebe, Iris, Juno, Metis, Pallas, and Vesta), and the dwarf planet Ceres. Characteristics of the W1J00 catalog: Category Range Average ------------------------------------------------------------- Magnitudes -1.6 to 10.4 7.18 RA standard errors of the mean 15 to 460 mas 98 mas Dec standard errors of the mean 10 to 400 mas 107 mas RA Number of observations / star 3 to 187 10 Dec Number of observations / star 2 to 179 10 Declination coverage -39 to +90 degrees ------------------------------------------------------------- Details of the W1J00 can be found in Rafferty, Holdenried, and Urban (2016, Publ. USNO, 2nd

  16. A Voyage around the Recumbent Stone Circles of North-East Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henty, Liz

    2015-05-01

    This paper details new archaeoastronomical research undertaken at the Recumbent Stone Circles (RSCs) of Scotland. Research to date has concentrated on the recumbent arrangement and the major theorists such as Thom, Ruggles and Burl, proposed that the recumbent and pillars are aligned to the lunar standstills or the passage of the moon over the recumbent. This research took a different voyage around the circles, which included checking all the stones of the circle for solar and stellar alignments as well as lunar alignments. It looks at nine RSCs, using both new plans drawn up by RCAHMS and plans published by Thom. The research was prompted by preliminary research, reported on at SEAC 2010, which detailed fieldwork completed at three sites. Because of the earlier focus on the recumbent, the RSCs have generally been interpreted in terms of a lunar narrative. By contrast, the aims of this research were to examine the circle in its entirety examining each circle stone for possible solar, lunar and stellar alignments using the dates of 2500 BC and 2000 BC. The results for all the circle stones showed that there were just as many solar as lunar alignments and that some stellar alignments may have been important symbolically.

  17. Circles-in-the-sky searches and observable cosmic topology in the inflationary limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, B.; Reboucas, M. J.; Tavakol, R.

    2008-10-15

    While the topology of the Universe is at present not specified by any known fundamental theory, it may in principle be determined through observations. In particular, a nontrivial topology will generate pairs of matching circles of temperature fluctuations in maps of the cosmic microwave background, the so-called circles-in-the-sky. A general search for such pairs of circles would be extremely costly and would therefore need to be confined to restricted parameter ranges. To draw quantitative conclusions from the negative results of such partial searches for the existence of circles we need a concrete theoretical framework. Here we provide such a framework by obtaining constraints on the angular parameters of these circles as a function of cosmological density parameters and the observer's position. As an example of the application of our results, we consider the recent search restricted to pairs of nearly back-to-back circles with negative results. We show that assuming the Universe to be very nearly flat, with its total matter-energy density satisfying the bounds 0<|{omega}{sub 0}-1| < or approx. 10{sup -5}, compatible with the predictions of typical inflationary models, this search, if confirmed, could in principle be sufficient to exclude a detectable nontrivial cosmic topology for most observers. We further relate explicitly the fraction of observers for which this result holds to the cosmological density parameters.

  18. Geomorphic domains and linear features on Landsat images, Circle Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    A remote sensing study using Landsat images was undertaken as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). Geomorphic domains A and B, identified on enhanced Landsat images, divide Circle quadrangle south of Tintina fault zone into two regional areas having major differences in surface characteristics. Domain A is a roughly rectangular, northeast-trending area of relatively low relief and simple, widely spaced drainages, except where igneous rocks are exposed. In contrast, domain B, which bounds two sides of domain A, is more intricately dissected showing abrupt changes in slope and relatively high relief. The northwestern part of geomorphic domain A includes a previously mapped tectonostratigraphic terrane. The southeastern boundary of domain A occurs entirely within the adjoining tectonostratigraphic terrane. The sharp geomorphic contrast along the southeastern boundary of domain A and the existence of known faults along this boundary suggest that the southeastern part of domain A may be a subdivision of the adjoining terrane. Detailed field studies would be necessary to determine the characteristics of the subdivision. Domain B appears to be divisible into large areas of different geomorphic terrains by east-northeast-trending curvilinear lines drawn on Landsat images. Segments of two of these lines correlate with parts of boundaries of mapped tectonostratigraphic terranes. On Landsat images prominent north-trending lineaments together with the curvilinear lines form a large-scale regional pattern that is transected by mapped north-northeast-trending high-angle faults. The lineaments indicate possible lithlogic variations and/or structural boundaries. A statistical strike-frequency analysis of the linear features data for Circle quadrangle shows that northeast-trending linear features predominate throughout, and that most northwest-trending linear features are found south of Tintina fault zone. A major trend interval of N.64-72E. in the linear

  19. Gene analysis of signal-joint T cell receptor excision circles and their relationship to age in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ito, Genta; Yoshimura, Kuniko; Momoi, Yasuyuki

    2015-07-15

    The quantification of DNA excision circles produced during T cell receptor (TCR) rearrangement, termed signal joint TCR rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs), has been employed as a measure of age and thymic function in humans and animals. δRec-ψJα sjTRECs are ring-shaped DNAs that are generated during TCRδ locus deletion that occurs at a late stage of T cell development. In this study, the nucleotide sequences of δRec-ψJα signal joints of canine δRec-ψJα sjTRECs were analyzed. The gene structure of canine δRec-ψJα signal joints was found to be similar to that of humans and mice. However, diversity of signal joints was detected and found to derive from N nucleotide insertions, recombination signal sequence combinational diversity and single-base substitutions at the recombination signal sequence. In addition, an adenine insertion or deletion was found approximately 280 bases from the ψJα signal end. Blood samples were collected from 46 dogs, ranging in age from 3 to 192 months, with a mean age of 96.4 and a SD of 51.5 months. Although δRec-ψJα sjTRECs were detectable in most of the dogs evaluated, the level did not significantly correlate with age. These results indicated that δRec-ψJα sjTREC levels were ineffective as a measure of age in dogs.

  20. Black-hole black-string phase transitions in thermal (1 + 1)-dimensional supersymmetric Yang Mills theory on a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharony, Ofer; Marsano, Joseph; Minwalla, Shiraz; Wiseman, Toby

    2004-11-01

    We review and extend earlier work that uses the AdS/CFT correspondence to relate the black-hole black-string transition of gravitational theories on a circle to a phase transition in maximally supersymmetric (1 + 1)-dimensional SU(N) gauge theories at large N, again compactified on a circle. We perform gravity calculations to determine a likely phase diagram for the strongly coupled gauge theory. We then directly study the phase structure of the same gauge theory, now at weak 't Hooft coupling. In the interesting temperature regime for the phase transition, the (1 + 1)-dimensional theory reduces to a (0 + 1)-dimensional bosonic theory, which we solve using Monte Carlo methods. We find strong evidence that the weakly coupled gauge theory also exhibits a black hole black string-like phase transition in the large N limit. We demonstrate that a simple Landau Ginzburg-like model describes the behaviour near the phase transition remarkably well. The weak coupling transition appears to be close to the cusp between a first-order and a second-order transition.

  1. On the organizing role of nonmuscular forces during performance of a giant circle in gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Sevrez, Violaine; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric; Bootsma, Reinoud J

    2012-02-01

    Five elite gymnasts performed giant circles on the high bar under different conditions of loading (without and with 6-kg loads attached to the shoulders, waist or ankles). Comparing the gymnasts' kinematic pattern of movement with that of a triple-pendulum moving under the sole influence of nonmuscular forces revealed qualitative similarities, including the adoption of an arched position during the downswing and a piked position during the upswing. The structuring role of nonmuscular forces in the organization of movement was further reinforced by the results of an inverse dynamics analysis, assessing the contributions of gravitational, inertial and muscular components to the net joint torques. Adding loads at the level of the shoulders, waist or ankles systematically influenced movement kinematics and net joint torques. However, with the loads attached at the level of the shoulders or waist, the load-induced changes in gravitational and inertial torques provided the required increase in net joint torque, thereby allowing the muscular torques to remain unchanged. With the loads attached at the level of the ankles, this was no longer the case and the gymnasts increased the muscular torques at the shoulder and hip joints. Together, these results demonstrate that expert gymnasts skillfully exploit the operative nonmuscular forces, employing muscle force only in the capacity of complementary forces needed to perform the task. PMID:21975422

  2. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed with rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hanxu; Yan, Feng; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2012-08-21

    An ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of DNA is designed with quantum dots (QDs) as a signal tag by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) and rolling circle amplification (RCA). Upon the recognition of the molecular beacon (MB) to target DNA, the MB hybridizes with assistants and target DNA to form a ternary ''Y-junction''. The target DNA can be dissociated from the structure under the reaction of nicking endonuclease to initiate the next hybridization process. The template enhanced MB fragments further act as the primers of the RCA reaction to produce thousands of repeated oligonucleotide sequences, which can bind with oligonucleotide functionalized QDs. The attached signal tags can be easily read out by square-wave voltammetry after dissolving with acid. Because of the cascade signal amplification and the specific TEHP and RCA reaction, this newly designed protocol provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of DNA down to the attomolar level (11 aM) with a linear range of 6 orders of magnitude (from 1 × 10(-17) to 1 × 10(-11) M) and can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfect matched target DNA with high selectivity. The high sensitivity and specificity make this method a great potential for early diagnosis in gene-related diseases.

  3. Accurate episomal HIV 2-LTR circles quantification using optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the detection of episomal HIV 2-LTR circles is a potential marker for ongoing viral replication. Quantification of 2-LTR circles is based on quantitative PCR or more recently on digital PCR assessment, but is hampered due to its low abundance. Sample pre-PCR processing is a critical step for 2-LTR circles quantification, which has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in patient derived samples. Materials and Methods We compared two sample processing procedures to more accurately quantify 2-LTR circles using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Episomal HIV 2-LTR circles were either isolated by genomic DNA isolation or by a modified plasmid DNA isolation, to separate the small episomal circular DNA from chromosomal DNA. This was performed in a dilution series of HIV-infected cells and HIV-1 infected patient derived samples (n=59). Samples for the plasmid DNA isolation method were spiked with an internal control plasmid. Results Genomic DNA isolation enables robust 2-LTR circles quantification. However, in the lower ranges of detection, PCR inhibition caused by high genomic DNA load substantially limits the amount of sample input and this impacts sensitivity and accuracy. Moreover, total genomic DNA isolation resulted in a lower recovery of 2-LTR templates per isolate, further reducing its sensitivity. The modified plasmid DNA isolation with a spiked reference for normalization was more accurate in these low ranges compared to genomic DNA isolation. A linear correlation of both methods was observed in the dilution series (R2=0.974) and in the patient derived samples with 2-LTR numbers above 10 copies per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (R2=0.671). Furthermore, Bland–Altman analysis revealed an average agreement between the methods within the 27 samples in which 2-LTR circles were detectable with both methods (bias: 0.3875±1.2657 log10). Conclusions 2-LTR circles

  4. Calculation of the mean circle size does not circumvent the bottleneck of crowding.

    PubMed

    Banno, Hayaki; Saiki, Jun

    2012-10-22

    Visually, we can extract a statistical summary of sets of elements efficiently. However, our visual system has a severe limitation in that the ability to recognize an object is remarkably impaired when it is surrounded by other objects. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the crowding effect obstructs the calculation of the mean size of objects. First, we verified that the crowding effect occurs when comparing the sizes of circles (Experiment 1). Next, we manipulated the distances between circles and measured the sensitivity when circles were on or off the limitation of crowding (Experiment 2). Participants were asked to compare the mean sizes of the circles in the left and right visual fields and to judge which was larger. Participants' sensitivity to mean size difference was lower when the circles were located in the nearer distance. Finally, we confirmed that crowding is responsible for the observed results by showing that displays without a crowded object eliminated the effects (Experiment 3). Our results indicate that the statistical information of size does not circumvent the bottleneck of crowding.

  5. Promoting retention, enabling success: Discovering the potential of student support circles.

    PubMed

    Bass, Janice; Walters, Caroline; Toohill, Jocelyn; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-09-01

    Retention of students is critical to education programs and future workforce. A mixed methods study evaluated student engagement within a Bachelor of Midwifery program and connection with career choice through participation in student support circles. Centred on the Five Senses of Success Framework (sense of capability, purpose, identity, resourcefulness and connectedness) and including four stages of engagement (creating space, preparing self, sharing stories, focused conversations), the circles support and develop student and professional identity. Of 80 students 43 (54%) provided responses to a two item survey assessed against a five point Likert scale to determine utility. Using a nominal group technique, student's voices gave rich insight into the personal and professional growth that participation in the student support circles provided. Evaluated as helpful to first year students in orientating to university study and early socialisation into the profession, the circles appear to influence the development of a strong sense of professional identity and personal midwifery philosophy based on the relational nature of the midwife being with woman rather than doing midwifery. This suggests that student support circles positively influence perceptions and expectations, contributing to a shared sense of purpose and discipline connection, for enhancing student retention and future workforce participation. PMID:27552548

  6. Infraorbital Dark Circles: A Review of the Pathogenesis, Evaluation and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vrcek, Ivan; Ozgur, Omar; Nakra, Tanuj

    2016-01-01

    Infraorbital dark circles represent a common and multifactorial challenge in the world of aesthetic medicine and are the result of a variety of factors including deep facial anatomy, soft tissue changes, as well as contributions from the skin. A variety of treatment options exist, and a customised management strategy can be developed for the particular anatomic changes present. A literature search using MEDLINE and non-MEDLINE sources was performed utilising keywords including: 'Dark circles' 'infraorbital dark circles', 'infraorbital pigment', 'under-eye circles' and 'lower eyelid bags'. A comprehensive review of the literature was performed and the data were assimilated with evidence from our practice. This review provides a detailed discussion of the aetiology, pathogenesis, evaluation and management of infraorbital dark circles. An understanding of the deep and superficial anatomy is crucial to the management of this complex entity. The armamentarium for treatment includes minimally invasive interventions such as makeup and cosmeceuticals, a variety of laser and chemical treatments, fillers and fat transfer, as well as more invasive surgical manoeuvres.

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles: A Subject for Debate.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Isabel; Pernas, María; Casado, Concepción; López-Galindez, Cecilio

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infections are characterized by the integration of the reverse transcribed genomic RNA into the host chromosomes making up the provirus. In addition to the integrated proviral DNA, there are other forms of linear and circular unintegrated viral DNA in HIV-1-infected cells. One of these forms, known as two-long terminal repeat circles, has been extensively studied and characterized both in in vitro infected cells and in cells from patients. Detection of two-long terminal repeat circles has been proposed as a marker of antiretroviral treatment efficacy or ongoing replication in patients with undetectable viral load. But not all authors agree with this use because of the uncertainty about the lifespan of the two-long terminal repeat circles. We review the major studies estimating the half-life of the two-long terminal repeat circles as well as those proposing its detection as a marker of ongoing replication or therapeutic efficacy. We also review the characteristic of these circular forms and the difficulties in its detection and quantification. The variety of approaches and methods used in the two-long terminal repeat quantification as well as the low reliability of some methods make the comparison between results difficult. We conclude that it is not possible to draw a clear supposition about the lifespan of two-long terminal repeat circles and consequently they should not be used as a marker of ongoing replication without a careful analysis of the methods and results.

  8. Promoting retention, enabling success: Discovering the potential of student support circles.

    PubMed

    Bass, Janice; Walters, Caroline; Toohill, Jocelyn; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-09-01

    Retention of students is critical to education programs and future workforce. A mixed methods study evaluated student engagement within a Bachelor of Midwifery program and connection with career choice through participation in student support circles. Centred on the Five Senses of Success Framework (sense of capability, purpose, identity, resourcefulness and connectedness) and including four stages of engagement (creating space, preparing self, sharing stories, focused conversations), the circles support and develop student and professional identity. Of 80 students 43 (54%) provided responses to a two item survey assessed against a five point Likert scale to determine utility. Using a nominal group technique, student's voices gave rich insight into the personal and professional growth that participation in the student support circles provided. Evaluated as helpful to first year students in orientating to university study and early socialisation into the profession, the circles appear to influence the development of a strong sense of professional identity and personal midwifery philosophy based on the relational nature of the midwife being with woman rather than doing midwifery. This suggests that student support circles positively influence perceptions and expectations, contributing to a shared sense of purpose and discipline connection, for enhancing student retention and future workforce participation.

  9. Specific RNA self-cleavage in coconut cadang cadang viroid: potential for a role in rolling circle replication.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y H; Symons, R H

    1998-01-01

    The rolling circle replication of the small, single-stranded viroid RNAs requires a specific processing reaction to produce monomeric RNAs that are ligated into the final circular form. For avocado sunblotch viroid, peach latent mosaic viroid, and chrysanthemum chlorotic mottle viroid, the hammerhead self-cleavage reaction is considered to provide this processing reaction. We have searched for a similar type of reaction in the 246-nt coconut cadang cadang viroid, the smallest viroid of the 24-member potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTV) group. RNA transcripts prepared from the cloned central or C domain of this viroid self-cleaved specifically after denaturation with methylmercuric hydroxide followed by incubation in the presence of spermidine but in the absence of added magnesium ions. The unique cleavage site was located in the bottom strand of the C domain within a potential hairpin structure that is conserved within members of all three subgroups of the PSTV group of viroids. PMID:9630248

  10. A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Wehus, I. K.; Eriksen, H. K.

    2011-06-01

    In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and {chi}{sup 2} statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian {Lambda}CDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

  11. Hydraulic characteristics of an underdrained irrigation circle, Muskegon County wastewater disposal system, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    Muskegon County, Mich., disposes of wastewater by spray irrigating farmland on its waste-disposal site. Buried drains in the highly permeable unconfined aquifer at the site control the level of the water table. Hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and drain leakance, the reciprocal of resistance to flow into the drains, was determined at a representative irrigation circle while calibrating a model of the ground-water flow system. Hydraulic conductivity is .00055 meter per second, in the north zone of the circle, and .00039 meter per second in the south zone. Drain leakance is low in both zones: 0.0000029 meter per second in the north and 0.0000095 meter per second in the south. Low drain leakance is responsible for waterlogging when irrigation rates are maintained at design levels. The capacity of the study circle to accept wastewater has been reduced by more than 35%. (USGS)

  12. Mosh pits and Circle pits: Collective motion at heavy metal concerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Matthew; Silverberg, Jesse L.; Sethna, James P.; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    Heavy metal concerts present an extreme environment in which large crowds (~102 -105) of humans experience very loud music (~ 130 dB) in sync with bright, flashing lights, often while intoxicated. In this setting, we find two types of collective motion: mosh pits, in which participants collide with each other randomly in a manner resembling an ideal gas, and circle pits, in which participants run collectively in a circle forming a vortex of people. We model these two collective behaviors using a flocking model and find qualitative and quantitative agreement with the behaviors found in videos of metal concerts. Futhermore, we find a phase diagram showing the transition from a mosh pit to a circle pit as well as a predicted third phase, lane formation.

  13. An analysis of two classes of grazing incidence mirrors for use with Rowland circle spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James; Bowyer, Stuart

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparative analysis of Hettrick Bowyer Type II (HBII) and Wolter-Schwarzschild Type II (WSII) optics for use with Rowland circle spectrometers. The HBII can substitute, with few exceptions, for a WSII in any Rowland circle with little change in spectrometer performance or design. However, the HBII telescope offers several clear advantages over the WSII in these configurations. Because the HBII employs a virtual focus, it requires a much shorter instrument length than a WSII. For example, a 3-m Rowland circle spectrometer, fed by an optimized, f/10, 1-m diameter WSII, has a total instrument length of 6 m. If a HBII is used to feed the identical spectrometer, the entire instrument length can be as little as 3 m. In addition, the improved imaging gained with the larger graze angles of the HBII design results in better resolution in slitless operation modes.

  14. Formula for the rms blur circle radius of Wolter telescope based on aberration theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Saha, Timo T.

    1990-01-01

    A formula for the rms blur circle for Wolter telescopes has been derived using the transverse ray aberration expressions of Saha (1985), Saha (1984), and Saha (1986). The resulting formula for the rms blur circle radius over an image plane and a formula for the surface of best focus based on third-, fifth-, and seventh-order aberration theory predict results in good agreement with exact ray tracing. It has also been shown that one of the two terms in the empirical formula of VanSpeybroeck and Chase (1972), for the rms blur circle radius of a Wolter I telescope can be justified by the aberration theory results. Numerical results are given comparing the rms blur radius and the surface of best focus vs the half-field angle computed by skew ray tracing and from analytical formulas for grazing incidence Wolter I-II telescopes and a normal incidence Cassegrain telescope.

  15. Great circle solution to polarization-based quantum communication (QC) in optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen; Newell, Raymond Thorson; Hughes, Richard John

    2016-03-15

    Birefringence in optical fibers is compensated by applying polarization modulation at a receiver. Polarization modulation is applied so that a transmitted optical signal has states of polarization (SOPs) that are equally spaced on the Poincare sphere. Fiber birefringence encountered in propagation between a transmitter and a receiver rotates the great circle on the Poincare sphere that represents the polarization bases used for modulation. By adjusting received polarizations, polarization components of the received optical signal can be directed to corresponding detectors for decoding, regardless of the magnitude and orientation of the fiber birefringence. A transmitter can be configured to transmit in conjugate polarization bases whose SOPs can be represented as equidistant points on a great circle so that the received SOPs are mapped to equidistant points on a great circle and routed to corresponding detectors.

  16. Botanical prospecting for uranium in the Circle Cliffs area, Garfield County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleinhampl, F.J.; Koteff, Carl

    1956-01-01

    Astragalus pattersoni and Stanleya pinnata broadly define some uraniferous localities adjacent to the contact of the Moenkopi formation and the Shinarump member of the Chinle formation, but the general paucity of Astragalus in the Circle Cliffs area limits the usefulness of this genus. Astragalus pattersoni, Stanleya pinnata, and Aster venustus(?) may serve as guides to mineralized parts of the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Morrison formation in the Circle Cliffs area. Thick and thin sandstones of the Shinarump member generally can be distinguished by pinyon-juniper ration studies. These studies may supplement drilling to define channel-fill sandstones which are associated with ore deposits in the Circle Cliffs area. Ratio studies appear to be applicable to other areas throughout the Colorado Plateau where similar geological and ecological conditions exist.

  17. Traffic flow behavior at a single lane roundabout as compared to traffic circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic Cellular Automata (CA) model to study traffic flow at a single-lane urban roundabout (resp. traffic circle) of N entry points (resp. exit points), the entry points are controlled by rates α1 and α2 while the removal rates from the exit points are denoted by β. The traffic is controlled by a self-organized scheme. Based on computer simulation, density profiles, global density and current are calculated in terms of rates. Furthermore, the phase diagrams for roundabout as well as traffic circle are constructed. It has turned out that the phase diagrams consist essentially of two phases namely free flow and jamming. It is noted that the typology of the phase diagrams of the roundabout is not similar to it in the traffic circle. Furthermore, we have compared the performance of the two systems in terms of the geometrical properties and the number of entry points.

  18. "Socratic Circles are a Luxury": Exploring the Conceptualization of a Dialogic Tool in Three Science Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelin, Michelle Renee

    Research has shown that dialogic instruction promotes learning in students. Secondary science has traditionally been taught from an authoritative stance, reinforced in recent years by testing policies requiring coverage. Socratic Circles are a framework for student-led dialogic discourse, which have been successfully used in English language arts and social studies classrooms. The purpose of this research was to explore the implementation process of Socratic Circles in secondary science classes where they have been perceived to be more difficult. Focusing on two physical science classes and one chemistry class, this study described the nature and characteristics of Socratic Circles, teachers' dispositions toward dialogic instruction, the nature and characteristics of student discussion, and student motivation. Socratic Circles were found to be a dialogic support that influenced classroom climate, social skills, content connections, and student participation. Teachers experienced conflict between using traditional test driven scripted teaching, and exploring innovation through dialogic instruction. Students experienced opportunities for peer interaction, participation, and deeper discussions in a framework designed to improve dialogic skills. Students in two of the classrooms showed evidence of motivation for engaging in peer-led discussion, and students in one class did not. The class that did not show evidence of motivation had not been given the same scaffolding as the other two classes. Two physical science teachers and one chemistry teacher found that Socratic Circles required more scaffolding than was indicated by their peers in other disciplines such as English and social studies. The teachers felt that student's general lack of background knowledge for any given topic in physical science or chemistry necessitated the building of a knowledge platform before work on a discussion could begin. All three of the teachers indicated that Socratic Circles were a

  19. Zernike expansion of derivatives and Laplacians of the Zernike circle polynomials.

    PubMed

    Janssen, A J E M

    2014-07-01

    The partial derivatives and Laplacians of the Zernike circle polynomials occur in various places in the literature on computational optics. In a number of cases, the expansion of these derivatives and Laplacians in the circle polynomials are required. For the first-order partial derivatives, analytic results are scattered in the literature. Results start as early as 1942 in Nijboer's thesis and continue until present day, with some emphasis on recursive computation schemes. A brief historic account of these results is given in the present paper. By choosing the unnormalized version of the circle polynomials, with exponential rather than trigonometric azimuthal dependence, and by a proper combination of the two partial derivatives, a concise form of the expressions emerges. This form is appropriate for the formulation and solution of a model wavefront sensing problem of reconstructing a wavefront on the level of its expansion coefficients from (measurements of the expansion coefficients of) the partial derivatives. It turns out that the least-squares estimation problem arising here decouples per azimuthal order m, and per m the generalized inverse solution assumes a concise analytic form so that singular value decompositions are avoided. The preferred version of the circle polynomials, with proper combination of the partial derivatives, also leads to a concise analytic result for the Zernike expansion of the Laplacian of the circle polynomials. From these expansions, the properties of the Laplacian as a mapping from the space of circle polynomials of maximal degree N, as required in the study of the Neumann problem associated with the transport-of-intensity equation, can be read off within a single glance. Furthermore, the inverse of the Laplacian on this space is shown to have a concise analytic form.

  20. Circles-in-the-sky searches and observable cosmic topology in a flat universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, B.; Tavakol, R.

    2010-05-15

    In a universe with a detectable nontrivial spatial topology, the last scattering surface contains pairs of matching circles with the same distribution of temperature fluctuations--the so-called circles-in-the-sky. Searches for nearly antipodal circles-in-the-sky in maps of cosmic microwave background radiation have so far been unsuccessful. This negative outcome, along with recent theoretical results concerning the detectability of nearly flat compact topologies, is sufficient to exclude a detectable nontrivial topology for most observers in very nearly flat positively and negatively curved universes, whose total matter-energy density satisfies 0<|{Omega}{sub tot}-1| < or approx. 10{sup -5}. Here, we investigate the consequences of these searches for observable nontrivial topologies if the Universe turns out to be exactly flat ({Omega}{sub tot}=1). We demonstrate that in this case, the conclusions deduced from such searches can be radically different. We show that, although there is no characteristic topological scale in the flat manifolds, for all multiply-connected orientable flat manifolds, it is possible to directly study the action of the holonomies in order to obtain a general upper bound on the angle that characterizes the deviation from antipodicity of pairs of matching circles associated with the shortest closed geodesic. This bound is valid for all observers and all possible values of the compactification length parameters. We also show that in a flat universe, there are observers for whom the circles-in-the-sky searches already undertaken are insufficient to exclude the possibility of a detectable nontrivial spatial topology. It is remarkable how such small variations in the spatial curvature of the Universe, which are effectively indistinguishable geometrically, can have such a drastic effect on the detectability of cosmic topology. Another important outcome of our results is that they offer a framework with which to make statistical inferences from

  1. [[Role of dyslipidemia in pathogenesis of vascular events among Arctic Circle population].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Vychuzhanova, E A; Gorbunov, A S; Tsibul'nikov, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    Habitation within the polar circle increases cardiovascular mortality rate and particularly increases mortality as a result of coronary events. The main reason of elevation of mortality from these diseases is a dyslipidemia which developed more among alien population residing long time in Far North. Dyslipidemia is less found among aboriginal population of Arctic Circle keeping traditional way of life and respectively it is low rate of mortality from coronary heart disease. The data showed that low rate of dyslipidemia among aboriginal population of North regions depends on fish consumption which is high content of Ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  2. Vicious circles of punishment: a reading of Melanie Klein's Envy and gratitude.

    PubMed

    Smith, Henry F

    2008-01-01

    Staged as a moral drama, Melanie Klein's Envy and Gratitude (1957) straddles two eras: one reflecting a simpler more concrete, historical method, and the other an approach of greater complexity, focused on the transferential moment. Embedded within the transference are the vicious circles of envy and punishment that are the hallmark of Klein's text. Punishment itself which is always punishment of both self and other, creates its own vicious circle, set in motion by a single act. In the sadomasochistic enactments that result, the moral force of Klein's categories fuels the countertransference. A detailed clinical hour is presented.

  3. Numerical solution of convection-diffusion problems in irregular domains mapped onto a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asako, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Faghri, Mohammad; Asaba, Makoto

    1991-01-01

    A coordinate transformation methodology has been developed for convection-diffusion problems with an arbitrary solution domain. An algebraic coordinate transformation is used that maps the solution domain onto a circle. The transformed conservation equations are discretized by a control-volume finite difference technique. Sample computations are performed for fully developed flow and heat transfer in a polygonal duct, and for natural convection in a square cavity, to validate the present methodology. The numerical results obtained compared reasonably well, even in the extreme case of a rectangular domain mapped onto a circle.

  4. From the Weyl quantization of a particle on the circle to number-phase Wigner functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przanowski, Maciej; Brzykcy, Przemysław; Tosiek, Jaromir

    2014-12-01

    A generalized Weyl quantization formalism for a particle on the circle is shown to supply an effective method for defining the number-phase Wigner function in quantum optics. A Wigner function for the state ϱ' and the kernel K for a particle on the circle is defined and its properties are analysed. Then it is shown how this Wigner function can be easily modified to give the number-phase Wigner function in quantum optics. Some examples of such number-phase Wigner functions are considered.

  5. [General practice quality circles in the large city. Participation by Hamburg general physicians].

    PubMed

    Steinkohl, M; Niemann, D

    1997-01-01

    Quality circles (peer review) will play an increasing and important role in ambulatory care when they are based on voluntary participation and in a setting of open discussion. Goal is the further qualification of physicians by critical reflections on their practice based on learning processes and the experiences of the participants. Reported are experiences from the unit for primary care and health service research of the Hamburg University on implementing quality circles. Engagement in quality assurance may be helpful in the shaping and professionalisation of general practice.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: W1J00 and W2J00 Transit Circle Catalogs (Rafferty+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, T. J.; Holdenried, E. R.; Urban, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    The W1J00, named because it was the first (of two) Washington transit circle catalog to be referred to the Equinox of J2000.0, is the result of observations made with the Six-inch Transit Circle in Washington, D.C., between September 1977 and July 1982. The observing program was structured to be absolute, in the sense that the positions were not explicitly relying on any previous observations. The absolute positions were defined with respect to an internally consistent frame that was unique to the particular instrument. Following the reductions, comparisons with stars from the Hipparcos Catalogue (European Space Agency 1997) revealed unaccounted for systematic differences on the level of 100-200mas. It was decided, therefore, to include data on both the absolute positions reduced in way common to many past Washington transit circle catalogs, as well as the positions differentially adjusted to the system of the Hipparcos Catalog. The W1J00 contains mean positions of 7267 stars and 4383 observations of solar system objects. The majority of the stars fall into two categories; those from the Fifth Fundamental Catalog (FK5; Fricke et al 1988), and those from the Catalog Of 3539 Zodiacal Stars For The Equinox 1950.0 (Robertson 1940). The solar system objects include the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, eight minor planets (Eunomia, Flora, Hebe, Iris, Juno, Metis, Pallas, and Vesta), and the dwarf planet Ceres. Characteristics of the W1J00 catalog: Category Range Average ------------------------------------------------------------- Magnitudes -1.6 to 10.4 7.18 RA standard errors of the mean 15 to 460 mas 98 mas Dec standard errors of the mean 10 to 400 mas 107 mas RA Number of observations / star 3 to 187 10 Dec Number of observations / star 2 to 179 10 Declination coverage -39 to +90 degrees ------------------------------------------------------------- Details of the W1J00 can be found in Rafferty, Holdenried, and Urban (2016, Publ. USNO, 2nd

  7. Separability and entanglement in C{sup 2}(multiply-in-circle sign)C{sup 3}(multiply-in-circle sign)C{sup N} composite quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Shao-Ming; Gao, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Zhi-Xi; Wu, Ke

    2003-08-01

    The separability and entanglement of quantum mixed states in C{sup 2}(multiply-in-circle sign)C{sup 3}(multiply-in-circle sign)C{sup N} composite quantum systems are investigated. It is shown that all quantum states {rho} with positive partial transposes and rank r({rho}){<=}N are separable.

  8. Expanding the Circle: Respecting the Past Preparing for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Jean E.; Huisken, Jennifer S.

    This curriculum was developed to support American Indian high school students in their transition from high school to postsecondary life. It provides a structured process and culturally relevant activities that can be led by either teachers, tribal elders, community members, or paraprofessionals. The curriculum is based on principles such as a…

  9. A Study of Traditional Circle Games of Five-Year-Old United States Public School Kindergarten Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothlein, Liz; Einspruch, Eric

    A total of 203 teachers of 5-year-olds in public school kindergartens representing 35 states responded to a questionnaire about traditional circle games. The teachers were asked to identify three of the favorite traditional circle games used in their classrooms and to indicate how often and how long the games were played. In addition, teachers…

  10. The Box and the Circle--Two Systems of Life: A Model for Understanding Native-Non-Native Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Jann

    Working as a family systems therapist with Native and non-Native families, the author observed two opposing social systems. Non-native families systems typify "The Box System," whereas native family systems portray "The Circle System." A few characteristics of the Circle System are: (1) a focus on life and peacefulness; (2) females and children…

  11. A ray-tracing model to account for off-great circle HF propagation over northerly paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaalov, N. Y.; Warrington, E. M.; Stocker, A. J.

    2005-08-01

    Off-great circle HF propagation effects are a common feature of the northerly ionosphere (i.e., the subauroral trough region, the auroral zone, and the polar cap). In addition to their importance in radiolocation applications where deviations from the great circle path may result in significant triangulation errors, they are also important in two other respects: (1) In systems employing directional antennas pointed along the great circle path, the signal quality may be degraded at times when propagation is via off-great circle propagation modes; and (2) the off-great circle propagation mechanisms may result in propagation at times when the signal frequency exceeds the maximum usable frequency along the great circle path. A ray-tracing model covering the northerly ionosphere is described in this paper. The results obtained using the model are very reminiscent of the directional characteristics observed in various experimental measurement programs, and consequently, it is believed that the model may be employed to enable the nature of off-great circle propagation effects to be estimated for paths which were not subject to experimental investigation. Although it is not possible to predict individual off-great circle propagation events, it is possible to predict the periods during which large deviations are likely to occur and their magnitudes and directions.

  12. "I Learned How to Talk about a Book": Children's Perceptions of Literature Circles across Grade and Ability Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Certo, Janine; Moxley, Kathleen; Reffitt, Kelly; Miller, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate students' perceptions of their experiences with literature circles across elementary grades. A stratified random sample of 24 diverse students in grades one, three, four, and five were individually interviewed to obtain perceptions of their attitudes toward literature circles and their…

  13. 76 FR 59680 - Full Circle Renewables, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Full Circle Renewables, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding of Full Circle Renewables, LLC's application for market-based rate...

  14. New head equivalent phantom for task and image performance evaluation representative for neurovascular procedures occurring in the Circle of Willis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Loughran, Brendan; Jain, Amit; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Levy, Elad; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Hopkins, L. N.; Rudin, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    Phantom equivalents of different human anatomical parts are routinely used for imaging system evaluation or dose calculations. The various recommendations on the generic phantom structure given by organizations such as the AAPM, are not always accurate when evaluating a very specific task. When we compared the AAPM head phantom containing 3 mm of aluminum to actual neuro-endovascular image guided interventions (neuro-EIGI) occurring in the Circle of Willis, we found that the system automatic exposure rate control (AERC) significantly underestimated the x-ray parameter selection. To build a more accurate phantom for neuro-EIGI, we reevaluated the amount of aluminum which must be included in the phantom. Human skulls were imaged at different angles, using various angiographic exposures, at kV's relevant to neuro-angiography. An aluminum step wedge was also imaged under identical conditions, and a correlation between the gray values of the imaged skulls and those of the aluminum step thicknesses was established. The average equivalent aluminum thickness for the skull samples for frontal projections in the Circle of Willis region was found to be about 13 mm. The results showed no significant changes in the average equivalent aluminum thickness with kV or mAs variation. When a uniform phantom using 13 mm aluminum and 15 cm acrylic was compared with an anthropomorphic head phantom the x-ray parameters selected by the AERC system were practically identical. These new findings indicate that for this specific task, the amount of aluminum included in the head equivalent must be increased substantially from 3 mm to a value of 13 mm.

  15. Using Reading Circles Strategy for Developing Preparatory Students' Critical Reading Skills and Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdelrasoul, Mohamed Mahmoud Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at developing the necessary critical reading skills and social skills of the Egyptian EFL second year preparatory school students, through a proposed program based on using reading circles strategy. The study participants were 44 students from Sohag Experimental Preparatory School in Sohag Governorate. Instruments of the…

  16. Functions of Rep and Rep' during porcine circovirus rolling-circle replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCV replicates its single-stranded (ss) DNA genome via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. In contrast to other RCR biological systems which utilize only one multi-functional protein (Rep) to replicate their respective genomes, PCV requires two proteins (Rep and Rep'). Rep and Rep' are i...

  17. Principles and Practices of the Circle of Trust[R] Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadsey, Terry; Jackson, Marcy

    2012-01-01

    Through the Center for Courage & Renewal, the authors offer personal and professional retreats and programs designed to explore vocational and life questions, offer renewal and encouragement, and deepen engagement in professional practice. Using what they call the Circle of Trust[R] approach, they invite groups into a communal process based upon a…

  18. Measuring the Impact of the Circle of Trust[R] Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Since the first Circle of Trust retreat was offered in 2005, the Center for Courage & Renewal (CCR) and other individual facilitators across the United States, Canada, and Australia have continued to offer many cross-professional retreats, as they have proven extremely popular. They are designed for people from any profession who want to deepen…

  19. Dialing in to a Circle of Trust: A "Medium" Tech Experiment and Poetic Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Christine T.

    2012-01-01

    In his 2004 book "A Hidden Wholeness," Parker Palmer makes explicit the unique qualities of the transformational "circle of trust." He describes a group of people embracing the paradox of "being alone together," where the only goal of the group is to invite the emergence of the soul of each individual, through journaling and carefully constructed…

  20. Circle Talks as Situated Experiential Learning: Context, Identity, and Knowledgeability in "Learning from Reflection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Jayson; Rheingold, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This article presents research that used ethnographic and sociolinguistic methods to study ways participants learn through reflection when carried out as a "circle talk." The data indicate that participants in the event (a) invoked different contextual frames that (b) implicated them in various identity positions, which (c) affected how…

  1. 78 FR 44119 - Circle Environmental #1 Superfund Site; Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...Under 122(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Walter G. Mercer, Jr. concerning the Circle Environmental 1 Superfund Site located in Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia. The settlement addresses cost incurred by the agency in conducting a fund lead......

  2. 78 FR 9910 - Circle Environmental #1 and #2 Sites; Dawson, Terrell County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ...Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with thirty-four (34) parties to recover past cost resulting from a removal action at the Circle Environmental 1 and 2 Superfund Sites located in Dawson, Terrell County,...

  3. Using Literature Circles to Increase Reading Comprehension in Third Grade Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Shawna R.

    2010-01-01

    Reading comprehension strategies are important skills for a child to learn. Good strategies support struggling students to be more successful in all subjects at school as reading is the basis for subsequent mastery of most subjects (Bender & Larkin, 2003). This action research project examined the use of literature circles in a third grade class.…

  4. Constructing Knowledge about the Trigonometric Functions and Their Geometric Meaning on the Unit Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Renana; Kidron, Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Processes of knowledge construction are investigated. A learner is constructing knowledge about the trigonometric functions and their geometric meaning on the unit circle. The analysis is based on the dynamically nested epistemic action model for abstraction in context. Different tasks are offered to the learner. In his effort to perform the…

  5. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Hollow Water's Community Holistic Circle Healing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Joe; Parker, Ted; Couture, Ruth; Laboucane, Patti

    Four Native American communities in Manitoba (Canada) known as Hollow Water devised a healing system for sexual abuse--the Hollow Water First Nation Community Holistic Circle Healing (CHCH). While integrating elements of a number of federal and provincially funded services, the 13-step CHCH healing process is based on the seven Midewin teachings…

  6. Learners' Perceptions toward Pronunciation Instruction in Three Circles of World Englishes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Okim

    2015-01-01

    From the perspective of World Englishes (i.e., varieties of English in different regions of the world), mutual intelligibility is a key issue for both listeners and speakers. Nevertheless, learners often have an idealized notion of native-speaker spoken norms and may be in favor of more prestigious inner circle models than others. This study…

  7. "Slow Down, You Move Too Fast:" Literature Circles as Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Becoming an effective literacy learner requires a bit of slowing down and appreciating the reflective nature of reading and writing. Literature circles support this instructional direction because they provide opportunities for immersing students in discussions that encourage their personal responses. When students feel their personal responses…

  8. Professional Development Using an Interdisciplinary Learning Circle: Linking Pedagogical Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynd-Balta, Eileen; Erklenz-Watts, Michelle; Freeman, Carol; Westbay, Theresa D.

    2006-01-01

    Science education reform requires innovative professional development initiatives. Here we report the success of an interdisciplinary learning circle that met regularly over the course of a year to explore pedagogical theory and develop action research projects with the goal of improving critical-thinking skills in math and science undergraduates.…

  9. Math Circles: A Tool for Promoting Engagement among Middle School Minority Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Eugene; Smolinsky, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    This article presents results of a case study of a math circle designed for low income, minority students from an inner city middle school. The students were 6th, 7th and 8th grade African American and Hispanic males enrolled in a science, technology, engineering and mathematics focused charter school. The study focused on the impact of…

  10. Motivating Women Offenders through Process-Based Writing in a Literacy Learning Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stino, Zandra H.; Palmer, Barbara C.

    1999-01-01

    Finds that a participatory literacy learning circle employing process-based writing activities significantly improved both writing skills and self esteem of a group of women at a residential treatment center who had received court sentences for drug sales or alcohol abuse. (SR)

  11. ECO TECH LINK: PT3 Grant Builds Technology Circles in the K-18 Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Katie; Duckett, Jane; Medrano, Maria; Crow, Nedra; Stowers, Gwen

    Through the vehicle of the PT3 grant program, ECO TECH LINK has built a strong consortium to support technology circles of government, education and business in order to raise student achievement scores, shorten the time it takes to earn a teaching credential, and enhance the quality of teacher credential courses. The ECO TECH LINK grant enables…

  12. Social Interactions and Learning in an Informal Setting: An Ethnography of Communication in a Knitting Circle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Anna

    This paper describes a study of a speech community, a group of approximately 10 women, aged 25 to 65, who met at least 3 times a month to knit, drink coffee, and chat. The paper notes that knitting circles have survived through history because they serve a social function that surpasses historical events--they are communities that co-construct the…

  13. The Inner Circle: Staff Development and Community Education, Bill C-61. Summary Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loucks, Bryan

    The Inner Circle project addresses the leadership staff and community education needs of Ontario's Native peoples as they relate to the introduction and implementation of the Young Offenders Act of 1984. The project is the first phase of a unique education process supporting self-determination, local control, and institution-building among…

  14. Evaluating Quality Circles in a College of Further Education. Manchester Monographs 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tim

    Quality circles (QCs) are small volunteer groups of workers who meet weekly with a trained leader operating to a strict code of conduct. They use techniques of brainstorming, cause and effect classification, pareto analysis, and presentation to consider work-related problems and recommend solutions to management. QCs have been tried in educational…

  15. Student Facilitation and Predictors of Engagement in Peer-Led Literature Circle Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relation between students' personality traits and the extent of their engagement and facilitation in peer-led literature circle discussions. The research was guided by two questions. To what extent do reading ability, gender, and personality traits predict the quality of verbal engagement in…

  16. Circle Justice: A Creative Arts Approach to Conflict Resolution in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This brief report describes a cooperative classroom art therapy intervention in a public elementary school that provided conflict resolution education, social learning, and group cohesion among sixth-grade students. The organizing framework of a "circle justice" group explored the roles of fictional characters in conflict, including group…

  17. Biophysical and chemical handles to control the size of DNA nanoparticles produced by rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Bang, Duhee; Bae, Se Won; Kim, Hak Joong; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2016-08-16

    Although rolling circle amplification (RCA) is an efficient method to produce DNA materials for biomedical applications, it does not yield nano-sized products suitable for intracellular delivery. We here provide the ways to control the size of RCA products and show a potential application of the size-controlled DNA nanoparticles. PMID:27464359

  18. Dear Nel: Opening the Circles of Care (Letters to Nel Noddings)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This collection is a moving tribute to Nel Noddings, a fascinating and influential scholar who has contributed greatly to numerous fields, including education, feminism, ethics, and the study of social justice and equity. "Dear Nel: Opening the Circles of Care" presents contributions from renowned teachers, educators, and activists, such as David…

  19. The Pacific Circle: A Report on the First Cycle of Activity (Note by the Secretariat).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmis, Stephen

    Initial activities of the Pacific Circle, an educational exchange project of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, are reported. Information is divided into four sections. Section I outlines the origins and evolution of the project. Section II details membership and describes the main lines of activity which have taken place…

  20. Some Comments On: A Historical Note on the Proof of the Area of a Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidu, Jaideep T.; Sanford, John F.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper by Wilamowsky et al. [6], an intuitive proof of the area of the circle dating back to the twelfth century was presented. They discuss challenges made to this proof and offer simple rebuttals to these challenges. The alternative solution presented by them is simple and elegant and can be explained rather easily to non-mathematics…

  1. An Analysis of Elementary School Children's Fractional Knowledge Depicted with Circle, Rectangle, and Number Line Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunç-Pekkan, Zelha

    2015-01-01

    It is now well known that fractions are difficult concepts to learn as well as to teach. Teachers usually use circular pies, rectangular shapes and number lines on the paper as teaching tools for fraction instruction. This article contributes to the field by investigating how the widely used three external graphical representations (i.e., circle,…

  2. Using Social Networks and ICTs to Enhance Literature Circles: A Practical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and demonstrate how social networks such as "Facebook" and "Goodreads", and information and communication technologies (ICTs) tools like laptops and iPods can support and enhance literature circles. The innovation described is implemented by the library and aims to promote reading for all students…

  3. Biophysical and chemical handles to control the size of DNA nanoparticles produced by rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Bang, Duhee; Bae, Se Won; Kim, Hak Joong; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2016-08-16

    Although rolling circle amplification (RCA) is an efficient method to produce DNA materials for biomedical applications, it does not yield nano-sized products suitable for intracellular delivery. We here provide the ways to control the size of RCA products and show a potential application of the size-controlled DNA nanoparticles.

  4. Facebook and Virtual Literature Circle Partnership in Building a Community of Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Paulette

    2009-01-01

    Social networks have given rise to a reading activity called an online literature circle. Generally from four to six students meet together in an online chat room to discuss the same reading. In this environment students engage in critical thinking and reflection as they read, discuss and respond to books. Collaboration is at the heart of this…

  5. Transforming Lives: Women's Study Circles in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda L.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the role which women's study groups and writing circles have played in the education of women in Japan, China, and the United States. Serves as an introduction to a cross-cultural study of women's history in the three cultures. Points out that the course raises questions about the politics of women's education. (LS)

  6. 77 FR 39651 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Circle Town, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of... 71 continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR... extending upward from 700 feet or more above the surface of the earth. * * * * * ANM MT E5 Circle Town,...

  7. The Three Circles Redux: A Market-Theoretic Perspective on World Englishes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joseph Sung-Yul; Wee, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    While Kachru's Three Circles model of World Englishes (Kachru 1985, 1986; Kachru and Nelson 1996) has been highly influential in highlighting the changing distribution and functions of English, it has also been criticized for its inability to account for the heterogeneity and dynamics of English-using communities, and for perpetuating the very…

  8. Quality Control Circles: A Vehicle for Just-in-Time Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sepehri, Mehran

    1985-01-01

    Explains just-in-time (JIT) material flow and production, a method of production designed to eliminate waste. Discusses why quality control circles work so well with a JIT system, and describes how several companies have made JIT work for them. (CT)

  9. Cultural Safety Circles and Indigenous Peoples' Perspectives: Inclusive Practices for Participation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aseron, Johnnie; Greymorning, S. Neyooxet; Miller, Adrian; Wilde, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Indigenous experiences, as found within traditional ways and cultural practices, are an acknowledgement of traditional methods for sharing, learning, and collective knowledge development and maintenance. The application of Cultural Safety Circles can help provide a collective space where definitions for cultural and educational exchange can take…

  10. The Scandinavian Study Circle: An Idea for the U.S.?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurland, Norman D.

    1979-01-01

    The Danes and the Swedes have perfected a form of true community education--the study circle. Sparked by social and political issues, these discussion groups have become an integral part of the democratic process in these countries. The history, theory, and possibilities for American use are outlined. (Author/MLW)

  11. Talking Books: Gender and the Responses of Adolescents in Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Rachel Malchow

    2006-01-01

    The use of student-led discussions, or literature circles, offers the potential to engage all students through a more democratic, dialogic approach. The central goal of this research was to understand how adolescents practise literacy within the context of a peer reading group, and how gender impacts these practices. Transcripts of student-led…

  12. Strategic Framing Study Circles: Toward a Gold Standard of Framing Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Jane

    2009-01-01

    This article explains how communities of practice have been developed as part of FrameWorks' field-building efforts. Strategic Framing Study Circles, as they are known, have been conducted with four statewide coalitions, one group of national organizations, and an emerging regional coalition. The goal of each community of practice is to build…

  13. Healing circles: an ethnographic study of the interactions among health and healing practitioners from multiple disciplines.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Meg

    2014-07-01

    "Healing circle" is a term that has been employed by a group of Northern California integrative medicine researchers as we embarked on an 8-year ethnographic study. As a clinical medical anthropologist and registered nurse specializing in integrative practice and behavioral health, I undertook this study with colleagues from various health disciplines.

  14. Early-Years Teachers' Concept Images and Concept Definitions: Triangles, Circles, and Cylinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsamir, Pessia; Tirosh, Dina; Levenson, Esther; Barkai, Ruthi; Tabach, Michal

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates practicing early-years teachers' concept images and concept definitions for triangles, circles, and cylinders. Teachers were requested to define each figure and then to identify various examples and non-examples of the figure. Teachers' use of correct and precise mathematical language and reference to critical and…

  15. We Modify Each Other's Lessons: The Role of Literacy Work Circles in Developing Professional Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardrip, Peter Samuelson; Gomez, Louis M.; Gomez, Kimberley

    2015-01-01

    To address teacher isolation in schools, more reform leaders are finding hope in establishing professional communities as a way to promote continuous school improvement. This case study presents one approach for developing teacher professional community: a teacher work circle. Using the characteristics of professional community created by Kruse,…

  16. Promoting Social Competence in School-Aged Children: The Effects of the Open Circle Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessey, Beth A.

    2007-01-01

    One hundred fifty-four fourth graders took part in an investigation of the Open Circle Program (OCP), an intervention model that encourages students, teachers and administrators to learn and practice communication, self-control and social problem-solving skills. Eight classrooms, two in each of four schools, were sampled. Two of these schools were…

  17. 1. View to west along Green Street/The Circle showing partial ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View to west along Green Street/The Circle showing partial southeast elevation and facade (northeast elevation) of Carpenter & Paint Shop, with Medical Storage Building (HABS No. VA-1287-K) and Central Power House (HABS No. VA-1287-J) beyond - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Carpenter & Paint Shop, Green Street, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  18. Encounters with Wisdom: A Case Study of Community Worker Reflection Circles in San Antonio, TX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arispe, Don D.

    2013-01-01

    This case study focuses upon the transformational experiences of 28 social service and pastoral workers engaged in a Reflection Circle Process (RCP) in San Antonio, TX. The RCP involves the writing of a holistic journal entry, known as a process note, coupled with an in-depth exploration of the note with the help of a group of trusted peers, known…

  19. A Refinement of Collaborative Circles Theory: Resource Mobilization and Innovation in an Emerging Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corte, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    Farrell's (2001) theory of collaborative circles provides a useful frame for analyzing the interpersonal dynamics that enable creative collaboration in small groups, but it leaves contextual factors of collaboration undertheorized. Using ethnographic data on freestyle BMXers in Greenville, North Carolina, this article demonstrates how resource…

  20. Runaway Climate Change as Challenge to the "Closing Circle" of Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, David; Kagawa, Fumiyo

    2010-01-01

    Education for sustainable development (ESD) is the latest and thickest manifestation of the "closing circle" of policy-driven environmental education. Characterised by definitional haziness, a tendency to blur rather than lay bare inconsistencies and incompatibilities, and a cozy but ill-considered association with the globalisation agenda, the…

  1. Literature Circles: Meeting Reading Standards, Making Personal Connections, and Appreciating Other Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latendresse, Carter

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses a reading instruction applicable to widely diverse classrooms, because it weaves together dynamic strands from three approaches to teaching reading: literature circle method, reciprocal teaching, and modern literary theories. The author presents three stages to achieve reading success: (1) applying the key features of…

  2. The Pervasiveness and Impact of Corporate Quality Circles: A Survey of Major American Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Susan A.; And Others

    To assess the pervasiveness of quality circles in American corporations, as well as to ascertain perceptions of their impact in terms of various organizational outcomes, a 45-item questionnaire was mailed to personnel directors of the Fortune 500 corporations. Some time after the initial mailing, a follow-up mailing was executed to maximize the…

  3. Reading and Analyzing Ethnographies through Literature Circles: A Praxis Model for Encouraging Multicultural Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles-Ritchie, Marilee

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the process of implementing literature circles using ethnographies as the texts to better prepare teachers for multicultural/ multilingual teaching contexts. Data collected by the course instructor and two of the participants, using a Critical Teacher Action Research (CTAR) methodology, indicate that participants think…

  4. Transactional Literature Circles and the Reading Comprehension of English Learners in the Mainstream Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElvain, Cheryl Marie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines a problem that many mainstream teachers face today: how to successfully improve reading comprehension for English language learners (ELLs) in an English-only environment. The researcher examines both the academic and psychosocial effects of the Transactional Literature Circles (TLC) programme on a treatment group of 75 fourth…

  5. An Investigation of "Circle of Friends" Peer-Mediated Intervention for Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlieder, Mary; Maldonado, Nancy; Baltes, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic rise in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is accompanied by a substantial increase in public school inclusion. A growing body of research supports the need for teachers proficient in evidence-based practices to support such students. One strategy involves using peer support networks like Circle of Friends (CoF)…

  6. Mathematical Practices in a Technological Setting: A Design Research Experiment for Teaching Circle Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akyuz, Didem

    2016-01-01

    This article documents the classroom mathematical practices observed in a collegiate level teacher education course related to the circle topic. The course, which was prepared as design research, utilized a dynamic geometry environment which influenced the type and nature of the evolved mathematical practices. The study uses emergent perspective…

  7. Circle of Life HIV/AIDS-Prevention Intervention for American Indian and Alaska Native Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Carol E.; Litchfield, Anne; Schupman, Edwin; Mitchell, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the objectives, theoretical bases, development process, and evaluation efforts to-date for the Circle of Life (COL) curricula, HIV/AIDS prevention interventions designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. The curricula are based on Indigenous models of learning and behavior encompassing concepts of Western…

  8. Decolonizing Family Literacy in a Culture Circle: Reinventing the Family Literacy Educator's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Loui; Torres, Myriam

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing ideological divide in the field of family literacy between programs that are striving to colonize families with middle-class European-American literacy practices, and those based on Freire's philosophy which works toward affirming diverse family literacy practices. The Freirean alternative includes "culture circles" for the…

  9. Dinner Tables and Concentric Circles: A Harmony of Mathematics, Music, and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthett, Jack; Krantz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    How should men and women be seated around a dinner table to maximize conversation between members of the opposite sex? What can be said about the distribution of points around two concentric circles? How are the white and black keys on the piano keyboard organized? What spin configuration in the Ising model minimizes energy? These four problems…

  10. Limits of the circles-in-the-sky searches in the determination of cosmic topology of nearly flat universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomero, G. I.; Mota, B.; Rebouças, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    An important observable signature of a detectable nontrivial spatial topology of the Universe is the presence in the cosmic microwave background sky of pairs of matching circles with the same distributions of temperature fluctuations—the so-called circles in the sky. Most of the recent attempts to find these circles, including the ones undertaken by the Planck Collaboration, were restricted to antipodal or nearly antipodal circles with radii λ ≥1 5 ° . In the most general search, pairs of circles with deviation from antipodality angles 0 ° ≤θ ≤16 9 ° and radii 1 0 ° ≤λ ≤9 0 ° were investigated. No statistically significant pairs of matching circles were found in the searches so far undertaken. Assuming that the negative result of general search can be confirmed through analysis made with data from Planck and future cosmic microwave background experiments, we examine the question as to whether there are nearly flat universes with compact topology, satisfying Planck constraints on cosmological parameters, that would give rise to circles in the sky whose observable parameters λ and θ fall outside the parameter ranges covered by this general search. We derive the expressions for the deviation from antipodality and for the radius of the circles associated to a pair of elements (γ , γ-1 ) of the holonomy group Γ which define the spatial section of any positively curved universe with a nontrivial compact topology. We show that there is a critical position that maximizes the deviation from antipodality and prove that, no matter how nearly flat the Universe is, it can always have a nontrivial spatial topology that gives rise to circles whose deviation from antipodality θ is larger than 169° and whose radii of the circles λ are smaller than 10° for some observers's positions. This makes it apparent that slightly positively curved nearly flat universes with cosmological parameters within Planck bounds can be endowed with a nontrivial spatial

  11. The Circle of Dust: From Nanoparticles to Macromolecules and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, E.; Jones, A.; Bocchio, M.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    There is increasing observational evidence that a non-negligible fraction of the cosmic carbon is locked up into macromolecules and nanoparticles. Carbonaceous nanoparticles and Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (HAC) nanoparticles represent one of the main components of interstellar dust. HAC nanoparticles have been proposed as a viable carrier for the Unidentified InfraRed (UIR) bands, which dominate the mid-infrared spectrum of almost any astronomical object. Fullerene molecules C60 and C70 have been detected in various circumstellar and interstellar environments. We present some of our recent results about the evolution of such carbonaceous structures and the possible connections between each other. We show how photo-processing of HAC nanoparticles can lead to the formation of C60 and C70 in space. There the low density of the gas precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes, even on astronomical timescales. We then discuss the processing of small hydrocarbon dust by energetic ions and electrons under extreme conditions, e.g., in shocked regions. Finally, we derive the astrophysical implications of such processing in terms of the observed emission.

  12. A new measuring method for motion accuracy of 3-axis NC equipments based on composite trajectory of circle and non-circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Du, Zhengchun; Yang, Jiangguo; Hong, Maisheng

    2011-12-01

    Geometric motion error measurement has been considered as an important task for accuracy enhancement and quality assurance of NC machine tools and CMMs. In consideration of the disadvantages of traditional measuring methods,a new measuring method for motion accuracy of 3-axis NC equipments based on composite trajectory including circle and non-circle(straight line and/or polygonal line) is proposed. The principles and techniques of the new measuring method are discussed in detail. 8 feasible measuring strategies based on different measuring groupings are summarized and optimized. The experiment of the most preferable strategy is carried out on the 3-axis CNC vertical machining center Cincinnati 750 Arrow by using cross grid encoder. The whole measuring time of 21 error components of the new method is cut down to 1-2 h because of easy installation, adjustment, operation and the characteristics of non-contact measurement. Result shows that the new method is suitable for `on machine" measurement and has good prospects of wide application.

  13. Simultaneous quantification of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and K-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs) by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Sottini, Alessandra; Serana, Federico; Bertoli, Diego; Chiarini, Marco; Valotti, Monica; Vaglio Tessitore, Marion; Imberti, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) and K-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs) are circularized DNA elements formed during recombination process that creates T- and B-cell receptors. Because TRECs and KRECs are unable to replicate, they are diluted after each cell division, and therefore persist in the cell. Their quantity in peripheral blood can be considered as an estimation of thymic and bone marrow output. By combining well established and commonly used TREC assay with a modified version of KREC assay, we have developed a duplex quantitative real-time PCR that allows quantification of both newly-produced T and B lymphocytes in a single assay. The number of TRECs and KRECs are obtained using a standard curve prepared by serially diluting TREC and KREC signal joints cloned in a bacterial plasmid, together with a fragment of T-cell receptor alpha constant gene that serves as reference gene. Results are reported as number of TRECs and KRECs/10(6) cells or per ml of blood. The quantification of these DNA fragments have been proven useful for monitoring immune reconstitution following bone marrow transplantation in both children and adults, for improved characterization of immune deficiencies, or for better understanding of certain immunomodulating drug activity.

  14. Bells Galore: Oscillations and circle-map dynamics from space-filling fractal functions

    SciTech Connect

    Puente, C.E.; Cortis, A.; Sivakumar, B.

    2008-10-15

    The construction of a host of interesting patterns over one and two dimensions, as transformations of multifractal measures via fractal interpolating functions related to simple affine mappings, is reviewed. It is illustrated that, while space-filling fractal functions most commonly yield limiting Gaussian distribution measures (bells), there are also situations (depending on the affine mappings parameters) in which there is no limit. Specifically, the one-dimensional case may result in oscillations between two bells, whereas the two-dimensional case may give rise to unexpected circle map dynamics of an arbitrary number of two-dimensional circular bells. It is also shown that, despite the multitude of bells over two dimensions, whose means dance making regular polygons or stars inscribed on a circle, the iteration of affine maps yields exotic kaleidoscopes that decompose such an oscillatory pattern in a way that is similar to the many cases that converge to a single bell.

  15. High-sensitivity temperature sensor based on a droplet-like fiber circle.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianglei; Xu, Ben; Li, Yi; Kang, Juan; Shen, Changyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Jin, Yongxing; Liu, Honglin; Ni, Kai; Dong, Xinyong; Zhao, Chunliu; Jin, Shangzhong

    2014-06-20

    A low-cost yet high-sensitivity temperature fiber sensor is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. A single-mode fiber with coating is simply bent in a droplet-like circle with a radius of several millimeters. The strong bending induces mode interferences between the silica core mode and the excited modes propagating in the polymer coating. Many resonant dips were observed in the transmission spectra and are found to shift to a shorter wavelength with the increase of environmental temperature. Our linear fitting result of the experimental data shows that the proposed sensor presents high temperature sensitivity up to -3.102  nm/°C, which is even comparable with sensors based on selective liquid-filled photonic crystal fibers. Such high temperature sensitivity results from the large thermo-optical coefficient difference between the silica core and the polymer coating. The influence of a circle radius to the sensitivities is also discussed. PMID:24979444

  16. NanoCluster Beacons as Reporter Probes in Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection†

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-01-01

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp.. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics. PMID:25901841

  17. Semi-automated identification of cones in the human retina using circle Hough transform

    PubMed Central

    Bukowska, Danuta M.; Chew, Avenell L.; Huynh, Emily; Kashani, Irwin; Wan, Sue Ling; Wan, Pak Ming; Chen, Fred K

    2015-01-01

    A large number of human retinal diseases are characterized by a progressive loss of cones, the photoreceptors critical for visual acuity and color perception. Adaptive Optics (AO) imaging presents a potential method to study these cells in vivo. However, AO imaging in ophthalmology is a relatively new phenomenon and quantitative analysis of these images remains difficult and tedious using manual methods. This paper illustrates a novel semi-automated quantitative technique enabling registration of AO images to macular landmarks, cone counting and its radius quantification at specified distances from the foveal center. The new cone counting approach employs the circle Hough transform (cHT) and is compared to automated counting methods, as well as arbitrated manual cone identification. We explore the impact of varying the circle detection parameter on the validity of cHT cone counting and discuss the potential role of using this algorithm in detecting both cones and rods separately. PMID:26713186

  18. Non-functioning posterior communicating arteries of circle of Willis in idiopathic sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    De Felice, C; De Capua, B; Tassi, R; Mencattini, G; Passàli, D

    2000-10-01

    Most cases of sudden hearing loss have no identifiable cause. A link between compensatory blood flow through the circle of Willis and recovery from sudden hearing loss has, however, been suggested. We assessed 22 patients with sudden hearing loss who had no cerebrovascular disease, and 41 controls matched for age and sex. We took ultrasonographic doppler flow measurements of the extracranial carotid and vertebrobasilar systems and independent audiological measurements. 12 patients with sudden hearing loss, compared with four controls had bilateral non-functioning posterior communicating arteries (p=0.00019). Our findings suggest a strong association between a non-functioning posterior communicating artery of the circle of Willis and sudden hearing loss.

  19. Collective Motion of Humans in Mosh and Circle Pits at Heavy Metal Concerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Jesse L.; Bierbaum, Matthew; Sethna, James P.; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Human collective behavior can vary from calm to panicked depending on social context. Using videos publicly available online, we study the highly energized collective motion of attendees at heavy metal concerts. We find these extreme social gatherings generate similarly extreme behaviors: a disordered gaslike state called a mosh pit and an ordered vortexlike state called a circle pit. Both phenomena are reproduced in flocking simulations demonstrating that human collective behavior is consistent with the predictions of simplified models.

  20. The Astrophysical Signatures of Black Holes: The Horizon, The ISCO, The Ergosphere and The Light Circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.

    Three advanced instruments planned for a near future ( LOFT, GRAVITY, THE EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE) provide unprecedented angular and time resolutions, which allow to probe regions in the immediate vicinity of black holes. We may soon be able to search for the signatures of the super-strong gravity that is characteristic to black holes: the event horizon, the ergosphere, the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO), and the photon circle. This review discusses a few fundamental problems concerning these theoretical concepts.

  1. (j,0){circle_plus}(0,j) representation space: Dirac-like construct

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, D.V.; Johnson, M.B.; Goldman, T.

    1993-12-31

    This is first of the two invited lectures presented at the ``XVII International School of Theoretical Physics: Standard Model and Beyond 1993.`` The text is essentially based on a recent publication by the present authors. Here we show that the Dirac-like construct in the (j,0){circle_plus}(0,j) representation space support a Bargmann-Wightman-Wigner type quantum field theory.

  2. Sensitive RNA detection by combining three-way junction formation and primer generation-rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Taku; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto

    2012-02-01

    Recently, we developed a simple isothermal nucleic acid amplification reaction, primer generation-rolling circle amplification (PG-RCA), to detect specific DNA sequences with great sensitivity and large dynamic range. In this paper, we combined PG-RCA with a three-way junction (3WJ) formation, and detected specific RNA molecules with high sensitivity and specificity in a one-step and isothermal reaction format. In the presence of target RNA, 3WJ probes (primer and template) are designed to form a 3WJ structure, from which multiple signal primers for the following PG-RCA can be generated by repeating primer extension, nicking and signal primer dissociation. Although this signal primer generation is a linear amplification process, the PG-RCA exponentially can amplify these signal primers and thus even a very small amount of RNA specimen can be detected. After optimizing the structures of 3WJ probes, the detection limit of this assay was 15.9 zmol (9.55 × 10(3) molecules) of synthetic RNA or 143 zmol (8.6 × 10(4) molecules) of in vitro transcribed human CD4 mRNA. Further, the applicability of this assay to detect CD4 mRNA in a human mRNA sample was demonstrated.

  3. Concentric circles based simple optical landing aid for vertical takeoff and landing aircrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murshid, Syed H.; Enaya, Rayan; Lovell, Gregory L.

    2014-09-01

    Vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircrafts such as helicopters and drones, add a flexible degree of operation to airborne vehicles. In order to operate these devices in low light situations, where it is difficult to determine slope of the landing surface, a lightweight and standalone device is proposed here. This small optical device can be easily integrated into current VTOL systems. An optical projector consisting of low power, light weight, solid state laser along with minimal optics is utilized to illuminate the landing surface with donut shaped circles and coaxial centralized dot. This device can placed anywhere on the aircraft and a properly placed fiber system can be used to illuminate the surface beneath the bottom of the VTOL aircraft in a fashion that during operation, when the aircraft is parallel to the landing surface, the radius between the central dot and outer ring(s) are equidistant for the entire circumference; however, when there the landing surface of the VTOL aircraft is not parallel to the landing strip, the radial distance between two opposite sides of the circle and central dot will be unequal. The larger this distortion, the greater the difference will be between the opposite sides of the circle. Visual confirmation or other optical devices can be used to determine relative alignment of the projector output allowing the pilot to make proper adjustments as they approach the landing surface to ensure safe landings. Simulated and experimental results from a prototype optical projector are presented here.

  4. Planning Curvature-Constrained Paths to Multiple Goals Using Circle Sampling.

    PubMed

    Lobaton, Edgar; Zhang, Jinghe; Patil, Sachin; Alterovitz, Ron

    2011-01-01

    We present a new sampling-based method for planning optimal, collision-free, curvature-constrained paths for nonholonomic robots to visit multiple goals in any order. Rather than sampling configurations as in standard sampling-based planners, we construct a roadmap by sampling circles of constant curvature and then generating feasible transitions between the sampled circles. We provide a closed-form formula for connecting the sampled circles in 2D and generalize the approach to 3D workspaces. We then formulate the multi-goal planning problem as finding a minimum directed Steiner tree over the roadmap. Since optimally solving the multi-goal planning problem requires exponential time, we propose greedy heuristics to efficiently compute a path that visits multiple goals. We apply the planner in the context of medical needle steering where the needle tip must reach multiple goals in soft tissue, a common requirement for clinical procedures such as biopsies, drug delivery, and brachytherapy cancer treatment. We demonstrate that our multi-goal planner significantly decreases tissue that must be cut when compared to sequential execution of single-goal plans.

  5. A U.K. cost-benefit analysis of circles of support and accountability interventions.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Ian A; Beech, Anthony R

    2013-06-01

    Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA) aim to augment sex offender risk management at the point of community reentry by facilitating "Circles" of volunteers who provide support, guidance, and advice, while ensuring that the offender remains accountable for their actions. In this study, the authors provide (a) a rapid evidence assessment of the effectiveness of CoSA in reducing reoffending, and (b) a U.K. cost-benefit analysis for CoSA when compared to the criminal justice costs of reoffending. From the study analysis, the average cost of a "Circle" was estimated to be £11,303 per annum and appears to produce a 50% reduction in reoffending (sexual and nonsexual), as the estimated cost of reoffending was estimated to be £147,161 per offender, per annum. Based on a hypothetical cohort of 100 offenders--50 of whom receive CoSA and 50 of whom do not--investment in CoSA appears to provide a cost saving of £23,494 and a benefit-cost ratio of 1.04. Accounting for estimates that the full extent of the cost to society may be 5 to 10 times the tangible costs substantially increases estimated cost savings related to CoSA.

  6. Effects of Local Configuration on the Flow in the Circle of Willis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, J. H.; Wu, G. X.; Smith, F. T.

    The circle of Willis is a confluence of large arteries which form a ring-like, three-to-six junction. The right and left internal carotid arteries and the basilar artery carry blood up the neck and meet a circular arrangement of three communicating arteries at the base of the cerebrum. Six cerebral arteries then depart from the circle of Willis towards different areas of the brain. The circle of Willis plays a pivotal role in allowing the correct blood distribution in the cerebrum. The presence of the communicating arteries provides routes along which blood may flow in order to moderate or effect changes in the efferent flux distribution, in response to variations in the supply of and local demands for blood[1]. The anterior communicating artery is a common site for the occurrence of cerebral aneurysms, an abnormal bulge in the arterial wall which grows over time [2]. Such cerebral aneurysms can eventually rupture leading to a subarachnoid haemorrhage [2]. It is widely thought that forces exerted by the blood on the arterial wall, such as wall pressure and wall shear stress, make a significant contribution to the growth of aneurysms [3].

  7. Numerical study of billiard motion in an annulus bounded by non-concentric circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitô, N.; Hirooka, H.; Ford, J.; Vivaldi, F.; Walker, G. H.

    1982-09-01

    This paper exposes a simple, focusing-dispersing billiard system whose phase space simultaneously exhibits the full range of possible Hamiltonian syste, orbit behavior over a continuous range of system parameter values. Specifically, we find that billiard motion between two non-concentric circles is characterized by three distinct phase space regions: (1) a rigorously integrable region in which billiard orbits undergo collisions only with the outer circle boundary; (2) a KAM near-integrable region in which billiard collisions strictly alternate between inner and outer circles; and (3) a chaotic region produced by orbital sequences of billiard collisions which randomly alternate between the integrable and near-integrable patterns. The properties of the integrable, near-integrable, and chaotic regions, the presence of island chains, and the homoclinic points associated with certain hyperbolic fixed points are discussed. Perhaps the most interesting feature of this billiard system, however, is the fresh view of the source of chaos it provides; specifically, the chaotic orbits of region (3) exhibit “random” jumping between the extended invariant curves of regions (1) and (2).

  8. Impact of a learning circle intervention across academic and service contexts on developing a learning culture.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel; Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra

    2011-05-01

    Partnerships between university schools of nursing and health services lead to successful learning experiences for students and staff. A purposive sample of academics and students from a university school of nursing and clinicians from three health institutions involved in clinical learning (n=73) actively participated in a learning circles intervention conducted over 5 months in south east Queensland. Learning circle discussions resulted in enhanced communication and shared understanding regarding: (1) staff attitudes towards students, expectations and student assessment; (2) strategies enhancing preparation of students, mechanisms for greater support of and recognition of clinicians; (3) challenges faced by staff in the complex processes of leadership in clinical nursing education; (4) construction of learning, ideas for improving communication, networking and sharing; and (5) questioning routine practices that may not enhance student learning. Pre-post surveys of hospital staff (n=310) revealed significant differences across three sub-scales of 'accomplishment' (t=-3.98, p<.001), 'recognition' (t=-2.22, p<.027) and 'influence' (t=-11.82, p<.001) but not 'affiliation'. Learning circles can positively enhance organisational learning culture. The intervention enabled participants to recognise mutual goals. Further investigation around staff perception of their influence on their workplace is required.

  9. Hydraulic characteristics of an underdrained irrigation circle, Muskegon County, wastewater disposal system, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    Muskegon County, Michigan, disposes of waste water by spray irrigating farmland on its waste-disposal site. Buried drains in the highly permeable unconfined aquifer at the site control the level of the water table. Hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and drain-leakance, the reciprocal of resistance to flow into the drains, was determined at a representative irrigation circle while calibrating a model of the ground-water flow system. Hydraulic conductivity is 0.00055 meter per second in the north zone of the circle and 0.00039 meter per second in the south zone. Drain leakance is low in both zones: 2.9 x 10-6 meters per second in the north and 9.5 x 10-6 meters per second in the south. Low drain leakance is responsible for waterlogging when irrigation rates are maintained at design levels. The capacity of the study circle to accept waste water is 35 percent less than design capacity.

  10. CircleRides: developing an older adult transportation application and evaluating feedback.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Melinda; Kelly, Norene

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess perceptions of CircleRides, a paper prototype of a service website designed to meet older adult transportation needs. Researchers used purposive sampling to conduct two focus groups comprised of older adults to obtain feedback on the CircleRides prototype at the beginning of its iterative design process. One focus group was conducted in a continuing care retirement community (n = 13) and the other in an independent living community for older adults (n = 11). The study assessed perceptions of the CircleRides prototype as well as self-reported older adult transportation preferences and needs. Three themes emerged from the data: (a) trust and concern, (b) socialization, and (c) flexibility and options. Researchers found that participants are interested in transportation options; however, concern exists about trusting a new system or prototype that has not established a reputation. Findings from the current study offer lessons learned for future iterations and for creating transportation prototypes for older adults. PMID:25643351

  11. Circles on pommel horse with a suspended aid: mass-centre rotation and hip joint moment.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Toshiyuki; Gervais, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This is the second study of the series, and its aim was to investigate the influence of using the suspended aid on circle kinetics. In addition to the kinematic data recorded for part one (Fujihara & Gervais, 2012), the pommel reaction forces and the force applied from the suspended aid (aid reaction force) were analysed in relation to the motion of a whole-body mass centre. The hip joint moment was also computed by combining all segments in the lower extremities into a single rigid segment. Generally, the use of the aid changed the magnitude of the mass-centre trajectory or horizontal pommel reaction forces but not their patterns. The results also showed that the net hip joint moment was altered during circles with the aid. In summary, a suspended aid can be used as a progression for a variety of goals because it allows gymnasts to practise circles which would not be possible without the aid. When a suspended aid is used, however, practitioners should be aware of the possible kinetic alteration caused by the external force from the aid. PMID:22697492

  12. White Blood Cell Segmentation by Circle Detection Using Electromagnetism-Like Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Diego; Díaz, Margarita; Zaldivar, Daniel; Pérez-Cisneros, Marco; Pajares, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is a relevant field of application of image processing algorithms. In particular, the analysis of white blood cell (WBC) images has engaged researchers from fields of medicine and computer vision alike. Since WBCs can be approximated by a quasicircular form, a circular detector algorithm may be successfully applied. This paper presents an algorithm for the automatic detection of white blood cells embedded into complicated and cluttered smear images that considers the complete process as a circle detection problem. The approach is based on a nature-inspired technique called the electromagnetism-like optimization (EMO) algorithm which is a heuristic method that follows electromagnetism principles for solving complex optimization problems. The proposed approach uses an objective function which measures the resemblance of a candidate circle to an actual WBC. Guided by the values of such objective function, the set of encoded candidate circles are evolved by using EMO, so that they can fit into the actual blood cells contained in the edge map of the image. Experimental results from blood cell images with a varying range of complexity are included to validate the efficiency of the proposed technique regarding detection, robustness, and stability. PMID:23476713

  13. Adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method for estimating tree diameter based on single terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Guochao; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been used to extract accurate forest biophysical parameters for inventory purposes. The diameter at breast height (DBH) is a key parameter for individual trees because it has the potential for modeling the height, volume, biomass, and carbon sequestration potential of the tree based on empirical allometric scaling equations. In order to extract the DBH from the single-scan data of TLS automatically and accurately within a certain range, we proposed an adaptive circle-ellipse fitting method based on the point cloud transect. This proposed method can correct the error caused by the simple circle fitting method when a tree is slanted. A slanted tree was detected by the circle-ellipse fitting analysis, then the corresponding slant angle was found based on the ellipse fitting result. With this information, the DBH of the trees could be recalculated based on reslicing the point cloud data at breast height. Artificial stem data simulated by a cylindrical model of leaning trees and the scanning data acquired with the RIEGL VZ-400 were used to test the proposed adaptive fitting method. The results shown that the proposed method can detect the trees and accurately estimate the DBH for leaning trees.

  14. Impact of a learning circle intervention across academic and service contexts on developing a learning culture.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rachel; Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra

    2011-05-01

    Partnerships between university schools of nursing and health services lead to successful learning experiences for students and staff. A purposive sample of academics and students from a university school of nursing and clinicians from three health institutions involved in clinical learning (n=73) actively participated in a learning circles intervention conducted over 5 months in south east Queensland. Learning circle discussions resulted in enhanced communication and shared understanding regarding: (1) staff attitudes towards students, expectations and student assessment; (2) strategies enhancing preparation of students, mechanisms for greater support of and recognition of clinicians; (3) challenges faced by staff in the complex processes of leadership in clinical nursing education; (4) construction of learning, ideas for improving communication, networking and sharing; and (5) questioning routine practices that may not enhance student learning. Pre-post surveys of hospital staff (n=310) revealed significant differences across three sub-scales of 'accomplishment' (t=-3.98, p<.001), 'recognition' (t=-2.22, p<.027) and 'influence' (t=-11.82, p<.001) but not 'affiliation'. Learning circles can positively enhance organisational learning culture. The intervention enabled participants to recognise mutual goals. Further investigation around staff perception of their influence on their workplace is required. PMID:20732731

  15. Amplified and multiplexed detection of DNA using the dendritic rolling circle amplified synthesis of DNAzyme reporter units.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Lu, Chun-Hua; Liu, Xiaoqing; Freage, Lina; Willner, Itamar

    2014-02-01

    The amplified, highly sensitive detection of DNA using the dendritic rolling circle amplification (RCA) is introduced. The analytical platform includes a circular DNA and a structurally tailored hairpin structure. The circular nucleic acid template includes a recognition sequence for the analyte DNA (the Tay-Sachs mutant gene), a complementary sequence to the Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme, and a sequence identical to the loop region of the coadded hairpin structure. The functional hairpin in the system consists of the analyte-sequence that is caged in the stem region and a single-stranded loop domain that communicates with the RCA product. The analyte activates the RCA process, leading to DNA chains consisting of the Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme and sequences that are complementary to the loop of the functional hairpin structure. Opening of the coadded hairpin releases the caged analyte sequence, resulting in the dendritic RCA-induced synthesis of the Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme units. The DNAzyme-catalyzed cleavage of a fluorophore/quencher-modified substrate leads to a fluorescence readout signal. The method enabled the analysis of the target DNA with a detection limit corresponding to 1 aM. By the design of two different circular DNAs that include recognition sites for two different target genes, complementary sequences for two different Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme sequences and two different functional hairpin structures, the dendritic RCA-stimulated multiplexed analysis of two different genes is demonstrated. The amplified dendritic RCA detection of DNA is further implemented to yield the hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme as catalytic labels that provide colorimetric or chemiluminescent readout signals.

  16. Improving Self-Esteem of Women Offenders through Process-based Writing in a Learning Circle: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stino, Zandra H.; Palmer, Barbara C.

    1998-01-01

    Over 18 weeks, nine female offenders worked in a collaborative learning circle with process-based writing (prewriting, drafting, sharing, revising, editing, proofreading, publishing). Most showed a significant increase in self-esteem. (SK)

  17. "Really," "Not Possible," "I Can't Believe It": Exploring Informational Text in Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Diane; Barone, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Fifth graders' interpretations of nonfiction or informational text were explored. Each literature circle group read and responded to informational text. Discoveries included that students' conversations and written responses were closely connected to text and that students created multimodal responses.

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids by template enhanced hybridization followed by rolling circle amplification and catalytic hairpin assembly.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiling; Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Wenbo

    2015-02-11

    An ultrasensitive protocol for fluorescent detection of DNA is designed by combining the template enhanced hybridization process (TEHP) with Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA) and Catalytic Hairpin Assembly (CHA), showing a remarkable amplification efficiency.

  19. Auditory and vestibular defects in the circling (ci2) rat mutant.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Fedrowitz, M; Ebert, U; Zimmermann, E; Hedrich, H J; Wedekind, D; Löscher, W

    2001-10-01

    The circling rat is an autosomal recessive mutant (homozygous ci2/ci2) that displays lateralized circling behaviour, locomotor hyperactivity, ataxia and stereotypic head-movement. These abnormal behaviours occur in phases or bursts either spontaneously or in response to stress. Heterozygous (ci2/+) littermates display normal spontaneous behaviours. We have previously found that ci2/ci2 rats of both genders have a lower tissue content of dopamine in the striatum ipsilateral to the preferred direction of rotation, indicating that the rats turn away from the brain hemisphere with higher striatal dopaminergic activity. In view of the similarities of the motor syndrome of the ci2/ci2 mutant rat to that of mouse deafness mutants, the present study evaluated the hearing ability of the circling rat mutant by recording brainstem auditory-evoked potentials. To test for vestibular dysfunction, a swimming test was conducted. Histological methods were used to examine the cochlear and vestibular parts of the inner ear and the cochlear and vestibular brainstem nuclei for defects. The absence of auditory-evoked potentials demonstrated a complete hearing loss in the adult ci2/ci2 mutant rat, whereas heterozygous littermates exhibited auditory-evoked potentials with thresholds resembling those of other laboratory strains. Furthermore, the mutant rats were unable to swim. Histological analysis of the inner ear of adult mutants revealed virtually complete loss of the cochlear neuroepithelium, while no such hair cell degeneration was seen in the vestibular parts of the inner ear. However, part of the vestibular hair cells showed protrusions into the endolymphatic space, suggesting alterations in the cytoskeletal architecture. The histological findings in mutant circling rats strongly indicate that the hearing loss of the mutants is of the sensory neural type, the most prevalent type of hearing loss. In the cochlear nuclei of the brain stem of mutant rats, neurons exhibited an abnormal

  20. Revisiting the vicious circle of dry eye disease: a focus on the pathophysiology of meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Christophe; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Aragona, Pasquale; Geerling, Gerd; Akova, Yonca A; Benítez-del-Castillo, José; Boboridis, Kostas G; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rolando, Maurizio; Labetoulle, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the most frequent cause of dry eye disease (DED). Eyelid inflammation, microbial growth, associated skin disorders as well as potentially severe corneal complications culminate to make MGD a complex multifactorial disorder. It is probable that MGD is a heterogeneous condition arising from any combination of the following five separate pathophysiological mechanisms: eyelid inflammation, conjunctival inflammation, corneal damage, microbiological changes and DED resulting from tear film instability. The pathogenesis of both MGD and DED can be described in terms of a 'vicious circle': the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of DED and MGD interact, resulting in a double vicious circle. The MGD vicious circle is self-stimulated by microbiological changes, which results in increased melting temperature of meibum and subsequent meibomian gland blockage, reinforcing the vicious circle of MGD. Meibomian gland blockage, dropout and inflammation directly link the two vicious circles. MGD-associated tear film instability provides an entry point into the vicious circle of DED and leads to hyperosmolarity and inflammation, which are both a cause and consequence of DED. Here we propose a new pathophysiological scheme for MGD in order to better identify the pathological mechanisms involved and to allow more efficient targeting of therapeutics. Through better understanding of this scheme, MGD may gain true disease status rather than being viewed as a mere dysfunction.